WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical emission spectroscopy

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy study on deposition process of microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zhi-Meng; Lei Qing-Song; Geng Xin-Hua; Zhao Ying; Sun Jian; Xi Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports that the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is used to monitor the plasma during the deposition process of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon films in a very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system. The OES intensities (SiH*, H*α and H*β) are investigated by varying the deposition parameters. The result shows that the discharge power, silane concentrations and substrate temperature affect the OES intensities. When the discharge power at silane concentration of 4% increases, the OES intensities increase first and then are constant, the intensities increase with the discharge power monotonously at silane concentration of 6%. The SiH* intensity increases with silane concentration, while the intensities of H*α and H*β increase first and then decrease. When the substrate temperature increases, the SiH* intensity decreases and the intensities of H*α and H*β are constant. The correlation between the intensity ratio of IH*α/ISiH* and the crystalline volume fraction (Xc) of films is confirmed.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  3. Real-time tissue differentiation based on optical emission spectroscopy for guided electrosurgical tumor resection

    OpenAIRE

    Spether, Dominik; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Neugebauer, Alexander; Nüßle, Daniela; Fischer, Klaus; Zappe, Hans; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Seifert, Andreas; Enderle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Complete surgical removal of cancer tissue with effective preservation of healthy tissue is one of the most important challenges in modern oncology. We present a method for real-time, in situ differentiation of tissue based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) performed during electrosurgery not requiring any biomarkers, additional light sources or other excitation processes. The analysis of the optical emission spectra, enables the differentiation of healthy and tumorous tissue. By using m...

  4. Emission Spectroscopy of the Interior of Optically Dense Post-Detonation Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    TP-2013-011 Emission Spectroscopy of the Interior of Optically Dense Post-Detonation Fireballs Distribution A: Approved for public release...Detonation Fireballs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) W.K. Lewis1, C.G. Rumchik2, M.J...detonation fireballs that form as under- oxidized detonation products burn in the surrounding air are optically dense and the corresponding emission

  5. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  6. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  7. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Investigation of a Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Aerodynamic Actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying-Hong; WU Yun; JIA Min; ZHOU Zhang-Wen; GUO Zhi-Gang; PU Yi-Kang

    2008-01-01

    The optical emission spectroscopy of a surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma aerodynamic actuator is investigated with different electrode configurations, applied voltages and driving frequencies. The rotational temperature of N2 (C3IIu) molecule is calculated according to its rotational emission band near 380.5 nm. The average electron energy of the discharge is evaluated by emission intensity ratio of first negative system to second positive system of N2. The rotational temperature is sensitive to the inner space of an electrode pair. The average electron energy shows insensitivity to the applied voltage, the driving frequency and the electrode configuration.

  8. Investigation of microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-07-01

    Microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy was investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode system. The electrodes of a Pd needle and a Pt plate were placed with a gap of 25 µm in typical artificial sea water or locally sampled natural deep sea water. A pulse current source, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the sea water between the electrodes, was used. The circuit parameters were optimized to decrease the breakdown voltage and the spark duration to suppress erosion of the electrodes. Using a microgap configuration, spark discharges were reproducibly ignited in the highly conductive sea water at low breakdown voltages. The ignition of spark discharges required not only a critical voltage sufficient for breakdown, but also a critical energy for preheating of the sea water, sufficient for bubble formation. The possibility of using optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in water is shown for identifying elemental composition of sea water.

  9. Optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using micro-torches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Huang, X.; Li, S.; Lu, Yao; Chen, K.; Lu, Y. F.

    2016-03-01

    A cost effective method for optical emission enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed in this research. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm was used for sample ablation and plasma generation. A cost effective commercial butane micro-torch was put parallel to the sample surface to generate a small flame above the surface. The laser-induced plasma expanded in the flame environment. The time-resolved optical emission intensity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) have been observed with and without micro torch. For laser with pulse energy of 20 mJ, the relationship between optical emission intensity and delay time indicates that signal intensities have been greatly enhanced in the initial several microseconds when using micro torch. The time-resolved study of signal-to-noise ratio shows that the maximum SNR occurs at the delay time of 2 μs. The laser energy effects on the enhancements of optical emission intensity and SNR have also been analyzed, which indicates that the enhancement factors are both delay time and laser energy dependent. The maximum enhancement factors for both optical emission intensity and SNR gradually decreases with the laser energy increase. The limits of detection (LODs) for aluminum (Al) and molybdenum (Mo) in steel have been estimated, which shows that the detection sensitivity has been improved by around 4 times. The LODs of Al and Mo have been reduced from 18 to 6 ppm and from 110 to 36 ppm in LIBS, respectively. The method of LIBS by a micro torch has been demonstrated to be a cost effective method for detection sensitivity improvement, especially in the situation of low laser pulse energy.

  10. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Verity Instruments, Inc., 2901 Eisenhower Street, Carrollton, Texas 75007 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  11. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  12. Boosting persistence time of laser-induced plasma by electric arc discharge for optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S., E-mail: simon.eschlboeck-fuchs@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolmhofer, P.J.; Bodea, M.A.; Hechenberger, J.G.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-07-01

    Plasma induced by nanosecond laser ablation is re-excited by a pulsed electric discharge and the parameters and optical emission of the plasma are measured. The discharge is a low-voltage and high-current electric arc that is triggered by the laser-induced plasma and slowly decaying with time. The optical emission of such combined plasma lasts up to several milliseconds which is much longer than without re-excitation (μs range). The emission spectra of re-excited plasma measured on different sample materials show higher line intensities than spectra measured by conventional laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Moreover, emission lines of fluorine (spectral range 683–691 nm) and sulfur (range 520–550 nm) not detected by conventional LIBS become easily detectable with the combined plasma. The concentration of major components in metallurgical slags, as determined by calibration-free LIBS, agrees very well to the reference data evaluating the spectra taken from re-excited plasma. - Highlights: • Persistence time of laser-induced plasma in air is increased from ~ 10 μs to ~ 1 ms. • Laser-induced plasma triggers an electric arc discharge that boosts the plasma. • The combined laser-arc plasma is in LTE state over very long time (ms range). • CF-LIBS method delivers accurate results evaluating spectra of combined plasma. • Emission from S and F, not detected by LIBS, is detected with combined plasma.

  13. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet During Tooth Bleaching Gel Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantak, Vedran; Zaplotnik, Rok; Tarle, Zrinka; Milošević, Slobodan

    2015-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was performed during atmospheric pressure plasma needle helium jet treatment of various tooth-bleaching gels. When the gel sample was inserted under the plasma plume, the intensity of all the spectral features increased approximately two times near the plasma needle tip and up to two orders of magnitude near the sample surface. The color change of the hydroxylapatite pastille treated with bleaching gels in conjunction with the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was found to be in correlation with the intensity of OH emission band (309 nm). Using argon as an additive to helium flow (2 L/min), a linear increase (up to four times) of OH intensity and, consequently, whitening (up to 10%) of the pastilles was achieved. An atmospheric pressure plasma jet activates bleaching gel, accelerates OH production, and accelerates tooth bleaching (up to six times faster).

  14. Laser-induced optical breakdown spectroscopy of polymer materials based on evaluation of molecular emission bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Stefan; Jasik, Juraj; Parigger, Christian G.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Spendelhofer, Wolfgang; Lackner, Johannes; Veis, Pavel; Heitz, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for composition analysis of polymer materials results in optical spectra containing atomic and ionic emission lines as well as molecular emission bands. In the present work, the molecular bands are analyzed to obtain spectroscopic information about the plasma state in an effort to quantify the content of different elements in the polymers. Polyethylene (PE) and a rubber material from tire production are investigated employing 157 nm F2 laser and 532 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation in nitrogen and argon gas background or in air. The optical detection reaches from ultraviolet (UV) over the visible (VIS) to the near infrared (NIR) spectral range. In the UV/VIS range, intense molecular emissions, C2 Swan and CN violet bands, are measured with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The measured molecular emission spectra can be fitted by vibrational-rotational transitions by open access programs and data sets with good agreement between measured and fitted spectra. The fits allow determining vibrational-rotational temperatures. A comparison to electronic temperatures Te derived earlier from atomic carbon vacuum-UV (VUV) emission lines show differences, which can be related to different locations of the atomic and molecular species in the expanding plasma plume. In the NIR spectral region, we also observe the CN red bands with a conventional CDD Czerny Turner spectrometer. The emission of the three strong atomic sulfur lines between 920 and 925 nm is overlapped by these bands. Fitting of the CN red bands allows a separation of both spectral contributions. This makes a quantitative evaluation of sulfur contents in the start material in the order of 1 wt% feasible.

  15. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy: a complementary technique to analyze thin electrodeposited polyaniline films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutarlier, V. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon (France); Lakard, S., E-mail: sophie.lakard@univ-fcomte.fr [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon (France); Patois, T. [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université Catholique de Louvain, Croix du Sud, 1/4, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Lakard, B. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-UMR 6213, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2014-01-01

    Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) has been developed to perform depth profiles of thick metallic films, in tens of microns range. GDOES spectroscopy can also be used to analyze thin organic polymer films since this technique has a great potential thanks to its high depth resolution, multi-element capability, sensitivity, and adaptability to solids or films and to conducting or non-conducting samples. In particular thin electrodeposited conducting polymer films remain an unexplored field of investigation for GDOES technique. However GDOES was used in this work to analyze electrodeposited polyaniline films, in addition to other techniques such as profilometry, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). More precisely polyaniline thin films were electrodeposited from HCl solutions and the presence of an anilinium chloride excess at the top surface of the polymer film was demonstrated using GDOES and XRD. Rinsing of these films with water led to the removal of this excess and to the partial dedoping of the polymer film due to the porous structure of polymer films. Polyaniline thin films were also electrodeposited from H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions and an anilinium hydrogen sulfate was similarly observed at the top surface of the polymer. This excess was removed by rinsing, contrary to hydrogen sulfate anions incorporated into the polymer film during the electrochemical polymerization that were not completely expulsed from the polyaniline films as proved using GDOES. - Highlights: • Polyaniline films were electrodeposited from HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions • Polymer films were analyzed by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES) • The incorporation of anions in the films was proved using GDOES depth profiles • The crystalline structure of polyaniline films was modified by water rinsing.

  16. Synthetic diagnostic for the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic using a full optical integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausammann, L.; Churchill, R. M.; Shi, L.

    2017-02-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic is used to measure fluctuations of electron density in the edge and core of fusion plasmas, and is a key in understanding turbulence in a plasma reactor. A synthetic BES diagnostic for the turbulence simulation code XGC1 has been developed using a realistic neutral beam model and an optical system easily adaptable to different kinds of tokamaks. The beam is modeled using multiple beam energy components, each one with a fraction of the total energy and their own mass and energy (mono-energetic components). The optical system consists of a lens focusing a bundle of optical fibers and resulting in a 2D measurement. The synthetic diagnostic gives similar correlation functions and behaviour of the turbulences than the usual methods that do not take into account the full 3D optical effects. The results, based on a simulation of XGC1, contain an analysis of the correlation (in space and time), a comparison of different approximations possible and their importance in accurately modeling the BES diagnostic.

  17. Temperature Effect on the Optical Emission Intensity in Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Super Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbani, S. M. R.; Ghezelbash, M.; Majd, A. E.; Soltanolkotabi, M.; Saghafifar, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of heating and cooling samples on the optical emission spectra and plasma parameters of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for Titanium 64, Inconel 718 super alloys, and Aluminum 6061 alloy is investigated. Samples are uniformly heated up to approximately 200°C and cooled down to -78°C by an external heater and liquid nitrogen, respectively. Variations of plasma parameters like electron temperature and electron density with sample temperature are determined by using Boltzmann plot and Stark broadening methods, respectively. Heating the samples improves LIBS signal strength and broadens the width of the spectrum. On the other hand, cooling alloys causes fluctuations in the LIBS signal and decrease it to some extent, and some of the spectral peaks diminish. In addition, our results show that electron temperature and electron density depend on the sample temperature variations.

  18. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy determination of trace element composition of argan oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, A; Ghanjaoui, M E; El Rhazi, M; de la Guardia, M

    2010-02-01

    A methodology based on inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave assisted acid digestion has been developed to determine the trace element content of Moroccan argan oil. Limit of detection values equal or lower than few mg/kg were obtained for all elements under study. To assure the accuracy of the whole procedure, recovery studies were carried out on argan oil samples spiked at different concentration levels from 10 to 200 µg/L. Quantitative average recovery values were obtained for all elements evaluated, demonstrating the suitability of this methodology for the determination of trace elements in argan oil samples. Aluminum, calcium, chromium, iron, potassium, lithium, magnesium, sodium, vanadium and zinc were quantitatively determined in Moroccan argan oils being found that their concentration is different of that found in other edible oils thus offering a way for authentication and for the evaluation of possible adulterations.

  19. Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valensi, F; Pellerin, S; Zielinska, S [GREMI, Universite d' Orleans (Site de Bourges)/CNRS, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges cedex (France); Boutaghane, A [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Alger (Algeria); Dzierzega, K [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, N [CNRS, UPR3079 CEMHTI, 1D av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Briand, F, E-mail: flavien.valensi@laplace.univ-tsle.f, E-mail: stephane.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: aboutaghane@yahoo.f, E-mail: krzycho@netmail.if.uj.edu.p, E-mail: sylwia.zielinska@airliquide.co, E-mail: nadia.pellerin@univ-orleans.f, E-mail: francis.briand@airliquide.co [CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l' Aumone, 95315 Cergy-Pontoise cedex (France)

    2010-11-03

    The plasma column in a metal inert gas welding process is investigated by optical emission spectroscopy and high-speed imaging. The concentration and repartition of iron vapours are measured and correlated with the plasma and electrode geometric configuration. Plasma temperatures and electron densities are also measured for each studied position in the plasma. The temperatures are calculated using two different methods, allowing validation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium state of the plasma. The results show a maximum temperature of 12 500 K in the upper part of the arc, away from the arc axis. The iron concentration reaches a maximum of 0.3% close to the anode and strongly decreases along both the vertical and radial directions. The plasma thermophysical properties, calculated from this plasma composition, are then discussed regarding the metal transfer mode.

  20. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  1. Optical Emission Spectroscopy Study of Competing Phases of Electrons in the Second Landau Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, A L; Wurstbauer, U; Kuznetsova, Y Y; Pinczuk, A; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Manfra, M J; Gardner, G C; Watson, J D

    2016-01-01

    Quantum phases of electrons in the filling factor range 2≤ν≤3 are probed by the weak optical emission from the partially populated second Landau level and spin wave measurements. Observations of optical emission include a multiplet of sharp peaks that exhibit a strong filling factor dependence. Spin wave measurements by resonant inelastic light scattering probe breaking of spin rotational invariance and are used to link this optical emission with collective phases of electrons. A remarkably rapid interplay between emission peak intensities manifests phase competition in the second Landau level.

  2. DETECTION OF REST-FRAME OPTICAL LINES FROM X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF WEAK EMISSION-LINE QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Gallo, Elena [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shemmer, Ohad [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Trakhtenbrot, Benny [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Brandt, W. N.; Luo, Bin; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wu, Jianfeng, E-mail: rplotkin@umich.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS 6, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 15 yr, examples of exotic radio-quiet quasars with intrinsically weak or absent broad emission line regions (BELRs) have emerged from large-scale spectroscopic sky surveys. Here, we present spectroscopy of seven such weak emission line quasars (WLQs) at moderate redshifts (z = 1.4–1.7) using the X-shooter spectrograph, which provides simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy covering the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) through optical. These new observations effectively double the number of WLQs with spectroscopy in the optical rest-frame, and they allow us to compare the strengths of (weak) high-ionization emission lines (e.g., C iv) to low-ionization lines (e.g., Mg ii, Hβ, Hα) in individual objects. We detect broad Hβ and Hα emission in all objects, and these lines are generally toward the weaker end of the distribution expected for typical quasars (e.g., Hβ has rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 15–40 Å). However, these low-ionization lines are not exceptionally weak, as is the case for high-ionization lines in WLQs. The X-shooter spectra also display relatively strong optical Fe ii emission, Hβ FWHM ≲ 4000 km s{sup −1}, and significant C iv blueshifts (≈1000–5500 km s{sup −1}) relative to the systemic redshift; two spectra also show elevated UV Fe ii emission, and an outflowing component to their (weak) Mg ii emission lines. These properties suggest that WLQs are exotic versions of “wind-dominated” quasars. Their BELRs either have unusual high-ionization components, or their BELRs are in an atypical photoionization state because of an unusually soft continuum.

  3. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in PECVD Helps Modulate Key Features in Biofunctional Coatings for Medical Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Miguel; Michael, Praveesuda; Filipe, Elysse; Wise, Steven; Bilek, Marcela; University of Sydney Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    We explore the use of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) diagnostic tools as a process feedback control strategy in plasma-assisted deposition of biofunctional coatings. Hydrogenated carbon nitride coatings are deposited on medical-grade metallic substrates using radio-frequency (rf) discharges sustained in C2H2/N2/Ar gaseous mixtures. The discharge is generated by capacitively coupling the rf power (supplied at f = 13.56 MHz) to the plasma and the substrates are electrically biased using a pulse generator to provide microsecond square profiled pulses at voltages in the range |Vbias| = 250 V - 1000 V. Nitrogen content and CN bonding configurations in the coatings follow similar trends to those of CN radicals and nitrogen molecular ions in the discharge. OES is used as a non-intrusive diagnostic technique to identify a suitable window of process parameters and ultimately achieve biofunctional interfaces compatible with current clinical demands. Importantly, we demonstrate that key features of the coatings can be modulated and made suitable for blood and/or tissue contacting medical implants, such as coronary stents and orthopaedic implants. The coatings are mechanically robust, inherently non-thrombogenic and can be readily modified, enabling an easy functionalization through the immobilization of biological molecules in a bioactive conformation.

  4. Characterization of a high current pulsed arc using optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Zaepffel, C.; Chemartin, L.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation realized on an experimental setup that simulates an arc column subjected to the transient phase of a lightning current waveform in laboratory conditions. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to assess space- and time-resolved properties of this high current pulsed arc. Different current peak levels are utilised in this work, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with a peak time around 15 µs. Ionic lines of nitrogen and oxygen are used to determine the radial profiles of temperature and electron density of the arc channel over time from 2 µs to 36 µs. A combination of 192 N II and O II lines is considered in the calculation of the bound-bound contribution of the absorption coefficient of the plasma channel. Calculations of the optical thickness showed that self-absorption of these ionic lines in the arc column is important. To obtain temperature and electron density profiles in the arc, we solved the radiative transfer equation across the channel under an axisymmetric assumption and considering the channel formed by uniform concentric layers. For the 100 kA current peak level, the temperature reaches more than 38 000 K and the electron density reaches 5  ×  1018 cm-3. The pressure inside the channel is calculated using the air plasma composition at local thermodynamic equilibrium, and reaches 45 bar. The results are discussed and utilised to estimate the electrical conductivity of the arc channel.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sismanoglu, B.N., E-mail: bogos@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Amorim, J., E-mail: jayr.amorim@bioetanol.org.b [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Souza-Correa, J.A., E-mail: jorge.correa@bioetanol.org.b [Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol - CTBE, Caixa Postal 6170, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C., E-mail: carlosf@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Gomes, M.P., E-mail: gomesmp@ita.b [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando-Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Pca Marechal Eduardo Gomes 50, 12 228-900, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-15

    This paper is about the use of optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool to determine the gas discharge parameters of a direct current (98% Ar-2% H{sub 2}) non-thermal microplasma jet, operated at atmospheric pressure. The electrical and optical behaviors were studied to characterize this glow discharge. The microplasma jet was investigated in the normal and abnormal glow regimes, for current ranging from 10 to 130 mA, at approx 220 V of applied voltage for copper cathode. OH (A {sup 2}SIGMA{sup +}, nu = 0 -> X {sup 2}PI, nu' = 0) rotational bands at 306.357 nm and also the 603.213 nm Ar I line, which is sensitive to van der Waals broadening, were used to determine the gas temperature, which ranges from 550 to 800 K. The electron number densities, ranging from 6.0 x 10{sup 14} to 1.4 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, were determined through a careful analysis of the main broadening mechanisms of the H{sub beta} line. From both 603.213 nm and 565.070 nm Ar I line broadenings, it was possible to obtain simultaneously electron number density and temperature (approx 8000 K). Excitation temperatures were also measured from two methods: from two Cu I lines and from Boltzmann-plot of 4p-4s and 5p-4s Ar I transitions. By employing H{sub alpha} line, the hydrogen atoms' H temperature was estimated (approx 18,000 K) and found to be surprisingly hotter than the excitation temperature.

  6. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  7. Copper Determination in Gunshot Residue by Cyclic Voltammetric and Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hashim Nurul’Afiqah Hashimah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of gunshot residue (GSR is a crucial evidences for a forensic analyst in the fastest way. GSR analysis insists a suitable method provides a relatively simple, rapid and precise information on the spot at the crime scene. Therefore, the analysis of Cu(II in GSR using cyclic voltammetry (CV on screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE is a better choice compared to previous alternative methods such as Inductive Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES those required a long time for analysis. SPCE is specially designed to handle with microvolumes of sample such as GSR sample. It gives advantages for identification of copper in GSR on-site preliminary test to prevent the sample loss on the process to be analyzed in the laboratory. SPCE was swabbed directly on the shooter’s arm immediately after firing and acetate buffer was dropped on SPCE before CV analysis. For ICP-OES analysis, cotton that had been soaked in 0.5 M nitric acid was swabbed on the shooter’s arm immediately after firing and kept in a tightly closed sampling tube. Gold coated SPCE that had been through nanoparticles modification exhibits excellent performance on voltammograms. The calibration was linear from 1 to 50 ppm of copper, the limit of detection for copper was 0.3 ppm and a relative standard deviation was 6.1 %. The method was successfully applied to the determination of copper in GSR. The Cu determination on SPCE was compared and validated by ICP-OES method with 94 % accuracy.

  8. Characterization of a direct dc-excited discharge in water by optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruggeman, Peter; Leys, Christophe [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Schram, Daan [Department of Applied Physics, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gonzalez, Manuel A [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Rego, Robby [Flemish Institute of Technological Research, VITO Materials, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Kong, Michael G [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.bruggeman@ugent.be

    2009-05-01

    Dc-excited discharges generated in water at the tip of a tungsten wire which is located at the orifice of a quartz capillary are investigated by time-averaged optical emission spectroscopy. Two distinctive discharge modes are observed. For small conductivities of the liquid the discharge is a streamer-like discharge in the liquid itself (liquid mode). For conductivities above typically 45 {mu}S cm{sup -1} a large vapour bubble is formed and a streamer discharge in this vapour bubble is observed (bubble mode). Plasma temperatures and electron densities are investigated for both modes. The gas temperature is estimated from the rotational temperature of N{sub 2}(C-B) and is 1600 {+-} 200 K for the bubble mode and 1900 {+-} 200 K for the liquid mode. The rotational temperature of OH(A-X) is up to 2 times larger and cannot be used as an estimate for the gas temperature. The rotational population distribution of OH(A), {nu} = 0 is also non-Boltzmann with a large overpopulation of high rotational states. This discrepancy in rotational temperatures is discussed in detail. Electron densities are obtained from the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line. The electron densities in the liquid mode are of the order of 10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. In the bubble mode electron densities are significantly smaller: (3-4) x 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. These values are compared with the Stark broadening of the hydrogen alpha and gamma lines and with electron densities obtained from current density measurements. The chemical reactivities of the bubble and liquid modes are compared by means of the hydrogen peroxide production rate.

  9. Optical emission spectroscopy of excited atoms sputtered on a Ti surface under irradiation with multicharged Ar ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, K [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Saitoh, Y [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kitazawa, S, E-mail: motohasi@cc.tuat.ac.j [Division of ITER Project, Fusion Research Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2009-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of excited atoms was carried out in order to investigate the sputtering processes on solid surfaces under irradiation of slow, multicharged ions. Many atomic lines of Ti I (neutral) and Ti II (single-charged ions) were observed in wavelengths from 250 to 750 nm with irradiation by Ar{sup 3+} (30 keV) on a Ti surface which was placed in a low pressure O{sub 2} atmosphere. The emission intensity of Ti I (520 nm) decreased monotonically with an increase of O{sub 2} partial pressure, whereas that of Ti I / II (670 nm, a 2nd order wavelength of 335 nm) slightly increased. From a semi-logarithmic plot of emission intensity for the 670 nm spectrum as a function of distance from the surface, the mean velocity of the excited Ti atoms and ions in a normal direction parallel to the surface, or

  10. A Proposed Method for Measurement of Absolute Air Fluorescence Yield based on High Resolution Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gika, V; Maltezos, S

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a method for absolute measurement of air fluorescence yield based on high resolution optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute measurement of the air fluorescence yield is feasible using the Cherenkov light, emitted by an electron beam simultaneously with the fluorescence light, as a "standard candle". The separation of these two radiations can be accomplished exploiting the "dark" spectral regions of the emission band systems of the molecular spectrum of nitrogen. In these "dark" regions the net Cherenkov light can be recorded experimentally and be compared with the calculated one. The instrumentation for obtaining the nitrogen molecular spectra in high resolution and the noninvasive method for monitoring the rotational temperature of the emission process are also described. For the experimental evaluation of the molecular spectra analysis we used DC normal glow discharges in air performed in an appropriate spectral lamp considered as an air-fluorescence light emulator. The propose...

  11. Optical emission spectroscopy characterizations of micro-air plasma used for simulation of cell membrane poration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerrouki, A.; Motomura, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Jinno, M.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-07-01

    A micro-air corona discharge, which is one of the plasmas successfully used for gene transfection in terms of high transfection and cell viability rates, is characterized by optical emission spectroscopy. This non-equilibrium low temperature plasma is generated from the tip of a pulsed high voltage micro-tube (0.2 mm inner diameter and 0.7 mm for outer diameter) placed 2 mm in front of a petri dish containing deionized water and set on a grounded copper plate. The electron temperature, equal to about 6.75 eV near the electrode tip and decreased down to 3.4 eV near the plate, has been estimated, with an error bar of about 30%, from an interesting approach based on the experimental ratio of the closest nitrogen emission spectra of \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm and N2(SPS) at 394.3 nm. This is based on one hand on a balance equation between creations and losses of the excited upper levels of these two UV spectra and on the other hand on the electron impact rates of the creation of these upper levels calculated from solution of the multi-term Boltzmann equation. Then using the measured Hα spectrum, electron density n e has been estimated from Stark broadening versus the inter-electrode position with an average error bar of about 50%. n e  ≈  1  ×  1015 cm-3 is near the tip coherent with the usual magnitude of electron density in the streamer head developed near the tip of the corona discharges. Rotational temperatures, estimated from comparison of synthetic and experimental spectra of OH(A  -  X), \\text{N}2+ (FNS) at 391.4 nm, and N2(SPS) at 337 nm are respectively equal to 2350 K, 2000 K and 700 K in the gap space. This clearly underlines a thermal non-equilibrium of the corresponding excited species generated inside the thin streamer filaments. But, due to the high dilution of these species in the background gas, these high rotational temperatures do not affect the mean gas temperature that remains close to 300

  12. Dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma inferred from thin film morphology and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krstulović, N., E-mail: niksak@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Salamon, K., E-mail: ksalamon@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Modic, M., E-mail: martina.modic@ijs.si [Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Bišćan, M., E-mail: mbiscan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milat, O., E-mail: milat@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milošević, S., E-mail: slobodan@ifs.hr [Institute of Physics, Bijenička 46, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, dynamics of double-pulse laser produced titanium plasma was studied both directly using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and indirectly from morphological properties of deposited thin films. Both approaches yield consistent results. Ablated material was deposited in a form of thin film on the Si substrate. During deposition, plasma dynamics was monitored using optical emission spectroscopy with spatial and temporal resolutions. The influence of ablation mode (single and double) and delay time τ (delay between first and second pulses in double-pulse mode) on plasma dynamics and consequently on morphology of deposited Ti-films was studied using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy. Delay time τ was varied from 170 ns to 4 μs. The results show strong dependence of both emission signal and Ti-film properties, such as thickness, density and roughness, on τ. In addition, correlation of average density and thickness of film is observed. These results are discussed in terms of dependency of angular distribution and kinetic energy of plasma plume particles on τ. Advantages of using double-pulse laser deposition for possible application in thin film production are shown. - Highlights: • Ti-thin films produced by single and double pulse laser ablation mode. • Ablation mode and delay time influenced plasma plume and film characteristics. • Films are most compact for optimized delay time (thinnest, smoothest and most dense). • Plasma dynamics can be inferred from film characteristics.

  13. Optical emission spectroscopy of the Linac4 and superconducting proton Linac plasma generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettry, J.; Kronberger, M.; Mahner, E.; Schmitzer, C.; Sanchez, J.; Scrivens, R.; Midttun, O.; O' Neil, M.; Pereira, H.; Paoluzzi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Fantz, U.; Wuenderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Myllyperkioe, P.; Tarvainen, O. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, 40500 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2012-02-15

    CERN's superconducting proton Linac (SPL) study investigates a 50 Hz high-energy, high-power Linac for H{sup -} ions. The SPL plasma generator is an evolution of the DESY ion source plasma generator currently operated at CERN's Linac4 test stand. The plasma generator is a step towards a particle source for the SPL, it is designed to handle 100 kW peak RF-power at a 6% duty factor. While the acquisition of an integrated hydrogen plasma optical spectrum is straightforward, the measurement of a time-resolved spectrum requires dedicated amplification schemes. The experimental setup for visible light based on photomultipliers and narrow bandwidth filters and the UV spectrometer setup are described. The H{sub {alpha}}, H{sub {beta}}, and H{sub {gamma}} Balmer line intensities, the Lyman band and alpha transition were measured. A parametric study of the optical emission from the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator as a function of RF-power and gas pressure is presented. The potential of optical emission spectrometry coupled to RF-power coupling measurements for on-line monitoring of short RF heated hydrogen plasma pulses is discussed.

  14. Tissue differentiation by means of high resolution optical emission spectroscopy during electrosurgical intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, Ines; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Nüßle, Daniela; Spether, Dominik; Neugebauer, Alexander; Bibinov, Nikita; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Enderle, Markus; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Electrosurgery is the use of radio-frequency electric current for the cutting of biological tissue e.g. for resection of tumour tissue. In this work, the optical emission of plasma being generated during the electrosurgical procedure is investigated with a high resolution echelle spectrometer to find differences between tumour tissue and normal renal tissue in a pre-clinical ex vivo study. Trace elements like zinc, iron, copper and cadmium are present in the tissue spectra as well as the electrolytes magnesium, calcium, sodium and potassium and some diatomic molecules such as hydroxyl radical, cyano radical, dicarbon, nitrogen monohydride and molecular nitrogen which are mainly dissociated from polyatomic molecules. With the atomic emission line of cadmium at 228.8 nm the treated tissue can be differentiated in tumorous and healthy tissue with correct assignment of 95% for tumour tissue and 92% for normal renal tissue.

  15. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical-Emission Spectroscopy Determination of Major and Minor Elements in Vinegar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu AKPINAR-BAYIZIT

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study characterizes the mineral content of vinegar samples. The concentrations of Na, K, Ca, Mg and P (major elements as well as Fe, Mn, Sn, Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd (minor elements were determined in 35 commercial vinegar samples using inductively coupled plasma optical-emission spectrometry (ICP-OES. The elements with the highest concentrations were K, Na, Ca, Mg and P. The concentrations of heavy metals in the vinegar samples, including Cd, Ni, Sn and Pb, were not considered a health risk.

  16. Glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy for accurate and well resolved analysis of coatings and thin films

    KAUST Repository

    Wilke, Marcus

    2011-12-01

    In the last years, glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (GDOES) gained more and more acceptance in the analysis of functional coatings. GDOES thereby represents an interesting alternative to common depth profiling techniques like AES and SIMS, based on its unique combination of high erosion rates and erosion depths, sensitivity, analysis of nonconductive layers and easy quantification even for light elements such as C, N, O and H. Starting with the fundamentals of GDOES, a short overview on new developments in instrument design for accurate and well resolved thin film analyses is presented. The article focuses on the analytical capabilities of glow discharge optical emission spectrometry in the analysis of metallic coatings and thin films. Results illustrating the high depth resolution, confirmation of stoichiometry, the detection of light elements in coatings as well as contamination on the surface or interfaces will be demonstrated by measurements of: a multilayer system Cr/Ti on silicon, interface contamination on silicon during deposition of aluminum, Al2O3-nanoparticle containing conversion coatings on zinc for corrosion resistance, Ti3SiC2 MAX-phase coatings by pulsed laser deposition and hydrogen detection in a V/Fe multilayer system. The selected examples illustrate that GDOES can be successfully adopted as an analytical tool in the development of new materials and coatings. A discussion of the results as well as of the limitations of GDOES is presented. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Characterization of RF He-N2/Ar mixture plasma via Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Hussain, S. S.; Zakaullah, M.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.

    2016-08-01

    A Magnetic Pole Enhanced inductively coupled RF H e - N 2 / A r plasma is characterized using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The effect of helium mixing on electron density ( n e ) and temperature ( T e ) , electron energy probability functions (EEPFs), [ N ] atomic density, and N 2 dissociation is investigated. A Langmuir probe and a zero slope method based on trace rare gas-optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES) are employed to measure the electron temperature. It is noted that the electron temperature shows an increasing trend for both methods. However, the temperature measured by a zero slope method T e ( Z . S ) approaches the temperature measured by a Langmuir probe; T e ( L . P ) at 56% and above helium concentration in the discharge. "Advance actinometry" is employed to monitor the variation in [ N ] atomic density with helium concentration and gas pressure. It is noted that [ N ] atomic density increases at 56% and above helium in the discharge, which is consistent with the trend of electron temperature and EEPFs. A drastic enhancement in N 2 dissociation fraction D 1 determined by "advance actinometry" is noted at 56% and above helium concentration in the mixture due to modifications in different population and depopulation mechanisms. However, it is also noted that the dissociation fraction D 2 determined by intensity ratio method increases linearly with helium addition.

  18. Investigations of the cathode region of an argon arc plasma by degenerate four-wave mixing laser spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzierzega, K [Marian Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Pokrzywka, B [Mt. Suhora Observatory, Cracow Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, 30-083 Cracow (Poland); Pellerin, S [LASEP, Universite d' Orleans-Centre Universitaire de Bourges, Rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2004-07-07

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) laser spectroscopy was used in local studies of atmospheric pressure argon plasma generated in a free-burning arc. The results of plasma diagnostics using the DFWM method were compared to the results obtained with optical emission measurements. In the cathode region of the arc the maxima of both the DFWM signal and the emission coefficient for the 696.5 nm Ar I line depend on the distance from the cathode tip. This effect proves the departure of the plasma state from local thermal equilibrium (LTE) as it has been reported by many authors. On the other hand the Stark shifts of the 696.5 nm Ar I line determined by the DFWM method in relation to plasma diagnostic results show no deviations from LTE on the arc axis down to 1.0 mm from the cathode tip.

  19. Time-resolved measurement of emission profiles in pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy: Investigation of the pre-peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberts, D. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Horvath, P. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Nelis, Th. [LAPLACE, Universite Paul Sabatier, 118 rte de Narbonne, Bat3R2, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); CU Jean Francois Champollion, Place de Verdun 81012 Albi Cedex 9 (France); Pereiro, R. [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Bordel, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Michler, J. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research (EMPA), Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Sanz-Medel, A., E-mail: asm@uniovi.e [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Radiofrequency glow discharge coupled to optical emission spectroscopy has been used in pulsed mode in order to perform a detailed study of the measured temporal emission profiles for a wide range of copper transitions. Special attention has been paid to the early emission peak (or so-called pre-peak), observed at the beginning of the emission pulse profile. The effects of the important pulse parameters such as frequency, duty cycle, pulse width and power-off time, have been studied upon the Cu pulse emission profiles. The influence of discharge parameters, such as pressure and power, was studied as well. Results have shown that the intensity observed in the pre-peak can be 10 times as large as the plateau value for resonant lines and up to 5 times in case of transitions to the metastable levels. Increasing pressure or power increased the pre-peak intensity while its appearance in time changed. The pre-peak decreased when the discharge off-time was shorter than 100 {mu}s. According to such results, the presence of the pre-peak could be probably due to the lack of self-absorption during the first 50 {mu}s, and not to the ignition of the plasma. Under the selected operation conditions, the use of the pre-peak emission as analytical signals increases the linearity of calibration curves for resonant lines subjected to self-absorption at high concentrations.

  20. The SMARTS Multi-epoch Optical Spectroscopy Atlas (SAMOSA): Using Emission Line Variability to Probe the Location of the Blazar Gamma-emitting Region

    CERN Document Server

    Isler, Jedidah C; Bailyn, C; Smith, P S; Coppi, P; Brady, M; Macpherson, E; Hasan, I; Buxton, M

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of seven southern Fermi-monitored blazars from 2008 - 2013 using the Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS), with supplemental spectroscopy and polarization data from the Steward Observatory. We find that the emission lines are much less variable than the continuum; 4 of 7 blazars had no detectable emission line variability over the 5 years. This is consistent with photoionization primarily by an accretion disk, allowing us to use the lines as a probe of disk activity. Comparing optical emission line flux with Fermi $\\gamma$-ray flux and optical polarized flux, we investigate whether relativistic jet variability is related to the accretion flow. In general, we see no such dependence, suggesting the jet variability is likely caused by internal processes like turbulence or shock acceleration rather than a variable accretion rate. However, three sources showed statistically significant emission line flares in close temporal proximity to very large...

  1. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  2. Determination of Silicon in Gasoline by Directly Measuring under Organic Phase Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-mei; Wen, Huan; Lü, Huan-ming; Liu, Hui-qin; Lin, Zhi-sheng; Wang, Rong-hua

    2015-03-01

    A simple and accurate method was developed for determining silicon in gasoline using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). For sample inroduction a Burgener nubulizer and a Cyclonic spray chamber were used. A gasoline sample was diluted with isooctane and then introduced into the cooled spray chamber of the ICP-OES. Good linearity was achieved in the silicon concentration range 0.1 - 10.0 mg x kg(-1), and the correlation coefficient was 0.999 96. The detection limit for silicon was 0.012 mg x kg(-1) and the silicon recoveries from gasoline samples were 95.8% - 98.4%, with relative standard deviations of less than 3.0% The method was proved to be simple, reliable and highly sensitive, and suitable for determining silicon in samples of motor gasoline, ethanol-gasoline and methanol-gasoline fuel mixtures those containing not more than 15% (V/V) oxygenates.

  3. A study of internal oxidation in carburized steels by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    An, X; Rainforth, W M; Chen, L

    2003-01-01

    The internal oxidation of Cr-Mn carburizing steel was studied. Internal oxidation was induced using a commercial carburizing process. Sputter erosion coupled with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) was used to determine the depth profile elemental distribution within the internal oxidation layer (<10 mu m). In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) studies were carried out on selected sputter eroded surfaces. Oxide type was identified primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The carburized surface was found to consist of a continuous oxide layer, followed by a complex internal oxidation layer, where Cr and Mn oxides were found to populate grain boundaries in a globular form in the near surface region. At greater depths (5-10 mu m), Si oxides formed as a grain boundary network. The internal oxides (mainly complex oxides) grew quickly during the initial stages of the carburizing process (2 h, 800 deg. C+3 h, 930 deg. C). G...

  4. Remote measurement of high preeruptive water vapor emissions at Sabancaya volcano by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Masias, Pablo; Apaza, Fredy; Reath, Kevin; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Water (H2O) is by far the most abundant volcanic volatile species and plays a predominant role in driving volcanic eruptions. However, numerous difficulties associated with making accurate measurements of water vapor in volcanic plumes have limited their use as a diagnostic tool. Here we present the first detection of water vapor in a volcanic plume using passive visible-light differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Ultraviolet and visible-light DOAS measurements were made on 21 May 2016 at Sabancaya Volcano, Peru. We find that Sabancaya's plume contained an exceptionally high relative water vapor abundance 6 months prior to its November 2016 eruption. Our measurements yielded average sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates of 800–900 t/d, H2O emission rates of around 250,000 t/d, and an H2O/SO2 molecular ratio of 1000 which is about an order of magnitude larger than typically found in high-temperature volcanic gases. We attribute the high water vapor emissions to a boiling-off of Sabancaya's hydrothermal system caused by intrusion of magma to shallow depths. This hypothesis is supported by a significant increase in the thermal output of the volcanic edifice detected in infrared satellite imagery leading up to and after our measurements. Though the measurement conditions encountered at Sabancaya were very favorable for our experiment, we show that visible-light DOAS systems could be used to measure water vapor emissions at numerous other high-elevation volcanoes. Such measurements would provide observatories with additional information particularly useful for forecasting eruptions at volcanoes harboring significant hydrothermal systems.

  5. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining spatial confinement and dual-pulse irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L B; Zhang, B Y; He, X N; Li, C M; Zhou, Y S; Wu, T; Park, J B; Zeng, X Y; Lu, Y F

    2012-01-16

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), a pair of aluminum-plate walls were used to spatially confine the plasmas produced in air by a first laser pulse (KrF excimer laser) from chromium (Cr) targets with a second laser pulse (Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm, 360 mJ/pulse) introduced parallel to the sample surface to re-excite the plasmas. Optical emission enhancement was achieved by combing the spatial confinement and dual-pulse LIBS (DP-LIBS), and then optimized by adjusting the distance between the two walls and the interpulse delay time between both laser pulses. A significant enhancement factor of 168.6 for the emission intensity of the Cr lines was obtained at an excimer laser fluence of 5.6 J/cm(2) using the combined spatial confinement and DP-LIBS, as compared with an enhancement factor of 106.1 was obtained with DP-LIBS only. The enhancement mechanisms based on shock wave theory and reheating in DP-LIBS are discussed.

  6. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Estado de México (Mexico); Villalobos, S. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  7. Optical emission spectroscopy of deuterium and helium plasma jets emitted from plasma focus discharges at the PF-1000U facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Dan'ko, S. A.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Sadowski, M. J.; Zaloga, D. R.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Kharrasov, A. M.; Krauz, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy techniques were used to investigate the spectra of dense deuterium-plasma jets generated by high-current pulse discharges within the large PF-1000U facility and to estimate parameters of plasma inside the jets and their surroundings. Time-resolved optical spectra were recorded by means of a Mechelle®900 spectrometer. From an analysis of the deuterium line broadening, it was estimated that the electron concentration at a distance 57 cm from the electrode outlets amounted to (0.4-3.7) × 1017 cm-3 depending on the initial gas distribution and the time interval of the spectrum registration after the instant of the plasma jet generation. From the re-absorption dip in the Dβ profile, it was assessed that the electron concentration in the surrounding gas was equal to about 1.5 × 1015 cm-3. On the basis of the measured ratio of He II 468.6 nm and He I 587.6 nm line intensities, it was estimated that the electron temperature amounted to about 5.3 eV. Also estimated were some dimensionless parameters of the investigated plasma jets.

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of point-plane corona and back-corona discharges in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, T.; Sobczyk, A. T.; Jaworek, A.

    2011-12-01

    Results of spectroscopic investigations and current-voltage characteristics of corona discharge and back discharge on fly-ash layer, generated in point-plane electrode geometry in air at atmospheric pressure are presented in the paper. The characteristics of both discharges are similar but differ in the current and voltage ranges of all the discharge forms distinguished during the experiments. Three forms of back discharge, for positive and negative polarity, were investigated: glow, streamer and low-current back-arc. In order to characterize ionisation and excitation processes in back discharge, the emission spectra were measured and compared with those obtained for normal corona discharge generated in the same electrode configuration but with fly ash layer removed. The emission spectra were measured in two discharge zones: near the tip of needle electrode and near the plate. Visual forms of the discharge were recorded with digital camera and referred to current-voltage characteristics and emission spectra. The measurements have shown that spectral lines emitted by back discharge depend on the form of discharge and the discharge current. From the comparison of the spectral lines of back and normal discharges an effect of fly ash layer on the discharge morphology can be determined. The recorded emission spectra formed by ionised gas and plasma near the needle electrode and fly ash layer are different. It should be noted that in back arc emission, spectral lines of fly ash layer components can be distinguished. On the other hand, in needle zone, the emission of high intensity N2 second positive system and NO γ lines can be noticed. Regardless of these gaseous lines, also atomic lines of dust layer were present in the spectrum. The differences in spectra of back discharge for positive and negative polarities of the needle electrode have been explained by considering the kind of ions generated in the crater in fly ash layer. The aim of these studies is to better

  9. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3-TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnama, K.; Alkhawwam, A.; Jazmati, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma plume of Al2O3-TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  10. Investigation of local thermodynamic equilibrium of laser induced Al2O3–TiC plasma in argon by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alnama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma plume of Al2O3–TiC is generated by third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond laser. It is characterized using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES at different argon background gas pressures 10, 102, 103, 104 and 105 Pa. Spatial evolution of excitation and ionic temperatures is deduced from spectral data analysis. Temporal evolution of Ti I emission originated from different energy states is probed. The correlation between the temporal behavior and the spatial temperature evolution are investigated under LTE condition for the possibility to use the temporal profile of Ti I emission as an indicator for LTE validity in the plasma.

  11. Characterization of low temperature graphene synthesis in inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition process with optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yifei; Kim, Daekyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Heeyeop

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature graphene was synthesized at 400 degrees C with inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The effects of plasma power and flow rate of various carbon containing precursors and hydrogen on graphene properties were investigated with optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Various radicals monitored by OES were correlated with graphene film properties such as sheet resistance, I(D)/I(G) ratio of Raman spectra and transparency. C2H2 was used as a main precursor and the increase of plasma power enhanced intensity of carbon (C2) radical OES intensity in plasma, reduced sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films. The reduced flow rate of C2H2 decreased sheet resistance and increased transparency of graphene films in the range of this study. H2 addition was found to increase sheet resistance, transparency and attributed to reduction of graphene grain and etching graphene layers. OES analysis showed that C2 radicals contribute to graphite networking and sheet resistance reduction. TEM and AFM were applied to provide credible information that graphene had been successfully grown at low temperature.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy of OH lines in N2 and Ar plasma during the treatments of cotton fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoro, Nikola; Puac, Nevena; Spasic, Kosta; Malovic, Gordana; Gorjanc, Marija; Petrovic, Zoran Lj

    2016-09-01

    Low pressure non-equilibrium plasmas are proven to be irreplaceable tool in material processing. Among other fields their applications in treatments of textiles are still diversifying, but the main role of plasma is activation of the surface of treated sample. After, or during, the treatments these surfaces can be covered with different materials or species (such as microcapsules) that enhance properties of the fabric. In order to investigate mechanisms how active species from plasma interact with the cotton surface, we studied both plasma and surface properties. Bleached cotton samples were treated in low-pressure nitrogen and argon plasma in a chamber with parallel-plate electrodes. The effect of the plasma treatment on the cotton samples was investigated with the colorimetric measurements on dyes absorption by a spectrophotometer. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed by using spectrometer with a sensitive CCD camera. We have recorded the evolution of the maximum of the intensity of OH and N2 second positive band lines. Measurement were done with and without samples in the chamber and comparison between the lines intensity was made. The parameters for optimal plasma treatment conditions were determined. Research supported by the MESTD, projects III41011 and ON171037.

  13. Diagnosis of Methane Plasma Generated in an Atmospheric Pressure DBD Micro-Jet by Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-Feng; BIAN Xin-Chao; CHEN Qiang; LIU Fu-Ping; LIU Zhong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis of methane plasma,generated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) microplasma jet with a quartz tube as dielectric material by a 25 kHz sinusoidal ac power source,is conducted by optical emission spectroscopy (OES).The reactive radicals in methane plasma such as CH,C2,and Ha are detected insitu by OES.The possible dissociation mechanism of methane in diluted Ar plasma is deduced from spectra.In addition,the density of CH radical,which is considered as one of the precursors in diamond-like (DLC) film formation,affected by the parameters of input voltage and the feed gas flow rate,is emphasized. With the Boltzmann plots,four Ar atomic spectral lines (located at 675.28nm,687.13nm,738.40nm and 794.82nm,respectively) are chosen to calculate the electron temperature,and the dependence of electron temperature on discharge parameters is also investigated.

  14. Determination of the electron energy distribution function of a low temperature plasma from optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodt, Dirk Hilar

    2009-01-05

    The experimental determination of the electron energy distribution of a low pressure glow discharge in neon from emission spectroscopic data has been demonstrated. The spectral data were obtained with a simple overview spectrometer and analyzed using a strict probabilistic, Bayesian data analysis. It is this Integrated Data Analysis (IDA) approach, which allows the significant extraction of non-thermal properties of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The results bear potential as a non-invasive alternative to probe measurements. This allows the investigation of spatially inhomogeneous plasmas (gradient length smaller than typical probe sheath dimensions) and plasmas with reactive constituents. The diagnostic of reactive plasmas is an important practical application, needed e.g. for the monitoring and control of process plasmas. Moreover, the experimental validation of probe theories for magnetized plasmas as a long-standing topic in plasma diagnostics could be addressed by the spectroscopic method. (orig.)

