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Sample records for optical diffusion imaging

  1. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

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    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  2. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

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    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  3. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

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    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  4. Table-top diffuse optical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturgeon, K.A.; Bakker, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the work done during a six months internshipat Philips Research for a Masters in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. An existing table-top tomography system for measuring lightin phantom breasts was restored. Updated software control and image reconstruction software was cr

  5. Table-top diffuse optical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturgeon, K.A.; Bakker, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the work done during a six months internshipat Philips Research for a Masters in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. An existing table-top tomography system for measuring lightin phantom breasts was restored. Updated software control and image reconstruction software was cr

  6. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

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    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  7. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

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    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  8. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis.

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    Kolbe, Scott C; van der Walt, Anneke; Butzkueven, Helmut; Klistorner, Alexander; Egan, Gary F; Kilpatrick, Trevor J

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON). We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1). We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD)] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of -2.6% per annum (control = -0.51%; p = 0.006). Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R = 0.450, p = 0.006; RD: R = -0.428, p = 0.009; MD: R = -0.365, p = 0.029). In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R = 0.489, p = 0.039). In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage.

  9. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis

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    Scott C. Kolbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON. We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1. We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD, and mean diffusivity (MD] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of −2.6% per annum (control = −0.51%; p=0.006. Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R=0.450, p=0.006; RD: R=-0.428, p=0.009; MD: R=-0.365, p=0.029. In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R=0.489, p=0.039. In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage.

  10. Method to improve the performance of reflectance diffuse optical imaging based on polygonal optical fibers arrangement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weitao Li; Zhiyu Qian; Ting Li

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of reflectance diffuse optical imaging(rDOI),a novel polynomial geometry(PG)of optical fibers arrangement is proposed.Polynomial geometry is based on the hexagonal geometry(HG)and multicentered double-density(MD)mode.The overlapping sensitivity matrix,area ratio(AR),reconstruction image,two-absorber model,arid contrast-to-noise ratio(CNR)in different depths are used to evaluate the performance of PG.The other three geometries including HG,rectangular geometry(RG),and MD mode are also compared with PG.The deformation of the reconstruction images is evaluted by circular ratio(CR).The results prove that the proposed PG has high performance and minimum deformation in quality of reconstruction image in rDOI.

  11. Glaucoma severity affects diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the optic nerve and optic radiation

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    Sidek, S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Medical Imaging Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selangor (Malaysia); Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Ramli, N.M.; Abdulrahman, F. [Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tan, L.K. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To evaluate whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiation in glaucoma patients provides parameters to discriminate between mild and severe glaucoma and to determine whether DTI derived indices correlate with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods: 3-Tesla DTI was performed on 90 subjects (30 normal, 30 mild glaucoma and 30 severe glaucoma subjects) and the FA and MD of the optic nerve and optic radiation were measured. The categorisation into mild and severe glaucoma was done using the Hodapp–Parrish–Anderson (HPA) classification. RNFL thickness was also assessed on all subjects using OCT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient was carried out. Results: FA and MD values in the optic nerve and optic radiation decreased and increased respectively as the disease progressed. FA at the optic nerve had the highest sensitivity (87%) and specificity (80%). FA values displayed the strongest correlation with RNFL thickness in the optic nerve (r = 0.684, p ≤ 0.001) while MD at the optic radiation showed the weakest correlation with RNFL thickness (r = −0.360, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: The high sensitivity and specificity of DTI-derived FA values in the optic nerve and the strong correlation between DTI-FA and RNFL thickness suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of disease severity.

  12. Optic nerve diffusion tensor imaging after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

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    van der Walt, Anneke; Kolbe, Scott C; Wang, Yejun E; Klistorner, Alexander; Shuey, Neil; Ahmadi, Gelareh; Paine, Mark; Marriott, Mark; Mitchell, Peter; Egan, Gary F; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J

    2013-01-01

    Early markers of axonal and clinical outcomes are required for early phase testing of putative neuroprotective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS). To assess whether early measurement of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters (axial and radial diffusivity) within the optic nerve during and after acute demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) could predict axonal (retinal nerve fibre layer thinning and multi-focal visual evoked potential amplitude reduction) or clinical (visual acuity and visual field loss) outcomes at 6 or 12 months. Thirty-seven patients presenting with acute, unilateral ON were studied at baseline, one, three, six and 12 months using optic nerve DTI, clinical and paraclinical markers of axonal injury and clinical visual dysfunction. Affected nerve axial diffusivity (AD) was reduced at baseline, 1 and 3 months. Reduced 1-month AD correlated with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thinning at 6 (R=0.38, p=0.04) and 12 months (R=0.437, p=0.008) and VEP amplitude loss at 6 (R=0.414, p=0.019) and 12 months (R=0.484, p=0.003). AD reduction at three months correlated with high contrast visual acuity at 6 (ρ = -0.519, p = 0.001) and 12 months (ρ = -0.414, p=0.011). The time-course for AD reduction for each patient was modelled using a quadratic regression. AD normalised after a median of 18 weeks and longer normalisation times were associated with more pronounced RNFL thinning and mfVEP amplitude loss at 12 months. Affected nerve radial diffusivity (RD) was unchanged until three months, after which time it remained elevated. These results demonstrate that AD reduces during acute ON. One month AD reduction correlates with the extent of axonal loss and persistent AD reduction at 3 months predicts poorer visual outcomes. This suggests that acute ON therapies that normalise optic nerve AD by 3 months could also promote axon survival and improve visual outcomes.

  13. Optic nerve diffusion tensor imaging after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

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    Anneke van der Walt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early markers of axonal and clinical outcomes are required for early phase testing of putative neuroprotective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether early measurement of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI parameters (axial and radial diffusivity within the optic nerve during and after acute demyelinating optic neuritis (ON could predict axonal (retinal nerve fibre layer thinning and multi-focal visual evoked potential amplitude reduction or clinical (visual acuity and visual field loss outcomes at 6 or 12 months. METHODS: Thirty-seven patients presenting with acute, unilateral ON were studied at baseline, one, three, six and 12 months using optic nerve DTI, clinical and paraclinical markers of axonal injury and clinical visual dysfunction. RESULTS: Affected nerve axial diffusivity (AD was reduced at baseline, 1 and 3 months. Reduced 1-month AD correlated with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thinning at 6 (R=0.38, p=0.04 and 12 months (R=0.437, p=0.008 and VEP amplitude loss at 6 (R=0.414, p=0.019 and 12 months (R=0.484, p=0.003. AD reduction at three months correlated with high contrast visual acuity at 6 (ρ = -0.519, p = 0.001 and 12 months (ρ = -0.414, p=0.011. The time-course for AD reduction for each patient was modelled using a quadratic regression. AD normalised after a median of 18 weeks and longer normalisation times were associated with more pronounced RNFL thinning and mfVEP amplitude loss at 12 months. Affected nerve radial diffusivity (RD was unchanged until three months, after which time it remained elevated. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that AD reduces during acute ON. One month AD reduction correlates with the extent of axonal loss and persistent AD reduction at 3 months predicts poorer visual outcomes. This suggests that acute ON therapies that normalise optic nerve AD by 3 months could also promote axon survival and improve visual outcomes.

  14. Artificial neural networks based estimation of optical parameters by diffuse reflectance imaging under in vitro conditions

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    Mahmut Ozan Gökkan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical parameters (properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms are determined through noninvasive optical imaging. Objective of this study is to decompose obtained diffuse reflectance into these optical properties such as absorption and scattering coefficients. To do so, transmission spectroscopy is firstly used to measure the coefficients via an experimental setup. Next, the optical properties of each characterized phantom are input for Monte Carlo (MC simulations to get diffuse reflectance. Also, a surface image for each single phantom with its known optical properties is obliquely captured due to reflectance-based geometrical setup using CMOS camera that is positioned at 5∘ angle to the phantoms. For the illumination of light, a laser light source at 633nm wavelength is preferred, because optical properties of different components in a biological tissue on that wavelength are nonoverlapped. During in vitro measurements, we prepared 30 different mixture samples adding clinoleic intravenous lipid emulsion (CILE and evans blue (EB dye into a distilled water. Finally, all obtained diffuse reflectance values are used to estimate the optical coefficients by artificial neural networks (ANNs in inverse modeling. For a biological tissue it is found that the simulated and measured values in our results are in good agreement.

  15. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

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    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  16. Imaging hemodynamic changes in preterm infant brains with two-dimensional diffuse optical tomography

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    Gao, Feng; Ma, Yiwen; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Huijuan; Jiang, Jingying; Kusaka, Takashi; Ueno, Masanori; Yamada, Yukio

    2008-02-01

    We present our preliminary results on two-dimensional (2-D) optical tomographic imaging of hemodynamic changes of two preterm infant brains in different ventilation settings conditions. The investigations use the established two-wavelength, 16-channel time-correlated single photon counting system for the detection, and the generalized pulse spectrum technique based algorithm for the image reconstruction. The experiments demonstrate that two-dimensional diffuse optical tomography may be a potent and relatively simple way of investigating the functions and neural development of infant brains in the perinatal period.

  17. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

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    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-08-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise.

  18. Accelerating frequency-domain diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction using graphics processing units.

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    Prakash, Jaya; Chandrasekharan, Venkittarayan; Upendra, Vishwajith; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K

    2010-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction uses advanced numerical models that are computationally costly to be implemented in the real time. The graphics processing units (GPUs) offer desktop massive parallelization that can accelerate these computations. An open-source GPU-accelerated linear algebra library package is used to compute the most intensive matrix-matrix calculations and matrix decompositions that are used in solving the system of linear equations. These open-source functions were integrated into the existing frequency-domain diffuse optical image reconstruction algorithms to evaluate the acceleration capability of the GPUs (NVIDIA Tesla C 1060) with increasing reconstruction problem sizes. These studies indicate that single precision computations are sufficient for diffuse optical tomographic image reconstruction. The acceleration per iteration can be up to 40, using GPUs compared to traditional CPUs in case of three-dimensional reconstruction, where the reconstruction problem is more underdetermined, making the GPUs more attractive in the clinical settings. The current limitation of these GPUs in the available onboard memory (4 GB) that restricts the reconstruction of a large set of optical parameters, more than 13,377.

  19. Diffusion tensor imaging for in vivo detection of degenerated optic radiation.

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    Michelson, Georg; Engelhorn, Tobias; Waerntges, Simone; Doerfler, Arnd

    2011-01-01

    Glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy may continue to the linked optic radiation by transneuronal degeneration, as described in animal models of glaucoma. In vivo visualization of the visual pathway represents a new challenge in the field of ophthalmology. We present a new approach for illustration of the optic radiation by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The DTI was established by use of a 3T high-field scanner. The case of a patient with primary open-angle glaucoma is opposed to this one of a healthy subject to demonstrate the visible rarefication of the optic radiation. The goal was to introduce the technique of the DTI also in ophthalmology and to demonstrate that it may be useful to judge glaucoma-related differences.

  20. Volumetric Diffuse Optical Tomography for Small Animals Using a CCD-Camera-Based Imaging System

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    Zi-Jing Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the feasibility of three-dimensional (3D volumetric diffuse optical tomography for small animal imaging by using a CCD-camera-based imaging system with a newly developed depth compensation algorithm (DCA. Our computer simulations and laboratory phantom studies have demonstrated that the combination of a CCD camera and DCA can significantly improve the accuracy in depth localization and lead to reconstruction of 3D volumetric images. This approach may present great interests for noninvasive 3D localization of an anomaly hidden in tissue, such as a tumor or a stroke lesion, for preclinical small animal models.

  1. Image reconstruction using wavelet multi-resolution technique for time-domain diffuse optical tomography

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    Yang, Fang; Gao, Feng; Jiao, Yuting; Zhao, Huijuan

    2010-02-01

    It is generally believed that the inverse problem in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is highly ill-posed and its solution is always under-determined and sensitive to noise, which is the main problem in the application of DOT. In this paper, we propose a method on image reconstruction for time-domain diffuse optical tomography based on panel detection and Finite-Difference Method, and introduce an approach to reduce the number of unknown parameters in the reconstruction process. We propose a multi-level scheme to reduce the number of unknowns by parameterizing the spatial distribution of optical properties via wavelet transform and then reconstruct the coefficients of this transform. Compared with previous traditional uni-level full spatial domain algorithm, this method can efficiently improve the reconstruction quality. Numerical simulations show that wavelet-based multi-level inversion is superior to the uni-level algebraic reconstruction technique.

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging detects rarefaction of optic radiation in glaucoma patients.

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    Engelhorn, Tobias; Michelson, Georg; Waerntges, Simone; Struffert, Tobias; Haider, Sultan; Doerfler, Arnd

    2011-06-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can depict rarefaction of the optical fibres. Hence, we applied DTI to assess pathological changes of the optic radiation in glaucoma patients. Fifty glaucoma patients and 50 healthy age-matched controls were examined by a 3T high-field magnetic resonance scanner. Fiber tracts were volume rendered using a semiquantitative approach to assess rarefaction and results were correlated with the extent of optic nerve atrophy and reduced spatial-temporal contrast sensitivity of the retina using established ophthalmological examinations. Twenty-two glaucoma patients (44%) showed significant rarefaction of the optic radiation: the volume was reduced to 67 ± 16% compared with controls. Hereby, the glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy stage correlated with the presence of DTI-derived rarefied optic radiation (Kendall tau-b 0.272, P = .016). Aside, cerebral microangiopathy affecting the optic radiation was significantly higher among glaucoma patients compared to controls (10 patients compared with 2 patients, P < .05). In patients with glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy, there is anterograde and-most likely because of microangiopathic lesions within the optic radiation-retrograde transneuronal rarefaction of the optic radiation that can be assessed in vivo using DTI with good correlation to established ophthalmological examinations. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) and tractography in children with septo-optic dysplasia

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    Salmela, Michael B. [University of Vermont College of Medicine-Fletcher Allen Health Care, Burlington, VT (United States); Cauley, Keith A. [UMass Memorial Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States); Nickerson, Joshua P.; Filippi, Christopher G. [University of Vermont College of Medicine-Fletcher Allen Health Care, Department of Radiology, Burlington, VT (United States); Koski, Chris J. [James Madison University, Department of Political Science, Harrisonburg, VA (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) refers to a heterogeneous group of midline brain developmental anomalies, with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) being one of the morphologic correlates of the condition. Traditionally, ONH has been diagnosed on fundoscopic exam. Conventional MRI is used in cases of suspected ONH to identify associated brain abnormalities and to compare findings to the fundoscopic exam. Advances in magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) permit in vivo, noninvasive, quantitative characterization of the entire visual pathway at 3.0 T. To investigate the feasibility of MRDTI at 3.0 T in children with SOD to evaluate the entire visual pathway. MRDTI at 3T was performed in two children with SOD and seven age-matched controls. Manual region-of-interest analysis was used to evaluate the tensor metrics of the optic nerves. Deterministic tractography was used to evaluate the tensor metrics of the optic radiations. The SOD patients demonstrated a significant decrease in anisotropy and increase in mean diffusivity of the optic nerves and radiations compared to the control subjects. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MRDTI to evaluate the entire visual pathway in children, and it demonstrates pre- and post-chiasmatic diffusion tensor abnormalities in SOD patients. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging-based evaluation of optic-radiation shape and position in meningioma.

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    Lv, Xueming; Chen, Xiaolei; Xu, Bainan; Zhang, Jiashu; Zheng, Gang; Li, Jinjiang; Li, Fangye; Sun, Guochen

    2012-03-25

    Employing magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional white-matter imaging and conventional magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate the tumor parenchyma, peritumoral edema and compression on surrounding brain tissue. A color-coded tensor map and three-dimensional tracer diagram were applied to clearly display the optic-radiation location, course and damage. Results showed that the altered anisotropy values of meningioma patients corresponded with optic-radiation shape, size and position on both sides. Experimental findings indicate that the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging technique is a means of tracing and clearly visualizing the optic radiation.

  5. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging-based evaluation of optic-radiation shape and position in meningioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueming Lv; Xiaolei Chen; Bainan Xu; Gang Zheng; Jinjiang Li; Fangye Li; Guochen Sun; liusan

    2012-01-01

    Employing magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional white-matter imaging and conventional magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate the tumor parenchyma, peritumoral edema and compression on surrounding brain tissue. A color-coded tensor map and three-dimensional tracer diagram were applied to clearly display the optic-radiation location, course and damage. Results showed that the altered anisotropy values of meningioma patients corresponded with optic-radiation shape, size and position on both sides. Experimental findings indicate that the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging technique is a means of tracing and clearly visualizing the optic radiation.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging correlates of visual impairment in multiple sclerosis and chronic optic neuritis.

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    Kolbe, Scott C; Marriott, Mark; Walt, Anneke van der; Fielding, Joanne; Klistorner, Alexander; Mitchell, Peter J; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Egan, Gary F

    2012-02-21

    To compare white matter (WM) injuries associated with vision loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) and optic neuritis (ON). Twenty-three patients with clinically definite relapsing-remitting MS and chronic unilateral ON and 14 neurologically healthy volunteers were monocularly tested with Sloan 100%, 2.5%, and 1.25% contrast visual acuity charts. Primary visual pathway and whole-brain WM injury were assessed with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). OCT and DTI correlates of high- and low-contrast visual impairment were identified using correlation analyses. The MS patients displayed significantly reduced retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and altered optic nerve and radiation DTI measures compared with the controls. In the patients, 2.5% and 1.25% contrast letter acuity in the unaffected eye correlated significantly and independently with optic nerve and optic radiation DTI measures. Visual acuity in affected eyes did not correlate with optic nerve or optic radiation DTI measures, but did correlate with DTI measures in prefrontal and temporal brain regions that were shown to connect structurally to visual cortices. In unaffected eyes, visual impairment was associated with WM injury in the visual pathway. In contrast, irrecoverable visual impairment after ON was associated with injury to frontal WM, which potentially impairs the capacity for remapping visual processing.

  7. Brain activation and connectivity of social cognition using diffuse optical imaging

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    Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-02-01

    In the current research, diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is used for the first time towards studies related to sociocommunication impairments, which is a characteristic feature of autism. DOI studies were performed on normal adult volunteers to determine the differences in the brain activation (cognitive regions) in terms of the changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels in response to joint and non-joint attention based stimulus (i.e. socio-communicative paradigms shown as video clips). Functional connectivity models are employed to assess the extent of synchronization between the left and right pre-frontal regions of the brain in response to the above stimuli.

  8. Assessment of Optic Nerve Impairment in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica by MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiye Chen

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has been used for the evaluation of the white matter integrity. In this study, we evaluated optic nerve impairment in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO using DTI.Optic nerve DTI were performed on 28 NMO patients and 38 normal controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA values were measured in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the intraorbital optic nerve segment. For the posterior intraorbital optic nerve, FA values of BI (0.20±0.07, MI (0.24±0.16, and NA (0.25±0.14 decreased significantly compared with that of NC (0.43±0.07 (P<0.05, and ROC analysis demonstrated that the area under the curve (AUC measurements for BI vs. NC, MI vs. NC, NA vs. NC, and NMO (including BI, MI, and NA vs. NC were 0.99, 0.93, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively. The corresponding diagnostic sensitivities of ROC analysis were 100%, 80%, 80%, and 91%; and the specificities were 93%, 97%, 91%, and 93%.Decreased FA value in the intraorbital optic nerve, especially in the posterior part of the nerve, was demonstrated as a characteristic MR feature for NMO-related optic nerve impairment.

  9. Optic radiation fiber tractography in glioma patients based on high angular resolution diffusion imaging with compressed sensing compared with diffusion tensor imaging - initial experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kuhnt

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Up to now, fiber tractography in the clinical routine is mostly based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. However, there are known drawbacks in the resolution of crossing or kissing fibers and in the vicinity of a tumor or edema. These restrictions can be overcome by tractography based on High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI which in turn requires larger numbers of gradients resulting in longer acquisition times. Using compressed sensing (CS techniques, HARDI signals can be obtained by using less non-collinear diffusion gradients, thus enabling the use of HARDI-based fiber tractography in the clinical routine. METHODS: Eight patients with gliomas in the temporal lobe, in proximity to the optic radiation (OR, underwent 3T MRI including a diffusion-weighted dataset with 30 gradient directions. Fiber tractography of the OR using a deterministic streamline algorithm based on DTI was compared to tractography based on reconstructed diffusion signals using HARDI+CS. RESULTS: HARDI+CS based tractography displayed the OR more conclusively compared to the DTI-based results in all eight cases. In particular, the potential of HARDI+CS-based tractography was observed for cases of high grade gliomas with significant peritumoral edema, larger tumor size or closer proximity of tumor and reconstructed fiber tract. CONCLUSIONS: Overcoming the problem of long acquisition times, HARDI+CS seems to be a promising basis for fiber tractography of the OR in regions of disturbed diffusion, areas of high interest in glioma surgery.

  10. Tomographic x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical imaging of osteoarthritis in the finger joints: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huizhu; Zhang, Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the typical optical findings that can be used to characterize osteoarthritis, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controllers were examined clinically and scanned by a novel hybrid imaging system. The hybrid imaging platform integrated a C-arm based x-ray tomosynthetic system with a multi-channel optic-fiber based diffuse optical imaging system. Optical images were recovered qualitatively and quantitatively based on a regularization-based reconstruction algorithm that can incorporate the fine structural maps obtained from x-ray as a priori spatial information into diffuse optical tomography reconstruction procedures. Our findings suggest statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. X-ray guided diffuse optical imaging may not only detect radiologic features supporting the development of an inflammatory disorder but may also help discriminate specific optical features that differ between osteoarthritic and healthy joints. These quantitative optical features are also potentially important for a better understanding of inflammatory arthritis in humans.

  11. [Diffusion tensor imaging of the visual pathway in glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhorn, T; A Schmidt, M; Dörfler, A; Michelson, G

    2017-03-01

    In Germany more than one million inhabitants suffer from glaucoma, more than 100,000 are threatened with blindness because glaucoma is often diagnosed too late or not at all. Diagnosis and monitoring is usually carried out "only" by examination of the retina and not the whole visual pathway. However, the eye is just "the tip of the iceberg" of the actual visual pathway, which extends through the brain to the visual cortex. The interdisciplinary holistic assessment of the whole visual pathway in glaucoma is of crucial importance because glaucoma is a complex neurodegenerative disease. Subtypes, such as normal tension glaucoma (NTG), seem to originate from primary damage to the intracranial visual pathway with secondary retrograde retinal degeneration. Recent studies including glaucoma patients and healthy controls could show that diffusion tensor imaging with calculation of diffusion coefficients, i.e. fractional anisotropy (FA), mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD) as markers of axonal integrity, provide the potential to assess the intracranial visual pathway with a high correlation to established ophthalmological examinations. In particular, calculation of FA maps of the visual pathway and accompanying voxel-based approaches, can be integrated into clinical routine. Thus, detection of glaucoma-related intracranial alterations, even in early stages of the disease, as well as differentiation of different glaucoma subtypes, is made possible. Furthermore, the diagnosis of normal tension glaucoma seems to be possible much earlier with these new imaging techniques compared to established ophthalmological work-up. Moreover, holistic imaging provides new insights into the pathophysiology of this form of glaucoma. This review article gives an overview of these novel magnetic resonance imaging techniques for assessment of the visual pathway in glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy and reveals the potential of an interdisciplinary approach.

  12. Differential diagnosis of breast masses in South Korean premenopausal women using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leproux, Anaïs; Kim, You Me; Min, Jun Won; McLaren, Christine E.; Chen, Wen-Pin; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Lee, Seung-ha; Chung, Phil-Sang; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-07-01

    Young patients with dense breasts have a relatively low-positive biopsy rate for breast cancer (˜1 in 7). South Korean women have higher breast density than Westerners. We investigated the benefit of using a functional and metabolic imaging technique, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI), to help the standard of care imaging tools to distinguish benign from malignant lesions in premenopausal Korean women. DOSI uses near-infrared light to measure breast tissue composition by quantifying tissue concentrations of water (ctH2O), bulk lipid (ctLipid), deoxygenated (ctHHb), and oxygenated (ctHbO2) hemoglobin. DOSI spectral signatures specific to abnormal tissue and absent in healthy tissue were also used to form a malignancy index. This study included 19 premenopausal subjects (average age 41±9), corresponding to 11 benign and 10 malignant lesions. Elevated lesion to normal ratio of ctH2O, ctHHb, ctHbO2, total hemoglobin (THb=ctHHb+ctHbO2), and tissue optical index (ctHHb×ctH2O/ctLipid) were observed in the malignant lesions compared to the benign lesions (p90% sensitivity and specificity. Malignant lesions showed significantly higher metabolism and perfusion than benign lesions. DOSI spectral features showed high discriminatory power for distinguishing malignant and benign lesions in dense breasts of the Korean population.

  13. Multimodal breast cancer imaging using coregistered dynamic diffuse optical tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis

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    Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Deng, Bin; Singh, Bhawana; Martino, Mark; Selb, Juliette; Fang, Qianqian; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Cormier, Jayne; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.; Saksena, Mansi A.; Carp, Stefan A.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is emerging as a noninvasive functional imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis and neoadjuvant chemotherapy monitoring. In particular, the multimodal approach of combining DOT with x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is especially synergistic as DBT prior information can be used to enhance the DOT reconstruction. DOT, in turn, provides a functional information overlay onto the mammographic images, increasing sensitivity and specificity to cancer pathology. We describe a dynamic DOT apparatus designed for tight integration with commercial DBT scanners and providing a fast (up to 1 Hz) image acquisition rate to enable tracking hemodynamic changes induced by the mammographic breast compression. The system integrates 96 continuous-wave and 24 frequency-domain source locations as well as 32 continuous wave and 20 frequency-domain detection locations into low-profile plastic plates that can easily mate to the DBT compression paddle and x-ray detector cover, respectively. We demonstrate system performance using static and dynamic tissue-like phantoms as well as in vivo images acquired from the pool of patients recalled for breast biopsies at the Massachusetts General Hospital Breast Imaging Division.

  14. A fast atlas-guided high density diffuse optical tomography system for brain imaging

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    Dai, Xianjin; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Hao; Jiang, Huabei

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging functional brain imaging tool capable of assessing cerebral concentrations of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbR) during brain activation noninvasively. As an extension of NIRS, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) not only shares the merits of providing continuous readings of cerebral oxygenation, but also has the ability to provide spatial resolution in the millimeter scale. Based on the scattering and absorption properties of nonionizing near-infrared light in biological tissue, DOT has been successfully applied in the imaging of breast tumors, osteoarthritis and cortex activations. Here, we present a state-of-art fast high density DOT system suitable for brain imaging. It can achieve up to a 21 Hz sampling rate for a full set of two-wavelength data for 3-D DOT brain image reconstruction. The system was validated using tissue-mimicking brain-model phantom. Then, experiments on healthy subjects were conducted to demonstrate the capability of the system.

  15. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  16. Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging to Detect and Quantify Adipose Tissue Browning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinish, U. S; Wong, Chi Lok; Sriram, Sandhya; Ong, Wee Kiat; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Sugii, Shigeki; Olivo, Malini

    2017-01-01

    Adipose (fat) tissue is a complex metabolic organ that is highly active and essential. In contrast to white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) is deemed metabolically beneficial because of its ability to burn calories through heat production. The conversion of WAT-resident adipocytes to “beige” or “brown-like” adipocytes has recently attracted attention. However, it typically takes a few days to analyze and confirm this browning of WAT through conventional molecular, biochemical, or histological methods. Moreover, accurate quantification of the overall browning process is not possible by any of these methods. In this context, we report the novel application of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and multispectral imaging (MSI) to detect and quantify the browning process in mice. We successfully demonstrated the time-dependent increase in browning of WAT, following its induction through β-adrenergic agonist injections. The results from these optical techniques were confirmed with those of standard molecular and biochemical assays, which measure gene and protein expression levels of UCP1 and PGC-1α, as well as with histological examinations. We envision that the reported optical methods can be developed into a fast, real time, cost effective and easy to implement imaging approach for quantification of the browning process in adipose tissue. PMID:28145475

  17. Sampling scheme optimization for diffuse optical tomography based on data and image space rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Sohail; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Sanghoon; Heo, Duchang; Kim, Kee Hyun; Ye, Jong Chul; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-10-01

    We present a methodology for the optimization of sampling schemes in diffuse optical tomography (DOT). The proposed method exploits singular value decomposition (SVD) of the sensitivity matrix, or weight matrix, in DOT. Two mathematical metrics are introduced to assess and determine the optimum source-detector measurement configuration in terms of data correlation and image space resolution. The key idea of the work is to weight each data measurement, or rows in the sensitivity matrix, and similarly to weight each unknown image basis, or columns in the sensitivity matrix, according to their contribution to the rank of the sensitivity matrix, respectively. The proposed metrics offer a perspective on the data sampling and provide an efficient way of optimizing the sampling schemes in DOT. We evaluated various acquisition geometries often used in DOT by use of the proposed metrics. By iteratively selecting an optimal sparse set of data measurements, we showed that one can design a DOT scanning protocol that provides essentially the same image quality at a much reduced sampling.

  18. Atlas-based high-density diffuse optical tomography for imaging the whole human cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Culver, Joseph P.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for brain imaging has the potential to be an alternative human brain mapping technique when MRI imaging is not applicable. It recovers tissue chromophore concentrations of brain tissue through measures of light transmission to monitor for example the resting-state brain dynamics. This imaging technique relies on simulation of the light propagation which can be generated based on a subject-specific model. There has been some study on using rigid atlas models as alternatives for model based DOT when subject-specific anatomical data is not available; but there is still a lack of detailed analysis between geometrical accuracy and internal light propagation in tissue for atlas-based DOT. This work is focused on High-Density DOT (HD-DOT) of the whole cortex based on atlas models from 11 different rigid registration algorithms across 24 subjects, and the results are evaluated in 19 areas of the human head. The correlation between geometrical surface error and internal light propagation errors is strong in most area but varies in different regions from R2 = 0.74 in the region around top of the head to R2 = 0.98 in the region around the temples. In the 11 registration methods, basic-4-landmark registration with 4.2mm average surface error and 50% average internal light propagation errors is shown to be the least accurate registration method whereas full-head landmark with non-iterative point to point with 1.7mm average surface error and 32% average internal light propagation error is shown to be the most accurate registration method for atlas-based DOT.

  19. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiations at 3T in children with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Christopher G.; Nickerson, Joshua P. [University of Vermont School of Medicine-FAHC, Department of Radiology, Burlington, VT (United States); Bos, Aaron [University of Vermont School of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Salmela, Michael B. [University of Minnesota School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Koski, Chris J. [James Madison University, Department of Political Sciences, Harrisonburg, VA (United States); Cauley, Keith A. [University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Optic pathway glioma (OPG) is a characteristic hallmark of neurofibromatosis type I (NF-I). To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MRDTI) at 3T to detect abnormalities of the optic nerves and optic radiations in children with NF-I. 3-T MRDTI was prospectively performed in 9 children with NF-I (7 boys, 2 girls, average age 7.8 years, range 3-17 years) and 44 controls (25 boys, 19 girls, average age 8.1 years, range 3-17 years). Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity were determined by region-of-interest analysis for the optic nerves and radiations. Statistical analysis compared controls to NF-I patients. Two NF-I patients had bilateral optic nerve gliomas, three had chiasmatic gliomas and four had unidentified neurofibromatosis objects (UNOs) along the optic nerve pathways. All NF-I patients had statistically significant decreases in FA and elevations in mean diffusivity in the optic nerves and radiations compared to age-matched controls. MRDTI can evaluate the optic pathways in children with NF-I. Statistically significant abnormalities were detected in the diffusion tensor metrics of the optic nerves and radiations in children with NF-I compared to age-matched controls. (orig.)

  20. Diffusion of flexible random-coil dextran polymers measured in anisotropic brain extracellular space by integrative optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Nicholson, Charles; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetová, Sabina

    2008-08-01

    There are a limited number of methods available to quantify the extracellular diffusion of macromolecules in an anisotropic brain region, e.g., an area containing numerous aligned fibers where diffusion is faster along the fibers than across. We applied the integrative optical imaging method to measure diffusion of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 488 (molecular weight (MW) 547) and fluorophore-labeled flexible random-coil dextran polymers (dex3, MW 3000; dex75, MW 75,000; dex282, MW 282,000; dex525, MW 525,000) in the extracellular space (ECS) of the anisotropic molecular layer of the isolated turtle cerebellum. For all molecules, two-dimensional images acquired an elliptical shape with major and minor axes oriented along and across, respectively, the unmyelinated parallel fibers. The effective diffusion coefficients, D*(major) and D*(minor), decreased with molecular size. The diffusion anisotropy ratio (DAR = D*(major)/D*(minor)) increased for Alexa Fluor 488 through dex75 but then unexpectedly reached a plateau. We argue that dex282 and dex525 approach the ECS width and deform to diffuse. In support of this concept, scaling theory shows the diffusion behavior of dex282 and dex525 to be consistent with transition to a reptation regime, and estimates the average ECS width at approximately 31 nm. These findings have implications for the interstitial transport of molecules and drugs, and for modeling neurotransmitter diffusion during ectopic release and spillover.

  1. Prediction of post-operative necrosis after mastectomy: A pilot study utilizing optical diffusion imaging spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xian-Jin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Flap necrosis and epidermolysis occurs in 18-30% of all mastectomies. Complications may be prevented by intra-operative detection of ischemia. Currently, no technique enables quantitative valuation of mastectomy skin perfusion. Optical Diffusion Imaging Spectroscopy (ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter measures the ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin over a 1 × 1 cm area to obtain a non-invasive measurement of perfusion (StO2. Methods This study evaluates the ability of ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter to predict mastectomy flap necrosis. StO2 measurements were taken at five points before and at completion of dissection in 10 patients. Data collected included: demographics, tumor size, flap length/thickness, co-morbidities, procedure length, and wound complications. Results One patient experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Five patients underwent immediate reconstruction, including the patient with necrosis. Statistically significant factors contributing to necrosis included reduction in medial flap StO2 (p = 0.0189, reduction in inferior flap StO2 (p = 0.003, and flap length (p = 0.009. Conclusion StO2 reductions may be utilized to identify impaired perfusion in mastectomy skin flaps.

  2. Characterization of water molecular state in in-vivo thick tissues using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, So Hyun

    Structural changes in water molecules are related to physiological, anatomical and pathological properties of tissues. Near infrared (NIR) optical absorption methods are sensitive to water; however, detailed characterization of water in thick tissues is difficult to achieve because subtle spectral shifts can be obscured by multiple light scattering. In the NIR, a water absorption peak is observed around 975 nm. The precise NIR peak's shape and position are highly sensitive to water molecular disposition. A bound water index (BWI) was developed that quantifies the spectral shift and shape changes observed in tissue water absorption spectra measured by broadband diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). DOSI quantitatively measures light absorption and scattering spectra in cm-deep tissues and therefore reveals bound water spectral shifts. BWI as a water state index was validated by comparing broadband DOSI to MRI and a conductivity cell using bound water phantoms. Non-invasive BWI measurements of malignant and normal tissues in 18 subjects showed a significantly higher fraction of free water in malignant tissues (pbreast cancer patients. The BWI and ADC correlated (R=0.8, p=<0.01) and both parameters decreased with increasing bulk water content in cancer tissues. Although BWI and ADC are positively correlated in vivo, BWI appears to be more sensitive to free water in the extracellular matrix while ADC reflects increased tumor cellularity. The relationship between ADC, BWI and bulk water concentration suggests that both parameters have potential for assessing tumor histopathological grade. My results confirm the importance of water as a critical tissue component that can potentially provide unique insight into the molecular pathophysiology of cancer.

  3. Optimizing the regularization for image reconstruction of cerebral diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermehl, Christina; Steinbrink, Jens; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Haufe, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an optical method for noninvasively determining brain activation by estimating changes in the absorption of near-infrared light. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) extends fNIRS by applying overlapping “high density” measurements, and thus providing a three-dimensional imaging with an improved spatial resolution. Reconstructing brain activation images with DOT requires solving an underdetermined inverse problem with far more unknowns in the volume than in the surface measurements. All methods of solving this type of inverse problem rely on regularization and the choice of corresponding regularization or convergence criteria. While several regularization methods are available, it is unclear how well suited they are for cerebral functional DOT in a semi-infinite geometry. Furthermore, the regularization parameter is often chosen without an independent evaluation, and it may be tempting to choose the solution that matches a hypothesis and rejects the other. In this simulation study, we start out by demonstrating how the quality of cerebral DOT reconstructions is altered with the choice of the regularization parameter for different methods. To independently select the regularization parameter, we propose a cross-validation procedure which achieves a reconstruction quality close to the optimum. Additionally, we compare the outcome of seven different image reconstruction methods for cerebral functional DOT. The methods selected include reconstruction procedures that are already widely used for cerebral DOT [minimum l2-norm estimate (l2MNE) and truncated singular value decomposition], recently proposed sparse reconstruction algorithms [minimum l1- and a smooth minimum l0-norm estimate (l1MNE, l0MNE, respectively)] and a depth- and noise-weighted minimum norm (wMNE). Furthermore, we expand the range of algorithms for DOT by adapting two EEG-source localization algorithms [sparse basis field expansions and linearly

  4. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  5. Mapping breast cancer blood flow index, composition, and metabolism in a human subject using combined diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging and diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Hossein S.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Leproux, Anais; Hill, Brian; Durkin, Amanda; Telep, Seraphim; Lam, Jesse; Yazdi, Siavash S.; Police, Alice M.; Carroll, Robert M.; Combs, Freddie J.; Strömberg, Tomas; Yodh, Arjun G.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) are model-based near-infrared (NIR) methods that measure tissue optical properties (broadband absorption, μa, and reduced scattering, μs‧) and blood flow (blood flow index, BFI), respectively. DOSI-derived μa values are used to determine composition by calculating the tissue concentration of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (HbO2, HbR), water, and lipid. We developed and evaluated a combined, coregistered DOSI/DCS handheld probe for mapping and imaging these parameters. We show that uncertainties of 0.3 mm-1 (37%) in μs‧ and 0.003 mm-1 (33%) in μa lead to ˜53% and 9% errors in BFI, respectively. DOSI/DCS imaging of a solid tissue-simulating flow phantom and a breast cancer patient reveals well-defined spatial distributions of BFI and composition that clearly delineates both the flow channel and the tumor. BFI reconstructed with DOSI-corrected μa and μs‧ values had a tumor/normal contrast of 2.7, 50% higher than the contrast using commonly assumed fixed optical properties. In conclusion, spatially coregistered imaging of DOSI and DCS enhances intrinsic tumor contrast and information content. This is particularly important for imaging diseased tissues where there are significant spatial variations in μa and μs‧ as well as potential uncoupling between flow and metabolism.

  6. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J., E-mail: Gregory.Czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Vorauer, Eric [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chin, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tran, William T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Wright, Frances C. [Division of General Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Gandhi, Sonal [Division of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Yaffe, Martin J. [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images, accompanied by alterations in their mean values, are demonstrated here for the first time as early surrogates of ultimate treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). NAC, as a standard component of treatment for LABC patient, induces measurable heterogeneous changes in tumor metabolism which were evaluated using DOS-based metabolic maps. This study characterizes such inhomogeneous nature of response development, by determining alterations in textural properties of DOS images apparent at early stages of therapy, followed later by gross changes in mean values of these functional metabolic maps. Methods: Twelve LABC patients undergoing NAC were scanned before and at four times after treatment initiation, and tomographic DOS images were reconstructed at each time. Ultimate responses of patients were determined clinically and pathologically, based on a reduction in tumor size and assessment of residual tumor cellularity. The mean-value parameters and textural features were extracted from volumetric DOS images for several functional and metabolic parameters prior to the treatment initiation. Changes in these DOS-based biomarkers were also monitored over the course of treatment. The measured biomarkers were applied to differentiate patient responses noninvasively and compared to clinical and pathologic responses. Results: Responding and nonresponding patients demonstrated different changes in DOS-based textural and mean-value parameters during chemotherapy. Whereas none of the biomarkers measured prior the start of therapy demonstrated a significant difference between the two patient populations, statistically significant differences were observed at week one after treatment initiation using the relative change in contrast/homogeneity of seven functional maps (0.001 < p < 0.049), and mean value of water

  7. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomographic imaging for the provision of both anatomical and functional information about biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2005-04-01

    We present in vivo images of near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of human lower legs and forearm to validate the dual functions of a time-resolved (TR) NIR DOT in clinical diagnosis, i.e., to provide anatomical and functional information simultaneously. The NIR DOT system is composed of time-correlated single-photon-counting channels, and the image reconstruction algorithm is based on the modified generalized pulsed spectral technique, which effectively incorporates the TR data with reasonable computation time. The reconstructed scattering images of both the lower legs and the forearm revealed their anatomies, in which the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscles. In the absorption images, some of the blood vessels were observable. In the functional imaging, a subject was requested to do handgripping exercise to stimulate physiological changes in the forearm tissue. The images of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentration changes in the forearm were obtained from the differential images of the absorption at three wavelengths between the exercise and the rest states, which were reconstructed with a differential imaging scheme. These images showed increases in both blood volume and oxyhemoglobin concentration in the arteries and simultaneously showed hypoxia in the corresponding muscles. All the results have demonstrated the capability of TR NIR DOT by reconstruction of the absolute images of the scattering and the absorption with a high spatial resolution that finally provided both the anatomical and functional information inside bulky biological tissues.

  8. Diffuse optical systems and methods to image physiological changes of the brain in response to focal TBI (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookasis, David; Volkov, Boris; Kofman, Itamar

    2017-02-01

    During the last four decades, various optical techniques have been proposed and intensively used for biomedical diagnosis and therapy both in animal model and in human. These techniques have several advantages over the traditional existing methods: simplicity in structure, low-cost, easy to handle, portable, can be used repeatedly over time near the patient bedside for continues monitoring, and offer high spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the use of two optical imaging modalities namely, spatially modulated illumination and dual-wavelength laser speckle to image the changes in brain tissue chromophores, morphology, and metabolic before, during, and after the onset of focal traumatic brain injury in intact mouse head (n=15). Injury was applied in anesthetized mice by weight-drop apparatus using 50gram metal rod striking the mouse's head. Following data analysis, we show a series of hemodynamic and structural changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation and blood flow, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. In addition, to validate the monitoring of cerebral blood flow by the imaging system, measurements with laser Doppler flowmetry were also performed (n=5), which confirmed reduction in blood flow following injury. Overall, our result demonstrates the capability of diffuse optical modalities to monitor and map brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain trauma.

  9. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  10. Convergence rate calculation of simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique algorithm for diffuse optical tomography image reconstruction: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Chen, Chung-Ming; Yu, Zong-Han; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2012-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging technique for functional biological imaging. The imaging quality of DOT depends on the imaging reconstruction algorithm. The SIRT has been widely used for DOT image reconstruction but there is no criterion to truncate based on any kind of residual parameter. The iteration loops will always be decided by experimental rule. This work presents the CR calculation that can be great help for SIRT optimization. In this paper, four inhomogeneities with various shapes of absorption distributions are simulated as imaging targets. The images are reconstructed and analyzed based on the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) method. For optimization between time consumption and imaging accuracy in reconstruction process, the numbers of iteration loop needed to be optimized with a criterion in algorithm, that is, the root mean square error (RMSE) should be minimized in limited iterations. For clinical applications of DOT, the RMSE cannot be obtained because the measured targets are unknown. Thus, the correlations between the RMSE and the convergence rate (CR) in SIRT algorithm are analyzed in this paper. From the simulation results, the parameter CR reveals the related RMSE value of reconstructed images. The CR calculation offers an optimized criterion of iteration process in SIRT algorithm for DOT imaging. Based on the result, the SIRT can be modified with CR calculation for self-optimization. CR reveals an indicator of SIRT image reconstruction in clinical DOT measurement. Based on the comparison result between RMSE and CR, a threshold value of CR (CRT) can offer an optimized number of iteration steps for DOT image reconstruction. This paper shows the feasibility study by utilizing CR criterion for SIRT in simulation and the clinical application of DOT measurement relies on further investigation.

  11. Image quality analysis of high-density diffuse optical tomography incorporating a subject-specific head model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan eZhan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available High-density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT methods have shown significant improvement in localization accuracy and image resolution compared to traditional topographic near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS of the human brain. In this work we provide a comprehensive evaluation of image quality in visual cortex mapping via a simulation study with the use of an anatomical head model derived from MRI data of a human subject. A model of individual head anatomy provides the surface shape and internal structure that allow for the construction of a more realistic physical model for the forward problem, as well as the use of a structural constraint in the inverse problem. The HD-DOT model utilized here incorporates multiple source-detector separations with continuous-wave data with added noise based on experimental results. To evaluate image quality we quantify the localization error and localized volume at half maximum (LVHM throughout a region of interest (ROI within the visual cortex and systematically analyze the use of whole brain tissue spatial constraint within image reconstruction. Our results demonstrate that an image quality with less than 10 mm in localization error and 1000 m3 in LVHM can be obtained up to 13 mm below the scalp surface with a typical unconstrained reconstruction and up to 18 mm deep when a spatial constraint based on the brain tissue is utilized.