  15. Shift endpoint trace selection algorithm and wavelet analysis to detect the endpoint using optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zakour, Sihem; Taleb, Hassen

    2016-06-01

    Endpoint detection (EPD) is very important undertaking on the side of getting a good understanding and figuring out if a plasma etching process is done on the right way. It is truly a crucial part of supplying repeatable effects in every single wafer. When the film to be etched has been completely erased, the endpoint is reached. In order to ensure the desired device performance on the produced integrated circuit, many sensors are used to detect the endpoint, such as the optical, electrical, acoustical/vibrational, thermal, and frictional. But, except the optical sensor, the other ones show their weaknesses due to the environmental conditions which affect the exactness of reaching endpoint. Unfortunately, some exposed area to the film to be etched is very low (signal and showing the incapacity of the traditional endpoint detection method to determine the wind-up of the etch process. This work has provided a means to improve the endpoint detection sensitivity by collecting a huge numbers of full spectral data containing 1201 spectra for each run, then a new unsophisticated algorithm is proposed to select the important endpoint traces named shift endpoint trace selection (SETS). Then, a sensitivity analysis of linear methods named principal component analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), and the nonlinear method called wavelet analysis (WA) for both approximation and details will be studied to compare performances of the methods mentioned above. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) is not only computed based on the main etch (ME) period but also the over etch (OE) period. Moreover, a new unused statistic for EPD, coefficient of variation (CV), is proposed to reach the endpoint in plasma etches process.

  16. THE SMARTS MULTI-EPOCH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY ATLAS (SaMOSA): AN ANALYSIS OF EMISSION LINE VARIABILITY IN SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE FERMI BLAZARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isler, Jedidah C. [Chancellor’s Faculty Fellow, Syracuse University, Department of Physics, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Urry, C. M.; Bailyn, C.; Coppi, P.; Brady, M.; MacPherson, E.; Hasan, I.; Buxton, M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Smith, P. S., E-mail: jcisler@syr.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    We present multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of seven southern Fermi-monitored blazars from 2008 to 2013 using the Small and Medium Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS), with supplemental spectroscopy and polarization data from the Steward Observatory. We find that the emission lines are much less variable than the continuum; four of seven blazars had no detectable emission line variability over the 5 yr observation period. This is consistent with photoionization primarily by an accretion disk, allowing us to use the lines as a probe of disk activity. Comparing optical emission line flux with Fermi γ-ray flux and optical polarized flux, we investigate whether relativistic jet variability is related to the accretion flow. In general, we see no such dependence, suggesting that the jet variability is likely caused by internal processes like turbulence or shock acceleration rather than a variable accretion rate. However, three sources showed statistically significant emission line flares in close temporal proximity to very large Fermi γ-ray flares. While we do not have sufficient emission line data to quantitatively assess their correlation with the γ-ray flux, it appears that in some cases the jet might provide additional photoionizing flux to the broad-line region (BLR), which implies that some γ-rays are produced within the BLR, at least for these large flares.

  17. Two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the principles and applications of two-dimensional vibrational and optical spectroscopy techniques. This book provides an account of basic theory required for an understanding of two-dimensional vibrational and electronic spectroscopy.

  18. Theoretical Modeling of Emission-Line galaxies: New Classification Parameters for Mid-Infrared and Optical Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Meléndez, M; Martínez-Paredes, M; Kraemer, S B; Mendoza, C

    2014-01-01

    We have carried out extensive and detailed photoionization modeling to successfully constrain the locations of different emission-line galaxies in optical and mid-infrared diagnostic diagrams. Our model grids cover a wide range in parameter space for the active galaxy continuum and starburst galaxies with different stellar population laws and metallicities. We compare the predicted AGN and star-formation mid-infrared line ratios [Ne III]15.56mm/[Ne II]12.81mm and [O IV]25.89mm/[Ne III]15.56mm to the observed values, and find that the best fit for the AGN is via a two-zone approximation. This two-zone approximation is a combination of a matter-bounded component, where [Ne III] and [O IV] are emitted efficiently, and a radiation-bounded component that maximizes [Ne II] emission. We overlay the predictions from this two-zone approximation onto the optical [O III]l5007/Hbeta and [N II]l6583/Halpha diagnostic diagram derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, to find that the high-density and low-ionization radiat...

  19. Evaluation of Optical Depths and Self-Absorption of Strontium and Aluminum Emission Lines in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfarraj, Bader A; Bhatt, Chet R; Yueh, Fang Yu; Singh, Jagdish P

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a widely used laser spectroscopic technique in various fields, such as material science, forensic science, biological science, and the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In most LIBS work, the analysis is performed using radiative transitions from atomic emissions. In this study, the plasma temperature and the product [Formula: see text] (the number density N and the absorption path length [Formula: see text]) were determined to evaluate the optical depths and the self-absorption of Sr and Al lines. A binary mixture of strontium nitrate and aluminum oxide was used as a sample, consisting of variety of different concentrations in powder form. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy spectra were collected by varying various parameters, such as laser energy, gate delay time, and gate width time to optimize the LIBS signals. Atomic emission from Sr and Al lines, as observed in the LIBS spectra of different sample compositions, was used to characterize the laser induced plasma and evaluate the optical depths and self-absorption of LIBS.

  20. Spectroscopy and optical diagnostics for gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanson, Ronald K; Goldenstein, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    This text provides an introduction to the science that governs the interaction of light and matter (in the gas phase). It provides readers with the basic knowledge to exploit the light-matter interaction to develop quantitative tools for gas analysis (i.e. optical diagnostics) and understand and interpret the results of spectroscopic measurements. The authors pair the basics of gas‐phase spectroscopy with coverage of key optical diagnostic techniques utilized by practicing engineers and scientists to measure fundamental flow‐field properties. The text is organized to cover three sub‐topics of gas‐phase spectroscopy: (1) spectral line positions, (2) spectral line strengths, and (3) spectral lineshapes by way of absorption, emission, and scattering interactions. The latter part of the book describes optical measurement techniques and equipment. Key subspecialties include laser induced fluorescence, tunable laser absorption spectroscopy, and wavelength modulation spectroscopy. It is ideal for students an...

  1. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy study of the expansion dynamics of a laser generated plasma during the deposition of thin films by laser ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazio, Enza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the expanding plasma produced by excimer laser ablation of different materials such as silicon, silicon carbide, graphite and tin powder were studied by means of time integrated, spatially resolved emission spectroscopy and fast photography imaging of the expanding plasma. Experiments were performed both in vacuum and in different pure background atmosphere (i.e. oxygen or nitrogen and, finally, in gaseous mixtures (i.e. in O2/Ar and N2/Ar mixtures. These investigations were performed to gather information on the nature of the chemical species present in the plasma and on the occurrence of chemical reactions during the interaction between the plasma and the background gas. Then, we tried to correlate the plasma expansion dynamics to the structural and physical properties of the deposited materials. Experimental results clearly indicate that there is a strong correlation between the plasma expansion dynamics and the structural properties of the deposited thin films. In this respect, the investigations performed by means of fast photography and of optical emission spectroscopy revealed themselves as powerful tools for an efficient control of the deposition process itself.

  3. Study of effect of H2 addition on the production of fluorocarbon radicals in H2/C4F8 inductively coupled plasma via optical emission spectroscopy actinometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Song; Xin Yu; Ning Zhao-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    C4F8 plasma with the addition of H2 is generated by the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method. The relative densities of CF, CF2, H and F radicals are determined by actinometric optical emission spectroscopy (AOES) as a function of the gas flow rate ratio R=H2/(H2+C4F8) at a pressure of 0.8 Pa and an input r.f. power of 400W, while that of HF is measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The results show that plasma activity increases firstly and then decreases with increasing R. As the gas flow rate ratio R changes from 0 to 0.625, relative densities of both CF and CF2 decrease, and the relative [CF] has a similar tendency as the calculated [CF], indicating that CF radicals are generated mainly by the electron impact dissociation of CF2 radicals. Production of HF is also discussed.

  4. Gas phase optical emission spectroscopy during remote plasma chemical vapour deposition of GaN and relation to the growth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corr, Cormac; Boswell, Rod [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Carman, Robert [Physics Department, Macquarie University, North Ryde, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2011-02-02

    A remote plasma chemical vapour deposition (RPCVD) system for the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) thin films is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The intensities of the various excited species in pure nitrogen as well as nitrogen/hydrogen plasmas are correlated with GaN film growth characteristics. We show a correlation between the plasma source spectrum, the downstream spectrum where trimethylgallium is introduced and the GaN film quality. In particular, we investigate the addition of hydrogen, which greatly affects the gas phase species and the GaN film characteristics. OES is demonstrated to be a valuable monitoring tool in a RPCVD system for optimization of GaN growth.

  5. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  6. Emissivity independent optical pyrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl, Dennis Duncan; Kisner, Roger A.

    2017-04-04

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for determining the temperature of an object using an optical pyrometer. Certain embodiments of the disclosed technology allow for making optical temperature measurements that are independent of the surface emissivity of the object being sensed. In one of the exemplary embodiments disclosed herein, a plurality of spectral radiance measurements at a plurality of wavelengths is received from a surface of an object being measured. The plurality of the spectral radiance measurements is fit to a scaled version of a black body curve, the fitting comprising determining a temperature of the scaled version of the black body curve. The temperature is then output. The present disclosure is not to be construed as limiting and is instead directed toward all novel and nonobvious features and aspects of the various disclosed embodiments, alone or in various combinations and subcombinations with one another.

  7. In situ diagnosis of pulsed UV laser surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal by using laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Wei, Yunrong; Huang, Feng; Dong, Jingxing; Liu, Jingru

    2001-12-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal with pulsed UV laser has been in situ diagnosed by using the technique of laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy. The dependence of emission intensity of cobalt lines on number of laser shots was investigated at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2. As a comparison, the reliance of emission intensity of cobalt lines as a function of laser pulse number by using pure cobalt as ablation sample was also studied at the same laser condition. It was found that for surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2, the intensities of cobalt lines fell off dramatically in the first 300 consecutive laser shots and then slowed down to a low stable level with even more shots. For surface ablation of pure cobalt at the same laser condition, the intensities of cobalt lines remained constant more or less even after 500 laser shots and then reduced very slowly with even more shots. It was concluded that selective evaporation of cobalt at this laser fluence should be responsible for the dramatic fall-off of cobalt lines with laser shots accumulation for surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal. In contrast, for surface ablation of pure cobalt, the slow reduction of cobalt lines with pulse number accumulation should be due to the formation of laser-induced crater effect.

  8. Diagnosis of the local thermal equilibrium by optical emission spectroscopy in the evolution of electric discharge; Diagnostico del equilibrio termico local por espectroscopia optica de emision en la evolucion de una descarga electrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdivia B, R.; Pacheco S, J.; Pacheco P, M.; Ramos F, F.; Cruz A, A. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Velazquez P, S. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho la Virgen, Metepec 52140, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this work applies the technique of optical emission spectroscopy to diagnose the temperature of the species generated in plasma in the transition to glow discharge arc. Whit this diagnosis is possible to determine the local thermal equilibrium conditions of the discharge. (Author)

  9. Measurement of Electron Density Using the Multipole Resonance Probe, Langmuir Probe and Optical Emission Spectroscopy in Low Pressure Plasmas with Different Electron Energy Distribution Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberberg, Moritz; Bibinov, Nikita; Ries, Stefan; Awakowicz, Peter; Institute of Electrical Engineering; Plasma Technology Team

    2016-09-01

    In recently publication, the young diagnostic tool Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP) for electron density measurements was introduced. It is based on active plasma resonance spectroscopy (APRS). The probe was simulated und evaluated for different devices. The geometrical and electrical symmetry simplifies the APRS model, so that the electron density can be easily calculated from the measured resonance. In this work, low pressure nitrogen mixture plasmas with different electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) are investigated. The results of the MRP measurement are compared with measurements of a Langmuir Probe (LP) and Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). Probes and OES measure in different regimes of kinetic electron energy. Both probes measure electrons with low kinetic energy (<10 eV), whereas the OES is influenced by electrons with high kinetic energy which are needed for transitions of molecule bands. By the determination of the absolute intensity of N2(C-B) and N2+(B-X)electron temperature and density can be calculated. In a non-maxwellian plasma, all plasma diagnostics need to be combined.

  10. Heterogeneity in optical properties of near white-light emissive europium complex species revealed by spectroscopy of single nanoaggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfanullah, Mir; Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Chulliyil, Ramya; Layek, Arunasish; De, Suman; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-01-01

    Photoluminescence microscopy has been used to interrogate individual nanoaggregates (NAs) of visible light excitable Eu(III)-complex species with 9-hydroxyphenalenone which we found to emit near-white light in methanol. In the solid state however, NAs display diverse emission spectra due to varied sensitization efficiencies, and thereby exhibit a wide range of emission colours. Heterogeneity in sensitization efficiency and asymmetry ratios for Eu-emission is intriguing because all measurable photoluminescence parameters are expected to average out over large number of Eu-complex species which constitute NAs, and suggests the existence of relatively few yet efficient Eu3+ radiative trap centres of varied asymmetry within NAs.

  11. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  12. Laser-induced Fluorescence and Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the Determination of Reactive Species in the Effluent of Atmospheric Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xuekai; Razavi, Hamid; Lu, Xinpei; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    OH radicals and O atoms are important active species in various applications of room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet (RT-APPJ). So the determination of absolute density of OH radicals and O atoms in RT-APPJs is necessary. In this work, the time and spatially resolved OH radicals density of a RT-APPJ are measured using the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology. In addition, the spatial distribution of the emitting species along the axial direction of the jet is of interest and is measured using optical emission spectroscopy. The absolute OH density of the RT-APPJ is about 2.0 × 1013 cm-3 at 5 mm away from the plasma jet nozzle and 1 μs after the discharge. The OH density reaches a maximum when H2O concentration in helium gas flow is about 130ppm. In order to control the OH density, the effect of voltage polarity, applied voltage magnitude, pulse frequency, pulse width on the OH density are also investigated and discussed. O atoms are investigated by TA-LIF. It is demonstrated that the O atoms density reaches a maximum when O2 percent is about 0.3% in pure He and the lifetime of O atoms in RT-APPJ is much longer (up to dozens of ms) than OH radicals.

  13. In-situ optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic of plasma ignition impact on crystalline silicon passivation by a-Si:H films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddeb, Hosny; Bearda, Twan; Abdulraheem, Yaser; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem; Gordon, Ivan; Szlufcik, Jozef; Poortmans, Jef

    2016-08-01

    The influence of the plasma ignition condition during PECVD deposition from a silane/hydrogen mixture on the amorphous silicon passivation of crystalline silicon surface is investigated. The changes in this process step mainly consist in varying the power density for very brief durations in between 1 s and 3 s. We find that the ignition phase contributes significantly in the film growth, especially in the a-Si:H/c-Si interface formation. In particular, the deposition rate increases with ignition power density. TEM cross-section inspection presents a rougher a-Si:H/c-Si interface with higher plasma power and thus, a tendency for nano-clusters formation caused by the crystalline nature of the substrate. In-situ plasma diagnostics reveal the gradual raise up of IHa*/ISiH* with the power density leading to worse SiH* abstraction to the surface. Whereas, time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy explains the possible recombination mechanism in the plasma due to higher-silane related reactive species (HSRS) formation via polymerization reactions. Our results point out that the ignition conditions with a rather low power for longer time give the best passivation, resulting an effective lifetime up to 9 ms.

  14. Temperature measurement of plasma-assisted flames: comparison between optical emission spectroscopy and 2-color laser induced fluorescence techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate thermometry of highly reactive environments, such as plasma-assisted combustion, is challenging. With the help of conical laminar premixed methane-air flames, this study compares two thermometry techniques for the temperature determination in a combustion front enhanced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) plasma discharges. Based on emission spectroscopic analysis, the results show that the rotational temperature of CH(A) gives a reasonable estimate for the adiabatic flame temperature, only for lean and stoichiometric conditions. The rotational temperature of N2(C) is found to significantly underestimate the flame temperature. The 2-color OH-PLIF technique gives correct values of the flame temperature.

  15. Time-Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy Diagnosis of CO2 Laser-Produced SnO2 Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hui; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-09-01

    The spectral emission and plasma parameters of SnO2 plasmas have been investigated. A planar ceramic SnO2 target was irradiated by a CO2 laser with a full width at half maximum of 80 ns. The temporal behavior of the specific emission lines from the SnO2 plasma was characterized. The intensities of Sn I and Sn II lines first increased, and then decreased with the delay time. The results also showed a faster decay of Sn I atoms than that of Sn II ionic species. The temporal evolutions of the SnO2 plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) were deduced. The measured temperature and density of SnO2 plasma are 4.38 eV to 0.5 eV and 11.38×1017 cm-3 to 1.1×1017 cm-3, for delay times between 0.1 μs and 2.2 μs. We also investigated the effect of the laser pulse energy on SnO2 plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11304235) and the Director Fund of WNLO

  16. In-situ optical emission spectroscopy for a better control of hybrid sputtering/evaporation process for the deposition of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posada, Jorge; Jubault, Marie [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, UMR 7174, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Bousquet, Angélique; Tomasella, Eric [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institute of Chemistry of Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF), CNRS-UMR 6296, 24 Avenue des Landais, 63171 Aubière (France); Lincot, Daniel [Institute of Research and Development on Photovoltaic Energy (IRDEP), EDF-CNRS-Chimie ParisTech, UMR 7174, 6 Quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France)

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we have developed a hybrid one-step co-sputtering/evaporation Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) process, where Cu, In and Ga are sputtered simultaneously with the thermal evaporation of selenium, thus avoiding the H{sub 2}Se use. An appropriate control of the selenium flux is very important to prevent the target poisoning and hence some material flux variations. Indeed, the control of the CIGS composition must be rigorous to ensure reproducible solar cell properties. In this regard, a study of the correlations between plasma species and thin film composition, structure and morphology has been performed by varying power values and Se evaporation temperature in the 170 to 230 °C range. We started by studying the plasma with a powerful technique: optical emission spectroscopy, following light emissions from different plasma species: sputtered Cu, Ga, In but also evaporated Se. Hence, we determined the Se flow threshold avoiding target poisoning and the main parameter controlling the CIGS composition. Obviously, we also focused our interest on the material. We measured film composition and thickness of the samples with X-ray fluorescence and by energy dispersive X-ray. Different phases formed during the process were identified by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The optoelectronic cell properties showed promising efficiency of 10.3% for an absorber with composition ratios of [Cu]/([In] + [Ga]) = 1.02 and [Ga]/([In] + [Ga]) = 0.44. Finally, this work shows that we are able to control this hybrid process and thus the structure and composition of CIGS thin film for industrial transfer in the photovoltaic field. - Highlights: • We have developed a hybrid one-step co-sputtering/evaporation Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} process. • Correlations between plasma species and thin film composition have been performed. • We determined the Se flow threshold avoiding target poisoning. • Efficient small-area CIGS cells with 10.3% efficiency were fabricated.

  17. Using optical nanofibers for spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Fernandez, R; Bruse, F; Dan, C; Karapetyan, K; Rehband, O; Stiebeiner, A; Wiedemann, U; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We review our recent progress in the production and characterization of tapered optical fibers with a sub-wavelength diameter waist. Such fibers exhibit a pronounced evanescent field and are therefore a useful tool for highly sensitive evanescent wave spectroscopy of adsorbates on the fiber waist or of the medium surrounding. We use a carefully designed flame pulling process that allows us to realize preset fiber diameter profiles. In order to determine the waist diameter and to verify the fiber profile, we employ scanning electron microscope measurements and a novel accurate in situ optical method based on harmonic generation. We use our fibers for linear and non-linear absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy of surface-adsorbed organic molecules and investigate their agglomeration dynamics. Furthermore, we apply our spectroscopic method to quantum dots on the surface of the fiber waist and to caesium vapor surrounding the fiber. Finally, towards dispersive measurements, we present our first results on buil...

  18. Time-resolved OES of nanosecond pulsed discharges in N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/H$_{2}$O mixtures]{Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/H$_{2}$O mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, R M; van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, nanosecond pulsed discharges in N$_{2}$ and N$_{2}$/0.9% H$_{2}$O at atmospheric pressure (at 300 K) are studied with time-resolved imaging, optical emission spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering. A 170 ns high voltage pulse is applied across two pin-shaped electrodes at a frequency of 1 kHz. The discharge consists of three phases: an ignition phase, a spark phase and a recombination phase. During the ignition phase the emission is mainly caused by molecular nitrogen (N$_{2}$(C-B)). In the spark and recombination phase mainly atomic nitrogen emission is observed. The emission when H$_{2}$O is added is very similar, except the small contribution of H$_{\\alpha}$ and the intensity of the molecular N$_{2}$(C-B) emission is less.

  19. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  20. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  1. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena-Diaz, M; Ponce, L; Arronte, M; Flores, T [Laboratorio TecnologIa Laser, CICATA-IPN, Unidad Altamira, Carretera Tampico-Puerto Ind. Altamira, 89600, TAMPS (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  2. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  3. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy compared with conventional plasma optical emission techniques for the analysis of metals - A review of applications and analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson, A.

    2017-08-01

    This review is focused on a comparison of LIBS with the two most common plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) techniques for analysis of metals; spark OES and glow discharge (GD) OES. It is shown that these two techniques have only minor differences in analytical performance. An important part of the paper reviews a direct comparison of the analytical figures of merit for bulk analysis of steels using spark and LIBS sources. The comparison was carried out using one instrument with interchangeable sources, eliminating differences related to the optical system and detectors. It was found that the spark provides slightly better analytical figures of merit. The spark analysis is considerably faster, the simple design of the spark stand has enabled complete automation, both properties of great importance in the metallurgical industry for routine analysis. The analysis of non-metallic inclusions (NMI) with spark and LIBS is presented, in the case of the spark this has become known as Pulse Distribution Analysis (PDA). A very significant difference between the techniques is that the electrical spark typically evaporates 100 times more material than a single laser pulse, resulting in complete evaporation of an NMI present in the evaporated metal. The major advantage of LIBS is that it is localised with very good lateral resolution. The major advantages of spark is that it is much faster (can be done simultaneous with the bulk analysis) and easier to quantify. Compositional Depth Profiling (CDP) is compared for GD-OES and LIBS. It is shown that for applications where GD-OES is well suited, e.g. coated metallic sheet, GD-OES still performs slightly better than LIBS. Similar to the case of NMI analysis, the major advantage of LIBS is the great lateral resolution. This allows elemental surface mapping, as well as CDP of very small areas on μm scale. One further advantage of LIBS is that samples of almost any material, shape and size can be analysed, whereas GD-OES has

  4. Challenges in Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepa, Sarah; Berger, Birk; Schulze, Julian; Schuengel, Edmund; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models (CRMs) are widely used to investigate plasma properties such as electron density, electron temperature and the form of the electron energy distribution function. In this work an extensive CRM for argon is presented, which models 30 excited states and various kinds of processes including electron impact excitation/de-excitation, radiation and radiation trapping. The CRM is evaluated in several test cases, i.e. inductively and capacitively coupled plasmas at various pressures, powers/voltages and gas admixtures. Deviations are found between modelled and measured spectra. The escape factor as a means of describing radiation trapping is discussed as well as the cross section data for electron impact processes. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  5. Self-Powered Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    publications, 1 more in preparation, 1 archival conference paper, and 2 invention disclosures . 15. SUBJECT TERMS spectroscopy, nanoparticles, medical...name and address of the organization(s) financially responsible for and monitoring the work. 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S). Enter, if...analyzing  the  chemical  composition  of  many   materials :  the  interaction  of  optical  photons   with  the  underlying

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy with multi-kHz fibre laser for mobile metal analysis tasks — A comparison of different analysis methods and with a mobile spark-discharge optical emission spectroscopy apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharun, Michael, E-mail: michael.scharun@ilt.fraunhofer.de [RWTH Aachen University, Chair for Laser Technology, Steinbachstraße 15, Aachen (Germany); Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Noll, Reinhard [Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Steinbachstraße 15, Aachen (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    The identification and separation of different alloys are a permanent task of crucial importance in the metal recycling industry. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers important advantages in comparison to the state-of-the-art techniques for this application. For LIBS measurement no additional sample preparation is necessary. The overall analysis time is much smaller than for the state-of-the-art techniques. The LIBS setup presented in this study enables mobile operation with a handheld probe for the analysis of metallic materials. Excitation source is a fibre laser with a repetition rate of 30 kHz and a pulse energy of 1.33 mJ. The compact optical setup allows measurements at almost every point of a sample within 5 ms. The generated plasma light is analysed using a Multi-CCD spectrometer. The broad spectral coverage and high resolution provide an outstanding amount of spectroscopic information thereby enabling a variety of calibration approaches. Using a set of Al-based and a set of Fe-based samples the analytical performance of uni- and multivariate calibrations is evaluated. The same sample sets are analysed with a commercial state-of-the-art spark-discharge optical emission spectrometer allowing an assessment of the achieved results. Even though the possible analytical correctness of the fibre laser based LIBS measurements is found to similar or even better than that of the conventional technique, advantages of the multivariate data evaluation have not yet been realised in the investigations. However, due to the in situ sample preparation and short measurement times, fibre-laser based LIBS offers superior features. - Highlights: • Mobile, hand-guided LIBS apparatus for metal analysis, even for steel • Comparable results as state-of-the-art SD-OES instrument • New sectioned calibration function resulting in smaller deviations • Comparison of univariate and multivariate analysis methods.

  7. Environmental biomonitoring of essential and toxic elements in human scalp hair using accelerated microwave-assisted sample digestion and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumakli, Hope; Duncan, A'ja V; McDaniel, Kiara; Mehari, Tsdale F; Stephenson, Jamira; Maple, Lareisha; Crawford, Zaria; Macemore, Calvin L; Babyak, Carol M; Fakayode, Sayo O

    2017-05-01

    Human scalp hair samples were collected and used to assess exposure to toxic elements and essential elements in the state of North Carolina, USA using accelerated microwave assisted acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The figures-of-merit of the ICP-OES were appropriate for elemental analysis in scalp hair with detection limits as low as 0.0001 mg/L for Cd, good linearity (R(2) > 0.9978), and percent recoveries that ranged from 96 to 106% for laboratory-fortified-blanks and 88-112% for sample spike recovery study. The concentrations of essential elements in scalp hair were larger than those of toxic elements, with Ca having the highest average concentration (3080 μg/g, s = 14,500, n = 194). Some of the maximum concentrations observed for As (65 μg/g), Ni (331 μg/g), Cd (2.96 μg/g), and Cr (84.6 μg/g) in individual samples were concerning, however. Samples were statistically analyzed to determine the influence of race, gender, smoking habits, or age on the elemental concentrations in scalp hair. Higher concentrations of essential elements were observed in the scalp hair of Caucasians, females, and non-smokers, and the differences were often significant at a 90% confidence level. Several pairs of essential elements, for example Ca-K, Ca-Mg, and Ca-Zn, were strongly correlated in Caucasian hair but uncorrelated in African-American hair. Similarly, essential elements were strongly correlated in female hair but weakly correlated in male hair. Toxic element pairs (As-Cd, As-Se, Pb-As, and Se-Cd) were strongly correlated in the hair of smokers but uncorrelated in that of non-smokers, suggesting that cigarette smoke is a common source of toxic elements in humans. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Correlated optical and gamma emissions from GRB 081126

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Alain; Atteia, J L; Boër, Michel; Coward, David M; Imerito, Alan C

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of time-resolved optical emissions observed from the gamma-ray burst GRB 081126 during the prompt phase. The analysis employed time-resolved photometry using optical data obtained by the TAROT telescope, using BAT data from the Swift spacecraft, and time-resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the GBM instrument onboard the Fermi spacecraft. The optical emission of GRB 081126 is found to be compatible with the second gamma emission pulse shifted by a positive time lag of 8.4 $\\pm$ 3.9 s. This is the first well-resolved observation of a time lag between optical and gamma emissions during a gamma-ray burst. Our observations could potentially provide new constraints on the fireball model for gamma-ray burst early emissions. Furthermore, observations of time lags between optical and gamma ray photons provides an exciting opportunity to constrain quantum gravity theories.

  9. Optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe II emission is strong while [O III] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad Hβ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad Hβ component of 4C 12.50 is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  10. Optical Spectroscopy of Four Young Radio Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Xu-Liang; Hu, Chen; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    We report the optical spectroscopy of four young radio sources which are observed with the Lijiang 2.4m telescope. The Eddington ratios of these sources are similar with those of narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). Their Fe {\\sc ii} emission is strong while [O {\\sc iii}] strength is weak. These results confirm the NLS1 features of young radio sources, except that the width of broad H$\\beta$ of young radio sources is larger than that of NLS1s. We thus suggest that the young radio sources are the high black hole mass counterparts of steep-spectrum radio-loud NLS1s. In addition, the broad H$\\beta$ component of \\astrobj{4C 12.50} is the blue wing of the narrow component, but not from the broad line region.

  11. Measurement of total site mercury emissions from a chlor-alkali plant using ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy and cell room roof-vent monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Eben D.; Secrest, Cary; Hall, Eric S.; Lee Jones, Donna; Shores, Richard C.; Modrak, Mark; Hashmonay, Ram; Norwood, Phil

    This technical note describes a United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) measurement project to determine elemental mercury (Hg 0) emissions from a mercury cell chlor-alkali (MCCA) facility in the southeastern U.S. during a 53-day monitoring campaign in the fall of 2006. The optical remote sensing (ORS) area source measurement method EPA OTM 10 was used to provide Hg 0 flux data for the site. These results are reported and compared with cell room roof-vent monitoring data acquired by the facility for similar time periods. The 24-h extrapolated mercury emission rate estimates determined by the two monitoring approaches are shown to be similar with overall averages in the 400 g day -1 range with maximum values around 1200 g day -1. Results from the OTM 10 measurements, which include both cell room emissions and potential fugitive sources outside the cell room, are shown to be approximately 10% higher than cell room monitoring results indicating that fugitive emissions from outside the cell room produce a small but measurable effect for this site.

  12. Making use of x-ray optical effects in photoelectron-, Auger electron-, and x-ray emission spectroscopies: Total reflection, standing-wave excitation, and resonant effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.-H. [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Gray, A. X. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kaiser, A. M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Peter Grunberg Institute, PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mun, B. S. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Gyeonggi 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Sell, B. C. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Physics, Otterbein College, Westerville, Ohio 43081 (United States); Kortright, J. B. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Fadley, C. S. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94740 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2013-02-21

    We present a general theoretical methodology and related open-access computer program for carrying out the calculation of photoelectron, Auger electron, and x-ray emission intensities in the presence of several x-ray optical effects, including total reflection at grazing incidence, excitation with standing-waves produced by reflection from synthetic multilayers and at core-level resonance conditions, and the use of variable polarization to produce magnetic circular dichroism. Calculations illustrating all of these effects are presented, including in some cases comparisons to experimental results. Sample types include both semi-infinite flat surfaces and arbitrary multilayer configurations, with interdiffusion/roughness at their interfaces. These x-ray optical effects can significantly alter observed photoelectron, Auger, and x-ray intensities, and in fact lead to several generally useful techniques for enhancing surface and buried-layer sensitivity, including layer-resolved densities of states and depth profiles of element-specific magnetization. The computer program used in this study should thus be useful for a broad range of studies in which x-ray optical effects are involved or are to be exploited in next-generation surface and interface studies of nanoscale systems.

  13. Optical and X-ray emission spectroscopy of high-power laser-induced dielectric breakdown in molecular gases and their mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babankova, Dagmar; Civis, Svatopluk; Juha, Libor; Bittner, Michal; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skala, Jirí; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Ryć, Leszek; Sedivcova, Tereza

    2006-11-09

    Large-scale plasma was created in molecular gases (CO, CO2, N2, H2O) and their mixtures by high-power laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB). Compositions of the mixtures used are those suggested for the early earth's atmosphere of neutral and/or mildly reducing character. Time-integrated optical spectra emitted from the laser spark have been measured and analyzed. The spectra of the plasma generated in the CO-containing mixtures are dominated by emission of both C2 and CN radicals. A vibrational temperature of approximately 10(4) K was determined according to an intensity distribution in a vibronic structure of the CN (B2Sigma(+)u-X2Sigma(+)g) violet band. For comparison, the NH3-CH4-H2-H2O mixture has been irradiated as a model of the strongly reducing version of the early earth's atmosphere. In this mixture, excited CN seems to be significantly less abundant than C2. The LIDB experiments were in the molecular gases carried out not only in the static cell but also using a large, double stream pulse jet (gas puff target) placed in the vacuum interaction chamber. The obtained soft X-ray emission spectra indicate the presence of highly charged atomic ions in the hot core of high-power laser sparks.

  14. Deep spectroscopy of the FUV-optical emission lines from a sample of radio galaxies at z~2.5: metallicity and ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Humphrey, A; Vernet, J; Fosbury, R; Alighieri, S di Serego; Binette, L

    2007-01-01

    We present long-slit NIR spectra, obtained using the ISAAC instrument at the Very Large Telescope, for nine radio galaxies at z~2.5. One-dimensional spectra have been extracted and cross calibrated with optical spectra from the literature to produce line spectra spanning a rest wavelength of ~1200-7000 A. We have also produced a composite of the rest-frame UV-optical line fluxes of powerful, z~2.5 radio galaxies. We have investigated the relative strengths of Ly-alpha, H-beta, H-alpha, HeII 1640 and HeII 4687, and we find that Av can vary significantly from object to object. In addition, we identify new line ratios to calculate electron temperature: [NeV] 1575/[NeV] 3426, [NeIV] 1602/[NeIV] 2423, OIII] 1663/[OIII] 5008 and [OII] 2471/[OII]3728. We model the emission line spectra and conclude they are best explained by AGN-photoionization with the ionization parameter U varying between objects. Single slab photoionization models are unable to reproduce the high- and the low-ionization lines simultaneously: thi...

  15. On the use of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy to characterize the naturally existing crystal in Pakistan and its optical emission spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Javed; Mahmood, S.; Tufail, Iram; Asghar, H.; Ahmed, R.; Baig, M.A., E-mail: baig@qau.edu.pk

    2015-09-01

    We have used the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopic (LIBS) technique to qualitatively identify the naturally existing transparent crystal as a pure quartz (SiO{sub 2}) by observing its optical emission spectra using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, fundamental wavelength at 1064 nm and second harmonic at 532 nm. The spectra were registered using a set of five miniature spectrometers covering the spectral range from 200 nm to 720 nm. The plasma temperature has been calculated in the range from 8500 K to 10,200 K and the electron densities determined from the Stark broadened spectral lines in the range of 1.0 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} to 6.0 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. We report here the full widths at maximum of the spectral lines associated with the 3p4s {sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2} → 3p{sup 23}P{sub 0,1,2}, {sup 1}S{sub 0}, {sup 1}D{sub 2} transitions in Si and four multiplets of singly ionized silicon. - Highlights: • Characterization of naturally existing transparent crystal as pure quartz (SiO{sub 2}) using LIBS. • Determination of plasma parameters and full width at half maximum of the neutral and singly ionized silicon lines. • Confirmation of optically thin plasma validity of LTE.

  16. The Enhanced Effect of Optical Emission from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of an Al-Li Alloy in the Presence of Magnetic Field Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Hai, Ran; Wu, Ding; Xiao, Qingmei; Sun, Liying; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the influence of magnetic field strength on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated for various pressures. The plasma plume was produced by employing Q-switch Nd:YAG laser ablation of an Al-Li alloy operating at a 1064 nm wavelength. The results indicated that the LIBS intensity of the Al and Li emission lines is boosted with an increase of magnetic strength. Typically, the intensity of the Al I and Li I spectral emissions can be magnified by 1.5-3 times in a steady magnetic field of 1.1 T compared with the field-free case. Also, in this investigation we recorded time-resolved images of the laser-produced plume by employing a fast ICCD camera. The results show that the luminance of the plasma is enhanced and the time of persistence is increased significantly, and the plasma plume splits into two lobes in the presence of a magnetic field. The probable reason for the enhancement is the magnetic confinement effect which increases the number density of excited atoms and the population of species in a high energy state. In addition, the electron temperature and density are also augmented by the magnetic field compared to the field-free case. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB109005) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175035), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ768), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Nos. DUT12ZD(G)01, (DUT14ZD(G)04), MMLab Research Project (DP1051208)

  17. Plant species discrimination using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Gilles; Gerhards, Max; Schlerf, Martin; Hecker, Christoph; Udelhoven, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Discrimination of plant species in the optical reflective domain is somewhat limited by the similarity of their reflectance spectra. Spectral characteristics in the visible to shortwave infrared (VSWIR) consist of combination bands and overtones of primary absorption bands, situated in the Thermal Infrared (TIR) region and therefore resulting in broad spectral features. TIR spectroscopy is assumed to have a large potential for providing complementary information to VSWIR spectroscopy. So far, in the TIR, plants were often considered featureless. Recently and following advances in sensor technology, plant species were discriminated based on specific emissivity signatures by Ullah et al. (2012) using directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements in the laboratory. Here we examine if an accurate discrimination of plant species is equally possible using emissive thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy, an explicit spatial technique that is faster and more flexible than non-imaging measurements. Hyperspectral thermal infrared images were acquired in the 7.8⿿11.56 μm range at 40 nm spectral resolution (@10 μm) using a TIR imaging spectrometer (Telops HyperCam-LW) on seven plants each, of eight different species. The images were radiometrically calibrated and subjected to temperature and emissivity separation using a spectral smoothness approach. First, retrieved emissivity spectra were compared to laboratory reference spectra and then subjected to species discrimination using a random forest classifier. Second, classification results obtained with emissivity spectra were compared to those obtained with VSWIR reflectance spectra that had been acquired from the same leaf samples. In general, the mean emissivity spectra measured by the TIR imaging spectrometer showed very good agreement with the reference spectra (average Nash-Sutcliffe-Efficiency Index = 0.64). In species discrimination, the resulting accuracies for emissivity spectra are highly dependent on

  18. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  19. Tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) and/or Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-OES) for the analysis of samples of geological interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropeza, D.

    2016-12-01

    A highly innovative laser ablation sampling instrument (J200 Tandem LA - LIBS) that combines the capabilities and analytical benefits of LIBS, LA-ICP-MS and LA-ICP-OES was used for micrometer-scale, spatially-resolved, elemental analysis of a wide variety of samples of geological interest. Data collected using ablation systems consisted of nanosecond (Nd:YAG operated 266nm) and femtosecond lasers (1030 and 343nm). An ICCD LIBS detector and Quadrupole based mass spectrometer were selected for LIBS and ICP-MS detection, respectively. This tandem instrument allows simultaneous determination of major and minor elements (for example, Si, Ca, Na, and Al, and trace elements such as Li, Ce, Cr, Sr, Y, Zn, Zr among others). The research also focused on elemental mapping and calibration strategies, specifically the use of emission and mass spectra for multivariate data analysis. Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) is shown to minimize and compensate for matrix effects in the emission and mass spectra improving quantitative analysis by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS, respectively. The study provides a benchmark to evaluate analytical results for more complex geological sample matrices.

  20. THz Emission Spectroscopy for THz Spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarik Huisman, Thomas; Rasing, Theo

    2017-01-01

    Spintronics is used as the standard for the readout of magnetically stored data and also has commercial applications for writing data. The generation, control and detection of spin-polarized currents, spin-dependent electric transport, and pure spin currents on the subpicosecond (10-12 s) timescale are the next challenges in spintronics. Terahertz (THz, 1012 Hz) emission spectroscopy has proven to be an excellent tool for investigating these challenges. In this short review, we outline the functioning of this spectroscopic technique and its recent applications to spintronics.

  1. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; Yang, Clayton S.-C.; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6 μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10 μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5 μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  2. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-05

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results.

  3. Review of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Rinneberg, Herbert; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy of the female breast is an area of active research. We review the present status of this field and discuss the broad range of methodologies and applications. Starting with a brief overview on breast physiology, the remodeling of vasculature and extracellular matrix caused by solid tumors is highlighted that is relevant for contrast in optical imaging. Then, the various instrumental techniques and the related methods of data analysis and image generation are described and compared including multimodality instrumentation, fluorescence mammography, broadband spectroscopy, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. We review the clinical results on functional properties of malignant and benign breast lesions compared to host tissue and discuss the various methods to improve contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, such as enhanced spectroscopic information, dynamic variations of functional properties, pharmacokinetics of extrinsic contrast agents, including the enhanced permeability and retention effect. We discuss research on monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy and on breast cancer risk assessment as potential clinical applications of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy. Moreover, we consider new experimental approaches, such as photoacoustic imaging and long-wavelength tissue spectroscopy.

  4. Optical & Infrared Spectroscopy of Transiting Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, C. A.; Tinetti, G.

    2010-10-01

    Two types of spectra can be measured from transiting extrasolar planets. The primary eclipse provides a transmission spectra of the exoplanet's limb as the planet passes in front of the star. These data probe the gas and particle composition of the atmosphere, as well as the atmospheric scale height. The secondary eclipse measures the emission of mainly the planet's dayside atmosphere from the planet plus star's emission minus the emission of star alone, when it eclipses the planet. These data probe the temperature and composition structure of the exoplanet. Only in the past 3 years, have infrared transmission and emission spectroscopy revealed the presence of the primary carbon and oxygen species (CH4, CO2, CO, and H2O). Efforts to constrain the abundances of these molecules are hindered by degenerate effects of the temperature and composition in the emission spectra. Transmission spectra, while less sensitive to the atmospheric temperatures, are difficult to interpret because the composition derived depends delicately on the assumed radius at a specified pressure level. This talk will discuss the correlations in the degenerate solutions that result from the radiative transfer analyses of both emission and transmission spectroscopy. The physical implications of these correlations are assessed in order to determine the temperature and composition structure of extrasolar planets, and their significance with respect to the exoplanet's chemistry and dynamics.

  5. Multivariate optical computation for predictive spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M P; Aust, J F; Dobrowolski, J A; Verly, P G; Myrick, M L

    1998-01-01

    A novel optical approach to predicting chemical and physical properties based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed and evaluated using a data set from earlier work. In our approach, a regression vector produced by PCA is designed into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog detector signal that is directly proportional to the chemical/physical property for which the regression vector was designed. This simple optical computational method for predictive spectroscopy is evaluated in several ways, using the example data for numeric simulation. First, we evaluate the sensitivity of the method to various types of spectroscopic errors commonly encountered and find the method to have the same susceptibilities toward error as standard methods. Second, we use propagation of errors to determine the effects of detector noise on the predictive power of the method, finding the optical computation approach to have a large multiplex advantage over conventional methods. Third, we use two different design approaches to the construction of the paired filter set for the example measurement to evaluate manufacturability, finding that adequate methods exist to design appropriate optical devices. Fourth, we numerically simulate the predictive errors introduced by design errors in the paired filters, finding that predictive errors are not increased over conventional methods. Fifth, we consider how the performance of the method is affected by light intensities that are not linearly related to chemical composition (as in transmission spectroscopy) and find that the method is only marginally affected. In summary, we conclude that many types of predictive measurements based on use of regression (or other) vectors and linear mathematics can be performed more rapidly, more effectly, and at considerably lower cost by the proposed optical computation method than by traditional dispersive or interferometric

  6. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  7. Collimating slicer for optical integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Florence; Hénault, François

    2016-07-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that gives simultaneously the spectrum of each spatial sampling element of a given field. It is a powerful tool which rearranges the data cube represented by two spatial dimensions defining the field and the spectral decomposition (x, y, λ) in a detector plane. In IFS, the "spatial" unit reorganizes the field, the "spectral" unit is being composed of a classical spectrograph. For the spatial unit, three main techniques - microlens array, microlens array associated with fibres and image slicer - are used in astronomical instrumentations. The development of a Collimating Slicer is to propose a new type of optical integral field spectroscopy which should be more compact. The main idea is to combine the image slicer with the collimator of the spectrograph mixing the "spatial" and "spectral" units. The traditional combination of slicer, pupil and slit elements and spectrograph collimator is replaced by a new one composed of a slicer and spectrograph collimator only. After testing few configurations, this new system looks very promising for low resolution spectrographs. In this paper, the state of art of integral field spectroscopy using image slicers will be described. The new system based onto the development of a Collimating Slicer for optical integral field spectroscopy will be depicted. First system analysis results and future improvements will be discussed.

  8. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy of three F + B binary stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Bernard W.; Dempsey, Robert C.; Parsons, Sidney B.

    1991-01-01

    Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy is presented for three F + B objects that are members of the first group of strongly interacting, F II + B systems. The data obtained confirm that HD 59771, HD 242257, and CoD -30 5135 are all binary star systems consisting of a luminous F-type component and a B star. Strong, variable H-alpha emission is seen in all the stars. It is found that the UV spectrum of HD 59771 resembles the spectrum of HD 207739. CoD -30 5135 has the most dramatic mid-UV spectrum seen among the scores of observed cool + hot star systems.

  9. Cellular biosensing using optical spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of light with biological cells can provide a unique tool for studying their biophysical properties. Optical spectroscopy of biological cells can reveal detailed information on their structure and dynamics in a way that is not possible with traditional microscopy techniques. Histological evaluation can only obtain a snapshot of the activity of individual cells, relying instead on large ensembles to develop a picture of their temporal evolution. On the other hand optical spectroscopy can be applied to cells with little to no preparation and can enable studies of the same live cells at extended time intervals. Our research group has developed a suite of optical spectroscopic tools to assess the structure and function of biological cells and modulation due to the onset of disease. The wavelength dependence of the interaction of cells with light provides information of cell features through elastic scattering across the visible and near infrared spectrum. Alternatively, the angular dependence of scattered light can also be used to reveal cell properties. We will discuss how both modes of elastic scattering can be used to evaluate cell status. Finally, the recent advances in the use of optical phase imaging to create contrast in nearly transparent biological cells will also be discussed as related to the role of this modality in biosensing.

  10. Adaptive Optics for Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Leroux, Charles Edouard; Derouard, Jacques; Delon, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) yields measurement parameters (number of molecules, diffusion time) that characterize the concentration and kinetics of fluorescent molecules within a supposedly known observation volume. Absolute derivation of concentrations and diffusion constants therefore requires preliminary calibrations of the confocal Point Spread Function with phantom solutions under perfectly controlled environmental conditions. In this paper, we quantify the influence of optical aberrations on single photon FCS and demonstrate a simple Adaptive Optics system for aberration correction. Optical aberrations are gradually introduced by focussing the excitation laser beam at increasing depths in fluorescent solutions with various refractive indices, which leads to drastic depth-dependent bias in the estimated FCS parameters. Aberration correction with a Deformable Mirror stabilizes these parameters within a range of several tens of \\mum into the solution. We also demonstrate, both theoretically...

  11. Process control by optical emission spectroscopy during growth of a-C:H from a CH4 plasma by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barholm-Hansen, C; Bentzon, MD; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    1994-01-01

    of the gas flow. Above a certain flow rate the intensity saturates, since the deposition process is limited by the power input. At low flow rates a large fraction of the feed gas is dissociated and the deposition is limited by the supply of feed gas. A relationship was found for the intensity of the CH 431...... in the process gas. The initial OH intensity was dependent on the ultimate vacuum prior to the plasma cleaning. A correlation was found between the vanishing of the OH line and the appearance of characteristic emission lines From sputtered electrode material....

  12. Optical Antenna Enhanced Spontaneous Emission in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Kevin James

    Optical antennas can be used to dramatically increase the rate that semiconductors spontaneously emit photons. While traditional LEDs are limited in bandwidth due to the "slow" rate of spontaneous emission, antenna-enhanced LEDs have the potential to be a fast, efficient, nanoscale light emitter. Traditionally, lasers have dominated LEDs as the emitter in optical interconnects due to a 200x speed advantage of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission. This paradigm may be reversed by coupling LEDs to optical antennas. In fact, antenna enhanced spontaneous emission can be faster than the fastest stimulated emission. Spontaneous emission originates from dipole fluctuations within the emitting material. The size of these fluctuations is much less than the wavelength of light emission, which leads to slow spontaneous emission. Coupling the material to an optical antenna corrects the size mismatch and improves the rate of radiation. An optical antenna circuit model is developed to predict the degree to which spontaneous emission can be enhanced. The circuit model presented in this dissertation shows that enhancement over 1000x is possible while still maintaining greater than 50% efficiency. The circuit model provides insight how to design optical antennas for coupling to dipole sources, for maximum enhancement, and for high efficiency. A method for incorporating the anomalous skin effect, often overlooked in metal optics, is provided. While FDTD/FEM simulations cannot include this effect due to its nonlocal nature, its impact can be examined through the use of the optical antenna circuit model. Analysis of the tradeoff between achieving large spontaneous emission enhancement and maintaining high efficiency leads to an ideal antenna feedgap size of 10nm. Experimental demonstration of spontaneous emission enhancement from InP coupled to an arch-dipole antenna is presented. Photoluminescence measurements show light emission from antenna-coupled InP over bare InP ridges

  13. Evaluation of conductive polymers as an adsorbent for eradication of As (III from aqueous solution using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Din

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The main focused of this research work is the preparation of conductive polymers like polypyrrole, polyaniline and polythiophene and their application as adsorbent materials for the removal of hyper toxic metal As (III from aqueous solution. The metal ions get attached on the π-electrons at the back bone of polymer that illustrate excellent affinity for metal ions. The adsorption of As (II ions was carried out on polythiophene due to its redox properties and the stronger interaction between sulfur atoms with arsenic atoms. To attain large surface area and for maximum interaction of As (III ions with polymers, the particle size of polymers was ranged in nano scale. As the surface area increases with decrease in particle size, the active sites for metal ions also increases. These polymers were characterized by FIIR spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Adsorption isothermal data was examined by two parameters (Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich and three parameters Redlich-Petrson, Sips and Toth models. Experimental results showed that based on standard deviation (SD and Chi square test (χ2 the experimental data was best explained by Freundlich and Toth isotherm. Thermodynamics parameters such as free energy change (ΔG0, enthalpy change (ΔH0 and entropy change (ΔS0 have been calculated respectively, which revealed the spontaneous, endothermic and feasible nature of adsorption process.   Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  14. Vacuum pump age effects by the exposure to the corrosive gases on the Cr etch rate as observed using optical emission spectroscopy in an Ar/O{sub 2}/Cl{sub 2} mixed plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seolhye; Roh, Hyun-Joon; Jang, Yunchang; Jeong, Sangmin; Ryu, Sangwon; Choe, Jae-Myung; Kim, Gon-Ho, E-mail: ghkim@snu.ac.kr

    2016-03-31

    Vacuum pumps of different ages were used to prepare Cl{sub 2} based plasmas for use in Cr etching. The effects of the vacuum pump age on the etching results were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy analysis. The composition of gas at the base pressure was mainly nitrogen and oxygen, although the ratio depended on the vacuum pump age and therefore, modulated the etch rate in a manner that was difficult to monitor. The effects of the pump age on the etch rate were clearly observed in the Cl{sub 2} plasma-assisted chromium film etching process, in which oxygen and chlorine radicals were responsible for the etching process. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF), which provided a proxy for the thermal equilibrium properties of the etching plasmas, was monitored. The shape of EEDF was derived from an analysis of the optical emission spectral data using an analysis model described previously. Because molecular nitrogen has a higher threshold energy and a larger cross-section of inelastic collisional processes than oxygen, the tail of the EEDF depends on the mixing ratio between nitrogen and oxygen. The various mechanisms that contribute to the chromium etch rate varied with subtle differences in the vacuum conditions, which were determined by age of the turbo molecular pump. The rates at which oxygen and chlorine radicals were generated were estimated using the measured EEDF, and the estimated oxygen radical and etching product contents were verified by comparing the residual gas analyzer data. The results revealed that the residual nitrogen partial pressures in two etchers equipped with either a new or an aged pump differed by 0.18%, and the EEDF tail areas differed by 10{sup −4}. Importantly, the chromium etch rates in these two instruments differed by 30%. These results suggest that the chamber-to-chamber mismatch should be monitored during plasma-assisted device fabrication processes. - Highlights: • We observed the vacuum pump age effect

  15. Optimally enhanced optical emission in laser-induced air plasma by femtosecond double-pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Anmin [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Suyu; Li, Shuchang; Jiang, Yuanfei; Ding, Dajun [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Tingfeng [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Huang, Xuri [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Jin, Mingxing [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China)

    2013-10-15

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, a femtosecond double-pulse laser was used to induce air plasma. The plasma spectroscopy was observed to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to femtosecond single-pulse laser. In particular, the optical emission intensity can be optimized by adjusting the delay time of femtosecond double-pulse. An appropriate pulse-to-pulse delay was selected, that was typically about 50 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, plasma channel, and so on.

  16. Plasma spectroscopy using optical vortex laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Toda, Yasunori; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Shikano, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Laser spectroscopy is a useful tool for nonintrusive plasma diagnostics; it can provide many important quantities in a plasma such as temperature, density, and flow velocity of ions and neutrals from the spectrum obtained by scanning the frequency of narrow bandwidth laser. Obtainable information is, however, limited in principle to the direction parallel to the laser path. The aim of this study is to introduce a Laguerre-Gaussian beam, which is called as optical vortex, in place of a widely used Hermite-Gaussian beam. One of the remarkable properties of the Laguerre-Gaussian beam is that it carries an angular momentum in contrast to the Hermite-Gaussian beam. It follows that particles in the laser beam feel the Doppler effect even in the transverse direction of the laser path. Therefore it is expected that the limitation imposed by the laser path can be overcome by using an optical vortex laser. The concept of optical vortex spectroscopy, the development of the laser system, and some preliminary results of a proof-of-principle experiment will be presented. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25287152.

  17. Polarized light in optics and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kliger, David S

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive introduction to polarized light provides students and researchers with the background and the specialized knowledge needed to fully utilize polarized light. It provides a basic introduction to the interaction of light with matter for those unfamiliar with photochemistry and photophysics. An in-depth discussion of polarizing optics is also given. Different analytical techniques are introduced and compared and introductions to the use of polarized light in various forms of spectroscopy are provided.Key Features* Starts at a basic level and develops tools for resear

  18. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  19. Determination of Serum Lithium by Flame Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nafissy

    1976-07-01

    Full Text Available Lithum can be de termined both by atomic absorption spectroscopy andflame emission spectroscopy. We have used the later method with a Zeiss Model pMQlI spectro photometer fitt ed with ante-chamber atomizer and a potensiome rric line recorder. Accurate ana lysis for the clement was acco mplished due to a sophisracared measuring instrument.

  20. Spectroscopy of Optical Excitations in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingzhong

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the optical spectra and electronic excited state dynamics of carbon naotubes is important both for fundamental research and a wide variety of potential applications. In this presentation, we will report the results of a systematic study on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) obtained by utilizing complementary femtosecond spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence up-conversion, frequency-resolved transient absorption, and three-pulse photon echo peakshift (3PEPS) spectroscopy. Our efforts have focused on optically selective detection of the spectra and dynamics associated with structurally distinct semiconducting SWNT species. Using individual nanotube enriched micelle-dispersed SWNT preparations, in combination with resonant excitation and detection, has enabled us to independently access selected species, such as the (8,3), (6,5), (7,5), (11,0), (7,6) and (9,5) nanotubes. We will discuss the following topics: (1) the excitonic nature of the elementary excitation and its unambiguous identification from direct determination of the exciton binding energy for a selected semiconducting nanotube, the (8,3) tube; (2) the spectroscopic and dynamical signatures of exciton-exciton annihilation and its predominant role in governing ultrafast excited state relaxation; (3) the annihilation-concomitant exciton dissociation and the spectroscopic and dynamic features of the resulting electron-hole continuum; (4) timescales characterizing the ultrafast thermalization processes. In addition, we will demonstrate the power of 3PEPS spectroscopy to elucidate the spectral properties and dynamics of SWNTs. This work was supported by the NSF.

  1. HOMES - Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HOMES (Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy) is a space telescope designed for exoplanet discovery. Its double dispersion architecture employs a...

  2. Optical Biopsy Using Tissue Spectroscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman S Nishioka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Optical biopsy’ or ‘optical diagnostics’ is a technique whereby light energy is used to obtain information about the structure and function of tissues without disrupting them. In fluorescence spectroscopy, light energy (usually provided by a laser is used to excite tissues and the resulting fluorescence provides information about the target tissue. Its major gastrointestinal application has been in the evaluation of colonic polyps, in which it can reliably distinguish malignant from benign lesions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT has been used in the investigation of Barrett’s epithelium (and dysplasia, although a variety of other applications are feasible. For example, OCT could assist in the identification and staging of mucosal and submucosal neoplasms, the grading of inflammation in the stomach and intestine, the diagnosis of biliary tumours and the assessment of villous architecture. OCT differs from endoscopic ultrasound, a complementary modality, in that it has a much higher resolution but lesser depth of penetration. The images correlate with the histopathological appearance of tissues, and the addition of Doppler methods may enable it to evaluate the vascularity of tumours and the amount of blood flow in varices. Refinements in these new optical techniques will likely make them valuable in clinical practice, although their specific roles have yet to be determined.

  3. Spectroscopy of unusual emission-line stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1988-01-01

    New spectroscopic observations are reported for ten stars that have been identified in the literature as having H-alpha emission with suspected F, G, or K spectral types. Three of the stars are shown to be BE stars, two are confirmed as early-type supergiants, three show composite (F or K + B) spectra, one is a 'post-T Tauri' star, and one is an ordinary F star without emission.

  4. Optical Reflection Spectroscopy of GEO Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Cardona, Tammaso; Lederer, Susan M.; Cowardin, Heather; Abercromby, Kira J.; Barker, Edwin S.; Bedard, Donald

    2013-01-01

    We report on optical reflection spectroscopy of geosynchronous (GEO) objects in the US Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. These observations were obtained using imaging spectrographs on the 6.5-m Magellan telescopes at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. Our goal is to determine the composition of these objects by comparing these spectral observations with ground-based laboratory measurements of spacecraft materials. The observations are all low resolution (1 nm after smoothing) obtained through a 5 arcsecond wide slit and using a grism as the dispersing element. The spectral range covered was from 450 nm to 800 nm. All spectra were flux calibrated using observations of standard stars with the exact same instrumental setup. An effort was made to obtain all observations within a limited range of topocentric phase angle, although the solar incident angle is unknown due to the lack of any knowledge of the attitude of the observed surface at the time of observation.

  5. Analysis of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in tungsten carbide by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer, M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to measure the concentrations of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in solutions of tungsten carbide. The main advantage of the method described here lies...

  6. Optical spectroscopy of SDSS J004054.65-0915268: three possible scenarios for the classification. A z \\sim 5 BL Lacertae, blue FSRQ or a weak emission line quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Landoni, M; Bianco, A; Tavecchio, F; Bonnoli, G; Ghisellini, G

    2015-01-01

    The haunt of high redshift BL Lacerate objects is day by day more compelling, to firmly understand their intrinsic nature and evolution. SDSS J004054.65-0915268 is, at the moment, one of the most distant BL Lac candidate at z \\sim 5 (Plotkin et al 2010). We present a new optical-near IR spectrum obtained with ALFOSC-NOT with a new, custom designed dispersive grating aimed to detect broad emission lines that could disprove this classification. In the obtained spectra we do not detect any emission features and we provide an upper limit to the luminosity of the C IV broad emission line. Therefore, the nature of the object is then discussed, building the overall spectral energy distribution and fitting it with three different models. Our fits, based on the SED modeling with different possible scenarios, cannot rule out the possibility that this source is indeed a BL Lac object although, the absence of optical variability and lack of strong radio flux, they seems to suggest that the observed optical emission origi...

  7. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS J004054.65-0915268: THREE POSSIBLE SCENARIOS FOR THE CLASSIFICATION. A z ∼ 5 BL LACERTAE, A BLUE FSRQ, OR A WEAK EMISSION LINE QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landoni, M.; Zanutta, A.; Bianco, A.; Tavecchio, F.; Bonnoli, G.; Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The haunt of high-redshift BL Lacerate objects is day by day more compelling to firmly understand their intrinsic nature and evolution. SDSS J004054.65-0915268 is, at the moment, one of the most distant BL Lac candidates, at z ∼ 5. We present a new optical-near-IR spectrum obtained with ALFOSC-NOT with a new, custom designed dispersive grating aimed to detect broad emission lines that could disprove this classification. In the obtained spectra, we do not detect any emission features and we provide an upper limit to the luminosity of the C iv broad emission line. Therefore, the nature of the object is then discussed, building the overall spectral energy distribution (SED) and fitting it with three different models. Our fits, based on SED modeling with different possible scenarios, cannot rule out the possibility that this source is indeed a BL Lac object, though the absence of optical variability and the lack of strong radio flux seem to suggest that the observed optical emission originates from a thermalized accretion disk.

  8. [Spectroscopy technique and ruminant methane emissions accurate inspecting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhan-Huan; Guo, Xu-Sheng; Long, Rui-Jun

    2009-03-01

    The increase in atmospheric CH4 concentration, on the one hand through the radiation process, will directly cause climate change, and on the other hand, cause a lot of changes in atmospheric chemical processes, indirectly causing climate change. The rapid growth of atmospheric methane has gained attention of governments and scientists. All countries in the world now deal with global climate change as an important task of reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, but the need for monitoring the concentration of methane gas, in particular precision monitoring, can be scientifically formulated to provide a scientific basis for emission reduction measures. So far, CH4 gas emissions of different animal production systems have received extensive research. The methane emission by ruminant reported in the literature is only estimation. This is due to the various factors that affect the methane production in ruminant, there are various variables associated with the techniques for measuring methane production, the techniques currently developed to measure methane are unable to accurately determine the dynamics of methane emission by ruminant, and therefore there is an urgent need to develop an accurate method for this purpose. Currently, spectroscopy technique has been used and is relatively a more accurate and reliable method. Various spectroscopy techniques such as modified infrared spectroscopy methane measuring system, laser and near-infrared sensory system are able to achieve the objective of determining the dynamic methane emission by both domestic and grazing ruminant. Therefore spectroscopy technique is an important methane measuring technique, and contributes to proposing reduction methods of methane.

  9. Fabrication and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Optical Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redinbo, Gregory Finley

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents the fabrication of buried optical nanostructures in III-V materials by modifying semiconductor quantum wells using an implantation enhanced interdiffusion (IEI) technique. An investigation of the effect of fabrication parameters on the resulting nanostructures is carried out, and the characteristics of the fabricated structures are measured using room temperature and low temperature cathodoluminescence (CL). IEI using protons is reported for the first time in this work and is found to increase the diffusion length of Al in GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum wells. The enhanced diffusion lengths compare favorably to Ga^ {+} IEI studies and the enhanced interdiffusion mechanism is determined to be due to implantation generated point defects. The use of H^{+} IEI for laterally patterning 100-nm optical nanostructures is demonstrated and is found to be limited by the lateral straggle of the light ions during implantation. Optical quantum wires with widths down to 40 nm are fabricated using low energy Ga^{+ } and electron beam lithography generated metal masks on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. Single nanostructures are measured with low temperature CL, and an increasing blue shift of wire emission with decreasing mask size is measured. The lateral extent of intermixing is found to be 30 nm, independent of Ga^{+} implantation energy. Based on a model of emission energy shift, a lateral quantization energy of ~3 meV for carriers is achieved in these structures. Optical nanostructures are also fabricated with direct write IEI using a Ga^{+ } focused ion beam (FIB) and are compared to the quantum wires. A larger effective lateral extent of intermixing of 200 nm is found with the FIB. IEI patterning of strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells is demonstrated and a model of the resulting lateral bandgap profile leads to a lateral defect diffusion length of ~1 mum. Strain enhanced lateral diffusion of defects during IEI cause this length to be substantially larger than that

  10. Time-resolved optical spectroscopy measurements of shocked liquid deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Knudson, M. D.; Carlson, A. L.; Dunham, G. S.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Hanson, D. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2008-10-01

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been used to measure the shock pressure steadiness, emissivity, and temperature of liquid deuterium shocked to 22-90 GPa. The shock was produced using magnetically accelerated flyer plate impact, and spectra were acquired with a suite of four fiber-optic-coupled spectrometers with streak camera detectors. The shock pressure changes by an average of -1.2% over the 10-30 ns cell transit time, determined from the relative changes in the shock front self-emission with time. The shock front reflectivity was measured from 5140Å and 5320Å laser light reflected from the D2 shock. The emissivity inferred from the reflectivity measurements was in reasonably good agreement with quantum molecular dynamics simulation predictions. The spectral radiance wavelength dependence was found to agree well (average normalized χ2=1.6 ) with a Planckian multiplied by the emissivity. The shock front temperature was determined from the emissivity and the wavelength-dependent shock self-emission. Thirty-seven temperature measurements spanning the 22-90 GPa range were accumulated. The large number of temperature measurements enables a comparison of the scatter in the data with expectations for a Gaussian distribution. This facilitates determination of uncertainties that incorporate both apparatus contributions and otherwise unquantified systematic effects that cause self-emission variations from one experiment to another. Agreement between temperatures determined from the absolute spectral radiance and from the relative shape of the spectrum further substantiates the absence of systematic biases. The weighted mean temperature uncertainties were as low as ±3-4% , enabling the discrimination between competing models for the D2 equation of state (EOS). The temperature results agree well with models that predict a maximum compression of ˜4.4 . Softer models that predict approximately sixfold compression are inconsistent with the data to a very high

  11. Optical Spectroscopy of Nano Materials and Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhao

    In this thesis, nanostructures and nanomaterials ranging from 3D to OD will be studied compresively, by using optical methods. Firstly, for 3D and 2D nanomaterials, nanoporous zeolite crystals, such as AFI and AEL are introduced as host materials to accommodate diatomic iodine molecules. Polarized Raman spectroscopy is utilized to identify the two configurations of iodine molecules to stay in the channels of AEL: the lying mode (the bond of the two atoms is parallel to the direction of the channels) and the standing mode (the bond is perpendicular to the direction of the channels). The lying mode and standing mode are switchable and can be well controlled by the amount of water molecules inside the crystal, revealed by both molecule dynamics simulation and experiment observation. With more water molecules inside, iodine molecules choose to stay in the standing mode, while with less water molecules, iodine molecules prefer to lie along the channel. Therefore, the configurations of molecules could be precisely controlled, globally by the surrounding pressure and temperature, and locally by the laser light. Ii is believed that this easy and reversible control of single molecule will be valuable in nanostructured devices, such as molecular sieving or molecular detection. Secondly, for 1D case, the PL spectrum of ZnO nanowire under uniaxial strain is studied. When a ZnO nanowire is bent, besides the lattice constant induced bandgap change on the tensile and compressive sides, there is a piezoelectric field generated along the cross section. This piezoelectric potential, together with the bandgap changes induced by the deformation, will redistribute the electrons excited by incident photons from valence band to conduction band. As a result, the electrons occupying the states at the tensile side will largely outnumbered the ones at the compressive side. Therefore, the PL spectrum we collected at the whole cross section will manifest a redshift, other than the peak

  12. Optical multichannel analyzer techniques for high resolution optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The development of optical multichannel analyzer techniques for UV/VIS spectroscopy is presented. The research focuses on the development of spectroscopic techniques for measuring high resolution spectral lineshape functions from the exciton phosphorescence in H/sub 2/-1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene. It is found that the temperature dependent frequency shifts and widths confirm a theoretical model based on an exchange theory. The exchange of low energy phonon modes which couple with excited state exciton transitions is shown to display the proper temperature dependent behavior. In addition to the techniques for using the optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) to perform low light level target integration, the use of the OMA for capturing spectral information in transient pulsed laser applications is discussed. An OMP data acquisition system developed for real-time signal processng is described. Both hardware and software interfacing considerations for control and data acquisition by a microcomputer are described. The OMA detector is described in terms of the principles behind its photoelectron detection capabilities and its design is compared with other optoelectronic devices.

  13. Optical emission from a small scale model electric arc furnace in 250-600 nm region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, A; Niskanen, J; Tikkala, H; Aksela, H

    2013-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy has been for long proposed for monitoring and studying industrial steel making processes. Whereas the radiative decay of thermal excitations is always taking place in high temperatures needed in steel production, one of the most promising environment for such studies are electric arc furnaces, creating plasma in excited electronic states that relax with intense characteristic emission in the optical regime. Unfortunately, large industrial scale electric arc furnaces also present a challenging environment for optical emission studies and application of the method is not straightforward. To study the usability of optical emission spectroscopy in real electric arc furnaces, we have developed a laboratory scale DC electric arc furnace presented in this paper. With the setup, optical emission spectra of Fe, Cr, Cr2O3, Ni, SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, and MgO were recorded in the wavelength range 250-600 nm and the results were analyzed with the help of reference data. The work demonstrates that using characteristic optical emission, obtaining in situ chemical information from oscillating plasma of electric arc furnaces is indeed possible. In spite of complications, the method could possibly be applied to industrial scale steel making process in order to improve its efficiency.

  14. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  15. Spectroscopy of an unusual emission line M star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Greenstein, Jesse L.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Moderate-resolution spectroscopy of an unusual late-type faint emission-line star, PC 0025 + 0047, is reported. A very strong (greater than 250 A equivalent width) an H-alpha emission line was detected by the present automated line search algorithm. The spectrum was found to have two unresolved emission lines (H-alpha and H-beta) near zero velocity, superposed on the absorption spectrum of a very red M dwarf which has strong K I, and relatively weak bands of TiO. From the weakness of the subordinate lines of Na I (8192 A) and other spectral features, it is inferred that it is definitely a cooler, and probably fainter, analog of LHS 2924. The strength of the emission lines indicates that PC 0025 + 0447 is very young and may be a fading predecessor brown drawf at an estimated M(bol) approaching 14m at a distance of about 60 pc.

  16. Probing Local Environments by Time-Resolved Stimulated Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-resolved stimulated emission spectroscopy was employed to probe the local environment of DASPMI (4-(4-(dimethylaminostyryl-N-methyl-pyridinium iodide in binary solvents of different viscosity and in a sol-gel matrix. DASPMI is one of the molecules of choice to probe local environments, and the dependence of its fluorescence emission decay on viscosity has been previously used for this purpose in biological samples, solid matrices as well as in solution. The results presented in this paper show that time-resolved stimulated emission of DASPMI is a suitable means to probe the viscosity of local environments. Having the advantage of a higher time resolution, stimulated emission can provide information that is complementary to that obtained from fluorescence decay measurements, making it feasible to probe systems with lower viscosity.

  17. Absorption and emission spectroscopy in natural and synthetic corundum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinolo, G.; Palanza, V.; Ledonne, A.; Paleari, A.

    2009-04-01

    In the frame of an extensive project on the optical characterization of the many varieties of corundum (see:www.gemdata.mater.unimib.it ) we reconsidered the current interpretation of the absorption spectra with particular attention to the bands attributed to the IVCT mechanism Fe2+→ Fe3+ and Fe2+→Ti4+. A detailed study was devoted to natural metamorphic and Verneuil synthetic pale blue sapphires . In that paper (I.Fontana et al 2008) we gave experimental evidence that the band at 17500 cm-1 often attributed to Fe2+→Ti4+ IVCT transitions is in reality due to the 4T2 crystal field transition of Cr3+ partially overlapped by the 2E of Ti3+. The results of radio and photoluminescence excitation experiments obtained there, led us to propose that the color of these sapphires is mainly due to Cr in its two valence states ; Ti 3+ and Fe3+ have a minor role. After those encouraging results, we decided to apply the same approach to the study of deep blue and yellow sapphires of magmatic origin. Evaluation of impurity ion concentration by EDXRF revealed that in all these samples the concentration of Fe is quite high (around 1%) while Cr and Ti are barely detectable. Characteristic of the absorption spectra of deep blue samples is the dominant presence of the 5E spin allowed transition of Fe2+; Fe3+ has a minor role due to the fact that all d5 transitions are spin forbidden and ,consequently, very weak. In yellow sapphires Fe is totally in its 3+ valence state. In these cases, the color from yellow to blue, sometimes even within the same sample, depends. on oxidizing or reducing growth conditions. Even if the concentrations of Cr and Ti are very low, their characteristic emissions are the only ones observable down to 10000 cm-1 in radio and photoluminescence spectra. This piece of evidence suggested us to propose for the absorption bands present in the 14000 to 21000 cm-1 range, often attributed to IVCT, the same attribution given to the analogous bands in metamorphic

  18. Optical Spectroscopy and Nebular Oxygen Abundances of the Spitzer/SINGS Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Moustakas, John; Jr.,; Tremonti, Christy A; Dale, Daniel A; Smith, John-David T; Calzetti, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    We present intermediate-resolution optical spectrophotometry of 65 galaxies obtained in support of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS). For each galaxy we obtain a nuclear, circumnuclear, and semi-integrated optical spectrum designed to coincide spatially with mid- and far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope. We make the reduced, spectrophotometrically calibrated one-dimensional spectra, as well as measurements of the fluxes and equivalent widths of the strong nebular emission lines, publically available. We use optical emission-line ratios measured on all three spatial scales to classify the sample into star-forming, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and galaxies with a mixture of star formation and nuclear activity. We find that the relative fraction of the sample classified as star-forming versus AGN is a strong function of the integrated light enclosed by the spectroscopic aperture. We supplement our observations with a large database of nebular emission-line measurements of...

  19. A system for endoscopic mechanically scanned localized proton MR and light-induced fluorescence emission spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Ahmet E.; Webb, Andrew G.; Spees, William M.; Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular and near-cellular modalities offer new opportunities in assessing living tissue in situ, and multimodality approaches, which offer complementary information, may lead to improved characterization of tissue pathophysiology benefiting diagnosis and focal therapy. However, many such modalities are limited by their low penetration through tissue, which has led to minimally invasive trans-cannula approaches to place the corresponding sensors locally at the area of interest. This work presents a system for performing localized fluorescence emission and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopies via endoscopic access. The in-house developed side-firing 1.9-mm wide dual-sensor integrates a three-fiber optical sensor for fluorescence emission optical spectroscopy and a 1-mm circular radiofrequency (RF) coil for localized MR proton spectroscopy. An MR-compatible manipulator was developed for carrying and mechanically translating the dual-sensor along a linear access channel. The hardware and software control of the system allows reconfigurable synchronization of the manipulator-assisted translation of the sensor, and MR and optical data collection. The manipulator serves as the mechanical link for the three modalities and MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra are inherently co-registered to the MR scanner coordinate system. These spectra were then used to generate spatio-spectral maps of the fluorophores and proton MR-signal sources in three-compartment phantoms with optically- and MR-visible, and distinguishable, materials. These data demonstrate a good spatial match between MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra along the scanned path. In addition to basic research, such a system may have clinical applications for assessing and characterizing cancer in situ, as well as guiding focal therapies.

  20. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    determinations even at lowest masses and highest redshifts. Finally, emission lines can be used in the first place to select large samples of galaxies at well defined redshifts through narrowband (NB) surveys, as the presence of a line in the NB filter raises the flux compared to that expected from the continuum...... for the gas surrounding a galaxy. Around some objects the extended Ly αemission is so strong that it can be detected for individual objects. In this thesis extremely deep VLT/XSHOOTER rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy is presented for Himiko, a gigantic Ly α emitter at redshift z = 6.6 or a time when...

  1. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-07-27

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process.

  2. Current Problems in X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Williams, David B.; Lyman, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Various problems that limit X-ray analysis in the analytical electron microscope are reviewed. Major emphasis is given to the trade-off between minimum mass fraction and spatial resolution. New developments such as high-brightness electron guns, new X-ray spectrometers and clean high-vacuum analysis conditions will lead to major improvements in the accuracy and detectability limits of X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  3. Self-absorption influence on the optical spectroscopy of zinc oxide laser produced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Posada, E; Arronte, M A; Ponce, L; Rodriguez, E; Flores, T [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Unidad Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Lunney, J G, E-mail: edeposada@ipn.mx [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy is used to study the laser ablation process of ZnO targets. It is demonstrated that even if Partial Local Thermal Equilibrium is present, self absorption process leads to a decrease of recorded lines emission intensities and have to be taken into account to obtain correct values of such parameters. It is presented a method that combines results of both Langmuir probe technique and Anisimov model to obtain correct values of plasma parameters.

  4. Non-coincident multi-wavelength emission absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    An analysis is presented of the effect of noncoincident sampling on the measurement of atomic number density and temperature by multiwavelength emission absorption. The assumption is made that the two signals, emission and transmitted lamp, are time resolved but not coincident. The analysis demonstrates the validity of averages of such measurements despite fluctuations in temperature and optical depth. At potassium-seeded MHD conditions, the fluctuations introduce additional uncertainty into measurements of potassium atom number density and temperature but do not significantly bias the average results. Experimental measurements in the CFFF aerodynamic duct with coincident and noncoincident sampling support the analysis.

  5. Enhancement of terahertz pulse emission by optical nanoantenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Gil; Jin, Kyong Hwan; Yi, Minwoo; Ye, Jong Chul; Ahn, Jaewook; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2012-03-27

    Bridging the gap between ultrashort pulsed optical waves and terahertz (THz) waves, the THz photoconductive antenna (PCA) is a major constituent for the emission or detection of THz waves by diverse optical and electrical methods. However, THz PCA still lacks employment of advanced breakthrough technologies for high-power THz emission. Here, we report the enhancement of THz emission power by incorporating optical nanoantennas with a THz photoconductive antenna. The confinement and concentration of an optical pump beam on a photoconductive substrate can be efficiently achieved with optical nanoantennas over a high-index photoconductive substrate. Both numerical and experimental results clearly demonstrate the enhancement of THz wave emission due to high photocarrier generation at the plasmon resonance of nanoantennas. This work opens up many opportunities for diverse integrated photonic elements on a single PCA at THz and optical frequencies.

  6. Tissue optics, light distribution, and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Utz, Sergei R.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    1994-10-01

    A model of multilayered tissue is considered. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is used to study laser beam transport through tissues with varying optical properties for each layer (absorption, scattering, scattering anisotropy factor, and refractive index). Calculations are performed for some models of the human skin and adjacent tissues for visible and UV wavelength ranges. New technology for human epidermis optical parameters determination is presented. This technology includes epidermis upper layers glue stripping; in vitro measurements of total transmission, diffuse reflection, and angular scattering of stripping samples; and using an inverse calculation technique based on four-flux approximation of radiation transport theory. The technology was successfully used for depth dependence monitoring of epidermis optical parameters. An inverse Monte Carlo technique for determining the optical properties of tissues based on spectrophotometric measurements is developed. This technique takes into accounts the 2-D geometry of the experiment, finite sizes of incident beam and integrating sphere ports, boundary conditions, and sideways losses of light.

  7. Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of Excited States in Polyfluorene

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, M; Vardeny, Z V

    2006-01-01

    We used a variety of nonlinear optical (NLO) spectroscopies to study the singlet excited states order, and primary photoexcitations in polyfluorene; an important blue emitting p-conjugated polymer. The polarized NLO spectroscopies include ultrafast pump-probe photomodulation, two-photon absorption, and electroabsorption. For completeness we also measured the linear absorption and photoluminescence spectra. We found that the primary photoexcitations in polyfluorene are singlet excitons.

  8. Optical luminescence spectroscopy as a probe of the surface mineralogy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Optical luminescence (OpL) spectroscopy is an attractive use of a visible-near-IR spectrometer on a Mars lander because mineral products of atmosphere-surface interactions on Mars will probably have characteristic OpL spectra. Optical luminescence spectra would be taken at night, when a spectrometer might otherwise sit idle. Also needed would be a source of exciting radiation, which could be shared with other experiments. Optical luminescence is emission of nonthermal optical photons (near-UV through near-IR) as a response to energy input. On absorption of energy, an atom (or ion) will enter an excited state. The favored decay of many such excited states involving valence-band electrons is emission of an optical photon. Optical luminescence spectra can be useful in determining mineralogy and mineral composition. Optical luminescence in crystals can arise from essential elements (or ions), trace-element substituents (activators), or defects. Common activators in salts of alkali and alkaline earth elements include Mn(2+)(VI), other transition metals, the rare earths, and the actinides. Trace substituents of other species can enhance or quench OpL (e.g., Pb(2+) vs. Fe(3+)). Optical luminescence can also arise from defects in crystal structures, including those caused by radiation and shock.

  9. Hyperspectrally-Resolved Surface Emissivity Derived Under Optically Thin Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Surface spectral emissivity derived from current and future satellites can and will reveal critical information about the Earth s ecosystem and land surface type properties, which can be utilized as a means of long-term monitoring of global environment and climate change. Hyperspectrally-resolved surface emissivities are derived with an algorithm utilizes a combined fast radiative transfer model (RTM) with a molecular RTM and a cloud RTM accounting for both atmospheric absorption and cloud absorption/scattering. Clouds are automatically detected and cloud microphysical parameters are retrieved; and emissivity is retrieved under clear and optically thin cloud conditions. This technique separates surface emissivity from skin temperature by representing the emissivity spectrum with eigenvectors derived from a laboratory measured emissivity database; in other words, using the constraint as a means for the emissivity to vary smoothly across atmospheric absorption lines. Here we present the emissivity derived under optically thin clouds in comparison with that under clear conditions.

  10. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Blankenship, Steve [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States); Sharma, Renu, E-mail: renu.sharma@nist.gov [Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6203 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. - Highlights: • Broadband, high-efficiency design adaptable to other electron microscopes. • Raman spectroscopy integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy. • Raman spectra peak frequency shifts enable measurement of local sample temperature. • Multiple types of optical spectroscopy enabled, e.g. cathodoluminescence.

  11. Absorption/emission spectroscopy and applications using shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1988-09-01

    A historical overview is presented about the important contributions made by Penner, his co-workers, and his students to the application of shock-tube techniques for quantitative emission and absorption spectroscopy and its applications to chemical kinetics studies in high-temperature gases. The discussions address critical aspects related to valid determinations of quantitative spectroscopic data and chemical rate parameters and stress the requirements for uniformly heated gas samples, temperature determinations, gas-mixture preparations, selection of useful spectral intervals, verification of LTE conditions, time resolutions for concentration histories, uniqueness of kinetic measurements, as well as accuracies and reproducibilities of measurement results.The potential of absorption spectroscopy by molecule and/or radical resonance radiation and by laser transmission techniques is highlighted for kinetic studies in mixtures with very small reactant concentrations.Besides the work by the honoree and his school, the references include books, monographs and key articles related to the subjects discussed.

  12. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf, Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-08-22

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour.

  13. Optical fiber sensing based on reflection laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T-Y; Chow, Jong H; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  14. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  15. Fiber-optic based in situ atomic spectroscopy for manufacturing of x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasoff, George; Metting, Christopher J.; von Bredow, Hasso

    2016-09-01

    The manufacturing of multilayer Laue (MLL) components for X-ray optics by physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires high precision and accuracy that presents a significant process control challenge. Currently, no process control system provides the accuracy, long-term stability and broad capability for adoption in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. In situ atomic absorption spectroscopy is a promising process control solution, capable of monitoring the deposition rate and chemical composition of extremely thin metal silicide films during deposition and overcoming many limitations of the traditional methods. A novel in situ PVD process control system for the manufacturing of high-precision thin films, based on combined atomic absorption/emission spectrometry in the vicinity of the deposited substrate, is described. By monitoring the atomic concentration in the plasma region independently from the film growth on the deposited substrate, the method allows deposition control of extremely thin films, compound thin films and complex multilayer structures. It provides deposition rate and film composition measurements that can be further utilized for dynamic feedback process control. The system comprises a reconfigurable hardware module located outside the deposition chamber with hollow cathode light sources and a fiber-optic-based frame installed inside the deposition chamber. Recent experimental results from in situ monitoring of Al and Si thin films deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering at a variety of plasma conditions and monitoring configurations are presented. The results validate the operation of the system in the deposition of compound thin films and provide a path forward for use in manufacturing of X-Ray optics.

  16. Optimal Extraction of Fibre Optic Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sharp, R

    2009-01-01

    We report an optimal extraction methodology, for the reduction of multi-object fibre spectroscopy data, operating in the regime of tightly packed (and hence significantly overlapping) fibre profiles. The routine minimises crosstalk between adjacent fibres and statistically weights the extraction to reduce noise. As an example of the process we use simulations of the numerous modes of operation of the AAOmega fibre spectrograph and observational data from the SPIRAL Integral Field Unit at the Anglo-Australian Telescope.

  17. Multiplexed sub-Doppler spectroscopy with an optical frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Long, David A; Plusquellic, David F; Hodges, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    An optical frequency comb generated with an electro-optic phase modulator and a chirped radiofrequency waveform is used to perform saturation and pump-probe spectroscopy on the $D_1$ and $D_2$ transitions of atomic potassium. With a comb tooth spacing of 200 kHz and an optical bandwidth of 2 GHz the hyperfine transitions can be simultaneously observed. Interferograms are recorded in as little as 5 $\\mu$s (a timescale corresponding to the inverse of the comb tooth spacing). Importantly, the sub-Doppler features can be measured as long as the laser carrier frequency lies within the Doppler profile, thus removing the need for slow scanning or a priori knowledge of the frequencies of the sub-Doppler features. Sub-Doppler optical frequency comb spectroscopy has the potential to dramatically reduce acquisition times and allow for rapid and accurate assignment of complex molecular and atomic spectra which are presently intractable.

  18. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  19. Hard X-ray emission spectroscopy with pink beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Rossberg, Andre; Exner, Joerg; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    Valence-band X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) with a ''pink beam'', i.e. a beam with large energy bandwidth produced by a double-multilayer monochromator, is introduced here to overcome the weak count rate of monochromatic beams produced by conventional double-crystal monochromators. Our results demonstrate that - in spite of the large bandwidth in the order of 100 eV - the high spectral resolution of the Johann-type spectrometer is maintained, while the two orders of magnitude higher flux greatly reduces the required counting time. The short working distance Johann-type X-ray emission spectrometer and multilayer monochromator is available at ROBL.

  20. Photon emission spectroscopy of ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystroem, B.

    1995-10-01

    Emission cross sections for the 1snp{sup 1}P{sub 1}-levels have been measured by photon emission spectroscopy for the collision systems He{sup +} + He at 10 keV and He{sup 2+} + He at 10-35 keV. Photon spectra of Krypton (Kr VIII) and Xenon (Xe V - IX) have also been obtained using 10q keV beams of Kr{sup q+} (q=7-9) and Xe{sup q+} (q=5-9) colliding with Helium and Argon. The Lifetimes of 3p{sup 2}P-levels in Na-like Nb are reported together with lifetime for the 3s3p{sup 3}P{sub 1}-level in Mg-like Ni, Kr, Y, Zr and Nb where this level has an intercombination transition to the ground state. 45 refs, 20 figs.

  1. Emission Spectroscopy of the Super-Earth 55 Cnc e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Diana; Bean, Jacob; Kreidberg, Laura; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Line, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Recent surveys have revealed an extraordinary and unexplained diversity of low-mass exoplanets. The main frontier for constraining the nature and origins of these planets is atmospheric characterization to reveal their detailed physical properties. Previous spectroscopic observations of small exoplanets have been focused on transmission measurements, but these studies are often limited by clouds. We are turning small exoplanet characterization in a new direction with multi-wavelength observations (Warm Spitzer and HST WFC3) of the dayside of 55 Cnc e, a quintessential super-Earth in a tight orbit and transiting a nearby star. We will present the first dayside emission spectrum of a super-Earth, which we use to distinguish between different atmospheric compositions and constrain the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere. Our results for 55 Cnc e will guide JWST emission spectroscopy of a much larger sample of small close-in transiting exoplanets.

  2. Emission Line Imaging and Spectroscopy of Distant Galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabl, Johannes Florian

    determinations even at lowest masses and highest redshifts. Finally, emission lines can be used in the first place to select large samples of galaxies at well defined redshifts through narrowband (NB) surveys, as the presence of a line in the NB filter raises the flux compared to that expected from the continuum...... applied a novel NB measurement method to a sample of UltraVISTA NB118 H α emitters, and demonstrate that this technique allows to recover more accurate fluxes. Additionally, the method allows to determine more accurate redshifts. Contemporary NB surveys have a strong focus on searches for Ly α emitters...... for the gas surrounding a galaxy. Around some objects the extended Ly αemission is so strong that it can be detected for individual objects. In this thesis extremely deep VLT/XSHOOTER rest-frame far-UV spectroscopy is presented for Himiko, a gigantic Ly α emitter at redshift z = 6.6 or a time when...

  3. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  4. Advances in Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Breast Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S; Vogel, A J; Gandjbakhche, A H

    2006-01-03

    A review is presented of recent advances in optical imaging and spectroscopy and the use of light for addressing breast cancer issues. Spectroscopic techniques offer the means to characterize tissue components and obtain functional information in real time. Three-dimensional optical imaging of the breast using various illumination and signal collection schemes in combination with image reconstruction algorithms may provide a new tool for cancer detection and monitoring of treatment.

  5. Microwaves spark emission spectroscopy for the analysis of cations: A simple form of atomic emission spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahid Hussain; Khalid Mohammed Khan; Khadim Hussain; Sadam Hussain; Shahnaz Perveen

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the cation analysis was investigated. The analysis is based on the sparking of the salts of metals in a microwave oven after placing in a graphite cell. The graphite cell absorbs microwaves and produces high temperature which converts the salt into light emitting species. The colour of light was found to dependent on the nature of cation, however, the intensity of the emitted light was found to be depending upon the form and shape of the graphite assembly in addition to the concentration of the salt. This communication presents explanation for all these observations and for the systematic and quantitative analysis using microwave spark emission technique.

  6. Optical absorption and scattering spectroscopies of single nano-objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2014-06-07

    Developments of optical detection and spectroscopy methods for single nano-objects are key advances for applications and fundamental understanding of the novel properties exhibited by nanosize systems. These methods are reviewed, focusing on far-field optical approaches based on light absorption and elastic scattering. The principles of the main linear and nonlinear methods are described and experimental results are illustrated in the case of metal nanoparticles, stressing the key role played by the object environment, such as the presence of a substrate, bound surface molecules or other nano-objects. Special attention is devoted to quantitative methods and correlation of the measured optical spectra of a nano-object with its morphology, characterized either optically or by electron microscopy, as this permits precise comparison with theoretical models. Application of these methods to optical detection and spectroscopy for single semiconductor nanowires and carbon nanotubes is also presented. Extension to ultrafast nonlinear extinction or scattering spectroscopies of single nano-objects is finally discussed in the context of investigation of their nonlinear optical response and their electronic, acoustic and thermal properties.

  7. K- band integral field spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy of massive young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J. L.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.; Sewiło, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present K-band integral field spectroscopic observations towards 17 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the low-metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and two YSO candidates in the compact H II regions N81 and N88 A (also in the SMC). These sources, originally identified using Spitzer photometry and/or spectroscopy, have been resolved into 29 K-band continuum sources. By comparing Brγ emission luminosities with those presented for a Galactic sample of massive YSOs, we find tentative evidence for increased accretion rates in the SMC. Around half of our targets exhibit emission-line (Brγ, He I and H2) morphologies that extend significantly beyond the continuum source and we have mapped both the emission morphologies and the radial velocity fields. This analysis also reveals evidence for the existence of ionized low-density regions in the centre outflows from massive YSOs. Additionally, we present an analysis of optical spectra towards a similar sample of massive YSOs in the SMC, revealing that the optical emission is photoexcited and originates near the outer edges of molecular clouds, and is therefore consistent with a high mean-free path of UV photons in the interstellar medium (ISM) of the SMC. Finally, we discuss the sample of YSOs in an evolutionary context incorporating the results of previous infrared and radio observations, as well as the near-infrared and optical observations presented in this work. Our spectroscopic analysis in both the K band and the optical regimes, combined with previously obtained infrared and radio data, exposes differences between properties of massive YSOs in our own Galaxy and the SMC, including tracers of accretion, discs and YSO-ISM interactions.

  8. Optical spectroscopy of ancient paper and textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missori, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ancient paper and textiles represent a striking example of optically inhomogenous materials whose optical responses are strongly governed by scattering effects. In order to recover the absorption coefficient from non-invasive and non-destructive reflectance measurements a specific approach based on Kubelka-Munk two-flux theory must be applied. In this way quantitative chemical information, such as chromophores concentration, can be obtained, as well as quantitative spectra of additional substances such as pigments or dyes. Results on a folio of the Codex on the Flight of Birds by Leonardo da Vinci and a linen cloth dated back to 1653 and called the Shroud of Arquata, a copy of the Shroud of Turin, will be presented.

  9. HOMES Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; McGrew, Stephen P.

    2013-09-01

    A novel telescope architecture is proposed specifically for the purpose of taking spectra of exoplanets orbiting stars within 10 pc ("the neighborhood"). The primary objective and the secondary spectrograph are holographic optical elements (HOEs) formed on flat membrane substrates of low areal mass that can be transported on cylinder rolls that are compatible with the payload geometry of delivery vehicles. Ribbon-shaped HOEs of up to 100 x 10 meters are contemplated. Computer models are presented with these dimensions. The models predict resolving power better than 10 mas. Because the primary separates wavelengths, we consider coronagraphs that use the divide and conquer strategy of one wavelength at a time. After delivery at the second Lagrange point, the stowed membranes are unfurled into flat holographic optics positioned in a four part formation spanning 1 km of open space.

  10. Prompt optical emission from residual collisions in GRB outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhuo

    2007-01-01

    The prompt $\\gamma$-ray emission in $\\gamma$-ray bursts is believed to be produced by internal shocks within a relativistic unsteady outflow. The recent detection of prompt optical emission accompanying the prompt $\\gamma$-ray emission appears to be inconsistent with this model since the out flowing plasma is expected to be highly optically thick to optical photons. We show here that fluctuations in flow properties on short, $\\sim1$ ms, time scale, which drive the $\\gamma$-ray producing collisions at small radii, are expected to lead to "residual" collisions at much larger radii, where the optical depth to optical photons is low. The late residual collisions naturally account for the relatively bright optical emission. The apparent simultaneity of $\\gamma$-ray and optical emission is due to the highly relativistic speed with which the plasma expands. Residual collisions may also account for the X-ray emission during the early "steep decline" phase, where the radius is inferred to be larger than the $\\gamma$-r...

  11. Collimating Slicer for Optical Integral Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that gives simultaneously the spectrum of each spatial sampling element in a given object field. It is a powerful tool which rearranges the data cube (x, y, lambda) represented by two spatial dimensions defining the field and the spectral decomposition in a detector plane. In IFS, the spatial unit reorganizes the field and the spectral unit is being composed of a classical spectrograph.The development of a Collimating Slicer aims at proposing a new type of integral field spectrograph which should be more compact. The main idea is to combine the image slicer with the collimator of the spectrograph, thus mixing the spatial and spectral units. The traditional combination of slicer, pupil and slit elements and the spectrograph collimator is replaced by a new one composed of a slicer and collimator only. In this paper, the state of the art of integral field spectroscopy using image slicers is described. The new system based onto the development of a Collimating Slic...

  12. 脉冲等离子体推力器等离子体羽流的光谱研究%Study on Plasma Characteristics in a Pulsed Plasma Thruster by Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华; 吴建军; 何振; 李是良; 张宇

    2016-01-01

    脉冲等离子体推力器(pulsed plasma thruster ,PPT )具有体积小、重量轻、比冲高等优点,特别适合作为执行微小卫星轨道转移、阻力补偿和姿态控制等任务的推进系统。为了深入理解 PPT 推力产生的机理,本文对采用具有张角的舌型极板的尾部馈送式 PPT 等离子体羽流开展了时空分辨光谱诊断研究。通过对光谱数据的分析发现:等离子体羽流的主要成分为 C ,F ,C +,F +,C2+,还含有少量的由于极板烧蚀产生的Cu +和 Cu2+;等离子体在放电通道内的分布不均匀,通道中心的等离子体浓度最大,靠近阳极板的等离子浓度要明显大于靠近阴极板的等离子体浓度;在不同位置处等离子体成分也具有较大差别,F +和中性粒子主要分布在靠近阳极侧的区域;通过对各个分立谱线进行多普勒线性拟合,得到了放电通道内等离子体温度信息;以中轴线靠近工质的观测点为例,对该点在整个放电过程中不同时刻的谱线进行分析,得到了该点等离子体的具体演化过程,发现在放电的不同阶段羽流成分及各组分所占比例差别较大。%The pulsed plasma thruster(PPT ) is suited for various applications ,e .g .,attitude control ,station keeping and for‐mation flying due to its significant advantage with regard to the related savings of wet system mass ,small volume and high spe‐cific impulse .In order to elaborate the mechanism of PPT operation process ,the optical emission spectrum was conducted on a breech‐fed PPT with tongue electrodes .The results show that plasma plume mainly consists of C ,F ,C + ,F + and C2 + ,besides Cu+ and Cu2 + were detected in plasma which were produced by electrodes ablation .The plasma distribution is asymmetric in the discharge channel ,the maximum of plasma density of plasma appears at the central axis of discharge channel and the plasma den‐sity nearby the

  13. Optical heterodyne detected velocity modulation molecular ionic spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Guanglong; YANG Xiaohua; YING Xuping; LIU Gang; HUANG Yunxia; CHEN Yangqin

    2004-01-01

    Optical heterodyne detected velocity modulation molecular ionic spectroscopy is presented and employed to observe the rovibrantional spectra of and That the lineshape of OH-VMS is of the second derivative of Gaussian profile and its sensitivity is 3.5×10-8 are theoretically analyzed, and they are both in good agreement with our experimental results.

  14. Characterization of dielectric barrier discharge in air applying current measurement, numerical simulation and emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekaran, Priyadarshini; Awakowicz, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air is characterized applying current measurement, numerical simulation and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). For OES, a non-calibrated spectrometer is used. This diagnostic method is applicable when cross-sectional area of the active plasma volume and current density can be determined. The nitrogen emission in the spectral range of 380 nm- 406 nm is used for OES diagnostics. Electric field in the active plasma volume is determined applying the measured spectrum, well-known Frank-Condon factors for nitrogen transitions and numerically- simulated electron distribution functions. The measured electric current density is used for determination of electron density in plasma. Using the determined plasma parameters, the dissociation rate of nitrogen and oxygen in active plasma volume are calculated, which can be used by simulation of the chemical kinetics.

  15. Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge

    CERN Document Server

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Hepburn, John W; Milner, Valery

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new spectroscopic method for studying electronic transitions in molecules with extremely broad range of angular momentum. We employ an optical centrifuge to create narrow rotational wave packets in the ground electronic state of $^{16}$O$_2$. Using the technique of resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization, we record the spectrum of multiple ro-vibrational transitions between $X^3\\Sigma_{g}^{-}$ and $C^3\\Pi_{g}$ electronic manifolds of oxygen. Direct control of rotational excitation, extending to rotational quantum numbers as high as $N\\gtrsim 120$, enables us to interpret the complex structure of rotational spectra of $C^3\\Pi_{g}$ beyond thermally accessible levels.