  12. Diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging as markers of clinical behavior in children with optic pathway glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Sarah C. [Swedish Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, Seattle, WA (United States); Ackerman, Joseph W. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Garbow, Joel R. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Manwaring, Linda P. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Genomic Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Gutmann, David H. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); McKinstry, Robert C. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) are common pediatric brain tumors that pose significant clinical challenges with regard to predicting which tumors are likely to become symptomatic and require treatment. These tumors can arise sporadically or in the context of the inherited cancer predisposition syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Few studies have suggested biological or imaging markers that predict the clinical course of this disease. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that the clinical behavior of OPGs in children can be differentiated by diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. A total of 27 children with OPG were studied using DW and DCE MRI protocols. Diffusivity and permeability were calculated and correlated with the clinical behavior the OPG. Mean diffusivity values of 1.39 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms and mean permeability values of 2.10 ml/min per 100 cm{sup 3} of tissue were measured. Clinically aggressive OPGs had significantly higher mean permeability values (P = 0.05) than clinically stable tumors. In addition, there was a strong correlation between clinical aggressiveness and the absence of NF1 (P < 0.01). These results suggest that DCE MRI might be a useful biomarker for clinically aggressive OPG, which should be confirmed in larger prospective longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  13. A new semi-quantitative approach for analysing 3T diffusion tensor imaging of optic fibres and its clinical evaluation in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhorn, Tobias; Haider, Sultan; Michelson, Georg; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging can depict rarefaction of the optical fibers. Manual segmentation is time consuming. The purposes of the study were (1) to present a new semiquantitative segmentation approach for analyzing 3-T diffusion tensor imaging of optical fibers and (2) to clinically test the new approach by comparing optic fiber rarefaction in patients with glaucoma to that in age-matched, healthy controls. To perform semiautomated and quantitative segmentation of the optical radiation, a Mathcad-based software program was developed. The results were compared to the manual evaluation of the images performed by two experienced neuroradiologists. The eyes of 42 subjects (22 patients with glaucoma and 20 controls) aged 37 to 86 years were assessed in full ophthalmologic examinations. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 3-T high-field scanner. The evaluation using the new approach matched 94% with manually acquired rarefaction of the optical radiation; Cronbach's α was >0.81 for calculation of the manually and semiautomatically derived volumes. The new approach seems to be robust and is clearly faster compared to the more tedious manual segmentation. Using diffusion tensor imaging at 3 T, it could be shown that there was increasing atrophy of the optical radiation (fourth neuron) with increasing age in patients with glaucoma. Compared to age-matched, healthy patients, more pronounced atrophy of the fourth neuron was found in patients with glaucoma. Copyright © 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional imaging of neoadjuvant chemotherapy response in women with locally advanced breast cancer using diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Hany; Yaffe, Martin J; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2009-01-01

    Functional imaging with tomographic near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) can quantitatively measure tissue parameters such as the concentration of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb), oxy-hemoglobin (HbO2), percent water (%water), and scattering power (SP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between DOS functional parameters with pathologic outcomes. Patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were recruited to this study (n = 10). Five scans were conducted per patient: a baseline scan was taken up to 3 days prior to treatment and at 1 week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and after neoadjuvant treatment prior to surgery. At each scan the patient lay prone with the breast suspended between immobilization plates in optical coupling medium. Pulsed near-infrared laser light was used to scan the breast at four different wavelengths and data was used for tomographic reconstruction. Volume-of-interest (VOI) weighted tissue Hb, HbO2, %water, and SP corresponding to the tumour was calculated and compared to clinical and pathological response as determined from full mount mastectomy pathology. For all 10 patients the tumour-based VOI was significantly different than background tissue for all functional parameters (pOne patient initially had a poor clinical response to chemotherapy but after a change in chemotherapy had a good clinical and radiographic response. Responders and non-responders were significantly different for all of the functional parameters (pdrop in Hb, HbO2, %water, and SP from baseline to the 4-week scan was 70.4% (SD = 18.6), 66.5% (SD = 24.5), 59.6% (SD = 30.9), and 60.7% (SD = 29.2), respectively. In contrast, the 4 non-responders had a mean drop of 17.7% (SD = 9.8), 18.0% (SD = 20.8), 15.4% (SD = 11.7), and 12.6% (SD = 10.2), for Hb, HbO2, %water and SP, respectively. Functional imaging using tomographic diffuse optical spectroscopy parameters of Hb, HbO2, %water and SP could be used as

  15. Quantitative volumetric analysis of the optic radiation in the normal human brain using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging-based tractography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Hoon Lee; Ji-Won Park; Cheol-Pyo Hong

    2014-01-01

    To attain the volumetric information of the optic radiation in normal human brains, we per-formed diffusion tensor imaging examination in 13 healthy volunteers. Simultaneously, we used a brain normalization method to reduce individual brain variation and increase the accuracy of volumetric information analysis. In addition, tractography-based group mapping method was also used to investigate the probability and distribution of the optic radiation pathways. Our results showed that the measured optic radiation ifber tract volume was a range of about 0.16%and that the fractional anisotropy value was about 0.53. Moreover, the optic radiation probability ifber pathway that was determined with diffusion tensor tractography-based group mapping was able to detect the location relatively accurately. We believe that our methods and results are help-ful in the study of optic radiation ifber tract information.

  16. Evaluation of Fourier transform coefficients for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis from diffuse optical tomography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, Ludguier D.; Jia, Jingfei; Kim, Hyun K.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    We apply the Fourier Transform to absorption and scattering coefficient images of proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints and evaluate the performance of these coefficients as classifiers using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. We find 25 features that yield a Youden index over 0.7, 3 features that yield a Youden index over 0.8, and 1 feature that yields a Youden index over 0.9 (90.0% sensitivity and 100% specificity). In general, scattering coefficient images yield better one-dimensional classifiers compared to absorption coefficient images. Using features derived from scattering coefficient images we obtain an average Youden index of 0.58 +/- 0.16, and an average Youden index of 0.45 +/- 0.15 when using features from absorption coefficient images.

  17. Image Reconstruction for Diffuse Optical Tomography Based on Radiative Transfer Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Bi

    2015-01-01

    L2 regularization. Results also show the competitive performance of the split Bregman algorithm for the DOT image reconstruction with sparsity regularization compared with other existing L1 algorithms.

  18. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: Diagnosis and Predicting the Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    protocols at the Shock Trauma Center usually involve early facial fracture fixation with metallic plates (often in the initial 1 or 2 days). Performing...such as signs of major facial trauma involving swollen shut eyes, orbital bone fractures, and muscle entrapment, then justification of enrollment...fibers and occurs from a number of mechanisms both in blunt and penetrating trauma . Out of all the types of ocular injuries, traumatic optic

  19. Functional imaging using diffuse optical spectroscopy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy response in women with locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Hany; Gunasekara, Anoma; Rycroft, Mary; Zubovits, Judit; Dent, Rebecca; Spayne, Jacqueline; Yaffe, Martin J; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2010-05-01

    Functional imaging with tomographic near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) can measure tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin (Hb), oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), percent water (%water), and scattering power (SP). In this study, we evaluated tumor DOS parameters and described their relationship to clinical and pathologic outcome in patients undergoing neoadjuvant therapy for locally advanced breast cancer. Ten patients were enrolled and intended to undergo five scans each. Scans were taken up to 3 days before treatment and at 1, 4, and 8 weeks after neoadjuvant treatment before surgery. Changes in volume of interest weighted tissue Hb, HbO2, %water, and SP corresponding to the tumor were compared with clinical and pathologic response. All patients' tumor volumes of interest were significantly different compared with background tissue for all parameters. Five patients had a good pathologic response. Four patients were considered nonresponders. One patient initially did not respond to chemotherapy but, after a change in chemotherapy, had a good response. In the five patients with a good response, the mean drop in Hb, HbO2, %water, and SP from baseline to the 4-week scan was 67.6% (SD = 20.8), 58.9% (SD = 20.3), 51.2% (SD = 28.3), and 52.6% (SD = 26.4), respectively. In contrast, the four nonresponders had a mean drop of 17.7% (SD = 9.8), 18.0% (SD = 20.8), 15.4% (SD = 11.7), and 12.6% (SD = 10.2) for Hb, HbO2, %water, and SP, respectively. Responders and nonresponders were significantly different for all functional parameters at the 4-week scan, except for %water, which approached significance. Thus, DOS could be used as an early detector of tumor response. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  20. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Lihong V. Wang

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method...

  1. The impact of optic nerve movement on optic nerve magnetic resonance diffusion parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optic nerve diffusion imaging is a useful investigational tool of optic nerve microstructure, but is limited by eye-movement-induced optic nerve movement and artifacts from surrounding cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone and air. Attempts at improving patient cooperation, thus voluntarily limiting eye movement during a standard diffusion imagingsequence, are usually futile. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of optic nerve movement on clinical diffusion parameters of the optic nerve.Method: Twenty-nine healthy volunteers with intact vision and intact conjugate gaze were recruited and subjected to magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI of the optic nerves. Twenty right eyes had nerve tracking done using single-shot echo-planar imaging at 20 time points over 3 minutes. Optic nerve movement measurements were correlated with diffusion parameters of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, mean diffusivity (MD, fractional anisotropy (FA and anisotropic index(AI using Spearman’s rank correlation.Results: No significant correlations were noted between optic nerve movement parameters and ADC in the axial plane and MD of the optic nerve. Low to moderate negative correlations were noted between optic nerve movement parameters and AI and FA and positive correlation with ADC in the radial plane.Conclusion: Optic nerve movement documented during the timespan of standard diffusion sequences (DWI and DTI has a negative effect on the anisotropic diffusion parameters of the optic nerve. With greater eye movement, optic nerve diffusion appears less anisotropic owing to greater radial diffusion.

  2. Near-Infrared Diffuse Optical Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Hielscher

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT is emerging as a viable new biomedical imaging modality. Using near-infrared (NIR light, this technique probes absorption as well as scattering properties of biological tissues. First commercial instruments are now available that allow users to obtain cross-sectional and volumetric views of various body parts. Currently, the main applications are brain, breast, limb, joint, and fluorescence/bioluminescence imaging. Although the spatial resolution is limited when compared with other imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or X-ray computerized tomography (CT, DOT provides access to a variety of physiological parameters that otherwise are not accessible, including sub-second imaging of hemodynamics and other fast-changing processes. Furthermore, DOT can be realized in compact, portable instrumentation that allows for bedside monitoring at relatively low cost. In this paper, we present an overview of current state-of-the -art technology, including hardware and image-reconstruction algorithms, and focus on applications in brain and joint imaging. In addition, we present recent results of work on optical tomographic imaging in small animals.

  3. Towards improved image reconstruction in breast diffuse optical tomography using compressed sensing: a comparative study among Lp (0<=p<=2) sparsity regularizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingyuan; Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    The underdeterminedness of the inverse problems encountered in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) becomes especially severe when detecting breast cancers, because much more variables are needed to be reconstructed due to the big-size. With the addition of ill-condition caused by the diffusive nature of light propagation, the ill-posedness makes it very difficult to improve the image reconstruction. Fortunately, from the anatomy viewpoint, we have known that the cancer is distributed locally and only amounts to a small percentage of the whole breast. This makes it possible to employ the compressive sensing theory to mitigate the ill-posedness, based on the prior knowledge about the sparsity of the signal to be reconstructed. Specifically speaking, sparsity regularizations can be used in DOT to improve the image reconstruction under the premise that un-increase the number of measurements required in the reconstruction. In this paper, we primarily focus on comparing the performances of different kinds of Lp-norm-based regularizations in terms of theory and real effects, respectively. The numerical and phantom experiments have proven that the sparsity regularizations can dramatically improve the image reconstruction. Furthermore, as the p in the Lp-norm decreasing to zero, the solutions become sparser and the corresponding image quality gets higher, with smooth L0-norm-based regularization providing the highest image quality.

  4. Optical image encryption topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Liang, Xiao; Xin, Zhou; Qiong-Hua, Wang; Sheng, Yuan; Yao-Yao, Chen

    2009-10-15

    Optical image encryption topology is proposed based on the principle of random-phase encoding. Various encryption topological units, involving peer-to-peer, ring, star, and tree topologies, can be realized by an optical 6f system. These topological units can be interconnected to constitute an optical image encryption network. The encryption and decryption can be performed in both digital and optical methods.

  5. Gradient-Based Quantitative Image Reconstruction in Ultrasound-Modulated Optical Tomography: First Harmonic Measurement Type in a Linearised Diffusion Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Samuel; Arridge, Simon R; Leung, Terence S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which uses the spatially localised acoustically-driven modulation of coherent light as a probe of the structure and optical properties of biological tissues. In this work we begin by providing an overview of forward modelling methods, before deriving a linearised diffusion-style model which calculates the first-harmonic modulated flux measured on the boundary of a given domain. We derive and examine the correlation measurement density functions of the model which describe the sensitivity of the modality to perturbations in the optical parameters of interest. Finally, we employ said functions in the development of an adjoint-assisted gradient based image reconstruction method, which ameliorates the computational burden and memory requirements of a traditional Newton-based optimisation approach. We validate our work by performing reconstructions of optical absorption and scattering in two- and three-dimensions using simulated measurements with 1% proportional Gaussian noise, and demonstrate the successful recovery of the parameters to within ±5% of their true values when the resolution of the ultrasound raster probing the domain is sufficient to delineate perturbing inclusions.

  6. Information theoretic regularization in diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, Christos; Somayajula, Sangeetha; Gibson, Adam P; Schweiger, Martin; Leahy, Richard M; Arridge, Simon R

    2009-05-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) retrieves the spatially distributed optical characteristics of a medium from external measurements. Recovering the parameters of interest involves solving a nonlinear and highly ill-posed inverse problem. This paper examines the possibility of regularizing DOT via the introduction of a priori information from alternative high-resolution anatomical modalities, using the information theory concepts of mutual information (MI) and joint entropy (JE). Such functionals evaluate the similarity between the reconstructed optical image and the prior image while bypassing the multimodality barrier manifested as the incommensurate relation between the gray value representations of corresponding anatomical features in the two modalities. By introducing structural information, we aim to improve the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of the solution. We provide a thorough explanation of the theory from an imaging perspective, accompanied by preliminary results using numerical simulations. In addition we compare the performance of MI and JE. Finally, we have adopted a method for fast marginal entropy evaluation and optimization by modifying the objective function and extending it to the JE case. We demonstrate its use on an image reconstruction framework and show significant computational savings.

  7. Cross-validation of serial optical coherence scanning and diffusion tensor imaging: a study on neural fiber maps in human medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhu, Junfeng; Reuter, Martin; Vinke, Louis N; Yendiki, Anastasia; Boas, David A; Fischl, Bruce; Akkin, Taner

    2014-10-15

    We established a strategy to perform cross-validation of serial optical coherence scanner imaging (SOCS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on a postmortem human medulla. Following DTI, the sample was serially scanned by SOCS, which integrates a vibratome slicer and a multi-contrast optical coherence tomography rig for large-scale three-dimensional imaging at microscopic resolution. The DTI dataset was registered to the SOCS space. An average correlation coefficient of 0.9 was found between the co-registered fiber maps constructed by fractional anisotropy and retardance contrasts. Pixelwise comparison of fiber orientations demonstrated good agreement between the DTI and SOCS measures. Details of the comparison were studied in regions exhibiting a variety of fiber organizations. DTI estimated the preferential orientation of small fiber tracts; however, it didn't capture their complex patterns as SOCS did. In terms of resolution and imaging depth, SOCS and DTI complement each other, and open new avenues for cross-modality investigations of the brain.

  8. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  9. Optical diffusers based on silicone emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jui-Hao; Lien, Shui-Yang; Ho, Jeng-Rong; Shih, Teng-Kai; Chen, Chia-Fu; Chen, Chien-Chung; Whang, Wha-Tzong

    2009-12-01

    The present study provides an experimental approach for fabricating optical diffuser films based on silicone emulsions. The silicone emulsion consisting of silicone polymer (Sylgard 184) and NaCl aq. solution was used as the optical material of diffusers, wherein NaCl aq. solution was severed as surfactant to stabilize the emulsions. After stirring mechanically, microscaled water drop with various sizes distributed randomly in silicone polymer, wherein water drop was used as scattering diffusion particles. To modulate the volume of NaCl aq. solution, the diffusing performance of diffusers could be change by different amount drop particles. Thereafter, an optical examination was carried out to characterize optical properties, transmittance, and light diffusivity of volumetric diffuser films.

  10. Diffusion weighted imaging in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kele, Petra G.; van der Jagt, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is an imaging technique which provides tissue contrast by the measurement of diffusion properties of water molecules within tissues. Diffusion is expressed in an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which reflects the diffusion properties unique t

  11. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  12. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  13. Diffusion Weighted and Trace Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Nayeri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available   "nThe signal intensity in MRI depends on the proton density, T1, T2, and T2* relaxation processes of any ensemble of the spins within each imaging element. Another important contrast mechanism in MRI is signal loss caused by proton dephasing in the presence of coherent and incoherent flow. Diffusion refers to the dispersion of molecules from a region of high concentration to one of low concentration by random molecular or “Brownian” motion. "nDWI is based on the microscopic movement (Brownian motion of water molecules. The motion of water molecules, under the influence of diffusion-sensitizing gradient pulses, causes irreversible signal attenuation (hypointensity on DWI. In restricted diffusion (like acute infarction the signal attenuation is decreased (hyperintensity on DWI. "nIn biological tissues, water diffusion is not truly random. Structural barriers such as membranes and cellular elements, as well as chemical interactions, restrict Brownian motion in 3-D space. Additionally, disturbances associated with tissue perfusion and respiration can alter the biological environment. So it is termed “apparent” because the measured value does not indicate pure diffusion, but reflects capillary perfusion and other processes.  ADC (Apparent Diffusion Coefficient maps are typically created by combining at least two DWIs that are differently sensitized to diffusion (different b-values but which remain identical with respect to the other imaging parameters (TR and TE. Diffusion-weighted images are a combination of diffusion information and T2 signal intensity. In order to avoid the hyperintensity effect of T2 signal intensity (T2 shine-through, DW images should be compared with ADC images. ADC maps demonstrate contrast based purely on diffusion differences.   "nThe apparent diffusion in tissue is slowed if the protons are “hindered” or slowed in their random motion by the presence of cell membranes, walls, and macromolecules but are not

  14. Diffusion weighted imaging in the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petra; G; Kele; Eric; J; van; der; Jagt

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is an imaging technique which provides tissue contrast by the measurement of diffusion properties of water molecules within tissues. Diffusion is expressed in an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which reflects the diffusion properties unique to each type of tissue. DWI has been originally used in neuroradiology. More recently, DWI has increasingly been used in addition to conventional unenhanced and enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in other p...

  15. Mapping distributed brain function and networks with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Ferradal, Silvina L.; Robichaux-Viehoever, Amy; Hassanpour, Mahlega S.; Dehghani, Hamid; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Hershey, Tamara; Culver, Joseph P.

    2014-06-01

    Mapping of human brain function has revolutionized systems neuroscience. However, traditional functional neuroimaging by positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance imaging cannot be used when applications require portability, or are contraindicated because of ionizing radiation (positron emission tomography) or implanted metal (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Optical neuroimaging offers a non-invasive alternative that is radiation free and compatible with implanted metal and electronic devices (for example, pacemakers). However, optical imaging technology has heretofore lacked the combination of spatial resolution and wide field of view sufficient to map distributed brain functions. Here, we present a high-density diffuse optical tomography imaging array that can map higher-order, distributed brain function. The system was tested by imaging four hierarchical language tasks and multiple resting-state networks including the dorsal attention and default mode networks. Finally, we imaged brain function in patients with Parkinson's disease and implanted deep brain stimulators that preclude functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Atlas-guided volumetric diffuse optical tomography enhanced by generalized linear model analysis to image risk decision-making responses in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Jing; Li, Lin; Cazzell, Mary; Liu, Hanli

    2014-08-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a variant of functional near infrared spectroscopy and has the capability of mapping or reconstructing three dimensional (3D) hemodynamic changes due to brain activity. Common methods used in DOT image analysis to define brain activation have limitations because the selection of activation period is relatively subjective. General linear model (GLM)-based analysis can overcome this limitation. In this study, we combine the atlas-guided 3D DOT image reconstruction with GLM-based analysis (i.e., voxel-wise GLM analysis) to investigate the brain activity that is associated with risk decision-making processes. Risk decision-making is an important cognitive process and thus is an essential topic in the field of neuroscience. The Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART) is a valid experimental model and has been commonly used to assess human risk-taking actions and tendencies while facing risks. We have used the BART paradigm with a blocked design to investigate brain activations in the prefrontal and frontal cortical areas during decision-making from 37 human participants (22 males and 15 females). Voxel-wise GLM analysis was performed after a human brain atlas template and a depth compensation algorithm were combined to form atlas-guided DOT images. In this work, we wish to demonstrate the excellence of using voxel-wise GLM analysis with DOT to image and study cognitive functions in response to risk decision-making. Results have shown significant hemodynamic changes in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during the active-choice mode and a different activation pattern between genders; these findings correlate well with published literature in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fNIRS studies.

  17. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners.

  18. Breast cancer detection using phase contrast diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Li, Changqing; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Fajardo, Laurie L.; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    In this report, a phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography system, which can measure the refractive indices of human breast masses in vivo, is described. To investigate the utility of phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT) for differentiation of malignant and benign breast masses in humans, and to compare PCDOT with conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for analysis of breast masses in humans. 35 breast masses were imaged in 33 patients (mean age = 51 years; range 22-80 years) using PCDOT. Images characterizing the tissue refractive index, absorption and scattering of breast masses were obtained with a finite element-based reconstruction algorithm. The accuracies of absorption and scattering images were compared with images of refractive index in light of the pathology results. Absorption and scattering images were unable to accurately discriminate benign from malignant lesions. Malignant lesions tended to have decreased refractive index allowing them to discriminate from benign lesions in most cases. The sensitivity, specificity, false positive value, and overall accuracy for refractive index were 81.8%, 70.8%, 29.2%, and 74.3%, respectively. Overall we show that benign and malignant breast masses in humans demonstrate different refractive index and differences in refractive index properties can be used to discriminate benign from malignant masses in patients with high accuracy. This opens up a new avenue for improved breast cancer detection using NIR diffusing light.

  19. Image denoising using modified nonlinear diffusion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Akhilesh R.; Talbar, Sanjay N.; Sontakke, Trimbak R.

    2006-01-01

    Partial Differential Equation (PDE) based, non-linear diffusion approaches are an effective way to denoise the images. In this paper, the work is extended to include anisotropic diffusion, where the diffusivity is a tensor valued function, which can be adapted to local edge orientation. This allows smoothing along the edges, but not perpendicular to it. The diffusion tensor is a function of differential structure of the evolving image itself. Such a feedback leads to nonlinear diffusion filters. It shows improved performance in the presence of noise. The original anisotropic diffusion algorithm updates each point based on four nearest-neighbor differences, the progress of diffusion results in improved edges. In the proposed method the edges are better preserved because diffusion is controlled by the gray level differences of diagonal neighbors in addition to 4 nearest neighbors using coupled PDF formulation. The proposed algorithm gives excellent results for MRI images, Biomedical images and Fingerprint images with noise.

  20. Optical imaging and metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Osten, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the state of the art and advances in the field, while also outlining the future potential and development trends of optical imaging and optical metrology, an area of fast growth with numerous applications in nanotechnology and nanophysics. Written by the world's leading experts in the field, it fills the gap in the current literature by bridging the fields of optical imaging and metrology, and is the only up-to-date resource in terms of fundamental knowledge, basic concepts, methodologies, applications, and development trends.

  1. Optical Design for Biomedical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Rongguang

    2010-01-01

    Designing an efficient imaging system for biomedical optics requires a solid understanding of the special requirements of the optical systems for biomedical imaging and the optical components used in the systems. However, a lack of reference books on optical design (imaging and illumination) for biomedical imaging has led to some inefficient systems. This book fills the gap between biomedical optics and optical design by addressing the fundamentals of biomedical optics and optical engineering, and biomedical imaging systems. The first half provides a brief introduction to biomedical optics and

  2. Overview of diffuse optical tomography and its clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Yoko; Yamada, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT), one of the most sophisticated optical imaging techniques for observations through biological tissue, allows 3-D quantitative imaging of optical properties, which include functional and anatomical information. With DOT, it is expected to be possible to overcome the limitations of conventional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as well as offering the potential for diagnostic optical imaging. However, DOT has been under development for more than 30 years, and the difficulties in development are attributed to the fact that light is strongly scattered and that diffusive photons are used for the image reconstruction. The DOT algorithm is based on the techniques of inverse problems. The radiative transfer equation accurately describes photon propagation in biological tissue, while, because of its high computation load, the diffusion equation (DE) is often used as the forward model. However, the DE is invalid in low-scattering and/or highly absorbing regions and in the vicinity of light sources. The inverse problem is inherently ill-posed and highly undetermined. Here, we first summarize NIRS and then describe various approaches in the efforts to develop accurate and efficient DOT algorithms and present some examples of clinical applications. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of DOT.

  3. Characterization of a time-resolved non-contact scanning diffuse optical imaging system exploiting fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Sieno, Laura, E-mail: laura.disieno@polimi.it; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Pifferi, Antonio [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mazurenka, Mikhail [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Hannoversches Zentrum für Optische Technologien, Nienburger Str. 17, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Hoshi, Yoko [Department of Biomedical Optics, Medical Photonics Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Becker, Wolfgang [Becker and Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Martelli, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a system for non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging, based on small source-detector distance and high dynamic range measurements utilizing a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode. The system is suitable for imaging of diffusive media without any contact with the sample and with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm at 1 cm depth. In order to objectively assess its performances, we adopted two standardized protocols developed for time-domain brain imagers. The related tests included the recording of the instrument response function of the setup and the responsivity of its detection system. Moreover, by using liquid turbid phantoms with absorbing inclusions, depth-dependent contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio as well as lateral spatial resolution were measured. To illustrate the potentialities of the novel approach, the characteristics of the non-contact system are discussed and compared to those of a fiber-based brain imager.

  4. Diffusion-bonded beryllium aluminum optical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapes, Thomas F.

    2003-12-01

    Beryllium aluminum material can present significant advantages for optical support structures. A likely advantage of beryllium aluminum compared to aluminum or titanium for such structures is its higher specific stiffness. However, beryllium aluminum material is significantly more expensive than most competing materials. The cost problem with beryllium aluminum is exacerbated if fabrication methods that result in near net shape parts are not used. Near net shape methods result in the least amount of material "thrown away" in the fabrication process. Casting is a primary example of near net shape manufacturing that is appropriate for some optical support structures. Casting aluminum, and other materials as well, is common. Casting of beryllium aluminum is very difficult, however, and has not had significant success. Diffusion bonding - a different approach for achieving near net shape beryllium aluminum optical support structures, was pursued and accomplished. Diffusion bonding is a term used to describe the joining of solid metal pieces under high temperature and pressure, but without melting. Three different optical support structures were designed and built of beryllium aluminum using diffusion bonding. Relatively small solid beryllium aluminum pieces were arranged together and then joined under hot isostatic pressure conditions. The resulting relatively large pressure bonded part was then machined to achieve the final product. Significant cost savings as compared to machining the part from a solid block were realized. Difficulties achieving diffusion bonds in complex joints were experienced and addressed.

  5. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, James M; Lafaille, Sophie; Soh, Debra W; Moayedi, Massieh; Mikulis, David J; Girard, Todd A

    2015-11-01

    Pedophilia is a principal motivator of child molestation, incurring great emotional and financial burdens on victims and society. Even among pedophiles who never commit any offense,the condition requires lifelong suppression and control. Previous comparison using voxel-based morphometry (VBM)of MR images from a large sample of pedophiles and controls revealed group differences in white matter. The present study therefore sought to verify and characterize white matter involvement using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which better captures the microstructure of white matter than does VBM. Pedophilics ex offenders (n=24) were compared with healthy, age-matched controls with no criminal record and no indication of pedophilia (n=32). White matter microstructure was analyzed with Tract-Based Spatial Statistics, and the trajectories of implicated fiber bundles were identified by probabilistic tractography. Groups showed significant, highly focused differences in DTI parameters which related to participants’ genital responses to sexual depictions of children, but not to measures of psychopathy or to childhood histories of physical abuse, sexual abuse, or neglect. Some previously reported gray matter differences were suggested under highly liberal statistical conditions (p(uncorrected)<.005), but did not survive ordinary statistical correction (whole brain per voxel false discovery rate of 5%). These results confirm that pedophilia is characterized by neuroanatomical differences in white matter microstructure, over and above any neural characteristics attributable to psychopathy and childhood adversity, which show neuroanatomic footprints of their own. Although some gray matter structures were implicated previously, only few have emerged reliably.

  6. Optical imaging. Expansion microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Tillberg, Paul W; Boyden, Edward S

    2015-01-30

    In optical microscopy, fine structural details are resolved by using refraction to magnify images of a specimen. We discovered that by synthesizing a swellable polymer network within a specimen, it can be physically expanded, resulting in physical magnification. By covalently anchoring specific labels located within the specimen directly to the polymer network, labels spaced closer than the optical diffraction limit can be isotropically separated and optically resolved, a process we call expansion microscopy (ExM). Thus, this process can be used to perform scalable superresolution microscopy with diffraction-limited microscopes. We demonstrate ExM with apparent ~70-nanometer lateral resolution in both cultured cells and brain tissue, performing three-color superresolution imaging of ~10(7) cubic micrometers of the mouse hippocampus with a conventional confocal microscope.

  7. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  8. Effect of probe diffusion on the SOFI imaging accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Live-cell super-resolution fluorescence imaging is becoming commonplace for exploring biological systems, though sample dynamics can affect the imaging quality. In this work we evaluate the effect of probe diffusion on super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI), using a theoretical model and numerical simulations based on the imaging of live cells labelled with photochromic fluorescent proteins. We find that, over a range of physiological conditions, fluorophore diffusion results in a change in the amplitude of the SOFI signal. The magnitude of this change is approximately proportional to the on-time ratio of the fluorophores. However, for photochromic fluorescent proteins this effect is unlikely to present a significant distortion in practical experiments in biological systems. Due to this lack of distortions, probe diffusion strongly enhances the SOFI imaging by avoiding spatial undersampling caused by the limited labeling density. PMID:28333166

  9. Acousto-optic laser optical feedback imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquin, Olivier; Lacot, Eric; Hugon, Olivier; De Chatellus, Hugues Guillet; François, Ramaz

    2012-01-01

    We present a photon noise and diffraction limited imaging method combining the imaging laser and ultrasonic waves. The laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) technique is an ultrasensitive imaging method for imaging objects through or embedded within a scattering medium. However, LOFI performances are dramatically limited by parasitic optical feedback occurring in the experimental setup. In this work, we have tagged the ballistic photons by an acousto-optic effect in order to filter the parasitic feedback effect and to reach the theoretical and ultimate sensitivity of the LOFI technique. We present the principle and the experimental setup of the acousto-optic laser optical feedback imaging (AO-LOFI) technique, and we demonstrate the suppression of the parasitic feedback.

  10. Non-diffusing photochromic gel for optical computed tomography phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines photochromic response in radiation sensitive hydrogels. Genipin, crosslinked, gelatin gel can support high resolution images because the chromophores do not diffuse. A low power, 633 nm He-Ne laser was used to write lines into the gels by a photobleaching reaction. Optical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans mapped the high resolution images in 3D with 0.25 mm voxel resolution. A straight line was written into a deformed gel and then readout in its relaxed, initial shape. The curved, photo-bleached line demonstrated deformable 3D dosimetry is possible with this system to the balloon edge. High resolution, photochromic images provide key information for characterizing optical CT scanners and 3D dosimeters. Many, ionizing radiation, dosimeter materials demonstrate either a photochromic or photothermal response, allowing this approach to be widely used in quantitative 3D scanning.

  11. Basic principles of diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bammer, Roland. E-mail: roland@s-word.stanford.edu

    2003-03-01

    In diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), image contrast is determined by the random microscopic motion of water protons. During the last years, DWI has become an important modality in the diagnostic work-up of acute ischemia in the CNS. There are also a few promising reports about the application of DWI to other regions in the human body, such as the vertebral column or the abdomen. This manuscript provides an introduction into the basics of DWI and Diffusion Tensor imaging. The potential of various MR sequences in concert with diffusion preparation are discussed with respect to acquisition speed, spatial resolution, and sensitivity to bulk physiologic motion. More advanced diffusion measurement techniques, such as high angular resolution diffusion imaging, are also addressed.

  12. Developing High-Density Diffuse Optical Tomography for Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian Richard

    Clinicians who care for brain-injured patients and premature infants desire a bedside monitor of brain function. A decade ago, there was hope that optical imaging would be able to fill this role, as it combined fMRI's ability to construct cortical maps with EEG's portable, cap-based systems. However, early optical systems had poor imaging performance, and the momentum for the technique slowed. In our lab, we develop diffuse optical tomography (DOT), which is a more advanced method of performing optical imaging. My research has been to pioneer the in vivo use of DOT for advanced neuroimaging by (1) quantifying the advantages of DOT through both in silico simulation and in vivo performance metrics, (2) restoring confidence in the technique with the first retinotopic mapping of the visual cortex (a benchmark for fMRI and PET), and (3) creating concepts and methods for the clinical translation of DOT. Hospitalized patients are unable to perform complicated neurological tasks, which has motivated us to develop the first DOT methods for resting-state brain mapping with functional connectivity. Finally, in collaboration with neonatologists, I have extended these methods with proof-of-principle imaging of brain-injured premature infants. This work establishes DOT's improvements in imaging performance and readies it for multiple clinical and research roles.

  13. Optical clearing of melanoma in vivo: characterization by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Layla; Demidov, Valentin; Vitkin, I. Alex; Bagnato, Vanderlei; Kurachi, Cristina; Wilson, Brian C.

    2016-08-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, with significant risk of fatality. Due to its pigmentation, light-based imaging and treatment techniques are limited to near the tumor surface, which is inadequate, for example, to evaluate the microvascular density that is associated with prognosis. White-light diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and near-infrared optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to evaluate the effect of a topically applied optical clearing agent (OCA) in melanoma in vivo and to image the microvascular network. DRS was performed using a contact fiber optic probe in the range from 450 to 650 nm. OCT imaging was performed using a swept-source system at 1310 nm. The OCT image data were processed using speckle variance and depth-encoded algorithms. Diffuse reflectance signals decreased with clearing, dropping by ˜90% after 45 min. OCT was able to image the microvasculature in the pigmented melanoma tissue with good spatial resolution up to a depth of ˜300 μm without the use of OCA; improved contrast resolution was achieved with optical clearing to a depth of ˜750 μm in tumor. These findings are relevant to potential clinical applications in melanoma, such as assessing prognosis and treatment responses. Optical clearing may also facilitate the use of light-based treatments such as photodynamic therapy.

  14. Substitution-diffusion based Image Cipher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra K Pareek

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new image encryption scheme using a secret key of 128-bit size is proposed. In thealgorithm, image is partitioned into several key based dynamic blocks and further, each block passesthrough the eight rounds of diffusion as well as substitution process. In diffusion process, sequences ofblock pixels are rearranged within the block by a zigzag approach whereas block pixels are replaced withanother by using difference calculation of row and column in substitution process. Due to high order ofsubstitution and diffusion, common attacks like linear and differential cryptanalysis are infeasible. Theexperimental results show that the proposed technique is efficient and has high security features.

  15. Robust diffusion imaging framework for clinical studies

    CERN Document Server

    Maximov, Ivan I; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01

    Clinical diffusion imaging requires short acquisition times and good image quality to permit its use in various medical applications. In turn, these demands require the development of a robust and efficient post-processing framework in order to guarantee useful and reliable results. However, multiple artefacts abound in in vivo measurements; from either subject such as cardiac pulsation, bulk head motion, respiratory motion and involuntary tics and tremor, or imaging hardware related problems, such as table vibrations, etc. These artefacts can severely degrade the resulting images and render diffusion analysis difficult or impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we developed a robust and efficient framework enabling the use of initially corrupted images from a clinical study. At the heart of this framework is an improved least trimmed squares diffusion tensor estimation algorithm that works well with severely degraded datasets with low signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been compared with other...

  16. Image Magnification Method Using Joint Diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Xuan Liu; Hong-Jian Wang; Si-Long Peng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a new algorithm for image magnification is presented. Because linear magnification/interpolation techniques diminish the contrast and produce sawtooth effects, in recent years, many nonlinear interpolation methods, especially nonlinear diffusion based approaches, have been proposed to solve these problems. Two recently proposed techniques for interpolation by diffusion, forward and backward diffusion (FAB) and level-set reconstruction (LSR), cannot enhance the contrast and smooth edges simultaneously. In this article, a novel Partial Differential Equations (PDE) based approach is presented. The contributions of the paper include:firstly, a unified form of diffusion joining FAB and LSR is constructed to have all of their virtues; secondly, to eliminate artifacts of the joint diffusion, soft constraint takes the place of hard constraint presented by LSR;thirdly, the determination of joint coefficients, criterion for stopping time and color image processing are also discussed. The results demonstrate that the method is visually and quantitatively better than Bicubic, FAB and LSR.

  17. Quaternion Diffusion for Color Image Filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-Xuan Liu; Shi-Guo Lian; Zhen Ren

    2006-01-01

    How to combine color and multiscale information is a fundamental question for computer vision, and quite a few color diffusion techniques have been presented. Most of these proposed techniques do not consider the direct interactions between color channel pairs. In this paper, a new method of color diffusion considering these effects is presented, which is based on quaternion diffusion (QD) equation. In addition to showing the solution to linear QD and its analysis, one form of nonlinear QD is discussed. Compared with other color diffusion techniques, considering the interactions between channel pairs, QD has the following advantages: 1) staircasing effect is avoided; 2) as diffusion tensor, the image derivative is regu larized without requiring additional convolution; 3) less time is needed. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of linear and nonlinear QD applied to natural color images for denoising by both visual and quantitative evaluations.

  18. Fiber optic sensing and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book is designed to highlight the basic principles of fiber optic imaging and sensing devices. The editor has organized the book to provide the reader with a solid foundation in fiber optic imaging and sensing devices. It begins with an introductory chapter that starts from Maxwell’s equations and ends with the derivation of the basic optical fiber characteristic equations and solutions (i.e. fiber modes). Chapter 2 reviews most common fiber optic interferometric devices and Chapter 3 discusses the basics of fiber optic imagers with emphasis on fiber optic confocal microscope. The fiber optic interferometric sensors are discussed in detail in chapter 4 and 5. Chapter 6 covers optical coherence tomography and goes into the details of signal processing and systems level approach of the real-time OCT implementation. Also useful forms of device characteristic equations are provided so that this book can be used as a reference for scientists and engineers in the optics and related fields.

  19. Optical encryption for large-sized images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpei, Takuho; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Kakue, Takashi; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Sano, Marie; Oikawa, Minoru; Sugie, Takashige; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-02-01

    We propose an optical encryption framework that can encrypt and decrypt large-sized images beyond the size of the encrypted image using our two methods: random phase-free method and scaled diffraction. In order to record the entire image information on the encrypted image, the large-sized images require the random phase to widely diffuse the object light over the encrypted image; however, the random phase gives rise to the speckle noise on the decrypted images, and it may be difficult to recognize the decrypted images. In order to reduce the speckle noise, we apply our random phase-free method to the framework. In addition, we employ scaled diffraction that calculates light propagation between planes with different sizes by changing the sampling rates.

  20. Optical image encryption based on diffractive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2010-11-15

    In this Letter, we propose a method for optical image encryption based on diffractive imaging. An optical multiple random phase mask encoding system is applied, and one of the phase-only masks is selected and laterally translated along a preset direction during the encryption process. For image decryption, a phase retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract a high-quality plaintext. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical results. The proposed method can provide a new strategy instead of conventional interference methods, and it may open up a new research perspective for optical image encryption.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging with multiple diffusion-weighted gradient directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Jiang; Meixia Liu; Tong Han; Weihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI or DTI) is emerging as an important non-invasive technology for elucidating internal brain structures.It has recently been utilized to diagnose a series of diseases that affect the integrity of neural systems to provide a basis for neuroregenerative studies.Results from the present study suggested that neural tissue is reconstructed with multiple diffusion-weighted gradient directions DTI,which varies from traditional imaging methods that utilize 6 gradient directions.Simultaneously,the diffusion tensor matrix is obtained by multiple linear regressions from an equation of echo signal intensity.The condition number value and standard deviation of fractional anisotropy for each scheme can be used to evaluate image quality.Results demonstrated that increasing gradient direction to some extent resulted in improved effects.Therefore,the traditional 6 and 15 directions should not be considered optimal scan protocols for clinical DTI application.In a scheme with 20 directions,the condition number and standard deviation of fractional anisotropy of the encoding gradients matrix were significantly reduced,and resulted in more clearly and accurately displayed neural tissue.Results demonstrated that the scheme with 20diffusion gradient directions provided better accuracy of structural renderings and could be an optimal scan protocol for clinical DTI application.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in leukodystrophies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patay, Zoltan [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Radiology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-01

    Leukodystrophies are genetically determined metabolic diseases, in which the underlying biochemical abnormality interferes with the normal build-up and/or maintenance of myelin, which leads to hypo- (or arrested) myelination, or dysmyelination with resultant demyelination. Although conventional magnetic resonance imaging has significantly contributed to recent progress in the diagnostic work-up of these diseases, diffusion-weighted imaging has the potential to further improve our understanding of underlying pathological processes and their dynamics through the assessment of normal and abnormal diffusion properties of cerebral white matter. Evaluation of conventional diffusion-weighted and ADC map images allows the detection of major diffusion abnormalities and the identification of various edema types, of which the so-called myelin edema is particularly relevant to leukodystrophies. Depending on the nature of histopathological changes, stage and progression gradient of diseases, various diffusion-weighted imaging patterns may be seen in leukodystrophies. Absent or low-grade myelin edema is found in mucopolysaccharidoses, GM gangliosidoses, Zellweger disease, adrenomyeloneuropathy, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, classical phenylketonuria, Van der Knaap disease and the vanishing white matter, medium grade myelin edema in metachromatic leukodystrophy, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and HMG coenzyme lyase deficiency and high grade edema in Krabbe disease, Canavan disease, hyperhomocystinemias, maple syrup urine disease and leukodystrophy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate. (orig.)

  3. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Anil N.; CHIANG, SHARON; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Kasprian, Gregor; Vannucci, Marina; Lee, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffu...

  4. Review of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Rinneberg, Herbert; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy of the female breast is an area of active research. We review the present status of this field and discuss the broad range of methodologies and applications. Starting with a brief overview on breast physiology, the remodeling of vasculature and extracellular matrix caused by solid tumors is highlighted that is relevant for contrast in optical imaging. Then, the various instrumental techniques and the related methods of data analysis and image generation are described and compared including multimodality instrumentation, fluorescence mammography, broadband spectroscopy, and diffuse correlation spectroscopy. We review the clinical results on functional properties of malignant and benign breast lesions compared to host tissue and discuss the various methods to improve contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, such as enhanced spectroscopic information, dynamic variations of functional properties, pharmacokinetics of extrinsic contrast agents, including the enhanced permeability and retention effect. We discuss research on monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy and on breast cancer risk assessment as potential clinical applications of optical breast imaging and spectroscopy. Moreover, we consider new experimental approaches, such as photoacoustic imaging and long-wavelength tissue spectroscopy.

  5. Optical Methods and Instrumentation in Brain Imaging and Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of optical approaches used in brain imaging and therapy. It covers a variety of imaging techniques including diffuse optical imaging, laser speckle imaging, photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography. A number of laser-based therapeutic approaches are reviewed, including photodynamic therapy, fluorescence guided resection and photothermal therapy. Fundamental principles and instrumentation are discussed for each imaging and therapeutic technique. Represents the first publication dedicated solely to optical diagnostics and therapeutics in the brain Provides a comprehensive review of the principles of each imaging/therapeutic modality Reviews the latest advances in instrumentation for optical diagnostics in the brain Discusses new optical-based therapeutic approaches for brain diseases

  6. First-harmonic sensitivity functions for a linearised diffusion model of ultrasound-modulated optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Samuel; Arridge, Simon R.; Leung, Terence S.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which uses the spatially localised acoustically-driven modulation of coherent light as a probe of the structure and optical properties of biological tissues. In this work we model the first-harmonic flux generated by the coupled physics using a simple linearised diffusion-style forward model. We derive analytical expressions for the sensitivity of this measurement type with respect to the optical absorption and scattering coefficients. These correlation measurement density functions can be employed as part of an image-reconstruction procedure capable of reconstructing quantitative images of the optical properties of a medium under investigation.

  7. Edge-promoting reconstruction of absorption and diffusivity in optical tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannukainen, A.; Harhanen, Lauri Oskari; Hyvönen, N.;

    2015-01-01

    In optical tomography a physical body is illuminated with near-infrared light and the resulting outward photon flux is measured at the object boundary. The goal is to reconstruct internal optical properties of the body, such as absorption and diffusivity. In this work, it is assumed that the imaged...

  8. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godavarty A

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Anuradha Godavarty,1 Suset Rodriguez,1 Young-Jin Jung,2 Stephanie Gonzalez1 1Optical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Radiological Science, Dongseo University, Busan, South Korea Abstract: Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE or self-breast examinations (SBEs. Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. Keywords: diffuse optical imaging, near-infrared, hand-held devices, breast cancer, prescreening, early detection 

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging of peripheral nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambawalikar, Sachin; Baum, Jeremy; Button, Terry; Li, Haifang; Geronimo, Veronica; Gould, Elaine S

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows the directional dependence of water diffusion to be studied. Analysis of the resulting image data allows for the determination of fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), as well as allowing three-dimensional visualization of the fiber tract (tractography). We visualized the ulnar nerve of ten healthy volunteers with DTI. We found FA to be 0.752 ± 0.067 and the ADC to be 0.96 ± 0.13 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s. A nuts-and-bolts description of the physical aspects of DTI is provided as an educational process for readers.

  10. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Afifi

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: MRI DWI offers quick and non-invasive technique to distinct between viable and necrotic tumor areas and helps the diagnosis of residual tumor. Potential effect of treatment can be detected as increase in the diffusion coefficient. We recommend that optimal follow-up after image guided trans-catheter tumor therapy should include DWI and contrast-enhanced MRI.

  11. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  12. A volume scanner for diffuse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafa, Elham; Roberts, Nicolas; Sharafutdinova, Galiya; Holdsworth, John

    2016-11-01

    Non-invasive optical screening mammography has a significant barrier in the extreme scatter of human tissue at optical wavelengths. A volume scanner suited for high numerical aperture capture of scattered light from diffuse media has been designed, modelled using Trace Pro software and experimentally constructed. Modelling results indicate the presence of an embedded volume with different scatter properties from the bulk yields a measurable difference in the overall scatter pattern and intensity recorded. Work towards a full tomographic reconstruction from scattered light recorded on the two dimensional array detector is currently underway.

  13. Image processing for optical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Prabu; Gupta, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Optical Mapping is an established single-molecule, whole-genome analysis system, which has been used to gain a comprehensive understanding of genomic structure and to study structural variation of complex genomes. A critical component of Optical Mapping system is the image processing module, which extracts single molecule restriction maps from image datasets of immobilized, restriction digested and fluorescently stained large DNA molecules. In this review, we describe robust and efficient image processing techniques to process these massive datasets and extract accurate restriction maps in the presence of noise, ambiguity and confounding artifacts. We also highlight a few applications of the Optical Mapping system.

  14. α-bandlimited diffuser in fractional Fourier optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño-Vanegas, Alberto; Durand, Pierre-Emmanuel; Torres, Rafael; Pellat-Finet, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    We propose a method for calculating appropriate α-band limited diffusers using the fractional Fourier transform. In order to do this, we implement a method for performing a numerical interpolation in the fractional Fourier domain. Such diffusers with compact support in the Fresnel regime may be used in fractional Fourier optical systems where the use of diffusers produce speckles, e.g. digital holography or optical encryption. Numerical simulations are presented.

  15. Multispectral guided fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenmarker, Pontus, E-mail: pontus.svenmarker@physics.umu.se [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR), Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Xu, Can T.; Liu, Haichun; Wu, Xia; Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-02-17

    We report on improved image detectability for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles doped with rare-earth elements. Core-shell NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@NaYF{sub 4} upconverting nanoparticles were synthesized through a stoichiometric method. The Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} sensitizer-activator pair yielded two anti-Stokes shifted fluorescence emission bands at 540 nm and 660 nm, here used to a priori estimate the fluorescence source depth with sub-millimeter precision. A spatially varying regularization incorporated the a priori fluorescence source depth estimation into the tomography reconstruction scheme. Tissue phantom experiments showed both an improved resolution and contrast in the reconstructed images as compared to not using any a priori information.

  16. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  17. Myelin water weighted diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Alexandru V; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W

    2010-10-15

    In this study we describe our development and implementation of a magnetization transfer (MT) prepared stimulated-echo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique that can be made sensitive to the microanatomy of myelin tissue. The short echo time (TE) enabled by the stimulated-echo acquisition preserves significant signal from the short T(2) component (myelin water), and the MT preparation further provides differentiating sensitization to this signal. It was found that this combined strategy could provide sufficient sensitivity in our first attempt to image myelin microstructure. Compared to the diffusion tensor derived from the conventional DTI technique, the myelin water weighted (MWW) tensor has the same principal diffusion direction but exhibits a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA), which is mainly due to a decrease in radial diffusivity. These findings are consistent with the microstructural organization of the myelin sheaths that wrap around the axons in the white matter and therefore hinder radial diffusion. Given that many white matter diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis) begin with a degradation of myelin microanatomy but not a loss of myelin content (e.g. loosening of the myelin sheaths), our newly implemented MWW DTI has the potential to lead to improved assessment of myelin pathology and early detection of demyelination.

  18. Interpolation of diffusion weighted imaging datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim B; Lundell, Henrik; Burke, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is used to study white-matter fibre organisation, orientation and structural connectivity by means of fibre reconstruction algorithms and tractography. For clinical settings, limited scan time compromises the possibilities to achieve high image resolution for finer...... anatomical details and signal-to-noise-ratio for reliable fibre reconstruction. We assessed the potential benefits of interpolating DWI datasets to a higher image resolution before fibre reconstruction using a diffusion tensor model. Simulations of straight and curved crossing tracts smaller than or equal...... to the voxel size showed that conventional higher-order interpolation methods improved the geometrical representation of white-matter tracts with reduced partial-volume-effect (PVE), except at tract boundaries. Simulations and interpolation of ex-vivo monkey brain DWI datasets revealed that conventional...

  19. Converting Multi-Shell and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Verstynen, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    Multi-shell and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) are becoming increasingly popular methods of acquiring diffusion MRI data in a research context. However, single-shell acquisitions, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), still remain the most common acquisition schemes in practice. Here we tested whether multi-shell and DSI data have conversion flexibility to be interpolated into corresponding HARDI data. We acquired multi-shell and DSI data on both a phantom and in vivo human tissue and converted them to HARDI. The correlation and difference between their diffusion signals, anisotropy values, diffusivity measurements, fiber orientations, connectivity matrices, and network measures were examined. Our analysis result showed that the diffusion signals, anisotropy, diffusivity, and connectivity matrix of the HARDI converted from multi-shell and DSI were highly correlated with those of the HARDI acquired on the MR scanner, with correlation coefficients around 0.8~0.9. The average angular error between converted and original HARDI was 20.7° at voxels with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. The network topology measures had less than 2% difference, whereas the average nodal measures had a percentage difference around 4~7%. In general, multi-shell and DSI acquisitions can be converted to their corresponding single-shell HARDI with high fidelity. This supports multi-shell and DSI acquisitions over HARDI acquisition as the scheme of choice for diffusion acquisitions.

  20. Converting Multi-Shell and Diffusion Spectrum Imaging to High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Verstynen, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-shell and diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) are becoming increasingly popular methods of acquiring diffusion MRI data in a research context. However, single-shell acquisitions, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI), still remain the most common acquisition schemes in practice. Here we tested whether multi-shell and DSI data have conversion flexibility to be interpolated into corresponding HARDI data. We acquired multi-shell and DSI data on both a phantom and in vivo human tissue and converted them to HARDI. The correlation and difference between their diffusion signals, anisotropy values, diffusivity measurements, fiber orientations, connectivity matrices, and network measures were examined. Our analysis result showed that the diffusion signals, anisotropy, diffusivity, and connectivity matrix of the HARDI converted from multi-shell and DSI were highly correlated with those of the HARDI acquired on the MR scanner, with correlation coefficients around 0.8~0.9. The average angular error between converted and original HARDI was 20.7° at voxels with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5. The network topology measures had less than 2% difference, whereas the average nodal measures had a percentage difference around 4~7%. In general, multi-shell and DSI acquisitions can be converted to their corresponding single-shell HARDI with high fidelity. This supports multi-shell and DSI acquisitions over HARDI acquisition as the scheme of choice for diffusion acquisitions. PMID:27683539

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Riccardo; De; Robertis; Paolo; Tinazzi; Martini; Emanuele; Demozzi; Flavia; Dal; Corso; Claudio; Bassi; Paolo; Pederzoli; Mirko; D’Onofrio

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is a reliable and accurate imaging method for the evaluation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma(PDAC). Diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) is a relatively recent technological improvement that expanded MRI capabilities, having brought functional aspects into conventional morphologic MRI evaluation. DWI can depict the random diffusion of water molecules within tissues(the so-called Brownian motions). Modifications of water diffusion induced by different factors acting on the extracellular and intracellular spaces, as increased cell density, edema, fibrosis, or altered functionality of cell membranes, can be detected using this MR sequence. The intravoxel incoherent motion(IVIM) model is an advanced DWI technique that consent a separate quantitative evaluation of all the microscopic random motions that contribute to DWI, which are essentially represented by molecular diffusion and blood microcirculation(perfusion). Technological improvements have made possible the routine use of DWI during abdominal MRI study. Several authors have reported that the addition of DWI sequence can be of value for the evaluation of patients with PDAC, especially improving the staging; nevertheless, it is still unclear whether and how DWI could be helpful for identification, characterization, prognostic stratification and follow-up during treatment. The aim of this paper is to review up-to-date literature data regarding the applications of DWI and IVIM to PDACs.

  2. Holographic imaging through a scattering medium by diffuser-aided statistical averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Michael J; Kumar, Manish; Rand, Stephen C; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a practical digital holographic method capable of imaging through a diffusive or scattering medium. The method relies on statistical averaging from a rotating ground glass diffuser to negate the adverse effects caused by speckle introduced by a static diffuser or scattering medium. In particular, a setup based on Fourier transform holography is used to show that an image can be recovered after scattering by introducing an additional diffuser in the optical setup. This method is capable of recovering object information from behind a scattering layer in biomedical or military imaging applications.

  3. Holographic imaging through a scattering medium by diffuser-aided statistical averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Purcell, Michael J; Rand, Stephen C; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a practical digital holographic method capable of imaging through a diffusive or scattering medium. The method relies on statistical averaging from a rotating ground glass diffuser to negate the adverse effects caused by speckle introduced by a first, static diffuser or scattering medium. In particular, a setup based on Fourier transform holography is used to show that an image can be recovered after scattering by introducing an additional diffuser in the optical setup. This method is capable of recovering object information from behind a scattering layer in biomedical or military imaging applications.

  4. Multiband optics for imaging systems (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Gibson, Daniel J.; Bayya, Shyam S.; Nguyen, Vinh Q.; Kotov, Mikhail; McClain, Collin

    2016-10-01

    There is a strong desire to reduce size and weight of single and multiband IR imaging systems in Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations on hand-held, helmet mounted or airborne platforms. NRL is developing new IR glasses that expand the glass map and provide compact solutions to multispectral imaging systems. These glasses were specifically designed to have comparable glass molding temperatures and thermal properties to enable lamination and co-molding of the optics which leads to a reduction in the number of air-glass interfaces (lower Fresnel reflection losses). Our multispectral optics designs using these new materials demonstrate reduced size, complexity and improved performance. This presentation will cover discussions on the new optical materials, multispectral designs, as well fabrication and characterization of new optics. Additionally, graded index (GRIN) optics offer further potential for both weight savings and increased performance but have so far been limited to visible and NIR bands (wavelengths shorter than about 0.9 µm). NRL is developing a capability to extend GRIN optics to longer wavelengths in the infrared by exploiting diffused IR transmitting chalcogenide glasses. These IR-GRIN lenses are compatible with all IR wavebands (SWIR, MWIR and LWIR) and can be used alongside conventional materials. The IR-GRIN lens technology, design space and anti-reflection considerations will be presented in this talk.

  5. Color Histogram Diffusion for Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taemin

    2011-01-01

    Various color histogram equalization (CHE) methods have been proposed to extend grayscale histogram equalization (GHE) for color images. In this paper a new method called histogram diffusion that extends the GHE method to arbitrary dimensions is proposed. Ranges in a histogram are specified as overlapping bars of uniform heights and variable widths which are proportional to their frequencies. This diagram is called the vistogram. As an alternative approach to GHE, the squared error of the vistogram from the uniform distribution is minimized. Each bar in the vistogram is approximated by a Gaussian function. Gaussian particles in the vistoram diffuse as a nonlinear autonomous system of ordinary differential equations. CHE results of color images showed that the approach is effective.

  6. Review of diffusion tensor imaging and its application in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorona, Gregory A. [Children' s Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Radiology, Richmond, VA (United States); Berman, Jeffrey I. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Diffusion MRI is an imaging technique that uses the random motion of water to probe tissue microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can quantitatively depict the organization and connectivity of white matter. Given the non-invasiveness of the technique, DTI has become a widely used tool for researchers and clinicians to examine the white matter of children. This review covers the basics of diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging and discusses examples of their clinical application in children. (orig.)

  7. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyoung Doo, E-mail: kdsong0308@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Hong, E-mail: rtombow@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye, E-mail: jhkate.kim@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, So-Young, E-mail: sy1131.yoo@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Tae Yeon, E-mail: hathor97.jeon@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  8. Fetal diffusion imaging: pearls and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprian, Gregor; Del Río, Maria; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-12-01

    Recently, diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging of the fetus has evolved from a basic research application to an important diagnostic imaging tool in fetal magnetic resonance imaging. Although technically challenging and still plagued with several sources of artifacts, DWI can add clinically important information, which cannot be provided by any other prenatal imaging modality. Its potential to noninvasively probe tissue structures on the basis of Brownian molecular motion enables the detection of early changes associated with acute fetal diseases, as well as structural alterations of functionally diverse compartments of different fetal organs. In this article, the current clinical applications of fetal brain and body DWI are outlined, as well as its current limitations.

  9. Diffused holographic information storage and retrieval using photorefractive optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Deanna Kay

    Holography offers a tremendous opportunity for dense information storage, theoretically one bit per cubic wavelength of material volume, with rapid retrieval, of up to thousands of pages of information simultaneously. However, many factors prevent the theoretical storage limit from being reached, including dynamic range problems and imperfections in recording materials. This research explores new ways of moving closer to practical holographic information storage and retrieval by altering the recording materials, in this case, photorefractive crystals, and by increasing the current storage capacity while improving the information retrieved. As an experimental example of the techniques developed, the information retrieved is the correlation peak from an optical recognition architecture, but the materials and methods developed are applicable to many other holographic information storage systems. Optical correlators can potentially solve any signal or image recognition problem. Military surveillance, fingerprint identification for law enforcement or employee identification, and video games are but a few examples of applications. A major obstacle keeping optical correlators from being universally accepted is the lack of a high quality, thick (high capacity) holographic recording material that operates with red or infrared wavelengths which are available from inexpensive diode lasers. This research addresses the problems from two positions: find a better material for use with diode lasers, and reduce the requirements placed on the material while maintaining an efficient and effective system. This research found that the solutions are new dopants introduced into photorefractive lithium niobate to improve wavelength sensitivities and the use of a novel inexpensive diffuser that reduces the dynamic range and optical element quality requirements (which reduces the cost) while improving performance. A uniquely doped set of 12 lithium niobate crystals was specified and

  10. Optical and digital image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Cristobal, Gabriel; Thienpont, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, Moore's law has fostered the steady growth of the field of digital image processing, though the computational complexity remains a problem for most of the digital image processing applications. In parallel, the research domain of optical image processing has matured, potentially bypassing the problems digital approaches were suffering and bringing new applications. The advancement of technology calls for applications and knowledge at the intersection of both areas but there is a clear knowledge gap between the digital signal processing and the optical processing communities. T

  11. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  12. Methanol-induced toxic optic neuropathy with diffusion weighted MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrivermis Sayit, Asli; Aslan, Kerim; Elmali, Muzaffer; Gungor, Inci

    2016-12-01

    We report a 52-year-old man with methanol intoxication who showed optic nerve damage as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). He was admitted to the hospital with blurred vision after the consumption of alcohol (600-700 ml of cologne). He was treated with intravenous ethanol, NaHCO3 and hemodialysis. On admission, a brain and orbital MRI was performed. Bilateral mild contrast enhancement was detected on the contrast-enhanced images in the retrobulbar segment of the optic nerves (RBONs). Also, diffusion-weighted images showed restricted diffusion in the RBONs. Diagnosis was considered as methanol-induced optic neuropathy based on the MRI findings of the optic nerves.

  13. Multibeam fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is a biomedical imaging modality that can be used for localization and quantification of fluorescent molecules inside turbid media. In this ill-posed problem, the reconstruction quality is directly determined by the amount and quality of the information obtained from the boundary measurements. Regularly, more information can be obtained by increasing the number of excitation positions in an FDOT system. However, the maximum number of excitation positions is limited by the finite size of the excitation beam. In the present work, we demonstrate a method in FDOT to exploit the unique nonlinear power dependence of upconverting nanoparticles to further increase the amount of information in a raster-scanning setup by including excitation with two beams simultaneously. We show that the additional information can be used to obtain more accurate reconstructions.

  14. Micro-optics for imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Robert R.

    2010-09-01

    This project investigates the fundamental imaging capability of an optic with a physical thickness substantially less than 1 mm. The analysis assumes that post-processing can overcome certain restrictions such as detector pixel size and image degradation due to aberrations. A first order optical analysis quickly reveals the limitations of even an ideal thin lens to provide sufficient image resolution and provides the justification for pursuing an annular design. Some straightforward examples clearly show the potential of this approach. The tradeoffs associated with annular designs, specifically field of view limitations and reduced mid-level spatial frequencies, are discussed and their impact on the imaging performance evaluated using several imaging examples. Additionally, issues such as detector acceptance angle and the need to balance aberrations with resolution are included in the analysis. With these restrictions, the final results present an excellent approximation of the expected performance of the lens designs presented.

  15. Diffusion and perfusion imaging of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Sourbron, Steven [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Division of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Duerr, Hans-Roland [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany); Baur-Melnyk, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.baur@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology, LMU University Hospitals, Grosshadern-Munich (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), the observed MRI signal intensity is attenuated by the self-diffusion of water molecules. DWI provides information about the microscopic structure and organization of a biological tissue, since the extent and orientation of molecular motion is influenced by these tissue properties. The most common method to measure perfusion in the body using MRI is T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). The analysis of DCE-MRI data allows determining the perfusion and permeability of a biological tissue. DWI as well as DCE-MRI are established techniques in MRI of the brain, while significantly fewer studies have been published in body imaging. In recent years, both techniques have been applied successfully in healthy bone marrow as well as for the characterization of bone marrow alterations or lesions; e.g., DWI has been used in particular for the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. In this review article, firstly a short introduction to diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is given. Non-quantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DWI and semiquantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DCE-MRI are introduced. Afterwards a detailed overview of the results of both techniques in healthy bone marrow and their applications for the diagnosis of various bone-marrow pathologies, like osteoporosis, bone tumors, and vertebral compression fractures are described.

  16. On some applications of diffusion processes for image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfu, S., E-mail: smorfu@u-bourgogne.f [Laboratoire d' Electronique, Informatique et Image (LE2i), UMR Cnrs 5158, Aile des Sciences de l' Ingenieur, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2009-06-29

    We propose a new algorithm inspired by the properties of diffusion processes for image filtering. We show that purely nonlinear diffusion processes ruled by Fisher equation allows contrast enhancement and noise filtering, but involves a blurry image. By contrast, anisotropic diffusion, described by Perona and Malik algorithm, allows noise filtering and preserves the edges. We show that combining the properties of anisotropic diffusion with those of nonlinear diffusion provides a better processing tool which enables noise filtering, contrast enhancement and edge preserving.

  17. Detecting Diffuse Sources in Astronomical Images

    CERN Document Server

    Butler-Yeoman, T; Hollitt, C P; Hogg, D W; Johnston-Hollitt, M

    2016-01-01

    We present an algorithm capable of detecting diffuse, dim sources of any size in an astronomical image. These sources often defeat traditional methods for source finding, which expand regions around points of high intensity. Extended sources often have no bright points and are only detectable when viewed as a whole, so a more sophisticated approach is required. Our algorithm operates at all scales simultaneously by considering a tree of nested candidate bounding boxes, and inverts a hierarchical Bayesian generative model to obtain the probability of sources existing at given locations and sizes. This model naturally accommodates the detection of nested sources, and no prior knowledge of the distribution of a source, or even the background, is required. The algorithm scales nearly linear with the number of pixels making it feasible to run on large images, and requires minimal parameter tweaking to be effective. We demonstrate the algorithm on several types of astronomical and artificial images.

  18. Discriminating Yogurt Microstructure Using Diffuse Reflectance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Møller, Flemming; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann;

    2015-01-01

    modalities is evaluated on a 24 factorial design covering four common production parameters, which significantly change the chemistry and the microstructure of the yogurt. It is found that the DRIs can be as discriminative as the CSLM images in certain cases, however the performance is highly governed...... microstructures using hyperspectral (500-900nm) diffuse reflectance images (DRIs) – a technique potentially well suited for inline process control. Comparisons are made to quantified measures of the yogurt microstructure observed through confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The output signal from both...... by the chemistry of the sample. Also, the DRIs shows better correlation to the CSLM images and are more discriminative when considering shorter wavelengths....

  19. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anil N; Chiang, Sharon; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Kasprian, Gregor; Vannucci, Marina; Lee, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal-Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain.

  20. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHETTY, ANIL N.; CHIANG, SHARON; MALETIC-SAVATIC, MIRJANA; KASPRIAN, GREGOR; VANNUCCI, MARINA; LEE, WESLEY

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal–Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain. PMID:27441031

  1. Region-of-interest diffuse optical tomography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikia, Manob Jyoti; Kanhirodan, Rajan, E-mail: rajan@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2016-01-15

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light is a promising tool for non-invasive imaging of deep tissue. This technique is capable of quantitative reconstruction of absorption (μ{sub a}) and scattering coefficient (μ{sub s}) inhomogeneities in the tissue. The rationale for reconstructing the optical property map is that the absorption coefficient variation provides diagnostic information about metabolic and disease states of the tissue. The aim of DOT is to reconstruct the internal tissue cross section with good spatial resolution and contrast from noisy measurements non-invasively. We develop a region-of-interest scanning system based on DOT principles. Modulated light is injected into the phantom/tissue through one of the four light emitting diode sources. The light traversing through the tissue gets partially absorbed and scattered multiple times. The intensity and phase of the exiting light are measured using a set of photodetectors. The light transport through a tissue is diffusive in nature and is modeled using radiative transfer equation. However, a simplified model based on diffusion equation (DE) can be used if the system satisfies following conditions: (a) the optical parameter of the inhomogeneity is close to the optical property of the background, and (b) μ{sub s} of the medium is much greater than μ{sub a} (μ{sub s} > > μ{sub a}). The light transport through a highly scattering tissue satisfies both of these conditions. A discrete version of DE based on finite element method is used for solving the inverse problem. The depth of probing light inside the tissue depends on the wavelength of light, absorption, and scattering coefficients of the medium and the separation between the source and detector locations. Extensive simulation studies have been carried out and the results are validated using two sets of experimental measurements. The utility of the system can be further improved by using multiple wavelength light sources. In such

  2. Region-of-interest diffuse optical tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Manob Jyoti; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light is a promising tool for non-invasive imaging of deep tissue. This technique is capable of quantitative reconstruction of absorption (μa) and scattering coefficient (μs) inhomogeneities in the tissue. The rationale for reconstructing the optical property map is that the absorption coefficient variation provides diagnostic information about metabolic and disease states of the tissue. The aim of DOT is to reconstruct the internal tissue cross section with good spatial resolution and contrast from noisy measurements non-invasively. We develop a region-of-interest scanning system based on DOT principles. Modulated light is injected into the phantom/tissue through one of the four light emitting diode sources. The light traversing through the tissue gets partially absorbed and scattered multiple times. The intensity and phase of the exiting light are measured using a set of photodetectors. The light transport through a tissue is diffusive in nature and is modeled using radiative transfer equation. However, a simplified model based on diffusion equation (DE) can be used if the system satisfies following conditions: (a) the optical parameter of the inhomogeneity is close to the optical property of the background, and (b) μs of the medium is much greater than μa (μs > > μa). The light transport through a highly scattering tissue satisfies both of these conditions. A discrete version of DE based on finite element method is used for solving the inverse problem. The depth of probing light inside the tissue depends on the wavelength of light, absorption, and scattering coefficients of the medium and the separation between the source and detector locations. Extensive simulation studies have been carried out and the results are validated using two sets of experimental measurements. The utility of the system can be further improved by using multiple wavelength light sources. In such a scheme, the spectroscopic

  3. Interpolation of diffusion weighted imaging datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrby, Tim B; Lundell, Henrik; Burke, Mark W; Reislev, Nina L; Paulson, Olaf B; Ptito, Maurice; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is used to study white-matter fibre organisation, orientation and structural connectivity by means of fibre reconstruction algorithms and tractography. For clinical settings, limited scan time compromises the possibilities to achieve high image resolution for finer anatomical details and signal-to-noise-ratio for reliable fibre reconstruction. We assessed the potential benefits of interpolating DWI datasets to a higher image resolution before fibre reconstruction using a diffusion tensor model. Simulations of straight and curved crossing tracts smaller than or equal to the voxel size showed that conventional higher-order interpolation methods improved the geometrical representation of white-matter tracts with reduced partial-volume-effect (PVE), except at tract boundaries. Simulations and interpolation of ex-vivo monkey brain DWI datasets revealed that conventional interpolation methods fail to disentangle fine anatomical details if PVE is too pronounced in the original data. As for validation we used ex-vivo DWI datasets acquired at various image resolutions as well as Nissl-stained sections. Increasing the image resolution by a factor of eight yielded finer geometrical resolution and more anatomical details in complex regions such as tract boundaries and cortical layers, which are normally only visualized at higher image resolutions. Similar results were found with typical clinical human DWI dataset. However, a possible bias in quantitative values imposed by the interpolation method used should be considered. The results indicate that conventional interpolation methods can be successfully applied to DWI datasets for mining anatomical details that are normally seen only at higher resolutions, which will aid in tractography and microstructural mapping of tissue compartments.

  4. UV image processing to detect diffuse clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengot, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; López-Santiago, J.; Sánchez-Doreste, N.

    2015-05-01

    The presence of diffuse clouds along the Galaxy is under consideration as far as they are related to stellar formation and their physical properties are not well understood. The signal received from most of these structures in the UV images is minimal compared to the point sources. The presence of noise in these images makes hard the analysis because the Signal-to-Noise ratio is proportionally much higher in these areas. However, the digital processing of the images shows that it is possible to enhance and target these clouds. Typically, this kind of treatment is done on purpose for specific research areas and the Astrophysicist's work depends on the computer tools and its possibilities for enhancing a particular area based on a prior knowledge. Automating this step is the goal of our work to make easier the study of these structures in UV images. In particular we have used the GALEX survey images in the aim of learning to automatically detect such clouds and be able of unsupervised detection and graphic enhancement to log them. Our experiments show the existence of some evidences in the UV images that allow the systematic computing and open the chance to generalize the algorithm to find these structures in universe areas where they have not been recorded yet.

  5. Imaging Granulomatous Lesions with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Banzhaf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors. Methods: Two patients with granulomas, tophi and granuloma annulare (GA, respectively, were photographed digitally, OCT-scanned and biopsied in the said order. Normal skin was OCT-scanned for comparison, but not biopsied. The OCT images from each lesion were compared with their histologic images as well as with OCT images with similar characteristics obtained from nonmelanoma skin tumors. Results: The OCT images of the tophi showed hyperreflective, rounded cloud-like structures in dermis, their upper part sharply delineated by a hyporeflective fringe. The deeper areas appeared blurred. The crystalline structures were delineated by a hyporeflective fringe. OCT images of GA showed two different structures in dermis: a hyporeflective rounded one, and one that was lobulated and wing-like. Conclusion: Granulomatous tissue surrounding urate deposits appeared as a clear hyporeflective fringe surrounding a light, hyperreflective area. The urate crystals appeared as hyperreflective areas, shielding the deeper part of dermis, meaning OCT could only visualize the upper part of the lesions. The lobulated, wing-like structure in GA may resemble diffuse GA or a dense lymphocytic infiltrate as seen on histology. The rounded structure in GA may represent an actual granuloma or either diffuse GA or a dense lymphocytic infiltrate as described above. This case suggests that OCT images granulomatous tissue as absorbent, hyporeflective areas, and urate crystals appear as reflective areas, obscuring the underlying tissue. In GA a new image shape looking like a wing has been found. The frequency, specificity and sensitivity of this new pattern in OCT imaging will require further studies.

  6. Retinal Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    The eye is essentially transparent, transmitting light with only minimal optical attenuation and scattering providing easy optical access to the anterior segment as well as the retina. For this reason, ophthalmic and especially retinal imaging has been not only the first but also most successful clinical application for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This chapter focuses on the development of OCT technology for retinal imaging. OCT has significantly improved the potential for early diagnosis, understanding of retinal disease pathogenesis, as well as monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. Development of ultrabroad bandwidth light sources and high-speed detection techniques has enabled significant improvements in ophthalmic OCT imaging performance, demonstrating the potential of three-dimensional, ultrahigh-resolution OCT (UHR OCT) to perform noninvasive optical biopsy of the living human retina, i.e., the in vivo visualization of microstructural, intraretinal morphology in situ approaching the resolution of conventional histopathology. Significant improvements in axial resolution and speed not only enable three-dimensional rendering of retinal volumes but also high-definition, two-dimensional tomograms, topographic thickness maps of all major intraretinal layers, as well as volumetric quantification of pathologic intraretinal changes. These advances in OCT technology have also been successfully applied in several animal models of retinal pathologies. The development of light sources emitting at alternative wavelengths, e.g., around #1,060 nm, not only enabled three-dimensional OCT imaging with enhanced choroidal visualization but also improved OCT performance in cataract patients due to reduced scattering losses in this wavelength region. Adaptive optics using deformable mirror technology, with unique high stroke to correct higher-order ocular aberrations, with specially designed optics to compensate chromatic aberration of the human eye, in

  7. Image Quality Stability of Whole-body Diffusion Weighted Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-bin Chen; Chun-miao Hu; Jing Zhong; Fei Sun

    2009-01-01

    To assess the reproducibility of whole-body diffusion weighted imaging (WB-DWI) technique in healthy volunteers under normal breathing with background body signal suppression. Methods WB-DWI was performed on 32 healthy volunteers twice within two-week period using short TI inversion-recovery diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging sequence and built-in body coil. The volunteers were scanned across six stations continuously covering the entire body from the head to the feet under normal breathing. The bone apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and exponential ADC (eADC) of regions of interest (ROIs) were measured. We analyzed correlation of the results using paired-t-test to assess the reproducibility of the WB-DWl technique.Results We were successful in collecting and analyzing data of 64 WB-DWI images. There was no significant difference in bone ADC and eADC of 824 ROIs between the paired observers and paired scans (P>0.05). Most of the images from all stations were of diagnostic quality.Conclusion The measurements of bone ADC and eADC have good reproducibility. WB-DWI technique under normal breathing with background body signal suppression is adequate.

  8. Multi-compartment microscopic diffusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaden, Enrico; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Carson, Robert P; Does, Mark D; Alexander, Daniel C

    2016-10-01

    This paper introduces a multi-compartment model for microscopic diffusion anisotropy imaging. The aim is to estimate microscopic features specific to the intra- and extra-neurite compartments in nervous tissue unconfounded by the effects of fibre crossings and orientation dispersion, which are ubiquitous in the brain. The proposed MRI method is based on the Spherical Mean Technique (SMT), which factors out the neurite orientation distribution and thus provides direct estimates of the microscopic tissue structure. This technique can be immediately used in the clinic for the assessment of various neurological conditions, as it requires only a widely available off-the-shelf sequence with two b-shells and high-angular gradient resolution achievable within clinically feasible scan times. To demonstrate the developed method, we use high-quality diffusion data acquired with a bespoke scanner system from the Human Connectome Project. This study establishes the normative values of the new biomarkers for a large cohort of healthy young adults, which may then support clinical diagnostics in patients. Moreover, we show that the microscopic diffusion indices offer direct sensitivity to pathological tissue alterations, exemplified in a preclinical animal model of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC), a genetic multi-organ disorder which impacts brain microstructure and hence may lead to neurological manifestations such as autism, epilepsy and developmental delay. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  10. Simulations of optical microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Thomas A.; Marx, Egon

    2006-03-01

    The resolution of an optical microscope is limited by the optical wavelengths used. However, there is no fundamental limit to the sensitivity of a microscope to small differences in any of a feature's dimensions. That is, those limits are determined by such things as the sensitivity of the detector array, the quality of the optical system, and the stability of the light source. The potential for using this nearly unbounded sensitivity has sparked interest in extending optical microscopy to the characterization of sub-wavelength structures created by photolithography and using that characterization for process control. In this paper, an analysis of the imaging of a semiconductor grating structure with an optical microscope will be presented. The analysis includes the effects of partial coherence in the illumination system, aberrations of both the illumination and the collection optics, non-uniformities in the illumination, and polarization. It can thus model just about any illumination configuration imaginable, including Koehler illumination, focused (confocal) illumination, or dark-field illumination. By propagating Jones matrices throughout the system, polarization control at the back focal planes of both illumination and collection can be investigated. Given a detailed characterization of the microscope (including aberrations), images can be calculated and compared to real data, allowing details of the grating structure to be determined, in a manner similar to that found in scatterometry.

  11. Biomedical Optical Imaging Technologies Design and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to design of biomedical optical imaging technologies and their applications. The main topics include: fluorescence imaging, confocal imaging, micro-endoscope, polarization imaging, hyperspectral imaging, OCT imaging, multimodal imaging and spectroscopic systems. Each chapter is written by the world leaders of the respective fields, and will cover: principles and limitations of optical imaging technology, system design and practical implementation for one or two specific applications, including design guidelines, system configuration, optical design, component requirements and selection, system optimization and design examples, recent advances and applications in biomedical researches and clinical imaging. This book serves as a reference for students and researchers in optics and biomedical engineering.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the brain. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moritani, Toshio [Univ. of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Ekholm, Sven; Westesson, Per-Lennart [Rochester Univ. School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States). Div. of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology

    2009-07-01

    This practical-minded text helps the radiologist and the clinician understand diffusion-weighted MR imaging. The book's 15 chapters range from basic principles to interpretation of diffusion-weighted MR imaging and specific disease. In this second edition, diffusion tensor imaging (fractional anisotropy, color map and fiber tractography) is covered and a new chapter, on ''Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of Scalp and Skull Lesions,'' is included. The volume is updated by newly added cases accompanied by radiological and pathological images along with the most recent references. It is aimed at all those who are involved in neuroimaging, including: residents, fellows, staff, as well as neurologists and neurosurgeons. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is widely accepted as a means to identify acute infarction but also to differentiate many other pathologic conditions. Understanding diffusion-weighted imaging is important for radiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons as well as radiology technologists. (orig.)

  13. Effects of probe geometry on transscleral diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenmarker, Pontus; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Krohn, Jørgen

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the geometry of a fiber optic probe affects the transmission and reflection of light through the scleral eye wall. Two geometrical parameters of the fiber probe were investigated: the source-detector distance and the fiber protrusion, i.e. the length of the fiber extending from the flat surface of the fiber probe. For optimization of the fiber optic probe geometry, fluorescence stained choroidal tumor phantoms in ex vivo porcine eyes were measured with both diffuse reflectance- and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The strength of the fluorescence signal compared to the excitation signal was used as a measure for optimization. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and temperature were monitored to assess the impact of the probe on the eye. For visualizing any possible damage caused by the probe, the scleral surface was imaged with scanning electron microscopy after completion of the spectroscopic measurements. A source-detector distance of 5 mm with zero fiber protrusion was considered optimal in terms of spectroscopic contrast, however, a slight fiber protrusion of 0.5 mm is argued to be advantageous for clinical measurements. The study further indicates that transscleral spectroscopy can be safely performed in human eyes under in vivo conditions, without leading to an unacceptable IOP elevation, a significant rise in tissue temperature, or any visible damage to the scleral surface.

  14. Diffusion filtering in image processing based on wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Feng

    2006-01-01

    The nonlinear diffusion filtering in image processing bases on the heat diffusion equations. Its key is the control of diffusion amount. In the previous models, the diffusivity depends on the gradients of images. So it is easily affected by noises. This paper first gives a new multiscale computational technique for diffusivity. Then we proposed a class of nonlinear wavelet diffusion (NWD) models that are used to restore images. The NWD model has strong ability to resist noise.But it, like the previous models, requires higher computational effort. Thus, by simplifying the NWD, we establish linear wavelet diffusion (LWD) models that consist of advection and diffusion. Since there exists the advection, the LWD filter is anisotropic, and hence can well preserve edges although the diffusion at edges is isotropic. The advantage is that the LWD model is easy to be analyzed and has lesser computational load. Finally, a variety of numerical experiments compared with the previous model are shown.

  15. Various diffusion magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Yue Tang; Xiao-Ming Zhang; Tian-Wu Chen; Xiao-Hua Huang

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common malignanttumors and remains a treatment-refractory cancer with a poor prognosis. Currently, the diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasm depends mainly on imaging and which methods are conducive to detecting small lesions. Compared to the other techniques, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) has irreplaceable advantages and can provide valuable information unattainable with other noninvasive or minimally invasive imaging techniques. Advances in MR hardware and pulse sequence design have particularly improved the quality and robustness of MRI of the pancreas. Diffusion MR imaging serves as one of the common functional MRI techniques and is the only technique that can be used to reflect the diffusion movement of water molecules in vivo. It is generally known that diffusion properties depend on the characterization of intrinsic features of tissue microdynamics and microstructure. With the improvement of the diffusion models, diffusion MR imaging techniques are increasingly varied, from the simplest and most commonly used technique to the more complex. In this review, the various diffusion MRI techniques for pancreatic cancer are discussed, including conventional diffusion weighted imaging(DWI), multi-b DWI based on intra-voxel incoherent motion theory, diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging. The principles, main parameters, advantages and limitations of these techniques, as well as future directions for pancreatic diffusion imaging are also discussed.

  16. Stereotactic diffusion tensor imaging tractography for Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Cormac G; Ian Sabin, H

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE The integration of modern neuroimaging into treatment planning has increased the therapeutic potential and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery. The authors report their method of integrating stereotactic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography into conventional treatment planning for Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS). The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and to address some of the technical limitations of previously reported techniques. METHODS Twenty patients who underwent GKRS composed the study cohort. They consisted of 1 initial test case (a patient with a vestibular schwannoma), 5 patients with arteriovenous malformations, 9 patients with cerebral metastases, 1 patient with parasagittal meningioma, and 4 patients with vestibular schwannoma. DT images were obtained at the time of standard GKRS protocol MRI (T1 and T2 weighted) for treatment, with the patient's head secured by a Leksell stereotactic frame. All studies were performed using a 1.5-T magnet with a single-channel head coil. DTI was performed with diffusion gradients in 32 directions and coregistered with the volumetric T1-weighted study. DTI postprocessing by means of commercially available software allowed tensor computation and the creation of directionally encoded color-, apparent diffusion coefficient-, and fractional anisotropy-mapped sequences. In addition, the software allowed visualized critical tracts to be exported as a structural volume and integrated into GammaPlan as an "organ at risk" during shot planning. Combined images were transferred to GammaPlan and integrated into treatment planning. RESULTS Stereotactic DT images were successfully acquired in all patients, with generation of correct directionally encoded color images. Tract generation with the software was straightforward and reproducible, particularly for axial tracts such as the optic radiation and the arcuate fasciculus. Corticospinal tract visualization was hampered by some

  17. The relevance of light diffusion profiles for interstitial PDT using light-diffusing optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringasci, Mirian D.; Fortunato, Thereza C.; Moriyama, Lilian T.; Vollet Filho, José Dirceu; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique used for several tumor types treatment. Light penetration on biological tissue is one limiting factor for PDT applied to large tumors. An alternative is using interstitial PDT, in which optical fibers are inserted into tumors. Cylindrical diffusers have been used in interstitial PDT. Light emission of different diffusers depends on the manufacturing process, size and optical properties of fibers, which make difficult to establish an adequate light dosimetry, since usually light profile is not designed for direct tissue-fiber contact. This study discusses the relevance of light distribution by a cylindrical diffuser into a turbid lipid emulsion solution, and how parts of a single diffuser contribute to illumination. A 2 cm-long cylindrical diffuser optical fiber was connected to a diode laser (630 nm), and the light spatial distribution was measured by scanning the solution with a collection probe. From the light field profile generated by a 1 mm-long intermediary element of a 20 mm-long cylindrical diffuser, recovery of light distribution for the entire diffuser was obtained. PDT was performed in rat healthy liver for a real treatment outcome analysis. By using computational tools, a typical necrosis profile generated by the irradiation with such a diffuser fiber was reconstructed. The results showed that it was possible predicting theoretically the shape of a necrosis profile in a healthy, homogeneous tissue with reasonable accuracy. The ability to predict the necrosis profile obtained from an interstitial illumination by optical diffusers has the potential improve light dosimetry for interstitial PDT.

  18. Wide-field quantitative imaging of tissue microstructure using sub-diffuse spatial frequency domain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchy, David M; Rizzo, Elizabeth J; Wells, Wendy A; Cheney, Philip P; Hwang, Jeeseong C; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W; Kanick, Stephen C

    2016-06-20

    Localized measurements of scattering in biological tissue provide sensitivity to microstructural morphology but have limited utility to wide-field applications, such as surgical guidance. This study introduces sub-diffusive spatial frequency domain imaging (sd-SFDI), which uses high spatial frequency illumination to achieve wide-field sampling of localized reflectances. Model-based inversion recovers macroscopic variations in the reduced scattering coefficient [Formula: see text] and the phase function backscatter parameter (γ). Measurements in optical phantoms show quantitative imaging of user-tuned phase-function-based contrast with accurate decoupling of parameters that define both the density and the size-scale distribution of scatterers. Measurements of fresh ex vivo breast tissue samples revealed, for the first time, unique clustering of sub-diffusive scattering properties for different tissue types. The results support that sd-SFDI provides maps of microscopic structural biomarkers that cannot be obtained with diffuse wide-field imaging and characterizes spatial variations not resolved by point-based optical sampling.

  19. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging of hippocampal network plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Alejandra; Laitinen, Teemu; Gröhn, Olli; Pitkänen, Asla

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has become a valuable tool to investigate white matter integrity in the brain. DTI also gives contrast in gray matter, which has been relatively little explored in studies assessing post-injury structural abnormalities. The present study was designed to compare white and gray matter reorganization in the rat hippocampus after two epileptogenic brain injuries, status epilepticus (SE) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), using ex vivo high-resolution DTI. Imaging was performed at 6-12 months post-injury and findings were compared to histological analyses of Nissl, myelin, and Timm-stained preparations from the same animals. In agreement with the severity of histological damage, fractional anisotropy (FA), axial (D ||) and radial (D ⊥) diffusivities, and mean diffusivity (MD) measurements were altered in the order SE > TBI ipsilaterally > TBI contralaterally. After SE, the most severe abnormalities were found in the dentate gyrus and CA3b-c subfields, in which the mean FA was increased to 125 % (p < 0.001) and 143 % (p < 0.001) of that in controls, respectively. In both subfields, the change in FA was associated with an increase in D || (p < 0.01). In the stratum radiatum of the CA1, FA was decreased to 81 % of that in controls (p < 0.05) which was associated with an increase in D ⊥ (p < 0.01). After TBI, DTI did not reveal any major abnormalities in the dentate gyrus. In the ipsilateral CA3b-c, however, FA was increased to 126 % of that in controls (p < 0.01) and associated with a mild decrease in D ⊥ (p < 0.05). In the stratum radiatum of the ipsilateral CA1, FA was decreased to 88 % of that in controls (p < 0.05). Our data demonstrate that DTI reveals subfield-specific abnormalities in the hippocampus with remarkable qualitative and quantitative differences between the two epileptogenic etiologies, suggesting that DTI could be a valuable tool for follow-up of focal circuitry reorganization during the post

  1. Control of diffusion of nanoparticles in an optical vortex lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Ivar; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Sáenz, Juan José

    2016-06-01

    A two-dimensional periodic optical force field, which combines conservative dipolar forces with vortices from radiation pressure, is proposed in order to influence the diffusion properties of optically susceptible nanoparticles. The different deterministic flow patterns are identified. In the low-noise limit, the diffusion coefficient is computed from a mean first passage time and the most probable escape paths are identified for those flow patterns which possess a stable stationary point. Numerical simulations of the associated Langevin equations show remarkable agreement with the analytically deduced expressions. Modifications of the force field are proposed so that a wider range of phenomena could be tested.

  2. Optical Waveguide Sensing and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Wojtek J; Tanev, Stoyan

    2008-01-01

    The book explores various aspects of existing and emerging fiber and waveguide optics sensing and imaging technologies including recent advances in nanobiophotonics. The focus is both on fundamental and applied research as well as on applications in civil engineering, biomedical sciences, environment, security and defence. The main goal of the multi-disciplinarry team of Editors was to provide an useful reference of state-of-the-art overviews covering a variety of complementary topics on the interface of engineering and biomedical sciences.

  3. High spatial resolution diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J J

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging is at present the only imaging technique available to measure diffusion of water and metabolites in humans. It provides vital insights to brain connectivity and has proved to be an important tool in diagnosis and therapy planning in many neurological diseases such as brain tumour, ischaemia and multiple sclerosis. This project focuses on the development of a high resolution diffusion tensor imaging technique. In this thesis, the basic theory of diffusion tensor MR Imaging is presented. The technical challenges encountered during development of these techniques will be discussed, with proposed solutions. New sequences with high spatial resolution have been developed and the results are compared with the standard technique more commonly used. Overview The project aims at the development of diffusion tensor imaging techniques with a high spatial resolution. Chapter 2 will describe the basic physics of MRI, the phenomenon of diffusion and the measurement of diffusion by MRI...

  4. Is diffusion weighted imaging adding value in diagnosis of focal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doaa Mokhtar Mohamed Emara

    2013-05-09

    May 9, 2013 ... Abstract Introduction: Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) offers molecular information that ... model, the effect of the first (dephasing) gradient is cancelled ... Areas of true restricted diffusion demonstrate high signal ... A phased array surface coil was ..... signal intensity ratios with small diffusion gradients for.

  5. Effects of microperfusion in hepatic diffusion weighted imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Baron, Paul; Kappert, Peter; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical hepatic diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) generally relies on mono-exponential diffusion. The aim was to demonstrate that mono-exponential diffusion in the liver is contaminated by microperfusion and that the bi-exponential model is required. Nineteen fasting healthy volunteers were examined

  6. Effects of microperfusion in hepatic diffusion weighted imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Baron, Paul; Kappert, Peter; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E.

    Clinical hepatic diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) generally relies on mono-exponential diffusion. The aim was to demonstrate that mono-exponential diffusion in the liver is contaminated by microperfusion and that the bi-exponential model is required. Nineteen fasting healthy volunteers were examined

  7. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of TBI: Potentials and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Iv, Michael; Douglas, Pamela K; Anderson, Ariana; Vos, Sjoerd B; Bammer, Roland; Zeineh, Michael; Wintermark, Max

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the setting in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an advanced magnetic resonance imaging technique that is capable of providing rich information on the brain's neuroanatomic connectome. The purpose of this article is to systematically review the role of DTI and advanced diffusion techniques in the setting of TBI, including diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, diffusion spectrum imaging, and q-ball imaging. We discuss clinical applications of DTI and review the DTI literature as it pertains to TBI. Despite the continued advancements in DTI and related diffusion techniques over the past 20 years, DTI techniques are sensitive for TBI at the group level only and there is insufficient evidence that DTI plays a role at the individual level. We conclude by discussing future directions in DTI research in TBI including the role of machine learning in the pattern classification of TBI.

  8. Comparative study of MRI and diffusion tensor imaging in acute optic neuritis%急性视神经炎的 MRI 和扩散张量成像对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宛四海; 肖新兰; 张雪林; 潘璜

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the sensitivity and diagnostic value of MR diffusion tensor imaging ( DTI) for acute optic neuritis.Methods DTI data of optic nerve were obtained in 16 patients with acute optic neuritis and 16 healthy subjects.The MRI manifestations and quantity parameters of DTI such as the fractional anisotropy(FA), the mean diffusivity(MD), and the eigenvalue were analyzed.The statistical analysis was conducted with one-way ANOVA.Results Acute optic neuritis showed isointense on T1 WI,and hyperintense on T2 WI, FLAIR T2 WI and fat suppressed sequences, but the sensitivity were low at 37.9%(11/29), 51.7%(15/29) and 58.6%(17/29),respectively.DTI, however, was very sensitive in showing acute optic neuritis which were hypointense on FA and ( directionally encoded color ) DEC maps and its sensitivity was 100%( 29/29 ) .Compared with unaffected contralateral nerves [ 0.59 ±0.01, ( 0.92 ± 0.17) ×10 -3 mm2/s,(2.02 ±0.09) ×10 -3 mm2/s and(0.71 ±0.13) ×10 -3 mm2/s,respectively)] and control groups[(0.59 ±0.07,(0.94 ±0.10) ×10 -3 mm2/s,(1.93 ±0.19) ×10 -3 mm2/s and(0.67 ± 0.10) ×10 -3 mm2/s,respectively],acute optic neuritis showed a significant reduction of FA value (0.34 ± 0.05) and elevation of MD value ( 1.46 ±0.18 ) ×10-3 mm2/s, eigenvalue λ∥( 2.33 ±0.16 ) × 10 -3 mm2/s and eigenvalue λ⊥(1.37 ±0.13) ×10 -3 mm2/s(F=162.106,152.693,39.897,291.591, respectively;P<0.01).Conclusion DTI is a sensitive technique for optic nerve imaging in vivo, and has important value for clinical application of acute optic neuritis.%目的:探讨MR DTI对急性视神经炎诊断的敏感度及其应用价值。方法16例临床诊断为急性视神经炎的患者和16名正常健康志愿者,分别行视神经常规MRI和DTI,分析其影像表现,计算DTI定量参数视神经的各向异性分数( FA)、平均扩散率( MD)、本征值,并采用单因素方差分析进行统计学分析。结果急性视神经炎在T1 WI为等信号,T2 WI

  9. Optomechatronics for Biomedical Optical Imaging: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Cho Hyungsuck

    2015-01-01

    The use of optomechatronic technology, particularly in biomedical optical imaging, is becoming pronounced and ever increasing due to its synergistic effect of the integration of optics and mechatronics. The background of this trend is that the biomedical optical imaging for example in-vivo imaging related to retraction of tissues, diagnosis, and surgical operations have a variety of challenges due to complexity in internal structure and properties of biological body and the resulting optical ...