  16. Early emission of rising optical afterglows: The case of GRB 060904B and GRB 070420

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, A; Stratta, G; Galli, A; Corsi, A; Preger, B; Cutini, S; Pelangeon, A; Atteia, J L; Boër, M; Piro, L

    2008-01-01

    We present the time-resolved optical emission of gamma-ray bursts GRB 060904B and GRB 070420 during their prompt and early afterglow phases. We used time resolved photometry from optical data taken by the TAROT telescope and time resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the Swift spacecraft instrument. The optical emissions of both GRBs are found to increase from the end of the prompt phase, passing to a maximum of brightness at t_{peak}=9.2 min and 3.3 min for GRB 060904B and GRB 070420 respectively and then decrease. GRB 060904B presents a large optical plateau and a very large X-ray flare. We argue that the very large X-flare occurring near t_{peak} is produced by an extended internal engine activity and is only a coincidence with the optical emission. GRB 070420 observations would support this idea because there was no X-flare during the optical peak. The nature of the optical plateau of GRB 060904B is less clear and might be related to the late energy injection.

  17. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, Luis; O'Neil, Galen C.; Joe, Young I.; Alpert, Bradley K.; Damrauer, Niels H.; Doriese, William B.; Fatur, Steven M.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hilton, Gene C.; Jimenez, Ralph; Reintsema, Carl D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Silverman, Kevin L.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Tatsuno, Hideyuki; Ullom, Joel N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond) time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3 keV ) spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe (2 ,2'-bipyridine)3]2 + and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  18. Assessment of Renal Ischemia By Optical Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, J T; Demos, S; Michalopoulou, A; Pierce, J L; Troppmann, C

    2004-01-07

    Introduction: No reliable method currently exists for quantifying the degree of warm ischemia in kidney grafts prior to transplantation. We describe a method for evaluating pretransplant warm ischemia time using optical spectroscopic methods. Methods: Lewis rat kidney vascular pedicles were clamped unilaterally in vivo for 0, 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 or 120 minutes; 8 animals were studied at each time point. Injured and contra-lateral control kidneys were then flushed with Euro-Collins solution, resected and placed on ice. 335 nm excitation autofluorescence as well as cross polarized light scattering images were taken of each injured and control kidney using filters of various wavelengths. The intensity ratio of the injured to normal kidneys was compared to ischemia time. Results: Autofluorescence intensity ratios through a 450 nm filter and light scattering intensity ratios through an 800 nm filter both decreased significantly with increasing ischemia time (p < 0.0001 for each method, one-way ANOVA). All adjacent and non-adjacent time points between 0 and 90 minutes were distinguishable using one of these two modalities by Fisher's PLSD. Conclusions: Optical spectroscopic methods can accurately quantify warm ischemia time in kidneys that have been subsequently hypothermically preserved. Further studies are needed to correlate results with physiological damage and posttransplant performance.

  19. Theoretical optical spectroscopy of complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, A. Mosca, E-mail: adriano.mosca.conte@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Violante, C., E-mail: claudia.violante@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Missori, M., E-mail: mauro.missori@isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00016 Monterotondo Scalo (Rome) (Italy); Bechstedt, F., E-mail: bech@ifto.physik.uni-jena.de [Institut fur Festkorpertheorie und -optik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Teodonio, L. [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy); Istituto centrale per il restauro e la conservazione del patrimonio archivistico e librario (IC-RCPAL), Italian Minister for Cultural Heritage, Via Milano 76, 00184 Rome (Italy); Ippoliti, E.; Carloni, P. [German Research School for Simulation Sciences, Julich (Germany); Guidoni, L., E-mail: leonardo.guidoni@univaq.it [Università degli Studi di L’Aquila, Dipartimento di Chimica e Materiali, Via Campo di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Pulci, O., E-mail: olivia.pulci@roma2.infn.it [MIFP, NAST, ETSF,CNR INFM-SMC, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: ► We review some theoretical condensed matter ab initio spectroscopic computational techniques. ► We show several applications ranging from 0 to 3 dimensional systems. ► For each system studied, we show which kind of information it is possible to obtain by performing these calculations. -- Abstract: We review here some of the most reliable and efficient computational theoretical ab initio techniques for the prediction of optical and electronic spectroscopic properties and show some important applications to molecules, surfaces, and solids. We investigate the role of the solvent in the optical absorption spectrum of indole molecule. We study the excited-state properties of a photo-active minimal model molecule for the retinal of rhodopsin, responsible for vision mechanism in animals. We then show a study about spectroscopic properties of Si(1 1 1) surface. Finally we simulate a bulk system: paper, that is mainly made of cellulose, a pseudo-crystalline material representing 40% of annual biomass production in the Earth.

  20. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.

  1. PREFACE: XVIII International Youth Scientific School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salakhov, M. Kh; Samartsev, V. V.; Gainutdinov, R. Kh

    2015-05-01

    Kazan Federal University has held the annual International Youth School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy" since 1997. The choice of the topic is not accidental. Kazan is the home of photon echo which was predicted at Kazan Physical-Technical Institute in 1963 by Prof. U.G. Kopvil'em and V.R. Nagibarov and observed in Columbia University by N.A. Kurnit, I.D. Abella, and S.R. Hartmann in 1964. Since then, photon echo has become a powerful tool of coherent optical spectroscopy and optical information processing, which have been developed here in Kazan in close collaboration between Kazan Physical-Technical Institute and Kazan Federal University. The main subjects of the XVIII International Youth School are: Nonlinear and coherent optics; Atomic and molecular spectroscopy; Coherent laser spectroscopy; Problems of quantum optics; Quantum theory of radiation; and Nanophotonics and Scanning Probe Microscopy. The unchallenged organizers of that school are Kazan Federal University and Kazan E.K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute. The rector of the School is Professor Myakzyum Salakhov, and the vice-rector is Professor Vitaly Samartsev. The International Youth Scientific School "Coherent Optics and Optical Spectroscopy" follows the global pattern of comprehensive studies of matter properties and their interaction with electromagnetic fields. Since 1997 more than 100 famous scientists from the USA, Germany, Ukraine, Belarus and Russia have given plenary lecture presentations. Here over 1000 young scientists had an opportunity to participate in lively discussions about the latest scientific news. Many young people have submitted interesting reports on photonics, quantum electronics, laser physics, quantum optics, traditional optical and laser spectroscopy, non-linear optics, material science and nanotechnology. Here we are publishing the fullsize papers prepared from the most interesting lectures and reports selected by the Program Committee of the School. The

  2. Optical Spectroscopy of IRAS 02091+6333

    CERN Document Server

    Kimeswenger, S; Emprechtinger, M; Groemer, G E; Kapferer, W; Kausch, W; Kitzbichler, M G; Lechner, M F M; Lederle, C; Uytterhoeven, K; Zijlstra, A A

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed spectroscopic investigation, spanning four winters, of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star IRAS 02091+6333. Zijlstra & Weinberger (2002) found a giant wall of dust around this star and modelled this unique phenomenon. However their work suffered from the quality of the optical investigations of the central object. Our spectroscopic investigation allowed us to define the spectral type and the interstellar foreground extinction more precisely. Accurate multi band photometry was carried out. This provides us with the possibility to derive the physical parameters of the system. The measurements presented here suggest a weak irregular photometric variability of the target, while there is no evidence of a spectroscopic variability over the last four years.

  3. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Gold Chrolride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2014-06-01

    The bonding and electrostatic properties of gold containing molecules are highly influenced by relativistic effects and electron correlation. Hence it is difficult to predict those properties via electron structure calculation, and such calculation are guided by experimental observations. Here we report on the A(Ω=1)-X1Σ+ and B(Ω=0)-X1Σ+ bands of AuCl, which have been previously recorded at Doppler limited resolution. A cold molecular beam sample was generated and the bands were recorded at high resolution (FWHM =35 MHz) using laser excitation spectroscopy, both field-free and in the presence of a static electric field. An improved set of spectroscopic parameters for the A(Ω=1) and B(Ω=0) states were obtained. The Stark induced shifts were analyzed to determine the permanent electric dipole moments for the X, A, and B states. A comparison with AuF and theory will be made. P. Pyykko; Angew Chem. Int {43} 4412, 2004. L. C. O'Brien, A. L. Elliott, and M. Dulick; J. Mol. Spectrosc, 194, 124, 1999.

  4. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of Plaskett's star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, N.; Rauw, G.; Martins, F.; Sana, H.; De Becker, M.; Gosset, E.

    2008-10-01

    Context: Plaskett's star (HD 47 129) is a very massive O + O binary that belongs to the Mon OB2 association. Previous work suggests that this system displays the Struve-Sahade effect although the measurements of the secondary radial velocities are very difficult and give controversial results. Both components have powerful stellar winds that collide and produce a strong X-ray emission. Aims: Our aim is to study the physical parameters of this system in detail and to investigate the relation between its spectral properties and its evolutionary status. Methods: We present here analysis of an extensive set of high-resolution optical spectra of HD 47 129. We used a disentangling method to separate the individual spectra of each star. We derived a new orbital solution and discuss the spectral classification of both components. A Doppler tomography technique applied to the emission lines Hα and He II λ 4686 yields a Doppler map that illustrates the wind interactions in the system. Finally, an atmosphere code is used to determine the different chemical abundances of the system components and the wind parameters. Results: HD 47 129 appears to be an O8 III/I + O7.5 III binary system in a post RLOF evolutionary stage, where matter has been transferred from the primary to the secondary star. The He overabundance of the secondary supports this scenario. In addition, the N overabundance and C underabundance of the primary component confirm previous results based on X-ray spectroscopy and indicate that the primary is an evolved massive star. We also determined a new orbital solution, with MP sin^3i = 45.4 ± 2.4 M⊙ and MS sin^3i = 47.3 ± 0.3 M⊙. Furthermore, the secondary star has a high rotational velocity (v sin i ˜ 300 km s-1) that deforms its surface, leading to a non-uniform distribution in effective temperature. This could explain the variations in the equivalent widths of the secondary lines with phase. We suggest that the wind of the secondary star is confined

  5. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of diamond surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, R.P.

    1995-04-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) and infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopies have been shown to be powerful and versatile for studying surfaces with submonolayer sensitivity. They have been used in this work to study bare diamond surfaces and molecular adsorption on them. In particular, infrared-visible SFG as a surface vibrational spectroscopic technique has been employed to identify and monitor in-situ surface bonds and species on the diamond (111) surface. The CH stretch spectra allow us to investigate hydrogen adsorption, desorption, abstraction, and the nature of the hydrogen termination. The C(111) surface dosed with atomic hydrogen was found to be in a monohydride configuration with the hydrogen atoms situated at top-sites. The ratio of the abstraction rate to the adsorption rate was appreciable during atomic hydrogen dosing. Kinetic parameters for thermal desorption of H on C(111) were determined showing a near first-order kinetics. For the fully H-terminated (111) surface, a large (110 cm{sup {minus}1}) anharmonicity and {approximately}19 psec lifetime were measured for the first-excited CH stretch mode. The bare reconstructed C(111)-(2 {times} l) surface showed the presence of CC stretch modes which were consistent with the Pandey {pi}-bonded chain structure. When exposed to the methyl radical, the SFG spectra of the C(111) surface showed features suggesting the presence of adsorbed methyl species. After heating to sufficiently high temperatures, they were converted into the monohydride species. Preliminary results on the hydrogen-terminated diamond (100) surface are also presented.

  6. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  7. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  8. Optical sensors for process control and emissions monitoring in industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. W. Alendorf; D. K. Ottensen; D. W. Hahn; T. J. Kulp; U. B. Goers

    1999-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has a number of ongoing projects developing optical sensors for industrial environments. Laser-based sensors can be attractive for relatively harsh environments where extractive sampling is difficult, inaccurate, or impractical. Tools developed primarily for laboratory research can often be adapted for the real world and applied to problems far from their original uses. Spectroscopic techniques, appropriately selected, have the potential to impact the bottom line of a number of industries and industrial processes. In this paper the authors discuss three such applications: a laser-based instrument for process control in steelmaking, a laser-induced breakdown method for hazardous metal detection in process streams, and a laser-based imaging sensor for evaluating surface cleanliness. Each has the potential to provide critical, process-related information in a real-time, continuous manner. These sensor techniques encompass process control applications and emissions monitoring for pollution prevention. They also span the range from a field-tested pre-commercial prototype to laboratory instrumentation. Finally, these sensors employ a wide range of sophistication in both the laser source and associated analytical spectroscopy. In the ultimate applications, however, many attributes of the sensors are in common, such as the need for robust operation and hardening for harsh industrial environments.

  9. Characterisation of a micro-plasma device sensor using electrical measurements and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, D

    2002-04-01

    This thesis reports on research undertaken on the characterisation of a micro-plasma device to be used for gas analysis by mean of plasma emission spectroscopy. The work covers aspects related to the micro-plasma electrical and optical emission parameters, and their importance for the utilisation of the micro-plasma device in gas analysis. Experimental results have been used to analyse the fundamental micro-plasma processes and to develop a model, which could provide additional information. This dissertation contains a general literature review of topics related to plasma physics, plasma emission spectroscopy, gas analysis (chemical analysis and artificial olfaction) and other micro-plasma applications. Experimental work focuses on two main areas: electrical measurements and emission measurements. Firstly, electrical measurements are taken and interpretations are given. Where necessary, new theoretical treatments are suggested in order to describe better the physical phenomena. Plasma emission has been considered under different working conditions. This allowed the characterisation of the micro-plasma emission and also a better understanding of the micro-plasma processes. On the basis of the experimental data obtained and other assumptions a model has been developed. A computer simulation based on this model provided additional useful information on the micro- plasma behaviour. The first fundamental implication of this new research is the peculiar behaviour of the micro-plasma. This micro-plasma exhibited deviations from Paschen law and strong dependency on cathode material, which contributed to the formation of a low current stable regime. These results have been followed by physical interpretations and theoretical descriptions. The second implication is the establishment of the boundaries and of the influencing parameters for plasma emission spectroscopy as an analytical tool in this particular micro-plasma. From the applied perspective this study has shown that

  10. The Masses of Distant Galaxies from Optical Emission Line Widths

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, E B; Gillespie, Elizabeth Barton; Zee, Liese van

    2002-01-01

    Promising methods for studying galaxy evolution rely on optical emission line width measurements to compare intermediate-redshift objects to galaxies with equivalent masses at the present epoch. However, emission lines can be misleading. We show empirical examples of galaxies with concentrated central star formation from a survey of galaxies in pairs; HI observations of these galaxies indicate that the optical line emission fails to sample their full gravitational potentials. We use simple models of bulge-forming bursts of star formation to demonstrate that compact optical morphologies and small half-light radii can accompany these anomalously narrow emission lines; thus late-type bulges forming on rapid (0.5-1 Gyr) timescales at intermediate redshift would exhibit properties similar to those of heavily bursting dwarfs. We conclude that some of the luminous compact objects observed at intermediate and high redshift may be starbursts in the centers of massive galaxies and/or bulges in formation.

  11. Optical Absorption Spectroscopy for Gas Analysis in Biomass Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosch, Helge

    the concentration of the mentioned compounds. However, continuous measurements of different species directly in the gas (in-situ) and at the same time are scarce. In this work, the basis of optical in-situ analysis with ultraviolet and infrared spectroscopy was build to determine the concentration of the most...... important gas species of the low-temperature circulating fluidized bed gasifier. At first, a special gas cell,the hot gas flow cell (HGC), was build up and veried. In this custom-made gas cell, the optical properties, the so-called absorption cross-sections, of the most important sulfur and aromatic...

  12. Optical gain and stimulated emission in periodic nanopatterned crystalline silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Sylvain G; Kossyrev, Pavel A; Xu, Jimmy

    2005-12-01

    Persistent efforts have been made to achieve efficient light emission from silicon in the hope of extending the reach of silicon technology into fully integrated optoelectronic circuits, meeting the needs for high-bandwidth intrachip and interchip connects. Enhanced light emission from silicon is known to be theoretically possible, enabled mostly through quantum-confinement effects. Furthermore, Raman-laser conversion was demonstrated in silicon waveguides. Here we report on optical gain and stimulated emission in uniaxially nanopatterned silicon-on-insulator using a nanopore array as an etching mask. In edge-emission measurements, we observed threshold behaviour, optical gain, longitudinal cavity modes and linewidth narrowing, along with a collimated far-field pattern, all indicative of amplification and stimulated emission. The sub-bandgap 1,278 nm emission peak is attributed to A-centre mediated phononless direct recombination between trapped electrons and free holes. The controlled nanoscale silicon engineering, combined with the low material loss in this sub-bandgap spectral range and the long electron lifetime in such A-type trapping centres, gives rise to the measured optical gain and stimulated emission and provides a new pathway to enhance light emission from silicon.

  13. Nonlinear optical signals and spectroscopy with quantum light

    CERN Document Server

    Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    Conventional nonlinear spectroscopy uses classical light to detect matter properties through the variation of its response with frequencies or time delays. Quantum light opens up new avenues for spectroscopy by utilizing parameters of the quantum state of light as novel control knobs and through the variation of photon statistics by coupling to matter. We present an intuitive diagrammatic approach for calculating ultrafast spectroscopy signals induced by quantum light, focusing on applications involving entangled photons with nonclassical bandwidth properties - known as "time-energy entanglement". Nonlinear optical signals induced by quantized light fields are expressed using time ordered multipoint correlation functions of superoperators. These are different from Glauber's g- functions for photon counting which use normally ordered products of ordinary operators. Entangled photon pairs are not subjected to the classical Fourier limitations on the joint temporal and spectral resolution. After a brief survey o...

  14. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  15. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Parigger, Christian G.; Hornkohl, James O.; László Nemes

    2010-01-01

    Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB). Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and ...

  16. Optical-fiber-based laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for detection of early caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-06-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system targeting for the in vivo analysis of tooth enamel is described. The system is planned to enable real-time analysis of teeth during laser dental treatment by utilizing a hollow optical fiber that transmits both Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light for LIBS and infrared Er:YAG laser light for tooth ablation. The sensitivity of caries detection was substantially improved by expanding the spectral region under analysis to ultraviolet (UV) light and by focusing on emission peaks of Zn in the UV region. Subsequently, early caries were distinguished from healthy teeth with accuracy rates above 80% in vitro.

  17. Understanding Multiferroic Hexagonal Manganites by Static and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ting Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiferroic hexagonal manganites ReMnO3 studied by optics are reviewed. Their electronic structures were revealed by static linear and nonlinear spectra. Two transitions located at ~1.7 eV and ~2.3 eV have been observed and attributed to the interband transitions from the lower-lying Mn3+dxy/dx2-y2 and dxz/dyz states to the Mn3+d3z2-r2 state, respectively. These so-called d-d transitions exhibit a blueshift as decreasing temperatures and an extra blueshift near TN. This dramatic change indicates that the magnetic ordering seriously influences the electronic structure. On the other hand, the ultrafast optical pump-probe spectroscopy has provided the important information on spin-charge coupling and spin-lattice coupling. Because of the strongly correlation between electronic structure and magnetic ordering, the amplitude of the initial rising component in ΔR/R shows striking changes at the vicinity of TN. Moreover, the coherent optical and acoustic phonons were observed on optical pump-probe spectroscopy. Both the amplitude and dephasing time of coherent phonons also exhibit significant changes at TN, which provide the evidence for spin-lattice interaction in these intriguing materials.

  18. 光谱方法研究大气压氩气等离子体喷枪的放电特性%Investigation of a Jet Operated in Atmospheric Pressure Argon by Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪辰; 鲍文婷; 贾鹏英; 狄聪; 袁宁

    2014-01-01

    plasma plume increases with the increase in the peak value of the applied voltage and the driving frequency.According to the discharge theory and based on the analysis of the turbu-lence and the advection,a qualitative explanation was given for the variance of plume length as functions of the experimental pa-rameters.Results also show that there is a discharge pulse for the plasma plume in every positive half cycle,while there is no pulse in negative half cycle.The coaxial dielectric barrier discharge shows two pulses in every positive half cycle and a pulse in every negative half cycle.Analyzing these experimental phenomena mentioned above,a formation mechanism of the plasma plume was proposed.The optical emission spectra were obtained for both the coaxial dielectric barrier discharge and the plasma plume.There was no apparent difference except that some emission lines from reactive species such as OH and N2 were found in the plasma plume.Using the first negative band of,the rational temperature of the plasma plume was measured.Results show that the rational temperature of the plasma plume decreases away from the jet nozzle,and increases with increasing the peak val-ue of the applied voltage.

  19. Photonic Crystals-Inhibited Spontaneous Emission: Optical Antennas-Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonovitch, Eli

    Photonic crystals are also part of everyday technological life in opto-electronic telecommunication devices that provide us with internet, cloud storage, and email. But photonic crystals have also been identified in nature, in the coloration of peacocks, parrots, chameleons, butterflies and many other species.In spite of its broad applicability, the original motivation of photonic crystals was to create a ``bandgap'' in which the spontaneous emission of light would be inhibited. Conversely, the opposite is now possible. The ``optical antenna'' can accelerate spontaneous emission. Over 100 years after the radio antenna, we finally have tiny ``optical antennas'' which can act on molecules and quantum dots. Employing optical antennas, spontaneous light emission can become faster than stimulated emission.

  20. Optical Spectroscopy of Two Dimensional Graphene and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Long

    This dissertation describes the use of optical spectroscopy in studying the physical properties of two dimensional nano materials like graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. Compared to bulk materials, atomically thin two dimensional materials have a unique character that is the strong dependence of physical properties on external control. Both electronic band structure and chemical potential can be tuned in situ by electric field-which is a powerful knob in experiment. Therefore the optical study at atomic thickness scale can greatly benefit from modern micro-fabrication technique and electric control of the material properties. As will be shown in this dissertation, such control of both gemometric and physical properties enables new possibilities of optical spectroscopic measurement as well as opto-electronic studies. Other experimental techniques like electric transport and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are also combined with optical spectroscopy to reveal the physics that is beyond the reach of each individual technique. There are three major themes in the dissertation. The first one is focused on the study of plasmon excitation of Dirac electrons in monolayer graphene. Unlike plasmons in ordinary two dimensional electron gas, plasmons of 2D electrons as in graphene obey unusual scaling laws. We fabricate graphene micro-ribbon arrays with photolithography technique and use optical absorption spectroscopy to study its absorption spectrum. The experimental result demonstrates the extraordinarily strong light-plasmon coupling and its novel dependence on both charge doping and geometric dimensions. This work provides a first glance at the fundamental properties of graphene plasmons and forms the basis of an emerging subfield of graphene research and applications such as graphene terahertz metamaterials. The second part describes the opto-electronic response of heterostructures composed of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. We found that there is

  1. Detection of Bioaerosols Using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) by Dr. Kristan P. Gurton, Melvin Felton, and...Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL-TR-5934 February 2012 Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission...October 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (First-year Report) 5a. CONTRACT

  2. Correlation between structure and optical properties in low emissivity coatings for solar thermal collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuste, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Fundacion Rafael Escola, E-28001 Madrid (Spain); Galindo, R. Escobar [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, O., E-mail: olgas@icmm.csic.e [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Cano, D. [Fundacion Rafael Escola, E-28001 Madrid (Spain); Casasola, R. [Isofoton, E-29590, Malaga (Spain); Albella, J.M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-02

    We have investigated the relation between the structure and morphology of TiN coatings with their optical properties. Samples were deposited by magnetron sputtering and, by changing the deposition parameters, different textures and chemical compositions can be obtained as measured by X-ray diffraction and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy respectively. The transmittance in the visible range, measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the emittance, derived from reflectance in the far infrared range as measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy have been related to the nitrogen atomic content and the preferred crystalline orientations present in the TiN coatings. The visible transmittance of the coatings was found not to be dependent on the preferential orientation, while the emittance clearly improves with increasing the film thickness and the presence of both (111) and (200) crystal orientations.

  3. $K$-band integral field spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy of massive young stellar objects in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, J L; van Loon, J Th; Sewiło, M

    2016-01-01

    We present $K$-band integral field spectroscopic observations towards 17 massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the low metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) and two YSO candidates in the compact H ii regions N81 and N88 A (also in the SMC). These sources, originally identified using $Spitzer$ photometry and/or spectroscopy, have been resolved into 29 $K$-band continuum sources. By comparing Br$\\gamma$ emission luminosities with those presented for a Galactic sample of massive YSOs, we find tentative evidence for increased accretion rates in the SMC. Around half of our targets exhibit emission line (Br$\\gamma$, He i and H$_2$) morphologies which extend significantly beyond the continuum source and we have mapped both the emission morphologies and the radial velocity fields. This analysis also reveals evidence for the existence of ionized low density regions in the centre outflows from massive YSOs. Additionally we present an analysis of optical spectra towards a similar sample of massive YSOs in the SMC, ...

  4. Optical investigation of gold shell enhanced 25 nm diameter upconverted fluorescence emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kory; Wirth, Janina; Lim, Shuang Fang

    2016-04-01

    We enhance the efficiency of upconverting nanoparticles by investigating the plasmonic coupling of 25 nm diameter NaYF4:Yb, Er nanoparticles with a gold-shell coating, and study the physical mechanism of enhancement by single-particle, time-resolved spectroscopy. A three-fold overall increase in emission intensity, and five-fold increase of green emission for these plasmonically enhanced particles have been achieved. Using a combination of structural and fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that fluorescence enhancement is based on the photonic properties of single, isolated particles. Time-resolved spectroscopy shows that the increase in fluorescence is coincident with decreased rise time, which we attribute to an enhanced absorption of infrared light and energy transfer from Yb3+ to Er3+ atoms. Time-resolved spectroscopy also shows that fluorescence life-times are decreased to different extents for red and green emission. This indicates that the rate of photon emission is not suppressed, as would be expected for a metallic cavity, but rather enhanced because the metal shell acts as an optical antenna, with differing efficiency at different wavelengths.

  5. Development and biological applications of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chang'an

    Optical tweezers is a three-dimensional manipulation tool that employs a gradient force that originates from the single highly focused laser beam. Raman spectroscopy is a molecular analytical tool that can give a highly unique "fingerprint" for each substance by measuring the unique vibrations of its molecules. The combination of these two optical techniques offers a new tool for the manipulation and identification of single biological cells and microscopic particles. In this thesis, we designed and implemented a Laser-Tweezers-Raman-Spectroscopy (LTRS) system, also called the Raman-tweezers, for the simultaneous capture and analysis of both biological particles and non-biological particles. We show that microparticles can be conveniently captured at the focus of a laser beam and the Raman spectra of trapped particles can be acquired with high quality. The LTRS system overcomes the intrinsic Brownian motion and cell motility of microparticles in solution and provides a promising tool for in situ identifying suspicious agents. In order to increase the signal to noise ratio, several schemes were employed in LTRS system to reduce the blank noise and the fluorescence signal coming from analytes and the surrounding background. These techniques include near-infrared excitation, optical levitation, confocal microscopy, and frequency-shifted Raman difference. The LTRS system has been applied for the study in cell biology at the single cell level. With the built Raman-tweezers system, we studied the dynamic physiological processes of single living cells, including cell cycle, the transcription and translation of recombinant protein in transgenic yeast cells and the T cell activation. We also studied cell damage and associated biochemical processes in optical traps, UV radiations, and evaluated heating by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. These studies show that the Raman-tweezers system is feasible to provide rapid and reliable diagnosis of cellular disorders and can be

  6. Novel microfluidic devices for Raman spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottevaere, Heidi; Liu, Qing; de Coster, Diane; Van Erps, Jürgen; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Traditionally, Raman spectroscopy is done in a specialized lab, with considerable requirements in terms of equipment, time and manual sampling of substances of interest. We present the modeling, the design and the fabrication process of a microfluidic device incorporation Raman spectroscopy, from which one enables confocal Raman measurements on-chip. The latter is fabricated using ultra precision diamond tooling and is tested in a proof-of-concept setup, by for example measuring Raman spectra of urea solutions with various concentrations. If one wants to analyze single cells instead of a sample solution, precautions need to be taken. Since Raman scattering is a weak process, the molecular fingerprint of flowing particles would be hard to measure. One method is to stably position the cell under test in the detection area during acquisition of the Raman scattering such that the acquisition time can be increased. Positioning of cells can be done through optical trapping and leads to an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and thus a more reliable cell identification. Like Raman spectroscopy, optical trapping can also be miniaturized. We present the modeling, design process and fabrication of a mass-manufacturable polymer microfluidic device for dual fiber optical trapping using two counterpropagating singlemode beams. We use a novel fabrication process that consists of a premilling step and ultraprecision diamond tooling for the manufacturing of the molds and double-sided hot embossing for replication, resulting in a robust microfluidic chip for optical trapping. In a proof-of-concept demonstration, we characterize the trapping capabilities of the hot embossed chip.

  7. Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the Oef supergiant lambda Cep

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, G; Naze, Y; Gonzalez-Perez, J N; Hempelmann, A; Mittag, M; Schmitt, J H M M; Schroeder, K -P; Gosset, E; Eenens, P; Uuh-Sonda, J M

    2015-01-01

    Probing the structures of stellar winds is of prime importance for the understanding of massive stars. Based on their optical spectral morphology and variability, the stars of the Oef class have been suggested to feature large-scale structures in their wind. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and time-series of X-ray observations of presumably-single O-type stars can help us understand the physics of their stellar winds. We have collected XMM-Newton observations and coordinated optical spectroscopy of the O6Ief star lambda Cep to study its X-ray and optical variability and to analyse its high-resolution X-ray spectrum. We investigate the line profile variability of the He II 4686 and H-alpha emission lines in our time series of optical spectra, including a search for periodicities. We further discuss the variability of the broadband X-ray flux and analyse the high-resolution spectrum of lambda Cep using line-by-line fits as well as a code designed to fit the full high-resolution X-ray spectrum consistently. D...

  8. Monitoring of Emissions From a Refinery Tank Farm Using a Combination of Optical Remote Sensing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidori, A.; Tisopulos, L.; Pikelnaya, O.; Mellqvist, J.; Samuelsson, J.; Marianne, E.; Robinson, R. A.; Innocenti, F.; Finlayson, A.; Hashmonay, R.

    2016-12-01

    Despite great advances in reducing air pollution, the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) still faces challenges to attain federal health standards for air quality. Refineries are large sources of ozone precursors and, hence contribute to the air quality problems of the region. Additionally, petrochemical facilities are also sources of other hazardous air pollutants (HAP) that adversely affect human health, for example aromatic hydrocarbons. In order to assure safe operation, decrease air pollution and minimize population exposure to HAP the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) has a number of regulations for petrochemical facilities. However, significant uncertainties still exist in emission estimates and traditional monitoring techniques often do not allow for real-time emission monitoring. In the fall of 2015 the SCAQMD, Fluxsense Inc., the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), and Atmosfir Optics Ltd. conducted a measurement study to characterize and quantify gaseous emissions from the tank farm of one of the largest oil refineries in the SCAB. Fluxsense used a vehicle equipped with Solar Occultation Flux (SOF), Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), and Extractive Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy instruments. Concurrently, NPL operated their Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system. Both research groups quantified emissions from the entire tank farm and identified fugitive emission sources within the farm. At the same time, Atmosfir operated an Open Path FTIR (OP-FTIR) spectrometer along the fenceline of the tank farm. During this presentation we will discuss the results of the emission measurements from the tank farm of the petrochemical facility. Emission rates resulting from measurements by different ORS methods will be compared and discussed in detail.

  9. Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kehoe, R; Balsano, R; Barthelmy, S D; Bloch, J; Butterworth, P S; Casperson, D E; Cline, T; Fletcher, S; Frontera, F; Gisler, G; Heise, J; Hills, J; Hurley, K; Lee, B; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Pawl, A; Piro, L; Priedhorsky, B; Szymanski, J J; Wren, J; Kehoe, Robert; Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; Kay, Tim Mc; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Priedhorsky, Bill; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2001-01-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure contemporaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The ROTSE-I telescope array has been fully automated and responding to burst alerts from the GRB Coordinates Network since March 1998, taking prompt optical data for 30 bursts in its first year. We will briefly review observations of GRB990123 which revealed the first detection of an optical burst occurring during the gamma-ray emission, reaching 9th magnitude at its peak. In addition, we present here preliminary optical results for seven other gamma-ray bursts. No other optical counterparts were seen in this analysis, and the best limiting sensitivities are m(V) > 13.0 at 14.7 seconds after the gamma-ray rise, and m(V) > 16.4 at 62 minutes. These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. This analysis suggests that there is not a strong correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray em...

  10. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Barbisan, M.; Cristofaro, S.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Serianni, G.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the Hα light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of Hα spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  11. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy of Biomimetic Mn Coordination Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Scott C; Davis, Katherine M; Sullivan, Brendan; Hartzler, Daniel A; Seidler, Gerald T; Casa, Diego M; Kasman, Elina; Colmer, Hannah E; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A; Pushkar, Yulia

    2017-06-15

    Understanding the function of Mn ions in biological and chemical redox catalysis requires precise knowledge of their electronic structure. X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is an emerging technique with a growing application to biological and biomimetic systems. Here, we report an improved, cost-effective spectrometer used to analyze two biomimetic coordination compounds, [Mn(IV)(OH)2(Me2EBC)](2+) and [Mn(IV)(O)(OH)(Me2EBC)](+), the second of which contains a key Mn(IV)═O structural fragment. Despite having the same formal oxidation state (Mn(IV)) and tetradentate ligands, XES spectra from these two compounds demonstrate different electronic structures. Experimental measurements and DFT calculations yield different localized spin densities for the two complexes resulting from Mn(IV)-OH conversion to Mn(IV)═O. The relevance of the observed spectroscopic changes is discussed for applications in analyzing complex biological systems such as photosystem II. A model of the S3 intermediate state of photosystem II containing a Mn(IV)═O fragment is compared to recent time-resolved X-ray diffraction data of the same state.

  12. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunai, D; Zoletnik, S; Sárközi, J; Field, A R

    2010-10-01

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements (≈10(8)-10(10) photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  13. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  14. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Studies of ICP Ar Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xuelian; REN Chunsheng; ZHANG Jian; MA Tengcai

    2007-01-01

    The ion line of 434.8 nm and atom line of 419.8 nm of Ar plasma produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were measured by optical emission spectroscopy and the influences from the working gas pressure, radio-frequency (RF) power and different positions in the discharge chamber on the line intensities were investigated in this study. It was found that the intensity of Ar atom line increased firstly and then saturated with the increase of the pressure. The line intensity of Ar+, on the other hand, reached a maximum value and then decreased along with the pressure. The intensity of the line in an RF discharge also demonstrated a jumping mode and a hysteresis phenomenon with the RF power. When the RF power increased to 400 W, the discharge jumped from the E-mode to the H-mode where the line intensity of Ar atom demonstrated a sudden increase, while the intensity of Ar+ ion only changed slightly. If the RF power decreased from a high value, e.g., 1000 W, the discharge would jump from the H-mode back to the E-mode at a power of 300 W. At this time the intensities of Ar and Ar+ lines would also decrease sharply. It was also noticed in this paper that the intensity of the ion line depended on the detective location in the chamber, namely at the bottom of the chamber the line was more intense than that in the middle of the chamber, but less intense than at the top, which is considered to be related to the capacitance coupling ability of the ICP plasma in different discharge areas.

  15. Optical inverse Compton emission from clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    Shocks around clusters of galaxies accelerate electrons which upscatter the Cosmic Microwave Background photons to higher-energies. We use an analytical model to calculate this inverse Compton (IC) emission, taking into account the effects of additional energy losses via synchrotron and Coulomb scattering. We find that the surface brightness of the optical IC emission increases with redshift and halo mass. The IC emission surface brightness, 32--34~mag~arcsec$^{-2}$, for massive clusters is potentially detectable by the newly developed Dragonfly Telephoto Array.

  16. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  17. Developing fibre optic Raman probes for applications in clinical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Oliver; Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Stone, Nick

    2016-04-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown by various groups over the last two decades to have significant capability in discriminating disease states in bodily fluids, cells and tissues. Recent development in instrumentation, optics and manufacturing approaches has facilitated the design and demonstration of various novel in vivo probes, which have applicability for myriad of applications. This review focusses on key considerations and recommendations for application specific clinical Raman probe design and construction. Raman probes can be utilised as clinical tools able to provide rapid, non-invasive, real-time molecular analysis of disease specific changes in tissues. Clearly the target tissue location, the significance of spectral changes with disease and the possible access routes to the region of interest will vary for each clinical application considered. This review provides insight into design and construction considerations, including suitable probe designs and manufacturing materials compatible with Raman spectroscopy.

  18. A device for obtaining stimulated optical emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvaril, J.; Kubelka, J.; Kvapil, J.; Perner, B.

    1983-04-30

    A laser is proposed which is characterized by the use of a YAG active material in the laser with neodymium ion and/or ionic elements with atomic numbers of 58-59 and 61-71 used as the dopant. The ratio of the molar concentration of the yttrium oxide and dopant oxide in the initial mixture is equal to (3.001 to 3.030) to 5. Additionally, an optical active filter is used in the laser; this filter includes a methyl orange and rhodamine 6G solution or glass with a dopant of 1 percent cesium oxide and 2.5 percent titanium oxide.

  19. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  20. Optical Characterization of Commercial Lithiated Graphite Battery Electrodes and in Situ Fiber Optic Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannoum, AbdulRahman; Norris, Ryan C; Iyer, Krishna; Zdravkova, Liliana; Yu, Aiping; Nieva, Patricia

    2016-07-27

    Optical characterization of graphite anodes in lithium ion batteries (LIB) is presented here for potential use in estimating their state of charge (SOC). The characterization is based on reflectance spectroscopy of the anode of commercial LIB cells and in situ optical measurements using an embedded optical fiber sensor. The optical characterization of the anode using wavelengths ranging from 500 to 900 nm supports the dominance of graphite over the solid electrolyte interface in governing the anode's reflectance properties. It is demonstrated that lithiated graphite's reflectance has a significant change in the near-infrared band, 750-900 nm, compared with the visible spectrum as a function of SOC. An embedded optical sensor is used to measure the transmittance of graphite anode in the near-infrared band, and the results suggest that a unique inexpensive method may be developed to estimate the SOC of a LIB.

  1. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  2. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  3. 3D OPTICAL AND IR SPECTROSCOPY OF EXCEPTIONAL HII GALAXIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Telles

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution I will very brie y summarize some recent results obtained applying 3D spectroscopy to observations of the well known HII galaxy II Zw 40, both in the optical and near-IR. I have studied the distribution of the dust in the starburst region, the velocity and velocity dispersion, and the geometry of the molecular hydrogen and ionized gas. I found a clear correlation between the component of the ISM and the velocity eld suggesting that the latter has a fundamental role in de ning the modes of the star formation process.

  4. Spectroscopy of intraband optical transitions in anisotropic semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new type of optical spectroscopy of anisotropic semiconductor nanocrystals, which is based on the welldeveloped stationary pump-probe technique, where the pump and probe fields are absorbed upon, respectively, interband and intraband transitions of the nanocrystals' electronic subsystem. We develop a general theory of intraband absorption based on the density matrix formalism. This theory can be applied to study degenerate eigenstates of electrons in semiconductor nanocrystals of different shapes and dimentions. We demonstrate that the angular dependence of intraband absorption by nonspherical nanocrystals enables investigating their shape and orientation, as well as the symmetry of quantum states excited by the probe field and selection rules of electronic transitions.

  5. Multi-epoch Spectroscopy of Dwarf Galaxies with AGN Signatures: Identifying Sources with Persistent Broad Hα Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassare, Vivienne F.; Reines, Amy E.; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny E.; Graur, Or; Geha, Marla; Hainline, Kevin; Carroll, Christopher M.; Hickox, Ryan C.

    2016-09-01

    We use time-domain optical spectroscopy to distinguish between broad emission lines powered by accreting black holes (BHs) and stellar processes (i.e., supernovae) for 16 galaxies identified as active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates by Reines et al (2013). Our study is primarily focused on those objects with narrow emission line ratios dominated by star formation, for which the origin of the broad Hα emission was unclear. Based on follow-up spectroscopy, we find that the broad Hα emission has faded or was ambiguous for all of the star-forming objects (14/16), over baselines ranging from 5-14 years, suggesting a transient stellar process was responsible for the broad emission in previous Sloan Digital Sky Survey observations. For the two objects in our follow-up sample with narrow-line AGN signatures (RGG 9 and RGG 119), we find persistent broad Hα emission consistent with an AGN origin. Additionally, we use high spectral resolution observations to measure stellar velocity dispersions for 15 objects in the Reines et al. (2013) sample, all with narrow-line ratios indicating the presence of an AGN. Stellar masses range from ˜ 5× {10}8 to 3× {10}9 M ⊙, and we measure {σ }* in the range of 28{--}71 {km} {{{s}}}-1. These {σ }* correspond to some of the lowest-mass galaxies with optical signatures of AGN activity. We show that RGG 119, the one object that has both a measured {σ }* and persistent broad Hα emission, falls near the extrapolation of the {\\text{}}{M}{BH}-{σ }\\star relation to the low-mass end.

  6. Ultrafast Third-Order Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoleon Thantu; Robert S. Schley

    2003-09-01

    Time-resolved Raman induced Kerr effect spectroscopy in the optical heterodyne detection configuration has been employed to investigate intermolecular, intramolecular, and reorientational dynamics in neat trichloroethylene (TCE). The reorientation time constant is directly measured from the time-resolved data, while Fourier transformation of the time-resolved data yields the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational spectrum. Use of ultrashort, femtosecond pulses enables excitation of depolarized Raman-active transitions between 1 and 500 cm-1. The intramolecular vibrations have been identified using a previous assignment. The limitations imposed by the laser and detector noise, and other nonlinear optical processes that are manifest at high pulse intensities, on the use of this time-domain technique for performing chemical species detection are discussed using carbon tetrachloride as an example.

  7. Recipes to make organic phantoms for diffusive optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2013-04-10

    Three recipes are presented to make tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids. Different approaches to prepare the emulsion are proposed. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser; instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30% to 70% by mass were tested. A broadband time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy system was used to characterize the phantoms in terms of optical properties and composition. For some water/lipid ratios the emulsion fails or the phantom has limited lifetime, but in most cases the recipes provide phantoms with a high degree of homogeneity [coefficient of variation (CV) of 4.6% and 1.5% for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively] and good reproducibility (CV of 8.3% and 12.4% for absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively).

  8. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  9. Optical spectroscopy of the dwarf nova U Geminorum

    CERN Document Server

    Morales-Rueda, T R

    2006-01-01

    U Gem is unique in having a direct measurement of K1 = 107 +- 2 km/s, Long et al. 1999). We present high-resolution optical spectra of the dwarf nova U Gem in quiescence taken to test the accuracy to which the HST value can be recovered from optical data. We find that, even with data of very high S/N we cannot recover Long et al.'s value to better than about 20% by any method. Contamination by neighbouring emission lines seems a likely culprit. Our data reveal a number of new features: Doppler tomograms show emission at low velocity, close to the centre of mass, and a transient, narrow absorption feature is seen in the Balmer lines near the line centres at the time of eclipse. We suggest that stellar prominences, as previously invoked for the dwarf novae IP Peg and SS Cyg in outburst, may explain both of these features. The He II 4686.75 A line emission is dominated by the gas stream/disc impact region. Two distinct spots are seen in Doppler maps, the first being very narrow and showing a velocity close to th...

  10. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonomo, F., E-mail: federica.bonomo@igi.cnr.it [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Istituto Gas Ionizzati - CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, Università di Padova, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cristofaro, S. [Universitá degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, 35122 Padova (Italy)

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  11. Measurement of aerosol optical properties by cw cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Guo; Ye, Shan-Shan; Yang, Xiao; Han, Ye-Xing; Tang, Huai-Wu; Yu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The CAPS (Cavity Attenuated Phase shift Spectroscopy) system, which detects the extinction coefficients within a 10 nm bandpass centered at 532 nm, comprises a green LED with center wavelength in 532nm, a resonant optical cavity (36 cm length), a Photo Multiplier Tube detector, and a lock in amplifier. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the optical cavity and is detected as a distorted waveform which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. Extinction coefficients are determined from changes in the phase shift of the distorted waveform of the square wave modulated LED light that is transmitted through the optical cavity. The performance of the CAPS system was evaluated by using measurements of the stability and response of the system. The minima ( 0.1 Mm-1) in the Allan plots show the optimum average time ( 100s) for optimum detection performance of the CAPS system. In the paper, it illustrates that extinction coefficient was correlated with PM2.5 mass (0.91). These figures indicate that this method has the potential to become one of the most sensitive on-line analytical techniques for extinction coefficient detection. This work aims to provide an initial validation of the CAPS extinction monitor in laboratory and field environments. Our initial results presented in this paper show that the CAPS extinction monitor is capable of providing state-of-the-art performance while dramatically reducing the complexity of optical instrumentation for directly measuring the extinction coefficients.

  12. Near- and far field spectroscopy of semi-continuous gold films with optically induced anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydendahl, Christian; Repän, Taavi; Geisler, Mathias

    Using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), optical spectroscopy, and finite element method simulations, we investigate the distributions of plasmonic modes present in fractal semi-continuous gold films, as well as studying anisotropy introduced into these films from photothermal melting...

  13. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Echelle long-slit optical spectroscopy of evolved stars

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, C Sanchez; de Paz, A Gil; Goodrich, R

    2008-01-01

    We present echelle long-slit optical spectra of a sample of objects evolving off the AGB, most of them in the pre-planetary nebula (pPN) phase, obtained with the ESI and MIKE spectrographs at Keck-II and Magellan-I, respectively. The total wavelength range covered with ESI (MIKE) is ~3900 to 10900 A (~3600 to 7200A). In this paper, we focus our analysis mainly on the Halpha profiles. Prominent Halpha emission is detected in half of the objects, most of which show broad Halpha wings (up to ~4000 km/s). In the majority of the Halpha-emission sources, fast, post-AGB winds are revealed by P-Cygni profiles. In ~37% of the objects Halpha is observed in absorption. In almost all cases, the absorption profile is partially filled with emission, leading to complex, structured profiles that are interpreted as an indication of incipient post-AGB mass-loss. All sources in which Halpha is seen mainly in absorption have F-G type central stars, whereas sources with intense Halpha emission span a larger range of spectral type...

  15. Effects of probe geometry on transscleral diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenmarker, Pontus; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Krohn, Jørgen

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the geometry of a fiber optic probe affects the transmission and reflection of light through the scleral eye wall. Two geometrical parameters of the fiber probe were investigated: the source-detector distance and the fiber protrusion, i.e. the length of the fiber extending from the flat surface of the fiber probe. For optimization of the fiber optic probe geometry, fluorescence stained choroidal tumor phantoms in ex vivo porcine eyes were measured with both diffuse reflectance- and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The strength of the fluorescence signal compared to the excitation signal was used as a measure for optimization. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and temperature were monitored to assess the impact of the probe on the eye. For visualizing any possible damage caused by the probe, the scleral surface was imaged with scanning electron microscopy after completion of the spectroscopic measurements. A source-detector distance of 5 mm with zero fiber protrusion was considered optimal in terms of spectroscopic contrast, however, a slight fiber protrusion of 0.5 mm is argued to be advantageous for clinical measurements. The study further indicates that transscleral spectroscopy can be safely performed in human eyes under in vivo conditions, without leading to an unacceptable IOP elevation, a significant rise in tissue temperature, or any visible damage to the scleral surface.

  16. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy Diagnostic of Laser-Induced Optical Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian G. Parigger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient laser plasma is generated in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB. Here we report experiments conducted with 10.6-micron CO2 laser radiation, and with 1.064-micron fundamental, 0.532-micron frequency-doubled, 0.355-micron frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation. Characterization of laser induced plasma utilizes laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS techniques. Atomic hydrogen Balmer series emissions show electron number density of 1017 cm−3 measured approximately 10 μs and 1 μs after optical breakdown for CO2 and Nd:YAG laser radiation, respectively. Recorded molecular recombination emission spectra of CN and C2 Swan bands indicate an equilibrium temperature in excess of 7000 Kelvin, inferred for these diatomic molecules. Reported are also graphite ablation experiments where we use unfocused laser radiation that is favorable for observation of neutral C3 emission due to reduced C3 cation formation. Our analysis is based on computation of diatomic molecular spectra that includes accurate determination of rotational line strengths, or Hönl-London factors.