  10. Reduction of noise in diffusion tensor images using anisotropic smoothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhaohua; Gore, John C; Anderson, Adam W

    2005-02-01

    To improve the accuracy of tissue structural and architectural characterization with diffusion tensor imaging, a novel smoothing technique is developed for reducing noise in diffusion tensor images. The technique extends the traditional anisotropic diffusion filtering method by allowing isotropic smoothing within homogeneous regions and anisotropic smoothing along structure boundaries. This is particularly useful for smoothing diffusion tensor images in which direction information contained in the tensor needs to be restored following noise corruption and preserved around tissue boundaries. The effectiveness of this technique is quantitatively studied with experiments on simulated and human in vivo diffusion tensor data. Illustrative results demonstrate that the anisotropic smoothing technique developed can significantly reduce the impact of noise on the direction as well as anisotropy measures of the diffusion tensor images.

  11. Optomechatronics for Biomedical Optical Imaging: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Hyungsuck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of optomechatronic technology, particularly in biomedical optical imaging, is becoming pronounced and ever increasing due to its synergistic effect of the integration of optics and mechatronics. The background of this trend is that the biomedical optical imaging for example in-vivo imaging related to retraction of tissues, diagnosis, and surgical operations have a variety of challenges due to complexity in internal structure and properties of biological body and the resulting optical phenomena. This paper addresses the technical issues related to tissue imaging, visualization of interior surfaces of organs, laparoscopic and endoscopic imaging and imaging of neuronal activities and structures. Within such problem domains the paper overviews the states of the art technology focused on how optical components are fused together with those of mechatronics to create the functionalities required for the imaging systems. Future perspective of the optical imaging in biomedical field is presented in short.

  12. Bayesian regularization of diffusion tensor images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jesper; Hobolth, Asger; Østergaard, Leif;

    2007-01-01

    several directions. The measured diffusion coefficients and thereby the diffusion tensors are subject to noise, leading to possibly flawed representations of the three dimensional fibre bundles. In this paper we develop a Bayesian procedure for regularizing the diffusion tensor field, fully utilizing...

  13. Interface diffusion kinetics and lifetime scaling in multilayer Bragg optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kruijs, Robbert Wilhelmus Elisabeth; Bruijn, S.; Yakshin, Andrey; Nedelcu, I.; Bijkerk, Frederik; van de Kruijs, R.W.E.

    2011-01-01

    The internal structure of Mo/Si multilayers is investigated during and after thermal annealing. Multilayer period compaction is shown to result from diffusion induced MoSi2 interlayer growth, reducing optical contrast and changing the reflected wavelength. We focus on early-stage interface growth

  14. Photoacoustic-guided convergence of light through optically diffusive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanting; Silverman, Ronald H; Liu, Liping; Chitnis, Parag V; Lee, Kotik K; Chen, Y C

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that laser beams can be converged toward a light-absorbing target through optically diffusive media by using photoacoustic-guided interferometric focusing. The convergence of light is achieved by shaping the wavefront of the incident light with a deformable mirror to maximize the photoacoustic signal, which is proportional to the scattered light intensity at the light absorber.

  15. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  16. Wavelet-Based Diffusion Approach for DTI Image Restoration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiang-fen; CHEN Wu-fan; TIAN Wei-feng; YE Hong

    2008-01-01

    The Rician noise introduced into the diffusion tensor images (DTIs) can bring serious impacts on tensor calculation and fiber tracking. To decrease the effects of the Rician noise, we propose to consider the wavelet-based diffusion method to denoise multichannel typed diffusion weighted (DW) images. The presented smoothing strategy, which utilizes anisotropic nonlinear diffusion in wavelet domain, successfully removes noise while preserving both texture and edges. To evaluate quantitatively the efficiency of the presented method in accounting for the Rician noise introduced into the DW images, the peak-to-peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and signal-to-mean squared error ratio (SMSE) metrics are adopted. Based on the synthetic and real data, we calculated the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and tracked the fibers. We made comparisons between the presented model,the wave shrinkage and regularized nonlinear diffusion smoothing method. All the experiment results prove quantitatively and visually the better performance of the presented filter.

  17. Diffuse optical fluorescence tomography using time-resolved data acquired in transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Frederic; Fortier, Simon; Friedlander, Michael P.

    2007-02-01

    We present an algorithm using data acquired with a time-resolved system with the goal of reconstructing sources of fluorescence emanating from the deep interior of highly scattering biological tissues. A novelty in our tomography algorithm is the integration of a light transport model adapted to rodent geometries. For small volumes, our analysis suggest that neglecting the index of refraction mismatch between diffusive and non-diffusive regions, as well as the curved nature of the boundary, can have a profound impact on fluorescent images and spectroscopic applications relying on diffusion curve fitting. Moreover, we introduce a new least-squares solver with bound constraints adapted for optical problems where a physical non-negative constraint can be imposed. Finally, we find that maximizing the time-related information content of the data in the reconstruction process significantly enhances the quality of fluorescence images. Preliminary noise propagation and detector placement optimization analysis are also presented.

  18. Imaging diffusion in a microfluidic device by third harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Uwe; Büchel, Andreas; Hardt, Steffen; Halfmann, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    We monitor and characterize near-surface diffusion of miscible, transparent liquids in a microfluidic device by third harmonic microscopy. The technique enables observations even of transparent or index-matched media without perturbation of the sample. In particular, we image concentrations of ethanol diffusing in water and estimate the diffusion coefficient from the third harmonic images. We obtain a diffusion coefficient D = (460 ± 30) μm2/s, which is consistent with theoretical predictions. The investigations clearly demonstrate the potential of harmonic microscopy also under the challenging conditions of transparent fluids.

  19. Comparison of the diagnostic performances of diffusion parameters in diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakir, Ozgur, E-mail: cakirozgur@hotmail.com; Arslan, Arzu, E-mail: arzu.s.arslan@gmail.com; Inan, Nagihan, E-mail: nagihaninan@yahoo.com.tr; Anık, Yonca, E-mail: yoncaanik@yahoo.com; Sarısoy, Tahsin, E-mail: htsarisoy@yahoo.com; Gumustas, Sevtap, E-mail: svtgumustas@yahoo.com; Akansel, Gur, E-mail: gakansel@gmail.com

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of the diffusion parameters measured by conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for discrimination of malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and the normal breast. Materials and methods: The study included 52 women with 55 breast lesions (30 malignant, 25 benign). DTI and DWI were performed complementary to dynamic contrast MRI at 3T. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of DWI, mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of DTI were measured for lesions and contralateral breast parenchyma in each patient. We used b factors of 0, 50, 850, 1000 and 1500 s/mm{sup 2} for DWI and b 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} for DTI. ADC, MD and FA values were compared between malignant and benign lesions, and the normal parenchyma by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Diffusion parameters showed no difference according to menopausal status in the normal breast. ADC and MD values of the malignant lesions were significantly lower than benign lesions and normal parenchyma (p = 0.001). The FA showed no statistical significance. With the cut-off values of ≤1.23 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (b 0–1000 s/mm{sup 2}) and ≤1.12 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (b 0–1500 s/mm{sup 2}), ADC showed 92.85% and 96.15% sensitivity; 72.22% and 73.52% PPV, respectively. With a cut-off value of ≤1.27 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (b 1000 s/mm{sup 2}), MD was 100% sensitive with a PPV of 65.90%. Comparing the diagnostic performance of the parameters in DTI with DWI, we obtained similar efficiency of ADC with b values of 0,1000 and 0,1500 s/mm{sup 2} and MD with a b value of 0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2} (AUC = 0.82 ± 0.07). Conclusion: ADC of DWI and MD of DTI values provide significant discriminative factors for benign and malignant breast lesions. FA measurement was not discriminative. Supported with clinical and dynamic contrast MRI findings, DWI and DTI findings provide significant

  20. Optimal Analysis Method for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Diffuse Optical Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ghijsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT is an optical imaging modality that has various clinical applications. However, the spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of DOT is poor due to strong photon scatting in biological tissue. Structural a priori information from another high spatial resolution imaging modality such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has been demonstrated to significantly improve DOT accuracy. In addition, a contrast agent can be used to obtain differential absorption images of the lesion by using dynamic contrast enhanced DOT (DCE-DOT. This produces a relative absorption map that consists of subtracting a reconstructed baseline image from reconstructed images in which optical contrast is included. In this study, we investigated and compared different reconstruction methods and analysis approaches for regular endogenous DOT and DCE-DOT with and without MR anatomical a priori information for arbitrarily-shaped objects. Our phantom and animal studies have shown that superior image quality and higher accuracy can be achieved using DCE-DOT together with MR structural a priori information. Hence, implementation of a combined MRI-DOT system to image ICG enhancement can potentially be a promising tool for breast cancer imaging.

  1. MR diffusion imaging of human intracranial tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K; Gideon, P; Wagn, P;

    1997-01-01

    We used MRI for in vivo measurement of brain water self-diffusion in patients with intracranial tumours. The study included 28 patients (12 with high-grade and 3 with low-grade gliomas, 7 with metastases, 5 with meningiomas and 1 with a cerebral abscess). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) wer...

  2. Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchin, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    Optical bioimaging methods have a wide range of applications in the life sciences, most notably including the molecular resolution study of subcellular structures, small animal molecular imaging, and structural and functional clinical diagnostics of tissue layers and organs. We review fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent macroscopy, optical coherence tomography, optoacoustic tomography, and optical diffuse spectroscopy and tomography from the standpoint of physical fundamentals, applications, and progress.

  3. Optically-induced-potential-based image encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Chu; Wang, He-Zhou

    2011-11-07

    We present a technique of nonlinear image encryption by use of virtual optics. The image to be encrypted is superposed on a random intensity image. And this superposed image propagates through a nonlinear medium and a 4-f system with single phase key. The image is encrypted to a stationary white noise. The decryption process is sensitive to the parameters of the encryption system and the phase key in 4-f system. This sensitivity makes attackers hard to access the phase key. In nonlinear medium, optically-induced potentials, which depend on intensity of optical wave, make the superposition principle frustrated. This nonlinearity based on optically induced potentials highly improves the secrecy level of image encryption. Resistance against attacks based on the phase retrieval technique proves that it has the high secrecy level. This nonlinear image encryption based on optically induced potentials is proposed and demonstrated for the first time.

  4. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Lyubimov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a 27% gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  5. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min ptissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  6. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  7. Development of time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Kenji; Ohmae, Etsuko; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Homma, Shu; Mimura, Tetsuya; Wada, Hiroko; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Yoshizawa, Nobuko; Nasu, Hatsuko; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Sakahara, Harumi; Yamashita, Yutaka; Ueda, Yukio

    2017-02-01

    We developed a time-resolved reflectance diffuse optical tomography (RDOT) system to measure tumor responses to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients at the bedside. This system irradiates the breast with a three-wavelength pulsed laser (760, 800, and 830 nm) through a source fiber specified by an optical switch. The light collected by detector fibers is guided to a detector unit consisting of variable attenuators and photomultiplier tubes. Thirteen irradiation and 12 detection points were set to a measurement area of 50 × 50 mm for a hand-held probe. The data acquisition time required to obtain the temporal profiles within the measurement area is about 2 minutes. The RDOT system generates topographic and tomographic images of tissue properties such as hemoglobin concentration and tissue oxygen saturation using two imaging methods. Topographic images are obtained from the optical properties determined for each source-detector pair using a curve-fitting method based on the photon diffusion theory, while tomographic images are reconstructed using an iterative image reconstruction method. In an experiment using a tissue-like solid phantom, a tumor-like cylindrical target (15 mm diameter, 15 mm high) embedded in a breast tissue-like background medium was successfully reconstructed. Preliminary clinical measurements indicated that the tumor in a breast cancer patient was detected as a region of high hemoglobin concentration. In addition, the total hemoglobin concentration decreased during chemotherapy. These results demonstrate the potential of RDOT for evaluating the effectiveness of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer.

  8. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    CERN Document Server

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast, perfusion weighted imaging uses tracers to exploit hemodynamic status, which enables researchers and clinicians to consider this imaging modality as an early biomarker of certain brain diseases. In this review, the fundamentals of physics for diffusion and perfusion MR imaging both of which are highly sensitive to microenvironmental alterations at the cellular level as well as their application in the treatment of aging, Alzheimer's disease, brain tumors and cerebral ischemic injury were discussed.

  9. Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Exploring the Motor Networks and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Soo; Lee, Seung Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    With the advances in diffusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been applied to a number of neurological conditions because DTI can demonstrate microstructures of the brain that are not assessable with conventional MR imaging. Tractography based on DTI offers gross visualization of the white matter fiber architecture in the human brain in vivo. Degradation of restrictive barriers and disruption of the cytoarchitecture result in changes in the diffusion of water molecules in various pathological conditions, and these conditions can also be assessed with DTI. Yet many factors may influence the ability to apply DTI clinically, so these techniques have to be used with a cautious hand.

  10. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  11. Diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes: signal models and experiment design

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) diffusion MRI can be advantageous over pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) for diffusion times that are long compared to $\\ttwo$. It is important therefore for biomedical diffusion imaging applications at 7T and above where $\\ttwo$ is short. However, imaging gradients in the STEAM sequence contribute much greater diffusion weighting than in PGSE, but are often ignored during post-processing. We demonstrate here that this can severely bias parameter estimates. Method: We present models for the STEAM signal for free and restricted diffusion that account for crusher and slice-select (butterfly) gradients to avoid such bias. The butterfly gradients also disrupt experiment design, typically by skewing gradient-vectors towards the slice direction. We propose a simple compensation to the diffusion gradient vector specified to the scanner that counterbalances the butterfly gradients to preserve the intended experiment design. Results: High-field data fixed monkey brain e...

  12. High angular resolution diffusion imaging with stimulated echoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B

    2014-01-01

    other than the diffusion gradients in the STEAM sequence contribute much greater diffusion weighting than in PGSE and lead to a disrupted experimental design. Here, we introduce a simple compensation to the STEAM acquisition that avoids the orientational bias and disrupted experiment design...... that these gradient pulses can otherwise produce. The compensation is simple to implement by adjusting the gradient vectors in the diffusion pulses of the STEAM sequence, so that the net effective gradient vector including contributions from diffusion and other gradient pulses is as the experiment intends. High...... angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data were acquired with and without the proposed compensation. The data were processed to derive standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) maps, which highlight the need for the compensation. Ignoring the other gradient pulses, a bias in DTI parameters from STEAM...

  13. Diffusion-weighted and diffusion-tensor imaging of normal and diseased uterus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duygu; Kara; Bozkurt; Murat; Bozkurt; Mehmet; Ali; Nazli; Ilhan; Nahit; Mutlu; Ozgur; Kilickesmez

    2015-01-01

    Owing to technical advances and improvement of the software, diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging(DWI and DTI) greatly improved the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the pelvic region. These imaging sequences can exhibit important tissue contrast on the basis of random diffusion(Brownian motion) of water molecules in tissues. Quantitative measurements can be done with DWI and DTI by apparent diffusion coefficient(ADC) and fractional anisotropy(FA) values respectively. ADC and FA values may be changed by various physiological and pathological conditions providing additional information to conventional MRI. The quantitative DWI assists significantly in the differentiation of benign and malignant lesions. It can demonstrate the microstructural architecture and celluler density of the normal and diseased uterine zones. On the other hand, DWI and DTI are useful for monitoring the treatment outcome of the uterine lesions. In this review, we discussed advantages of DWI and DTI of the normal and diseased uterus.

  14. NMR-Based Diffusion Lattice Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion experiments are widely employed as they yield information about structures hindering the diffusion process, e.g. about cell membranes. While it has been shown in recent articles, that these experiments can be used to determine the exact shape of closed pores averaged over a volume of interest, it is still an open question how much information can be gained in open systems. In this theoretical work, we show that the full structure information of periodic open systems is accessible. To this end, the so-called 'SEquential Rephasing by Pulsed field-gradient Encoding N Time-intervals' (SERPENT) sequence is used, which employs several diffusion weighting gradient pulses with different amplitudes. The structural information is obtained by an iterative technique relying on a Gaussian envelope model of the diffusion propagator. Two solid matrices that are surrounded by an NMR-visible medium are considered: a hexagonal lattice of cylinders and a cubic lattice of triangles.

  15. Simulation of a fast diffuse optical tomography system based on radiative transfer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Payani, A.

    2016-12-01

    Studies show that near-infrared (NIR) light (light with wavelength between 700nm and 1300nm) undergoes two interactions, absorption and scattering, when it penetrates a tissue. Since scattering is the predominant interaction, the calculation of light distribution in the tissue and the image reconstruction of absorption and scattering coefficients are very complicated. Some analytical and numerical methods, such as radiative transport equation and Monte Carlo method, have been used for the simulation of light penetration in tissue. Recently, some investigators in the world have tried to develop a diffuse optical tomography system. In these systems, NIR light penetrates the tissue and passes through the tissue. Then, light exiting the tissue is measured by NIR detectors placed around the tissue. These data are collected from all the detectors and transferred to the computational parts (including hardware and software), which make a cross-sectional image of the tissue after performing some computational processes. In this paper, the results of the simulation of an optical diffuse tomography system are presented. This simulation involves two stages: a) Simulation of the forward problem (or light penetration in the tissue), which is performed by solving the diffusion approximation equation in the stationary state using FEM. b) Simulation of the inverse problem (or image reconstruction), which is performed by the optimization algorithm called Broyden quasi-Newton. This method of image reconstruction is faster compared to the other Newton-based optimization algorithms, such as the Levenberg-Marquardt one.

  16. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irwan, R; Sijens, PE; Potze, JH; Oudkerk, M

    2005-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1-MRS) provides indices of neuronal damage. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) relates to water diffusivity and fiber tract orientation. A method to compare H-1-MRS and DTI findings was developed, tested on phantom and applied on normal brain. Point-resolved spe

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging predicts cognition in pediatric brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babikian, Talin; Tong, Karen A; Galloway, Nicholas R; Freier-Randall, Mary-Catherin; Obenaus, André; Ashwal, Stephen

    2009-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted imaging predict gross neurologic outcome in adults with traumatic brain injury. Few studies in children have been reported, and none have used apparent diffusion coefficient maps to predict long-term (>1 year) neurocognitive outcomes. In this study, pooled regional and total brain diffusion coefficients were used to predict long-term outcomes in 17 pediatric brain injury patients. Apparent diffusion coefficient values were grouped into peripheral and deep gray and white matter, posterior fossa, and total brain. Regions of interest excluded areas that appeared abnormal on T(2)-weighted images. Apparent diffusion coefficient values from peripheral regions were inversely correlated with cognitive functioning. No significant correlations were apparent between the cognitive scores and apparent diffusion coefficient values for deep tissue or the posterior fossa. Regression analyses suggested that combined peripheral gray and white matter apparent diffusion coefficients explained 42% of the variance in the combined neurocognitive index. Peripheral gray diffusion coefficients alone explained an additional 20% of variance after accounting for clinical variables. These results suggest that obtaining apparent diffusion coefficient values, specifically from peripheral brain regions, may predict long-term outcome after pediatric brain injury. Discrepancies in the literature on this topic, as well as possible explanations, including sampling and clinical considerations, are discussed.

  18. Intra-retinal layer segmentation of 3D optical coherence tomography using coarse grained diffusion map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafieh, Raheleh; Rabbani, Hossein; Abramoff, Michael D; Sonka, Milan

    2013-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful and noninvasive method for retinal imaging. In this paper, we introduce a fast segmentation method based on a new variant of spectral graph theory named diffusion maps. The research is performed on spectral domain (SD) OCT images depicting macular and optic nerve head appearance. The presented approach does not require edge-based image information in localizing most of boundaries and relies on regional image texture. Consequently, the proposed method demonstrates robustness in situations of low image contrast or poor layer-to-layer image gradients. Diffusion mapping applied to 2D and 3D OCT datasets is composed of two steps, one for partitioning the data into important and less important sections, and another one for localization of internal layers. In the first step, the pixels/voxels are grouped in rectangular/cubic sets to form a graph node. The weights of the graph are calculated based on geometric distances between pixels/voxels and differences of their mean intensity. The first diffusion map clusters the data into three parts, the second of which is the area of interest. The other two sections are eliminated from the remaining calculations. In the second step, the remaining area is subjected to another diffusion map assessment and the internal layers are localized based on their textural similarities. The proposed method was tested on 23 datasets from two patient groups (glaucoma and normals). The mean unsigned border positioning errors (mean ± SD) was 8.52 ± 3.13 and 7.56 ± 2.95 μm for the 2D and 3D methods, respectively.

  19. Fluid Registration of Diffusion Tensor Images Using Information Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Chang; Leow, Alex D.; Klunder, Andrea D.; Dutton, Rebecca A.; Barysheva, Marina; Rose, Stephen E.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    We apply an information-theoretic cost metric, the symmetrized Kullback-Leibler (sKL) divergence, or J-divergence, to fluid registration of diffusion tensor images. The difference between diffusion tensors is quantified based on the sKL-divergence of their associated probability density functions (PDFs). Three-dimensional DTI data from 34 subjects were fluidly registered to an optimized target image. To allow large image deformations but preserve image topology, we regularized the flow with a large-deformation diffeomorphic mapping based on the kinematics of a Navier-Stokes fluid. A driving force was developed to minimize the J-divergence between the deforming source and target diffusion functions, while reorienting the flowing tensors to preserve fiber topography. In initial experiments, we showed that the sKL-divergence based on full diffusion PDFs is adaptable to higher-order diffusion models, such as high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). The sKL-divergence was sensitive to subtle differences between two diffusivity profiles, showing promise for nonlinear registration applications and multisubject statistical analysis of HARDI data. PMID:18390342

  20. Imaging granulomatous lesions with optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2012-01-01

    To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors.......To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors....

  1. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Konecky, Soren D.; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M.; Saffer, Janet R.; FREIFELDER, RICHARD; Karp, Joel S.; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2008-01-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluor...

  2. Syphilitic myelitis with diffuse spinal cord abnormality on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, E.Y.K.; Lai, K.F.; Chan, J.H.M. [Department of Radiology, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun (Hong Kong); Ng, S.H.; Chow, L. [Department of Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun (Hong Kong); Fong, D. [Department of Neurosurgery, Tuen Mun Hospital, Tuen Mun (Hong Kong)

    2002-12-01

    Syphilitic myelitis is a very rare manifestation of neurosyphilis. The MRI appearance of syphilitic myelitis is not well documented and only a few cases have been reported. We present a 52-year-old woman with acute onset of paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed diffuse high signal intensity in the whole spinal cord on T2-weighted images. Focal enhancement was observed in the dorsal aspect of the thoracic cord on T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced images. To our knowledge, diffuse spinal cord abnormality in syphilitic myelitis has not been reported in the international literature. Disappearance of the diffuse high-signal lesions with residual focal enhancement was noted after antibiotic therapy. The patient suffered significant neurological deficit despite improvement in the MR images. In this article we present the imaging findings and review the literature of this rare condition. (orig.)

  3. Reduction of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Contrast of Acute Ischemic Stroke at Short Diffusion Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Corey Allan; Kate, Mahesh; Gioia, Laura; Butcher, Kenneth; Emery, Derek; Budde, Matthew; Beaulieu, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of tissue water is a sensitive and specific indicator of acute brain ischemia, where reductions of the diffusion of tissue water are observed acutely in the stroke lesion core. Although these diffusion changes have been long attributed to cell swelling, the precise nature of the biophysical mechanisms remains uncertain. The potential cause of diffusion reductions after stroke was investigated using an advanced DWI technique, oscillating gradient spin-echo DWI, that enables much shorter diffusion times and can improve specificity for alterations of structure at the micron level. Diffusion measurements in the white matter lesions of patients with acute ischemic stroke were reduced by only 8% using oscillating gradient spin-echo DWI, in contrast to a 37% decrease using standard DWI. Neurite beading has recently been proposed as a mechanism for the diffusion changes after ischemic stroke with some ex vivo evidence. To explore whether beading could cause such differential results, simulations of beaded cylinders and axonal swelling were performed, yielding good agreement with experiment. Short diffusion times result in dramatically reduced diffusion contrast of human stroke. Simulations implicate a combination of neuronal beading and axonal swelling as the key structural changes leading to the reduced apparent diffusion coefficient after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance imaging for subsurface pattern visualization toward development of a lensless imaging platform: phantom experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkanova, Irina; Pandya, Aditya; Saiko, Guennadi; Nacy, Lidia; Babar, Hannan; Shah, Duoaud; Lilge, Lothar; Douplik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A portable, spatially resolved, diffuse reflectance lensless imaging technique based on the charge-coupled device or complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor directly coupled to the fiber optic bundle is proposed for visualization of subsurface structures such as superficial microvasculature in the epithelium. We discuss an experimental method for emulating a lensless imaging setup via raster scanning a single fiber-optic cable over a microfluidic phantom containing periodic hemoglobin absorption contrast. To evaluate the ability of the technique to recover information about the subsurface linear structures, scattering layers formed of the Sylgard® 184 Silicone Elastomer and titanium dioxide were placed atop the microfluidic phantom. Thickness of the layers ranged from 0.2 to 0.7 mm, and the values of the reduced scattering coefficient (μs‧) were between 0.85 and 4.25 mm-1. The results demonstrate that fiber-optic, lensless platform can be used for two-dimensional imaging of absorbing inclusions in diffuse reflectance mode. In these experiments, it was shown that diffuse reflectance imaging can provide sufficient spatial sampling of the phantom for differentiation of 30 μm structural features of the embedded absorbing pattern inside the scattering media.

  5. Fast imaging of mean, axial and radial diffusion kurtosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian; Shemesh, Noam; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is being increasingly reported to provide sensitive biomarkers of subtle changes in tissue microstructure. However, DKI also imposes larger data requirements than diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), hence, the widespread adaptation and exploration of DKI would...... for the first time, and referred to as axially symmetric DKI. The second approach is applicable in tissues with a priori known principal diffusion direction, and does not require fitting of any kind. The approaches are evaluated in human brain in vivo as well as in fixed rat spinal cord, and are demonstrated...... benefit from more efficient acquisition and computational methods. To meet this demand, we recently developed a method capable of estimating mean kurtosis with only 13 diffusion weighted images. This approach was later shown to provide very accurate mean kurtosis estimates and to be more efficient...

  6. Modified anisotropic diffusion for image smoothing and enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2001-05-01

    This paper discusses an improved nonlinear filtering approach based on anisotropic diffusion technique. This modified anisotropic diffusion method smooths along curve directions, i.e. the directions of level sets. The upwind scheme for level set is used to solve the diffusion equation. Compared with the conventional anisotropic diffusion, which depends only on the local gradient of intensities of the processed image, this modified scheme overcomes the defect of indefinite edge enhancement associated with Perona-Malik model while depressing noises in a better performance. Moreover, a multi-scale diffusion technique is applied to limit blurring by the presence of edges as measured at the scale of interest, so that accurate information about boundaries of objects could be preserved and small details that fall below the scale of interest be removed. Then an extension into vector-valued diffusion is also presented in this paper, which is capable of smoothing small objects while maintaining boundaries information in vector-valued images. Experiments on gray-scale and color images demonstrate the efficacy of this method in image smoothing as well as image enhancement.

  7. Using quantum filters to process images of diffuse axonal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda Osorio, Mateo

    2014-06-01

    Some images corresponding to a diffuse axonal injury (DAI) are processed using several quantum filters such as Hermite Weibull and Morse. Diffuse axonal injury is a particular, common and severe case of traumatic brain injury (TBI). DAI involves global damage on microscopic scale of brain tissue and causes serious neurologic abnormalities. New imaging techniques provide excellent images showing cellular damages related to DAI. Said images can be processed with quantum filters, which accomplish high resolutions of dendritic and axonal structures both in normal and pathological state. Using the Laplacian operators from the new quantum filters, excellent edge detectors for neurofiber resolution are obtained. Image quantum processing of DAI images is made using computer algebra, specifically Maple. Quantum filter plugins construction is proposed as a future research line, which can incorporated to the ImageJ software package, making its use simpler for medical personnel.

  8. Driving micro-optical imaging systems towards miniature camera applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Andreas; Duparré, Jacques; Dannberg, Peter; Leitel, Robert; Bräuer, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Up to now, multi channel imaging systems have been increasingly studied and approached from various directions in the academic domain due to their promising large field of view at small system thickness. However, specific drawbacks of each of the solutions prevented the diffusion into corresponding markets so far. Most severe problems are a low image resolution and a low sensitivity compared to a conventional single aperture lens besides the lack of a cost-efficient method of fabrication and assembly. We propose a microoptical approach to ultra-compact optics for real-time vision systems that are inspired by the compound eyes of insects. The demonstrated modules achieve a VGA resolution with 700x550 pixels within an optical package of 6.8mm x 5.2mm and a total track length of 1.4mm. The partial images that are separately recorded within different optical channels are stitched together to form a final image of the whole field of view by means of image processing. These software tools allow to correct the distortion of the individual partial images so that the final image is also free of distortion. The so-called electronic cluster eyes are realized by state-of-the-art microoptical fabrication techniques and offer a resolution and sensitivity potential that makes them suitable for consumer, machine vision and medical imaging applications.

  9. Contrast improvement of continuous wave diffuse optical tomography reconstruction by hybrid approach using least square and genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K

    2015-07-01

    Reconstruction of the absorption coefficient of tissue with good contrast is of key importance in functional diffuse optical imaging. A hybrid approach using model-based iterative image reconstruction and a genetic algorithm is proposed to enhance the contrast of the reconstructed image. The proposed method yields an observed contrast of 98.4%, mean square error of 0.638×10⁻³, and object centroid error of (0.001 to 0.22) mm. Experimental validation of the proposed method has also been provided with tissue-like phantoms which shows a significant improvement in image quality and thus establishes the potential of the method for functional diffuse optical tomography reconstruction with continuous wave setup. A case study of finger joint imaging is illustrated as well to show the prospect of the proposed method in clinical diagnosis. The method can also be applied to the concentration measurement of a region of interest in a turbid medium.

  10. Suppressing Spectral Diffusion of the Emitted Photons with Optical Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Fotso, H F; Awschalom, D D; Dobrovitski, V V

    2016-01-01

    In many quantum architectures the solid-state qubits, such as quantum dots or color centers, are interfaced via emitted photons. However, the frequency of photons emitted by solid-state systems exhibits slow uncontrollable fluctuations over time (spectral diffusion), creating a serious problem for implementation of the photon-mediated protocols. Here we show that a sequence of optical pulses applied to the solid-state emitter can stabilize the emission line at the desired frequency. We demonstrate efficiency, robustness, and feasibility of the method analytically and numerically. Taking nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond as an example, we show that only several pulses, with the width of 1 ns, separated by few ns (which is not difficult to achieve) can suppress spectral diffusion. Our method provides a simple and robust way to greatly improve the efficiency of photon-mediated entanglement and/or coupling to photonic cavities for solid-state qubits.

  11. Pre-seizure state identified by diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Junli; Jiang, Ruixin; Yang, Hao; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Here we demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking such brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns, along with intracranial electroencephalogram gamma power changes, several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a ``pre-seizure'' state. We also observed the decoupling between local hemodynamic and neural activities. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging for brain malformations: does it help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Poretti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    In this article, the basics of diffusion-weighted imaging/diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are discussed, including a short historical perspective on the fiber dissection technique, followed by a review of selected brain malformations in which DTI and tractography have contributed to a better understanding of the malformations, and by a clinical case in which DTI showed a disorder of the internal neuroarchitecture that could not be correctly appreciated by conventional anatomic magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Image encryption using a synchronous permutation-diffusion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enayatifar, Rasul; Abdullah, Abdul Hanan; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi; Altameem, Ayman; Lee, Malrey

    2017-03-01

    In the past decade, the interest on digital images security has been increased among scientists. A synchronous permutation and diffusion technique is designed in order to protect gray-level image content while sending it through internet. To implement the proposed method, two-dimensional plain-image is converted to one dimension. Afterward, in order to reduce the sending process time, permutation and diffusion steps for any pixel are performed in the same time. The permutation step uses chaotic map and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to permute a pixel, while diffusion employs DNA sequence and DNA operator to encrypt the pixel. Experimental results and extensive security analyses have been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of this proposed image encryption method.

  14. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncton, David E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Khaykovich, Boris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-03-30

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Neurologia e Neuroradiologia, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Wetzel, Stephan [Swiss Neuro Institute (SNI), Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Hirslanden Klinik Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Santini, Francesco [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  16. Algorithm for localized adaptive diffuse optical tomography and its application in bioluminescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Mohamed A.; Patterson, Michael S.; Wong, John W.

    2014-04-01

    A reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography based on diffusion theory and finite element method is described. The algorithm reconstructs the optical properties in a permissible domain or region-of-interest to reduce the number of unknowns. The algorithm can be used to reconstruct optical properties for a segmented object (where a CT-scan or MRI is available) or a non-segmented object. For the latter, an adaptive segmentation algorithm merges contiguous regions with similar optical properties thereby reducing the number of unknowns. In calculating the Jacobian matrix the algorithm uses an efficient direct method so the required time is comparable to that needed for a single forward calculation. The reconstructed optical properties using segmented, non-segmented, and adaptively segmented 3D mouse anatomy (MOBY) are used to perform bioluminescence tomography (BLT) for two simulated internal sources. The BLT results suggest that the accuracy of reconstruction of total source power obtained without the segmentation provided by an auxiliary imaging method such as x-ray CT is comparable to that obtained when using perfect segmentation.

  17. Improving breast cancer diagnosis by reducing chest wall effect in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feifei; Mostafa, Atahar; Zhu, Quing

    2017-03-01

    We have developed the ultrasound (US)-guided diffuse optical tomography technique to assist US diagnosis of breast cancer and to predict neoadjuvant chemotherapy response of patients with breast cancer. The technique was implemented using a hand-held hybrid probe consisting of a coregistered US transducer and optical source and detector fibers which couple the light illumination from laser diodes and photon detection to the photomultiplier tube detectors. With the US guidance, diffused light measurements were made at the breast lesion site and the normal contralateral reference site which was used to estimate the background tissue optical properties for imaging reconstruction. However, background optical properties were affected by the chest wall underneath the breast tissue. We have analyzed data from 297 female patients, and results have shown statistically significant correlation between the fitted optical properties (μa and μs‧) and the chest wall depth. After subtracting the background μa at each wavelength, the difference of computed total hemoglobin (tHb) between malignant and benign lesion groups has improved. For early stage malignant lesions, the area-under-the-receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) has improved from 88.5% to 91.5%. For all malignant lesions, the AUC has improved from 85.3% to 88.1%. Statistical test has revealed the significant difference of the AUC improvements after subtracting background tHb values.

  18. New frontiers in time-domain diffuse optics, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Antonio; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in time-domain diffuse optics that rely on physical concepts (e.g., time-gating and null distance) and advanced photonic components (e.g., vertical cavity source-emitting laser as light sources, single photon avalanche diode, and silicon photomultipliers as detectors, fast-gating circuits, and time-to-digital converters for acquisition) are focused. This study shows how these tools could lead on one hand to compact and wearable time-domain devices for point-of-care diagnostics down to the consumer level and on the other hand to powerful systems with exceptional depth penetration and sensitivity.

  19. Diffuse optical tomography based on time-resolved compressive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, A.; Betcke, M.; Di Sieno, L.; Bassi, A.; Ducros, N.; Pifferi, A.; Valentini, G.; Arridge, S.; D'Andrea, C.

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) can be described as a highly multidimensional problem generating a huge data set with long acquisition/computational times. Biological tissue behaves as a low pass filter in the spatial frequency domain, hence compressive sensing approaches, based on both patterned illumination and detection, are useful to reduce the data set while preserving the information content. In this work, a multiple-view time-domain compressed sensing DOT system is presented and experimentally validated on non-planar tissue-mimicking phantoms containing absorbing inclusions.

  20. NAOMI: nanoparticle-assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2007-02-01

    We present our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using biodegradable nanoparticles. Our focus is on using optical coherence tomography(OCT) as the imaging modality. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with carefully selected dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. Moreover, we perform a qualitative pilot study using these biodegradable nanoparticles, measuring their optical properties which are found to be in line with theoretical predictions.

  1. Diffusion weighted imaging in cystic fibrosis disease: beyond morphological imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands); Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Andrinopoulou, Eleni Rosalina [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Colagrande, Stefano [University of Florence - Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Radiodiagnostic Unit n. 2, Florence (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To explore the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess inflammatory lung changes in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) CF patients referred for their annual check-up had spirometry, chest-CT and MRI on the same day. MRI was performed in a 1.5 T scanner with BLADE and EPI-DWI sequences (b = 0-600 s/mm{sup 2}). End-inspiratory and end-expiratory scans were acquired in multi-row scanners. DWI was scored with an established semi-quantitative scoring system. DWI score was correlated to CT sub-scores for bronchiectasis (CF-CT{sub BE}), mucus (CF-CT{sub mucus}), total score (CF-CT{sub total-score}), FEV{sub 1}, and BMI. T-test was used to assess differences between patients with and without DWI-hotspots. Thirty-three CF patients were enrolled (mean 21 years, range 6-51, 19 female). 4 % (SD 2.6, range 1.5-12.9) of total CF-CT alterations presented DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots coincided with mucus plugging (60 %), consolidation (30 %) and bronchiectasis (10 %). DWI{sub total-score} correlated (all p < 0.0001) positively to CF-CT{sub BE} (r = 0.757), CF-CT{sub mucus} (r = 0.759) and CF-CT{sub total-score} (r = 0.79); and negatively to FEV{sub 1} (r = 0.688). FEV{sub 1} was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients without DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots strongly correlated with radiological and clinical parameters of lung disease severity. Future validation studies are needed to establish the exact nature of DWI-hotspots in CF patients. (orig.)

  2. Radio-Optical Imaging of ATLBS Survey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kshitij Thorat

    2011-12-01

    We present the radio-optical imaging of ATLBS, a sensitive radio survey (Subrahmanyan et al. 2010). The primary aim of the ATLBS survey is to image low-power radio sources which form the bulk of the radio source population to moderately high red-shifts ( ∼ 1.0). The accompanying multiband optical and near infra-red observations provide information about the hosts and environments of the radio sources. We give here details of the imaging of the radio data and optical data for the ATLBS survey.

  3. Recipes to make organic phantoms for diffusive optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Taroni, Paola

    2013-04-10

    Three recipes are presented to make tissue constituent-equivalent phantoms of water and lipids. Different approaches to prepare the emulsion are proposed. Nature phantoms are made using no emulsifying agent, but just a professional disperser; instead Agar and Triton phantoms are made using agar or Triton X-100, respectively, as agents to emulsify water and lipids. Different water-to-lipid ratios ranging from 30% to 70% by mass were tested. A broadband time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy system was used to characterize the phantoms in terms of optical properties and composition. For some water/lipid ratios the emulsion fails or the phantom has limited lifetime, but in most cases the recipes provide phantoms with a high degree of homogeneity [coefficient of variation (CV) of 4.6% and 1.5% for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively] and good reproducibility (CV of 8.3% and 12.4% for absorption and reduced scattering coefficient, respectively).

  4. Anthropomorphic image reconstruction via hypoelliptic diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Boscain, Ugo; Gauthier, Jean-Paul; Rossi, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a model of geometry of vision which generalizes one due to Petitot, Citti and Sarti. One of its main features is that the primary visual cortex V1 lifts the image from $R^2$ to the bundle of directions of the plane $PTR^2=R^2\\times P^1$. Neurons are grouped into orientation columns, each of them corresponding to a point of the bundle $PTR^2$. In this model a corrupted image is reconstructed by minimizing the energy necessary for the activation of the orientation columns corresponding to regions in which the image is corrupted. The minimization process gives rise to an hypoelliptic heat equation on $PTR^2$. The hypoelliptic heat equation is studied using the generalized Fourier transform. It transforms the hypoelliptic equation into a 1-d heat equation with Mathieu potential, which one can solve numerically. Preliminary examples of image reconstruction are hereby provided.

  5. New approach to optical imaging of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2001-07-01

    Site specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as phototherapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carriers such as antibiodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in long blood clearance times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmacokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near infrared absorbing dye to several bioactive peptides that specifically target overexpressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit from this approach.

  6. Approximate Marginalization of Absorption and Scattering in Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mozumder, Meghdoot; Arridge, Simon; Kaipio, Jari P; d'Andrea, Cosimo; Kolehmainen, Ville

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT), the reconstruction of the fluorophore concentration inside the target body is usually carried out using a normalized Born approximation model where the measured fluorescent emission data is scaled by measured excitation data. One of the benefits of the model is that it can tolerate inaccuracy in the absorption and scattering distributions that are used in the construction of the forward model to some extent. In this paper, we employ the recently proposed Bayesian approximation error approach to fDOT for compensating for the modeling errors caused by the inaccurately known optical properties of the target in combination with the normalized Born approximation model. The approach is evaluated using a simulated test case with different amount of error in the optical properties. The results show that the Bayesian approximation error approach improves the tolerance of fDOT imaging against modeling errors caused by inaccurately known absorption and scattering of the...

  7. A partial reconstruction scheme for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography with reflection geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K

    2015-01-01

    Image quality and photon measurement with good SNR (signal to noise ratio) in continuous wave diffuse optical tomography depend on the source detector density and sensitivity of photo detector. For large volume objects, it is difficult to obtain detectable light intensity with good SNR over the whole boundary. As an alternative, instead of the full boundary, the measurements are taken over a semi circle as in reflection geometry and a partial reconstruction scheme for the same is proposed in this paper. The cross-sectional optical parameters are reconstructed for different half of the sample with modified boundary conditions and finally the average of all the reconstructions are considered as the final reconstructed image. Simulation and experimental results have been illustrated to validate the proposed method. The main advantage of this scheme is to improve signal to noise ratio which controls the quality of reconstruction in actual phantoms. The use of continuous wave measurement makes the system cost effective as well.

  8. Comparative analysis of isotropic diffusion weighted imaging sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellmer, Sebastian; Stirnberg, Rüdiger; Edelhoff, Daniel; Suter, Dieter; Stöcker, Tony; Maximov, Ivan I.

    2017-02-01

    Visualisation of living tissue structure and function is a challenging problem of modern imaging techniques. Diffusion MRI allows one to probe in vivo structures on a micrometer scale. However, conventional diffusion measurements are time-consuming procedures, because they require several measurements with different gradient directions. Considerable time savings are therefore possible by measurement schemes that generate an isotropic diffusion weighting in a single shot. Multiple approaches for generating isotropic diffusion weighting are known and have become very popular as useful tools in clinical research. Thus, there is a strong need for a comprehensive comparison of different isotropic weighting approaches. In the present work we introduce two new sequences based on simple (co)sine modulations and compare their performance to established q-space magic-angle spinning sequences and conventional DTI, using a diffusion phantom assembled from microcapillaries and in vivo experiments at 7 T. The advantages and disadvantages of all compared schemes are demonstrated and discussed.

  9. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in MELAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Watanabe, C.; Katayama, S.; Yamaguchi, S. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Kajima, T.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S.

    2000-09-01

    Clinical features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) resemble those of cerebral infarcts, but the pathogenesis of infarct-like lesions is not fully understood. To characterise these infarct-like lesions, we studied two patients with MELAS using diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI before and after stroke-like episodes and measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the new infarct-like lesions. These gave high signal on DWI and had much higher ADC than normal-appearing regions. The ADC remained high even 30 days after a stroke-like episode then decreased in lesions, with or without abnormality as shown by conventional MRI. We speculate that early elevation of ADC in the acute or subacute phase reflects vasogenic rather than cytotoxic edema. The ADC of the lesions, which disappeared almost completely with clinical improvement, returned to normal levels, which may reflect tissue recovery without severe damage. To our knowledge, this is the first study of DWI in MELAS. (orig.)

  10. Comparing analytical and Monte Carlo optical diffusion models in phosphor-based X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyvas, N.; Liaparinos, P.

    2014-03-01

    Luminescent materials are employed as radiation to light converters in detectors of medical imaging systems, often referred to as phosphor screens. Several processes affect the light transfer properties of phosphors. Amongst the most important is the interaction of light. Light attenuation (absorption and scattering) can be described either through "diffusion" theory in theoretical models or "quantum" theory in Monte Carlo methods. Although analytical methods, based on photon diffusion equations, have been preferentially employed to investigate optical diffusion in the past, Monte Carlo simulation models can overcome several of the analytical modelling assumptions. The present study aimed to compare both methodologies and investigate the dependence of the analytical model optical parameters as a function of particle size. It was found that the optical photon attenuation coefficients calculated by analytical modeling are decreased with respect to the particle size (in the region 1- 12 μm). In addition, for particles sizes smaller than 6μm there is no simultaneous agreement between the theoretical modulation transfer function and light escape values with respect to the Monte Carlo data.

  11. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for retina imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guohua Shi; Yun Dai; Ling Wang; Zhihua Ding; Xuejun Rao; Yudong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    When optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for human retina imaging, its transverse resolution is limited by the aberrations of human eyes. To overcome this disadvantage, a high resolution imaging system for living human retina, which consists of a time domain OCT system and a 37-elements adaptive optics (AO) system, has been developed. The AO closed loop rate is 20 frames per second, and the OCT has a 6.7-μm axial resolution. In this paper, this system is introduced and the high resolution imaging results for retina are presented.

  12. Space-based optical image encryption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2010-12-20

    In this paper, we propose a new method based on a three-dimensional (3D) space-based strategy for the optical image encryption. The two-dimensional (2D) processing of a plaintext in the conventional optical encryption methods is extended to a 3D space-based processing. Each pixel of the plaintext is considered as one particle in the proposed space-based optical image encryption, and the diffraction of all particles forms an object wave in the phase-shifting digital holography. The effectiveness and advantages of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical results. The proposed method can provide a new optical encryption strategy instead of the conventional 2D processing, and may open up a new research perspective for the optical image encryption.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  14. Langevin equation approach to diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jennie M; Kalmykov, Yuri P; Coffey, William T; Kerskens, Christian M

    2009-12-01

    The normal phase diffusion problem in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is treated by means of the Langevin equation for the phase variable using only the properties of the characteristic function of Gaussian random variables. The calculation may be simply extended to anomalous diffusion using a fractional generalization of the Langevin equation proposed by Lutz [E. Lutz, Phys. Rev. E 64, 051106 (2001)] pertaining to the fractional Brownian motion of a free particle coupled to a fractal heat bath. The results compare favorably with diffusion-weighted experiments acquired in human neuronal tissue using a 3 T MRI scanner.

  15. ORTHOGONAL-DIRECTIONAL FORWARD DIFFUSION IMAGE INPAINTING AND DENOISING MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Jiying; Ruan Qiuqi; An Gaoyun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,an orthogonal-directional forward diffusion Partial Differential Equation (PDE) image inpainting and denoising model which processes image based on variation problem is proposed. The novel model restores the damaged information and smoothes the noise in image si-multaneously. The model is morphological invariant which processes image based on the geometrical property. The regularization item of it diffuses along and cross the isophote,and then the known image information is transported into the target region through two orthogonal directions. The cross isophote diffusion part is the TV (Total Variation) equation and the along isophote diffusion part is the inviscid Helmholtz vorticity equation. The equivalence between the Helmholtz equation and the inpainting PDEs is proved. The model with the fidelity item which is used in the whole image domain denoises while preserving edges. So the novel model could inpaint and denoise simultaneously. Both theoretical analysis and experiments have verified the validity of the novel model proposed in this paper.

  16. Decoding diffusivity in multiple sclerosis: analysis of optic radiation lesional and non-lesional white matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Klistorner

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has been suggested as a new promising tool in MS that may provide greater pathological specificity than conventional MRI, helping, therefore, to elucidate disease pathogenesis and monitor therapeutic efficacy. However, the pathological substrates that underpin alterations in brain tissue diffusivity are not yet fully delineated. Tract-specific DTI analysis has previously been proposed in an attempt to alleviate this problem. Here, we extended this approach by segmenting a single tract into areas bound by seemingly similar pathological processes, which may better delineate the potential association between DTI metrics and underlying tissue damage.Several compartments were segmented in optic radiation (OR of 50 relapsing-remitting MS patients including T2 lesions, proximal and distal parts of fibers transected by lesion and fibers with no discernable pathology throughout the entire length of the OR.Asymmetry analysis between lesional and non-lesional fibers demonstrated a marked increase in Radial Diffusivity (RD, which was topographically limited to focal T2 lesions and potentially relates to the lesional myelin loss. A relative elevation of Axial Diffusivity (AD in the distal part of the lesional fibers was observed in a distribution consistent with Wallerian degeneration, while diffusivity in the proximal portion of transected axons remained normal. A moderate, but significant elevation of RD in OR non-lesional fibers was strongly associated with the global (but not local T2 lesion burden and is probably related to microscopic demyelination undetected by conventional MRI.This study highlights the utility of the compartmentalization approach in elucidating the pathological substrates of diffusivity and demonstrates the presence of tissue-specific patterns of altered diffusivity in MS, providing further evidence that DTI is a sensitive marker of tissue damage in both lesions and NAWM. Our results suggest that, at

  17. Decoding diffusivity in multiple sclerosis: analysis of optic radiation lesional and non-lesional white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klistorner, Alexander; Vootakuru, Nikitha; Wang, Chenyu; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart L; Parratt, John; Garrick, Raymond; Levin, Netta; Masters, Lynette; Lagopoulos, Jim; Barnett, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been suggested as a new promising tool in MS that may provide greater pathological specificity than conventional MRI, helping, therefore, to elucidate disease pathogenesis and monitor therapeutic efficacy. However, the pathological substrates that underpin alterations in brain tissue diffusivity are not yet fully delineated. Tract-specific DTI analysis has previously been proposed in an attempt to alleviate this problem. Here, we extended this approach by segmenting a single tract into areas bound by seemingly similar pathological processes, which may better delineate the potential association between DTI metrics and underlying tissue damage. Several compartments were segmented in optic radiation (OR) of 50 relapsing-remitting MS patients including T2 lesions, proximal and distal parts of fibers transected by lesion and fibers with no discernable pathology throughout the entire length of the OR. Asymmetry analysis between lesional and non-lesional fibers demonstrated a marked increase in Radial Diffusivity (RD), which was topographically limited to focal T2 lesions and potentially relates to the lesional myelin loss. A relative elevation of Axial Diffusivity (AD) in the distal part of the lesional fibers was observed in a distribution consistent with Wallerian degeneration, while diffusivity in the proximal portion of transected axons remained normal. A moderate, but significant elevation of RD in OR non-lesional fibers was strongly associated with the global (but not local) T2 lesion burden and is probably related to microscopic demyelination undetected by conventional MRI. This study highlights the utility of the compartmentalization approach in elucidating the pathological substrates of diffusivity and demonstrates the presence of tissue-specific patterns of altered diffusivity in MS, providing further evidence that DTI is a sensitive marker of tissue damage in both lesions and NAWM. Our results suggest that, at least within

  18. Diffusion Pore Imaging by Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Windschuh, Johannes; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements are widely used to derive parameters indirectly related to the microstructure of biological tissues and porous media. However, a direct imaging of cell or pore shapes and sizes would be of high interest. For a long time, determining pore shapes by NMR diffusion acquisitions seemed impossible, because the necessary phase information could not be preserved. Here we demonstrate experimentally using the measurement technique which we have recently proposed theoretically that the shape of arbitrary closed pores can be imaged by diffusion acquisitions, which yield the phase information. For this purpose, we use hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined geometries. The signal can be collected from the whole sample which mainly eliminates the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution of conventional NMR imaging. This could be used to non-invasively gain structural information inaccessible so far such as pore or cell shapes, cell density or axon integri...

  19. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battu, Rajani; Dabir, Supriya; Khanna, Anjani; Kumar, Anupama Kiran; Roy, Abhijit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  20. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Battu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging of the human calf: Variation of inter- and intramuscle-specific diffusion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaffke, Lara; Rehmann, Robert; Froeling, Martijn; Kley, Rudolf; Tegenthoff, Martin; Vorgerd, Matthias; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2017-10-01

    To investigate to what extent inter- and intramuscular variations of diffusion parameters of human calf muscles can be explained by age, gender, muscle location, and body mass index (BMI) in a specific age group (20-35 years). Whole calf muscles of 18 healthy volunteers were evaluated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a 3T scanner and a 16-channel Torso XL coil. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired to perform fiber tractography and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis for each muscle of both legs. Fiber tractography was used to separate seven lower leg muscles. Associations between DTI parameters and confounds were evaluated. All muscles were additionally separated in seven identical segments along the z-axis to evaluate intramuscular differences in diffusion parameters. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were obtained for each muscle with low standard deviations (SDs) (SDFA : 0.01-0.02; SDMD : 0.07-0.14(10(-3) )). We found significant differences in FA values of the tibialis anterior muscle (AT) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles between men and women for whole muscle FA (two-sample t-tests; AT: P = 0.0014; EDL: P = 0.0004). We showed significant intramuscular differences in diffusion parameters between adjacent segments in most calf muscles (P muscle insertions showed higher (SD 0.03-0.06) than muscle bellies (SD 0.01-0.03), no relationships between FA or MD with age or BMI were found. Inter- and intramuscular variations in diffusion parameters of the calf were shown, which are not related to age or BMI in this age group. Differences between muscle belly and insertion should be considered when interpreting datasets not including whole muscles. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1137-1148. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and noninterferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-11-01

    Information security has attracted much current attention due to the rapid development of modern technologies, such as computer and internet. We propose a novel method for optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and rotatable-phase-mask noninterferometric imaging. An optical image encryption scheme is developed in the gyrator transform domain, and one phase-only mask (i.e., phase grating) is rotated and updated during image encryption. For the decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract high-quality plaintexts. Conventional encoding methods (such as digital holography) have been proven vulnerably to the attacks, and the proposed optical encoding scheme can effectively eliminate security deficiency and significantly enhance cryptosystem security. The proposed strategy based on the rotatable phase-only mask can provide a new alternative for data/image encryption in the noninterferometric imaging.

  3. Clinical applications of diffusion imaging in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Lawrence N

    2013-05-01

    As in the brain, the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to ischemic damage in the spinal cord may provide early identification of infarction. Diffusion anisotropy may enhance the detection and understanding of damage to the long fiber tracts with clinical implications for diseases such as multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and may also yield insight into damage that occurs with spondylotic and traumatic myelopathy. This article reviews the basis for DWI for the evaluation of the spinal cord, osseous, and soft tissues of the spine and reviews the imaging appearance of a variety of disease states.

  4. Diffusion MR Imaging of the Brain in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matthew Debnam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been significant advancement in the molecular characterization of intracranial diseases, particularly cerebral neoplasms. While nuclear medicine technology, including PET/CT, has been at the foreground of exploration, new MR imaging techniques, specifically diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, have shown interesting applications towards advancing our understanding of cancer involving the brain. In this paper, we review the fundamentals and basic physics of these techniques, and their applications to patient care for both general diagnostic use and in answering specific questions in selection of patients in terms of expected response to treatment.

  5. Rotational Diffusion of Plasmon-Resonant Gold Nanorods for Depth-Resolved Microrheology Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Amy; Chhetri, Raghav; Kozek, Krystian; Johnston-Peck, Aaron; Tracy, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    The ability to perform microrheology in optically thick samples would enable analysis of bulk tissues. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides imaging several mean free scattering path lengths into tissue. In this study we report the use of plasmon-resonant gold nanorods as microrheological sensors in OCT. Nanorods exhibit a longitudinal mode that is excited when they are oriented parallel to the polarization of the incident light, which is favorable for passive microrheology using polarized light to monitor their rotational diffusion. We demonstrate measurements of the rotational diffusion of unconfined, colloidal gold nanorods using polarization-sensitive OCT, and validate the Stokes-Einstein relationship for the nanorods in simple fluids of varying viscosity. We then show that OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of fluid viscosity through measurements of the rotational diffusion rate of the nanorods. We acknowledge support from the Carolina Cancer Center for Nanotechnology Excellence (C-CCNE NIH (NCI) #U54CA119343).

  6. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrymgeour, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boye, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Adelsberger, Kathleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  7. Lateral diffusion of the topological charge density in stochastic optical fields

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available is described by a diffusion process that has a diffusion parameter which depends on the propagation distance. Keywords: optical vortex, singular optics, stochastic optical field, topological charge density, diffusion equation 1. Introduction The spatial... [1, 2], which measures the continuous phase distortions and then removes them with a continuous deformable mirror. The problem with this approach comes in with strong scintillation, when the phase distortions are severe enough to give rise...

  8. Spatially varying regularization based on retrieved support in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Sohail; Cho, Sanghoon; Cho, Seunryong

    2017-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a promising noninvasive imaging modality capable of providing the functional characteristics (oxygen saturation and hemodynamic states) of thick biological tissue by quantifying the optical parameters. The parameter recovery problem in DOT is a nonlinear, ill-posed and ill conditioned inverse problem. The non-linear iterative methods are usually employed for image reconstruction in DOT by utilizing Tikhonov based regularization approach. These methods employ l2-norm based regularization where the constant regularization parameter is determined either empirically or generalized cross validation methods or L curve method. The reconstructed images look smoother or noisy depending on the chosen value of the regularization constant. Moreover the edges information of the inclusions appeared to be blurred in such constant regularization methods. In this study we proposed a method to retrieve and utilized a non-zero support (possible tumor location) to generate a spatially varying regularization map. The inclusions locations were determined by considering the imaging problem as a multiple measurements vector (MMV) problem. Based on the recovered inclusion positions spatially regularization map was generated to be used in non-linear image reconstruction framework. The results retrieved with such spatially varying priors shows slightly improved image reconstruction in terms of better contrast recovery, reduction in background noise and preservation of edge information of inclusions compared with the constant regularization approach.

  9. Changes of radial diffusivity and fractional anisotropy in the optic nerve and optic radiation of glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhorn, Tobias; Michelson, Georg; Waerntges, Simone; Otto, Marlen; El-Rafei, Ahmed; Struffert, Tobias; Doerfler, Arnd

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to evaluate with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) changes of radial diffusivity (RD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the optic nerve (ON) and optic radiation (OR) in glaucoma and to determine whether changes in RD and FA correlate with disease severity. Therefore, glaucoma patients and controls were examined using 3T. Regions of interest were positioned on RD and FA maps, and mean values were calculated for ON and OR and correlated with optic nerve atrophy and reduced spatial-temporal contrast sensitivity (STCS) of the retina. We found, that RD in glaucoma patients was significantly higher in the ON (0.74 ± 0.21 versus 0.58 ± 0.17·10(-3) mm(2) s(-1); P 0.77). In conclusion, DTI at 3 Tesla allows robust RD and FA measurements in the ON and OR. Hereby, the extent of RD increase and FA decrease in glaucoma correlate with established ophthalmological examinations.

  10. Changes of Radial Diffusivity and Fractional Anisotopy in the Optic Nerve and Optic Radiation of Glaucoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engelhorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study was to evaluate with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI changes of radial diffusivity (RD and fractional anisotropy (FA in the optic nerve (ON and optic radiation (OR in glaucoma and to determine whether changes in RD and FA correlate with disease severity. Therefore, glaucoma patients and controls were examined using 3T. Regions of interest were positioned on RD and FA maps, and mean values were calculated for ON and OR and correlated with optic nerve atrophy and reduced spatial-temporal contrast sensitivity (STCS of the retina. We found, that RD in glaucoma patients was significantly higher in the ON (0.74 ± 0.21 versus 0.58 ± 0.17⋅10−3 mm2 s−1; P0.77. In conclusion, DTI at 3 Tesla allows robust RD and FA measurements in the ON and OR. Hereby, the extent of RD increase and FA decrease in glaucoma correlate with established ophthalmological examinations.

  11. Application of Perona Malik anisotropic diffusion on digital radiographic image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halim, Suhaila Abd; Razak, Rohayu Abdul; Ibrahim, Arsmah [Center of Mathematics Studies, Faculty of Computer and Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor DE (Malaysia); Manurung, Yupiter HP [Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor DE (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    Perona Malik Anisotropic Diffusion (PMAD) is a very useful and efficient denoising technique if the parameters are properly selected. Overestimating the parameters may cause oversmoothed and underestimating it may leave unfiltered noise. This makes the selection of parameters a crucial process. In this paper the PMAD model is solved using a finite difference scheme The discretized model is evaluated using different diffusion coefficient of exponential and quadratic on defective radiographic images in terms of quality and efficiency. In the application of the PMAD model on image data, a set of defective radiographic images of welding is used as input data. Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR), Structural Similarity Measure (SSIM) and temporal time are used to evaluate the performance of the model. The implementation of the experiment has been carried out using MATLAB R2009a. In terms of quality, results show that the Quadratic Diffusion Coefficient Function (QDCF) provides better results compared with the Exponential Diffusion Coefficient Function (EDCF). In conclusion, the denoising effect using PMAD model based on finite difference scheme shows able to improve image quality by removing noise in the defective radiographic image.

  12. Ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements using an optical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganssle, Paul J; Shin, Hyun D; Seltzer, Scott J; Bajaj, Vikram S; Ledbetter, Micah P; Budker, Dmitry; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John; Pines, Alexander

    2014-09-08

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and diffusometry are important tools for the characterization of heterogeneous materials and porous media, with applications including medical imaging, food characterization and oil-well logging. These methods can be extremely effective in applications where high-resolution NMR is either unnecessary, impractical, or both, as is the case in the emerging field of portable chemical characterization. Here, we present a proof-of-concept experiment demonstrating the use of high-sensitivity optical magnetometers as detectors for ultra-low-field NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements.

  13. Optical medical imaging: from glass to man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Mark

    2016-11-01

    A formidable challenge in modern respiratory healthcare is the accurate and timely diagnosis of lung infection and inflammation. The EPSRC Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (IRC) `Proteus' seeks to address this challenge by developing an optical fibre based healthcare technology platform that combines physiological sensing with multiplexed optical molecular imaging. This technology will enable in situ measurements deep in the human lung allowing the assessment of tissue function and characterization of the unique signatures of pulmonary disease and is illustrated here with our in-man application of Optical Imaging SmartProbes and our first device Versicolour.

  14. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Thomsen, C.; Frederiksen, J.; Henriksen, O.; Olesen, J.

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestion of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3 of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions.

  15. Nonlinear complex diffusion approaches based on a novel noise estimation for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE)-based nonlinear diffusion processes have been widely used for image denoising. In the traditional nonlinear anisotropic diffusion denoising techniques, behavior of the diffusion depends highly on the gradient of image. However, it is difficult to get a good effect if we use these methods to reduce noise in optical coherence tomography images. Because background has the gradient that is very similar to regions of interest, so background noise will be mistaken for edge information and cannot be reduced. Therefore, nonlinear complex diffusion approaches using texture feature(NCDTF) for noise reduction in phase-resolved optical coherence tomography is proposed here, which uses texture feature in OCT images and structural OCT images to remove noise in phase-resolved OCT. Taking into account the fact that texture between background and signal region is different, which can be linked with diffusion coefficient of nonlinear complex diffusion model, we use NCDTF method to reduce noises of structure and phase images first. Then, we utilize OCT structure images to filter phase image in OCT. Finally, to validate our method, parameters such as image SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL), and edge preservation were compared between our approach and median filter, Gaussian filter, wavelet filter, nonlinear complex diffusion filter (NCDF). Preliminary results demonstrate that NCDTF method is more effective than others in keeping edges and denoising for phase-resolved OCT.

  16. Application of diffusion tensor imaging in neurosurgery; Anwendung der Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung in der Neurochirurgie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saur, R. [Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany); Augenklinik des Universitaetsklinikums Tuebingen (Germany); Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie des Universitaetsklinikums Tuebingen (Germany); Gharabaghi, A. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie des Universitaetsklinikums Tuebingen (Germany); Erb, M. [Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Knowledge about integrity and location of fibre tracts arising from eloquent cortical areas is important to plan neurosurgical interventions and to allow maximization of resection of pathological tissue while preserving vital white matter tracts. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is so far the only method to get preoperatively an impression of the individual complexity of nerve bundles. Thereby nerve fibres are not mapped directly. They are derived indirectly by analysis of the directional distribution of diffusion of water molecules which is influenced mainly by large fibre tracts. From acquisition to reconstruction and visualisation of the fibre tracts many representational stages and working steps have to be passed. Exact knowledge about problems of Diffusion Imaging is important for interpretation of the results. Particularly, brain tumor edema, intraoperative brain shift, MR-artefacts and limitations of the mathematical models and algorithms challenge DTI-developers and applicants. (orig.)

  17. Detection of brain tumors using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and nanoparticles as contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Koenig, Anne; Heinrich, Emilie; Texier, Isabelle; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is used to localize tumors in mice using fluorescent nanoparticles as a blood pool contrast agent. The infrared dye DiR is loaded in the lipid core of nontargeted nanoparticles (DiR-lipidots) and injected systemically via the tail vein in mice bearing U87 tumors. Distribution and time-course of DiR-lipidots are followed using in vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and reveal enhanced fluorescent signal within the subcutaneous tumors up to seven days due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Tumor growth into the brain is followed using bioluminescent imaging, and tumor localization is further determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The fDOT provides three-dimensional fluorescent maps that allow for consistent localization for both subcutaneous and brain tumors.

  18. Evaluation of digital halftones image by vector error diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzaki, Masahiro; Itoh, Tetsuya; Kawaguchi, Takayuki; Tsumura, Norimichi; Haneishi, Hideaki; Miyake, Yoichi

    1998-12-01

    The vector error diffusion (VED) method is applied to proudce the digital halftone images by an electrophotographic printer with 600 dpi. Objective image quality of those obtained images is evaluated and analyzed. As a result, in the color reproduction of halftone image by the VED method, it was clear that there are large color difference between target color and printed color typically in the mid-tone colors. We consider it is due to the printer properties including dot-gain. It was also clear that the color noise of the VED method is larger compared with that of the conventional scalar error diffusion method in some patches. It was remarkable that ununiform patterns are generated by the VED method.

  19. Diffusion-weighted images of intracranial cyst-like lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergui, M.; Zhong, J.; Sales, S. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University of Turin (Italy); Bradac, G.B. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University of Turin (Italy); Neuroradiologia Universitaria, Ospedale S. G. Battista, Turin (Italy)

    2001-10-01

    Magnetic resonance sequences may be designed to evaluate the diffusion movements of the protons (diffusion-weighted images, DWI). In these images, a bright signal identifies a region where the diffusion along a spatial axis is restricted. The contents of a cystic lesion frequently have the signal intensities of a generic homogeneous hyperproteinic fluid (hypointensity in T1-, hyperintensity in T2-weighted images). DWI may give further information about the microscopic organisation of these fluids: a hyperintense signal indicates the presence of a restricted diffusion, due to some kind of microscopic organisation, at the cellular or macromolecular level. This may provide additional information useful for clinical purposes. We obtained DWI in 24 consecutive patients with intracranial cystic lesions, (19 intra-axial: five abscesses, five gliomas, six metastases, two demyelinating lesions, one neurocysticercosis; five extra-axial: two arachnoid cysts, two epidermoid cysts, one cholesteatoma). We found a strongly hyperintense signal, indicating restricted diffusion, in brain abscesses, epidermoid cysts and cholesteatoma; all the remaining lesions were hypointense or mildly hyperintense. We found these data useful in critical diagnoses, such as in differentiating abscesses from tumours, and in identifying elusive tumours such as epidermoid cysts. (orig.)

  20. Oriented diffusion filtering for enhancing low-quality fingerprint images

    KAUST Repository

    Gottschlich, C.

    2012-01-01

    To enhance low-quality fingerprint images, we present a novel method that first estimates the local orientation of the fingerprint ridge and valley flow and next performs oriented diffusion filtering, followed by a locally adaptive contrast enhancement step. By applying the authors\\' new approach to low-quality images of the FVC2004 fingerprint databases, the authors are able to show its competitiveness with other state-of-the-art enhancement methods for fingerprints like curved Gabor filtering. A major advantage of oriented diffusion filtering over those is its computational efficiency. Combining oriented diffusion filtering with curved Gabor filters led to additional improvements and, to the best of the authors\\' knowledge, the lowest equal error rates achieved so far using MINDTCT and BOZORTH3 on the FVC2004 databases. The recognition performance and the computational efficiency of the method suggest to include oriented diffusion filtering as a standard image enhancement add-on module for real-time fingerprint recognition systems. In order to facilitate the reproduction of these results, an implementation of the oriented diffusion filtering for Matlab and GNU Octave is made available for download. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  1. Optical Digital Image Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-18

    This could be accomplished even if the files were artificially determined. " Super files," composed of a number of files, could be artificially created...in order to expedite transfer through the scanning process. These " super files" could later be broken down into their actual component files. Another...hesitant about implementing an optical disk system. While Sandra Napier believed it "looks promising," she felt an optical disk replacement of microfilm

  2. 正常视神经纤维 DTI 的 T2-weighted trace 图定量研究%Quantitative diffusion tensor imaging study of T2-weighted trace map in healthy optic nerve tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳秋; 史大鹏; 田勤

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantitatively study the manifestation of T2-weighted trace( T2-WT) parameter map of diffusion tensor imaging( DTI)in healthy optic nerve tract. Methods Sixty-eight healthy right-handed volunteers(36 men,32 women;9-78 years old,mean age:38 years)were enrolled in this study. DTI and conventional MRI were performed on all subjects. The mean T2-WT,fractional anisotropy(FA)and mean deviation(MD)were obtained for quantitative analysis. Differences between right and left eyes,and differences between males and females were both evaluated by using paired t-test and independent-samples t-test respectively. Further analyses were performed to determine the correlation of T2-WT of 136 ONs in patients with FA,MD and age respectively. Results In healthy right-handed volunteers,the value of T2-WT from left nerves was higher than that from right nerves( P =0. 004),while FA,MD between left and right nerves showed no significant differences(P > 0. 05). There was no significant differences between males and females were seen in T2-WT,FA and MD calculated from DTI. In addition,there was a negative correlation of T2-WT with MD( r = - 0. 374,P = 0. 000),but no correlation with FA and age( P >0. 05). Conclusions T2-WT of optic nerve tract show left dominance in normal right-handed group. As an isotropic parameter of DTI,T2-WT has a relationship with MD. In addition,values of T2-WT do not decrease with the increasing age.%目的:定量研究正常视神经纤维扩散张量成像(DTI)的 T2-weighted trace(T2-WT)参数值的特点。方法选择无视功能障碍的健康志愿者68例,男36例,女32例,年龄9~78岁,中位年龄38岁,均为右利手,行视神经常规 MRI 和 DTI 检查,获取 DTI 的 T2-WT、FA 及 MD 三种后处理参数图:测量视神经纤维的三种参数值,研究T2-WT 参数值左右侧间及性别间的差异,分析其值与年龄的关系,并得出其值与 FA、MD 的相关性。结果视神经纤维 T2-WT 值

  3. Optical encryption with selective computational ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Mohammad; kheradmand, Reza; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab

    2014-10-01

    Selective computational ghost imaging (SCGI) is a technique which enables the reconstruction of an N-pixel image from N measurements or less. In this paper we propose an optical encryption method based on SCGI and experimentally demonstrate that this method has much higher security under eavesdropping and unauthorized accesses compared with previous reported methods.

  4. Optical imaging of fast, dynamic neurophysiological function.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rector, D. M. (David M.); Carter, K. M. (Kathleen M.); Yao, X. (Xincheng); George, J. S. (John S.)

    2002-01-01

    Fast evoked responses were imaged from rat dorsal medulla and whisker barrel cortex. To investigate the biophysical mechanisms involved, fast optical responses associated with isolated crustacean nerve stimulation were recorded using birefringence and scattered light. Such studies allow optimization of non-invasive imaging techniques being developed for use in humans.

  5. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo Z.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  6. Combining calcium imaging with other optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, Marco; Zecevic, Dejan; Vogt, Kaspar E; Ogden, David; De Waard, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Ca(2+) imaging is a commonly used approach for measuring Ca(2+) signals at high spatial resolution. The method is often combined with electrode recordings to correlate electrical and chemical signals or to investigate Ca(2+) signals following an electrical stimulation. To obtain information on electrical activity at the same spatial resolution, Ca(2+) imaging must be combined with membrane potential imaging. Similarly, stimulation of subcellular compartments requires photostimulation. Thus, combining Ca(2+) imaging with an additional optical technique facilitates the study of a number of physiological questions. The aim of this article is to introduce some basic principles regarding the combination of Ca(2+) imaging with other optical techniques. We discuss the design of the optics, the design of experimental protocols, the optical characteristics of Ca(2+) indicators used in combination with an optical probe, and the affinity of the Ca(2+) indicator in relation to the type of measurement. This information will enable the reader to devise an optimal strategy for combined optical experiments.

  7. Super-resolution in brain Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI)

    OpenAIRE

    Tarquino González, Jonathan Steve

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Diffusion Weighted (DW) imaging has proven to be useful at analysing brain architecture as well as at establishing brain tract organization and neuronal connectivity. However, an actual clinical use of DW images is currently limited by a series of acquisition artifacts, among them the partial volume effect (PVE) that may completely alter the spatial resolution and therefore the visualization of microanatomical details. In this work, a new superresolution method will be presented, ta...

  8. Image correction in magneto-optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Larsen, B.H.; Jacobsen, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects in the indi......An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects...... in the indicator film and unevenness of light, as well as additive signals from detector bias, external light sources, etc. When properly corrected a better measurement of the local magnetic field can be made, even in the case of heavily damaged films. For superconductors the magnetic field distributions may...

  9. NAOMI: nanoparticle assisted optical molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Dirk J.; van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; de Bruin, Martijn; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Graf, Christina; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2006-02-01

    Our first steps towards nanoparticle assisted, optical molecular imaging (NAOMI) using OCT as the imaging modality are presented. We derive an expression to estimate the sensitivity of this technique. We propose to use nanoparticles based on biodegradable polymers, loaded with suitable dyes as contrast agent, and outline a method for establishing their desired optical properties prior to synthesis. This report presents preliminary results of our investigation on the use of nanoshells to serve as contrast agents We injected nanoshells with specific contrast features in the 800 nm wavelength region in excised porcine eyes. The nanoshells showed up as bright reflecting structures in the OCT images, which confirm their potential as contrast agents.

  10. Optical topography guided semi-three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography for a multi-layer model of occipital cortex: a pilot methodological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jie; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an optical topography (OT) guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scheme is developed for functional imaging of the occipital cortex. The method extends the previously proposed semi-three-dimensional DOT methodology to reconstruction of two-dimensional extracerebral and cerebral images using a visual cortex oriented five-layered slab geometry, and incorporate the OT localization regularization in the cerebral reconstruction to achieve enhanced quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. We validate the methodology using simulated data and demonstrate its merits in comparison to the standalone OT and DOT.

  11. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Sheng; ZHOU Kang-rong; ZHAO Wei-dong; PENG Wei-jun; TANG Feng; MAO Jian

    2005-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of diffuse hepatic lesions in early stage is a tough task at any time for clinical conventional imaging Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (MR DWI) can detect the changes of tissue structure at molecular level This study was designed to determine the value of DWI in the diagnosis of diffuse liver lesions in early stage.Methods Diffuse liver lesions were induced by diethylnitrosamine in 42 rats of test group. Fourteen rats in control group were fed with pure water. Dynamic changes of MR DWI were observed every week in both groups during the early stage of diffuse liver lesions (1 to 12 weeks after drug administration in the test group). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of liver parenchyma in different stages and pathologic changes were analyzed.Results The process of diffuse hepatic lesions in the test group was classified into three stages according to pathological changes, namely hepatitis, hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. No obvious morphological changes were shown by conventional imaging in both groups during this stage. But MR DWI demonstrated heterogeneous signal changes in early stage of hepatic cirrhosis in the test group. No significant change of ADC values was found in the control group between different weeks (P>0.05). The ADC values of the test group declined from the fifth week, and after the tenth week the ADC values were significantly different between the test and control groups at gradient factor (b) value 300 sec/mm2 (P<0.05). At b value 600 and 1000 sec/mm2, significant difference was seen between the two groups from the sixth week onward. The range of ADC value of the groups was (1.7-0.9)±(0.40-0.04) mm2/sec (b=600) and (1.38-0.75)±(0.07-0.35) mm2/sec (b=1000), respectively. Dominant pathological changes included swelled hepatocytes within 1 to 4 weeks after the administration of diethylnitrosamine in the test group, hyperplasia of fibrous tissues in 5-8 weeks and formation of cirrhotic nodules in 9

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in spinal cord ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRS/I Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare clinical diagnosis characterized by a sudden onset of paralysis, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and loss of pain and temperature perception, with preservation of proprioception and vibration sense. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually demonstrates intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images with cord enlargement. However, in approximately 45% of patients, MR shows no abnormality. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been widely used for the evaluation of a variety of brain disorders, especially for acute stroke. Preliminary data suggest that DWI has the potential to be useful in the early detection of spinal infarction. We performed DWI, using navigated, interleaved, multishot echo planar imaging (IEPI), in a series of six patients with a clinical suspicion of acute spinal cord ischemia. In all patients, high signal was observed on isotropic DWI images with low ADC values (0.23 and 0.86 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/s), indicative of restricted diffusion. We analyzed the imaging findings from conventional MR sequences and diffusion-weighted MR sequences in six patients with spinal cord infarction, compared the findings with those in published series, and discuss the value of DWI in spinal cord ischemia based on current experience. Although the number of patients with described DWI findings totals only 23, the results of previously published studies and those of our study suggest that DWI has the potential to be a useful and feasible technique for the detection of spinal infarction. (orig.)

  13. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L; Khalil, Michael A; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K; Fong, Christopher J; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L; Barbour, Randall L; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  14. PANDA: a pipeline toolbox for analyzing brain diffusion images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zaixu; Zhong, Suyu; Xu, Pengfei; He, Yong; Gong, Gaolang

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is widely used in both scientific research and clinical practice in in-vivo studies of the human brain. While a number of post-processing packages have been developed, fully automated processing of dMRI datasets remains challenging. Here, we developed a MATLAB toolbox named "Pipeline for Analyzing braiN Diffusion imAges" (PANDA) for fully automated processing of brain diffusion images. The processing modules of a few established packages, including FMRIB Software Library (FSL), Pipeline System for Octave and Matlab (PSOM), Diffusion Toolkit and MRIcron, were employed in PANDA. Using any number of raw dMRI datasets from different subjects, in either DICOM or NIfTI format, PANDA can automatically perform a series of steps to process DICOM/NIfTI to diffusion metrics [e.g., fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD)] that are ready for statistical analysis at the voxel-level, the atlas-level and the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS)-level and can finish the construction of anatomical brain networks for all subjects. In particular, PANDA can process different subjects in parallel, using multiple cores either in a single computer or in a distributed computing environment, thus greatly reducing the time cost when dealing with a large number of datasets. In addition, PANDA has a friendly graphical user interface (GUI), allowing the user to be interactive and to adjust the input/output settings, as well as the processing parameters. As an open-source package, PANDA is freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/panda/. This novel toolbox is expected to substantially simplify the image processing of dMRI datasets and facilitate human structural connectome studies.

  15. Photoluminescence and optical transmission of diffusion-pump oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The photoluminescence and optical transmission of the four widely used diffusion-pump oils, DC-705, DC-704, Convalex-10, and Convoil-20, were measured. Each of the oils was found to be transparent throughout the visible region, showed some absorption in the near-UV region, and became very opaque below approximately 300 nm. Both Convalex-10 and Convoil-20 turned yellow after exposure to UV light. No such change was noted in DC-705 or DC-704. Photoluminescence was produced in each of the four oils when irradiated with UV light. Both DC-705 and DC-704 had a nearly identical luminescence spectra that peaked at 350 nm. The spectra of Convalex-10 and Convoil-20 were fairly complex, with several peaks in the visible region.

  16. Fast Bayesian inference of optical trap stiffness and particle diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Sudipta; Paul, Shuvojit; Singh, Rajesh; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kundu, Avijit; Banerjee, Ayan; Adhikari, R.

    2017-01-01

    Bayesian inference provides a principled way of estimating the parameters of a stochastic process that is observed discretely in time. The overdamped Brownian motion of a particle confined in an optical trap is generally modelled by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and can be observed directly in experiment. Here we present Bayesian methods for inferring the parameters of this process, the trap stiffness and the particle diffusion coefficient, that use exact likelihoods and sufficient statistics to arrive at simple expressions for the maximum a posteriori estimates. This obviates the need for Monte Carlo sampling and yields methods that are both fast and accurate. We apply these to experimental data and demonstrate their advantage over commonly used non-Bayesian fitting methods.

  17. Fast Bayesian inference of optical trap stiffness and particle diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Bera, Sudipta; Singh, Rajesh; Ghosh, Dipanjan; Kundu, Avijit; Banerjee, Ayan; Adhikari, R

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian inference provides a principled way of estimating the parameters of a stochastic process that is observed discretely in time. The overdamped Brownian motion of a particle confined in an optical trap is generally modelled by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and can be observed directly in experiment. Here we present Bayesian methods for inferring the parameters of this process, the trap stiffness and the particle diffusion coefficient, that use exact likelihoods and sufficient statistics to arrive at simple expressions for the maximum a posteriori estimates. This obviates the need for Monte Carlo sampling and yields methods that are both fast and accurate. We apply these to experimental data and demonstrate their advantage over commonly used non-Bayesian fitting methods.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author).

  19. Meyer’s Loop Anatomy Demonstrated Using Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging and Fiber Tractography at 3T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goga Cristina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The ultimate anatomy of the Meyer’s loop continues to elude us. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT may be able to demonstrate, in vivo, the anatomy of the complex network of white matter fibers surrounding the Meyer’s loop and the optic radiations. This study aims at exploring the anatomy of the Meyer’s loop by using DTI and fiber tractography.

  20. Light illumination and detection patterns for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography based on compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, An; Yazici, Birsen; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is an emerging molecular imaging modality that uses near infrared light to excite the fluorophore injected into tissue; and to reconstruct the fluorophore concentration from boundary measurements. The FDOT image reconstruction is a highly ill-posed inverse problem due to a large number of unknowns and limited number of measurements. However, the fluorophore distribution is often very sparse in the imaging domain since fluorophores are typically designed to accumulate in relatively small regions. In this paper, we use compressive sensing (CS) framework to design light illumination and detection patterns to improve the reconstruction of sparse fluorophore concentration. Unlike the conventional FDOT imaging where spatially distributed light sources illuminate the imaging domain one at a time and the corresponding boundary measurements are used for image reconstruction, we assume that the light sources illuminate the imaging domain simultaneously several times and the corresponding boundary measurements are linearly filtered prior to image reconstruction. We design a set of optical intensities (illumination patterns) and a linear filter (detection pattern) applied to the boundary measurements to improve the reconstruction of sparse fluorophore concentration maps. We show that the FDOT sensing matrix can be expressed as a columnwise Kronecker product of two matrices determined by the excitation and emission light fields. We derive relationships between the incoherence of the FDOT forward matrix and these two matrices, and use these results to reduce the incoherence of the FDOT forward matrix. We present extensive numerical simulation and the results of a real phantom experiment to demonstrate the improvements in image reconstruction due to the CS-based light illumination and detection patterns in conjunction with relaxation and greedy-type reconstruction algorithms.

  1. Analysis of optical amplifier noise in coherent optical communication systems with optical image rejection receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bo Foged; Mikkelsen, Benny; Mahon, Cathal J.

    1992-01-01

    performance. Two types of optical image rejection receivers are investigated: a novel, all-optical configuration and the conventional, microwave-based configuration. The analysis shows that local oscillator-spontaneous emission beat noise (LO-SP), signal-spontaneous emission beat noise (S-SP), and spontaneous......A detailed theoretical analysis of optical amplifier noise in coherent optical communication systems with heterodyne receivers is presented. The analysis quantifies in particular how optical image rejection receiver configurations reduce the influence of optical amplifier noise on system......-spontaneous beat noise (SP-SP) can all be reduced by 3 dB, thereby doubling the dynamic range of the optical amplifier. A 2.5-dB improvement in dynamic range has been demonstrated experimentally with the all-optical image rejection configuration. The implications of the increased dynamic range thus obtained...

  2. All-optically integrated multimodality imaging system: combined photoacoustic microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a multimodality imaging system by optically integrating all-optical photoacoustic microscopy (AOPAM), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence microscopy (FLM) to provide complementary information including optical absorption, optical back-scattering and fluorescence contrast of biological tissue. By sharing the same low-coherence Michelson interferometer, AOPAM and OCT could be organically optically combined to obtain the absorption and scattering information of the biological tissues. Also, owing to using the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence signals are obtained to present the radiative and nonradiative transition process of absorption. Simultaneously photoacoustic angiography, tissue structure and fluorescence molecular in vivo images of mouse ear were acquired to demonstrate the capabilities of the optically integrated trimodality imaging system, which can present more information to study tumor angiogenesis, vasculature, anatomical structure and microenvironments in vivo.

  3. Diffuse reflection imaging of sub-epidermal tissue haematocrit using a simple RGB camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Martin J.; O'Doherty, Jim; McNamara, Paul; Henricson, Joakim; Nilsson, Gert E.; Anderson, Chris; Sjoberg, Folke

    2007-05-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of a novel easy to use, tissue viability imaging system (TiVi). The system is based on the methods of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and polarization spectroscopy. The technique has been developed as an alternative to current imaging technology in the area of microcirculation imaging, most notably optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI). The system is based on standard digital camera technology, and is sensitive to red blood cells (RBCs) in the microcirculation. Lack of clinical acceptance of both OCT and LDPI fuels the need for an objective, simple, reproducible and portable imaging method that can provide accurate measurements related to stimulus vasoactivity in the microvasculature. The limitations of these technologies are discussed in this paper. Uses of the Tissue Viability system include skin care products, drug development, and assessment spatial and temporal aspects of vasodilation (erythema) and vasoconstriction (blanching).

  4. Multimodal optical imaging for detecting breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Wirth, Dennis; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate wide-field and high-resolution multimodal optical imaging, including polarization, reflectance, and fluorescence for the intraoperative detection of breast cancer. Lumpectomy specimens were stained with 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired between 390 and 750 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 and 750 nm. High resolution confocal reflectance and fluorescence images were excited at 642 nm. Confocal fluorescence images were acquired between 670 nm and 710 nm. After imaging, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Histological slides were compared with wide-field and high-resolution optical images to evaluate correlation of tumor boundaries and cellular morphology, respectively. Fluorescence polarization imaging identified the location, size, and shape of the tumor in all the cases investigated. Averaged fluorescence polarization values of tumor were higher as compared to normal tissue. Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of these differences. Fluorescence confocal imaging enabled cellular-level resolution. Evaluation and statistical analysis of MB fluorescence polarization values registered from single tumor and normal cells demonstrated higher fluorescence polarization from cancer. Wide-field high-resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of breast cancers.

  5. Clinical applications for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, Christina; Cao, Yue; Chenevert, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In this article, we review the clinical applications of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiotherapy treatment of several key clinical sites, including those of the central nervous system, the head and neck, the prostate, and the cervix. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) is an imaging technique that is rapidly gaining widespread acceptance owing to its ease and wide availability. DWI measures the mobility of water within tissue at the cellular level without the need of any exogenous contrast agent. For radiotherapy treatment planning, DWI improves upon conventional imaging techniques, by better characterization of tumor tissue properties required for tumor grading, diagnosis, and target volume delineation. Because DWI is also a sensitive marker for alterations in tumor cellularity, it has potential clinical applications in the early assessment of treatment response following radiation therapy.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer using cylinder diffuse radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenming; Li, Li; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of diseases with high mortality in man. Many clinical imaging modalities are utilized for the detection, grading and staging of prostate cancer, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, etc. But they lacked adequate sensitivity and specificity for finding cancer in transition or central zone of prostate. To overcome these problems, we propose a photoacoustic imaging modality based on cylinder diffuse radiation through urethra for prostate cancer detection. We measure the related parameters about this system like lateral resolution (~2mm) and axial resolution(~333μm). Finally, simulated sample was imaged by our system. The results demonstrate the feasibility for detecting prostate cancer by our system.

  7. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction within noncontact diffuse optical tomography using structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Kirstin; Hartmann, Raimo; Bischoff, Tobias; Oelerich, Jan O.; Finkensieper, Stephan; Heverhagen, Johannes T.

    2012-12-01

    A main field in biomedical optics research is diffuse optical tomography, where intensity variations of the transmitted light traversing through tissue are detected. Mathematical models and reconstruction algorithms based on finite element methods and Monte Carlo simulations describe the light transport inside the tissue and determine differences in absorption and scattering coefficients. Precise knowledge of the sample's surface shape and orientation is required to provide boundary conditions for these techniques. We propose an integrated method based on structured light three-dimensional (3-D) scanning that provides detailed surface information of the object, which is usable for volume mesh creation and allows the normalization of the intensity dispersion between surface and camera. The experimental setup is complemented by polarization difference imaging to avoid overlaying byproducts caused by inter-reflections and multiple scattering in semitransparent tissue.

  8. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction within noncontact diffuse optical tomography using structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Kirstin; Hartmann, Raimo; Bischoff, Tobias; Oelerich, Jan O; Finkensieper, Stephan; Heverhagen, Johannes T

    2012-12-01

    A main field in biomedical optics research is diffuse optical tomography, where intensity variations of the transmitted light traversing through tissue are detected. Mathematical models and reconstruction algorithms based on finite element methods and Monte Carlo simulations describe the light transport inside the tissue and determine differences in absorption and scattering coefficients. Precise knowledge of the sample's surface shape and orientation is required to provide boundary conditions for these techniques. We propose an integrated method based on structured light three-dimensional (3-D) scanning that provides detailed surface information of the object, which is usable for volume mesh creation and allows the normalization of the intensity dispersion between surface and camera. The experimental setup is complemented by polarization difference imaging to avoid overlaying byproducts caused by inter-reflections and multiple scattering in semitransparent tissue.

  9. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadhira, Vebi, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, Deddy, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Juliastuti, E., E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Sutiswan, Adeline, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id [Instrumentation and Control Research Group, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10 40132 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  10. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhira, Vebi; Kurniadi, Deddy; Juliastuti, E.; Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-01

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  11. Surface diffusion of Sb on Ge(111) monitored quantitatively with optical second harmonic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.A.; Seebauer, E.G. (Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Surface diffusion of Sb on Ge(111) has been measured with the newly developed technique of optical second harmonic microscopy. In this method, concentration profiles at submonolayer coverage are imaged directly by surface second harmonic generation with 5 {mu} spatial resolution. A Boltzmann--Matano analysis yields the coverage dependence of the diffusivity {ital D} without parametrization. Experiments were performed at roughly 70% of the bulk melting temperature {ital T}{sub {ital m}}. In the coverage range 0{le}{theta}{le}0.6, the activation energy {ital E}{sub diff} remains constant at 47.5{plus minus}1.5 kcal/mol, but the pre-exponential factor {ital D}{sub 0} decreases from 8.7{times}10{sup 3{plus minus}0.4} to 1.6{times}10{sup 2{plus minus}0.4} cm{sup 2}/s. Both {ital E}{sub diff} and {ital D}{sub 0} are quite large, which is consistent with high-temperature measurements in other systems. The inadequacies of current theories for high-temperature surface diffusion are outlined, and a new vacancy model is proposed for low-coverage diffusion. The model accounts semiquantitatively for the large values of {ital E}{sub diff} and {ital D}{sub 0}, and suggests that these quantities may be manipulated using doping levels and photon illumination. An islanding mechanism is proposed to explain the decrease in {ital D}{sub 0} with {theta}.