  17. Optical and Microwave Spectroscopy of Transient Metal-Containing Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Small metal containing molecules are ideal venues for testing Fundamental Physics, investigating relativistic effects, and modelling spin-orbit induced unimolecular dynamics. Electronic spectroscopy is an effective method for probing these phenomena because such spectra are readily recorded at the natural linewidth limited resolution and accuracy of 0.0001 wn. The information garnered includes fine and hyperfine interactions, magnetic and electric dipoles, and dynamics. With this in mind, three examples from our recent (unpublished) studies will be highlighted. SiHD: Long ago Duxbury et al. developed a semi-quantitative model invoking Renner-Teller and spin-orbit coupling of the tilde{a}3B{1}, tilde{X}1A1, and tilde{A}1B1, states to explain the observed local perturbations and anomalous radiative lifetimes in the visible spectrum. More recently, the tilde{a}3B1 to tilde{A}1B1 intersystem crossing has been modeled using both semi-classical transition state theory and quantum trajectory surface hopping dynamics. Here we investigate the effects of the reduced symmetry of SiHD on the spectroscopy and dynamics using 2D spectroscopy. Rotationally resolved lines in the origin tilde{X}1A'→ tilde{A}1A" band are assigned to both c-type transitions and additional axis-switching induced transitions. AuO and AuS: The observed markedly different bonding of thiols and alcohols to gold clusters should be traceable to the difference in Au-O and Au-S bonding. To investigate this difference we have used optical Stark and Zeeman spectroscopy to determine the permanent electric dipole moments and magnetic g-factors. The results are rationalized using simple m.o. correlation diagrams and compared to ab initio predictions. TaN: TaN is the best candidate to search for a T,P- violating nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment. Here we report on the optical 2D, Stark, and Zeeman spectra, and our efforts to record the pure rotational spectrum using the separated field pump/probe microwave-optical

  18. Unidirectional enhanced spontaneous emission with metallo-dielectric optical antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hongming; Lu, Guowei; He, Yingbo; Cheng, Yuqing; Gong, Qihuang

    2017-07-01

    A metallo-dielectric system consisted of two coupled metallic nanoparticles embedded in a planar dielectric antenna is proposed to control the light emission from a localized emitter. Such design integrates the advantages of planar dielectric antenna and plasmonic antenna such as highly localized excitation enhancement, emission direction control, and high collection efficiency. For specific configurations, the antenna can achieve unidirectional and plasmon-enhanced emission from single emitters, simultaneously presenting remarkable collection efficiency up to 96%. We show that the unidirectional effect is mainly determined by the plasmon coupling effect of the plasmonic dimer. The dependences of directivity property on the antenna geometry and emitter's position are also discussed in detail. These findings provide a promising route to realize novel optical devices involving directional and surface enhanced spontaneous emission, e.g. bright single-photon sources with high collection efficiency.

  19. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. MARTINEZ; O. FLORES; J. C. POVEDA; B. CAMPILLO

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05)× 10^16 m^-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N2+, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  20. Transmittance, Reflectance, and Emission Spectroscopy of Meteorites from the UV to the IR Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Koulen, J. M.; Ferrari, S.; Martellato, E.

    2016-08-01

    Transmittance, reflectance, and emissivity Spectra of six meteorites have been collected at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of DLR in Berlin in the whole spectral range from the UV to the IR.

  1. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  2. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  3. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  4. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  5. Optical emission studies of plasma induced by single and double femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinon, V. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Universidad de A Coruna, Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, E-15403 Ferrol, A Coruna (Spain); Anglos, D., E-mail: anglos@iesl.forth.g [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (IESL-FORTH), P.O. Box 1385, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Department of Chemistry, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    Double-pulse femtosecond laser ablation has been shown to lead to significant increase of the intensity and reproducibility of the optical emission signal compared to single-pulse ablation particularly when an appropriate interpulse delay is selected, that is typically in the range of 50-1000 ps. This effect can be especially advantageous in the context of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of materials. A detailed comparative study of collinear double- over single-pulse femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been carried out, based on measurements of emission lifetime, temperature and electronic density of plasmas, produced during laser ablation of brass with 450 fs laser pulses at 248 nm. The results obtained show a distinct increase of plasma temperature and electronic density as well as a longer decay time in the double-pulse case. The plasma temperature increase is in agreement with the observed dependence of the emission intensity enhancement on the upper energy level of the corresponding spectral line. Namely, intensity enhancement of emission lines originating from higher lying levels is more profound compared to that of lines arising from lower energy levels. Finally, a substantial decrease of the plasma threshold fluence was observed in the double-pulse arrangement; this enables sensitive analysis with minimal damage on the sample surface.

  6. Determination of Metals Present in Textile Dyes Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Cross-Validation Using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rehan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS was used for the quantitative analysis of elements present in textile dyes at ambient pressure via the fundamental mode (1064 nm of a Nd:YAG pulsed laser. Three samples were collected for this purpose. Spectra of textile dyes were acquired using an HR spectrometer (LIBS2000+, Ocean Optics, Inc. having an optical resolution of 0.06 nm in the spectral range of 200 to 720 nm. Toxic metals like Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn along with other elements like Al, Mg, Ca, and Na were revealed to exist in the samples. The %-age concentrations of the detected elements were measured by means of standard calibration curve method, intensities of every emission from every species, and calibration-free (CF LIBS approach. Only Sample 3 was found to contain heavy metals like Cr, Cu, and Ni above the prescribed limit. The results using LIBS were found to be in good agreement when compared to outcomes of inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES.

  7. Correction of the Influence of Multiple Scattering on NO2 Emission Flux during the Pollutants Source Measurement by Mobile Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy%利用O4测量去除车载差分吸收光谱测量污染源NO2排放通量计算中多次散射的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丰成; 谢品华; 李昂; 司福祺; 王杨; 刘文清

    2011-01-01

    基于被动差分光学吸收光谱(DOAS)算法,使用车载被动DOAS技术在测量污染源排放通量时,由于云的多次散射影响,导致污染源排放通量的计算误差.特别对于像NO2这样的整层分布气体,由于低层云的出现造成多次散射增强使得NO2浓度显著升高,造成在计算污染源排放通量时产生较大误差.针对此问题,提出在车载DOAS污染源排放通量监测中利用O4及SO2的垂直柱浓度信息,在通量计算中对由于多次散射造成的NO2柱浓度增加进行修正.利用此方法反演了2010年10月9日上海某工业区的实验数据,修正后及修正前通量计算值分别为0.50 t/h和1.49 t/h.结果表明利用此方法能够修正污染源排放通量测量中多次散射引起的柱浓度显著升高影响,进一步促进了此技术在准确获取污染源排放通量上的发展及应用.%A large calculation error of pollutant emission flux occurs due to the influence of multiple scattering when we utilize the mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), which is based on the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy, to measure the pollutant source. The concentration of N0z that lies in the total layer increases significantly because of multi scattering in the lower atmospheric cloud. This results in large computing error of NO2 emission flux. To solve this problem, a new method is proposed. The information of O4 and SO2 vertical column density is employed during the measurement and then used to adjust the enhancement of NO2 due to multi scattering in the process of calculating flux. The experimental data from a certain Shanghai industrial district on Oct. 9th, 2010 is retrieved using this method. The flux value is 1. 49 t/h and 0. 5 t/h before and after correction, respectively. The results indicate that this method could effectively eliminate the influence of column density rise caused by multi scattering during the measurement. This novel method

  8. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  9. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  10. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  11. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  12. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  13. Discrepancy between infrared and optical emission in some Be stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An expanding ring model is put forward to investigate the original regions of Hα line emission and infrared excess emission in Be stars, by taking optical depth into account. We find that the two regions depend strongly on the physical properties of the envelope of Be stars such as the initial density and density structure. This model can be used to qualitatively interpret the disagreement between the near infrared excess and the equivalent width (EW) of Hα emissionline, as observed in some Be stars.

  14. Analysis of quantum semiconductor heterostructures by ballistic electron emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Daniel K.

    1998-09-01

    The microelectronics industry is diligently working to achieve the goal of gigascale integration (GSI) by early in the 21st century. For the past twenty-five years, progress toward this goal has been made by continually scaling down device technology. Unfortunately, this trend cannot continue to the point of producing arbitrarily small device sizes. One possible solution to this problem that is currently under intensive study is the relatively new area of quantum devices. Quantum devices represent a new class of microelectronic devices that operate by utilizing the wave-like nature (reflection, refraction, and confinement) of electrons together with the laws of quantum mechanics to construct useful devices. One difficulty associated with these structures is the absence of measurement techniques that can fully characterize carrier transport in such devices. This thesis addresses this need by focusing on the study of carrier transport in quantum semiconductor heterostructures using a relatively new and versatile measurement technique known as ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES). To achieve this goal, a systematic approach that encompasses a set of progressively more complex structures is utilized. First, the simplest BEES structure possible, the metal/semiconductor interface, is thoroughly investigated in order to provide a foundation for measurements on more the complex structures. By modifying the semiclassical model commonly used to describe the experimental BEES spectrum, a very complete and accurate description of the basic structure has been achieved. Next, a very simple semiconductor heterostructure, a Ga1-xAlxAs single-barrier structure, was measured and analyzed. Low-temperature measurements on this structure were used to investigate the band structure and electron-wave interference effects in the Ga1-xAlxAs single barrier structure. These measurements are extended to a simple quantum device by designing, measuring, and analyzing a set of

  15. The Structure of the Inner HH 34 Jet from Optical Integral Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, T L; Raga, A C; Reipurth, B; Beck, Tracy L.; Reipurth, Bo

    2006-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution optical integral field spectroscopy of a collimated Herbig-Haro jet viewed nearly edge-on. Maps of the line emission, velocity centroid, and velocity dispersion were generated for the H$\\alpha$ and [S II] emission features from the inner collimated jet and exciting source region of the HH 34 outflow. The kinematic structure of the jet shows several maxima and minima in both velocity centroid value and velocity dispersion along the jet axis. Perpendicular to the flow direction the velocity decreases outward from the axis to the limb of the jet, but the velocity dispersion increases. Maps of the electron density structure were derived from the line ratio of [S II] 6731/6716 emission. We have found that the jet exhibits a pronounced ``striped'' pattern in electron density; the high $n_e$ regions are at the leading side of each of the emission knots in the collimated jet, and low $n_e$ regions in the down-flow direction. On average, the measured electron density decreases outwar...

  16. The Sedentary Survey of Extreme High Energy Peaked BL Lacs III. Results from Optical Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Piranomonte, S; Giommi, P; Landt, H; Padovani, P

    2007-01-01

    The multi-frequency Sedentary Survey is a flux limited, statistically well-defined sample of highly X-ray dominated BL Lacertae objects (HBLs) which includes 150 sources. In this paper, the third of the series, we report the results of a dedicated optical spectroscopy campaign that, together with results from other independent optical follow up programs, led to the spectroscopic identification of all sources in the sample. We carried out a systematic spectroscopic campaign for the observation of all unidentified objects of the sample using the ESO 3.6m, the KPNO 4m, and the TNG optical telescopes. We present new identifications and optical spectra for 76 sources, 50 of which are new BL Lac objects, 18 are sources previously referred as BL Lacs but for which no redshift information was available, and 8 are broad emission lines AGNs. We find that the multi-frequency selection technique used to build the survey is highly efficient (about 90%) in selecting BL Lacs objects. We present positional and spectroscopic ...

  17. Obsidian hydration profiles measured by sputter-induced optical emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsong, I S; Houser, C A; Yusef, N A; Messier, R F; White, W B; Michels, J W

    1978-07-28

    The variation of concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, lithium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, and aluminum as a function of depth in the hydration layer of obsidian artifacts has been determined by sputter-induced optical emission. The surface hydration is accompanied by dealkalization, and there is a buildup of alkaline earths, calcium and magnesium in the outermost layers. These results have clarified the phenomena underlying the obsidian hydration dating technique.

  18. A Search for Optical Laser Emission Using Keck HIRES

    CERN Document Server

    Tellis, Nathaniel K

    2015-01-01

    We present a search for laser emission coming from point sources in the vicinity of 2796 stars, including 1368 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) that host one or more exoplanets. We search for extremely narrow emission lines in the wavelength region between 3640 and 7890 Angstroms using the Keck 10-meter telescope and spectroscopy with high resolution ($\\lambda/\\Delta \\lambda$ = 60,000). Laser emission lines coming from non-natural sources are distinguished from natural astrophysical sources by being monochromatic and coming from an unresolved point in space. We search for laser emission located 2-7 arcsec from the 2796 target stars. The detectability of laser emission is limited by Poisson statistics of the photons and scattered light, yielding a detection threshold flux of approximately $10^{-2}$ photons $m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for typical Kepler stars and 1 photon $m^{-2} s^{-1}$ for solar-type stars within 100 light-years. Diffraction-limited lasers having a 10-meter aperture can be detected from 100 light-years ...

  19. Enhancing stellar spectroscopy with extreme adaptive optics and photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Cvetojevic, Nick; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    Extreme adaptive optics systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of 90% in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a sp...

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography and Raman Spectroscopy of the retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Liu, R; Chan, J; Lane, S; Werner, J S

    2009-01-16

    Imaging the structure and correlating it with the biochemical content of the retina holds promise for fundamental research and for clinical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is commonly used to image the 3D structure of the retina and while the added functionality of biochemical analysis afforded by Raman scattering could provide critical molecular signatures for clinicians and researchers, there are many technical challenges to combining these imaging modalities. We present an ex vivo OCT microscope combined with Raman spectroscopy capable of collecting morphological and molecular information about a sample simultaneously. The combined instrument will be used to investigate remaining technical challenges to combine these imaging modalities, such as the laser power levels needed to achieve a Raman signal above the noise level without damaging the sample.

  1. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  2. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  3. Correlations between radio emission of the parsec-scale jet and optical nuclear emission of host AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Torrealba, Janet; Chavushyan, Vahram; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between the VLBA (Very Long Baseline Array) radio emission at 15 GHz and the optical nuclear emission at 5100 A for a sample of 233 core-dominated AGN with relativistic jets. For 181 quasars, there is a significant positive correlation between optical nuclear emission and total radio (VLBA) emission of unresolved cores (on milliarcsecond scales) of the jet at 15 GHz. Optical continuum emission correlates with radio emission of the jet for 31 BL Lacs. These correlations confirm that the radio and optical emission are beamed and originate at sub-parsec scales in the innermost part of the jet in quasars, while they are generated in the parsec-scale jet in BL Lacs. These results are in agreement with that reported earlier by Arshakian et al. 2010 for a sample of 135 AGN.

  4. Optical characterization of gaps in directly bonded Si compound optics using infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gully-Santiago, Michael; White, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Silicon direct bonding offers flexibility in the design and development of Si optics by allowing manufacturers to combine subcomponents with a potentially lossless and mechanically stable interface. The bonding process presents challenges in meeting the requirements for optical performance because air gaps at the Si interface cause large Fresnel reflections. Even small (35 nm) gaps reduce transmission through a direct bonded Si compound optic by 4% at $\\lambda = 1.25 \\; \\mu$m at normal incidence. We describe a bond inspection method that makes use of precision slit spectroscopy to detect and measure gaps as small as 14 nm. Our method compares low finesse Fabry-P\\'{e}rot models to high precision measurements of transmission as a function of wavelength. We demonstrate the validity of the approach by measuring bond gaps of known depths produced by microlithography.

  5. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeoni, G. G., E-mail: ggsimeoni@outlook.com [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E13, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Valicu, R. G. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E13, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physics Department E21, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Borchert, G. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), FRM II, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Böni, P. [Physics Department E21, Technical University of Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rasmussen, N. G. [Nanoscience Center, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A. [Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, D-51170 Köln (Germany)

    2015-12-14

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4–10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  6. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J. X., E-mail: jsliu9@berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Milbourne, T. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 (United States); Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Dominguez, A.; Efthimion, P. C.; Hill, K. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Kung, C.; Pablant, N. A.; Tobias, B. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Kubota, S. [Department of Physics, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Kasparek, W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Lu, J. [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Park, H. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  7. Optical Stark Spectroscopy of Chloro-Methylene HCCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiujuan; Steimle, Timothy C.; Wang, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    The optical spectrum of chloro-methylene, HCCl, has been studied for more than 40 years by both conventional and laser-based spectroscopy. Surprisingly, numerous visible bands have yet to be characterized, due in part to known perturbations. Furthermore, the permanent electric dipole moment, μEl, for any state has yet to be determined. Here we report on the field-free and optical Stark spectrum of the tilde{A}1A'' (060)- tilde{X}1A '(000) band system. A cold molecular beam sample was produced by skimming the output of a pulsed discharge source and the spectrum recorded at a resolution of approximately 30 MHz via LIF detection. The field-free spectrum was analyzed to produce an improved set of spectroscopic parameters for the tilde{A}1A''(060)state. The Stark induced shifts were analyzed to determine the values of the a-component of μEl for the tilde{X}1A^ {'}(000)state of 0.498(8)D. Small perturbations in the tilde{A}1A''(060)state will be described. A. J. Merer and D.N. Travis Can. J. Phys., 44, 525 1966. M.Kakimoto, S.Saito and E. Hirota J.Mol.Spectrosc., 97, 194 1983. B.-C.Chang and T. Sears J.Mol.Spectrosc., 173, 391 1995. H. Fan, I. Ionescu, C. Annesley, J. Cummins, M. Bowers and S. A. Reid J.Mol.Spectrosc., 225, 43 2004.

  8. Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Calcium Fluoride, CaF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Timothy; Kokkin, Damian L.; Delvin, Jack; Tarbutt, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Recently laser cooling has been demonstrated for the diatomic radical calcium fluoride, CaF. The mechanism of magneto-optical trapping for diatomic molecules has been elucidated recently by Tarbutt where a rate model was used to model the interaction of molecules with multiple frequencies of laser light. It was shown that the correct choice of laser polarization depends on the sign of the upper state magnetic g-factor. The magnetic tuning of the low rotational levels in the X^2σ^+, A^2Π and B^2σ^+ electronic states of CaF, have been experimentally investigated using high resolution optical Zeeman spectroscopy of a cold molecular beam sample. The observed Zeeman-induced shifts and splittings were successfully modeled using a traditional effective Hamiltonian approach to account for the interaction between the (ν=0) A^2Π and (ν=0) B^2σ^+ states. The determined magnetic g-factors for the X^2σ^+, A^2Π and B^2σ^+ states are compared to those predicted by perturbation theory. V. Zhelyazkova, A. Cournol, T.E. Wall, A. Matsushima, J.J. Hudson, E.A. Hinds, M.R. Tarbutt and B.E. Sauer, Phys. Rev. A 89, 053416 (2014) M. R. Tarbutt, New J. Phys 17, 015007 (2015)

  9. Authenticity screening of stained glass windows using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulebroeck, Wendy; Wouters, Hilde; Nys, Karin; Thienpont, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    Civilized societies should safeguard their heritage as it plays an important role in community building. Moreover, past technologies often inspire new technology. Authenticity is besides conservation and restoration a key aspect in preserving our past, for example in museums when exposing showpieces. The classification of being authentic relies on an interdisciplinary approach integrating art historical and archaeological research complemented with applied research. In recent decades analytical dating tools are based on determining the raw materials used. However, the traditional applied non-portable, chemical techniques are destructive and time-consuming. Since museums oftentimes only consent to research actions which are completely non-destructive, optical spectroscopy might offer a solution. As a case-study we apply this technique on two stained glass panels for which the 14th century dating is nowadays questioned. With this research we were able to identify how simultaneous mapping of spectral signatures measured with a low cost optical spectrum analyser unveils information regarding the production period. The significance of this research extends beyond the re-dating of these panels to the 19th century as it provides an instant tool enabling immediate answering authenticity questions during the conservation process of stained glass, thereby providing the necessary data for solving deontological questions about heritage preservation.

  10. Monitoring of Tumor Response to Cisplatin Using Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Evers, Daniel J.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; Rottenberg, Sven; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Anatomic imaging alone is often inadequate for tuning systemic treatment for individual tumor response. Optically based techniques could potentially contribute to fast and objective response monitoring in personalized cancer therapy. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of dual-modality diffuse reflectance spectroscopy–autofluorescence spectroscopy (DRS-AFS) to monitor the effects of systemic treatment in a mouse model for hereditary breast cancer. METHODS: Brca1−/−; p53−/− mammary tumors were grown in 36 mice, half of which were treated with a single dose of cisplatin. Changes in the tumor physiology and morphology were measured for a period of 1 week using dual-modality DRS-AFS. Liver and muscle tissues were also measured to distinguish tumor-specific alterations from systemic changes. Model-based analyses were used to derive different optical parameters like the scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as sources of intrinsic fluorescence. Histopathologic analysis was performed for cross-validation with trends in optically based parameters. RESULTS: Treated tumors showed a significant decrease in Mie-scattering slope and Mie-to-total scattering fraction and an increase in both fat volume fraction and tissue oxygenation after 2 days of follow-up. Additionally, significant tumor-specific changes in the fluorescence spectra were seen. These longitudinal trends were consistent with changes observed in the histopathologic analysis, such as vital tumor content and formation of fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that dual-modality DRS-AFS provides quantitative functional information that corresponds well with the degree of pathologic response. DRS-AFS, in conjunction with other imaging modalities, could be used to optimize systemic cancer treatment on the basis of early individual tumor response. PMID:24726234

  11. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  12. Thermal Emissivity-Based Chemical Spectroscopy through Evanescent Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Zsolt L; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented, with which environmentalchemistry-induced thermal emissivity changes of thin films are extracted with high isolation through evanescent tunneling. With this method the hydrogen-induced emissivity changes of films of TiO2 , Pd-TiO2 , and Au-TiO2 , with properties of high conductivity, hydrogen chemisorption, and plasmonic activity, are characterized in the UV-vis and NIR wavelength ranges, at 1073 K.

  13. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  14. Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cundiff, Steven T. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-05-03

    This final report describes the activities undertaken under grant "Optical Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy of Disordered Semiconductor Quantum Wells and Quantum Dots". The goal of this program was to implement optical 2-dimensional Fourier transform spectroscopy and apply it to electronic excitations, including excitons, in semiconductors. Specifically of interest are quantum wells that exhibit disorder due to well width fluctuations and quantum dots. In both cases, 2-D spectroscopy will provide information regarding coupling among excitonic localization sites.

  15. Transmission And Emission Spectroscopy Of Exoplanetary Atmospheres From The Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown in recent years with great success that spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres is feasible using space based observatories such as the HST and Spitzer. However, with the end of the Spitzer cold-phase, space based observations in the near to mid infra-red are limited, which will remain true until the the onset of the JWST. The importance of developing methods of ground based spectroscopic analysis of known hot Jupiters is therefore apparent. In the past, various groups have attempted exoplanetary spectroscopy using ground based facilities and various techniques. Here I like to present some preliminary results on a new attempt of the ground based efforts and discuss the feasibility of ground-based spectroscopy of exoplanetary atmospheres. This project is under the supervision of Giovanna Tinetti (University College London) and in collaboration with J. P. Beaulieu (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris), Mark Swain and Pieter Deroo (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech).

  16. Frank Isakson Prize for Optical Effects in Solids: Optical spectroscopy and mechanisms of superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Dirk

    By its very nature the phenomenon of superconductivity is intimately connected to the electrodynamics properties of a material, both in the normal and in the superconducting state. Optical spectroscopy and electrical transport -corresponding to the zero-frequency limit of the optical response- provide for this reason sensitive tools probing the collective response of a superconducting material. Optical spectroscopy can provide the real and imaginary parts of the optical conductivity of an electron liquid for all frequencies from radiowaves through infrared and visible up to the ultraviolet and even X-ray frequencies. Theory of the optical response is particularly well developed, leading among others to a number of sumrules, providing powerful tools for confronting experiment and theoretical models of superconducting pairing. In this talk examples of sumrules will be discussed relating to the kinetic energy and the Coulomb energy of the paired electrons, and experimental data of addressing these two energies will be presented. The basic understanding of pair formation in the conventional (i.e. BCS) model of superconductivity is, that electrons form pairs as a result of an attractive interaction. On general grounds one than expects the interaction energy to become reduced when the electrons form pairs, while at the same their kinetic energy increases. Superconductivity is a stable state of matter provided that all contributions together result in a lowering of the total (interaction, kinetic plus other terms if relevant) lowering of energy. In this talk I will demonstrate that these two effects can be observed in the cuprate superconductors, that behave according to aforementioned trends for strongly overdoped cuprates, but that the observed effects have the opposite sign for underdoped and optimally doped cuprates. These observations compare favorably with published numerical calculations based on models of strong electron-electron correlation, not involving the

  17. Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Layla; Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I. Alex; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Kurachi, Cristina; Wilson, Brian C.

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ˜90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ˜300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ˜750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy.

  18. High Resolution Optical Spectroscopy of Rosetta Target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Using Keck HIRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Adam; Cochran, Anita L.; Bodewits, Dennis; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Gulkis, Samuel; Snodgrass, Colin; Borro, Miguel de Val; Kelley, Michael S.; Feaga, Lori M.; Wooden, Diane H.; Bauer, James M.; Kramer, Emily A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high spectral resolution optical spectroscopy of Rosetta target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko obtained on UT Dec 26 and 27, 2015 using the HIRES instrument on Keck I when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of approximately 2 AU post-perihelion. The spectra cover a spectral range of 3500-10000 Angstroms at a spectral resolution of 67,000. These observations aim to provide high spectral resolution, large projected field of view context for the high spatial resolution and small projected field of view observations obtained from the Rosetta instrument suite. We report detections of CN, NH2, and [OI] emission. From the [OI]6300 emission we derive a water production rate of approximately 2 x 1027 mol/s. Production rates (or upper limits) for other species will be presented and placed in context with recent results from Rosetta. We will also present results pertaining to the [OI]5577 line, which combined with the [OI]6300 emission can be used as a proxy for CO2. We will compare our results to observations obtained by Rosetta as well as NEOWISE and Spitzer.

  19. Towards an understanding of the Of?p star HD 191612: optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Howarth, Ian D; Lennon, Danny J; Puls, Joachim; Naze, Yael; Annuk, K; Antokhin, I; Bohlender, D A; Bond, H; Donati, J -F; Georgiev, L; Gies, D; Harmer, D; Herrero, A; Kolka, I; McDavid, D; Morel, T; Negueruela, I; Rauw, G; Reig, P

    2007-01-01

    We present extensive optical spectroscopy of the early-type magnetic star HD 191612 (O6.5f?pe-O8fp). The Balmer and HeI lines show strongly variable emission which is highly reproducible on a well-determined 538-d period. Metal lines and HeII absorptions (including many selective emission lines but excluding He II 4686A emission) are essentially constant in line strength, but are variable in velocity, establishing a double-lined binary orbit with P(orb) = 1542d, e=0.45. We conduct a model-atmosphere analysis of the primary, and find that the system is consistent with a O8: giant with a B1: main-sequence secondary. Since the periodic 538-d changes are unrelated to orbital motion, rotational modulation of a magnetically constrained plasma is strongly favoured as the most likely underlying `clock'. An upper limit on the equatorial rotation is consistent with this hypothesis, but is too weak to provide a strong constraint.

  20. Optical absorption and emission of nitrogen-doped silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Xiaodong; Chen, Xiaobo; Ma, Yeshi; Yang, Deren

    2011-11-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) may be both unintentionally and intentionally doped with nitrogen (N) during their synthesis and processing. Since the importance of Si NCs largely originates from their remarkable optical properties, it is critical to understand the effect of N doping on the optical behavior of Si NCs. On the basis of theoretical calculations, we show that the doping of Si NCs with N most likely leads to the formation of paired interstitial N at the NC surface, which causes both the optical absorption and emission of Si NCs to redshift. But these redshifts are smaller than those induced by doubly bonded O at the NC surface. It is found that high radiative recombination rates can be reliably obtained for Si NCs with paired interstitial N at the NC surface. The current results not only help to understand the optical behavior of Si NCs synthesized and processed in N-containing environments, but also inspire intentional N doping as an additional means to control the optical properties of Si NCs.

  1. Optical Gratings Coated with Thin Si3N4 Layer for Efficient Immunosensing by Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Diéguez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available New silicon nitride coated optical gratings were tested by means of Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy (OWLS. A thin layer of 10 nm of transparent silicon nitride was deposited on commercial optical gratings by means of sputtering. The quality of the layer was tested by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. As a proof of concept, the sensors were successfully tested with OWLS by monitoring the concentration dependence on the detection of an antibody-protein pair. The potential of the Si3N4 as functional layer in a real-time biosensor opens new ways for the integration of optical waveguides with microelectronics.

  2. Radio imaging spectroscopy of synchrotron emission associated with a CME on the 14th of August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Hazel; Krucker, S.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Raftery, C.

    2013-07-01

    We present Nancay Radioheliograph observations of a moving type IV solar radio burst which occurred in association with a CME on the 14th of August 2010. The event was well observed at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2 and by the LASCO white light coronograph. The burst emission was found to be cospatial with the core of the CME. Using radio imaging spectroscopy we are able to characterize the underlying electron distribution and plasma parameters within the source. Fitted spectra reveal a clear power law component consistent with optically thin synchrotron emission from accelerated electrons trapped in the erupting flux rope. As is often observed in type IV bursts, polarization measurements show the source to be moderately polarized during the peak of the burst, before steadily increasing to around 70% as the brightness temperature of the burst decays.

  3. Spectral analysis of optical emission of microplasma in sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Morita, Hayato; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an analysis of optical emission spectra from microplasma in three types of liquid, namely artificial sea water composed of 10 typical agents (10ASW), reference solutions each containing a single agent (NaCl, MgCl2 + H2O, Na2SO4, CaCl2, KCl, NaHCO3, KBr, NaHCO3, H3BO3, SrCl2 + H2O, NaF) and naturally sampled deep sea water (DSW). Microplasma was operated using a needle(Pd)-to-plate(Pt) electrode system sunk into each liquid in a quartz cuvette. The radius of the tip of the needle was 50 μm and the gap between the electrodes was set at 20 μm. An inpulse generator circuit, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the liquid between the electrodes, was used as a pulse current source for operation of discharges. In the spectra, the emission peaks for the main components of sea water and contaminants from the electrodes were detected. Spectra for reference solutions were examined to enable the identification of unassigned peaks in the spectra for sea water. Analysis of the Stark broadening of H α peak was carried out to estimate the electron density of the plasma under various conditions. The characteristics of microplasma discharge in sea water and the analysis of the optical emission spectra will be presented. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26600129.

  4. The UV-Optical Albedo of Broad Emission Line Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Korista, K T; Korista, Kirk; Ferland, Gary

    1997-01-01

    We explore the effective UV-optical albedos of a variety of types of broad emission line clouds, as well as their possible effects on the observed spectra of AGN. An important albedo source in moderately ionized ionization-bounded clouds is that due to neutral hydrogen: Rayleigh scattering of continuum photons off the extreme damping wings of Lya. The photons resulting from this scattering mechanism may contribute significantly to the Lya emission line, especially in the very broad wings. In addition, line photons emitted near 1200 Angstroms (e.g., N V 1240) that stream toward the neutral portion of the cloud may be reflected off this Rayleigh scattering mirror, so that they preferentially escape from the illuminated face. Inclusion of this effect can alter predicted emission line strengths and profiles. In more highly-ionized ionization-bounded clouds, Thompson scattering dominates the UV-optical albedo, but this albedo is lessened by the hydrogen gas opacity. These clouds are most reflective on the long wav...

  5. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  6. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, F. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption process. Section II discusses 1s X-ray absorption, i.e., the K edges, and section III deals with 2p X-ray absorption, the L edges. X-ray emission is discussed in, respectively, the L edges. X-ray emis...

  7. Dynamics, OH distributions and UV emission of a gliding arc at various flow-rates investigated by optical measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Sun, Zhiwei; Li, Zhongshan

    2014-01-01

    -state OH were investigated using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The results show that the shape, height, intensity and thickness of ground-state OH distribution vary significantly with air flow rates. Finally, UV emission of the gliding arc is measured using optical emission spectroscopy......We demonstrate a plasma discharge which is generated between two diverging electrodes and extended into a gliding arc in non-equilibrium condition by an air flow at atmospheric pressure. Effects of the air flow rates on the dynamics, ground-state OH distributions and spectral characterization of UV...

  8. Investigations of GMAW plasma by optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinska, S [Instytut Fizyki im. Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Musiol, K [Instytut Fizyki im. Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K [Instytut Fizyki im. Mariana Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences-Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Valensi, F [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences-Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Izarra, Ch de [LASEP, Faculte des Sciences-Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Briand, F [CTAS - Air Liquide Welding, Rue des Epluches, Saint Ouen l' Aumone (France)

    2007-11-15

    We report on investigations of gas metal arc welding plasma operated in pure argon and in a mixture of argon and CO{sub 2} at a dc current of 326 A. The spatially resolved electron densities and temperatures were directly obtained by measuring the Stark widths of the Ar I 695.5 nm and Fe I 538.3 nm spectral lines. Our experimental results show a reduction of the plasma conductivity and transfer from spray arc to globular arc operation with increasing CO{sub 2} concentration. Although the electron density n{sub e} increases while approaching the core of the plasma in the spray-arc mode, a drop in the electron temperature T{sub e} is observed. Moreover, the maximum T{sub e} that we measure is about 13 000 K. Our experimental results differ from the Haidar model where T{sub e} is always maximum on the arc axis and its values exceed 20 000 K. These discrepancies can be explained as a result of underestimation of the amount of metal vapours in the plasma core and of the assumption of local thermal equilibrium plasma in the model.

  9. Characteristics of THz Emission from GaAs Crystal Excited by 400 nm and 800 nm Optical Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yu-Ping; XU Xin-Long; YAN Wei; WANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ THz emission spectroscopy is used to study the generation mechanism dependent behaviour of terahertz (THz) electromagnetic waves from the GaAs crystal under excitation by 400 nm and 800 nm femtosecond (fs) pulses,respectively. The wavelength dependence of the emission spectrum under two types of THz generation mechanisms is analysed. Under the optical rectification mechanism, a slight enhancement of the spectral amplitude in the high-frequency regime is observed in a GaAs(110) crystal by the excitation of a 400-nm optical pulse compared with that of 800nm. Whereas an obvious red shift of the amplitude spectrum occurs in the GaAs(100) sample under the transient photoconduction mechanism. These phenomena are explained in detail by the duration of the optical pump pulse and the band structure of GaAs, respectively.

  10. Enhancing Stellar Spectroscopy with Extreme Adaptive Optics and Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, N.; Schwab, C.; Cvetojevic, N.; Guyon, O.; Martinache, F.

    2016-12-01

    Extreme adaptive optics (AO) systems are now in operation across the globe. These systems, capable of high order wavefront correction, deliver Strehl ratios of ∼ 90 % in the near-infrared. Originally intended for the direct imaging of exoplanets, these systems are often equipped with advanced coronagraphs that suppress the on-axis-star, interferometers to calibrate wavefront errors, and low order wavefront sensors to stabilize any tip/tilt residuals to a degree never seen before. Such systems are well positioned to facilitate the detailed spectroscopic characterization of faint substellar companions at small angular separations from the host star. Additionally, the increased light concentration of the point-spread function and the unprecedented stability create opportunities in other fields of astronomy as well, including spectroscopy. With such Strehl ratios, efficient injection into single-mode fibers (SMFs) or photonic lanterns becomes possible. With diffraction-limited components feeding the instrument, calibrating a spectrograph’s line profile becomes considerably easier, as modal noise or imperfect scrambling of the fiber output are no longer an issue. It also opens up the possibility of exploiting photonic technologies for their advanced functionalities, inherent replicability, and small, lightweight footprint to design and build future instrumentation. In this work, we outline how extreme AO systems will enable advanced photonic and diffraction-limited technologies to be exploited in spectrograph design and the impact it will have on spectroscopy. We illustrate that the precision of an instrument based on these technologies, with light injected from an efficient SMF feed would be entirely limited by the spectral content and stellar noise alone on cool stars and would be capable of achieving a radial velocity precision of several m/s; the level required for detecting an exo-Earth in the habitable zone of a nearby M-dwarf.

  11. Multi-epoch Spectroscopy of Dwarf Galaxies with AGN Signatures: Identifying Sources with Persistent Broad H-alpha Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Baldassare, Vivienne F; Gallo, Elena; Greene, Jenny E; Graur, Or; Geha, Marla; Hainline, Kevin; Carroll, Christopher M; Hickox, Ryan C

    2016-01-01

    We use time-domain optical spectroscopy to distinguish between broad emission lines powered by accreting black holes (BHs) or stellar processes (i.e., supernovae) for 16 galaxies identified as AGN candidates by Reines et al. (2013). 14 of these have star-formation--dominated narrow-line emission ratios, one is a narrow-line AGN, and the last is a star-forming--AGN composite. We find that broad H$\\alpha$ emission has faded for 11/16 targets, based on spectra taken with the Magellan Echellette Spectrograph (MagE), the Dual Imaging Spectrograph, and the Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph with baselines ranging from 5 to 14 years. The 11 faded systems all have narrow-line ratios consistent with recent star formation, suggesting the broad emission for those targets was produced by a transient stellar process. The two objects with narrow-line AGN signatures (RGG 9 and RGG 119) have persistent broad H$\\alpha$ emission consistent with previous SDSS observations. The final three star-forming objects are classified a...

  12. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot optical bioimaging probes with ultra-thin biocompatible coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, Michael J; Shaw, David L; Long, Eric C; Naumann, Christoph A

    2008-04-01

    The current study reports on the colloidal stabilities and emission properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) optical probes capped with a variety of thin, hydrophilic surface coatings as studied using confocal fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These coatings are based on mercaptoethanol, mercaptopropionic acid (with and without conjugated aminoethoxyethanol), lipopolymers (DSPE-PEG2000), cysteine (Cys), and a variety of Xaa-Cys dipeptides. The study shows that several types of QDs with thin hydrophilic coatings can be designed that combine good colloidal stability and excellent emission properties (brightness). Furthermore, there is a general correlation between colloidal stability and brightness. The experiments reported herein illustrate that QDs with multiple types of thin coatings can be created for optical imaging applications in a biological environment while also maintaining a size below 10 nm.

  13. Optical Instabilities and Spontaneous Light Emission by Polarizable Moving Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário G. Silveirinha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most extraordinary manifestations of the coupling of the electromagnetic field and matter is the emission of light by charged particles passing through a dielectric medium: the Vavilov-Cherenkov effect. Here, we theoretically predict that a related phenomenon may be observed when neutral fast polarizable particles travel near a metal surface supporting surface plasmon polaritons. Based on a classical formalism, we find that at some critical velocity, even if the initial optical field is vanishingly small, the system may become unstable and may start spontaneously emitting light such that in some initial time window the electromagnetic field grows exponentially with time.

  14. Emission spectroscopy of laser-ablated Si plasma related to nanoparticle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, V.; Thareja, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the laser ablation of Si in vacuum, and in the presence of helium ambient at 1 and 10 Torr, respectively. The silicon nanoparticles were deposited on silicon substrate at room temperature by ablating silicon wafer in ambient atmosphere of helium at 1 Torr. The mean cluster size ranging from 1.8 to 4.4 nm is observed depending on the laser intensity. Optical emission spectroscopy and images of the plume are used to study the spatial and temporal variation of the silicon plasma. The electron density, measured by the Stark-broadening of Si I transition 3 p2 1S-4 s 1P0 at 390.55 nm and temperature, assuming thermal equilibrium, were found to be 1.2×10 18 cm -3 and 2 eV, respectively. The temporal variation of Si I transition 3 p2 1S-4 s 1P0 at 390.55 nm showed a shift in peak position attributed to collisions at an early stage of plasma formation. The relative concentration of Si II/Si I estimated by using the Saha-Boltzmann relation showed abundance of Si I. Time resolved images of the plume were used to investigate the dynamics of the expanding plasma plume, estimating the vapor pressure, vapor temperature, velocity, and stopping distance of the plume. The photoluminescent spectra of the Si thin films showed three distinct emission bands at 2.7, 2.2 and 1.69 eV, the origin of these bands is attributed to defects and quantum confinement.

  15. Magneto-optical spectroscopy of (Ga,Mn)N epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcet, S.; Ferrand, D.; Halley, D.; Kuroda, S.; Mariette, H.; Gheeraert, E.; Teran, F. J.; Sadowski, M. L.; Galera, R. M.; Cibert, J.

    2006-09-01

    We report on the magneto-optical spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence of a set of wurtzite (Ga,Mn)N epilayers with a low Mn content, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The sharpness of the absorption lines associated with the Mn3+ internal transitions allows a precise study of its Zeeman effect in both Faraday and Voigt configurations. We obtain a good agreement if we assume a dynamical Jahn-Teller effect in the 3d4 configuration of Mn, and we determine the parameters of the effective Hamiltonians describing the T25 and E5 levels, and those of the spin Hamiltonian in the ground spin multiplet, from which the magnetization of the isolated ion can be calculated. On layers grown on transparent substrates, transmission close to the band gap, and the associated magnetic circular dichroism, reveal the presence of the giant Zeeman effect resulting from exchange interactions between the Mn3+ ions and the carriers. The spin-hole interaction is found to be ferromagnetic.

  16. Optical humidity detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keke; Liu, Shixuan; Chen, Shizhe; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Xuanqun; Wang, Wenyan; Wu, Yushang

    2017-02-01

    Humidity is an important environmental parameter, which is difficult to be measured accurately and quickly using traditional measurement methods. Under the environment of low temperature or high humidity, traditional humidity and temperature sensor has shortages in humidity measurement accuracy, corresponding time and wet fade speed. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure the environmental humidity with wavelength modulation technology and harmonic detection technology based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. H2O molecular absorption line near 1392 nm is selected as the characteristic spectra. The effects of temperature, pressure and water concentration on the absorption spectrum width, the wavelength modulation coefficient and the amplitude of the harmonic signal are analyzed. Humidity and temperature sensor is modified using temperature and pressure compensation model, and the influence of the water concentration variation is eliminated by the iterative algorithm. The new humidity and temperature sensor prototype is developed, and the structure of the optical system is simple, which is easy to be adjusted. The response frequency of the humidity detection is 40 Hz. The experiment was carried out for 3 months at Qingdao national basic weather station. Experimental results show that the consistency of the humidity and temperature data is very good, which can proves the validity of the humidity measurement technology.

  17. Optical Spectroscopy of 2MASS Color-Selected Ultracool Subdwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, A J; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2006-01-01

    We present Gemini GMOS and Magellan LDSS-3 optical spectroscopy for seven ultracool subdwarf candidates color-selected from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Five are identified as late-type subdwarfs, including the previously reported sdM9.5 SSSPM 1013-1356 and L subdwarf 2MASS 1626+3925, and a new sdM8.5 2MASS 0142+0523. 2MASS 1640+1231 exhibits spectral features intermediate between a late-type M dwarf and subdwarf, similar to the previously identified high proper motion star SSSPM 1444-2019, and we classify both sources as mild subdwarfs, d/sdM9. 2MASS 1227-0447 is a new ultracool extreme subdwarf, spectral type esdM7.5. Spectral model fits yield metallicities that are consistent with these metallicity classifications. Effective temperatures track with numerical subtype within a metallicity class, although they are not equivalent across metallicity classes. As a first attempt to delineate subtypes in the L subdwarf regime we classify 2MASS 1626+3925 and the previously identified 2MASS 0532+8246 as sdL4 and s...

  18. Detection of Bioaerosols using Single Particle Thermal Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    droplets was accomplished by using a peristaltic pump to inject a set flow-rate of liquid mineral oil into a heated hypodermic needle . Heated mineral...heated to temperatures in excess of a 100 °C. Prevailing theory suggests a strong link between thermal emission and absorption spectra for bulk...iv 1. Background 1 2. Theory 1 3. Experiment 5 4. Results 13 5. Conclusion 16 6. References 18 List of Symbols, Abbreviations, and Acronyms 20

  19. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  20. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Geon Joon, E-mail: gjlee@kw.ac.kr; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha [Plasma Bioscience Research Center/Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Wan [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan, E-mail: piceae@naver.com [Department of Microbiology and Institute of Basic Sciences, Dankook University, Cheonan 330-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-14

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  1. Continuous optical monitoring during the prompt emission of GRB 060111B

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, A; Stratta, G; Atteia, J L; Boër, M; Malacrino, F; Damerdji, Y; Behrend, R; Klotz, Alain; Gendre, Bruce; Stratta, Giulia; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Boer, Michel; Malacrino, Frederic; Damerdji, Yassine; Behrend, Raoul

    2006-01-01

    We present the time-resolved optical emission of GRB 060111B during its prompt phase, measured with the TAROT robotic observatory. This is the first time that the optical emission from a gamma-ray burst has been continuously monitored with a temporal resolution of a few seconds during the prompt gamma-ray phase. The temporal evolution of the prompt optical emission at the level of several seconds is used to provide a clue to the origin of this emission. The optical emission was found to decay steadily from our first measure, 28s after the trigger, in contrast to the gamma-ray emission, which exhibits strong variability at the same time. This behaviour strongly suggests that the optical emission is due to the reverse shock.

  2. Optical spectroscopy of Be/gamma-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R K; Marti, J; Latev, G Y; Nikolov, Y M; Bode, M F; Luque-Escamilla, P L

    2016-01-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations of the gamma-ray binaries LSI+61303, MWC 656, MWC 148. The peak separation and equivalent widths of prominent emission lines (H-alpha, H-beta, H-gamma, HeI and FeII) are measured. We estimate the circumstellar disc size, compare it with separation between the components and discuss the disc truncation. We find that in LSI+61303 the compact object comes into contact with the outer parts of the circumstellar disc at periastron; in MWC 148 the compact object goes deeply into the disc during the periastron passage, and in MWC 656 the black hole is accreting from the outer parts of the circumstellar disc along the entire orbit. The interstellar extinction is estimated using interstellar lines and hydrogen column density. The rotation of the mass donors appears to be similar to the rotation of the mass donors in Be/X-ray binaries. We suggest that X-ray periodicity ~1 day deserves to be searched for.

  3. Probing the Active Galactic Nuclei using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, M.

    Variability studies offer one of the best tools for understanding the physical conditions present in regions close to the central engine in an AGN. We probed the various properties of AGN through time variability studies of spectral lines in the optical wavelengths using the 2m telescope in IUCAA Girawali observatory. The absorption line variability studies are mainly concentrated in understanding the nature of outflows in quasars. Quasar outflows have a huge impact on the evolution of central supermassive blackholes, their host galaxies and the surrounding intergalactic medium. Studying the variability in these Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) can help us understand the structure, evolution, and basic physical properties of these outflows. We conducted a repeated Low ionization BAL monitoring program with 27 LoBALs (Low Ionization BALs) at z 0.3-2.1 covering timescales from 3.22 to 7.69 years in the quasar rest frame. We see a variety of phenomena, including some BALs that either appeared or disappeared completely and some BALs which do not vary over the observation period. In one case, the excited fine structure lines have changed dramatically. One source shows signatures of radiative acceleration. Here, we present the results from this program. Emission line studies are concentrated in understanding the peculiar characteristics of a dual-AGN source SDSS J092712.64+294344.0.

  4. BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey II: X-ray Emission and High Ionization Optical Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Berney, Simon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Ricci, Claudio; Lamperti, Isabella; Schawinski, Kevin; Balokovic, Mislav; Crenshaw, D Michael; Fischer, Travis; Gehrels, Neil; Harrison, Fiona; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ichikawa, Kohei; Mushotzky, Richard; Oh, Kyuseok; Stern, Daniel; Treister, Ezequiel; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Veilleux, Sylvain; Winter, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between X-ray and optical line emission in 340 nearby AGN selected above 10 keV using Swift BAT. We find a weak correlation between the extinction corrected [O III] and hard X-ray luminosity (14-195 keV) with a [OIII] large scatter (R_Pear = 0.64, sigma = 0.62 dex) and a similarly large scatter with the intrinsic 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosities (RPear=0.63, sigma = 0.63 dex). Correlations of the hard X-ray fluxes with the fluxes of high-ionization narrow lines ([O III], He II, [Ne III] and [Ne V]) are not significantly better than with the low ionization lines (Halpha, [SII]). Factors like obscuration or physical slit size are not found to be a significant part of the large scatter. In contrast, the optical emission lines show much better correlations with each other (sigma = 0.3 dex) than with the X-ray flux. The inherent large scatter questions the common usage of narrow emission lines as AGN bolometric luminosity indicators and suggests that other issues such as geometrical...

  5. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  6. Ground-based NIR emission spectroscopy of HD189733b

    CERN Document Server

    Waldmann, I P; Tinetti, G; Griffith, C A; Swain, M R; Deroo, P

    2011-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of transiting exoplanets are providing an unprecedented view of the atmospheres of planets around nearby stars. As we learn more about the atmospheres of these remote bodies, we begin to build up a clearer picture of their composition and thermal structure. Here we investigate the case of K and L band emissions of the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b. Using the SpeX instrument on the NASA IRTF, we obtained three nights of secondary eclipse data using equivalent settings for all nights. Our sample includes one night previously presented by Swain et al. (2010) which allows for comparability of results. In this publication we present and discuss in detail a greatly improved data-reduction and analysis routine. This, in conjunction with more data, allows us to increase the spectral resolution of our planetary spectrum (R ~ 170-180), leading to a better identifiability of the features present. We confirm the existence of a strong emission at ~3.3 microns which is inconsistent with LTE simulations ...

  7. Optically stimulated exoelectron emission processes in quartz: comparison of experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that it is possible to measure optically stimulated exoelectron emission (OSE) signals simultaneously with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from quartz samples. These experiments provide valuable information on the charge movement in quartz grains. Two...