  12. Probing biological nanotopology via diffusion of weakly constrained plasmonic nanorods with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K; Blackmon, Richard L; Wu, Wei-Chen; Hill, David B; Button, Brian; Casbas-Hernandez, Patricia; Troester, Melissa A; Tracy, Joseph B; Oldenburg, Amy L

    2014-10-14

    Biological materials exhibit complex nanotopology, i.e., a composite liquid and solid phase structure that is heterogeneous on the nanoscale. The diffusion of nanoparticles in nanotopological environments can elucidate biophysical changes associated with pathogenesis and disease progression. However, there is a lack of methods that characterize nanoprobe diffusion and translate easily to in vivo studies. Here, we demonstrate a method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to depth-resolve diffusion of plasmon-resonant gold nanorods (GNRs) that are weakly constrained by the biological tissue. By using GNRs that are on the size scale of the polymeric mesh, their Brownian motion is minimally hindered by intermittent collisions with local macromolecules. OCT depth-resolves the particle-averaged translational diffusion coefficient (DT) of GNRs within each coherence volume, which is separable from the nonequilibrium motile activities of cells based on the unique polarized light-scattering properties of GNRs. We show how this enables minimally invasive imaging and monitoring of nanotopological changes in a variety of biological models, including extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling as relevant to carcinogenesis, and dehydration of pulmonary mucus as relevant to cystic fibrosis. In 3D ECM models, DT of GNRs decreases with both increasing collagen concentration and cell density. Similarly, DT of GNRs is sensitive to human bronchial-epithelial mucus concentration over a physiologically relevant range. This novel method comprises a broad-based platform for studying heterogeneous nanotopology, as distinct from bulk viscoelasticity, in biological milieu.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging of hemispheric asymmetries in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; McCauley, Stephen R; Chu, Zili; Hunter, Jill V; Bigler, Erin D; Yallampalli, Ragini; Wang, Zhiyue J; Hanten, Gerri; Li, Xiaoqi; Ramos, Marco A; Sabir, Sharjeel H; Vasquez, Ana C; Menefee, Deleene; Levin, Harvey S

    2009-02-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in 39 right-handed children to examine structural hemispheric differences and the impact of age, socioeconomic status, and sex on these differences. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were smaller in the left than in the right temporal, prefrontal, anterior internal capsular and the thalamic regions, and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were larger in the left than in the right internal capsule, thalamus, and cingulate. Significant region-by-sex interactions disclosed that the relation of DTI asymmetries to performance depended on sex including the relation of temporal lobes to reading comprehension and the relation of frontal lobes to solving applied mathematical problems.

  14. Intensity interferometry: Optical imaging with kilometer baselines

    CERN Document Server

    Dravins, Dainis

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.

  15. PANDA: a pipeline toolbox for analyzing brain diffusion images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaixu eCui

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI is widely used in both scientific research and clinical practice in in-vivo studies of the human brain. While a number of post-processing packages have been developed, fully automated processing of dMRI datasets remains challenging. Here, we developed a MATLAB toolbox named Pipeline for Analyzing braiN Diffusion imAges (PANDA for fully automated processing of brain diffusion images. The processing modules of a few established packages, including FMRIB Software Library (FSL, Pipeline System for Octave and Matlab (PSOM, Diffusion Toolkit and MRIcron, were employed in PANDA. Using any number of raw dMRI datasets from different subjects, in either DICOM or NIfTI format, PANDA can automatically perform a series of steps to process DICOM/NIfTI to diffusion metrics (e.g., FA and MD that are ready for statistical analysis at the voxel-level, the atlas-level and the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS-level and can finish the construction of anatomical brain networks for all subjects. In particular, PANDA can process different subjects in parallel, using multiple cores either in a single computer or in a distributed computing environment, thus greatly reducing the time cost when dealing with a large number of datasets. In addition, PANDA has a friendly graphical user interface (GUI, allowing the user to be interactive and to adjust the input/output settings, as well as the processing parameters. As an open-source package, PANDA is freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/panda/. This novel toolbox is expected to substantially simplify the image processing of dMRI datasets and facilitate human structural connectome studies.

  16. Optical secure image verification system based on ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingjing; Haobogedewude, Buyinggaridi; Liu, Zhengjun; Liu, Shutian

    2017-09-01

    The ghost imaging can perform Fourier-space filtering by tailoring the configuration. We proposed a novel optical secure image verification system based on this theory with the help of phase matched filtering. In the verification process, the system key and the ID card which contain the information of the correct image and the information to be verified are put in the reference and the test paths, respectively. We demonstrate that the ghost imaging configuration can perform an incoherent correlation between the system key and the ID card. The correct verification manifests itself with a correlation peak in the ghost image. The primary image and the image to be verified are encrypted and encoded into pure phase masks beforehand for security. Multi-image secure verifications can also be implemented in the proposed system.

  17. Surface diffusion of In on Ge(111) studied by optical second harmonic microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suni, I.I.; Seebauer, E.G. (Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Surface diffusion of In on Ge(111) has been measured by optical second harmonic microscopy. This technique employs surface second harmonic generation to directly image submonolayer surface concentration profiles. The coverage dependence of the diffusivity [ital D] can then be obtained from a Boltzmann--Matano analysis. In the coverage range 0.1[lt][theta][lt]0.48, the activation energy [ital E][sub diff] decreased with increasing coverage, ranging from 31 kcal/mol at [theta]=0.1 to 23 kcal/mol at [theta]=0.48. Over the same coverage range, the pre-exponential factor [ital D][sub 0] decreased from 5[times]10[sup 2] to 1[times]10[sup [minus]1] cm[sup 2]/s. This gradual change reflects a change in diffusion mechanism arising from the disordered nature of the Ge(111) surface. At low coverages, In adatoms sink into the top layer of Ge, and diffusion is dominated by thermal formation of adatom-vacancy pairs. At high coverages, diffusion occurs by normal site-to-site hopping. The gradual change in diffusion parameters with coverage was interrupted by an apparent phase transition at [theta]=0.16. At this point, both [ital E][sub diff] and [ital D][sub 0] peaked sharply at 41 kcal/mol and 6[times]10[sup 5] cm[sup 2]/s, respectively. The desorption energy [ital E][sub des] was measured by temperature programmed desorption. [ital E][sub des] decreased from 60 kcal/mol at submonolayer coverages to 55 kcal/mol at multilayer coverages.

  18. LDA optical setup using holographic imaging configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Nirala, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes one of the possible ways for improving fringe quality at LDA measuring volume using a holographic imaging configuration consisting of a single hololens. For its comparative study with a conventional imaging configuration, a complete characterization of fringes formed at the measurement volume by both the configuration is presented. Results indicate the qualitative as well as quantitative improvement of the fringes formed at measurement volume by the holographic imaging configuration. Hence it is concluded that use of holographic imaging configuration for making LDA optical setup is a better choice than the conventional one.

  19. Amplitude image processing by diffractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J; Canales, V F

    2016-02-22

    In contrast to the standard digital image processing, which operates over the detected image intensity, we propose to perform amplitude image processing. Amplitude processing, like low pass or high pass filtering, is carried out using diffractive optics elements (DOE) since it allows to operate over the field complex amplitude before it has been detected. We show the procedure for designing the DOE that corresponds to each operation. Furthermore, we accomplish an analysis of amplitude image processing performances. In particular, a DOE Laplacian filter is applied to simulated astronomical images for detecting two stars one Airy ring apart. We also check by numerical simulations that the use of a Laplacian amplitude filter produces less noisy images than the standard digital image processing.

  20. Light-emitting diode-based multiwavelength diffuse optical tomography system guided by ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guangqian; Alqasemi, Umar; Chen, Aaron; Yang, Yi; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Laser diodes are widely used in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) systems but are typically expensive and fragile, while light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are cheaper and are also available in the near-infrared (NIR) range with adequate output power for imaging deeply seated targets. In this study, we introduce a new low-cost DOT system using LEDs of four wavelengths in the NIR spectrum as light sources. The LEDs were modulated at 20 kHz to avoid ambient light. The LEDs were distributed on a hand-held probe and a printed circuit board was mounted at the back of the probe to separately provide switching and driving current to each LED. Ten optical fibers were used to couple the reflected light to 10 parallel photomultiplier tube detectors. A commercial ultrasound system provided simultaneous images of target location and size to guide the image reconstruction. A frequency-domain (FD) laser-diode-based system with ultrasound guidance was also used to compare the results obtained from those of the LED-based system. Results of absorbers embedded in intralipid and inhomogeneous tissue phantoms have demonstrated that the LED-based system provides a comparable quantification accuracy of targets to the FD system and has the potential to image deep targets such as breast lesions. PMID:25473884

  1. OH radical imaging in a DI diesel engine and the structure of the early diffusion flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dec, J.E.; Coy, E.B.

    1996-03-01

    Laser-sheet imaging studies have considerably advanced our understanding of diesel combustion; however, the location and nature of the flame zones within the combusting fuel jet have been largely unstudied. To address this issue, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical has been applied to the reacting fuel jet of a direct-injection diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class, modified for optical access. An Nd:YAG-based laser system was used to pump the overlapping Q{sub 1}9 and Q{sub 2}8 lines of the (1,0) band of the A{yields}X transition at 284.01 nm, while the fluorescent emission from both the (0,O) and (1, I) bands (308 to 320 nm) was imaged with an intensified video camera. This scheme allowed rejection of elastically scattered laser light, PAH fluorescence, and laser-induced incandescence. OH PLIF is shown to be an excellent diagnostic for diesel diffusion flames. The signal is strong, and it is confined to a narrow region about the flame front because the threebody recombination reactions that reduce high flame-front OH concentrations to equilibrium levels occur rapidly at diesel pressures. No signal was evident in the fuel-rich premixed flame regions where calculations and burner experiments indicate that OH concentrations will be below detectable limits. Temporal sequences of OH PLIF images are presented showing the onset and development of the early diffusion flame up to the time that soot obscures the images. These images show that the diffusion flame develops around the periphery of the-downstream portion of the reacting fuel jet about half way through the premixed burn spike. Although affected by turbulence, the diffusion flame remains at the jet periphery for the rest of the imaged sequence.

  2. MR imaging of optic chiasmatic glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seong Sook; Lee, Ho Kyu; Kim, Hyun Jin; Ryu, Meung Sun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Ra, Young Shin; Khang, Shin Kwang [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of optic chiasmatic glioma (OCG). MR images were reviewed in 14 patients with histologically proven OCGs and one with neurofibromatosis type 1 (male: female=8:7, mean age=8.5 years.) Tumors were evaluated retrospectively with respect to their size, involvement of the optic pathway, transverse/vertical diameter ratio based on the coronal plane, signal intensities, enhancement pattern, and the presence of a cyst or calcification. Tumors was measured 1.7-5.5 (mean, 3.3) cm in maximum diameter. In ten patients, the optic tracts were involved, and in three, the optic nerves. In 12 patients, tumors had a transverse/vertical diameter ratio of over one, and showed iso (n=5) or low signal intensity (n=10) compared with gray matter at T1-weighted imaging and high signal intensity (n=15) at T2-weighted imaging. Cyst formations were ween in eight patients, and tumors were enhanced strongly and homogeneously in nine and peripherally in four. In seven three was associated hydrocephalus, and in one, calcification. OCG is a suprasellar tumor which can extend into the optic pathway, has a transverse/vertical diameter ratio of more than one, and shows strong and homogeneous enhancement. These MR imaging findings are useful for the differentiation of OCG from other suprasellar tumors.

  3. Semiautomated spleen volumetry with diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, Ho; Lee, So Jung; Choi, Sanghyun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kye, Heewon; Song, Gi-Won; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we determined the relative accuracy of semiautomated spleen volumetry with diffusion-weighted (DW) MR images compared to standard manual volumetry with DW-MR or CT images. Semiautomated spleen volumetry using simple thresholding followed by 3D and 2D connected component analysis was performed with DW-MR images. Manual spleen volumetry was performed on DW-MR and CT images. In this study, 35 potential live liver donor candidates were included. Semiautomated volumetry results were highly correlated with manual volumetry results using DW-MR (r = 0.99; P volumetry was significantly shorter compared to that of manual volumetry with DW-MR (P volumetry with DW-MR images can be performed rapidly and accurately when compared with standard manual volumetry.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging findings of adnexal torsion: Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Shinya, E-mail: sfujii@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8504 (Japan); Kaneda, Sachi; Kakite, Suguru; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Matsusue, Eiji [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8504 (Japan); Harada, Tasuku [Division of Reproductive-Perinatal Medicine and Gynecological Oncology, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, Yonago (Japan); Kaminou, Toshio; Ogawa, Toshihide [Division of Radiology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori University, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8504 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Our purpose is to clarify the diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging findings of adnexal torsion. We retrospectively analyzed the DW imaging findings in 11 consecutive patients with surgical confirmation of adnexal torsion. We assessed signal intensity of the adnexal mass and fallopian tube thickening, and the location of abnormal signal intensity within the adnexal mass. On DW imaging, thickening of the fallopian tube was apparent as abnormal signal intensity in 8 of 11 patients. Abnormal signal intensity was inhomogeneous in 7 of 8 patients. Abnormal signal intensity on DW imaging was observed in 10 of 11 adnexal masses, and in the walls of 7 out of 8 adnexal cystic lesions. In adnexal torsion, DW imaging showed abnormal signal intensity in the thickened fallopian tube and in the wall of cystic ovarian lesions. These findings would be feasible to diagnose adnexal torsion.

  5. MRI-Guided Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Ntziachristos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical implementation of a novel hybrid system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and near-infrared (NIR optical measurements for the noninvasive study of breast cancer in vivo. Fourteen patients were studied with a MR-NIR prototype imager and spectrometer. A diffuse optical tomographic scheme employed the MR images as a priori information to implement an image-guided NIR localized spectroscopic scheme. All patients who entered the study also underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRI and biopsy so that the optical findings were crossvalidated with MR readings and histopathology. The technique quantified the oxy-and deoxyhemoglobin of five malignant and nine benign breast lesions in vivo. Breast cancers were found with decreased oxygen saturation and higher blood concentration than most benign lesions. The average hemoglobin concentration ([H] of cancers was 0.130±0.100 mM, and the average hemoglobin saturation (Y was 60±9% compared to [H]=0.018±0.005 mM and Y=69±6% of background tissue. Fibroadenomas exhibited high hemoglobin concentration [H]=0.060±0.010 mM and mild decrease in oxygen saturation Y=67±2%. Cysts and other normal lesions were easily differentiated based on intrinsic contrast information. This novel optical technology can be a significant add-on in MR examinations and can be used to characterize functional parameters of cancers with diagnostic and treatment prognosis potential. It is foreseen that the technique can play a major role in functional activation studies of brain and muscle as well.

  6. Fast dictionary-based reconstruction for diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Setsompop, Kawin; Cauley, Stephen F; Yendiki, Anastasia; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2013-11-01

    Diffusion spectrum imaging reveals detailed local diffusion properties at the expense of substantially long imaging times. It is possible to accelerate acquisition by undersampling in q-space, followed by image reconstruction that exploits prior knowledge on the diffusion probability density functions (pdfs). Previously proposed methods impose this prior in the form of sparsity under wavelet and total variation transforms, or under adaptive dictionaries that are trained on example datasets to maximize the sparsity of the representation. These compressed sensing (CS) methods require full-brain processing times on the order of hours using MATLAB running on a workstation. This work presents two dictionary-based reconstruction techniques that use analytical solutions, and are two orders of magnitude faster than the previously proposed dictionary-based CS approach. The first method generates a dictionary from the training data using principal component analysis (PCA), and performs the reconstruction in the PCA space. The second proposed method applies reconstruction using pseudoinverse with Tikhonov regularization with respect to a dictionary. This dictionary can either be obtained using the K-SVD algorithm, or it can simply be the training dataset of pdfs without any training. All of the proposed methods achieve reconstruction times on the order of seconds per imaging slice, and have reconstruction quality comparable to that of dictionary-based CS algorithm.

  7. Assessment of tissue heterogeneity using diffusion tensor and diffusion kurtosis imaging for grading gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Rajikha; Sinha, Neelam [International Institute of Information Technology-Bangalore, Bangalore (India); Saini, Jitender; Mahadevan, Anita; Rao, K.V.L. Narasinga; Swaminathan, Aarthi [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore (India)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we aim to assess the significance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) parameters in grading gliomas. Retrospective studies were performed on 53 subjects with gliomas belonging to WHO grade II (n = 19), grade III (n = 20) and grade IV (n = 14). Expert marked regions of interest (ROIs) covering the tumour on T2-weighted images. Statistical texture measures such as entropy and busyness calculated over ROIs on diffusion parametric maps were used to assess the tumour heterogeneity. Additionally, we propose a volume heterogeneity index derived from cross correlation (CC) analysis as a tool for grading gliomas. The texture measures were compared between grades by performing the Mann-Whitney test followed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for evaluating diagnostic accuracy. Entropy, busyness and volume heterogeneity index for all diffusion parameters except fractional anisotropy and anisotropy of kurtosis showed significant differences between grades. The Mann-Whitney test on mean diffusivity (MD), among DTI parameters, resulted in the highest discriminability with values of P = 0.029 (0.0421) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.0312 (0.0415) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). In DKI, mean kurtosis (MK) showed the highest discriminability, P = 0.018 (0.038) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.022 (0.04) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). Results of CC analysis illustrate the existence of homogeneity in volume (uniformity across slices) for lower grades, as compared to higher grades. Hypothesis testing performed on volume heterogeneity index showed P values of 0.0002 (0.0001) and 0.0003 (0.0003) between grades II vs. III and III vs. IV, respectively, for MD (MK). In summary, the studies demonstrated great potential towards automating grading gliomas by employing tumour heterogeneity measures on DTI and DKI parameters. (orig.)

  8. Laboratory testing & measurement on optical imaging systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  “Rectification” of Greek literature Reproduction of a page of Ibn Sahl's manuscript showing his discovery of the law of refraction”, now known as Snell's law. [5] Some History of Arabic Optics 2 See [4]  Arabic military interest in optics (Caliphs... science. Vol 2. Mathematics and the physical sciences, Routledge, 1996 [5] image used: “Reproduction of a page of Ibn Sahl's manuscript showing his discovery of the law of refraction”, now known as Snell's law.”, image from http...

  9. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  10. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging in the characterization of multiple system atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rulseh AM

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Michael Rulseh,1–3 Jiri Keller,1,4 Jan Rusz,5,6 Michael Syka,1 Hana Brozova,6 Robert Rusina,6,7 Petra Havrankova,6 Katerina Zarubova,8 Hana Malikova,1 Robert Jech,6 Josef Vymazal1 1Department of Radiology, Na Homolce Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Department of Radiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, General University Hospital, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 3National Institute of Mental Health, Klecany, Czech Republic; 43rd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 5Department of Circuit Theory, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 6Department of Neurology and Centre of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 7Thomayer Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic; 8Department of Neurology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Purpose: Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a rare neurodegenerative disease that remains poorly understood, and the diagnosis of MSA continues to be challenging. We endeavored to improve the diagnostic process and understanding of in vivo characteristics of MSA by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Materials and methods: Twenty MSA subjects, ten parkinsonian dominant (MSA-P, ten cerebellar dominant (MSA-C, and 20 healthy volunteer subjects were recruited. Fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity maps were processed using tract-based spatial statistics. Diffusion data were additionally evaluated in the basal ganglia. A support vector machine was used to assess diagnostic utility, leave-one-out cross-validation in the evaluation of classification schemes, and receiver operating characteristic analyses to determine cutoff values.Results: We detected widespread changes in the brain white matter of MSA subjects; however, no group-wise differences were found between MSA-C and MSA

  12. 3D integral imaging with optical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Corral, Manuel; Martínez-Cuenca, Raúl; Saavedra, Genaro; Javidi, Bahram

    2008-04-01

    Integral imaging (InI) systems are imaging devices that provide auto-stereoscopic images of 3D intensity objects. Since the birth of this new technology, InI systems have faced satisfactorily many of their initial drawbacks. Basically, two kind of procedures have been used: digital and optical procedures. The "3D Imaging and Display Group" at the University of Valencia, with the essential collaboration of Prof. Javidi, has centered its efforts in the 3D InI with optical processing. Among other achievements, our Group has proposed the annular amplitude modulation for enlargement of the depth of field, dynamic focusing for reduction of the facet-braiding effect, or the TRES and MATRES devices to enlarge the viewing angle.

  13. Spatially-dense, multi-spectral, frequency-domain diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Han Yong

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) employs near-infrared light to image the concentration of chromophores and cell organelles in tissue and thereby providing access to functional parameters that can differentiate cancerous from normal tissues. This thesis describes research at the bench and in the clinic that explores and identifies the potential of DOT breast cancer imaging. The bench and clinic instrumentation differ but share important features: they utilize a very large, spatially dense, set of source-detector pairs (10 7) for imaging in the parallel-plate geometry. The bench experiments explored three-dimensional (3D) image resolution and fidelity as a function of numerous parameters and also ascertained the effects of a chest wall phantom. The chest wall is always present but is typically ignored in breast DOT. My experiments clarified chest wall influences and developed schemes to mitigate these effects. Mostly, these schemes involved selective data exclusion, but their efficacy also depended on reconstruction approach. Reconstruction algorithms based on analytic (fast) Fourier inversion and linear algebraic techniques were explored. The clinical experiments centered around a DOT instrument that I designed, constructed, and have begun to test (in-vitro and in-vivo). This instrumentation offers many features new to the field. Specifically, the imager employs spatially-dense, multi-spectral, frequency-domain data; it possesses the world's largest optical source-detector density yet reported, facilitated by highly-parallel CCD-based frequency-domain imaging based on gain-modulation heterodyne detection. The instrument thus measures both phase and amplitude of the diffusive light waves. Other features include both frontal and sagittal breast imaging capabilities, ancillary cameras for measurement of breast boundary profiles, real-time data normalization, and mechanical improvements for patient comfort. The instrument design and construction is my most significant

  14. X-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography: in vivo study of osteoarthritis in the finger joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2007-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by the damage of the articular cartilage, is the most common joint problem worldwide. In the effort of developing new clinical tools with the potential to alter the natural history of OA, near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has received much attention due to its unique advantages. For optical imaging in highly heterogeneous media such as the finger joints, prior information could improve the quality of optical imaging. We report a hybrid imaging system for early detection of OA in the finger joints by imposing the geometry information obtained by X-ray on three-dimensional near-infrared DOT. X-ray tomosynthesis was employed to recover the three-dimensional structure of the two bones based on 16 X-ray projections generated with a mini C-arm system at different directions within a range of 180 degrees. The interface was carefully designed to guarantee an accurate co-registration of the optical and x-ray modalities. The prior structural information of bones was incorporated into our multi-modality imaging reconstruction algorithm to enhance the recovery of the optical properties of joint tissues. Several healthy and OA finger joints were examined. The initial clinical results showed that this hybrid imaging system had the ability to provide much enhanced image resolution and contrast than DOT alone for OA detection.

  15. Recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer demonstrate decreased diffusion on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Katsuo; Sagawa, Motoyasu; Motomo, Nozomu; Ueno, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Makoto; Machida, Yuichiro; Maeda, Sumiko; Matoba, Munetaka; Tonami, Hisao; Ueda, Yoshimichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is reported to be useful for detecting malignant lesions. The purpose of this study is to clarify characteristics of imaging, detection rate and sensitivity of DWI for recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 36 lung cancer patients with recurrence or metastasis were enrolled in this study. While 16 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), 17 underwent MRI and CT, and 3 underwent MRI and PET-CT. Each recurrence or metastasis showed decreased diffusion, which was easily recognized in DWI. The detection rate for recurrence or metastasis was 100% (36/36) in DWI, 89% (17/19) in PET-CT and 82% (27/33) in CT. Detection rate of DWI was significantly higher than that of CT (p=0.0244) but not significantly higher than that of PET-CT (p=0.22). When the optimal cutoff value of the apparent diffusion coefficient value was set as 1.70?10-3 mm2/sec, the sensitivity of DWI for diagnosing recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer was 95.6%. DWI is useful for detection of recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer.

  16. Comparison of diffuse optical tomography of human breast with whole-body and breast-only positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, Soren D; Choe, Regine; Corlu, Alper; Lee, Kijoon; Wiener, Rony; Srinivas, Shyam M; Saffer, Janet R; Freifelder, Richard; Karp, Joel S; Hajjioui, Nassim; Azar, Fred; Yodh, Arjun G

    2008-02-01

    We acquire and compare three-dimensional tomographic breast images of three females with suspicious masses using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and positron emission tomography (PET). Co-registration of DOT and PET images was facilitated by a mutual information maximization algorithm. We also compared DOT and whole-body PET images of 14 patients with breast abnormalities. Positive correlations were found between total hemoglobin concentration and tissue scattering measured by DOT, and fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake. In light of these observations, we suggest potential benefits of combining both PET and DOT for characterization of breast lesions.

  17. Diffusion imaging: technology and clinical application; Diffusionsbildgebung. Technik und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Greschus, Susanne; Pieper, Claus Christian [Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Goldstein, Jan [Staedtisches Klinikum Solingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2017-03-15

    While diffusion imaging was predominantly used for cerebral ischemia diagnostics it is now a widely applied MR diagnostic tool for oncologic or inflammatory diseases. The contribution is focused on the fundamentals of diffusion imaging and the most important indications.

  18. Image segmentation and edge enhancement with stabilized inverse diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, I; Willsky, A S; Krim, H

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a family of first-order multidimensional ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with discontinuous right-hand sides and demonstrate their applicability in image processing. An equation belonging to this family is an inverse diffusion everywhere except at local extrema, where some stabilization is introduced. For this reason, we call these equations "stabilized inverse diffusion equations" (SIDEs). Existence and uniqueness of solutions, as well as stability, are proven for SIDEs. A SIDE in one spatial dimension may be interpreted as a limiting case of a semi-discretized Perona-Malik equation. In an experiment, SIDE's are shown to suppress noise while sharpening edges present in the input signal. Their application to image segmentation is also demonstrated.

  19. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  20. Image denoising using a directional adaptive diffusion filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cuifang; Shi, Caicheng; He, Peikun

    2006-11-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) are well-known due to their good processing results which it can not only smooth the noise but also preserve the edges. But the shortcomings of these processes came to being noticed by people. In some sense, PDE filter is called "cartoon model" as it produces an approximation of the input image, use the same diffusion model and parameters to process noise and signal because it can not differentiate them, therefore, the image is naturally modified toward piecewise constant functions. A new method called a directional adaptive diffusion filter is proposed in the paper, which combines PDE mode with wavelet transform. The undecimated discrete wavelet transform (UDWT) is carried out to get different frequency bands which have obviously directional selectivity and more redundancy details. Experimental results show that the proposed method provides a performance better to preserve textures, small details and global information.

  1. Diffusion weighted imaging with circularly polarized oscillating gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Dyrby, Tim B

    2015-01-01

    in diffusion weighting with encoding in a plane rather than in one direction. CP-OGSE can be used for rotationally invariant acquisitions on anisotropic tissues. METHODS: Experiments with a 4.7 T preclinical scanner on a postmortem monkey brain as well as simulations were performed using conventional OGSE...... and CP-OGSE. RESULTS: Simulations and experiments show that CP-OGSE provides the same microstructural information as OGSE but provides more robust parameter estimates with limited gradient strength. CONCLUSIONS: CP-OGSE can be an important contribution for making OGSE imaging more effective in clinical...... imaging settings with limited gradient strength. Furthermore, the improved diffusion weighting can also be used to expand the investigated frequency range. Magn Reson Med, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  2. Multiplane 3D superresolution optical fluctuation imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Geissbuehler, Stefan; Godinat, Aurélien; Bocchio, Noelia L; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Lasser, Theo; Leutenegger, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    By switching fluorophores on and off in either a deterministic or a stochastic manner, superresolution microscopy has enabled the imaging of biological structures at resolutions well beyond the diffraction limit. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) provides an elegant way of overcoming the diffraction limit in all three spatial dimensions by computing higher-order cumulants of image sequences of blinking fluorophores acquired with a conventional widefield microscope. So far, three-dimensional (3D) SOFI has only been demonstrated by sequential imaging of multiple depth positions. Here we introduce a versatile imaging scheme which allows for the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes. Using 3D cross-cumulants, we show that the depth sampling can be increased. Consequently, the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes reduces the acquisition time and hence the photo-bleaching of fluorescent markers. We demonstrate multiplane 3D SOFI by imaging the mitochondria network in fixed ...

  3. Application of diffusion tensor imaging in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Filipa Costa

    2015-01-01

    Trabalho final de mestrado integrado em Medicina, apresentado à Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Coimbra. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS), being a significant cause of disability. During the last years, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been applied in the study of MS patients in an attempt to improve the understanding of the pathologic process at a microstructural level, in early stages of the disease. DTI, due to its high sen...

  4. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Rifeng; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologicall...

  5. Diffusion MR imaging in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcak Cakir Pekoz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare dementing disease and is thought to caused by a prion. It is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia, myoclonus, akinetic mutism and eventual death. Brain biopsy or autopsy is required for a definitive diagnosis of CJD. Diffusion-weighted imaging became an important tool for early diagnosis of CJD because of the high sensitivity. We present 59-year-old female patient diagnosed as sporadic CJD with typical MR imagings. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 880-883

  6. Clinical benefits of diffusion tensor imaging in hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Sira, Liat; Goder, Noam; Bassan, Haim; Lifshits, Shlomi; Assaf, Yaniv; Constantini, Shlomi

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT The object of this study was to use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate and characterize white matter changes in hydrocephalus. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective analysis of DTI in a cohort of patients with hydrocephalus (n = 35), 19 of whom had both pre- and postsurgical imaging studies. These patient's DTI values were compared with values extracted from age-dependent trend lines computed from a healthy subject group (n = 70, age span 14 months-14 years). Several DTI parameters in different regions of interest (ROIs) were evaluated to find the most sensitive parameters for clinical decision making in hydrocephalus. RESULTS Compared with healthy controls, patients with active hydrocephalus had a statistically significant change in all DTI parameters. The most sensitive and specific DTI parameter for predicting hydrocephalus was axial diffusivity (λ1) measured at the level of the corona radiata. Diffusion tensor imaging parameters correlated with several conventional radiological parameters in the assessment of hydrocephalus but were not superior to them. There was no convincing correlation between clinical disease severity and DTI parameters. When examining the pre- and postsurgical effect, it was found that DTI may be a sensitive tool for estimating tissue improvement. CONCLUSIONS This large-cohort study with a multidisciplinary approach combining clinical, neurological, radiological, and multiple DTI parameters revealed the most sensitive DTI parameters for identifying hydrocephalus and suggested that they may serve as an important tool for the disorder's quantitative radiological assessment.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging of midline posterior fossa malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widjaja, Elysa; Blaser, Susan; Raybaud, Charles [Hospital for Sick Children, Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8 (Canada)

    2006-06-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography have been used to evaluate a variety of brain malformations. However, these studies have focused mainly on malformations involving the supratentorial compartments. There is a paucity of data on diffusion tensor imaging of posterior fossa malformations. To describe the color vector maps and modified or abnormal tracts of midline posterior fossa malformations. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed in one patient with rhombencephalosynapsis and two with Joubert syndrome. Color vector maps of fractional anisotropy were used to place a region of interest for seed point of fiber tracking. The vermis was severely hypoplastic or absent in rhombencephalosynapsis and Joubert syndrome. In rhombencephalosynapsis, vertically oriented fibers were visualized in the midportion of the cerebellum. The location of the deep cerebellar nuclei could be inferred from the amiculum and were medially located in rhombencephalosynapsis. In the two patients with Joubert syndrome, the horizontally arranged superior cerebellar peduncles were well demonstrated on the color vector maps. Failure of the superior cerebellar peduncles to decussate in the mesencephalon was also well demonstrated on both color vector maps and tractography. The deep cerebellar nuclei were more laterally located in Joubert syndrome. The use of tractography in midline posterior fossa malformations expands our understanding of these malformations. (orig.)

  8. A novel image inpainting technique based on median diffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajkumar L Biradar; Vinayadatt V Kohir

    2013-08-01

    Image inpainting is the technique of filling-in the missing regions and removing unwanted objects from an image by diffusing the pixel information from the neighbourhood pixels. Image inpainting techniques are in use over a long time for various applications like removal of scratches, restoring damaged/missing portions or removal of objects from the images, etc. In this study, we present a simple, yet unexplored (digital) image inpainting technique using median filter, one of the most popular nonlinear (order statistics) filters. The median is maximum likelihood estimate of location for the Laplacian distribution. Hence, the proposed algorithm diffuses median value of pixels from the exterior area into the inner area to be inpainted. The median filter preserves the edge which is an important property needed to inpaint edges. This technique is stable. Experimental results show remarkable improvements and works for homogeneous as well as heterogeneous background. PSNR (quantitative assessment) is used to compare inpainting results.

  9. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D [Inserm U930, CNRS ERL3106, Universite Francois Rabelais, Tours (France); Stute, S; Buvat, I [IMNC, IN2P3, UMR 8165 CNRS-Paris 7 and Paris 11 Universities, Orsay (France); Chau, M [ASA-Advanced Solutions Accelerator, Montpellier (France); Spiteri, P, E-mail: clovis.tauber@univ-tours.fr [IRIT-ENSEEIHT, UMR CNRS 5505, Toulouse (France)

    2011-10-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  10. Edge-Based Image Compression with Homogeneous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainberger, Markus; Weickert, Joachim

    It is well-known that edges contain semantically important image information. In this paper we present a lossy compression method for cartoon-like images that exploits information at image edges. These edges are extracted with the Marr-Hildreth operator followed by hysteresis thresholding. Their locations are stored in a lossless way using JBIG. Moreover, we encode the grey or colour values at both sides of each edge by applying quantisation, subsampling and PAQ coding. In the decoding step, information outside these encoded data is recovered by solving the Laplace equation, i.e. we inpaint with the steady state of a homogeneous diffusion process. Our experiments show that the suggested method outperforms the widely-used JPEG standard and can even beat the advanced JPEG2000 standard for cartoon-like images.

  11. Deformable image registration between pathological images and MR image via an optical macro image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takashi; Nakamura, Yuka; Tanaka, Toru; Tanaka, Takuya; Hashimoto, Noriaki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Batchelor, Tracy T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Taylor, Jennie W; Snuderl, Matija; Yagi, Yukako

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have been widely used for visualizing the inside of the human body. However, in many cases, pathological diagnosis is conducted through a biopsy or resection of an organ to evaluate the condition of tissues as definitive diagnosis. To provide more advanced information onto CT or MR image, it is necessary to reveal the relationship between tissue information and image signals. We propose a registration scheme for a set of PT images of divided specimens and a 3D-MR image by reference to an optical macro image (OM image) captured by an optical camera. We conducted a fundamental study using a resected human brain after the death of a brain cancer patient. We constructed two kinds of registration processes using the OM image as the base for both registrations to make conversion parameters between the PT and MR images. The aligned PT images had shapes similar to the OM image. On the other hand, the extracted cross-sectional MR image was similar to the OM image. From these resultant conversion parameters, the corresponding region on the PT image could be searched and displayed when an arbitrary pixel on the MR image was selected. The relationship between the PT and MR images of the whole brain can be analyzed using the proposed method. We confirmed that same regions between the PT and MR images could be searched and displayed using resultant information obtained by the proposed method. In terms of the accuracy of proposed method, the TREs were 0.56±0.39mm and 0.87±0.42mm. We can analyze the relationship between tissue information and MR signals using the proposed method.

  12. Exploiting data redundancy in computational optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T

    2015-11-30

    We present an algorithm which exploits data redundancy to make computational, coherent, optical imaging more computationally efficient. This algorithm specifically addresses the computation of how light scattered by a sample is collected and coherently detected. It is of greatest benefit in the simulation of broadband optical systems employing coherent detection, such as optical coherence tomography. Although also amenable to time-harmonic data, the algorithm is designed to be embedded within time-domain electromagnetic scattering simulators such as the psuedo-spectral and finite-difference time domain methods. We derive the algorithm in detail as well as criteria which ensure accurate execution of the algorithm. We present simulations that verify the developed algorithm and demonstrate its utility. We expect this algorithm to be important to future developments in computational imaging.

  13. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  14. Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography in Diffuse Unilateral Subacute Neuroretinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre de A. Garcia Filho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the SD-OCT findings in patients with diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis (DUSN and evaluate CRT and RNFL thickness. Methods. Patients with clinical diagnosis of DUSN who were submitted to SD-OCT were included in the study. Complete ophthalmologic examination and SD-OCT were performed. Cirrus scan strategy protocols used were macular cube, optic nerve head cube, and HD-5 line raster. Results. Eight patients with DUSN were included. Mean RNFL thickness was 80.25 μm and 104.75 μm for affected and normal eyes, respectively. Late stage had mean RNFL thickness of 74.83 μm compared to 96.5 μm in early stage. Mean CMT was 205.5 μm for affected eyes and 255.13 μm for normal fellow eyes. Conclusion. RNFL and CMT were thinner in DUSN eyes compared to normal eyes. Late-stage disease had more pronounced thinning compared to early-stage patients. This thinning in RNFL and CMT may reflect the low visual acuity in patients with DUSN.

  15. Spread spectrum time-resolved diffuse optical measurement system for enhanced sensitivity in detecting human brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kalpesh; Hasnain, Ali; Zhou, Xiaowei; Luo, Jianwen; Penney, Trevor B.; Chen, Nanguang

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging methods have been widely applied to noninvasive detection of brain activity. We have designed and implemented a low cost, portable, real-time one-channel time-resolved DOS system for neuroscience studies. Phantom experiments were carried out to test the performance of the system. We further conducted preliminary human experiments and demonstrated that enhanced sensitivity in detecting neural activity in the cortex could be achieved by the use of late arriving photons.

  16. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  17. Fast optical imaging of human brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Gratton

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Great advancements in brain imaging during the last few decades have opened a large number of new possibilities for neuroscientists. The most dominant methodologies (electrophysiological and magnetic resonance-based methods emphasize temporal and spatial information, respectively. However, theorizing about brain function has recently emphasized the importance of rapid (within 100 ms or so interactions between different elements of complex neuronal networks. Fast optical imaging, and in particular the event-related optical signal (EROS, a technology that has emerged over the last 15 years may provide descriptions of localized (to sub-cm level brain activity with a temporal resolution of less than 100 ms. The main limitations of EROS are its limited penetration, which allows us to image cortical structures not deeper than 3 cm from the surface of the head, and its low signal-to-noise ratio. Advantages include the fact that EROS is compatible with most other imaging methods, including electrophysiological, magnetic resonance, and trans-cranial magnetic stimulation techniques, with which can be recorded concurrently. In this paper we present a summary of the research that has been conducted so far on fast optical imaging, including evidence for the possibility of recording neuronal signals with this method, the properties of the signals, and various examples of applications to the study of human cognitive neuroscience. Extant issues, controversies, and possible future developments are also discussed.

  18. Optical and opto-acoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2013-01-01

     Since the inception of the microscope, optical imaging is serving the biological discovery for more than four centuries. With the recent emergence of methods appropriate for in vivo staining, such as bioluminescence, fluorescent molecular probes, and proteins, as well as nanoparticle-based targeted agents, significant attention has been shifted toward in vivo interrogations of different dynamic biological processes at the molecular level. This progress has been largely supported by the development of advanced optical tomographic imaging technologies suitable for obtaining volumetric visualization of biomarker distributions in small animals at a whole-body or whole-organ scale, an imaging frontier that is not accessible by the existing tissue-sectioning microscopic techniques due to intensive light scattering beyond the depth of a few hundred microns. Biomedical optoacoustics has also emerged in the recent decade as a powerful tool for high-resolution visualization of optical contrast, overcoming a variety of longstanding limitations imposed by light scattering in deep tissues. By detecting tiny sound vibrations, resulting from selective absorption of light at multiple wavelengths, multispectral optoacoustic tomography methods can now "hear color" in three dimensions, i.e., deliver volumetric spectrally enriched (color) images from deep living tissues at high spatial resolution and in real time. These new-found imaging abilities directly relate to preclinical screening applications in animal models and are foreseen to significantly impact clinical decision making as well.

  19. Cloned images and the optical unconscious

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romic, Bojana

    , because this young woman had no political/activist record – it was her image that communicated with the world. References: Benjamin, W. (1999) Little History of Photography. in: Jennings, M.W., Eiland, H., Smith, G. (eds) Selected Writings: Volume 2 1927-1934. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press...... that her use of the term is at an angle to Benjamin's: speaking of the modernist optical logic, she retrieves the associationist theory and the notion of memory: 'the only point of recognition within associationist theory that consciousness might be shot through by unconscious conflict...... be stored in a memory of an observer – and later recognised as a pattern (structure) in the another image. The associative process that takes place is usually hidden from the observer, thus the use of the term optical unconscious. As the image gets disseminated via electronic media – 'cloned' is the term...

  20. Biocomputing: numerical simulation of glioblastoma growth using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique, 2004 Route des Lucioles, 06 902 Sophia Antipolis (France); Clatz, Olivier [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique, 2004 Route des Lucioles, 06 902 Sophia Antipolis (France); Sermesant, Maxime [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique, 2004 Route des Lucioles, 06 902 Sophia Antipolis (France); Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Departement de Radiotherapie, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 av de Valombrose, 06189 Nice (France); Delingette, Herve [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique, 2004 Route des Lucioles, 06 902 Sophia Antipolis (France); Frenay, Marc [Departement d' Oncologie Medicale, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33 av de Valombrose, 06189 Nice (France); Ayache, Nicholas [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et Automatique, 2004 Route des Lucioles, 06 902 Sophia Antipolis (France)

    2008-02-21

    Glioblastoma multiforma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive tumors of the central nervous system. It can be represented by two components: a proliferative component with a mass effect on brain structures and an invasive component. GBM has a distinct pattern of spread showing a preferential growth in the white fiber direction for the invasive component. By using the architecture of white matter fibers, we propose a new model to simulate the growth of GBM. This architecture is estimated by diffusion tensor imaging in order to determine the preferred direction for the diffusion component. It is then coupled with a mechanical component. To set up our growth model, we make a brain atlas including brain structures with a distinct response to tumor aggressiveness, white fiber diffusion tensor information and elasticity. In this atlas, we introduce a virtual GBM with a mechanical component coupled with a diffusion component. These two components are complementary, and can be tuned independently. Then, we tune the parameter set of our model with an MRI patient. We have compared simulated growth (initialized with the MRI patient) with observed growth six months later. The average and the odd ratio of image difference between observed and simulated images are computed. Displacements of reference points are compared to those simulated by the model. The results of our simulation have shown a good correlation with tumor growth, as observed on an MRI patient. Different tumor aggressiveness can also be simulated by tuning additional parameters. This work has demonstrated that modeling the complex behavior of brain tumors is feasible and will account for further validation of this new conceptual approach.

  1. Parallel Solver for Diffuse Optical Tomography on Realistic Head Models with Scattering and Clear Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placati, Silvio; Guermandi, Marco; Samore, Andrea; Franchi Scarselli, Eleonora; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2015-11-26

    Diffuse Optical Tomography is an imaging technique based on evaluating how light propagates within the human head to obtain functional information about the brain. Precision in reconstructing such an optical properties map is highly affected by the accuracy of the light propagation model implemented, which needs to take into account the presence of clear and scattering tissues. We present a numerical solver based on the radiosity-diffusion model integrating the anatomical information provided by a structural MRI. The solver is designed to run on parallel heterogeneous platforms based on multiple GPUs and CPUs. We demonstrate how the solver provides a 7x speed-up over an isotropic-scattered parallel Monte Carlo engine based on a Radiative Transport Equation for a domain composed of 2 millions voxels, along with a significant improvement in accuracy. The speed-up greatly increases for larger domains, allowing us to compute the light distribution of a full human head ( 3 million voxels) in 116 seconds for the platform used.

  2. Renal water molecular diffusion characteristics in healthy native kidneys: assessment with diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the characteristics of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetic resonance (MR imaging in healthy native kidneys. METHODS: Seventy-three patients without chronic kidney disease underwent DTI-MRI with spin echo-echo planar (SE-EPI sequences accompanied by an array spatial sensitivity encoding technique (ASSET. Cortical and medullary mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD, AD and RD, fractional anisotropy (FA and primary, secondary and tertiary eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, λ3 were analysed in both kidneys and in different genders. RESULTS: Cortical MD, λ2, λ3, and RD values were higher than corresponding medullary values. The cortical FA value was lower than the medullary FA value. Medullary λ1 and RD values in the left kidney were lower than in the right kidney. Medullary λ2, and λ3 values in women were higher than those in men. Medullary FA values in women were lower than those in men. Medullary FA (r = 0.351, P = 0.002 and λ1 (r = 0.277, P = 0.018 positively correlated with eGFR. Medullary FA (r = -0.25, P = 0.033 negatively correlated with age. CONCLUSIONS: Renal water molecular diffusion differences exist in human kidneys and genders. Age and eGFR correlate with medullary FA and primary eigenvalue.

  3. Imaging of the brain, including diffusion-weighted imaging in methylmalonic acidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Steven J.; Given, Curtis A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Room HX-311C, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Robertson, William C. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is a multifactorial autosomal recessive inborn error of organic acid metabolism, often presenting with neurologic findings. We report the imaging findings in a case of a child with classic neurological and laboratory findings for MMA. Imaging studies demonstrated abnormalities within the basal ganglia, particularly the globi pallidi (GP). Diffusion-weighted abnormalities seen in patients with MMA during an acute episode of metabolic acidosis and at follow-up are discussed. The authors are aware of only one prior report of serial examinations demonstrating resolution of restricted diffusion in the GP. The biochemical and pathophysiologic basis of the imaging findings of MMA are explained. (orig.)

  4. Fourier optics of image formation in LEEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, A B; Altman, M S [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Mueller, Th; Bauer, Ernst [Physikalisches Institute, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2009-08-05

    A Fourier optics calculation of image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM) is presented. The adaptation of the existing theory for transmission electron microscopy to the treatment of LEEM and other forms of cathode lens electron microscopy is explained. The calculation incorporates imaging errors that are caused by the objective lens (aberrations), contrast aperture (diffraction), imperfect source characteristics, and voltage and current instabilities. It is used to evaluate the appearance of image features that arise from phase objects such as surface steps and amplitude objects that produce what is alternatively called amplitude, reflectivity or diffraction contrast in LEEM. This formalism can be used after appropriate modification to treat image formation in other emission microscopies. Implications for image formation in the latest aberration-corrected instruments are also discussed.

  5. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  6. Using diffuse optical tomograpy to monitor tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jacqueline E.; Lim, Emerson; Kim, Hyun Keol; Flexman, Molly; Brown, Mindy; Refrice, Susan; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer patients often undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy to reduce the size of the tumor before surgery. Tumors which demonstrate a pathologic complete response associate with improved disease-free survival; however, as low as 10% of patients may achieve this status. The goal is to predict response to anti-cancer therapy early, so as to develop personalized treatments and optimize the patient's results. Previous studies have shown that tumor response can be predicted within a few days of treatment initiation. We have developed a diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging system for monitoring the response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our breast imaging system is a continuous wave system that uses four wavelengths in the near-infrared spectrum (765 nm, 808 nm, 827 nm, and 905 nm). Both breasts are imaged simultaneously with a total of 64 sources and 128 detectors. Three dimensional reconstructions for oxy-hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]), deoxy-hemoglobin ([Hb]) concentrations, and water are performed using a PDE-constrained multispectral imaging method that uses the diffusion approximation as a model for light propagation. Each patient receives twelve weekly treatments of Taxane followed by four cycles of Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide (AC) given every other week. There are six DOT imaging time points: baseline, week 3 and 5 of Paclitaxel, before cycle 1 and 2 of AC, and before surgery. Preliminary results show that there is statistical significance for the percent change of [HbO2], [Hb], [HbT], and percent water at week 2 from the baseline between patients with a pathologic response to chemotherapy.

  7. Diffusion weighted imaging in gynecological malignancies-present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dinesh Manoharan; Chandan J Das; Ankita Aggarwal; Arun K Gupta

    2016-01-01

    The management of gynaecological malignancies has undergone a significant change in recent years with our improved understanding of cancer biogenetics, development of new treatment regimens and enhanced screening. Due to the rapid blooming of newer methods and techniques in gynaecology, surgery and oncology the scope and the role of imaging has also widened. Functional imaging in the form of diffusion weighted imaging(DWI) has been recently found to be very useful in assessing various tumours. Its ability to identify changes in the molecular level has dramatically changed the diagnostic approach of radiologists which was solely based on morphological criteria. It can improve the diagnostic accuracy of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, lend a hand in assessing tumour response to treatment regimens and detect tumour recurrence with better spatial resolution, negative radiation and diagnostic accuracy compared to positron emission tomography scan. The ability to quantify the diffusion has also lead to potential prediction of tumour aggressiveness and grade which directly correlate with the patient prognosis and management. Hence, it has become imperative for a radiologist to understand the concepts of DWI and its present and evolving role. In this article we present a brief description of the basics of DWI followed by its role in evaluation of female gynaecological malignancies.

  8. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Rat Spinal Cord In-Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rekabi, Zeinab

    2008-05-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), an MRI technique based on probing the structure of tissues at a microscopic level is used to determine regional values of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (Dav) of excised and in-vivo rat spinal cords. Two pulse sequences: Spin Echo (SE) and Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) are optimized to provide the best image quality, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the greatest spatial resolution at reasonable acquisition times in the rat spinal cord. The study was conducted using a 7T BRUKER BioSpec MRI animal scanner. In the ex-vivo experiments images with the spatial resolution of 100 μm and the SNR of 1.938 ± 0.010 were acquired in 2 minutes. After optimization both methods were applied in-vivo. The values of FA and Dav acquired in this study showed good correlation with the literature values. Furthermore, results from these studies should provide the necessary baseline data for serial DTI in injured spinal cord in future studies.

  9. White Matter Degeneration with Aging: Longitudinal Diffusion MR Imaging Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Marius; Cremers, Lotte G M; Ikram, M Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Krestin, Gabriel P; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; Vernooij, Meike W

    2016-05-01

    To determine longitudinally the rate of change in diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of white matter microstructure with aging and to investigate whether cardiovascular risk factors influence this longitudinal change. This prospective population-based cohort study was approved by a dedicated ethics committee overseen by the national government, and all participants gave written informed consent. Community-dwelling participants without dementia were examined by using a research-dedicated 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imager on two separate visits that were, on average, 2.0 years apart. Among 810 persons who were eligible for imaging at baseline, longitudinal imaging data were available for 501 persons (mean age, 69.9 years; age range, 64.1-91.1 years). Changes in normal-appearing white matter DTI characteristics in the tract centers were analyzed globally to investigate diffuse patterns of change and then locally by using voxelwise multilinear regression. The influence of cardiovascular risk factors was assessed by treating them as additional determinants in both analyses. Over the 2.0-year follow-up interval, global fractional anisotropy (FA) decreased by 0.0042 (P aging, with relative sparing of sensorimotor fibers. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  10. Assessment of calf muscle contraction by diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deux, J.F.; Luciani, A.; Zerbib, P.; Kobeiter, H.; Rahmouni, A. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire H. Mondor, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Malzy, P. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, Paris (France); Paragios, N. [Ecole Centrale de Paris, Chatenay Malabris (France); Bassez, G. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire H. Mondor, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Service des Maladies Neuro-Musculaires, Creteil (France); Roudot-Thoraval, F. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire H. Mondor, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Centre d' Investigation Clinique, Creteil (France); Vignaud, A. [Siemens Medical Division, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    The goal of this study was to assess the changes of water diffusion during contraction and elongation of calf muscles using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI in normal volunteers. Twenty volunteers (mean age, 29 {+-} 4 years) underwent DT MRI examination of the right calf. Echo planar imaging sequence was performed at rest, during dorsal flexion and during plantar flexion. The three eigenvalues ({lambda}1, {lambda}2, and {lambda}3), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of the diffusion tensor were calculated for medial gastrocnemius (mGM) and tibialis anterior (TA). A fiber tractography was performed on both muscles. Non-parametric Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical evaluation. At rest, {lambda}1, {lambda}2 and ADC of mGM were higher than their counterparts of TA (P < 0.01). During dorsal flexion, the three eigenvalues and ADC of TA significantly increased (P < 0.05) as their counterparts of mGM slightly decreased (P=NS). Opposite variations were detected during plantar flexion of the foot. Visual analysis evidenced a relationship between 3D representations of MRI fibers and physiological state of muscles. Contraction of calf muscles produces changes in DT parameters, which are related to the physiological state of the muscle. (orig.)

  11. Atlas-based diffusion tensor imaging correlates of executive function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowrangi, Milap A.; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Lyketsos, Constantine; Oishi, Kenichi; Mori, Susumu; Albert, Marilyn; Mielke, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Impairment in executive function (EF) is commonly found in Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Atlas-based Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) methods may be useful in relating regional integrity to EF measures in MCI and AD. 66 participants (25 NC, 22 MCI, and 19 AD) received DTI scans and clinical evaluation. DTI scans were applied to a pre-segmented atlas and fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated. ANOVA was used to assess group differences in frontal, parietal, and cerebellar regions. For regions differing between groups (p<0.01), linear regression examined the relationship between EF scores and regional FA and MD. Anisotropy and diffusivity in frontal and parietal lobe white matter (WM) structures were associated with EF scores in MCI and only frontal lobe structures in AD. EF was more strongly associated with FA than MD. The relationship between EF and anisotropy and diffusivity was strongest in MCI. These results suggest that regional WM integrity is compromised in MCI and AD and that FA may be a better correlate of EF than MD. PMID:25318544

  12. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  13. Diffusion tensor imaging in medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; LI Kun-cheng; YU Chun-shui; WANG Yu-ping; XUE Su-fang

    2006-01-01

    Background Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive imaging technique for the assessment of theintegrity of cerebral tissues. This study was undertaken to assess the changes of diffusion indices of hippocampalformation (HF) in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE).Methods Fourteen patients with MTLE and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated. Mean diffusivity (MD) andfractional anisotropy (FA) from the symmetrical-voxel sampling regions of the anterior HF were calculated in allsubjects. The MD and FA values were compared across the groups.Results No significant differences of MD and FA values were noted between right and left HF in the controls.In the patient group, MD significantly increased in the HF ipsilateral to the lesioned side [(9.27±1.09)×10-4mm2/s], compared with the values in the contralateral HF [(8.20±0.59)×10-4 mm2/s] (t = 4.479, P = 0.001) andhealthy subjects [(7.58±0.51)×10-4 mm2/s] (P<0.001), but no significant differences were found in FA. Whencompared with the controls, patients had a significantly higher MD inthe contralateral HF (P<0.05), but thedifference in FA was not statistically significant.Conclusions DTI could detect hippocampal abnormality in patients with MTLE. This technique may be helpfulfor preoperative evaluation of such patients.

  14. Correlation of proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwan, Roy; Sijens, Paul E; Potze, Jan-Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-10-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) provides indices of neuronal damage. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) relates to water diffusivity and fiber tract orientation. A method to compare (1)H-MRS and DTI findings was developed, tested on phantom and applied on normal brain. Point-resolved spectroscopy (T(R)/T(E)=1500/135) was used for chemical shift imaging of a supraventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm(3) (64 voxels). In DTI, a segmental spin-echo sequence (T(R)/T(E)=5500/91) was used and slices were stacked to reproduce the slab used in MRS. The spatial distributions of choline and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) correlated to mean fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for the inner 6 x 6=36 voxels defined in MRS, most notably NAA and ADC value (r=-.70, P<.00001; correlation across four subjects, 144 data pairs). This is the first association of neuron metabolite contents in volunteers with structure as indicated by DTI.

  15. Utility of diffusion tensor imaging parameters for diagnosis of hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Tomomi; Tatewaki, Yasuko; Murata, Takaki; Kato, Yumiko; Mugikura, Shunji; Takase, Kei; Takahashi, Shoki

    2015-12-01

    Hemimegalencephaly is a rare hamartomatous entity characterised by enlargement of all or part of the cerebral hemisphere ipsilaterally with cortical dysgenesis, large lateral ventricle and white matter hypertrophy with or without advanced myelination. Although conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for detecting these diagnostic features, hemimegalencephaly is not always easily distinguished from other entities, especially when hemimegalencephaly shows blurring between the grey and white matter. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a functional MRI technique commonly used to assess the integrity of white matter. The usefulness of DTI in assessing hemimegalencephaly has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we clarified the characteristics of hemimegalencephaly with regard to DTI and its parameters including fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient. Three patients with hemimegalencephaly underwent MRI including DTI. We first visually compared fractional anisotropy mapping and conventional MRI. Next, we quantitatively measured the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient values in the subcortical white matter of the hemisphere with hemimegalencephaly and corresponding normal-appearing contralateral regions and analysed the values using the Mann-Whitney U test. On fractional anisotropy mapping, we could clearly distinguish the junction of grey and white matter and observed thicker white matter in the hemisphere with hemimegalencephaly, which was unclear on conventional MRI. The white matter in the hemisphere with hemimegalencephaly showed significantly higher fractional anisotropy (Phemimegalencephaly features and could be useful in its assessment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Diffusion imaging in pediatric central nervous system infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, J. [Dept. de Imagiologia, Hospital Geral De Santo Antonio, Porto (Portugal); Zimmerman, R.A.; Haselgrove, J.C.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the role of diffusion imaging (DI) in central nervous system (CNS) infections in pediatric patients. It was anticipated that DI would be more sensitive than conventional MRI in the detection of the infarctive complications of infection, and possibly, in the detection of the infectious process as well. Seventeen pediatric patients, eight having meningitis'' five with herpes encephalitis, three with brain abscess or cerebritis and one with sepsis, were evaluated at 1.5-T with DI. All herpes patients had positive DI at the site of herpetic involvement, and two had the addition of watershed infarctions. DI demonstrated more lesions in three of the four cases of herpetic encephalitis. Half the meningitis cases had watershed infarction where DI was better and half had vasculitic infarctions in which DI was equal to or better than conventional MRI. Diffusion imaging was more sensitive than conventional MRI alone in detection of changes due to infections and ischemic lesions, but did not differentiate between them by DI or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), although anatomic distribution of lesions proved useful. (orig.)

  17. Image Retrieval Method for Multiscale Objects from Optical Colonoscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Nosato

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical colonoscopy is the most common approach to diagnosing bowel diseases through direct colon and rectum inspections. Periodic optical colonoscopy examinations are particularly important for detecting cancers at early stages while still treatable. However, diagnostic accuracy is highly dependent on both the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor. Moreover, it is extremely difficult, even for specialist doctors, to detect the early stages of cancer when obscured by inflammations of the colonic mucosa due to intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis. Thus, to assist the UC diagnosis, it is necessary to develop a new technology that can retrieve similar cases of diagnostic target image from cases in the past that stored the diagnosed images with various symptoms of colonic mucosa. In order to assist diagnoses with optical colonoscopy, this paper proposes a retrieval method for colonoscopy images that can cope with multiscale objects. The proposed method can retrieve similar colonoscopy images despite varying visible sizes of the target objects. Through three experiments conducted with real clinical colonoscopy images, we demonstrate that the method is able to retrieve objects of any visible size and any location at a high level of accuracy.

  18. Optical coherence tomography for endodontic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soest, G.; Shemesh, H.; Wu, M.-K.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2008-02-01

    In root canal therapy, complications frequently arise as a result of root fracture or imperfect cleaning of fins and invaginations. To date, there is no imaging method for nondestructive in vivo evaluation of the condition of the root canal, during or after treatment. There is a clinical need for a technique to detect defects before they give rise to complications. In this study we evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image root canal walls, and its capacity to identify complicating factors in root canal treatment. While the potential of OCT to identify caries has been explored before, endodontic imaging has not been reported. We imaged extracted lower front teeth after endodontic preparation and correlated these images to histological sections. A 3D OCT pullback scan was made with an endoscopic rotating optical fiber probe inside the root canal. All oval canals, uncleaned fins, risk zones, and one perforation that were detected by histology were also imaged by OCT. As an example of an area where OCT has clinical potential, we present a study of vertical root fracture identification with OCT.

  19. Diffusion-Weighted Images Superresolution Using High-Order SVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Yang, Zhipeng; Hu, Jinrong; Peng, Jing; He, Peiyu; Zhou, Jiliu

    2016-01-01

    The spatial resolution of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is limited by several physical and clinical considerations, such as practical scanning times. Interpolation methods, which are widely used to enhance resolution, often result in blurred edges. Advanced superresolution scanning acquires images with specific protocols and long acquisition times. In this paper, we propose a novel single image superresolution (SR) method which introduces high-order SVD (HOSVD) to regularize the patch-based SR framework on DWI datasets. The proposed method was implemented on an adaptive basis which ensured a more accurate reconstruction of high-resolution DWI datasets. Meanwhile, the intrinsic dimensional decreasing property of HOSVD is also beneficial for reducing the computational burden. Experimental results from both synthetic and real DWI datasets demonstrate that the proposed method enhances the details in reconstructed high-resolution DWI datasets and outperforms conventional techniques such as interpolation methods and nonlocal upsampling.

  20. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in musculoskeletal infections: Current perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Yogesh [Yale New Haven Health System at Bridgeport Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Khaleel, Mohammad [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Boothe, Ethan; Awdeh, Haitham [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Accurate diagnosis and prompt therapy of musculoskeletal infections are important prognostic factors. In most cases, clinical history, examination and laboratory findings help one make the diagnosis, and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to identify the extent of the disease process. However, in many situations, a routine MRI may not be specific enough especially if the patient cannot receive contrast intravenously, thereby delaying the appropriate treatment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help in many such situations by providing additional information, accurate characterization and defining the extent of the disease, so that prompt treatment can be initiated. In this article, we illustrate the imaging findings of the spectrum of musculoskeletal infections, emphasizing the role of DWI in this domain. (orig.)

  1. Spatial characteristics of wave-like structures in diffuse aurora obtained using optical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Axelsson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a statistical study using optical images from ALIS (Auroral Large Imaging System to investigate the spatial and temporal variations of structures in diffuse aurora. Analysis of conjugate Reimei data shows that such fine structures are a result of modulation of high-energy precipitating electrons. Pitch angle diffusion into the loss cone due to interaction of whistler mode waves with plasma sheet electrons is the most feasible mechanism leading to high-energy electron precipitation. This suggests that the fine structure is an indication of modulations of the efficiency of the wave–particle interaction. The scale sizes and variations of these structures, mapped to the magnetosphere, can give us information about the characteristics of the modulating wave activity. We found the scale size of the auroral stripes and the spacing between them to be on average 13–14 km, which corresponds to 3–4 ion gyro radii for protons with an energy of 7 keV. The structures move southward with a speed close to zero in the plasma convection frame.

  2. Physical Optics Based Computational Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivas, Stephen Joseph

    There is an ongoing demand on behalf of the consumer, medical and military industries to make lighter weight, higher resolution, wider field-of-view and extended depth-of-focus cameras. This leads to design trade-offs between performance and cost, be it size, weight, power, or expense. This has brought attention to finding new ways to extend the design space while adhering to cost constraints. Extending the functionality of an imager in order to achieve extraordinary performance is a common theme of computational imaging, a field of study which uses additional hardware along with tailored algorithms to formulate and solve inverse problems in imaging. This dissertation details four specific systems within this emerging field: a Fiber Bundle Relayed Imaging System, an Extended Depth-of-Focus Imaging System, a Platform Motion Blur Image Restoration System, and a Compressive Imaging System. The Fiber Bundle Relayed Imaging System is part of a larger project, where the work presented in this thesis was to use image processing techniques to mitigate problems inherent to fiber bundle image relay and then, form high-resolution wide field-of-view panoramas captured from multiple sensors within a custom state-of-the-art imager. The Extended Depth-of-Focus System goals were to characterize the angular and depth dependence of the PSF of a focal swept imager in order to increase the acceptably focused imaged scene depth. The goal of the Platform Motion Blur Image Restoration System was to build a system that can capture a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-exposure image which is inherently blurred while at the same time capturing motion data using additional optical sensors in order to deblur the degraded images. Lastly, the objective of the Compressive Imager was to design and build a system functionally similar to the Single Pixel Camera and use it to test new sampling methods for image generation and to characterize it against a traditional camera. These computational

  3. Skin lesion classification using oblique-incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrübeoğlu, Mehrübe; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Marquez, Guillermo; Duvic, Madeleine; Wang, Lihong V

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the use of a noninvasive in vivo optical technique, diffuse reflectance spectroscopic imaging with oblique incidence, to distinguish between benign and cancer-prone skin lesions. Various image features were examined to classify the images from lesions into benign and cancerous categories. Two groups of lesions were processed separately: Group 1 includes keratoses, warts versus carcinomas; and group 2 includes common nevi versus dysplastic nevi. A region search algorithm was developed to extract both one- and two-dimensional spectral information. A bootstrap-based Bayes classifier was used for classification. A computer-assisted tool was then devised to act as an electronic second opinion to the dermatologist. Our approach generated only one false-positive misclassification out of 23 cases collected for group 1 and two misclassifications out of 34 cases collected for group 2 under the worst estimation condition.

  4. Diffusion kurtosis imaging of the liver at 3 Tesla: in vivo comparison to standard diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budjan, Johannes; Sauter, Elke A; Zoellner, Frank G; Lemke, Andreas; Wambsganss, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional techniques like diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) are gaining more and more importance in liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is an advanced technique that might help to overcome current limitations of DWI. Purpose To evaluate DKI for the differentiation of hepatic lesions in comparison to conventional DWI at 3 Tesla. Material and Methods Fifty-six consecutive patients were examined using a routine abdominal MR protocol at 3 Tesla which included DWI with b-values of 50, 400, 800, and 1000 s/mm(2). Apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated applying a standard mono-exponential fit, while a non-Gaussian kurtosis fit was used to obtain DKI maps. ADC as well as Kurtosis-corrected diffusion ( D) values were quantified by region of interest analysis and compared between lesions. Results Sixty-eight hepatic lesions (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] [n = 25]; hepatic adenoma [n = 4], cysts [n = 18]; hepatic hemangioma [HH] [n = 18]; and focal nodular hyperplasia [n = 3]) were identified. Differentiation of malignant and benign lesions was possible based on both DWI ADC as well as DKI D-values ( P values were in the range of 0.04 to < 0.0001). Conclusion In vivo abdominal DKI calculated using standard b-values is feasible and enables quantitative differentiation between malignant and benign liver lesions. Assessment of conventional ADC values leads to similar results when using b-values below 1000 s/mm(2) for DKI calculation.

  5. Imaging features in conventional MRI, spectroscopy and diffusion weighted images of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Benjamin; Klose, Uwe; Lindig, Tobias; Biskup, Saskia; Nägele, Thomas; Schöls, Ludger; Karle, Kathrin N

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations within the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene. While a small number of reports on imaging findings in routine MRI exist, reported imaging findings in DWI and spectroscopy are scarce, and limited to not genetically proven case reports. We assessed MRI including DWI and MR spectroscopy in six patients with HDLS and two asymptomatic mutation carriers. A total of 13 MRIs were evaluated and a score of the white-matter lesion (WML) load was calculated. The course of MR abnormalities was followed for 6-19 months in four patients and 95 months in one carrier. MRI revealed widespread white-matter lesions of patchy or confluent pattern especially in the frontal and occipital lobe. The pyramidal tract was less affected than the surrounding tissue in all symptomatic patients on conventional T2WI. Three of four cases with DWI showed small dots of diffusion restriction within WML. Spectroscopy showed increased levels of mIns, Cho and lactate while NAA was decreased. Asymptomatic mutation carriers had, for the age of the patients, unusually pronounced unspecific WMLs. No diffusion restriction or alterations in metabolite levels could be detected in asymptomatic mutation carriers. Microbleeds were not found in any patient. Diffusion restriction seems to be a typical imaging pattern visible in patients with active disease progression in HDLS. Spectroscopic findings and the absence of microbleeds differ clearly from reported findings in CADASIL and subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy. While the distribution and character of WMLs in asymptomatic cases remain unspecific they are likely to represent subclinical markers of HDLS.

  6. Atypical pyogenic brain abscess evaluation by diffusion-weighted imaging: diagnosis with multimodality MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Ulus, Ozden Sila; Berkman, Mehmet Zafer; Kocagoz, Sesin; Karaarslan, Ercan

    2015-10-01

    Whether a brain abscess is apparent by imaging depends on the stage of the abscess at the time of imaging, as well as the etiology of the infection. Because conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited in its ability to distinguish brain abscesses from necrotic tumors, advanced techniques are required. The management of these two disease entities differs and can potentially affect the clinical outcome. We report a case having atypical imaging features of a pyogenic brain abscess on advanced MRI, in particular, on diffusion-weighted and perfusion imaging, in a patient with osteosarcoma undergoing chemotherapy.

  7. The usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in detection of diffuse axonal injury in a patient with head trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyeok Gyu Kwon; Sung Ho Jang

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is the predominant mechanism of injuries in patients with traumatic brain injury. Neither conventional brain computed tomography nor magnetic resonance imaging has shown sufficient sensitivity in the diagnosis of diffuse axonal injury. In the current study, we attempted to demonstrate the usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging in the detection of lesion sites of diffuse axonal injury in a patient with head trauma who had been misdiagnosed as having a stroke. A 44-year-old man fell from a height of about 2 m. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (32 months after onset) showed leukomalactic lesions in the isthmus of the corpus callosum and the left temporal lobe. He presented with mild quadriparesis, intentional tremor of both hands, and trunkal ataxia. From diffusion tensor imaging results of 33 months after traumatic brain injury onset, we found diffuse axonal injury in the right corticospinal tract (centrum semiovale, pons), both fornices (columns and crus), and both inferior cerebellar peduncles (cerebellar portions). We think that diffusion tensor imaging could be a useful tool in the detection of lesion sites of diffuse axonal injuryin patients with head trauma.

  8. Generalized pupil aberrations of optical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elazhary, Tamer T.

    In this dissertation fully general conditions are presented to correct linear and quadratic field dependent aberrations that do not use any symmetry. They accurately predict the change in imaging aberrations in the presence of lower order field dependent aberrations. The definitions of the image, object, and coordinate system are completely arbitrary. These conditions are derived using a differential operator on the scalar wavefront function. The relationships are verified using ray trace simulations of a number of systems with varying degrees of complexity. The math is shown to be extendable to provide full expansion of the scalar aberration function about field. These conditions are used to guide the design of imaging systems starting with only paraxial surface patches, then growing freeform surfaces that maintain the analytic conditions satisfied for each point in the pupil. Two methods are proposed for the design of axisymmetric and plane symmetric optical imaging systems. Design examples are presented as a proof of the concept.

  9. Image Distortion of Optical Coherence Tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安源; 姚建铨

    2004-01-01

    A kind of image distortion in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) resulted from average refractive index changes between structures of bio-tissue is discussed for the first time.Analysis is given on following situations:1) Exact refraction index changes between microstructures;2)The gradient of average refractive index change between different tissue layers is parallel to the probe beam;3) The gradient of average refractive index change is vertical to the probe beam.The results show that the image distortion of situation 1) is usually negligible;in situation 2) there is a spread or shrink effect without relative location error; however,in situation 3) there is a significant image error inducing relative location displacement between different structures.Preliminary design to eliminate the distortion is presented,the method of which mainly based on the image classification and pixel array re-arrangement.

  10. Multispectral Cerenkov luminescence tomography for small animal optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Kuo, Chaincy; Rice, Brad W; Calandrino, Riccardo; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea; Boschi, Federico

    2011-06-20

    Quite recently Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) has been introduced as a novel pre-clinical imaging for the in vivo imaging of small animals such as mice. The CLI method is based on the detection of Cerenkov radiation (CR) generated by beta particles as they travel into the animal tissues with an energy such that Cerenkov emission condition is satisfied. This paper describes an image reconstruction method called multi spectral diffuse Cerenkov luminescence tomography (msCLT) in order to obtain 3D images from the detection of CR. The multispectral approach is based on a set of 2D planar images acquired using a number of narrow bandpass filters, and the distinctive information content at each wavelength is used in the 3D image reconstruction process. The proposed msCLT method was tested both in vitro and in vivo using 32P-ATP and all the images were acquired by using the IVIS 200 small animal optical imager (Caliper Life Sciences, Alameda USA). Source depth estimation and spatial resolution measurements were performed using a small capillary source placed between several slices of chicken breast. The theoretical Cerenkov emission spectrum and optical properties of chicken breast were used in the modelling of photon propagation. In vivo imaging was performed by injecting control nude mice with 10 MBq of 32P-ATP and the 3D tracer bio-distribution was reconstructed. Whole body MRI was acquired to provide an anatomical localization of the Cerenkov emission. The spatial resolution obtained from the msCLT reconstructed images of the capillary source showed that the FWHM is about 1.5 mm for a 6 mm depth. Co-registered MRI images showed that the Cerenkov emission regions matches fairly well with anatomical regions, such as the brain, heart and abdomen. Ex vivo imaging of the different organs such as intestine, brain, heart and ribs further confirms these findings. We conclude that in vivo 3D bio-distribution of a pure beta-minus emitting radiopharmaceutical such as 32P

  11. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  12. Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography and multimodality physiological monitoring system for muscle and exercise applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gang; Zhang, Quan; Ivkovic, Vladimir; Strangman, Gary E.

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography (aDOT) is based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and enables three-dimensional imaging of regional hemodynamics and oxygen consumption during a person's normal activities. Although NIRS has been previously used for muscle assessment, it has been notably limited in terms of the number of channels measured, the extent to which subjects can be ambulatory, and/or the ability to simultaneously acquire synchronized auxiliary data such as electromyography (EMG) or electrocardiography (ECG). We describe the development of a prototype aDOT system, called NINscan-M, capable of ambulatory tomographic imaging as well as simultaneous auxiliary multimodal physiological monitoring. Powered by four AA size batteries and weighing 577 g, the NINscan-M prototype can synchronously record 64-channel NIRS imaging data, eight channels of EMG, ECG, or other analog signals, plus force, acceleration, rotation, and temperature for 24+ h at up to 250 Hz. We describe the system's design, characterization, and performance characteristics. We also describe examples of isometric, cycle ergometer, and free-running ambulatory exercise to demonstrate tomographic imaging at 25 Hz. NINscan-M represents a multiuse tool for muscle physiology studies as well as clinical muscle assessment.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging in neuroradiology; Diffusionsgewichtung in der Neuroradiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlamann, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging is becoming increasingly more important in neuroradiology. Formerly this technique was mainly used in stroke diagnostics but the spectrum of applications is becoming increasingly larger. Diffusion-weighted imaging is a useful tool for differentiation between metastases and abscesses, for assessment of the depth of invasiveness of tumors and to differentiate inflammation from astrocytomas. It has now become a standard technique in multiple sclerosis imaging. A further advantage in addition to the diagnostic capabilities is the speed of the sequence which makes it insensitive to movement artefacts. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusionsgewichtung erhaelt in der Neuroradiologie einen immer hoeheren Stellenwert. War sie frueher hauptsaechlich in der Schlaganfalldiagnostik verbreitet, erweitert sich das Anwendungsspektrum immer mehr. Die Diffusionsgewichtung ist sowohl ein hilfreiches Werkzeug zur Differenzierung zwischen Metastasen und Abszessen als auch zur Beurteilung der Invasionstiefe von Tumoren oder zur Unterscheidung von Entzuendungen und Astrozytomen. Sie gehoert mittlerweile zum Standard in der MS-Bildgebung. Ein weiterer Vorteil neben der diagnostischen Aussagekraft ist die Schnelligkeit der Sequenz, die damit sehr unempfindlich gegenueber Bewegungsartefakten ist. (orig.)

  14. 7th International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of the FRINGE Workshop Series this Proceeding contains all contributions presented at the 7. International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology. The FRINGE Workshop Series is dedicated to the presentation, discussion and dissemination of recent results in Optical Imaging and Metrology. Topics of particular interest for the 7. Workshop are: - New methods and tools for the generation, acquisition, processing, and evaluation of data in Optical Imaging and Metrology (digital wavefront engineering, computational imaging, model-based reconstruction, compressed sensing, inverse problems solution) - Application-driven technologies in Optical Imaging and Metrology (high-resolution, adaptive, active, robust, reliable, flexible, in-line, real-time) - High-dynamic range solutions in Optical Imaging and Metrology (from macro to nano) - Hybrid technologies in Optical Imaging and Metrology (hybrid optics, sensor and data fusion, model-based solutions, multimodality) - New optical sensors, imagi...

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosottini, M. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy); Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Tavarelli, C.; De Cori, S.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Del Bono, L.; Doria, G. [Unit of Infectious Diseases AO, Pisa (Italy); Giannelli, M. [Unit of Medical Physics, Pisa (Italy); Michelassi, M.C. [Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Murri, L. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the central nervous system due to JC polyoma virus infection of oligodendrocytes. PML develops in patients with impaired T-cell function as occurs in HIV, malignancy or immunosuppressive drugs users. Until now no imaging methods have been reported to correlate with clinical status. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a robust MRI tool in investigating white matter architecture and diseases. The aim of our work was to assess diffusion abnormalities in focal white matter lesions in patients with PML and to correlate the lesion load measured with conventional MRI and DWI to clinical variables. We evaluated eight patients with a biopsy or laboratory-supported diagnosis of PML. All patients underwent MRI including conventional sequences (fluid attenuated inversion recovery-FLAIR) and DWI. Mean diffusivity (MD) maps were used to quantify diffusion on white matter lesions. Global lesion load was calculated by manually tracing lesions on FLAIR images, while total, central core and peripheral lesion loads were calculated by manually tracing lesions on DWI images. Lesion load obtained with the conventional or DWI-based methods were correlated with clinical variables such as disease duration, disease severity and survival. White matter focal lesions are characterized by a central core with low signal on DWI images and high MD (1.853 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s), surrounded by a rim of high signal intensity on DWI and lower MD (1.1 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). The MD value of normal-appearing white matter is higher although not statistically significant (0.783 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s) with respect to control subjects (0.750 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). Inter-rater correlations of global lesion load between FLAIR (3.96%) and DWI (3.43%) was excellent (ICC =0.87). Global lesion load on FLAIR and DWI correlates with disease duration and severity (respectively, p = 0.037, p = 0.0272 with Karnofsky scale and p = 0.0338 with

  16. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  17. Interrogation of living myocardium in multiple static deformation states with diffusion tensor and diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohezic, Maelene; Teh, Irvin; Bollensdorff, Christian; Peyronnet, Rémi; Hales, Patrick W; Grau, Vicente; Kohl, Peter; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reveals valuable insights into tissue histo-anatomy and microstructure, and has steadily gained traction in the cardiac community. Its wider use in small animal cardiac imaging in vivo has been constrained by its extreme sensitivity to motion, exaggerated by the high heart rates usually seen in rodents. Imaging of the isolated heart eliminates respiratory motion and, if conducted on arrested hearts, cardiac pulsation. This serves as an important intermediate step for basic and translational studies. However, investigating the micro-structural basis of cardiac deformation in the same heart requires observations in different deformation states. Here, we illustrate the imaging of isolated rat hearts in three mechanical states mimicking diastole (cardioplegic arrest), left-ventricular (LV) volume overload (cardioplegic arrest plus LV balloon inflation), and peak systole (lithium-induced contracture). An optimised MRI-compatible Langendorff perfusion setup with the radio-frequency (RF) coil integrated into the wet chamber was developed for use in a 9.4T horizontal bore scanner. Signal-to-noise ratio improved significantly, by 75% compared to a previous design with external RF coil, and stability tests showed no significant changes in mean T1, T2 or LV wall thickness over a 170 min period. In contracture, we observed a significant reduction in mean fractional anisotropy from 0.32 ± 0.02 to 0.28 ± 0.02, as well as a significant rightward shift in helix angles with a decrease in the proportion of left-handed fibres, as referring to the locally prevailing cell orientation in the heart, from 24.9% to 23.3%, and an increase in the proportion of right-handed fibres from 25.5% to 28.4%. LV overload, in contrast, gave rise to a decrease in the proportion of left-handed fibres from 24.9% to 21.4% and an increase in the proportion of right-handed fibres from 25.5% to 26.0%. The modified perfusion and coil setup offers

  18. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  19. Optical cell sorting with multiple imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Carrissemoux, Caro; Palima, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    techniques. Scattering forces from beams actuated via efficient phase-only efficient modulation has been adopted. This has lowered the required power for sorting cells to a tenth of our previous approach, and also makes the cell sorter safer for use in clinical settings. With the versatility of dynamically...... programmable phase spatial light modulators, a plurality of light shaping techniques, including hybrid approaches, can be utilized in cell sorting....... healthy cells. With the richness of visual information, a lot of microscopy techniques have been developed and have been crucial in biological studies. To utilize their complementary advantages we adopt both fluorescence and brightfield imaging in our optical cell sorter. Brightfield imaging has...

  20. Electro-optic imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Znod, Hanying (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EOIFTS) for Hyperspectral Imaging is described. The EOIFTS includes an input polarizer, an output polarizer, and a plurality of birefringent phase elements. The relative orientations of the polarizers and birefringent phase elements can be changed mechanically or via a controller, using ferroelectric liquid crystals, to substantially measure the spectral Fourier components of light propagating through the EIOFTS. When achromatic switches are used as an integral part of the birefringent phase elements, the EIOFTS becomes suitable for broadband applications, with over 1 micron infrared bandwidth.

  1. Magneto-optical imaging of exotic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, C. J.; Losco, J.; Konczykowski, M.; Pari, P.; Shibauchi, T.; Shishido, H.; Matsuda, Y.

    2009-02-01

    We have constructed a novel compact cryostat for optical measurements at temperatures below 2 K. The desktop cryostat, small enough to be placed under the objective of a standard commercial polarized light microscope, functions in a single shot mode, with a five hour autonomy at 1.5 K. Central to its conception are four charcoal pumps for adsorption and desorption of He contained in a closed circuit, and novel thermal switches allowing for thermalization of the pumps and of the two 1 K pots. The latter are connected to the 1" diameter sample holder through braids. Sample access is immediate, through the simple removal of the optical windows. In this contribution, we shall present first results on magneto-optical imaging of flux penetration in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCoIn5.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of thyroid nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Coskun, Sonay; Ogur, Erkin [Firat University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Dagli, A.F. [Firat University, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Ozkan, Yusuf; Sahpaz, Fatih [Firat University, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine the diagnostic role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the differentiating of malignant and benign thyroid nodules by using fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology criteria as a reference standard. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the normal-looking thyroid parenchyma were also evaluated both in normal patients and in patients with nodules. Between March 2007 and February 2008, 76 consecutive patients with ultrasound-diagnosed thyroid nodules and 20 healthy subjects underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging by using single-shot spin echo, echo planar imaging. A total of 93 nodules were included in the study using the following b factors 100, 200, and 300 mm{sup 2}/s. ADC values of thyroid nodules and normal area in all subjects were calculated and compared using suitable statistical analysis. Mean ADC values for malignant and benign nodules were 0.96{+-}0.65 x 10{sup -3} and 3.06{+-}0.71 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. for b-300 factor, 0.56{+-}0.43 x 10{sup -3} and 1.80{+-}0.60 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for b-200, and 0.30{+-}0.20 x 10{sup -3} and 1.15{+-}0.43 x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, for b-300, respectively. Mean ADC values of malignant nodules were lower than benign nodules. There were significant differences in ADC values between benign and malignant nodules. ADC values among normal-appearing thyroid parenchyma of patients and normal-appearing thyroid parenchyma of healthy subjects were insignificant at all b factors. Benign nodules have higher ADC values than malignant ones. DWI may be helpful in differentiating malign and benign thyroid nodules. (orig.)

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  4. Improving depth resolution of diffuse optical tomography with an exponential adjustment method based on maximum singular value of layered sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haijing Niu; Ping Guo; Xiaodong Song; Tianzi Jiang

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging exponentially decreases with the increase of photon penetration depth, which leads to a poor depth resolution for DOT. In this letter, an exponential adjustment method (EAM) based on maximum singular value of layered sensitivity is proposed. Optimal depth resolution can be achieved by compensating the reduced sensitivity in the deep medium. Simulations are performed using a semi-infinite model and the simulation results show that the EAM method can substantially improve the depth resolution of deeply embedded objects in the medium. Consequently, the image quality and the reconstruction accuracy for these objects have been largely improved.

  5. IOT Overview: Optical Spectro-Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patat, F.

    Taking the FORS instruments as a representative case, I review the Calibration Plan for optical spectro-imagers currently offered at ESO, discussing various aspects related both to the scientific outcome and the instrument/site monitoring. I also describe ongoing and future calibration projects planned by the Instrument Operations Teams, trying to give an objective view on the limitations of the Calibration Plans currently implemented at ESO for this class of instruments.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography in brain malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poretti, Andrea; Meoded, Avner; Rossi, Andrea; Raybaud, Charles; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an advanced MR technique that provides qualitative and quantitative information about the micro-architecture of white matter. DTI and its post-processing tool fiber tractography (FT) have been increasingly used in the last decade to investigate the microstructural neuroarchitecture of brain malformations. This article aims to review the use of DTI and FT in the evaluation of a variety of common, well-described brain malformations, in particular by pointing out the additional information that DTI and FT renders compared with conventional MR sequences. In addition, the relevant existing literature is summarized.

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography in brain malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poretti, Andrea; Meoded, Avner; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Institue, Pediatric Neuroradiology, Genova (Italy); Raybaud, Charles [University of Toronto, Department of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an advanced MR technique that provides qualitative and quantitative information about the micro-architecture of white matter. DTI and its post-processing tool fiber tractography (FT) have been increasingly used in the last decade to investigate the microstructural neuroarchitecture of brain malformations. This article aims to review the use of DTI and FT in the evaluation of a variety of common, well-described brain malformations, in particular by pointing out the additional information that DTI and FT renders compared with conventional MR sequences. In addition, the relevant existing literature is summarized. (orig.)

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qualls Clifford R

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Methods We used Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI to assess white matter abnormalities in seventeen NPSLE patients, sixteen SLE patients without NPSLE, and twenty age- and gender-matched controls. Results NPSLE patients differed significantly from SLE and control patients in white matter integrity of the body of the corpus callosum, the left arm of the forceps major and the left anterior corona radiata. Conclusions Several possible mechanisms of white matter injury are explored, including vascular injury, medication effects, and platelet or fibrin macro- or microembolism from Libman-Sacks endocarditis.

  9. Digital volume imaging of the PEFC gas diffusion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL; Shim, Eunkyoung [NC ST

    2010-01-01

    The gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a key role in the overall performance/durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Of profound importance, especially in the context of water management and flooding phenomena, is the influence of the underlying pore morphology and wetting characteristics Of the GDL microstructure. In this article, we present the digital volumetric imaging (DVI) technique in order to generate the 3-D carbon paper GDL microstructure. The internal pore structure and the local microstructural variations in terms of fiber alignment and fiber/binder distributions are investigated using the several 3-D thin sections of the sample obtained from DVI.

  10. Diffusion tensor imaging differences relate to memory deficits in diffuse traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roig Teresa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory is one of the most impaired functions after traumatic brain injury (TBI. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to determine the structural basis of memory deficit. We correlated fractional anisotropy (FA of the fasciculi connecting the main cerebral regions that are involved in declarative and working memory functions. Methods Fifteen patients with severe and diffuse TBI and sixteen healthy controls matched by age and years of education were scanned. The neuropsychological assessment included: Letter-number sequencing test (LNS, 2-back task, digit span (forwards and backwards and the Rivermead profilet. DTI was analyzed by a tract-based spatial statics (TBSS approach. Results Whole brain DTI analysis showed a global decrease in FA values that correlated with the 2-back d-prime index, but not with the Rivermead profile. ROI analysis revealed positive correlations between working memory performance assessed by 2-back d-prime and superior longitudinal fasciculi, corpus callosum, arcuate fasciculi and fornix. Declarative memory assessed by the Rivermead profile scores correlated with the fornix and the corpus callosum. Conclusions Diffuse TBI is associated with a general decrease of white matter integrity. Nevertheless deficits in specific memory domains are related to different patterns of white matter damage.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the abdomen at 3.0 Tesla: image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient reproducibility compared with 1.5 Tesla.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkrantz, A.B.; Oei, M.T.H.; Babb, J.S.; Niver, B.E.; Taouli, B.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS EPI) diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) of abdominal organs between 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T in healthy volunteers in terms of image quality, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and ADC reproducibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight healthy vol

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the abdomen at 3.0 Tesla: image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient reproducibility compared with 1.5 Tesla.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkrantz, A.B.; Oei, M.T.H.; Babb, J.S.; Niver, B.E.; Taouli, B.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS EPI) diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) of abdominal organs between 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T in healthy volunteers in terms of image quality, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and ADC reproducibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight healthy

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the abdomen at 3.0 Tesla: image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient reproducibility compared with 1.5 Tesla.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkrantz, A.B.; Oei, M.T.H.; Babb, J.S.; Niver, B.E.; Taouli, B.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS EPI) diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) of abdominal organs between 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T in healthy volunteers in terms of image quality, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and ADC reproducibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight healthy vol

  14. Improving the light quantification of near infrared (NIR) diffused light optical tomography with ultrasound localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman

    According to the statistics published by the American Cancer Society, currently breast cancer is the second most common cancer after skin cancer and the second cause of cancer death after lung cancer in the female population. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared (NIR) light, guided by ultrasound localization, has shown great promise in distinguishing benign from malignant breast tumors and in assessing the response of breast cancer to chemotherapy. Our ultrasound-guided DOT system is based on reflection geometry, with patients scanned in supine position using a hand-held probe. For patients with chest-wall located at a depth shallower than 1 to 2cm, as in about 10% of our clinical cases, the semi-infinite imaging medium is not a valid assumption and the chest-wall effect needs to be considered in the imaging reconstruction procedure. In this dissertation, co-registered ultrasound images were used to model the breast-tissue and chest-wall as a two-layer medium. The effect of the chest wall on breast lesion reconstruction was systematically investigated. The performance of the two-layer model-based reconstruction, using the Finite Element Method, was evaluated by simulation, phantom experiments and clinical studies. The results show that the two-layer model can improve the accuracy of estimated background optical properties, the reconstructed absorption map and the total hemoglobin concentration of the lesion. For patients' data affected by chest wall, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at lesion and normal reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch between these two sites. Because the imaging reconstruction is based on the perturbation approach, the effect of this mismatch between the optical properties at the two sites on reconstructed optical absorption was studied and a guideline for imaging procedure was developed to reduce these effects during data capturing. To reduce the artifacts

  15. Computational optical sensing and imaging: introduction to feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwe, David R; Harvey, Andrew; Gehm, Michael E

    2013-04-01

    The 2012 Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging (COSI) conference of the Optical Society of America was one of six colocated meetings composing the Imaging and Applied Optics Congress held in Monterey, California, 24-28 June. COSI, together with the Imaging Systems and Applications, Optical Sensors, Applied Industrial Optics, and Optical Remote Sensing of the Environment conferences, brought together a diverse group of scientists and engineers sharing a common interest in measuring and processing of information carried by optical fields. This special feature includes several papers based on presentations given at the 2012 COSI conference as well as independent contributions, which together highlight several important trends.

  16. Diffusion-weighted imaging of normal fibroglandular breast tissue : influence of microperfusion and fat suppression technique on the apparent diffusion coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Paul; Dorrius, Monique D.; Kappert, Peter; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of microperfusion and fat suppression technique on the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) of normal fibroglandular breast tissue was investigated. Seven volunteers (14 breasts) were scanned using diffusion weighting factors (b val

  17. Diffusion between glass and metals for optical fiber preform extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Felicia Yan Xin; Zhang, Zhifeng; Kumar Chakkathara Janardhanan Nair, Dileep; Zhang, Yilei

    2015-07-01

    When silica is extruded, diffusion of metal atoms into silica results contamination to the silica being heated, and thus is a serious concern for the glass extrusion process, such as extrusion of glass fiber preform. This paper examines diffusion between fused silica and two high strength metals, the stainless steel SS410 and the superalloy Inconel 718, at 1000 °C and under the normal atmosphere condition by SEM and Electron Dispersion Spectrum. It is found that diffusion occurs between silica and SS410, and at the same time, SS410 is severely oxidized during diffusion experiment. On the contrary, the diffusion between Inconel 718 and silica is unnoticeable, suggesting excellent high temperature performance of Inconel 718 for glass extrusion.

  18. CCD imaging for optical tomography of gel radiation dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolodzko, J G; Marsden, C; Appleby, A

    1999-11-01

    Several investigations have been carried out by a number of researchers over the past few years to evaluate the utility of imaging gel dosimeters for the three-dimensional measurement of radiation fields. These have been proposed to be of particular value in mapping radiation dose distributions associated with emerging and complex approaches to cancer treatment such as conformal (CRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), "gamma knife," and pencil beam radiotherapies. Imaging of the gels has been successfully accomplished with clinical MRI units and via laser-based optical scanning. However, neither of these methods is generally accessible to all potential users, limiting the broader study and implementation of this valuable tool. We report here the design, methodology, and results of a preliminary study carried out to evaluate the utility of a new, inexpensive, and simplified approach to tomographic imaging of gel radiation dosimeters. For the purpose of this initial investigation, an array of liquid scintillation vials was prepared, containing a ferrous sulphate xylenol orange (FSX) gelatin formulation. The FSX formulation undergoes a change in optical absorption characteristics following irradiation, and the resulting color change can be observed visually. The vials were irradiated individually to different doses. Three-dimensional imaging was accomplished by tomographic reconstruction from two-dimensional optical images acquired using a diffuse, fluorescent light source, a digital charge-coupled device camera, single-photon-emission-computed tomography software, and other simple components designed by the authors. The resulting transverse images were evaluated through a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain the average change in image density in each vial as a function of radiation dose. These measured ROI values were subjected to a linear regression analysis to fit them to a straight line, and to determine the goodness of fit. Results from multiple imaging trials

  19. Optical image processing by using a photorefractive spatial soliton waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bao-Lai, E-mail: liangbaolai@gmail.com [College of Physics Science & Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang, Ying; Zhang, Su-Heng; Guo, Qing-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Fu, Guang-Sheng [College of Physics Science & Technology, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Simmonds, Paul J. [Department of Physics and Micron School of Materials Science & Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Wang, Zhao-Qi [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2017-04-04

    By combining the photorefractive spatial soliton waveguide of a Ce:SBN crystal with a coherent 4-f system we are able to manipulate the spatial frequencies of an input optical image to perform edge-enhancement and direct component enhancement operations. Theoretical analysis of this optical image processor is presented to interpret the experimental observations. This work provides an approach for optical image processing by using photorefractive spatial solitons. - Highlights: • A coherent 4-f system with the spatial soliton waveguide as spatial frequency filter. • Manipulate the spatial frequencies of an input optical image. • Achieve edge-enhancement and direct component enhancement operations of an optical image.