  8. Emission Spectroscopy of Atmospheric-Pressure Ball Plasmoids: Higher Energy Reveals a Rich Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Rose, Amber Nicole; Glumac, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2017-06-01

    Ball plasmoids (self-sustaining spherical plasmas) are a particularly unique example of a non-equilibrium air plasma. These plasmoids have lifetimes on the order of hundreds of milliseconds without an external power source, however, current models dictate that a ball plasmoid should recombine in a millisecond or less. Ball plasmoids are considered to be a laboratory analogue of natural ball lightning, a phenomenon that has eluded scientific explanation for centuries. We are searching for the underlying physicochemical mechanism(s) by which ball plasmoids and (by extension) ball lightning are stabilized using a variety of diagnostic techniques. This presentation will focus on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) of ball plasmoid discharges between 190-850 nm. The previous generation of OES measurements of this system showed emission from only a few atomic and molecular species, however, the energy available for the discharges in these experiments was limited by the size of the capacitor banks and voltages to which the capacitor banks were charged. We are capable of generating plasmoids at much higher energies, and as a result we are the first to report a very rich chemistry previously not observed in ball plasmoids. We have identified signals from species including NO A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, OH A^{2}Σ^{+}→X^{2}Π, NH A^{3}Π→X^{3}Σ^{-}, AlO A^{2}Π→X^{2}Σ^{+}, NH^{+} B^{2}Δ→X^{2}Π, W I, Al I, Cu I, and H_{α}, all of which have not yet been reported for this system. Analysis of the emission spectra and fitting procedures will be discussed, rotational temperatures of constituent species will be reported, and theories of ball plasmoid stabilization based upon these new results will be presented. Versteegh, A.; Behringer, K.; Fantz, U.; Fussman, G.; Jüttner, B.; Noack, S. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2008, 17(2), 024014 Stephan, K. D.; Dumas, S.; Komala-Noor, L.; McMinn, J. Plas. Sour. Sci. Technol. 2013, 22(2), 025018

  9. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  10. Impurity induced crystallinity and optical emissions in ZnO nanorod arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, N. R.; Acharya, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    We report the growth of ZnO nanocrystallites doped with impurities such as B, N and S by green chemistry route using ultrasound. The effect of intrinsic defects and impurity doping on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures has been studied and discussed. Characterization studies carried out using x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal the change in lattice parameters and crystallinity of ZnO in the presence of dopant. This has been explained on the basis of the dopant substitution at regular anion and interstitial sites. Study on surface morphology by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) shows a change from particle-like structure to aligned nanorods nucleated at definite sites. Elemental analysis such as x-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS) has been carried out to ascertain the dopant configuration in ZnO. This has been corroborated by the results obtained from FTIR and Raman studies. UV-vis light absorption and PL studies show an expansion of the band gap which has been explained on the basis of Moss-Burstein shift in the electronic band gap of ZnO by impurity incorporation. The optical emissions corresponding to excitonic transition and defect centres present in the band gap of ZnO is found to shift towards lower/higher wavelength sides. New PL bands observed have been assigned to the transitions related to the impurity states present in the band gap of ZnO along with intrinsic defects.

  11. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC1805

    CERN Document Server

    Rauw, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4If$^+$ star HD15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. We have observed IC1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60$^{\\circ}$ 497 and HD15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60$^{\\circ}$ 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast r...

  12. Optical spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1758-258: a possible intermediate mass system?

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J

    2016-01-01

    Context. GRS 1758-258 is one of two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic Center direction discovered almost a quarter of a century ago. The system remains poorly studied in the optical domain due to its counterpart being a very faint and absorbed target in a crowded region of the sky. Aims. Our aim is to investigate GRS 1758-258 in order to shed light on the nature of the stellar binary components. In particular, the main physical parameters of the donor star, such as the mass or the spectral type, are not yet well constrained. Methods. GRS 1758-258 has remained so far elusive to optical spectroscopy owing to its observational difficulties. Here, we use this traditional tool of stellar astronomy at low spectral resolution with a 10 m class telescope and a long slit spectrograph. Results. An improved spectrum is obtained as compared to previous work. The quality of the data does not allow the detection of emission or absorption features but, nevertheless, we manage to partially achieve our aims compa...

  13. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was s

  14. Spectroscopy and photophysics of self-organized zinc porphyrin nanolayers. 1. Optical spectroscopy of excitonic interactions involving the soret band

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, H.; Koehorst, R.B.M.; Schaafsma, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    The photophysical properties of excited singlet states of zinc tetra-(p-octylphenyl)-porphyrin in 5-25-nm-thick films spin-coated onto quartz slides have been investigated by optical spectroscopy. Analysis of the polarized absorption spectra using a dipole-dipole exciton model with two mutually perp

  15. Measuring spatiotemporal variation in snow optical grain size under a subalpine forest canopy using contact spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molotch, Noah P; Barnard, David M; Burns, Sean P; Painter, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    .... In this study, we address one of many measurement gaps by using contact spectroscopy to measure snow optical grain size at high spatial resolution in trenches dug between tree boles in a subalpine forest...

  16. Effect of mechanical optical clearing on near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelson, Christopher R; Vogt, William C; King-Casas, Brooks; LaConte, Stephen M; Rylander, Christopher G

    2015-08-01

    Near-infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is a broadly utilized technology with many emerging applications including clinical diagnostics, sports medicine, and functional neuroimaging, to name a few. For functional brain imaging NIR light is delivered at multiple wavelengths through the scalp and skull to the brain to enable spatial oximetry measurements. Dynamic changes in brain oxygenation are highly correlated with neural stimulation, activation, and function. Unfortunately, NIRS is currently limited by its low spatial resolution, shallow penetration depth, and, perhaps most importantly, signal corruption due to light interactions with superficial non-target tissues such as scalp and skull. In response to these issues, we have combined the non-invasive and rapidly reversible method of mechanical tissue optical clearing (MOC) with a commercially available NIRS system. MOC utilizes a compressive loading force on tissue, causing the lateral displacement of blood and water, while simultaneously thinning the tissue. A MOC-NIRS Breath Hold Test displayed a ∼3.5-fold decrease in the time-averaged standard deviation between channels, consequentially promoting greater channel agreement. A Skin Pinch Test was implemented to negate brain and muscle activity from affecting the recorded signal. These results displayed a 2.5-3.0 fold increase in raw signal amplitude. Existing NIRS instrumentation has been further integrated within a custom helmet device to provide a uniform force distribution across the NIRS sensor array. These results showed a gradual decrease in time-averaged standard deviation among channels with an increase in applied pressure. Through these experiments, and the development of the MOC-NIRS helmet device, MOC appears to provide enhancement of NIRS technology beyond its current limitations.

  17. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Heshou; Richter, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H\\,{\\sc ii} Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show...

  18. Field-emission spectroscopy of beryllium atoms adsorbed on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czyzewski, J.J.; Grzesiak, W.; Krajniak, J. (Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    Field emission energy distributions (FEED) have been measured for the beryllium-tungsten (023) adsorption system over the 78-450 K temperature range. A temperature dependence of the normalized half-width, ..delta../d, of FEED peaks changed significantly due to beryllium adsorption; and the curve, ..delta../d vs p, for the Be/W adsorption system was identical in character to the calculated curve based on the free electron model in contrast to the curve for the clean tungsten surface. In the last part of this paper Gadzuk's theory of the resonance-tunneling effect is applied to the beryllium atom on tungsten. Experimental and theoretical curves of the enhancement factor as a function of energy have been discussed.

  19. Identifying four $INTEGRAL$ sources in the Galactic Plane via VLT/optical and $XMM$-$Newton$/X-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rahoui, Farid; Krivonos, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We report on FORS2 spectroscopy aiming at the identification of four Galactic Plane sources discovered by $INTEGRAL$, IGR J18088-2741, IGR J18381-0924, IGR J17164-3803, and IGR J19173+0747, complemented by $XMM$-$Newton$ spectroscopy for IGR J18381-0924. The presence of broad emission lines of neutral H and He and a flat Balmer decrement H{\\alpha}/H{\\beta} show that IGR J18088-2741 is a cataclysmic variable located beyond 8 kpc. For IGR J18381-0924, the detection of red-shifted H{\\alpha} and neutral O emission signatures and the absence of narrow forbidden emission lines point towards a low-luminosity Seyfert 1.9 nature at $z=0.031\\pm0.002$. Its $XMM$-$Newton$ spectrum, best-fit by an absorbed ${\\Gamma}=1.19\\pm0.07$ power law combined with a $z=0.026_{-0.016}^{+0.008}$ red-shifted iron emission feature, is in agreement with this classification. The likely IGR J17164-3803 optical counterpart is an M2 III star at 3 to 4 kpc which, based on the X-ray spectrum of the source, is the companion of a white dwarf in a...

  20. Optical Emissions Associated with Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Celestin, S. J.; Pasko, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Measurements have correlated TGFs with initial development stages of normal polarity intracloud lightning that transports negative charge upward (+IC) [e.g., Lu et al., GRL, 37, L11806, 2010; JGR, 116, A03316, 2011]. Moreover, Østgaard et al. [GRL, 40, 2423, 2013] have recently reported, for the first time, space-based observations of optical emissions from TGF-associated IC lightning flashes. The purpose of the present work is to quantify the intensities of optical emissions resulting from the excitation of air molecules produced by conventional streamer discharges in negative corona flashes of stepping negative leaders and by the large amount of electrons involved in TGF events based on two production mechanisms: relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005] and production of runaway electrons by high-potential +IC lightning leaders [e.g., Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011; Xu et al., GRL, 39, L08801, 2012]. We employ a Monte Carlo model to simulate the acceleration of electrons in the energy range from sub-eV to GeV in either large-scale homogeneous electric field sustaining RREAs or highly inhomogeneous electric field produced around the lightning leader tip region. With the knowledge of the electron energy distribution function, a model similar to that described in [Liu and Pasko, JGR, 109, A

  1. Investigation of the atomic emission spectroscopy of F atoms and CF2 molecules in CF4 plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huiliang; Li, Jie; Tang, Caixue; Deng, Wenhui; Chen, Xianhua

    2016-10-01

    The surface chemistry reaction involved in the processing of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) produced from CF4 precursor has been explored. The atomic emission spectroscopy of F atoms and CF2 molecules was investigated as they contribute to substrate etching and FC film formation during APPJ processing. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) spectra were acquired for CF4 plasma, relative concentrations of excited state species of F atoms and CF2 molecules were also dependent upon plasma parameters. The densities of F atoms increased dramatically with increasing applied RF power, whereas CF2 molecules decreased monotonically over the same power range, the subsequent electron impacted decomposition of plasma species after CF4 precursor fragmentation. The spectrum of the F atoms and CF2 molecules fallowed the same tendency with the increasing concentration of gas CF4, reaching the maximum at the 20sccm and 15sccm respectively, and then the emission intensity of reactive atoms decreased with more CF4 molecules participating. Addition certain amount O2 into CF4 plasma resulted in promoting CF4 dissociation, O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF2 molecules, which inhibit the compound of the F atoms, so with the increasing concentration of O2, the concentration of the CF2 molecules decreased and the emission intensities of F atoms showed the maximum at the O2/CF4 ratio of 20%. These results have led to the development of a scheme that illustrates the mechanisms of surface chemistry reaction and the affection of plasma parameters in CF4 plasma systems with respect to F and CF2 gas-phase species.

  2. Observation of SERS effect in Raman optical activity, a new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim

    2006-01-01

    A new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy is here reported. A Surface Enhanced effect was observed using Raman Optical Activity (ROA). This observation opens new possibilities for ROA as a tool for vibrational spectroscopy. The combination of surface enhanced effect SE and ROA into SEROA...

  3. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  4. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  5. Ultrafast terahertz conductivity and transient optical absorption spectroscopy of silicon nanocrystal thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Harthy, Rahma Al; Cooke, David

    We use time-resolved THz spectroscopy and transient optical absorption spectroscopy as two complementary techniques to study ultrafast carrier dynamics in silicon nanocrystal thin films. We find that the photoconductive dynamics in these materials is dominated by interface trapping, and we observe...... several different relaxation mechanisms for photoexcited carriers...

  6. Continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system with stably tunable beat source using optical switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Joo Beom; Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jaesung

    2017-01-01

    A tunable beat source has been made using an optical switch module. A stably-tunable beat source for continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was implemented by simply connecting 16 coaxial distributed feedback laser diodes to an optical switch. The terahertz frequency was rapidly changed without frequency drifts by changing the optical path. The continuous wave terahertz frequency was tuned from 0.05 to 0.8 THz in steps of 50 GHz or 0.4 nm. We measured continuous wave terahertz waveforms emitted from the photomixers using the switched optical beat source. We also calculated the terahertz frequency peaks by taking fast Fourier transforms of the measured terahertz waveforms. By equipping the implemented tunable beat source with an optical switch, a continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy system was constructed and used to demonstrate the feasibility of continuous wave terahertz spectroscopy for nondestructive tests using the spectra of two type of Si wafers with different resistivity.

  7. The influence of magnetic fields on absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Heshou; Yan, Huirong [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Richter, Philipp [Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP) (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Spectroscopic observations play essential roles in astrophysics. They are crucial for determining important physical parameters, providing information about the composition of various objects in the universe, as well as depicting motions in the universe. However, spectroscopic studies often do not consider the influence of magnetic fields. In this paper, we explore the influence of magnetic fields on the spectroscopic observations arising from Ground State Alignment (GSA). Synthetic spectra are generated to show the measurable changes of the spectra due to GSA. The influences of atomic alignment on absorption from DLAs, emission from H II Regions, submillimeter fine-structure lines from star forming regions are presented as examples to illustrate the effect in diffuse gas. Furthermore, we demonstrate the influence of atomic alignment on physical parameters derived from spectral line ratios, such as the alpha-to-iron ratio([X/Fe]), interstellar temperature, and ionization rate. Results in our paper show that due to GSA, magnetic fields will affect the spectra of diffuse gas with high signal-to-noise(S/N) ratio under the condition that photon-excitation is much more efficient than thermal collision.

  8. Optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ben; Wang, Zhenxing; Tian, Yue; Fok, Mable P; Shastri, Bhavin J; Kanoff, Daniel R; Prucnal, Paul R

    2013-01-28

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optical steganography method in which a data signal is transmitted using amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise as a carrier. The ASE serving as a carrier for the private signal has an identical frequency spectrum to the existing noise generated by the Erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) in the transmission system. The system also carries a conventional data channel that is not private. The so-called "stealth" or private channel is well-hidden within the noise of the system. Phase modulation is used for both the stealth channel and the public channel. Using homodyne detection, the short coherence length of the ASE ensures that the stealth signal can only be recovered if the receiver closely matches the delay-length difference, which is deliberately changed in a dynamic fashion that is only known to the transmitter and its intended receiver.

  9. Optical emission spectrum of filamentary nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbanev, S. A.; Khomenko, A. Yu; Stepanyan, S. A.; Popov, N. A.; Starikovskaia, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    Streamer-to-filament transition is a general feature of high pressure high voltage (HV) nanosecond surface dielectric barrier discharges. The transition was studied experimentally using time- and space-resolved optical emission in UV and visible parts of spectra. The discharge was initiated by HV pulses 20 ns in duration and 2 ns rise time, positive or negative polarity, 20-60 kV in amplitude on the HV electrode. The experiments were carried out in a single-shot regime at initial pressures P  >  3 bar and ambient initial temperature in air, N2, H2:N2 and O2:Ar mixtures. It was shown that the transition to filamentary mode is accompanied by the appearance of intense continuous radiation and broad atomic lines. Electron density calculated from line broadening is characterized by high absolute values and long decay in the afterglow. The possible reasons for the continuous spectra were analyzed.

  10. Reverberation Mapping of Optical Emission Lines in Five Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fausnaugh, M M; Bentz, M C; Denney, K D; De Rosa, G; Peterson, B M; Kochanek, C S; Pogge, R W; Adams, S M; Barth, A J; Beatty, Thomas G; Bhattacharjee, A; Borman, G A; Boroson, T A; Bottorff, M C; Brown, Jacob E; Brown, Jonathan S; Brotherton, M S; Coker, C T; Crawford, S M; Croxall, K V; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eracleous, Michael; Joner, M D; Henderson, C B; Holoien, T W -S; Horne, Keith; Hutchison, T; Kaspi, Shai; Kim, S; King, Anthea L; Li, Miao; Lochhaas, Cassandra; Ma, Zhiyuan; MacInnis, F; Manne-Nicholas, E R; Mason, M; Montuori, Carmen; Mosquera, Ana; Mudd, Dale; Musso, R; Nazarov, S V; Nguyen, M L; Okhmat, D N; Onken, Christopher A; Ou-Yang, B; Pancoast, A; Pei, L; Penny, Matthew T; Poleski, Radoslaw; Rafter, Stephen; Romero-Colmenero, E; Runnoe, Jessie; Sand, David J; Schimoia, Jaderson S; Sergeev, S G; Shappee, B J; Simonian, Gregory V; Somers, Garrett; Spencer, M; Starkey, D; Stevens, Daniel J; Tayar, Jamie; Treu, T; Valenti, Stefano; Van Saders, J; Villanueva, S; Villforth, C; Weiss, Yaniv; Winkler, H; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014, targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGN) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a "changing look" AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H$\\beta$ lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H$\\gamma$ and He{\\sc ii}\\,$\\lambda 4686$ lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He{\\sc ii}\\,$\\lambda 4686$ lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100--300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.

  11. Near-Field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Pointed Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    metal nanostructure can be viewed as an optical antenna . Of course, the efficiency depends on the material composition and the geometry of the...nanostructure. A simple form of optical antenna is a single ellipsoidal particle. This particle ex- hibits a distinct resonance for which the field...Grober RD, Schoelkopf RJ, Prober DE. 1997. Optical antenna : towards a unity efficiency near-field optical probe. Appl. Phys. Lett. 70:1354 54. Farahani

  12. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  13. Identification of microcrystalline rocks using thermal emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardgrove, C. J.; Rogers, D.; Glotch, T. D.; Arnold, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    High-silica deposits on Mars have been discovered from orbit (Holden Crater, Mawrth Vallis) and from landed surface missions to both Gusev Crater (Spirit) and Gale Crater (Curiosity). The character of these silica deposits can be used to understand both the depositional environment (i.e. fumarole vs. sinter) and/or diagenetic process. Initial work has shown that, in the case of opaline silica, there are differences in spectral shape that may be related to surface textural features imparted during formation or post-depositional alteration. Due to the increasing importance of understanding microcrystalline deposits on Mars, here, we study the effects of crystal size and surface roughness on thermal infrared emission spectra of micro- and macro-crystalline quartz. The spectra of chert and macro-crystalline quartz have significant differences in both spectral contrast, and in the rounded doublet between ~1000-1250 cm-1, which can shift and appear less rounded in microcrystalline samples. We find that microcrystalline minerals exhibit naturally rough surfaces compared to their macrocrystalline counterparts at the 10 micron scale; and that this roughness causes distinct spectral differences within the Reststrahlen bands. We find that surface roughness, if rough on the scale of the wavelengths where the wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient (k) is large, can cause not only decreased spectral contrast, but also substantial changes in spectral shape. The spectral shape differences are small enough that the composition of the material is still recognizable, but large enough such that a roughness effect could be detected. We find that my studying the thermal infrared spectral character of the sample, it may be possible to make general inferences about microcrystallinity, and thus aid in the potential reconstruction of sedimentary rock diagenesis.

  14. Curve of growth methodology applied to laser-induced plasma emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornushkin, I. B.; Anzano, J. M.; King, L. A.; Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1999-04-01

    The curve-of-growth (COG) method was applied to a laser-induced plasma. The plasma was produced by a Nd:YAG laser on the surface of steel samples containing 0.007-1.3% of Cr. The emission was collected from the top of the plasma by means of a 45° pierced mirror and aligned onto an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) with a gate width of 1 μs and a variable delay time. The resonance 425.4 nm Cr line was used for construction of the COG. The temperature of the plasma (˜8000 K at 5-μs delay) was determined from a Boltzmann plot. The damping constant a, proportional to the ratio of the Lorentzian to the Doppler line widths, was found from the best fit of a series of calculated COG to the experimental data points and was 0.20±0.05. The number density of neutral Cr atoms which corresponded to the transition between low and high optical densities, was ≈6.5·10 12 cm -3. The cross-section for broadening collisions of Cr atoms with atmospheric species (presumably N 2) was calculated to be (66±16) Å. The shape of the 425.4-nm Cr line was additionally checked by scanning an ultra-narrow cw Ti:Sapphire laser across the atomic transition and found to be in agreement with preliminary estimates. The potential of the COG method for laser breakdown spectroscopy is discussed.

  15. Anisotropic optical response of optically opaque elastomers with conductive fillers as revealed by terahertz polarization spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Makoto; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2016-12-01

    Elastomers are one of the most important materials in modern society because of the inherent viscoelastic properties due to their cross-linked polymer chains. Their vibration-absorbing and adhesive properties are especially useful and thus utilized in various applications, for example, tires in automobiles and bicycles, seismic dampers in buildings, and seals in a space shuttle. Thus, the nondestructive inspection of their internal states such as the internal deformation is essential in safety. Generally, industrial elastomers include various kinds of additives, such as carbon blacks for reinforcing them. The additives make most of them opaque in a wide spectral range from visible to mid-infrared, resulting in that the nondestructive inspection of the internal deformation is quite difficult. Here, we demonstrate transmission terahertz polarization spectroscopy as a powerful technique for investigating the internal optical anisotropy in optically opaque elastomers with conductive additives, which are transparent only in the terahertz frequency region. The internal deformation can be probed through the polarization changes inside the material due to the anisotropic dielectric response of the conductive additives. Our study about the polarization-dependent terahertz response of elastomers with conductive additives provides novel knowledge for in situ, nondestructive evaluation of their internal deformation.

  16. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments.

  17. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Krauss, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  18. Fast optical in situ spectroscopy in III-V MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspari, C.

    2007-09-29

    This work describes the application of optical in situ measurement techniques (reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy, RAS, and spectroscopic ellipsometry, SE) to processes that are important for the growth of III-V semiconductors like GaAs, InP, InAs and GaP in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Special emphasis is placed on the determination of the free carrier concentration (doping level) and the study of the thermal desorption properties of III-V oxides. A large part of this work is concerned with the development and the construction of a multichannel RAS setup that allows the recording of RAS spectra within fractions of a second. On the basis of benchmark measurements it was shown that the spectral resolution is sufficiently accurate for application in epitaxy. To demonstrate the recording of spectra with high temporal resolution, RAS monolayer oscillations during growth of GaAs were studied and it was shown that the surface changes periodically between a relatively smooth morphology with adsorbed methyl groups (type III) and a stepped, gallium-rich surface (type II). Furthermore the non-reversible process of growing InAs quantum dots on GaAs was studied. It was shown that the multichannel RAS is capable of detecting the 2D-3D transition as well as the following morphological change of the surface at high temporal resolution. For the measurement of the doping level, the relationship between the doping-induced internal electric field and the anisotropy of the sample was studied. To understand the effect of the so-called doping oscillations, a theoretical model was developed. For the investigation of the thermal desorption of the III-V oxides in MOVPE, a number of test series were realised. It was also found that the formation of the reconstructed surface is finished a considerable time after the SE transient indicates stable conditions (no further reduction of the oxide layer). The activation energy for oxide desorption from InAs, GaAs and InP was

  19. Excitation emission and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of selected varnishes used in historical musical instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Austin; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Thoury, Mathieu; Comelli, Daniela; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of various varnishes from different origins, which are commonly found on historical musical instruments was carried out for the first time with both fluorescence excitation emission spectroscopy and laser-induced time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Samples studied include varnishes prepared using shellac, and selected diterpenoid and triterpenoid resins from plants, and mixtures of these materials. Fluorescence excitation emission spectra have been collected from films of naturally aged varnishes. In parallel, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of varnishes provides means for discriminating between short- (less than 2.0 ns) and long-lived (greater than 7.5 ns) fluorescence emissions in each of these complex materials. Results suggest that complementary use of the two non destructive techniques allows a better understanding of the main fluorophores responsible for the emission in shellac, and further provides means for distinguishing the main classes of other varnishes based on differences in fluorescence lifetime behaviour. Spectrofluorimetric data and time resolved spectra presented here may form the basis for the interpretation of results from future in situ fluorescence examination and time resolved fluorescence imaging of varnished musical instruments.

  20. HST Emission Line Galaxies at z ~ 2: Comparing Physical Properties of Lyman Alpha and Optical Emission Line Selected Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Alex; Behrens, Christoph; Ciardullo, Robin; Gebhardt, Henry S Grasshorn; Gronwall, Caryl; Bridge, Joanna S; Fox, Derek B; Schneider, Donald P; Trump, Jonathan R; Blanc, Guillermo A; Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Chonis, Taylor S; Finkelstein, Steven L; Hill, Gary J; Jogee, Shardha; Gawiser, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We compare the physical and morphological properties of z ~ 2 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) identified in the HETDEX Pilot Survey and narrow band studies with those of z ~ 2 optical emission line galaxies (oELGs) identified via HST WFC3 infrared grism spectroscopy. Both sets of galaxies extend over the same range in stellar mass (7.5 < logM < 10.5), size (0.5 < R < 3.0 kpc), and star-formation rate (~1 < SFR < 100). Remarkably, a comparison of the most commonly used physical and morphological parameters -- stellar mass, half-light radius, UV slope, star formation rate, ellipticity, nearest neighbor distance, star formation surface density, specific star formation rate, [O III] luminosity, and [O III] equivalent width -- reveals no statistically significant differences between the populations. This suggests that the processes and conditions which regulate the escape of Ly-alpha from a z ~ 2 star-forming galaxy do not depend on these quantities. In particular, the lack of dependence on ...

  1. Kinetic model of atomic and molecular emissions in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    A kinetic model previously developed to predict the relative intensities of atomic emission lines in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been extended to include processes related to CN and C(2) molecular emissions. Simulations with this model were performed to predict the relative excited-state populations. The results from the simulations are compared with experimentally determined excited-state populations from 1,064 nm laser irradiation of organic residues on aluminum foil. The model reasonably predicts the relative intensity of the molecular emissions. Significantly, the model reproduces the vastly different temporal profiles of the atomic and molecular emissions. The latter are found to extend to much longer times after the laser pulse, and this appears to be due to the increasing concentration of the molecules versus time. From the simulations, the important processes affecting the CN and C(2) concentrations are identified.

  2. Excitation-emission fluorescence spectroscopy and time-gated Raman microscopy analysis of dental tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, M.; Sen, S.; Kouklin, Nikolai A.; Skliarov, A.; Dhuru, D. B.; Iacopino, A. M.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2007-02-01

    We applied two new spectroscopic techniques (time-gated Raman microscopy and excitation-emission fluorescence microspectroscopy) to characterize healthy and carious dental tissues. These methods were used together with visual inspection, DIAGNOdent, optical polarization microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and chemical microanalysis to get a more detailed picture of chemical and structural transformations in dental tissues as a result of caries development.

  3. Investigating the nature of the Fried Egg nebula: CO mm-line and optical spectroscopy of IRAS 17163-3907

    CERN Document Server

    Wallström, Sofia H J; Lagadec, E; Black, J H; Oudmaijer, R D; Justtanont, K; van Winckel, H; Zijlstra, A A

    2015-01-01

    Through CO mm-line and optical spectroscopy, we investigate the properties of the Fried Egg nebula IRAS 17163-3907, which has recently been proposed to be one of the rare members of the yellow hypergiant class. The CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 emission arises from a region within 20" of the star and is clearly associated with the circumstellar material. The CO lines show a multi-component asymmetrical profile, and an unexpected velocity gradient is resolved in the east-west direction, suggesting a bipolar outflow. This is in contrast with the apparent symmetry of the dust envelope as observed in the infrared. The optical spectrum of IRAS 17163-3907 between 5100 and 9000 {\\AA} was compared with that of the archetypal yellow hypergiant IRC+10420 and was found to be very similar. These results build on previous evidence that IRAS 17163-3907 is a yellow hypergiant.

  4. Optical spectroscopy for tissue diagnostics and treatment control

    OpenAIRE

    Yavari, Nazila

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical Optics as an interdisciplinary field of science has been developed during many years and is experiencing tremendous growth, to cover a wide range of optical techniques and methods, utilized for medical therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Biomedical optics contributes by introducing methods and creation of devices used in healthcare of various specialties, such as ophthalmology, cardiology, surgery, dermatology, oncology, radiology, etc. Each of these specialities mi...

  5. Identifying four INTEGRAL sources in the Galactic plane via VLT/optical and XMM-Newton/X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahoui, Farid; Tomsick, John. A.; Krivonos, Roman

    2017-02-01

    We report on FORS2 (FOcal Reducer/low dispersion Spectrograph 2) spectroscopy aiming at the identification of four Galactic plane sources discovered by INTEGRAL, IGR J18088-2741, IGR J18381-0924, IGR J17164-3803, and IGR J19173+0747, complemented by XMM-Newton spectroscopy for IGR J18381-0924. The presence of broad H I and He I emission lines and a flat Balmer decrement Hα/Hβ show that IGR J18088-2741 is a cataclysmic variable located beyond 8 kpc. For IGR J18381-0924, the detection of redshifted Hα and O I emission signatures and the absence of narrow forbidden emission lines point towards a low-luminosity Seyfert 1.9 nature at z = 0.031 ± 0.002. Its XMM-Newton spectrum, best fitted by an absorbed Γ = 1.19 ± 0.07 power law combined with a z=0.026_{-0.008}^{+0.016} redshifted iron emission feature, is in agreement with this classification. The likely IGR J17164-3803 optical counterpart is an M2 III star at 3-4 kpc which, based on the X-ray spectrum of the source, is the companion of a white dwarf in an X-ray faint symbiotic system. Finally, we challenge the accepted identification of IGR J19173+0747 as a high-mass X-ray binary. Indeed, the USNO optical counterpart is actually a blend of two objects located at the most likely 3 kpc distance, both lying within the error circle of the Swift position. The first is a cataclysmic variable, which we argue is the real nature of IGR J19173+0747. However, we cannot rule out the second one which we identify as an F3 V star which, if associated with IGR J19173+0747, likely belongs to a quiescent X-ray binary.

  6. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhalkar, H. S.; Dewhirst, M.; Oliver, T.; Cao, Y.; Oldham, M.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate or BABB

  7. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Measurement of Hydroxyl Radicals in Air Discharge with Atomized Water%Optical Emission Spectroscopic Measurement of Hydroxyl Radicals in Air Discharge with Atomized Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明; 陈维刚; 张颖

    2011-01-01

    Effects of discharge mode, voltage applied, size of the nozzle discharge electrode and flow rate of water on the generation of hydroxyl radical were investigated in air discharge with atomized water, by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Water was injected into the discharge region through the discharge nozzle electrode, and a large amount of fine water drops, formed and distributed in the discharge region, corona discharge was more effective to generate were observed. It was found that negative DC the hydroxyl radicals in comparison to positive DC corona discharge or negative pulsed discharge. A larger outer diameter of the nozzle electrode or a stronger electric field is beneficial for hydroxyl-radical generation. Moreover, there is a critical value in the flow rate of atomized water against the discharge voltage. Below this critical value, hydroxyl-radical generation increases with the increase in flow rate of the water, while above this value, it decreases. In addition, it is observed that OES from the discharge is mainly in the ultraviolet domain. The results are helpful in the study of the mechanism and application of plasma in pollution-control in either air or water.

  8. Hole emission from Ge/Si quantum dots studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapteyn, C.M.A.; Lion, M.; Heitz, R.; Bimberg, D. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik; Miesner, C.; Asperger, T.; Brunner, K.; Abstreiter, G. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Walter-Schottky-Inst. fuer Physikalische Grundlagen der Halbleiterelektronik

    2001-03-01

    Emission of holes from self-organized Ge quantum dots (QDs) embedded in Si Schottky diodes is studied by time-resolved capacitance spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS signal is rather broad and depends strongly on the filling and detection bias conditions. The observed dependence is interpreted in terms of carrier emission from many-hole states of the QDs. The activation energies obtained from the DLTS measurements are a function of the amount of stored charge and the position of the Fermi level in the QDs. (orig.)

  9. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  10. Laser induced surface emission of neutral species and its relationship to optical surface damage processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, L. L.; Smith, L. K.

    1988-03-01

    The laser-induced emission of neutral constituents and impurities from surfaces of several optical materials is shown to be correlated with optical surface damage thresholds. The characteristics of the emission can be utilized to investigate physical processes involved in the absorption of laser energy at the surface. Examples are given of neutral emission correlated with catastrophic surface heating, changes in surface stoichiometry, and thermally-induced cracking.

  11. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Goeroge P. Miller; Dr. Christopher B. Winstead

    2001-12-04

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the avsorved signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time.

  12. Dimension reduction of multivariable optical emission spectrometer datasets for industrial plasma processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; McArdle, Conor; Daniels, Stephen

    2013-12-19

    A new data dimension-reduction method, called Internal Information Redundancy Reduction (IIRR), is proposed for application to Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) datasets obtained from industrial plasma processes. For example in a semiconductor manufacturing environment, real-time spectral emission data is potentially very useful for inferring information about critical process parameters such as wafer etch rates, however, the relationship between the spectral sensor data gathered over the duration of an etching process step and the target process output parameters is complex. OES sensor data has high dimensionality (fine wavelength resolution is required in spectral emission measurements in order to capture data on all chemical species involved in plasma reactions) and full spectrum samples are taken at frequent time points, so that dynamic process changes can be captured. To maximise the utility of the gathered dataset, it is essential that information redundancy is minimised, but with the important requirement that the resulting reduced dataset remains in a form that is amenable to direct interpretation of the physical process. To meet this requirement and to achieve a high reduction in dimension with little information loss, the IIRR method proposed in this paper operates directly in the original variable space, identifying peak wavelength emissions and the correlative relationships between them. A new statistic, Mean Determination Ratio (MDR), is proposed to quantify the information loss after dimension reduction and the effectiveness of IIRR is demonstrated using an actual semiconductor manufacturing dataset. As an example of the application of IIRR in process monitoring/control, we also show how etch rates can be accurately predicted from IIRR dimension-reduced spectral data.

  13. Observations of the Prompt Optical Emission of GRB 160625B with Mini-MegaTORTORA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Orekhova, N.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2017-06-01

    Here we report our observations of bright optical flash coincident with Fermi GRB160625B using Mini-MegaTORTORA wide-field monitoring system. The prompt optical emission is correlated with gamma one and lags behind it for about 3 seconds, that suggests that optical and gamma emission are formed in different regions of the burst. The multiwavelength properties of this burst are very similar to ones of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080319B, we detected earlier with TORTORA camera.

  14. GROUND-BASED NEAR-INFRARED EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY OF HD 189733B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Drossart, P. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, Universit Paris-Diderot. 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Swain, M. R.; Deroo, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Griffith, C. A., E-mail: ingo@star.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the K- and L-band dayside emission of the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b with three nights of secondary eclipse data obtained with the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. The observations for each of these three nights use equivalent instrument settings and the data from one of the nights have previously been reported by Swain et al. We describe an improved data analysis method that, in conjunction with the multi-night data set, allows increased spectral resolution (R {approx} 175) leading to high-confidence identification of spectral features. We confirm the previously reported strong emission at {approx}3.3 {mu}m and, by assuming a 5% vibrational temperature excess for methane, we show that non-LTE emission from the methane {nu}{sub 3} branch is a physically plausible source of this emission. We consider two possible energy sources that could power non-LTE emission and additional modeling is needed to obtain a detailed understanding of the physics of the emission mechanism. The validity of the data analysis method and the presence of strong 3.3 {mu}m emission are independently confirmed by simultaneous, long-slit, L-band spectroscopy of HD 189733b and a comparison star.

  15. Is optical Fe II emission related to the soft X-ray properties of quasars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Elvis, Martin; Mchardy, Ian

    1987-01-01

    Radio-quiet quasars generally show broad, blended multiplets of Fe II emission in their optical and UV spectra. Radio-loud quasars also show UV Fe II emission, but their optical Fe II emission is generally weaker. No satisfactory theory connecting the generation of Fe II and radio emission has been found to explain this effect. A second, well-established distinction between the two clases of quasar is in their X-ray properties: radio-loud quasars are more X-ray luminous, and recent results have shown that they also have systematically flatter soft X-ray slopes. Here it is proposed that the second effect causes the first; i.e., that the primary factor controlling the optical Fe II emission is the soft X-ray spectrum. This proposition is supported by X-ray and optical data for nine quasars, which shows a correlation between the soft X-ray slope and the strength of the optical Fe II emission. One of these quasars (1803+676) is radio-quiet, and yet its optical spectrum shows no evidence for Fe II emission. This quasar is also unusual in that it has a flat X-ray spectrum. This further supports the proposal that the X-ray spectrum is important in determining the relative strengths of UV and optical Fe II emission.

  16. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  17. Toward contrast-enhanced, optically-detected NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriles, Carlos; Pagliero, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    Optical detection of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) takes place via a two-step process that relies on the interaction between optical photons and electrons on the one hand, and the hyperfine coupling between electrons and nuclear spins on the other. The latter depends on the material system under consideration while the former is dominated by the difference between the illumination and optical transition wavelengths. Here we use optical Faraday rotation to monitor nuclear spins in real time after resonant radio-frequency excitation at high-magnetic field. Comparison between inductively and optically detected NMR spectra in model sample fluids indicates that each of these mechanisms can lead to alternate forms of spectral contrast. Extension of these findings may find application in solvent suppression protocols, sensitivity-enhanced NMR of metalloproteins, or the characterization of molecular orbitals in diamagnetic systems. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation.

  18. Localization Spectroscopy of a Single Ion in an Optical Lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legrand, Olivier Philippe Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing-wave. Bes......The work reported in this thesis primarily focuses on studies of the dynamics of a single laser-cooled ion, simultaneously confined in the harmonic potential of a linear Paul trap and a rapidly varying periodic potential – a so-called optical lattice – generated from an optical standing...... calibration and analysis of the detection system, several theoretical simulations of the expected dynamics and associated optical response of the ion were undertaken. Finally, a new laser source based on second harmonic generation was developed in order to perform laser-cooling of Ca+ ions, and to serve...

  19. Synthesis, field emission properties and optical properties of ZnSe nanoflowers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, S.L., E-mail: slxue@dhu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Wu, S.X.; Zeng, Q.Z.; Xie, P.; Gan, K.X.; Wei, J.; Bu, S.Y.; Ye, X.N.; Xie, L. [Department of Applied Physics, College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zou, R.J. [State Key Laboratory for Modification and Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhang, C.M.; Zhu, P.F. [Department of Physics, School of Fundamental Studies, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Unique ZnSe nanoflowers have been successfully synthesized by reaction of Se powder with Zn substrates. They are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, EDS and Raman spectroscopy and were single crystals with cubic zinc blende (ZB) structure. They also have excellent field emission properties and optical properties. - Highlights: • Novel ZnSe nanoflowers are grown on Zn foils. • ZnSe nanoflowers are characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. • ZnSe nanoflowers on Zn foils as cathodes possess good FE properties. - Abstract: ZnSe nanoflowers have been synthesized by reaction of Se powder with Zn substrates at low temperature. The as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that the morphologies of the as-prepared samples highly depended on reaction time. ZnSe nanoclusters and nanoflowers formed at 573 K when the reaction time was 20 and 60 min, respectively. The as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers were composed of radically aligned ZnSe nanorods with smooth surfaces. The results of XRD, XPS, EDS, TEM and Raman showed that the as-prepared ZnSe nanocrystals were single crystals with cubic zinc blende (ZB) structure. The formation mechanism of the as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers was also discussed. In addition, the as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers had excellent electron emission properties. The turn-on field of the as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers was 3.5 V/μm and the enhancement factor was 3499. The optical properties of the as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the as-prepared ZnSe nanoflowers were potential candidates for optoelectronic devices.

  20. Development of fiber optic spectroscopy for in-vitro and in-planta detection of fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Oi Wah; Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this project is to apply photonics technology to bio-safety management of genetically modified (GM) plants. The conventional method for screening GM plants is through selection using antibiotic resistance markers. There is public concern with such approaches and these are associated with food safety issues, escape of antibiotic resistance genes to pathogenic microorganisms and interference with antibiotic therapy. Thus, the strategy taken in this project is to replace antibiotic resistance markers with fluorescent protein markers that allow for rapid and non-invasive optical screening of genetically modified plants. In this paper, fibre optic spectroscopy was developed to detect and quantify recombinant green (EGFP) and red (DsRED) fluorescent proteins in vitro and in planta. In vitro detection was first carried out to optimize the sensitivity of the optical system. The bacterial expression vectors carrying the coding regions of EGFP and DsRED were introduced into Escherichia coli host cells and fluorescent proteins were produced following induction with IPTG. Soluble EGFP and DsRED proteins were isolated from lysed bacterial cells and serially diluted for quantitative analysis by fibre optic spectroscopy using different light sources, namely, blue LED (475 nm), tungsten halogen (350 - 1000 nm) and double frequency Nd:YAG green laser (532 nm). Fluorescence near the expected emission wavelengths could be detected up to 320X dilution for EGFP and DsRED with blue LED and 532 nm green laser, respectively, as the excitation source. Tungsten halogen was found to be unsuitable for excitation of both EGFP and DsRED. EGFP was successfully purified by size separation under non-denaturing electrophoretic conditions and quantified. The minimum concentration of EGFP detectable with blue LED excitation was 5 mg/ml. To determine the capability of spectroscopy detection in planta, transgenic potato hairy roots and whole modified plant lines expressing the

  1. Characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the cathodic disbonding of Zn coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amami, Souhail [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)], E-mail: souhail.amami@utc.fr; Lemaitre, Christian; Laksimi, Abdelouahed; Benmedakhene, Salim [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 6066 du CNRS, B.P. 20529, 60206 Compiegne Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    Galvanized steel has been tested in a synthetic sea water solution under different cathodic overprotection conditions. The generated hydrogen flux caused the damage of the metal-zinc interface and led to a progressive coating detachment. Scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and acoustic emission technique were used to characterize the damage chronology under different cathodic potentials. A damage mechanism was proposed and the acoustic signature related to the coating degradation was statistically identified using clustering techniques.

  2. Detection and characterization of singly deuterated silylene, SiHD, via optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkin, Damian L; Ma, Tongmei; Steimle, Timothy; Sears, Trevor J

    2016-06-28

    Singly deuterated silylene has been detected and characterized in the gas-phase using high-resolution, two-dimensional, optical spectroscopy. Rotationally resolved lines in the 00 (0)X̃(1)A(')→Ã(1)A(″) band are assigned to both c-type perpendicular transition and additional parallel, axis-switching induced bands. The extracted rotational constants were combined with those for SiH2 and SiD2 to determine an improved equilibrium bond length, rSiH, and bond angle, θ, of 1.5137 ± 0.0003 Å and 92.04° ± 0.05°, and 1.4853 ± 0.0005 Å and 122.48° ± 0.08° for the X̃(1)A(')0,0,0 and Ã(1)A(″)(0,0,0) state respectively. The dispersed fluorescence consists of a long progression in the Ã(1)A(″)(0,0,0)→X̃(1)A(')(0,ν2,0) emission which was analyzed to produce vibrational parameters. A strong quantum level dependence of the rotationally resolved radiative decay curves is analyzed.

  3. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  4. Unveiling the nature of INTEGRAL objects through optical spectroscopy. X. A new multi-year, multi-observatory campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Masetti, N; Palazzi, E; Jimenez-Bailon, E; Chavushyan, V; McBride, V; Rojas, A F; Steward, L; Bassani, L; Bazzano, A; Bird, A J; Charles, P A; Galaz, G; Landi, R; Malizia, A; Mason, E; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Schiavone, F; Stephen, J B; Ubertini, P

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of our program (running since 2004) of identification of hard X-ray INTEGRAL sources through optical spectroscopy, we present the results concerning the nature of 33 high-energy objects. The data were acquired with the use of six telescopes of different sizes and from one on-line archive. The results indicate that the majority of these objects (23 out of 33) are active galactic nuclei (AGNs), whereas 10 are sources in the local Universe with eight of which in the Galaxy and two in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the identified AGNs, 13 are of Type 1 (i.e., with broad emission lines), eight are of Type 2 (with narrow emissions only), and two are X-ray bright, optically normal galaxies with no apparent nuclear activity in the optical. Six of these AGNs lie at high redshift (z > 0.5). Concerning local objects, we found that five of them are Galactic cataclysmic variables, three are high-mass X-ray binaries (two of which lying in the SMC), one is a low-mass X-ray binary, and one is cl...

  5. Optical spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1758-258: a possible intermediate mass system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J.

    2016-11-01

    Context. GRS 1758-258 is one of two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic center direction discovered almost a quarter of a century ago. The system remains poorly studied in the optical domain due to its counterpart being a very faint and absorbed target in a crowded region of the sky. Aims: Our aim is to investigate GRS 1758-258 in order to shed light on the nature of the stellar binary components. In particular, the main physical parameters of the donor star, such as the mass or the spectral type, are not yet well constrained. Methods: GRS 1758-258 has remained so far elusive to optical spectroscopy owing to its observational difficulties. Here, we use this traditional tool of stellar astronomy at low spectral resolution with a 10 m class telescope and a long slit spectrograph. Results: An improved spectrum is obtained as compared to previous work. The quality of the data does not allow the detection of emission or absorption features but, nevertheless, we manage to partially achieve our aims comparing the de-reddened continuum with the spectral energy distribution expected from an irradiated disc model and different donor star templates. Conclusions: We tentatively propose that GRS 1758-258 does not host a giant star companion. Instead, a main sequence star with mid-A spectral type appears to better agree with our data. The main impacts of this finding are the possibility that we are dealing with an intermediate mass system and, in this case, the prediction of an orbital period significantly shorter than previously proposed.

  6. Noninvasive optical cytochrome c oxidase redox state measurements using diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Yoon, David; Boss, Gerry R.; Patterson, Steven E.; Rockwood, Gary; Isom, Gary; Brenner, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A major need exists for methods to assess organ oxidative metabolic states in vivo. By contrasting the responses to cyanide (CN) poisoning versus hemorrhage in animal models, we demonstrate that diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) can detect cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) redox states. Intermittent decreases in inspired O2 from 100% to 21% were applied before, during, and after CN poisoning, hemorrhage, and resuscitation in rabbits. Continuous DOS measurements of total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxidized and reduced CcO from muscle were obtained. Rabbit hemorrhage was accomplished with stepwise removal of blood, followed by blood resuscitation. CN treated rabbits received 0.166 mg/min NaCN infusion. During hemorrhage, CcO redox state became reduced concurrently with decreases in oxyhemoglobin, resulting from reduced tissue oxygen delivery and hypoxia. In contrast, during CN infusion, CcO redox state decreased while oxyhemoglobin concentration increased due to CN binding and reduction of CcO with resultant inhibition of the electron transport chain. Spectral absorption similarities between hemoglobin and CcO make noninvasive spectroscopic distinction of CcO redox states difficult. By contrasting physiological perturbations of CN poisoning versus hemorrhage, we demonstrate that DOS measured CcO redox state changes are decoupled from hemoglobin concentration measurement changes.

  7. Integrated optical measurement system for fluorescence spectroscopy in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2001-01-01

    A transportable miniaturized fiber-pigtailed measurement system is presented which allows quantitative fluorescence detection in microliquid handling systems. The microliquid handling chips are made in silica on silicon technology and the optical functionality is monolithically integrated...... with the microfluidic channel system. This results in inherent stability and photolithographic alignment precision. Permanently attached optical fibers provide a rugged connection to the light source, detection, and data processing unit, which potentially allows field use of such systems. Fluorescence measurements...

  8. Engine Throat/Nozzle Optics for Plume Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    which describes the percentage of chrome atoms existing in an atomic state. This value from Handbook of Flame Spectroscopy by Parsons[I] is approximate...with a modified SMA connector. The bundle extends through the SMA connector and is encased in a flexible sheathing . A metal band at the fiber bundle

  9. [Techniques of on-line monitoring volatile organic compounds in ambient air with optical spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhen-Hui; Zhai, Ya-Qiong; Li, Jin-Yi; Hu, Bo

    2009-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are harmful gaseous pollutants in the ambient air. The techniques of on-line monitoring VOCs are very significant for environment protection. Until now, there is no single technology that can meet all the needs of monitoring various VOCs. The characteristics and present situation of several optical methods, which can be applied to on-line monitoring VOCs, including non dispersive infrared (NDIR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and laser spectroscopy were reviewed. Comparison was completed between the national standard methods and spectroscopic method for measuring VOCs. The main analysis was focused on the status and trends of tuning diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology.

  10. Estimation of optical parameters of highly scattering materials by time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinski, Jerzy

    2004-07-01

    Optical measurement methods are indispensable tool in biomedical research, providing invaluable information on optical properties of biological tissues. However, the application of these techniques is a big challenge, as most tissues are highly scattering materials whose optical properties cannot be measured in a straightforward way, due to multiple scattering of photons. Therefore, new optical measurement techniques and methods for highly scattering media are being developed to address this problem. One of the very promising techniques is time-of-flight spectroscopy. The paper presents problems encountered in reconstruction of basic optical parameters of tissues or other highly scattering materials from optical time-of-flight spectroscopy measurement data. To estimate the reconstruction accuracy of optical parameters (i.e. absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, anisotropy factor and refractive index) the test data were generated by a computer program simulating light propagation in highly scattering material by Monte Carlo method. Following, a set of computer programs based on diffusion equation and optimization algorithms such as simplex method and genetic method were used to reconstruct optical parameters from the test data. Finally, by comparing reconstructed optical parameters with those used for generation of the test data, the accuracy of reconstructing algorithms it was estimated.

  11. Raman spectroscopy of optical properties in CdS thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajić J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of CdS thin films were investigated applying atomic force microscopy (AFM and Raman spectroscopy. CdS thin films were prepared by using thermal evaporation technique under base pressure 2 x 10-5 torr. The quality of these films was investigated by AFM spectroscopy. We apply Raman scattering to investigate optical properties of CdS thin films, and reveal existence of surface optical phonon (SOP mode at 297 cm-1. Effective permittivity of mixture were modeled by Maxwell - Garnet approximation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45003

  12. Hollow Core Fiber Optics for Mid-Wave and Long-Wave Infrared Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Erikson, Rebecca L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    The development and testing of hollow core glass waveguides (i.e., fiber optics) for use in Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) spectroscopy systems is described. LWIR fiber optics are a key enabling technology needed to improve the utility and effectiveness of trace chemical detection systems based in the 8 to 12 micron region. This paper focuses on recent developments in hollow waveguide technology geared specifically for LWIR spectroscopy, including a reduction in both the length dependent loss and the bending loss while maintaining relatively high beam quality. Results will be presented from tests conducted with a Quantum Cascade Laser.

  13. Calibration of effective optical path length for hollow-waveguide based gas cell using absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Du, Zhenhui; Li, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    The Hollow Waveguide (HWG) has emerged as a novel tool to transmit laser power. Owing to its long Effective Optical Path Length (EOPL) within a relatively small volume, it is suitable for the application as a gas cell in concentration measurement by using laser spectroscopy. The measurement of effective optical path length for a hollow waveguide, which possesses the physical length of 284.0 cm, by using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) was demonstrated. Carbon dioxide was used as a sample gas for a hollow waveguide calibration. A 2004 nm Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) laser was used as the light source to cover a CO2 line near 2003 nm, which was selected as the target line in the measurement. The reference direct absorption spectroscopy signal was obtained by delivering CO2 into a reference cell possessing a length of 29.4 cm. Then the effective optical path length of HWG was calculated by least-squares fitting the measured absorption signal to the reference absorption signal. The measured EOPL of HWG was 282.8 cm and the repeatability error of effective optical path length was calculated as 0.08 cm. A detection limit of 0.057 cm (with integral time 5 s) characterized by the Allan variance, was derived. The effective optical path length is obtained as the significant parameter to calculate the concentration of gases and it is of great importance to precise measurement of absorption spectroscopy.

  14. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  15. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Stavros [Livermore, CA; Fitzgerald, Jason [Sacramento, CA; Troppmann, Christoph [Sacramento, CA; Michalopoulou, Andromachi [Athens, GR

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  16. Further evidence for charge transfer complexes in brown carbon aerosols from excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Sabrina M; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2015-05-14

    The light-absorbing fraction of organic molecules in ambient aerosols, known as "brown carbon," is an important yet poorly characterized component. Despite the fact that brown carbon could alter the radiative forcing of aerosols significantly, identification of specific chromophores has remained challenging. We recently demonstrated that charge transfer (CT) complexes formed in organic molecules could be responsible for a large fraction of absorption observed in water-extracted ambient particulate matter.1 In the present study, we use excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy to further corroborate the importance of CT complexes in defining aerosol optical properties. Monotonically increasing and decreasing quantum yields, decreasing Stokes shifts, and red-shifting emission maxima are observed from ambient particulate matter collected in Athens, Georgia, strongly suggesting that a superposition of independent chromophores is not sufficient to explain brown carbon absorption and fluorescence. Instead, we show that a model in which such chromophores are energetically coupled to a dense manifold of CT complexes is consistent with all of the observations. Further, we suggest that a significant fraction of the observed fluorescence originates from CT complexes and that their contribution to brown carbon absorption is likely greater than we reported previously.

  17. NONLINEAR OPTICS: Coherent laser spectroscopy of matter utilizing waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaus, A. I.; Yashkir, Yu N.

    1990-07-01

    Some features of CARS spectroscopy in waveguide structures are investigated theoretically taking into account stimulated Raman amplification of a weak pump wave in the field of a strong wave and allowing for the phase matching. A four-photon intermode coupling which occurs under amplification conditions results in energy diffusion between different modes. General expressions for the intensities of the pump waves undergoing stimulated amplification and for the anti-Stokes signal are derived and analyzed.

  18. Radiation-induced defects in chalcogenide glasses characterized by combined optical spectroscopy, XPS and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Golovchak, R. [Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' ' Carat' ' , 202, Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Zurawska, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    Temperature-dependent optical absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetimes spectroscopy are utilized to understand radiation-induced changes in Ge-Sb-S chalcogenide glasses. Theoretically predicted topological scheme of {gamma}-induced coordination defect formation in stoichiometric Ge{sub 23.5}Sb{sub 11.8}S{sub 64.7} glass composition is supported by these measurements. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy with an optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaowei; Gardiner, Tom; Reid, Derryck T

    2013-08-15

    We present the first implementation of mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy with an optical parametric oscillator. Methane absorption spectroscopy was demonstrated with a resolution of 0.2 cm(-1) (5 GHz) at an acquisition time of ~10.4 ms over a spectral coverage at 2900-3050 cm(-1). The average power from each individual mid-infrared comb line was ~1 μW, representing a power level much greater than typical difference-frequency-generation sources. Mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy opens up unique opportunities to perform broadband spectroscopic measurements with high resolution, high requisition rate, and high detection sensitivity.

  20. Influence of sample temperature on the expansion dynamics and the optical emission of laser-induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschlböck-Fuchs, S.; Haslinger, M.J.; Hinterreiter, A.; Kolmhofer, P.; Huber, N. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rössler, R. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, A-4031 Linz (Austria); Heitz, J. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Pedarnig, J.D., E-mail: johannes.pedarnig@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Laser-Assisted Diagnostics, Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the influence of sample temperature on the dynamics and optical emission of laser induced plasma for various solid materials. Bulk aluminum alloy, silicon wafer, and metallurgical slag samples are heated to temperature T{sub S} ≤ 500 °C and ablated in air by Nd:YAG laser pulses (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration approx. 7 ns). The plasma dynamics is investigated by fast time-resolved photography. For laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) the optical emission of plasma is measured by Echelle spectrometers in combination with intensified CCD cameras. For all sample materials the temporal evolution of plume size and broadband plasma emission vary systematically with T{sub S}. The size and brightness of expanding plumes increase at higher T{sub S} while the mean intensity remains independent of temperature. The intensity of emission lines increases with temperature for all samples. Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with T{sub S}. We apply the calibration-free LIBS method to determine the concentration of major oxides in slag and find good agreement to reference data up to T{sub S} = 450 °C. The LIBS analysis of multi-component materials at high temperature is of interest for technical applications, e.g. in industrial production processes. - Highlights: • Size and emission of laser-induced plasma increase with sample temperature Ts. • Mean optical intensity of plasma is independent of Ts. • Plasma temperature and electron number density do not vary with Ts. • Major oxides in steel slag are quantified up to Ts = 450 °C. • Industrial steel slags are analyzed by calibration-free LIBS method.

  1. GRB 090727 and gamma-ray bursts with early time optical emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Gomboc, A; Japelj, J; Mundell, C G; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Bersier, D; Cano, Z; Smith, R J; Steele, I A; Virgili, F J

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2-m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation processes. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early time optical emission shows sharp and steep beha...

  2. Crystal optics for hard-X-ray spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, H. F.; Attia, D.; Banas, D; Bigot, E. -O. Le; Bosch, F.; Dousse, Jean-Claude; Förster, E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Heß, S.; J. Hoszowska; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kozhuharov, Chr.; Krings, Th.

    2009-01-01

    A twin crystal-spectrometer assembly, operated in the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue geometry has been developed for accurate spectroscopy of fast highly charged heavy ions in the hard-X-ray region. Coupled to the focusing crystal optics is a specially developed two-dimensional position-sensitive X-ray detector which is necessary for retaining spectral resolution also for fast moving sources. We summarize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrument for spectrosco...

  3. Development of a gated optical multichannel analyser for laser-plasma spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, Richard

    1990-01-01

    An Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) has been developed for the detection of radiation from laser-produced plasmas (LPPs). The system is based on a gated image - intensified photodiode array (PDA) Software for the control of, and data acquisition from, the OMA system has been developed. A high resolution (10ns) delay generator was also designed and constructed to permit timeresolved. optical spectroscopy. The system has been tested and operated with a laser plasma source m...

  4. Optical spectroscopy of erbium and thulium doped SnO glass ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of multifunctional integrated optical components in planar devices are well known. For these devices to be small, a planar amplifier with high rare-earth solubility and photosensitivity would be highly desirable. Tin-doped silica has been found to have high negative photosensitivity, with excellent thermal stability. Optical spectroscopy has been carried out on a range of erbium- and thulium-doped tin-silicates, with rare earth doping levels from 200-10,000ppm and tin concentra...

  5. Optical spectroscopy of the dwarf nova U Geminorum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unda-Sanzana, E.; Marsh, T.R.; Morales-Rueda, L.

    2006-01-01

    The dwarf nova U Gem is unique in having a direct measurement of the K velocity of its white dwarf from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) spectra (K1 = 107 +/- 2kms-1 from Long et al.). We present high-resolution optical spectra of U Gem in quiescence taken to test the accuracy to w

  6. Photometry and spectroscopy of the GRB 970508 optical counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Benitez, N.;

    1998-01-01

    were observed for 1 hour during the decline phase. According to the fireball and afterglow models, the intensity should rise monotonically before the observed optical maximum, but the data indicate that another physical mechanism may be responsible for the constant phase seen during the first hours...

  7. Single metal nanoparticle absorption spectroscopy and optical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, O. L.; Del Fatti, N.; Vallée, F.; Huntzinger, J. R.; Billaud, P.; Broyer, M.

    2006-02-01

    Optical absorption spectra of small single metal nanoparticles are measured using a far-field technique combining a spatial modulation microscope with a broadband light source. Quantitative determination of the spectral and polarization dependencies of the absorption cross section of individual gold nanoparticles permits precise determination of their geometrical properties in excellent agreement with transmission electron microscopy measurements.

  8. Evolution of infrared spectra and optical emission spectra in hydrogenated silicon thin films prepared by VHF-PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Guo-Fu; Geng, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Ying

    2011-07-01

    A series of hydrogenated silicon thin films with varying silane concentrations have been deposited by using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) method. The deposition process and the silicon thin films are studied by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that when the silane concentration changes from 10% to 1%, the peak frequency of the Si-H stretching mode shifts from 2000 cm-1 to 2100 cm-1, while the peak frequency of the Si—H wagging—rocking mode shifts from 650 cm-1 to 620 cm-1. At the same time the SiH/Hα intensity ratio in the plasma decreases gradually. The evolution of the infrared spectra and the optical emission spectra demonstrates a morphological phase transition from amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) to microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H). The structural evolution and the μc-Si:H formation have been analyzed based on the variation of Hα and SiH intensities in the plasma. The role of oxygen impurity during the plasma process and in the silicon films is also discussed in this study.

  9. Combined optical emission and resonant absorption diagnostics of an Ar-O{sub 2}-Ce-reactive magnetron sputtering discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Mel, A.A. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), Research Institute for Materials Science and Engineering, Université de Mons, Place du Parc 23, Mons B-7000 (Belgium); Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, Université de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssinière B.P. 32229, Nantes Cedex 3 44322 (France); Ershov, S. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), Research Institute for Materials Science and Engineering, Université de Mons, Place du Parc 23, Mons B-7000 (Belgium); Britun, N., E-mail: nikolay.britun@umons.ac.be [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), Research Institute for Materials Science and Engineering, Université de Mons, Place du Parc 23, Mons B-7000 (Belgium); Ricard, A. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, Toulouse Cedex 9 F-31062 (France); Konstantinidis, S. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), Research Institute for Materials Science and Engineering, Université de Mons, Place du Parc 23, Mons B-7000 (Belgium); Snyders, R. [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), Research Institute for Materials Science and Engineering, Université de Mons, Place du Parc 23, Mons B-7000 (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, Avenue Copernic 1, Mons B-7000 (Belgium)

    2015-01-01

    We report the results on combined optical characterization of Ar-O{sub 2}-Ce magnetron sputtering discharges by optical emission and resonant absorption spectroscopy. In this study, a DC magnetron sputtering system equipped with a movable planar magnetron source with a Ce target is used. The intensities of Ar, O, and Ce emission lines, as well as the absolute densities of Ar metastable and Ce ground state atoms are analyzed as a function of the distance from the magnetron target, applied DC power, O{sub 2} content, etc. The absolute number density of the Ar{sup m} is found to decrease exponentially as a function of the target-to-substrate distance. The rate of this decrease is dependent on the sputtering regime, which should be due to the different collisional quenching rates of Ar{sup m} by O{sub 2} molecules at different oxygen contents. Quantitatively, the absolute number density of Ar{sup m} is found to be equal to ≈ 3 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3} in the metallic, and ≈ 5 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} in the oxidized regime of sputtering, whereas Ce ground state densities at the similar conditions are found to be few times lower. The absolute densities of species are consistent with the corresponding deposition rates, which decrease sharply during the transition from metallic to poisoned sputtering regime. - Highlights: • Optical emission and resonant absorption spectroscopy are employed to study Ar-O{sub 2}-Ce magnetron sputtering discharges. • The density of argon metastables is found to decrease exponentially when increasing the target-to-substrate distance. • The collision-quenching rates of Ar{sup m} by O{sub 2} molecules at different oxygen contents is demonstrated. • The deposition rates of cerium and cerium oxide thin films decrease sharply during the transition from the metallic to the poisoned sputtering regime.

  10. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  11. A Novel Acoustic Emission Fiber Optic Sensor Based on a Single Mode Optical Fiber Coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rongsheng; LIAO Yanbiao; ZHENG Gangtie; LIU Tongyu; Gerard Franklyn Fernando

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, on the use of a fused-taper single mode optical fiber coupler as a sensing element for the detection of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound. When an acoustic wave impinges on the mode-coupling region of a coupler, the coupling coefficient is modulated via the photo-elastic effect. Therefore, the transfer function of the coupler is modulated by an acoustic wave. The sensitivity of the sensor at 140 kHz was approximately 5.2 mV/Pa and the noise floor was 1 Pa. The bandwidth of the sensor was up to several hundred kHz. This AE sensor exhibits significant advantage compared with interferometer-based AE sensors.

  12. Compositional and Optical Properties of Titan Haze Analogs Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry, Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugelow, M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The organic haze that surrounds Saturn's moon Titan is formed through the photolysis and electron initiated dissociation of methane and nitrogen. The chemical pathways leading to haze formation and the resulting haze optical properties are still highly uncertain. Here we examine the compositional and optical properties of Titan haze aerosol analogs. By studying these properties together, the impact of haze on Titan's radiative balance can be better understood. The aerosol analogs studied are produced from different initial methane concentrations (0.1, 2 and 10% CH4) using spark discharge excitation. To determine the complex refractive index of the aerosol, we combine two spectroscopic techniques, one that measures absorption and one that measures extinction: photoacoustic spectroscopy coupled with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PASCaRD). This technique provides the benefit of a high precision determination of the imaginary component of the refractive index (k), along with the highly sensitive determination of the real component of the refractive index (n). The refractive indices are retrieved at two wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, using the PASCaRD system. To yield aerosol composition, quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry is used. Compositional information is obtained from a technique that uses isotopically labeled and unlabeled methane gas. I will present preliminary data on the complex refractive indices of Titan aerosol analogs at both wavelengths, in conjunction with the aerosol composition as a percent by weight of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The correlation of optical and chemical properties should be useful for remote sensing instruments probing Titan haze.

  13. Lithium-ion battery electrolyte emissions analyzed by coupled thermogravimetric/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Simon; Larsson, Fredrik; Furlani, Maurizio; Albinsson, Ingvar; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years the use of Li-ion batteries has increased rapidly, powering small as well as large applications, from electronic devices to power storage facilities. The Li-ion battery has, however, several safety issues regarding occasional overheating and subsequent thermal runaway. During such episodes, gas emissions from the electrolyte are of special concern because of their toxicity, flammability and the risk for gas explosion. In this work, the emissions from heated typical electrolyte components as well as from commonly used electrolytes are characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy and FT-IR coupled with thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, when heating up to 650 °C. The study includes the solvents EC, PC, DEC, DMC and EA in various single, binary and ternary mixtures with and without the LiPF6 salt, a commercially available electrolyte, (LP71), containing EC, DEC, DMC and LiPF6 as well as extracted electrolyte from a commercial 6.8 Ah Li-ion cell. Upon thermal heating, emissions of organic compounds and of the toxic decomposition products hydrogen fluoride (HF) and phosphoryl fluoride (POF3) were detected. The electrolyte and its components have also been extensively analyzed by means of infrared spectroscopy for identification purposes.

  14. Quantifying Fugitive Methane Emissions at an Underground Coal Fire Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, D.; Gannon, L.; Kim-Hak, D.; Ide, T.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding methane emissions is of utmost importance due to its greenhouse warming potential. Methane emissions can occur from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources which include wetlands, landfills, oil/gas/coal extraction activities, underground coal fires, and natural gas distribution systems. Locating and containing these emissions are critical to minimizing their environmental impacts and economically beneficial when retrieving large fugitive amounts. In order to design a way to mitigate these methane emissions, they must first be accurately quantified. One such quantification method is to measure methane fluxes, which is a measurement technique that is calculated based on rate of gas accumulation in a known chamber volume over methane seepages. This allows for quantification of greenhouse gas emissions at a localized level (sub one meter) that can complement remote sensing and other largescale modeling techniques to further paint the picture of emission points. High performance analyzers are required to provide both sufficient temporal resolution and precise concentration measurements in order to make these measurements over only minutes. A method of measuring methane fluxes was developed using the latest portable, battery-powered Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy analyzer from Picarro (G4301). In combination with a mobile accumulation chamber, the instrument allows for rapid measurement of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes over wide areas. For this study, methane fluxes that were measured at an underground coal fire near the Four Corners region using the Picarro analyzer are presented. The flux rates collected demonstrate the ability for the analyzer to detect methane fluxes across many orders of magnitude. Measurements were accompanied by simultaneously geotagging the measurements with GPS to georeferenced the data. Methane flux data were instrumental in our ability to characterize the extent and the migration of the underground fire. In the future

  15. Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy of Ion Implanted Gallium Arsenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    PECVD processes are silane (SiH4 ) plus either 47 t - Im ammonia (NH 3 ) or nitrogen (N2 ) or both. The chemical reactions are, 3SiH4+2N 2-Si3N 4+6H 2...Physics, 44:5183-5184 (Nov 1973). 68 I i . 13. Sawyer, R., Experimental Spectroscopy, New York: Dover Publication, Inc. (1963) 14. Kerm , W., R. Rosler...composition as functions of the follow- ing parameters: flow, pressure, substrate temperature, and RF power. Kerm , et al., (Ref 14) studied films grown

  16. Coherent, multi-heterodyne spectroscopy using stabilized optical frequency combs

    CERN Document Server

    Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R

    2007-01-01

    The broadband, coherent nature of narrow-linewidth fiber frequency combs is exploited to measure the full complex spectrum of a molecular gas through multi-heterodyne spectroscopy. We measure the absorption and phase shift experienced by each of 155,000 individual frequency comb lines, spaced by 100 MHz and spanning from 1495 nm to 1620 nm, after passing through a hydrogen cyanide gas. The measured phase spectrum agrees with Kramers-Kronig transformation of the absorption spectrum. This technique can provide a full complex spectrum rapidly, over wide bandwidths, and with hertz-level accuracy.

  17. Optical transistor action by nonlinear coupling of stimulated emission and coherent scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Bradshaw, David S.

    2010-08-01

    In the pursuit of improved platforms for computing, communications and internet connectivity, all-optical systems offer excellent prospects for a speed and fidelity of data transmission that will greatly surpass conventional electronics, alongside the anticipated benefits of reduced energy loss. With a diverse range of sources and fiber optical connections already in production, much current effort is being devoted towards forging optical components for signal switching, such as an all-optical transistor. Achievement of the desired characteristics for any practicable device can be expected to depend crucially on the engagement of a strongly nonlinear optical response. The innovative scheme proposed in the present work is based upon a third-order nonlinearity - its effect enhanced by stimulated emission - operating within a system designed to exploit the highly nonlinear response observed at the threshold for laser emission. Here, stimulated emission is strongly driven by coupling to the coherent scattering of a signal input beam whose optical frequency is purposely off-set from resonance. An electrodynamical analysis of the all-optical coupling process shows that the signal beam can significantly modify the kinetics of emission, and so lead to a dramatically enhanced output of resonant radiation. The underlying nonlinear optical mechanism is analyzed, model calculations are performed for realizable three-level laser systems, and the results exhibited graphically. The advantages of implementing this all-optical transistor scheme, compared to several previously envisaged proposals, are then outlined.

  18. Strong electronic correlation effects in coherent multidimensional nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadimitriou, M E; Kavousanaki, E G; Dani, K M; Fromer, N A; Perakis, I E

    2011-05-12

    We discuss a many-body theory of the coherent ultrafast nonlinear optical response of systems with a strongly correlated electronic ground state that responds unadiabatically to photoexcitation. We introduce a truncation of quantum kinetic density matrix equations of motion that does not rely on an expansion in terms of the interactions and thus applies to strongly correlated systems. For this we expand in terms of the optical field, separate out contributions to the time-evolved many-body state due to correlated and uncorrelated multiple optical transitions, and use "Hubbard operator" density matrices to describe the exact dynamics of the individual contributions within a subspace of strongly coupled states, including "pure dephasing". Our purpose is to develop a quantum mechanical tool capable of exploring how, by coherently photoexciting selected modes, one can trigger nonlinear dynamics of strongly coupled degrees of freedom. Such dynamics could lead to photoinduced phase transitions. We apply our theory to the nonlinear response of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in a magnetic field. We coherently photoexcite the two lowest Landau level (LL) excitations using three time-delayed optical pulses. We identify some striking temporal and spectral features due to dynamical coupling of the two LLs facilitated by inter-Landau-level magnetoplasmon and magnetoroton excitations and compare to three-pulse four-wave-mixing (FWM) experiments. We show that these features depend sensitively on the dynamics of four-particle correlations between an electron-hole pair and a magnetoplasmon/magnetoroton, reminiscent of exciton-exciton correlations in undoped semiconductors. Our results shed light into unexplored coherent dynamics and relaxation of the quantum Hall system (QHS) and can provide new insight into non-equilibrium co-operative phenomena in strongly correlated systems.

  19. Far Infrared Optical Spectroscopy of Alkali Halide-Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, J. T.; Broderick, S. D.; Rodriguez, G. A.

    1998-03-01

    Composite samples of small (dimension polytetrafluoroethylene) have been prepared. The far infrared optical spectra of these samples are presented, spanning a temperature range of 300 to thermal expansion, using published values for the mode Gruneisen parameter and the temperature dependence of the lattice thermal coefficient. In contrast, the linewidth (phonon lifetime) of the composite samples is roughly twice as large as that observed for thin film and bulk crystals, and has a much stronger temperature dependence as well.

  20. A rapid screening method for heavy metals in biological materials by emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacklock, E C; Sadler, P A

    1981-06-02

    A semi-quantitative screening method for heavy metals in biological material is described. The metals are complexed with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, sodium diethyl dithiocarbamate and potassium sodium tartrate. The solutions are adjusted to pH 4 and then extracted into chloroform. The chloroform phase is evaporated onto a matrix mixture of lithium fluoride and graphite. The sample is analysed by direct current arc emission spectroscopy using a 3 metre grating spectrograph. The spectra are recorded on a photographic plate. The method is developed on aqueous and spiked samples and then applied to in vivo samples containing toxic levels of heavy metals. Atomic absorption spectroscopy is used to check standard concentrations and to monitor the efficiency of the extraction procedure.

  1. Excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann-Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 - 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  2. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  3. Electro-Optical Multichannel Spectrometer for Transient Resonance Raman and Absorption Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karina Benthin; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1979-01-01

    An optical multichannel system is described, used for time‐dependent absorption measurements in the gas phase and the liquid phase and for resonance Raman spectroscopy of short‐lived transient species in the liquid phase in pulse radiolysis. It consists of either an image converter streak unit or...

  4. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  5. Diameter grouping in bulk samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes from optical absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golden, M.S.; Fink, J.; Dunsch, L.; Bauer, H.-D.; Reibold, M.; Knupfer, M.; Friedlein, R.; Pichler, T.; Jost, O.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the mean characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes in soot produced by the laser vaporization of graphite has been analyzed using optical absorption spectroscopy. The abundance and mean diameter of the nanotubes were found to be most influenced by

  6. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne.; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. By assessing the eccentricity of the elliptic shape of a 2D optical correlation spectrum the value of the underlying frequency-frequency correlation function can be retrieved

  7. Two-dimensional optical correlation spectroscopy applied to liquid/glass dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazonder, Kees; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    2006-01-01

    Correlation spectroscopy was used to study the effects of temperature and phase changes on liquid and glass solvent dynamics. This method yielded both intuitive clues and a quantitative measure of the dynamics of the system. © 2006 Optical Society of America.

  8. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  9. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  10. In-plane spectroscopy with optical fibers and liquid-filled APEX™ glass microcuvettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, William R.; Hasan Tantawi, Khalid; Waddell, Emanuel; Fedorov, Vladimir; Williams, John D.

    2013-10-01

    Chemical etching and laser drilling of microstructural glass results in opaque or translucent sidewalls, limiting the optical analysis of glass microfluidic devices to top down or non-planar topologies. These non-planar observation topologies prevent each layer of a multilayered device from being independently optically addressed. However, novel photosensitive glass processing techniques in APEX™ have resulted in microfabricated glass structures with transparent sidewalls. Toward the goal of a transparent multilayered glass microfluidic device, this study demonstrates the ability to perform spectroscopy with optical fibers and microcuvettes fabricated in photosensitive APEX™ glass.

  11. Assessing topographic cutaneous autofluorescence variation using fluorescence UV and visible excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zandi, Soodabeh; Feng, Florina; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2011-03-01

    Cutaneous autofluorescence properties were systematically studied using fluorescence excitation emission matrix spectroscopy. Twenty-six healthy subjects with a mean age of 34 (range 21-74) participated in this study. The fluorescence of major skin fluorophores such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin and NADH could be readily identified. On average, facial skin shows strong tryptophan and measurable porphyrin fluorescence; the palm and nail show strong tryptophan and keratin fluorescence. These results demonstrate that regional topographic variations exist not only in the amount of fluorescence but also in the relative distribution of fluorophores in normal skin. Moreover this provides a basis for future interpretation of autofluorescence in diseased skin.

  12. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  13. Application of {sup 57}Co emission Moessbauer spectroscopy to studying biocomplexes in frozen solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamnev, A. A., E-mail: aakamnev@ibppm.sgu.ru [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry Techniques, Department of Radiochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Antonyuk, L. P. [Laboratory of Biochemistry of Plant-Bacterial Symbioses, Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kuzmann, E.; Vertes, A. [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Research Group for Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Department of Nuclear Chemistry (Hungary)

    2005-09-15

    Emission Moessbauer spectroscopy with the {sup 57}Co isotope was used to study very dilute rapidly frozen aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight biomolecules (aromatic amino acids - anthranilic acid and L-tryptophan) and within a sophisticated biopolymer, bacterial glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism. The appearance of after-effects of the {sup 57}Co{sup {yields}57}Fe nuclear transformation as well as the coordination properties of the cation and the ligands in the complexes are discussed on the basis of their Moessbauer parameters.

  14. Remote gas analysis of aircraft exhausts using FTIR-emission-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heland, J.; Schaefer, K. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    FITR emission spectroscopy as a remote sensing multi-component analyzing technique was investigated to determine the composition of aircraft exhausts at ground level. A multi-layer radiative transfer interpretation software based on a line-by-line computer algorithm using the HITRAN data base was developed. Measurements were carried out with different engine types to determine the traceable gas species and their detection limits. Finally validation measurements were made to compare the results of the system to those of conventional equipment. (author) 8 refs.

  15. VUV emission spectroscopy combined with H− density measurements in the ion source Prometheus I

    OpenAIRE

    Aleiferis, S.; Laulainen, Janne; Svarnas, P.; Tarvainen, Olli; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2017-01-01

    “Prometheus I” is a volume H− negative ion source, driven by a network of dipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR; 2.45 GHz) modules. The vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectrum of low-temperature hydrogen plasmas may be related to molecular and atomic processes involved directly or indirectly in the production of negative ions. In this work, VUV spectroscopy has been performed in the above source, Prometheus I, both in the ECR zones and the bulk (far from ECR zones and surfaces) plasma....

  16. Application of 57Co emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to studying biocomplexes in frozen solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, A. A.; Kulikov, L. A.; Perfiliev, Yu. D.; Antonyuk, L. P.; Kuzmann, E.; Vértes, A.

    2005-09-01

    Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy with the 57Co isotope was used to study very dilute rapidly frozen aqueous solutions of cobalt(II) complexes with low-molecular-weight biomolecules (aromatic amino acids anthranilic acid and L-tryptophan) and within a sophisticated biopolymer, bacterial glutamine synthetase, a key enzyme of nitrogen metabolism. The appearance of after-effects of the 57Co→57Fe nuclear transformation as well as the coordination properties of the cation and the ligands in the complexes are discussed on the basis of their Mössbauer parameters.

  17. Optical spectroscopy of a highly fluorescent aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Cheng, P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c and a similar model compound, Mg-methyl bacteriopheophorbide d, form several types of aggregates in nonpolar solvents. One of these aggregates is highly fluorescent, with a quantum yield higher than that of the monomer. This aggregate is also unusual in that it shows a rise time in its fluorescence emission decay at certain wavelengths, which is ascribed to a change in conformation of the aggregate. An analysis of fluorescence depolarization data is consistent with either a linear aggregate of four or five monomers or preferably a cyclic arrangement of three dimers.

  18. Optical spectroscopy by 5-aminolevulinic acid hexylester induced photodynamic treatment in rat bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Gederaas, Odrun A.; Arum, Carl-Jørgen; Krokan, Hans E.; Hjelme, Dag R.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality which has been shown to be effective for both malignant and non-malignant diseases. New photosensitizers such as 5-aminolevulinic acid hexylester (hALA) may increase the efficiency of PDT. Monitoring of the tissue response provides important information for optimizing factors such as drug and light dose for this treatment modality. Optical spectroscopy may be suited for this task. To test the efficacy of hALA induced PDT, a study on rats with a superficial bladder cancer model, in which a bladder cancer cell line (AY-27) is instilled, will be performed. Preliminary studies have included a PDT feasibility study on rats, fluorescence spectroscopy on AY-27 cell suspensions, and optical reflection and fluorescence spectroscopy in rat bladders in vivo. The results from the preliminary studies are promising, and the study on hALA induced PDT treatment of bladder cancer will be continued.

  19. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  20. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, I-Ting; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A; Rupke, David S N; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M

    2016-01-01

    We present LZIFU (LaZy-IFU), an IDL toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. LZIFU is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. LZIFU has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of LZIFU, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying LZIFU to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line prof...

  1. THz Acoustic Spectroscopy by using Double Quantum Wells and Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fan Jun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Lin, Kung-Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    GaN is a pivotal material for acoustic transducers and acoustic spectroscopy in the THz regime, but its THz phonon properties have not been experimentally and comprehensively studied. In this report, we demonstrate how to use double quantum wells as a THz acoustic transducer for measuring generated acoustic phonons and deriving a broadband acoustic spectrum with continuous frequencies. We experimentally investigated the sub-THz frequency dependence of acoustic attenuation (i.e., phonon mean-free paths) in GaN, in addition to its physical origins such as anharmonic scattering, defect scattering, and boundary scattering. A new upper limit of attenuation caused by anharmonic scattering, which is lower than previously reported values, was obtained. Our results should be noteworthy for THz acoustic spectroscopy and for gaining a fundamental understanding of heat conduction.

  2. Two-dimensional imaging of optical emission in a multicusp-ECR microwave resonant cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, C.B.; Brake, M.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1996-02-01

    Optical emission of the electron-cyclotron resonant (ECR) region of a multicusp microwave resonant cavity plasma source has been imaged onto a two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The technique provides a real-time diagnostic of the plasma emission around the ECR region within a wavelength region defined by low-bandpass filters.

  3. Spectroscopy and optical characterization of thulium doped TZN glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebavi, H; Milanese, D; Ferraris, M [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali ed Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Balda, R; Fernandez, J [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Alda. Urquijo s/n 48013 Bilbao, Spain and Center of Materials Physics CSIC-UPV/EHU and Donostia International Physics Center, Apartado 1072, 20080 San Sebastian (Spain); Chaussedent, S [Laboratoire POMA-FRE CNRS 2988, Universite d' Angers, 2 bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Ferrari, M, E-mail: gebavi@yahoo.co [CNR-IFN, CSMFO Lab., via alla Cascata 56/C, 38050 Povo-Trento (Italy)

    2010-04-07

    This paper reports on the spectroscopic properties of the {sup 3}H{sub 4} and {sup 3}F{sub 4} Tm{sup 3+} levels in a TZN glass host with a concentration range from 0.82 to 22 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. Precise refractive index measurements are performed on five different wavelengths by the prism coupling method. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters have been determined in order to obtain transition rate, branching ratio and radiative lifetime. Spectroscopic measurements show the most promising concentration for the1.8 {mu}m short cavity laser emission at 6.84 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} Tm{sup 3+} with a 24% quantum efficiency and upper limit concentration of 11 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} Tm{sup 3+}. Energy transfer microparameters and critical ion distance are determined for both emission levels within the framework of diffusion-limited regime and dipole-dipole interaction.

  4. Galactic Outflows in Absorption and Emission: Near-UV Spectroscopy of Galaxies at 1

    CERN Document Server

    Erb, Dawn K; Henry, Alaina L; Martin, Crystal L

    2012-01-01

    We study large-scale outflows in a sample of 96 star-forming galaxies at 1spectroscopy of FeII and MgII absorption and emission. The average blueshift of the FeII interstellar absorption lines with respect to the systemic velocity is -85+/-10 km/s at z~1.5, with standard deviation 87 km/s; this is a decrease of a factor of two from the average blueshift measured for far-UV interstellar absorption lines in similarly selected galaxies at z~2. The profiles of the MgII 2796, 2803 lines show much more variety than the FeII profiles, which are always seen in absorption; MgII ranges from strong emission to pure absorption, with emission more common in galaxies with blue UV slopes and at lower stellar masses. Outflow velocities, as traced by the centroids and maximum extent of the absorption lines, increase with increasing stellar mass with 2-3sigma significance, in agreement with previous results. We study fine structure emission from FeII*, finding several lines of evidence in support of t...

  5. Measuring NMHC and NMOG emissions from motor vehicles via FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierczak, Christine A.; Kralik, Lora L.; Mauti, Adolfo; Harwell, Amy L.; Maricq, M. Matti

    2017-02-01

    The determination of non-methane organic gases (NMOG) emissions according to United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations is currently a multi-step process requiring separate measurement of various emissions components by a number of independent on-line and off-line techniques. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method described in this paper records all required components using a single instrument. It gives data consistent with the regulatory method, greatly simplifies the process, and provides second by second time resolution. Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are measured by identifying a group of hydrocarbons, including oxygenated species, that serve as a surrogate for this class, the members of which are dynamically included if they are present in the exhaust above predetermined threshold levels. This yields an FTIR equivalent measure of NMHC that correlates within 5% to the regulatory flame ionization detection (FID) method. NMOG is then determined per regulatory calculation solely from FTIR recorded emissions of NMHC, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde, yielding emission rates that also correlate within 5% with the reference method. Examples are presented to show how the resulting time resolved data benefit aftertreatment development for light duty vehicles.

  6. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique. PMID:22340277

  7. Coherent optical spectroscopy in a biological semiconductor quantum dot-DNA hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Jin; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2012-02-16

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical spectroscopy of a biological semiconductor quantum dot (QD) coupled to DNA molecules. Coupling with DNAs, the linear optical responses of the peptide QDs will be enhanced significantly in the simultaneous presence of two optical fields. Based on this technique, we propose a scheme to measure the vibrational frequency of DNA and the coupling strength between peptide QD and DNA in all-optical domain. Distinct with metallic quantum dot, biological QD is non-toxic and pollution-free to environment, which will contribute to clinical medicine experiments. This article leads people to know more about the optical behaviors of DNAs-quantum dot system, with the currently popular pump-probe technique.

  8. Low-power Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy with optimized electro-optical detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorenflo, Stefan; Hinkov, Iliyana; Lambrecht, Armin

    2005-01-01

    A Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system with electro-optical detector based on a ZnTe crystal is presented. The pump laser is a Ti:Sa laser with pulse duration of approx. 10 fs at a central wavelength of 800 nm. Using an optimized detection configuration, a signal-to-noise ratio bet...... better than 103 is achieved, applying an optical laser power of only 25mW. Several substances can be clearly distinguished on the basis of their specific THz absorption spectra.......A Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system with electro-optical detector based on a ZnTe crystal is presented. The pump laser is a Ti:Sa laser with pulse duration of approx. 10 fs at a central wavelength of 800 nm. Using an optimized detection configuration, a signal-to-noise ratio...

  9. An overview on applications of optical spectroscopy in cervical cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chilakapati Murali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in the treatment modalities, cervical cancers are one of the leading causes of cancer death among women. Pap smear and colposcopy are the existing screening methods and histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. However, these methods have been shown to be prone to reporting errors, which could be due to their subjective interpretation. Radiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the locally advanced stages of cervical cancers. The typical treatment regimen spans over 4 months, from the first fraction of radiation to clinical assessment of tumor response to radiotherapy. It is often noticed that due to intrinsic properties of tumors, patients with the same clinical stage and histological type respond differently to radiotherapy. Hence, there exists a need for the development of new methods for early diagnosis as well as for early prediction of tumor radioresponse. Optical spectroscopic methods have been shown to be potential alternatives for use in cancer diagnosis. In this review, we provide a brief background on the anatomy and histology of the uterine cervix and the etiology of cervical cancers; we briefly discuss the optical spectroscopic approach to cervical cancer diagnosis. A very brief discussion on radiation therapy and radiation resistance is also provided. We also share our experiences with the Raman spectroscopic methodologies in cervical cancer diagnosis as well as in the prediction of tumor radioresponse.

  10. Remote sensing of temperature and concentration profiles of a gas jet by coupling infrared emission spectroscopy and LIDAR for characterization of aircraft engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offret, J.-P.; Lebedinsky, J.; Navello, L.; Pina, V.; Serio, B.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature data play an important role in the combustion chamber since it determines both the efficiency and the rate of pollutants emission of engines. Air pollution problem concerns the emissions of gases such as CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and also aerosols, soot and volatile organic compounds. Flame combustion occurs in hostile environments where temperature and concentration profiles are often not easy to measure. In this study, a temperature and CO2 concentration profiles optical measurement method, suitable for combustion analysis, is discussed and presented. The proposed optical metrology method presents numerous advantages when compared to intrusive methods. The experimental setup comprises a passive radiative emission measurement method combined with an active laser-measurement method. The passive method is based on the use of gas emission spectroscopy. The experimental spectrometer device is coupled with an active method. The active method is used to investigate and correct complex flame profiles. This method similar to a LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) device is based on the measurement of Rayleigh scattering of a short laser pulse recorded using a high-speed streak camera. The whole experimental system of this new method is presented. Results obtained on a small-scale turbojet are shown and discussed in order to illustrate the potentials deliver by the sophisticated method. Both temperature and concentration profiles of the gas jet are presented and discussed.

  11. Optical studies of the X-ray transient XTE J2123-058 - II. Phase-resolved spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, R. I.; Charles, P. A.; Haswell, C. A.; Casares, J.; Zurita, C.; Serra-Ricart, M.

    2001-06-01

    We present time-resolved spectroscopy of the soft X-ray transient XTEJ2123-058 in outburst. A useful spectral coverage of 3700-6700Å was achieved spanning two orbits of the binary, with single-epoch coverage extending to ~9000Å. The optical spectrum approximates a steep blue power law, consistent with emission on the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot blackbody spectrum. The strongest spectral lines are Heii 4686Å and Ciii/Niii 4640Å (Bowen blend) in emission. Their relative strengths suggest that XTEJ2123-058 was formed in the Galactic plane, not in the halo. Other weak emission lines of Heii and Civ are present, and Balmer lines show a complex structure, blended with Heii. Heii 4686-Å profiles show a complex multiple S-wave structure, with the strongest component appearing at low velocities in the lower-left quadrant of a Doppler tomogram. Hα shows transient absorption between phases 0.35 and 0.55. Both of these effects appear to be analogous to similar behaviour in SW Sex type cataclysmic variables. We therefore consider whether the spectral line behaviour of XTEJ2123-058 can be explained by the same models invoked for those systems.

  12. Optical properties of lamps with cold emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenik, Jerzy; Czerwosz, ElŻbieta; Biernacki, Krzysztof; Rymarczyk, Joanna; Stepińska, Izabela

    2016-12-01

    A luminescent lamp was constructed and tested. Phosphor excited by electrons is the source of light. The source of electrons is field emission cathode. The cathode is covered with nickel-carbon layer containing carbon nanotubes that enhance electron emission from the cathode. Results of luminance measurements are presented. Luminance is high enough for lighting application.

  13. Using Optically Stimulated Electron Emission as an Inspection Method to Monitor Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingbloom, Mike S.

    2008-01-01

    During redesign of the Space Shuttle reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM), NASA amended the contract with ATK Launch Systems (then Morton Thiokol Inc.) with Change Order 966 to implement a contamination control and cleanliness verification method. The change order required: (1) A quantitative inspection method (2) A written record of actual contamination levels versus a known reject level (3) A method that is more sensitive than existing methods of visual and black light inspection. Black light inspection is only useful for inspection of contaminants that fluoresce near the 365 nm spectral line and is not useful for inspection of most silicones that will not produce strong fluorescence. Black light inspection conducted by a qualified inspector under controlled light is capable of detecting Conoco HD-2 grease in gross amounts and is very subjective due to operator sensitivity. Optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE), developed at the Materials and Process Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), was selected to satisfy Change Order 966. OSEE offers several important advantages over existing laboratory methods with similar sensitivity, e.g., spectroscopy and nonvolatile residue sampling, which provide turn around time, real time capability, and full coverage inspection capability. Laboratory methods require sample gathering and in-lab analysis, which sometimes takes several days to get results. This is not practical in a production environment. In addition, these methods do not offer full coverage inspection of the large components

  14. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  15. Emission enhancement using two orthogonal targets in double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Ake, C. [Laboratorio de Fotofisica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: citlali.sanchez@ccadet.unam.mx; Bolanos, Marduk [Laboratorio de Fotofisica, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-186, Mexico D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Ramirez, C.Z. [Colegio de Ciencias y Humanidades Plantel Sur, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The enhancement of emission intensity resulting from the interaction between two laser-induced plasmas on two orthogonal targets was investigated using double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at 0.7 Pa, by means of time-resolved spectroscopy and fast photography. The results showed that the interaction between both plasmas improved carbon emission intensity in comparison to a single laser-induced plasma. For all the carbon lines of interest 477.2 nm (CI), 426.7 nm (CII), and 473.4 nm (C{sub 2} Swan band head), the intensity enhancement showed a maximum at a delay between lasers in the range from 2 to 5 {mu}s; moreover it increased with the fluence of the first laser. On the other hand, in the case of C{sub 2} the intensity enhancement reached a maximum at 5 mm from the target; however it decreased with increasing fluence of the second laser. The largest intensity enhancement found was twofold for atomic species and sixfold for molecular species.

  16. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  17. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  18. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC 1805

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC 1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4 If+ star HD 15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Aims: Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. Methods: We have observed IC 1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. Results: The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60° 497 and HD 15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60° 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC 1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast rotator BD+60° 513, and to a lesser extent the O4 If+ star HD 15570 appear somewhat underluminous. Whilst the underluminosity of HD 15570 is only marginally significant, its amplitude is found to be compatible with theoretical expectations based on its stellar and wind properties. A number of other X-ray sources are detected in the field, and the brightest objects, many of which are likely low-mass pre-main sequence stars, are analyzed in detail. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the USA (NASA), and with the TIGRE telescope (La Luz, Mexico).Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A82

  19. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  20. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  1. Optical constants and near infrared emission of Er doped ZnO sol–gel thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vettumperumal, R. [P.G. and Research Department of Physics, Sri Paramakalyani College, Alwarkurichi 627412, Tamil Nadu (India); Kalyanaraman, S., E-mail: mayura_priya2003@yahoo.co.in [P.G. and Research Department of Physics, Sri Paramakalyani College, Alwarkurichi 627412, Tamil Nadu (India); Thangavel, R., E-mail: rtvel_au@yahoo.co.in [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad (India)

    2015-02-15

    Erbium (Er) doped zinc oxide (ZnO) sol–gel thin films were deposited on glass substrate using the spin coating method. The effect of erbium concentration and annealing temperature on structural and optical properties was studied. The annealed film was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectrum (EDX), micro-Raman, photoluminescence (PL) and UV–vis spectroscopy. All the films showed a wurtzite structure of polycrystalline nature with an average crystal size of 27.44 nm at 500 °C and 29.28 nm at 600 °C. The Raman spectra confirmed the absence of secondary phases in the Er doped ZnO films and the longitudinal optical phonon mode was upto the fifth order. Densely packed surfaces of the films were observed from SEM images. The presence and distribution of Zn, O and Er elements in the deposited films were confirmed by EDX analysis. The calculated value of exciton binding energy of ZnO film was 60 meV with a maximum value of 72 meV being observed for Er doped films. The near infra-red emission peak was observed at 1.63 eV through PL spectra studies. The average transmission was 80% with the calculated value of optical band gap being 3.26–3.32 eV. An increase in the refractive index value predicts the substitutional incorporation of Er ions in ZnO with the maximum optical conductivity being observed in the UV region. - Highlights: • Higher exciton binding energy in the doped ZnO films. • Near infrared emission is observed and better than ZnO. • Refractive index is calculated by theoretical and experimental means. • Maximum optical conductivity in the UV region.

  2. Testing of Cerex Open-Path Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Systems for Fenceline Monitoring Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of cost-effective, time-resolved fenceline measurement methods that facilitate improved emissions mitigation strategies is of growing interest to both industry and regulators. Ground-based optical remote sensing (ORS) is a well-known class of technical approaches use...

  3. Testing of Cerex Open-Path Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy System for Fenceline Monitoring Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of cost-effective, time-resolved fenceline measurement methods that facilitate improved emissions mitigation strategies is of growing interest to both industry and regulators. Ground-based optical remote sensing (ORS) is a well-known class of technical approaches use...

  4. The Nature of Emission from Optical Breakdown Induced by Pulses of fs and ns Duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, C W; Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Demange, P; Kucheyev, S; Shirk, M D; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

    2004-11-09

    Spectral emission from optical breakdown in the bulk of a transparent dielectric contains information about the nature of the breakdown medium. We have made time resolved measurements of the breakdown induced emission caused by nanosecond and femtosecond infrared laser pulses. We previously demonstrated that the emission due to ns pulses is blackbody in nature allowing determination of the fireball temperature and pressure during and after the damage event. The emission due to femtosecond pulse breakdown is not blackbody in nature; two different spectral distributions being noted. In one case, the peak spectral distribution occurs at the second harmonic of the incident radiation, in the other the distribution is broader and flatter and presumably due to continuum generation. The differences between ns and fs breakdown emission can be explained by the differing breakdown region geometries for the two pulse durations. The possibility to use spectral emission as a diagnostic of the emission region morphology will be discussed.

  5. Optical spectroscopy of RU Cam, a pulsating carbon star

    CERN Document Server

    Kipper, Tonu

    2007-01-01

    We analysed the high resolution spectra of a RU Cam, classified as W Vir type star. The atmospheric parameters of RU Cam were estimated Teff=5250K and log g=1.0. The hydrogen deficiency of RU Cam was not confirmed. The iron abundance, [Fe/H]=-0.37, is close to the solar one. Abundances of most other elements are also close to normal. We found considerable excesses of carbon and nitrogen: [C/Fe]=+0.98, [N/Fe]=+0.60. The carbon to oxygen ratio is C/O$\\ge$1. The carbon isotopic abundance ratio is equal to C^12/C^13=4.5. For sodium a moderate overabundance Na/Fe=+0.55 was obtained. For two moments of observations we found close heliocentric velocity values, Vr=-21.7+/-0.8 and -23.1+/-1.0 km/s. Both spectra contain a peculiar feature - an emission component of NaI doublet which location agrees with the radial velocity from the bulk of metallic lines. For our two observing moments we found no dependence of radial velocities on the formation depth or on excitation energy for metallic lines.

  6. Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite films studied by magneto-optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lišková-Jakubisová, E., E-mail: liskova@karlov.mff.cuni.cz; Višňovský, Š. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague (Czech Republic); Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J. [Nanotechnology Center, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 708 33 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Sahoo, Subasa C. [Department of Physics, Central University of Kerala, Kasaragod, Kerala 671314 (India); Prasad, Shiva [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Venkataramani, N. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Bohra, Murtaza [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), Okinawa (Japan); Krishnan, R. [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS-UVSQ, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78935 Versailles (France)

    2015-05-07

    Ferrimagnetic Zn-ferrite (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) films can be grown with the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of 40 Oe at 9.5 GHz without going through a high temperature processing. This presents interest for applications. The work deals with laser ablated ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} films deposited at O{sub 2} pressure of 0.16 mbar onto fused quartz substrates. The films about 120 nm thick are nanocrystalline and their spontaneous magnetization, 4πM{sub s}, depends on the nanograin size, which is controlled by the substrate temperature (T{sub s}). At T{sub s} ≈ 350 °C, where the grain distribution peaks around ∼20–30 nm, the room temperature 4πM{sub s} reaches a maximum of ∼2.3 kG. The films were studied by magnetooptical polar Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy at photon energies between 1 and 5 eV. The complementary characteristics were provided by spectral ellipsometry (SE). Both the SE and MOKE spectra confirmed ferrimagnetic ordering. The structural details correspond to those observed in MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} spinels. SE experiments confirm the insulator behavior. The films display MOKE amplitudes somewhat reduced with respect to those in Li{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2.5}O{sub 4} and MgFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to a lower degree of spinel inversion and nanocrystalline structure. The results indicate that the films are free of oxygen vacancies and Fe{sup 3+}-Fe{sup 2+} exchange.

  7. Comparison Between X-rays Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Measurements on a Ceramic Envelop Lamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruno LAFITTE; Michel AUBES; Georges ZISSIS

    2007-01-01

    Burners of metal halide lamps used for illumination are generally made of polycrystalline alumina ceramic (PCA) which is translucent to visible light.We show that the difficulty of selecting a line of sight through the lamp prevents the use of optical emission diagnostic.X-rays photons are mainly absorbed and not scattered by PCA.Absorption by mercury atoms contributing to the discharge allowed us to determine the density of mercury in the lamp.By comparing diagnostic methods,we put in evidence the difficulty of taking into account the scattering of light mathematically.

  8. Adaptive optics near infrared integral field spectroscopy of NGC 2992

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, S; Hicks, E K S; Engel, H; Müller-Sánchez, F; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L J

    2010-01-01

    NGC 2992 is an intermediate Seyfert 1 galaxy showing outflows on kilo parsec scales which might be due either to AGN or starburst activity. We therefore aim at investigating its central region for a putative starburst in the past and its connection to the AGN and the outflows. Observations were performed with the adaptive optics near infrared integral field spectrograph SINFONI on the VLT, complemented by longslit observations with ISAAC on the VLT, as well as N- and Q-band data from the Spitzer archive. The spatial and spectral resolutions of the SINFONI data are 50 pc and 83 km/s, respectively. The field of view of 3" x 3" corresponds to 450 pc x 450 pc. Br_gamma equivalent width and line fluxes from PAHs were compared to stellar population models to constrain the age of the putative recent star formation. A simple geometric model of two mutually inclined disks and an additional cone to describe an outflow was developed to explain the observed complex velocity field in H_2 1-0S(1). The morphologies of the B...

  9. Time domain terahertz electro- and magneto-optic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, G P

    2001-01-01

    sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r = 0 centre dot 19m sub e and m sub p sub a sub r sub a sub l sub l sub e sub l = 0 centre dot 90m sub e. The temperature dependence of the cyclotron resonance was measured over the range 5K to 80 K, and a peak is found at approx 30 K which can be explained in terms of ionised and neutral impurity scattering at temperatures below 30 K and by phonon scattering above 30 K. The measurement of small amplitude ferromagnetic resonance oscillations in the time domain in thin films of permalloy (78), iron and cobalt has been achieved by using the time resolved magneto-optic Kerr effect. A stripline device was fabricated to provide an out of plane broadband magnetic pulse with a peak strength of approx 5 Oe. The observed frequencies are shown to agree well with the established theory. A time domain terahertz spectrometer and a bolometer have been used to study the coherent THz radiation emitted from n- and p-type InAs surfaces illuminated by femtosecond near infrared pulses. The magn...

  10. Molecular Beam Optical Zeeman Spectroscopy of Vanadium Monoxide, VO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung; Zhang, Ruohan; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Like almost all astronomical studies, exoplanet investigations are observational endeavors that rely primarily on remote spectroscopic sensing to infer the physical properties of planets. Most exoplanet related information is inferred from to temporal variation of luminosity of the parent star. An effective method of monitoring this variation is via Magnetic Doppler Imaging (MDI), which uses optical polarimetry of paramagnetic molecules or atoms. One promising paramagnetic stellar absorption is the near infrared spectrum of VO. With this in mind, we have begun a project to record and analyze the field-free and Zeeman spectrum of the band. A cold (approx. 20 K) beam of VO was probed with a single frequency laser and detected using laser induced fluorescence. The determined spectral parameters will be discussed and compared to those extracted from the analysis of a hot spectrum. Supported by the National Science Foundation under the Grant No. CHE-1265885. O. Kochukhov, N. Rusomarov, J. A. Valenti, H. C. Stempels, F. Snik, M. Rodenhuis, N. Piskunov, V. Makaganiuk, C. U. Keller and C. M. Johns-Krull, Astron. Astrophys. 574 (Pt. 2), A79/71-A79/12 (2015). S. V. Berdyugina, Astron. Soc. Pac. Conf. Ser. 437 (Solar Polarization 6), 219-235 (2011). S. V. Berdyugina, P. A. Braun, D. M. Fluri and S. K. Solanki, Astron. Astrophys. 444 (3), 947-960 (2005). A. S. C. Cheung, P. G. Hajigeorgiou, G. Huang, S. Z. Huang and A. J. Merer, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 163 (2), 443-458 (1994)

  11. Nonlinear optical spectroscopy of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Hernandez, R C; Gleason-Villagran, R; Cheang-Wong, J C; Crespo-Sosa, A; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L; Lopez-Suarez, A; Oliver, A; Reyes-Esqueda, J A [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. 04510 (Mexico); Torres-Torres, C [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, ESIME-Zacatenco, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F. 07338 (Mexico); Rangel-Rojo, R, E-mail: reyes@fisica.unam.mx [CICESE/Depto. de Optica, A.P. 360, Ensenada, B. C. 22860 (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the nonlinear absorption and refraction of isotropic and anisotropic metallic nanocomposites, which consist of Au and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in matrices of SiO{sub 2}. We performed this study at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique in the picosecond regime. The wavelengths were selected accordingly to the absorption spectra of the nanocomposites, choosing wavelengths into the inter- and intra-band transitions regions, including the surface plasmon (SP) resonance, as well as in the transparent region. For the anisotropic nanocomposites, the polarization and the incident angle were varied in order to evaluate the different components of the third order susceptibility tensor, {chi}{sup (3)}. We observed dramatic changes of sign for both, nonlinear refraction and absorption, when passing from Au to Ag and/or varying the wave length. The results accentuate the importance of the hot-electrons contribution to the nonlinear optical response at this temporal regime, when compared to inter-band and intra-band transitions contributions.

  12. Carrier dynamics of optical emission from two-dimensional electron gas in undoped AlGaN/GaN single heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwack, H.S.; Cho, Y.H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Basic Science Research, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea); Kim, G.H. [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea); Park, M.R.; Youn, D.H.; Bae, S.B.; Lee, K.S. [Basic Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea); Lee, J.H.; Lee, J.H. [Department of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Taegu 702-701 (Korea)

    2006-06-15

    The structural and optical properties of undoped AlGaN/GaN single heterojunctions (HJs) were studied by means of high-resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence (PL), cathodoluminescence (CL), and time-resolved PL spectroscopy. An additional two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)-related PL and CL emission appeared at about 40 meV below the GaN band-edge emission energy and persisted up to about 100 K, while this peak disappeared when the top AlGaN layer was removed by reactive ion etching. Depth-resolved CL spectra reveal the presence of a 2DEG at the heterointerface. The additional PL and CL emission below the GaN band-edge emission is attributed to the recombination between photogenerated holes and electrons confined at 2DEG states in the triangular-shaped interface potential. For the 2DEG emission, we observed an about 50-ps delayed rise time than the GaN and AlGaN emissions by using time-resolved PL, indicating effective carrier transfer from the GaN flatband and AlGaN regions to the heterointerface. From the results, we explained the optical properties and carrier recombination dynamics of 2DEG, GaN, and AlGaN emissions in undoped AlGaN/GaN single HJs. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Carrier dynamics of optical emission from two-dimensional electron gas in undoped AlGaN/GaN single heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwack, H. S.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, G. H.; Park, M. R.; Youn, D. H.; Bae, S. B.; Lee, K.-S.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, J. H.

    2006-06-01

    The strucutral and optical properties of undoped AlGaN/GaN single heterojunctions (HJs) were studied by means of high-resolution x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence (PL), cathodoluminescence (CL), and time-resolved PL spectroscopy. An additional two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG)-related PL and CL emission appeared at about 40 meV below the GaN band-edge emission energy and persisted up to about 100 K, while this peak disappeared when the top AlGaN layer was removed by reactive ion etching. Depth-resolved CL spectra reveal the presence of a 2DEG at the heterointerface. The additional PL and CL emission below the GaN band-edge emission is attributed to the recombination between photogenerated holes and electrons confined at 2DEG states in the triangular-shaped interface potential. For the 2DEG emission, we observed an about 50-ps delayed rise time than the GaN and AlGaN emissions by using time-resolved PL, indicating effective carrier transfer from the GaN flatband and AlGaN regions to the heterointerface. From the results, we explained the optical properties and carrier recombination dynamics of 2DEG, GaN, and AlGaN emissions in undoped AlGaN/GaN single HJs.

  14. Optical property and spectroscopy studies on the selected lubricating oil in the terahertz range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Lu; ZHOU QingLi; JIN Bin; ZHAO Kun; ZHAO SongQing; SHI YuLei; ZHANG CunLin

    2009-01-01

    The optical property and spectroscopy of selected kinds of lubricating oil are studied based on the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.3-1.6 THz. The samples are classified by their characteristics via the near-infrared spectrum. The experimental results reveal that lubricating oil is more sensitive in the range of terahertz than in the near-infrared, and the specific kinds of lubricating oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the terahertz range. The THz-TDS technology applied to lubricating oil analysis has potentially significant impact on the petroleum field.

  15. Optical property and spectroscopy studies on the selected lubricating oil in the terahertz range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The optical property and spectroscopy of selected kinds of lubricating oil are studied based on the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the spectral range of 0.3-1.6 THz. The samples are classified by their characteristics via the near-infrared spectrum. The experimental results reveal that lubricating oil is more sensitive in the range of terahertz than in the near-infrared,and the specific kinds of lubricating oil can be identified according to their different spectral features in the terahertz range. The THz-TDS technology applied to lubricating oil analysis has potentially significant impact on the petroleum field.

  16. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single living cells: principle and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianliao; Wei, Qing; Wang, Yuzhu; Li, Yong Qing

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the principle and applications of the combination technique of optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy for real-time analysis of single living cells. We demonstrate that the information of each substance inside a captured cell can be retrieved by the Raman spectrum of the cell. The effect of alcohol solution on single human Red Blood Cell (RBC) is investigated using near-infrared laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS). The significant difference between the spectrum of fresh RBC and the spectrum of RBC exposed to alcohol is observed due to the degradation of RBC. We also present the preliminary study result on the diagnosis of colorectal cancer using LTRS system.

  17. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of RS Ophiuchi during 2008-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somero, A.; Hakala, P.; Wynn, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    RS Ophiuchi (RS Oph) is a symbiotic variable and a recurrent nova (RN). We have monitored it with the Nordic Optical Telescope and obtained 30 high-resolution (R = 46 000) optical spectra over one orbital cycle during quiescence. To our knowledge, this is the best-sampled high-resolution spectroscopic data set of RS Oph over one orbital period. We do not detect any direct signatures of an accretion disc such as double peaked emission lines, but many line profiles are complex consisting of superimposed emission and absorption components. We measure the spin of the red giant and conclude that it is tidally locked to the binary orbit. We observe Na I absorption features, probably arising from the circumbinary medium, that has been shaped by previous RN outbursts. We do not detect any intrinsic polarization in the optical wavelengths.

  18. High-resolution optical spectroscopy of RS Ophiuchi during 2008 -- 2009

    CERN Document Server

    Somero, A; Wynn, G A

    2016-01-01

    RS Ophiuchi is a symbiotic variable and a recurrent nova. We have monitored it with the Nordic Optical Telescope and obtained 30 high resolution (R=46 000) optical spectra over one orbital cycle during quiescence. To our knowledge this is the best-sampled high resolution spectroscopic dataset of RS Oph over one orbital period. We do not detect any direct signatures of an accretion disc such as double peaked emission lines, but many line profiles are complex consisting of superimposed emission and absorption components. We measure the spin of the red giant and conclude that it is tidally locked to the binary orbit. We observe Na I absorption features, probably arising from the circumbinary medium, that has been shaped by previous recurrent nova outbursts. We do not detect any intrinsic polarisation in the optical wavelengths.

  19. Ultrafast and Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2011-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provide a variety of unique opportunities for studying the dynamics and interactions of one-dimensional (1-D) electrons and phonons. We have carried out a series of ultrafast and nonlinear optical experiments on SWNTs, revealing novel properties of high- density 1-D excitons as well as coherent lattice vibrations. We have shown that there exists an upper limit on the density of 1-D excitons in SWNTs, which results in photoluminescence saturation. Using a model based on diffusion-limited exciton- exciton annihilation, we provided realistic estimates for the exciton densities in the saturation regime. We also predicted and demonstrated that there is an optimum temperature at which the exciton density can be maximized, due to the existence of a dark exciton state. Using ultrashort pulses, we have also investigated the dynamics of coherent phonons (CPs) in SWNTs, including both the low frequency radial breathing mode and high frequency G-mode phonons. Pulse shaping techniques allowed us to generate and detect CPs in SWNTs in a chirality-selective manner, which provided insight into the chirality dependence of light absorption, phonon generation, and phonon-induced band- structure modulations. Finally, we observed novel large- amplitude CPs through near-band-edge excitations as well as strongly polarization-dependent CP signals in highly-aligned SWNTs. This work was performed in collaboration with Y. Murakami, A. Srivastava, T. A. Searles, L. G. Booshehri, E. H. Hároz, D. T. Morris, J.-H. Kim, K.-J. Yee, Y.-S. Lim, G. D. Sanders, C. J. Stanton, and R. Saito.

  20. An Optical Tweezers Platform for Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy in Organic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jacob; Kamenetska, Maria; Ganim, Ziad

    2017-10-03

    Observation at the single molecule level has been a revolutionary tool for molecular biophysics and materials science, but single molecule studies of solution-phase chemistry are less widespread. In this work we develop an experimental platform for solution-phase single molecule force spectroscopy in organic solvents. This optical-tweezer-based platform was designed for broad chemical applicability and utilizes optically trapped core-shell microspheres, synthetic polymer tethers, and click chemistry linkages formed in situ. We have observed stable optical trapping of the core-shell microspheres in ten different solvents, and single molecule link formation in four different solvents. These experiments demonstrate how to use optical tweezers for single molecule force application in the study of solution-phase chemistry.

  1. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li;

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fiber...... be proportionally improved by increasing the length of the optical fiber ring resonator....... of the fiber ring resonator can be measured with the transmission spectrum. A good linearity is obtained between displacement and the inverse of wavelength spacing with an R2 of 0.9989, and high sensitivities better than 40  pm/με within the range of 0 to 10  με are achieved. The sensitivity can...

  2. New compact and efficient local oscillator optic system for the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Y. B.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, J.; Kim, C.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.

    2016-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic on Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research utilizes quasi-optical heterodyne-detection method to measure 2D (vertical and radial) Te fluctuations from two toroidally separated poloidal cross section of the plasma. A cylindrical lens local oscillator (LO) optics with optical path length (OPL) 2-2.5 m has been used in the current ECEI system to couple the LO source to the 24 vertically aligned array of ECE detectors. For efficient and compact LO optics employing the Powell lens is proposed so that the OPL of the LO source is significantly reduced from ˜2.0 m to 0.4 m with new optics. The coupling efficiency of the LO source is expected to be improved especially at the edge channels. Results from the optical simulation together with the laboratory test of the prototype optics will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Emission Spectroscopy as a Probe into Photoinduced Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Polyazine Bridged Ru(II,Rh(III Supramolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J. Brewer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy are valuable tools to probe photochemical processes of metal-ligand, coordination complexes. Ru(II polyazine light absorbers are efficient light harvesters absorbing in the UV and visible with emissive 3MLCT excited states known to undergo excited state energy and electron transfer. Changes in emission intensity, energy or band-shape, as well as excited state lifetime, provide insight into excited state dynamics. Photophysical processes such as intramolecular electron transfer between electron donor and electron acceptor sub-units may be investigated using these methods. This review investigates the use of steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy to measure excited state intramolecular electron transfer in polyazine bridged Ru(II,Rh(III supramolecular complexes. Intramolecular electron transfer in these systems provides for conversion of the emissive 3MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state to a non-emissive, but potentially photoreactive, 3MMCT (metal-to-metal charge transfer excited state. The details of the photophysics of Ru(II,Rh(III and Ru(II,Rh(III,Ru(II systems as probed by steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy will be highlighted.

  4. Monitoring the cementitious materials subjected to sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanfei; Bai, Yun; Muhammed Basheer, P. A.; Boland, John J.; Wang, Jing Jing

    2013-10-01

    Formation of ettringite and gypsum from sulfate attack together with carbonation and chloride ingress have been considered as the most serious deterioration mechanisms of concrete structures. Although electrical resistance sensors and fiber optic chemical sensors could be used to monitor the latter two mechanisms on site, currently there is no system for monitoring the deterioration mechanisms of sulfate attack. In this paper, a preliminary study was carried out to investigate the feasibility of monitoring sulfate attack with optical fiber excitation Raman spectroscopy through characterizing the ettringite and gypsum formed in deteriorated cementitious materials under an optical fiber excitation + objective collection configuration. Bench-mounted Raman spectroscopy analysis was also conducted to validate the spectrum obtained from the fiber-objective configuration. The results showed that the expected Raman bands of ettringite and gypsum in the sulfate-attacked cement paste can be clearly identified by the optical fiber excitation Raman spectrometer and are in good agreement with those identified from bench-mounted Raman spectrometer. Therefore, based on these preliminary results, it is considered that there is a good potential for developing an optical fiber-based Raman system to monitor the deterioration mechanisms of concrete subjected to sulfate attack in the future.

  5. Optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of laser-cooled atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, C.; Münchow, F.; Görlitz, A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on optical Autler-Townes spectroscopy in a heteronuclear mixture of {}^{87}Rb and {}^{176}Yb in a continuously loaded double-species magneto-optical trap. An excited vibrational level of Rb*Yb which is energetically close to the 5^2P_{1/2} state of Rb is coupled by a strong laser field to a vibrational level in the ground state of RbYb and probed by a weak probe laser field. The induced Autler-Townes splittings in the photoassociation spectra allow us to determine relative Franck-Condon factors of molecular transitions in RbYb.

  6. Optical spectroscopy of low-dimensional rare-earth iron borates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    The family of RFe 3(BO 3) 4 borates (R=Pr, Nd, Eu-Er, Y) was studied by high-resolution optical absorption and Raman spectroscopies. Structural and magnetic phase transitions were detected and the types of magnetic structure were determined. Energy of crystal-field (CF) levels and exchange splitting of the ground state of the R 3+ ion were obtained from the analysis of optical spectra. CF calculations were carried out. Effective magnetic field at the R 3+ site was found, using the calculated value of the magnetic g-factor. Some peculiarities of modeling the paramagnetic susceptibility of NdFe 3(BO 3) 4 are discussed.

  7. Comparison of organic phantom recipes and characterization by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, G.; Pifferi, A.; Bargigia, I.; Farina, A.; Cubeddu, R.; Taroni, P.

    2013-06-01

    Three recipes for tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids are presented. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser, instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30 to 70 percent by mass are proposed and tested. Optical characterization by time-resolved spectroscopy was performed in terms of optical properties, homogeneity, reproducibility and composition retrieval.

  8. Diffractive optics based four-wave, six-wave, ..., nu-wave nonlinear spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R J Dwayne; Paarmann, Alexander; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I

    2009-09-15

    A detailed understanding of chemical processes requires information about both structure and dynamics. By definition, a reaction involves nonstationary states and is a dynamic process. Structure describes the atomic positions at global minima in the nuclear potential energy surface. Dynamics are related to the anharmonicities in this potential that couple different minima and lead to changes in atomic positions (reactions) and correlations. Studies of molecular dynamics can be configured to directly access information on the anharmonic interactions that lead to chemical reactions and are as central to chemistry as structural information. In this regard, nonlinear spectroscopies have distinct advantages over more conventional linear spectroscopies. Because of this potential, nonlinear spectroscopies could eventually attain a comparable level of importance for studying dynamics on the relevant time scales to barrier crossings and reactive processes as NMR has for determining structure. Despite this potential, nonlinear spectroscopy has not attained the same degree of utility as linear spectroscopy largely because nonlinear studies are more technically challenging. For example, unlike the linear spectrometers that exist in almost all chemistry departments, there are no "black box" four-wave mixing spectrometers. This Account describes recent advances in the application of diffractive optics (DOs) to nonlinear spectroscopy, which reduces the complexity level of this technology to be closer to that of linear spectroscopy. The combination of recent advances in femtosecond laser technology and this single optic approach could bring this form of spectroscopy out of the exclusive realm of specialists and into the general user community. However, the real driving force for this research is the pursuit of higher sensitivity limits, which would enable new forms of nonlinear spectroscopy. This Account chronicles the research that has now extended nonlinear spectroscopy to six

  9. Determination of the emissivity of the tungsten hexa-ethoxide pyrolysis flame using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudau, AE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available of the Tungsten Hexa-Ethoxide Pyrolysis Flame using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Azwitamisi E Mudau1, Bonex W Mwakikunga2, Neels Brink3, Cornelius J Willers1, Andrew Forbes2, Lerato Shikwambana2, Malcolm Govender2 1Defence, Peace... effects. The later is negligible in the setup used. In this paper we present the emissivity of the flame determined from the transmissivity measured using the FTIR Spectroscopy. 1. Introduction Laser pyrolysis is a versatile non...

  10. Continuous measurements of volcanic gases from Popocatepetl volcano by thermal emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taquet, Noemie; Stremme, Wolfgang; Meza, Israel; Grutter, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Passive volcanic gas emissions have been poorly studied despite their impact on the atmospheric chemistry with important consequences on its geochemical cycles and climate change on regional and global scale. Therefore, long-term monitoring of volcanic gas plumes and their composition are of prime importance for climatic models and the estimation of the volcanic contribution to climate change. We present a new measurement and analysis strategy based on remote thermal emission spectroscopy which can provide continuous (day and night) information of the composition of the volcanic plume. In this study we show results from the Popocatepetl volcano in Mexico with measurements performed during the year 2015 from the Altzomoni Atmospheric Observatory (19.12N, -98.65W, 3,985 masl). This site, which forms part of the RUOA (www.ruoa.unam.mx) and NDACC (https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/irwg) networks, is located north of the crater of this active volcano at 12 km distance. Emission spectra were recorded with an FTIR spectrometer (OPAG22, Bruker) at 0.5 cm-1 spectral resolution and processed using the SFIT4 radiative transfer and profile retrieval code, based on the Optimal Estimation method (Rodgers, 1976; 1990; 2000). This newly improved methodology is intercompared to a former retrieval strategy using measurements from 2008 and recent results of the variability of the SiF4/SO2 composition ratio during 2015 is presented. A discussion of how the new measurements improve the understating of the impact of volcanic gas emissions on the atmosphere on global and regional scale is included.

  11. Excitation and Imaging of Resonant Optical Modes of Au Triangular Nano-Antennas Using Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Anil; Mabon, James C; Chow, Edmond; Fang, Nicholas X

    2010-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging spectroscopy is an important technique to understand resonant behavior of optical nanoantennas. We report high-resolution CL spectroscopy of triangular gold nanoantennas designed with near-vacuum effective index and very small metal-substrate interface. This design helped in addressing issues related to background luminescence and shifting of dipole modes beyond visible spectrum. Spatial and spectral investigations of various plasmonic modes are reported. Out-of-plane dipole modes excited with vertically illuminated electron beam showed high-contrast tip illumination in panchromatic imaging. By tilting the nanostructures during fabrication, in-plane dipole modes of antennas were excited. Finite-difference time-domain simulations for electron and optical excitations of different modes showed excellent agreement with experimental results. Our approach of efficiently exciting antenna modes by using low index substrates is confirmed both with experiments and numerical simulations....

  12. Optical properties of 3d-ions in crystals spectroscopy and crystal field analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brik, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    "Optical Properties of 3d-Ions in Crystals: Spectroscopy and Crystal Field Analysis" discusses spectral, vibronic and magnetic properties of 3d-ions in a wide range of crystals, used as active media for solid state lasers and potential candidates for this role. Crystal field calculations (including first-principles calculations of energy levels and absorption spectra) and their comparison with experimental spectra, the Jahn-Teller effect, analysis of vibronic spectra, materials science applications are systematically presented. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students in crystal spectroscopy, materials science and optical applications. Dr. N.M. Avram is an Emeritus Professor at the Physics Department, West University of Timisoara, Romania; Dr. M.G. Brik is a Professor at the Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Estonia.

  13. Optical spectroscopy for differentiation of liver tissue under distinct stages of fibrosis: an ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabila, D. A.; Hernández, L. F.; de la Rosa, J.; Stolik, S.; Arroyo-Camarena, U. D.; López-Vancell, M. D.; Escobedo, G.

    2013-11-01

    Liver fibrosis is the decisive step towards the development of cirrhosis; its early detection affects crucially the diagnosis of liver disease, its prognosis and therapeutic decision making. Nowadays, several techniques are employed to this task. However, they have the limitation in estimating different stages of the pathology. In this paper we present a preliminary study to evaluate if optical spectroscopy can be employed as an auxiliary tool of diagnosis of biopsies of human liver tissue to differentiate the fibrosis stages. Ex vivo fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired from biopsies using a portable fiber-optic system. Empirical discrimination algorithms based on fluorescence intensity ratio at 500 nm and 680 nm as well as diffuse reflectance intensity at 650 nm were developed. Sensitivity and specificity of around 80% and 85% were respectively achieved. The obtained results show that combined use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could represent a novel and useful tool in the early evaluation of liver fibrosis.

  14. Crystal optics for precision x-ray spectroscopy on highly charged ions—conception and proof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, H. F.; Gassner, T.; Trassinelli, M.; Heß, R.; Spillmann, U.; Banaś, D.; Blumenhagen, K.-H.; Bosch, F.; Brandau, C.; Chen, W.; Dimopoulou, Chr; Förster, E.; Grisenti, R. E.; Gumberidze, A.; Hagmann, S.; Hillenbrand, P.-M.; Indelicato, P.; Jagodzinski, P.; Kämpfer, T.; Kozhuharov, Chr; Lestinsky, M.; Liesen, D.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Loetzsch, R.; Manil, B.; Märtin, R.; Nolden, F.; Petridis, N.; Sanjari, M. S.; Schulze, K. S.; Schwemlein, M.; Simionovici, A.; Steck, M.; Stöhlker, Th; Szabo, C. I.; Trotsenko, S.; Uschmann, I.; Weber, G.; Wehrhan, O.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Winters, N.; Ziegler, E.

    2015-07-01

    The experimental investigation of quantum-electrodydamic contributions to the binding energies of inner shells of highly charged heavy ions requires an accurate spectroscopy in the region of hard x-rays suitable at a limited source strength. For this purpose the focusing compensated asymmetric Laue crystal optics has been developed and a twin-spectrometer assembly has been built and commissioned at the experimental storage ring of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum Darmstadt. We characterize the crystal optics and demonstrate the usefulness of the instrumentation for accurate spectroscopy of both stationary and fast moving x-ray sources. The experimental procedures discussed here may also be applied for other spectroscopic studies where a transition from conventional germanium x-ray detectors to crystal spectrometers seems too demanding because of low source intensity.

  15. Emission enhancement of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by localized surface plasmon resonance for analyzing plant nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Kotani, Takashi; Hattori, Takeaki

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the monitoring of plant nutrients in leaves of Citrus unshiu and Rhododendron obtusum using low-energy (laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The raw plant leaf was successfully ablated without desiccation before laser irradiation, by applying metallic colloidal particles to the leaf surface. The emission intensity with the metallic particles was larger than that without the particles. This result indicates an improvement of the sensitivity and the detection limit of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The emission enhancement was caused by localized surface plasmon resonance and was dependent on the size and material of metallic particles.

  16. Diode-Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of an Optically Thick Plasma in Combination with Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nomura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortion of laser-induced fluorescence profiles attributable to optical absorption and saturation broadening was corrected in combination with laser absorption spectroscopy in argon plasma flow. At high probe-laser intensity, saturated absorption profiles were measured to correct probe-laser absorption. At low laser intensity, nonsaturated absorption profiles were measured to correct fluorescence reabsorption. Saturation broadening at the measurement point was corrected using a ratio of saturated to non-saturated broadening. Observed LIF broadening and corresponding translational temperature without correction were, respectively, 2.20±0.05 GHz and 2510±100 K and corrected broadening and temperature were, respectively, 1.96±0.07 GHz and 1990±150 K. Although this correction is applicable only at the center of symmetry, the deduced temperature agreed well with that obtained by LAS with Abel inversion.

  17. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    benefits from the stable ringdown baseline stability of this pulsed UV -CRDS system that offers a laser beam in a wide wavelength range from visible to...measure wavelength-dependent single particle extinction for different types of particles and in different wavelength regions ( Visible - UV ). We found: (1...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We report a new single-aerosol particle scope using an optical trapping-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OT-CRDS) technique

  18. Optical signatures of molecular particles via mass-selected cluster spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A new molecular beam apparatus was developed to study optical absorption in cold (less than 100 K) atomic clusters and complexes produced by their condensation with simple molecular gases. In this instrument, ionized clusters produced in a laser vaporization nozzle source are mass selected and studied with photodissociation spectroscopy at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. This new approach can be applied to synthesize and characterize numerous particulates and weakly bound complexes expected in planetary atmospheres and in comets.

  19. Development and use of compact instruments for tropospheric investigations based on optical spectroscopy from mobile platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Merlaud, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of four different remote-sensing instruments dedicated to atmospheric research and their use in field campaigns between 2008 and 2012. The instruments are based on uv-visible spectrometers and installed respectively on a scientific aircraft (Safire ATR-42), ultralight aircraft, and cars. One of the instruments is targeted to operate from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is used to quantify ...

  20. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Bean Seeds Investigated Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, G.; Hernandez-Aguilar, C.; Dominguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Perez-Reyes, M. C. J.; Martinez, E. Moreno

    2015-06-01

    A knowledge about seed optical parameters is of great relevance in seed technology practice. Such parameters provide information about its absorption and reflectance, which could be useful for biostimulation processes, by light sources, in early stages of seed germination. In the present research photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and the Rosencwaig and Gersho model were used to determine the optical absorption coefficient () of five varieties of bean seeds ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), of different productive cycles; the seeds were biostimulated by laser treatment to evaluate the effects of biostimulation pre-sowing. It was found that the bean varieties V1, V2, V4, and V5 were optically opaque in the visible spectrum; in the case of the V3 variety, this sample was optically transparent from 680 nm. The varieties of the studied bean seeds showed significant statistical differences in sizes and also in their optical absorption spectra. The biostimulation effects showed that the seed samples with a higher optical penetration length had a positive biostimulation, in the percentage of germination, obtaining an enhancement of 47 % compared to the control sample. The utility of PAS for the optical characterization of seeds has been demonstrated in this study of the laser biostimulation process of this kind of samples.

  1. Spatio-spectral characteristics of ultra-broadband THz emission from two-colour photoexcited gas plasmas and their impact for nonlinear spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, V.; Thomson, M. D.; Roskos, H. G.

    2013-07-01

    We present a characterization of the combined spatial and spectral properties of the terahertz (THz) and mid-infrared emission from gas plasmas generated and driven by two-colour femtosecond optical pulses. For its use in nonlinear spectroscopy, the impact of the relatively complex spatial profile for both broadband (∼ 10 THz) and ultra-broadband (> 100 THz) emission needs to be considered, in particular for experiments based on z-scan techniques. Here we apply spatially resolved measurements based on both field autocorrelation and sum-frequency (up-conversion) detection. Based on these results, we present simulations of the ultra-broadband profile during its passage through a focal region. In addition to the inherent features of the emission profile due to the generation mechanism in the plasma filament, we also analyse the role of the semconductor (silicon) wafer typically placed after the plasma to discard the optical pump beams, whose photoexcitation also can play a role in the resultant THz profile.

  2. Simultaneous X-Ray and optical spectroscopy of the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 993

    CERN Document Server

    Corral, A; Carrera, F J; Ceballos, M T; Mateos, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of simultaneous XMM-Newton X-ray and 3.5m/CAHA optical spectroscopic observations of the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 993. This galaxy exhibited in the past significant variations of its broad emission lines which classified it as Sy1, Sy1.5 and Sy1.9 in different epochs. In order to test the X-ray/optical consistency of the unified AGN model we have compared the amount of photoelectric X-ray absorption with the Balmer decrement of broad emission line components. The optical data show that during our observations Mrk 993 was in a Sy1.8 state with a Balmer decrement of 9. The X-ray absorbing gas amounts only to 7E20 cmE-02, most likely due to the host galaxy. For a normal gas to dust ratio in the absorbing material (expected to arise in the molecular torus) both quantities are clearly discrepant with an intrinsic Balmer decrement of 3.4. We therefore conclude that the Balmer ratio is intrinsic rather than produced by obscuration and therefore that in this object the optical broad line emission pro...

  3. PAH 8μm Emission as a Diagnostic of HII Region Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oey, M. S.; Lopez-Hernandez, J.; Kellar, J. A.; Pellegrini, E. W.; Gordon, Karl D.; Jameson, Katherine; Li, Aigen; Madden, Suzanne C.; Meixner, Margaret; Roman-Duval, Julia; Bot, Caroline; Rubio, Monica; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2017-01-01

    PAHs are easily destroyed by Lyman continuum radiation and so in optically thick Stromgren spheres, they tend to be found only on the periphery of HII regions, rather than in the central volume. We therefore expect that in HII regions that are optically thin to ionizing radiation, PAHs would be destroyed beyond the primary nebular structure. Using data from the Spitzer SAGE survey of the Magellanic Clouds, we test whether 8 μm emission can serve as a diagnostic of optical depth in HII regions. We find that 8 μm emission does provide valuable constraints in the Large Magellanic Cloud, where objects identified as optically thick by their atomic ionization structure have 6 times higher median 8 μm surface brightness than optically thin objects. However, in the Small Magellanic Cloud, this differentiation is not observed. This appears to be caused by extremely low PAH production in this low-metallicity environment, such that any differentiation between optically thick and thin objects is washed out by stochastic variations, likely driven by the interplay between dust production and UV destruction. Thus, PAH emission is sensitive to nebular optical depth only at higher metallicities.

  4. Multiband fiber optic radiometry for measuring the temperature and emissivity of gray bodies of low or high emissivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Sharon; Katzir, Abraham

    2004-03-20

    Infrared fiber optic radiometry was used for noncontact thermometry of gray bodies whose temperature was close to room temperature (40-70 degrees C). We selected three gray bodies, one with high emissivity (epsilon = 0.97), one with medium emissivity (epsilon = 0.71), and one with low emissivity (epsilon = 0.025). We carried out optimization calculations and measurements for a multiband fiber optic radiometer that consisted of a silver halide (AgClBr) infrared-transmitting fiber, a dual-band cooled infrared detector, and a set of 18 narrowband infrared filters that covered the 2-14-microm spectral range. We determined the optimal spectral range, the optimal number of filters to be used, and the optimal chopping scheme. Using these optimal conditions, we performed measurements of the three gray bodies and obtained an accuracy of better than 1 degrees C for body temperature and for room temperature. An accuracy of 0.03 was obtained for body emissivity.

  5. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  6. Uncertainties in Carbonaceous Aerosol Emissions, Scavenging Parameterizations, and Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T.; Kinne, S.; Klimont, Z.; Sun, H.; van Aardenne, J.; van der Werf, G.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of human influence on climate are especially hindered by poor constraint on the amount of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the atmosphere. Coordination of observation and model analyses attempt to constrain particle absorption amount, however these are limited by uncertainties in aerosol emission estimates, model scavenging parameterization, aerosol size assumption, contributions from organic aerosol absorption, air concentration observational techniques and by sparsity of data coverage. We perform multiple simulations using GISS modelE and six present-day emission estimates for black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) (Bond et al 2004 middle and upper estimates, IIASA, EDGAR, GFED v1 and v2); for one of these emissions we apply 4 different BC/OC scavenging parameterizations. The resulting concentrations will be compared with a new compilation of observed BC/OC concentrations. We then use these model concentrations, together with effective radius assumptions and estimates of OC absorption to calculate a range of carbonaceous aerosol absorption. We constrain the wavelength-dependent model τ- absorption with AERONET sun-photometer observations. We will discuss regions, seasons and emission sectors with greatest uncertainty, including those where observational constraint is lacking. We calculate the range of model radiative forcing from our simulations and discuss the degree to which it is constrained by observations.

  7. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, S., E-mail: kobayashi@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ohshima, S.; Kado, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Otani, Y. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Oishi, T.; Kenmochi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be −20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  8. Development of beam emission spectroscopy for turbulence transport study in Heliotron J

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Matsuda, H.; Lu, X. X.; Kokubu, D.; Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Kenmochi, N.; Otani, Y.; Konoshima, S.; Mizuuchi, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the development study of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) for the turbulent transport study in Heliotron J. Modification of the sightlines (10 × 4 for edge and 10 × 2 for edge) enables us to obtain 2-dimensional BES imaging. The cooling effect on the reduction in the electrical noise of avalanche photodiode (APD) assembly has been investigated using a refrigerant cooling system. When the temperature of the APD element has set to be -20 °C, the electrical noise can be reduced more than 50%. The measurement error of the phase difference in the case of low signal level has been tested by two light-emitting diode lamps. The APD cooling has an effect to improve the measurement error at the low signal level of APD.

  9. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sole, Angelo; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases.

  10. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Angelo Del [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo e Universita di Milano, 20142 Milan (Italy); Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS H San Raffaele e Universita Vita e Salute, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Lucignani, Giovanni [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare c/o Ospedale L. Sacco, Via G.B. Grassi, 74, 20157 Milan (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  11. Larger red-shift in optical emissions obtained from the thin films of globular proteins (BSA, lysozyme) - polyelectrolyte (PAA) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Hrishikesh; Kundu, Sarathi; Basu, Saibal

    2016-09-01

    Globular proteins (lysozyme and BSA) and polyelectrolyte (sodium polyacrylic acid) are used to form protein-polyelectrolyte complexes (PPC). Out-of-plane structures of ≈30-60 nm thick PPC films and their surface morphologies have been studied by using X-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy, whereas optical behaviors of PPC and protein conformations have been studied by using UV-vis, photoluminescence and FTIR spectroscopy respectively. Our study reveals that thin films of PPC show a larger red-shift of 23 and 16 nm in the optical emissions in comparison to that of pure protein whereas bulk PPC show a small blue-shift of ≈3 nm. A small amount of peak-shift is found to occur due to the heat treatment or concentration variation of the polyelectrolyte/protein in bulk solution but cannot produce such film thickness independent larger red-shift. Position of the emission peak remains nearly unchanged with the film thickness. Mechanism for such larger red-shift has been proposed.

  12. X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF YB3+-DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citron, Robert; Kropf, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Optical fibers doped with Ytterbium-3+ have become increasingly common in fiber lasers and amplifiers. Yb-doped fibers provide the capability to produce high power and short pulses at specific wavelengths, resulting in highly effective gain media. However, little is known about the local structure, distribution, and chemical coordination of Yb3+ in the fibers. This information is necessary to improve the manufacturing process and optical qualities of the fibers. Five fibers doped with Yb3+ were studied using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), in addition to Yb3+ mapping. The Yb3+ distribution in each fiber core was mapped with 2D and 1D intensity scans, which measured X-ray fluorescence over the scan areas. Two of the five fibers examined showed highly irregular Yb3+ distributions in the core center. In four of the five fibers Yb3+ was detected outside of the given fiber core dimensions, suggesting possible Yb3+ diffusion from the core, manufacturing error, or both. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis has so far proven inconclusive, but did show that the fibers had differing EXAFS spectra. The Yb3+ distribution mapping proved highly useful, but additional modeling and examination of fiber preforms must be conducted to improve XAS analysis, which has been shown to have great potential for the study of similar optical fi bers.

  13. Optical spectroscopy study of nc-Si-based p-i-n solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sancho-Parramon, Jordi; Gracin, Davor; Gajovic, Andreja [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Modreanu, Mircea [Tyndall Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2009-10-15

    In the present study we analyzed nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si)-based p-i-n thin film structures (SiC/nc-Si/n-doped amorphous Si) on glass produced by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The crystallinity of the nc-Si layer was modified by varying the deposition conditions ([SiH{sub 4}]/[H{sub 2}] ratio in the plasma and radio-frequency power). Structural properties of the samples (crystalline fraction and crystal size distribution) were inferred by Raman spectroscopy. Different optical spectroscopy methods were combined for the determination of the optical constants in different spectral ranges: spectrophotometry, ellipsometry and photothermal deflection spectroscopy. Characterization results evidence that the optical properties of the nc-Si layers are strongly connected with the layer structural properties. Thus, the correlation between density of defects, Urbach energy, band-gap and line-shape of dielectric function critical points with the crystalline properties of the films is established. (author)

  14. Feasibility Study of Optical Spectroscopy as a Medical Tool for Diagnosis of Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Saf

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is one of the most frequently en-countered types of cancer in the Western world. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation Statistics, one in every five Americans develops skin cancer during his/her lifetime. Today, the incurability of advanced cutaneous melanoma raises the importance of its early detection. Since the differentiation of early melanoma from other pigmented skin lesions is not a trivial task, even for experienced dermatologists, computer aided diagnosis could become an important tool for reducing the mortality rate of this highly malignant cancer type. In this paper, a computer aided diagnosis system based on machine learning is proposed in order to support the clinical use of optical spectroscopy for skin lesions quantification and classification. The focuses is on a feasibility study of optical spectroscopy as a medical tool for diagnosis. To this end, data acquisition protocols for optical spectroscopy are defined and detailed analysis of feature vectors is performed. Different tech-niques for supervised and unsupervised learning are explored on clinical data, collected from patients with malignant and benign skin lesions.

  15. Optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy for oral lesions characterization: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luis Felipe C. S.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Oliveira, Inajara P.; Rangel, João. Lucas; Ferreira, Isabelle; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In the clinical daily life various lesions of the oral cavity have shown different aspects, generating an inconclusive or doubtful diagnosis. In general, oral injuries are diagnosed by histopathological analysis from biopsy, which is an invasive procedure and does not gives immediate results. In the other hand, Raman spectroscopy technique it is a real time and minimal invasive analytical tool, with notable diagnostic capability. This study aims to characterize, by optical fiber Raman-based spectroscopy (OFRS), normal, inflammatory, potentially malignant, benign and malign oral lesions. Raman data were collected by a Holospec f / 1.8 spectrograph (Kayser Optical Systems) coupled to an optical fiber, with a 785nm laser line source and a CCD Detector. The data were pre-processed and vector normalized. The average analysis and standard deviation was performed associated with cluster analysis and compared to the histopalogical results. Samples of described oral pathological processes were used in the study. The OFRS was efficient to characterized oral lesions and normal mucosa, in which biochemical information related to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and carbohydrates were observed. The technique (OFRS) is able to demonstrate biochemical information concern different types of oral lesions showing that Raman spectroscopy could be useful for an early and minimal invasive diagnosis.

  16. SPATIALLY RESOLVED HST GRISM SPECTROSCOPY OF A LENSED EMISSION LINE GALAXY AT z {approx} 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Brenda L. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hurley, Mairead [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Bowen, David V. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Meurer, Gerhardt [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia M468, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Sharon, Keren [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Straughn, Amber [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Coe, Dan [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Broadhurst, Tom [Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, E-48011 Bilbao (Spain); Guhathakurta, Puragra, E-mail: bfrye@as.arizona.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    We take advantage of gravitational lensing amplification by A1689 (z 0.187) to undertake the first space-based census of emission line galaxies (ELGs) in the field of a massive lensing cluster. Forty-three ELGs are identified to a flux of i{sub 775} = 27.3 via slitless grism spectroscopy. One ELG (at z = 0.7895) is very bright owing to lensing magnification by a factor of Almost-Equal-To 4.5. Several Balmer emission lines (ELs) detected from ground-based follow-up spectroscopy signal the onset of a major starburst for this low-mass galaxy (M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) with a high specific star formation rate ( Almost-Equal-To 20 Gyr{sup -1}). From the blue ELs we measure a gas-phase oxygen abundance consistent with solar (12+log(O/H) = 8.8 {+-} 0.2). We break the continuous line-emitting region of this giant arc into seven {approx}1 kpc bins (intrinsic size) and measure a variety of metallicity-dependent line ratios. A weak trend of increasing metal fraction is seen toward the dynamical center of the galaxy. Interestingly, the metal line ratios in a region offset from the center by {approx}1 kpc have a placement on the blue H II region excitation diagram with f ([O III])/f (H{beta}) and f ([Ne III])/f (H{beta}) that can be fitted by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). This asymmetrical AGN-like behavior is interpreted as a product of shocks in the direction of the galaxy's extended tail, possibly instigated by a recent galaxy interaction.

  17. Optical and Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectroscopy of the SCUBA Galaxy N2-850.4

    CERN Document Server

    Swinbank, M; Borys, C; Bower, R; Bunker, A; Chapman, S; Ivison, R; Keel, W; Ramsay-Howat, S; Smail, I; Swinbank, Mark; Smail, Ian; Bower, Richard; Borys, Colin; Chapman, Scott; Blain, Andrew; Ivison, Rob; Ramsay-Howat, Suzie; Keel, William

    2005-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the SCUBA galaxy SMM J163650.43+405734.5 (ELAIS N2 850.4) at z=2.385. We combine Ly-alpha and H-alpha emission line maps and velocity structure with high resolution HST ACS and NICMOS imaging to probe the complex dynamics of this vigorous star-burst galaxy. The imaging data shows a complex morphology, consisting of at least three components separated by ~1'' (8kpc) in projection. When combined with the H-alpha velocity field from UKIRT UIST IFU observations we identify two components whose redshifts are coincident with the systemic redshift, measured from previous CO observations, one of which shows signs of AGN activity. A third component is offset by 220+/-50km/s from the systemic velocity. The total star formation rate of the whole system (estimated from the narrow-line H-alpha and uncorrected for reddening) is 340+/-50Mo/yr. The Ly-alpha emission mapped by the GMOS IFU covers the complete galaxy and is offset by +270+/-40km/s from the sys...

  18. Excitation spectroscopy in multispectral optical fluorescence tomography: methodology, feasibility and computer simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Ahn, Sangtae; Levenson, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular probes used for in vivo optical fluorescence tomography (OFT) studies in small animals are typically chosen such that their emission spectra lie in the 680-850 nm wavelength range. This is because tissue attenuation in this spectral band is relatively low, allowing optical photons even from deep sites in tissue to reach the animal surface and consequently be detected by a CCD camera. The wavelength dependence of tissue optical properties within the 680-850 nm band can be exploited for emitted light by measuring fluorescent data via multispectral approaches and incorporating the spectral dependence of these optical properties into the OFT inverse problem—that of reconstructing underlying 3D fluorescent probe distributions from optical data collected on the animal surface. However, in the aforementioned spectral band, due to only small variations in the tissue optical properties, multispectral emission data, though superior for image reconstruction compared to achromatic data, tend to be somewhat redundant. A different spectral approach for OFT is to capitalize on the larger variations in the optical properties of tissue for excitation photons than for the emission photons by using excitation at multiple wavelengths as a means of decoding source depth in tissue. The full potential of spectral approaches in OFT can be realized by a synergistic combination of these two approaches, that is, exciting the underlying fluorescent probe at multiple wavelengths and measuring emission data multispectrally. In this paper, we describe a method that incorporates both excitation and emission spectral information into the OFT inverse problem. We describe a linear algebraic formulation of the multiple wavelength illumination-multispectral detection forward model for OFT and compare it to models that use only excitation at multiple wavelengths or those that use only multispectral detection techniques. This study is carried out in a realistic inhomogeneous mouse atlas

  19. Discovery of Early Optical Emission from GRB 021211

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, D W; Soderberg, A M; Berger, E; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Frail, D A; Harrison, F A; Yost, S A; Matthews, K; Peterson, B A; Tanaka, I; Christiansen, J; Moriarty-Schieven, G H

    2003-01-01

    We report our discovery and early time optical, near-infrared, and radio wavelength follow-up observations of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021211. Our optical observations, beginning 21 min after the burst trigger, demonstrate that the early afterglow of this burst is roughly three magnitudes fainter than the afterglow of GRB 990123 at similar epochs, and fainter than almost all known afterglows at an epoch of 1d after the GRB. Our near-infrared and optical observations indicate that this is not due to extinction. Combining our observations with data reported by other groups, we identify the signature of a reverse shock. This reverse shock is not detected to a 3-sigma limit of 110 uJy in an 8.46-GHz VLA observation at t=0.10d, implying either that the Lorentz factor of the burst gamma ~ 1 week, we find that the late-time radio flux is suppressed by a factor of two relative to the >~ 80 uJy peak flux at optical wavelengths. This suppression is not likely to be due to synchrotron self-absorption or ...

  20. A synthetic diagnostic for beam emission spectroscopy in the helically symmetric experiment stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, T. J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Anderson, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) has a number of active spectroscopy diagnostics. Due to the relatively large beam width compared to the plasma minor radius, it is difficult to achieve good spatial resolution at the core of the HSX plasma. This is due to the fact that the optical sightline cuts through many flux surfaces with varying field vectors within the beam. In order to compare the experimental results with theoretical models it is important to accurately model the beam width effects. A synthetic diagnostic has been developed for this purpose. This synthetic diagnostic calculates the effect of spot size and beam width on the measurements of quantities of interest, including radial electric field, flow velocity, and Stark polarization.