  20. Diffusion fMRI detects white-matter dysfunction in mice with acute optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsen-Hsuan; Spees, William M; Chiang, Chia-Wen; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Cross, Anne H; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2014-07-01

    Optic neuritis is a frequent and early symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) techniques provide means to assess multiple MS-related pathologies, including axonal injury, demyelination, and inflammation. A method to directly and non-invasively probe white-matter function could further elucidate the interplay of underlying pathologies and functional impairments. Previously, we demonstrated a significant 27% activation-associated decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient of water perpendicular to the axonal fibers (ADC⊥) in normal C57BL/6 mouse optic nerve with visual stimulation using diffusion fMRI. Here we apply this approach to explore the relationship between visual acuity, optic nerve pathology, and diffusion fMRI in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of optic neuritis. Visual stimulation produced a significant 25% (vs. baseline) ADC⊥ decrease in sham EAE optic nerves, while only a 7% (vs. baseline) ADC⊥ decrease was seen in EAE mice with acute optic neuritis. The reduced activation-associated ADC⊥ response correlated with post-MRI immunohistochemistry determined pathologies (including inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury). The negative correlation between activation-associated ADC⊥ response and visual acuity was also found when pooling EAE-affected and sham groups under our experimental criteria. Results suggest that reduction in diffusion fMRI directly reflects impaired axonal-activation in EAE mice with optic neuritis. Diffusion fMRI holds promise for directly gauging in vivo white-matter dysfunction or therapeutic responses in MS patients.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging and histology of developing hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Osama M; Seidel, Thomas; Dahl, MarJanna; Gomez, Arnold David; Yiep, Gavin; Cortino, Julia; Sachse, Frank B; Albertine, Kurt H; Hsu, Edward W

    2016-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has emerged as a promising method for noninvasive quantification of myocardial microstructure. However, the origin and behavior of DTI measurements during myocardial normal development and remodeling remain poorly understood. In this work, conventional and bicompartmental DTI in addition to three-dimensional histological correlation were performed in a sheep model of myocardial development from third trimester to postnatal 5 months of age. Comparing the earliest time points in the third trimester with the postnatal 5 month group, the scalar transverse diffusivities preferentially increased in both left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV): secondary eigenvalues D2 increased by 54% (LV) and 36% (RV), whereas tertiary eigenvalues D3 increased by 85% (LV) and 67% (RV). The longitudinal diffusivity D1 changes were small, which led to a decrease in fractional anisotropy by 41% (LV) and 33% (RV) in 5 month versus fetal hearts. Histological analysis suggested that myocardial development is associated with hyperplasia in the early stages of the third trimester followed by myocyte growth in the later stages up to 5 months of age (increased average myocyte width by 198%, myocyte length by 128%, and decreased nucleus density by 70% between preterm and postnatal 5 month hearts.) In a few histological samples (N = 6), correlations were observed between DTI longitudinal diffusivity and myocyte length (r = 0.86, P eigenvectors during development changed significantly. Collectively, the findings demonstrate a role for DTI to monitor and quantify myocardial development, and potentially cardiac disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mathematical abilities in dyslexic children: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerte, Inga K; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Moll, Kristina; Cornell, Sonia; Pixner, Silvia; Steffinger, Denise; Keeser, Daniel; Heinen, Florian; Kubicki, Marek; Shenton, Martha E; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2016-09-01

    Dyslexia is characterized by a deficit in language processing which mainly affects word decoding and spelling skills. In addition, children with dyslexia also show problems in mathematics. However, for the latter, the underlying structural correlates have not been investigated. Sixteen children with dyslexia (mean age 9.8 years [0.39]) and 24 typically developing children (mean age 9.9 years [0.29]) group matched for age, gender, IQ, and handedness underwent 3 T MR diffusion tensor imaging as well as cognitive testing. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics were performed to correlate behavioral data with diffusion data. Children with dyslexia performed worse than controls in standardized verbal number tasks, such as arithmetic efficiency tests (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division). In contrast, the two groups did not differ in the nonverbal number line task. Arithmetic efficiency, representing the total score of the four arithmetic tasks, multiplication, and division, correlated with diffusion measures in widespread areas of the white matter, including bilateral superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi in children with dyslexia compared to controls. Children with dyslexia demonstrated lower performance in verbal number tasks but performed similarly to controls in a nonverbal number task. Further, an association between verbal arithmetic efficiency and diffusion measures was demonstrated in widespread areas of the white matter suggesting compensatory mechanisms in children with dyslexia compared to controls. Taken together, poor fact retrieval in children with dyslexia is likely a consequence of deficits in the language system, which not only affects literacy skills but also impacts on arithmetic skills.

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging of post mortem multiple sclerosis brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmierer, Klaus; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Boulby, Phil A; Scaravilli, Francesco; Altmann, Daniel R; Barker, Gareth J; Tofts, Paul S; Miller, David H

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being used to probe the central nervous system (CNS) of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic demyelinating disease. Conventional T(2)-weighted MRI (cMRI) largely fails to predict the degree of patients' disability. This shortcoming may be due to poor specificity of cMRI for clinically relevant pathology. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown promise to be more specific for MS pathology. In this study we investigated the association between histological indices of myelin content, axonal count and gliosis, and two measures of DTI (mean diffusivity [MD] and fractional anisotropy [FA]), in unfixed post mortem MS brain using a 1.5-T MR system. Both MD and FA were significantly lower in post mortem MS brain compared to published data acquired in vivo. However, the differences of MD and FA described in vivo between white matter lesions (WMLs) and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) were retained in this study of post mortem brain: average MD in WMLs was 0.35x10(-3) mm(2)/s (SD, 0.09) versus 0.22 (0.04) in NAWM; FA was 0.22 (0.06) in WMLs versus 0.38 (0.13) in NAWM. Correlations were detected between myelin content (Tr(myelin)) and (i) FA (r=-0.79, ppost mortem MS brain.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging in characterization of cystic pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K., E-mail: ksandras@iupui.edu [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Akisik, F.M.; Patel, A.A.; Rydberg, M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cramer, H.M.; Agaram, N.P. [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Schmidt, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can characterize or predict the malignant potential of cystic pancreatic lesions. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database over a 2-year period revealed 136 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions. Patients with DWI studies and histological confirmation of cystic mass were included. In patients with known pancreatitis, lesions with amylase content of >1000 IU/l that resolved on subsequent scans were included as pseudocysts. ADC of cystic lesions was measured by two independent reviewers. These values were then compared to categorize these lesions as benign or malignant using conventional MRI sequences. Results: Seventy lesions were analysed: adenocarcinoma (n = 4), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; n = 28), mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN; n = 9), serous cystadenoma (n = 16), and pseudocysts (n = 13). There was no difference between ADC values of malignant and non-malignant lesions (p = 0.06), between mucinous and serous tumours (p = 0.12), or between IPMN and MCN (p = 0.42). ADC values for low-grade IPMN were significantly higher than those for high-grade or invasive IPMN (p = 0.03). Conclusion: ADC values may be helpful in deciding the malignant potential of IPMN. However, they are not useful in differentiating malignant from benign lesions or for characterizing cystic pancreatic lesions.

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in transient ischaemic attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C.; Calvet, D.; Domigo, V.; Mas, J. [de l' Hopital Sainte-Anne, Service de Neurologie, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Oppenheim, C.; Naggara, O.; Meder, J.F. [Hoepital Sainte-Anne, Departement d' Imagere Morphologique et Fonchonnille, Paris (France)

    2006-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency and the characteristics of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We analysed data of 98 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.6{+-}15.4 years, 56 men) admitted between January 2003 and April 2004 for TIA. Age, gender, symptom type and duration, delay from onset to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), probable or possible TIA and cause of TIA were compared in patients with (DWI+) and without (DWI-) lesions on DWI. Volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI lesions were computed. DWI revealed ischaemic lesions in 34 patients (34.7%). Lesions were small (mean volume: 1.9 cm{sup 3}{+-}3.3), and ADC was moderately decreased (mean ADC ratio: 79.5%). The diagnosis of TIA was considered as probable in all DWI+ patients. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that TIA duration greater than or equal to 60 min (OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.3-25.7), aphasia (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 2.7-31.4) and motor deficit (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.5-17.8) were independent predictors of DWI lesions. Prolonged TIA duration, aphasia and motor deficits are associated with DWI lesions. More than half of TIA patients with symptoms lasting more than 60 min have DWI lesions. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging in normal fetal brain maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F. [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Confort-Gouny, S.; Le Fur, Y.; Viout, P.; Cozzone, P. [UMR-CNRS 6612, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Bennathan, M.; Chapon, F.; Fogliarini, C.; Girard, N. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Department of Neuroradiology AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information about tissue maturation not seen on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution over time of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal fetal brain in utero. DWI was performed on 78 fetuses, ranging from 23 to 37 gestational weeks (GW). All children showed at follow-up a normal neurological evaluation. ADC values were obtained in the deep white matter (DWM) of the centrum semiovale, the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe, in the cerebellar hemisphere, the brainstem, the basal ganglia (BG) and the thalamus. Mean ADC values in supratentorial DWM areas (1.68 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s) were higher compared with the cerebellar hemisphere (1.25 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 2}/s) and lowest in the pons (1.11 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s). Thalamus and BG showed intermediate values (1.25 {+-} 0.04 mm{sup 2}/s). Brainstem, cerebellar hemisphere and thalamus showed a linear negative correlation with gestational age. Supratentorial areas revealed an increase in ADC values, followed by a decrease after the 30th GW. This study provides a normative data set that allows insights in the normal fetal brain maturation in utero, which has not yet been observed in previous studies on premature babies. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography of joint tissues in hand osteoarthritis: Morphological and functional assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Zhen; Zhang Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang Huabei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of multimodality functional imaging techniques to identify the quantitative optical findings that can be used to distinguish between osteoarthritic and normal finger joints. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 female subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controls were examined clinically and scanned by a hybrid imaging system. This system integrated x-ray tomosynthetic setup with a diffuse optical imaging system. Optical absorption and scattering images were recovered based on a regularization-based hybrid reconstruction algorithm. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to calculate the statistical significance of specific optical features obtained from osteoarthritic and healthy joints groups. Results: The three-dimensional optical and x-ray images captured made it possible to quantify optical properties and joint space width of finger joints. Based on the recovered optical absorption and scattering parameters, the authors observed statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. Conclusions: The statistical results revealed that sensitivity and specificity values up to 92% and 100%, respectively, can be achieved when optical properties of joint tissues were used as classifiers. This suggests that these optical imaging parameters are possible indicators for diagnosing osteoarthritis and monitoring its progression.

  8. Dual-phase cardiac diffusion tensor imaging with strain correction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Stoeck

    Full Text Available In this work we present a dual-phase diffusion tensor imaging (DTI technique that incorporates a correction scheme for the cardiac material strain, based on 3D myocardial tagging.In vivo dual-phase cardiac DTI with a stimulated echo approach and 3D tagging was performed in 10 healthy volunteers. The time course of material strain was estimated from the tagging data and used to correct for strain effects in the diffusion weighted acquisition. Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, helix, transverse and sheet angles were calculated and compared between systole and diastole, with and without strain correction. Data acquired at the systolic sweet spot, where the effects of strain are eliminated, served as a reference.The impact of strain correction on helix angle was small. However, large differences were observed in the transverse and sheet angle values, with and without strain correction. The standard deviation of systolic transverse angles was significantly reduced from 35.9±3.9° to 27.8°±3.5° (p<0.001 upon strain-correction indicating more coherent fiber tracks after correction. Myocyte aggregate structure was aligned more longitudinally in systole compared to diastole as reflected by an increased transmural range of helix angles (71.8°±3.9° systole vs. 55.6°±5.6°, p<0.001 diastole. While diastolic sheet angle histograms had dominant counts at high sheet angle values, systolic histograms showed lower sheet angle values indicating a reorientation of myocyte sheets during contraction.An approach for dual-phase cardiac DTI with correction for material strain has been successfully implemented. This technique allows assessing dynamic changes in myofiber architecture between systole and diastole, and emphasizes the need for strain correction when sheet architecture in the heart is imaged with a stimulated echo approach.

  9. Diffuse reflectance optical topography: location of inclusions in 3D and detectability limits

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone, Nicolás Abel; Baez, Guido Rodrigo; García, Héctor Alfredo; Waks Serra, María Victoria; Di Rocco, Hector Omar; Iriarte, Daniela Ines; Pomarico, Juan Antonio; Grosenick, D.; MacDonald, R.

    2014-01-01

    In the present contribution we investigate the images of CW diffusely reflected light for a point-like source, registered by a CCD camera imaging a turbid medium containing an absorbing lesion. We show that detection of μa variations (absorption anomalies) is achieved if images are normalized to background intensity. A theoretical analysis based on the diffusion approximation is presented to investigate the sensitivity and the limitations of our proposal and a novel procedure to find the loca...

  10. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the pancreas; Diffusionsbildgebung des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, K. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, E010, Heidelberg (Germany); Grenacher, L.; Klauss, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has increasingly gained in importance over the last 10 years especially in cancer imaging for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. Through development of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences DWI is not only applicable in neuroradiology but also in abdominal imaging. As a diagnostic tool of the pancreas DWI enables a differentiation between normal tissue, cancer and chronic pancreatitis. The ADC values (apparent diffusion coefficient, the so-called effective diffusion coefficient) reported in the literature for healthy pancreatic tissue are in the range from 1.49 to 1.9 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, for pancreatic cancer in the range from 1.24 to 1.46 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and for autoimmune pancreatitis an average ADC value of 1.012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. There are controversial data in the literature concerning the differentiation between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Using DWI-derived IVIM (intravoxel incoherent motion) the parameter f (perfusion fraction) seems to be advantageous but it is important to use several b values. In the literature the mean f value in chronic pancreatitis is around 16%, in pancreatic cancer 8% and in healthy pancreatic tissue around 25%. So far, DWI has not been helpful for differentiating cystic lesions of the pancreas. There are many references with other tumor entities and in animal models which indicate that there is a possible benefit of DWI in monitoring therapy of pancreatic cancer but so far no original work has been published. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusionsbildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) gewann in den letzten 10 Jahren insbesondere in der Tumorbildgebung zur Unterscheidung zwischen malignen und benignen Laesionen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Durch Entwicklung schnellerer MR-Sequenzen ist sie nicht nur in der Neuroradiologie, sondern auch in der Abdomenbildgebung einsetzbar. In der Pankreasdiagnostik ermoeglicht sie

  11. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  12. Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging and fiber-tracking diffusion tensor tractography in the management of spinal astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Alessandro; Palmarini, Valeria; D'Elia, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Salvati, Maurizio; Santoro, Antonio; Delfini, Roberto

    2016-01-16

    Some specially imaging of magnetic resonance imaging, the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), the diffusion tensor imaging and fractional anisotropy (FA), are useful to described, detect, and map the extent of spinal cord lesions. FA measurements may are used to predicting the outcome of patients who have spinal cord lesions. Fiber tracking enable to visualizing the integrity of white matter tracts surrounding some lesions, and this information could be used to formulating a differential diagnosis and planning biopsies or resection. In this article, we will describe the current uses for DWI and fiber tracking and speculate on others in which we believe these techniques will be useful in the future.

  13. Noise removal in magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Hsu, Edward W

    2005-08-01

    Although promising for visualizing the structure of ordered tissues, MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been hampered by long acquisition time and low spatial resolution associated with its inherently low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Moreover, the uncertainty in the DTI measurements has a direct impact on the accuracy of structural renderings such as fiber streamline tracking. Noise removal techniques can be used to improve the SNR of DTI without requiring additional acquisitions, albeit most low-pass filtering methods are accompanied by undesirable image blurring. In the present study, a modified vector-based partial-differential-equation (PDE) filtering formalism was implemented for smoothing DTI vector fields. Using an image residual-energy criterion to equate the degree of smoothing and error metrics empirically derived from DTI data to quantify the relative performances, the effectiveness in denoising DTI data is compared among image-based and vector-based PDE and fixed and adaptive low-pass k-space filtering. The results demonstrate that the edge-preservation feature of the PDE approach can be highly advantageous in enhancing DTI measurements, particularly for vector-based PDE filtering in applications relying on DTI directional information. These findings suggest a potential role for the postprocessing enhancement technique to improve the practical utility of DTI.

  14. Image Encryption Based on Diffusion and Multiple Chaotic Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Sathishkumar, G A; Sriraam, Dr N; 10.5121/ijnsa.2011.3214

    2011-01-01

    In the recent world, security is a prime important issue, and encryption is one of the best alternative way to ensure security. More over, there are many image encryption schemes have been proposed, each one of them has its own strength and weakness. This paper presents a new algorithm for the image encryption/decryption scheme. This paper is devoted to provide a secured image encryption technique using multiple chaotic based circular mapping. In this paper, first, a pair of sub keys is given by using chaotic logistic maps. Second, the image is encrypted using logistic map sub key and in its transformation leads to diffusion process. Third, sub keys are generated by four different chaotic maps. Based on the initial conditions, each map may produce various random numbers from various orbits of the maps. Among those random numbers, a particular number and from a particular orbit are selected as a key for the encryption algorithm. Based on the key, a binary sequence is generated to control the encryption algorit...

  15. Compressive optical image watermarking using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Ting; Dai, Xiaofang; Yang, Chanxia; Li, Rong; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    A new optical image watermarking technique based on compressive sensing using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture has been presented. A secret scene or image is first embedded into a host image to perform optical image watermarking by use of joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture. Then, the watermarked image is compressed to much smaller signal data using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in optical domain. At the received terminal, the watermarked image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory and a specified holographic reconstruction algorithm. The preliminary numerical simulations show that it is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in the coming absolutely optical network for the reason of the completely optical implementation and largely decreased holograms data volume.

  16. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of glial brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferda, Jiri, E-mail: ferda@fnplzen. [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Kastner, Jan [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Mukensnabl, Petr [Sikl' s Institute of Pathological Anatomy, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Choc, Milan [Department of Neurosurgery, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic); Horemuzova, Jana; Ferdova, Eva; Kreuzberg, Boris [Department of Radiology, Charles University Hospital Plzen, Medical Faculty Plzen, Alej Svobody 80, 304 60 Plzen (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    Aim: To evaluate the author's experience with the use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) on patients with glial tumors. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of a group of 24 patients with glial tumors was performed. There were eight patients with Grade II, eight patients with Grade III and eight patients with Grade IV tumors with a histologically proven diagnosis. All the patients underwent routine imaging including T2 weighted images, multidirectional diffusion weighted imaging (measured in 60 non-collinear directions) and T1 weighted non-enhanced and contrast enhanced images. The imaging sequence and evaluation software were produced by Massachusetts General Hospital Corporation (Boston, MA, USA). Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were calculated in all patients. The white matter FA changes were assessed within the tumorous tissue, on the tumorous borderline and in the normally appearing white matter adjacent to the tumor. A three-dimensional model of the white matter tract was created to demonstrate the space relationship of the tumor and the capsula interna or corpus callosum in each case using the following fiber tracing parameters: FA step 0.25 and a tensor declination angle of 45 gr. An additional assessment of the tumorous tissue enhancement was performed. Results: A uniform homogenous structure with sharp demargination of the Grade II tumors and the wide rim of the intermedial FA in all Grade III tumors respectively, were found during the evaluation of the FA maps. In Grade IV tumors a variable demargination was noted on the FA maps. The sensitivity and specificity for the discrimination of low- and high-grade glial tumors using FA maps was revealed to be 81% and 87% respectively. If the evaluation of the contrast enhancement was combined with the evaluation of the FA maps, both sensitivity and specificity were 100%. Conclusion: Although the evaluation of the fractional anisotropy maps is not sufficient for glioma grading, the

  17. Optical Brain Imaging: A Powerful Tool for Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinpei; Xia, Yanfang; Wang, Xuecen; Si, Ke; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-01

    As the control center of organisms, the brain remains little understood due to its complexity. Taking advantage of imaging methods, scientists have found an accessible approach to unraveling the mystery of neuroscience. Among these methods, optical imaging techniques are widely used due to their high molecular specificity and single-molecule sensitivity. Here, we overview several optical imaging techniques in neuroscience of recent years, including brain clearing, the micro-optical sectioning tomography system, and deep tissue imaging.

  18. Simultaneous analysis and quality assurance for diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn B Lauzon

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI enables non-invasive, cyto-architectural mapping of in vivo tissue microarchitecture through voxel-wise mathematical modeling of multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI acquisitions, each differently sensitized to water diffusion. DTI computations are fundamentally estimation processes and are sensitive to noise and artifacts. Despite widespread adoption in the neuroimaging community, maintaining consistent DTI data quality remains challenging given the propensity for patient motion, artifacts associated with fast imaging techniques, and the possibility of hardware changes/failures. Furthermore, the quantity of data acquired per voxel, the non-linear estimation process, and numerous potential use cases complicate traditional visual data inspection approaches. Currently, quality inspection of DTI data has relied on visual inspection and individual processing in DTI analysis software programs (e.g. DTIPrep, DTI-studio. However, recent advances in applied statistical methods have yielded several different metrics to assess noise level, artifact propensity, quality of tensor fit, variance of estimated measures, and bias in estimated measures. To date, these metrics have been largely studied in isolation. Herein, we select complementary metrics for integration into an automatic DTI analysis and quality assurance pipeline. The pipeline completes in 24 hours, stores statistical outputs, and produces a graphical summary quality analysis (QA report. We assess the utility of this streamlined approach for empirical quality assessment on 608 DTI datasets from pediatric neuroimaging studies. The efficiency and accuracy of quality analysis using the proposed pipeline is compared with quality analysis based on visual inspection. The unified pipeline is found to save a statistically significant amount of time (over 70% while improving the consistency of QA between a DTI expert and a pool of research associates. Projection of QA

  19. Simultaneous analysis and quality assurance for diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Carolyn B; Asman, Andrew J; Esparza, Michael L; Burns, Scott S; Fan, Qiuyun; Gao, Yurui; Anderson, Adam W; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E; Landman, Bennett A

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enables non-invasive, cyto-architectural mapping of in vivo tissue microarchitecture through voxel-wise mathematical modeling of multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions, each differently sensitized to water diffusion. DTI computations are fundamentally estimation processes and are sensitive to noise and artifacts. Despite widespread adoption in the neuroimaging community, maintaining consistent DTI data quality remains challenging given the propensity for patient motion, artifacts associated with fast imaging techniques, and the possibility of hardware changes/failures. Furthermore, the quantity of data acquired per voxel, the non-linear estimation process, and numerous potential use cases complicate traditional visual data inspection approaches. Currently, quality inspection of DTI data has relied on visual inspection and individual processing in DTI analysis software programs (e.g. DTIPrep, DTI-studio). However, recent advances in applied statistical methods have yielded several different metrics to assess noise level, artifact propensity, quality of tensor fit, variance of estimated measures, and bias in estimated measures. To date, these metrics have been largely studied in isolation. Herein, we select complementary metrics for integration into an automatic DTI analysis and quality assurance pipeline. The pipeline completes in 24 hours, stores statistical outputs, and produces a graphical summary quality analysis (QA) report. We assess the utility of this streamlined approach for empirical quality assessment on 608 DTI datasets from pediatric neuroimaging studies. The efficiency and accuracy of quality analysis using the proposed pipeline is compared with quality analysis based on visual inspection. The unified pipeline is found to save a statistically significant amount of time (over 70%) while improving the consistency of QA between a DTI expert and a pool of research associates. Projection of QA metrics to a low

  20. Diffusion tensor MR imaging in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'souza, Maria M; Choudhary, Ajay; Poonia, Mahesh; Kumar, Pawan; Khushu, Subash

    2017-04-01

    The ability of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to complement conventional MR imaging by diagnosing subtle injuries to the spinal cord is a subject of intense research. We attempted to study change in the DTI indices, namely fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) after traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and compared these with corresponding data from a control group of individuals with no injury. The correlation of these quantitative indices to the neurological profile of the patients was assessed. 20 cases of acute cervical trauma and 30 age and sex matched healthy controls were enrolled. Scoring of extent of clinical severity was done based on the Frankel grading system. MRI was performed on a 3T system. Following the qualitative tractographic evaluation of white matter tracts, quantitative datametrics were calculated. In patients, the Mean FA value at the level of injury (0.43+/-0.08) was less than in controls (0.62+/-0.06), which was statistically significant (p value injury (1.30+/-0.24) in cases was higher than in controls (1.07+/-0.12, p value injury (r value=0.86). Negative correlation was found between clinical grade and Mean MD at the level of injury (r value=-0.38) which was however statistically not significant. Quantitative DTI indices are a useful parameter for detection of spinal cord injury. FA value was significantly decreased while MD value was significantly increased at the level of injury in cases as compared to controls. Further, FA showed significant correlation with clinical grade. DTI could thus serve as a reliable objective imaging tool for assessment of white matter integrity and prognostication of functional outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlations between diffusion-weighted imaging and breast cancer biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martincich, Laura; Deantoni, Veronica; Bertotto, Ilaria; Liotti, Michele; Regge, Daniele [Unit of Radiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Redana, Stefania; Rossi, Valentina; Aglietta, Massimo; Montemurro, Filippo [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Division of Medical Oncology, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Kubatzki, Franziska; Ponzone, Riccardo [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Division of Gynecological Oncology, Candiolo, Turin (Italy); Sarotto, Ivana [Unit of Pathology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Candiolo, Turin (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    We evaluated whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) provided by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) varies according to biological features in breast cancer. DWI was performed in 190 patients undergoing dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local staging. For each of the 192 index cancers we studied the correlation between ADC and classical histopathological and immunohistochemical breast tumour features (size, histological type, grade, oestrogen receptor [ER] and Ki-67 expression, HER2 status). ADC was compared with immunohistochemical surrogates of the intrinsic subtypes (Luminal A; Luminal B; HER2-enriched; triple-negative). Correlations were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis H tests. A weak, statistically significant correlation was observed between ADC values and the percentage of ER-positive cells (-0.168, P = 0.020). Median ADC values were significantly higher in ER-negative than in ER-positive tumours (1.110 vs 1.050 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, P = 0.015). HER2-enriched tumours had the highest median ADC value (1.190 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, range 0.950-2.090). Multiple comparisons showed that this value was significantly higher than that of Luminal A (1.025 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [0.700-1.340], P = 0.004) and Luminal B/HER2-negative (1.060 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s [0.470-2.420], P = 0.008) tumours. A trend towards statistical significance (P = 0.018) was seen with Luminal B/HER2-positive tumours. ADC values vary significantly according to biological tumour features, suggesting that cancer heterogeneity influences imaging parameters. (orig.)

  2. Nanoscale optical imaging of semiconductor nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmler, Miriam; Hartschuh, Achim [Department Chemie, CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Myalitsin, Anton; Mews, Alf [Department Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Inorganic semiconducting nanowires (NWs) feature size-related optical properties which make them interesting for a wide range of applications, e.g. nanoscale optoelectronics, sensors, and photovoltaics. Their relevant length scales that are determined by nanowire diameter and exciton Bohr radius, however, can not be resolved by conventional diffraction limited methods. We illustrate the prospects of tip-enhanced near-field optical microscopy (TENOM) as a method to investigate single nanowires. In TENOM a sharp metallic tip acts as optical antenna thereby enhancing the detected signal and increasing the optical resolution to about 15 nm. We present our investigations of CdSe NWs which have been grown by the wet chemical solution liquid solid technique. Here, TENOM provides the possibility to simultaneously image photoluminescence (PL) as well as Raman scattering of individual NWs with nanoscale resolution. We observe spatial variations of the PL intensity and energy on a length scale of about 15 nm indicating crystal phase transitions and diameter fluctuations.

  3. Boundary Element Method for Reconstructing Absorption and Diffusion Coefficients of Biological Tissues in DOT/MicroCT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wenhao; Deng, Yong; Lian, Lichao; Yan, Dongmei; Yang, Xiaoquan; Luo, Qingming

    2016-01-01

    The functional information, the absorption and diffusion coefficients, as well as the structural information of biological tissues can be provided by the DOT(Diffuse Optical Tomograph)/MicroCT. In this paper, we use boundary element method to calculate the forward problem of DOT based on the structure prior given by the MicroCT, and then we reconstruct the absorption and diffusion coefficients of different biological tissues by the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The method only needs surface meshing, reducing the complexity of calculation; in addition, it reconstructs a single value within an organ, which reduces the ill-posedness of the inverse problem to make reconstruction results have good noise stability. This indicates that the boundary element method-based reconstruction can serve as an new scheme for getting absorption and diffusion coefficients in DOT/MicroCT multimodality imaging.

  4. Performance of laser based optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhrupesh S.; Banerjee, Arup; Vora, Anup; Biswas, Amiya; Patel, Naimesh; Kurulkar, Amit; Dutt, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    Day night imaging application requires high dynamic range optical imaging system to detect targets of interest covering mid-day (>32000 Lux)[1], and moonless night ( 1mLux)[1] under clear sky- (visibility of >10km, atmospheric loss of 500m, atmospheric loss of >15dB/Km) conditions. Major governing factors for development of such camera systems are (i) covert imaging with ability to identify the target, (ii) imaging irrespective to the scene background, (iii) reliable operation , (iv) imaging capabilities in inclement weather conditions, (v) resource requirement vs availability power & mass, (vi) real-time data processing, (vii) self-calibration, and (viii) cost. Identification of optimum spectral band of interest is most important to meet these requirements. Conventional detection systems sensing in MWIR and LWIR band has certain draw backs in terms of target detection capabilities, susceptibility to background and huge thermo-mechanical resource requirement. Alternatively, range gated imaging camera system sensing in NIR/SWIR spectrum has shown significant potential to detect wide dynamic range targets. ToF Camera configured in NIR band has certain advantages in terms of Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) development with large format detectors and thermo-mechanical resource requirement compared to SWIR band camera configuration. In past, ToF camera systems were successfully configured in NIR spectrum using silicon based Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD), Intensifier CCD (ICCD) along with Gating device and pulsed laser source having emission in between 800nm to 900nm. However, these systems have a very low dynamic range and not suitable for clear sky mid-day conditions. Recently silicon based scientific grade CMOS image sensors have shown significant improvement in terms of high NIR responsivity and available in bigger formats (5MP or more), adequate Full well capacity for day time imaging (>30Ke), very low readout noise (<2e) required for night imaging and higher frame

  5. Diagnostic performance of conventional diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging for the liver fibrosis and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosun, Mesude, E-mail: mesude.tosun@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Inan, Nagihan, E-mail: inannagihan@ekolay.net [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin, E-mail: htssarisoy@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Akansel, Gur, E-mail: gakansel@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Gumustas, Sevtap, E-mail: svtgumustas@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Gürbüz, Yeşim, E-mail: yesimgurbuz2002@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Demirci, Ali, E-mail: alidemirci@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of liver apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured with conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (CDI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis and inflammation. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with histologic diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis and 34 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. All patients and healthy volunteers were examined by 3 T MRI. CDI and DTI were performed using a breath-hold single-shot echo-planar spin echo sequence with b factors of 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADCs were obtained with CDI and DTI. Histopathologically, fibrosis of the liver parenchyma was classified with the use of a 5-point scale (0–4) and inflammation was classified with use of a 4-point scale (0–3) in accordance with the METAVIR score. Quantitatively, signal intensity and the ADCs of the liver parenchyma were compared between patients stratified by fibrosis stage and inflammation grade. Results: With a b factor of 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, the signal intensity of the cirrhotic livers was significantly higher than those of the normal volunteers. In addition, ADCs reconstructed from CDI and DTI of the patients were significantly lower than those of the normal volunteers. Liver ADC values inversely correlated with fibrosis and inflammation but there was only statistically significant for inflammatory grading. CDI performed better than DTI for the diagnosis of fibrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: ADC values measured with CDI and DTI may help in the detection of liver fibrosis. They may also give contributory to the inflammatory grading, particularly in distinguishing high from low grade.

  6. Confocal imaging of protein distributions in porous silicon optical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Stefano, Luca [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Department of Naples, National Council of Research, Via P Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy); D' Auria, Sabato [Institute of Protein Biochemistry, National Council of Research, Via P Castellino 111, 80131 Naples (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    The performances of porous silicon optical biosensors depend strongly on the arrangement of the biological probes into their sponge-like structures: it is well known that in this case the sensing species do not fill the pores but instead cover their internal surface. In this paper, the direct imaging of labelled proteins into different porous silicon structures by using a confocal laser microscope is reported. The distribution of the biological matter in the nanostructured material follows a Gaussian behaviour which is typical of the diffusion process in the porous media but with substantial differences between a porous silicon monolayer and a multilayer such as a Bragg mirror. Even if semi-quantitative, the results can be very useful in the design of the porous silicon based biosensing devices.

  7. Wide-field optical sectioning for live-tissue imaging by plane-projection multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann; Kuo, Chun-Hung; Holland, Daniel B.; Chen, Yenyu; Ouyang, Mingxing; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Zadoyan, Ruben; Guo, Chin-Lin

    2011-11-01

    Optical sectioning provides three-dimensional (3D) information in biological tissues. However, most imaging techniques implemented with optical sectioning are either slow or deleterious to live tissues. Here, we present a simple design for wide-field multiphoton microscopy, which provides optical sectioning at a reasonable frame rate and with a biocompatible laser dosage. The underlying mechanism of optical sectioning is diffuser-based temporal focusing. Axial resolution comparable to confocal microscopy is theoretically derived and experimentally demonstrated. To achieve a reasonable frame rate without increasing the laser power, a low-repetition-rate ultrafast laser amplifier was used in our setup. A frame rate comparable to that of epifluorescence microscopy was demonstrated in the 3D imaging of fluorescent protein expressed in live epithelial cell clusters. In this report, our design displays the potential to be widely used for video-rate live-tissue and embryo imaging with axial resolution comparable to laser scanning microscopy.

  8. Study Of The Theory Of Optical Stabilizing Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Wang; Jianping, Zheng

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, all varieties of the optical stabilizing image methods have been summarized into an optical stabilization pattern, and a mathematical model of the optical stabilizing image are proposed. Some representative systems are analyzed by means of this model in orde to show how to use this model.

  9. Design parameters for wearable optical imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ata; Kim, Sanghyun; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko

    2001-06-01

    This paper summarizes the design steps that are followed during the development of the portable optical imager for breast cancer screening. The design steps considered the parameters such as total power consumption versus battery weight and size, speed of data acquisition versus cost and complexity of the design (functionality), graphical display versus operating system choice. We have used a single board computer system that uses Windows CE as the real time operating system. This choice was preferred since our graphical display requirements can only be carried out with the CE environment's GUI kernels.

  10. Optical and opto-acoustic interventional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Beziere, Nicolas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-02-01

    Many clinical interventional procedures, such as surgery or endoscopy, are today still guided by human vision and perception. Human vision however is not sensitive or accurate in detecting a large range of disease biomarkers, for example cellular or molecular processes characteristic of disease. For this reason advanced optical and opto-acoustic (photo-acoustic) methods are considered for enabling a more versatile, sensitive and accurate detection of disease biomarkers and complement human vision in clinical decision making during interventions. Herein, we outline developments in emerging fluorescence and opto-acoustic sensing and imaging techniques that can lead to practical implementations toward improving interventional vision.

  11. Explaining the Effect of a Grid by Using an Optical Analog to an X-ray Radiographic Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnicke, M. G.; Gavinho, L.; Cusatis, C.

    2008-01-01

    Compton scattering and diffuse scattering degenerate the contrast in radiographic images. To avoid such scattering effects, a grid, between the patient and the film is currently used to improve the image quality. Teaching this topic to medical physics students requires demonstration experiments. In this paper, an optical analog to an x-ray…

  12. Optical image segmentation using wavelet filtering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronin, Christopher P.

    1990-12-01

    This research effort successfully implemented an automatic, optically based image segmentation scheme for locating potential targets in a cluttered FLIR image. Such a design is critical to achieve real-time segmentation and classification for machine vision applications. The segmentation scheme used in this research was based on texture discrimination and employs orientation specific, bandpass spatial filters as its main component. The orientation specific, bandpass spatial filters designed during this research include symmetrically located circular apertures implemented on heavy, black aluminum foil; cosine and sine Gabor filters implemented with detour-phase computer generated holography photoreduced onto glass slides; and symmetrically located circular apertures implemented on a liquid crystal television (LCTV) for real-time filter selection. The most successful design was the circular aperture pairs implemented on the aluminum foil. Segmentation was illustrated for simple and complex texture slides, glass template slides, and static and real-time FLIR imagery displayed on an LCTV.

  13. Optical metabolic imaging for monitoring tracheal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Gil, Daniel A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa and submucosa is a vital yet poorly understood component of critical care medicine, and a minimally-invasive method is needed to monitor tracheal health in patients. Of particular interest are the ciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium that move mucus away from the lungs and prevent respiratory infection. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) allows cellular-level measurement of metabolism, and is a compelling method for assessing tracheal health because ciliary motor proteins require ATP to function. In this pilot study, we apply multiphoton imaging of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD to the mucosa and submucosa of ex vivo mouse trachea. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential diagnostic utility of these measurements for assessing tracheal health and pathophysiology at the single-cell level.

  14. Longitudinal cerebellar diffusion tensor imaging changes in posterior fossa syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. McEvoy, MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior fossa syndrome is a severe transient loss of language that frequently complicates resection of tumors of the cerebellum. The associated pathophysiology and relevant anatomy to this language deficit remains controversial. We performed a retrospective analysis of all cerebellar tumor resections at Seattle Children's Hospital from 2010 to 2015. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed on each of the patients as part of their clinical scan. Patients included in the study were divided into groups based on language functioning following resection: intact (N = 19, mild deficit (N = 19, and posterior fossa syndrome (N = 9. Patients with posterior fossa syndrome showed white matter changes evidenced by reductions in fractional anisotropy in the left and right superior cerebellar peduncle following resection, and these changes were still evident 1-year after surgery. These changes were greater in the superior cerebellar peduncle than elsewhere in the cerebellum. Prior to surgery, posterior fossa patients did not show changes in fractional anisotropy however differences were observed in mean and radial diffusivity measures in comparison to other groups which may provide a radiographic marker of those at greatest risk of developing post-operative language loss.

  15. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal fetal lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Bankier, Alexander; Herold, Christian J.; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Csapo, Bence [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [University of Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To quantify apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in fetuses with normal lungs and to determine whether ADC can be used in the assessment of fetal lung development. In 53 pregnancies (20-37th weeks of gestation), we measured ADC on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the apical, middle, and basal thirds of the right lung. ADCs were correlated with gestational age. Differences between the ADCs were assessed. Fetal lung volumes were measured on T2-weighted sequences and correlated with ADCs and with age. ADCs were 2.13 {+-} 0.44 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms (mean {+-} SD) in the apex, 1.99 {+-} 0.42 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms (mean {+-} SD) in the middle third, and 1.91 {+-} 0.41 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms (mean {+-} SD) in the lung base. Neither the individual ADC values nor average ADC values showed a significant correlation with gestational age or with lung volumes. Average ADCs decreased significantly from the lung apex toward the base. Individual ADCs showed little absolute change and heterogeneity. Lung volumes increased significantly during gestation. We have not been able to identify a pattern of changes in the ADC values that correlate with lung maturation. Furthermore, the individual, gravity-related ADC changes are subject to substantial variability and show nonuniform behavior. ADC can therefore not be used as an indicator of lung maturity. (orig.)

  16. Adaptive distance metric learning for diffusion tensor image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Youyong; Wang, Defeng; Shi, Lin; Hui, Steve C N; Chu, Winnie C W

    2014-01-01

    High quality segmentation of diffusion tensor images (DTI) is of key interest in biomedical research and clinical application. In previous studies, most efforts have been made to construct predefined metrics for different DTI segmentation tasks. These methods require adequate prior knowledge and tuning parameters. To overcome these disadvantages, we proposed to automatically learn an adaptive distance metric by a graph based semi-supervised learning model for DTI segmentation. An original discriminative distance vector was first formulated by combining both geometry and orientation distances derived from diffusion tensors. The kernel metric over the original distance and labels of all voxels were then simultaneously optimized in a graph based semi-supervised learning approach. Finally, the optimization task was efficiently solved with an iterative gradient descent method to achieve the optimal solution. With our approach, an adaptive distance metric could be available for each specific segmentation task. Experiments on synthetic and real brain DTI datasets were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed distance metric learning approach. The performance of our approach was compared with three classical metrics in the graph based semi-supervised learning framework.

  17. Adaptive distance metric learning for diffusion tensor image segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youyong Kong

    Full Text Available High quality segmentation of diffusion tensor images (DTI is of key interest in biomedical research and clinical application. In previous studies, most efforts have been made to construct predefined metrics for different DTI segmentation tasks. These methods require adequate prior knowledge and tuning parameters. To overcome these disadvantages, we proposed to automatically learn an adaptive distance metric by a graph based semi-supervised learning model for DTI segmentation. An original discriminative distance vector was first formulated by combining both geometry and orientation distances derived from diffusion tensors. The kernel metric over the original distance and labels of all voxels were then simultaneously optimized in a graph based semi-supervised learning approach. Finally, the optimization task was efficiently solved with an iterative gradient descent method to achieve the optimal solution. With our approach, an adaptive distance metric could be available for each specific segmentation task. Experiments on synthetic and real brain DTI datasets were performed to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed distance metric learning approach. The performance of our approach was compared with three classical metrics in the graph based semi-supervised learning framework.

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal fetal lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Csapo, Bence; Weber, Michael; Hörmann, Marcus; Bankier, Alexander; Bammer, Roland; Herold, Christian J; Prayer, Daniela

    2008-04-01

    To quantify apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in fetuses with normal lungs and to determine whether ADC can be used in the assessment of fetal lung development. In 53 pregnancies (20-37th weeks of gestation), we measured ADC on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the apical, middle, and basal thirds of the right lung. ADCs were correlated with gestational age. Differences between the ADCs were assessed. Fetal lung volumes were measured on T2-weighted sequences and correlated with ADCs and with age. ADCs were 2.13 +/- 0.44 microm(2)/ms (mean +/- SD) in the apex, 1.99 +/- 0.42 microm(2)/ms (mean +/- SD) in the middle third, and 1.91 +/- 0.41 microm(2)/ms (mean +/- SD) in the lung base. Neither the individual ADC values nor average ADC values showed a significant correlation with gestational age or with lung volumes. Average ADCs decreased significantly from the lung apex toward the base. Individual ADCs showed little absolute change and heterogeneity. Lung volumes increased significantly during gestation. We have not been able to identify a pattern of changes in the ADC values that correlate with lung maturation. Furthermore, the individual, gravity-related ADC changes are subject to substantial variability and show nonuniform behavior. ADC can therefore not be used as an indicator of lung maturity.

  19. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keil Carsten

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, caused by progressive loss of motor neurons. Changes are widespread in the subcortical white matter in ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI detects pathological changes in white matter fibres in vivo, based on alterations in the degree (diffusivity, ADC and directedness (fractional anisotropy, FA of proton movement. Methods 24 patients with ALS and 24 age-matched controls received 1.5T DTI. FA and ADC were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping. In 15 of the 24 ALS patients, a second DTI was obtained after 6 months. Results Decreased FA in the corticospinal tract (CST and frontal areas confirm existing results. With a direct comparison of baseline and follow-up dataset, the progression of upper motor neuron degeneration, reflected in FA decrease, could be captured along the CST and in frontal areas. The involvement of cerebellum in the pathology of ALS, as suspected from functional MRI studies, could be confirmed by a reduced FA (culmen, declive. These structural changes correlated well with disease duration, ALSFRS-R, and physical and executive functions. Conclusion DTI detects changes that are regarded as prominent features of ALS and thus, shows promise in its function as a biomarker. Using the technique herein, we could demonstrate DTI changes at follow-up which correlated well with clinical progression.

  20. A hitchhiker’s guide to Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose eSoares

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI studies are increasingly popular among clinicians and researchers as they provide unique insights into brain network connectivity. However, in order to optimize the use of DTI, several technical and methodological aspects must be factored in. These include decisions on: acquisition protocol, artifact handling, data quality control, reconstruction algorithm and visualization approaches, and quantitative analysis methodology. Furthermore, the researcher and/or clinician also needs to take into account and decide on the most suited software tool(s for each stage of the DTI analysis pipeline. Herein, we provide a straightforward hitchhiker’s guide, covering all of the workflow’s major stages. Ultimately, this guide will help newcomers navigate the most critical roadblocks in the analysis and further encourage the use of DTI.

  1. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in transient global amnesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godeiro-Junior, Clecio; Miranda-Alves, Maramelia Araujo de [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo SP (Brazil). Dept. of Neurology and Neurosurgery], e-mail: cleciojunior@yahoo.com.br; Massaro, Ayrton Roberto [Fleury Diagnostic Center, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a well known clinical entity characterized by anterograde memory disturbance of sudden onset that lasts 1 to 24 hours. Orientation in space and time is impaired while consciousness remains undisturbed. TGA may refer to a single expression of several physiopathological phenomena. Conceptually, cerebral ischemia, epileptic discharge, and migraine constitute the main pathogenic hypothesis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a powerful tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected stroke owing to its high sensitivity and specificity, even for small areas of acute ischemia. Consequently, this method has also been applied to TGA to gain further insights into the ischemic hypothesis of this condition. We report a patient with a typical TGA presentation and MRI findings suggestive of an ischemic insult. We further discuss the ischemic hypothesis of TGA. (author)

  2. An investigation of diffusion imaging techniques in the evaluation of spinocerebellar ataxia and multisystem atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenfeld, Michael N; Nemeth, Alexander J; Walker, Matthew T; Mohan, Prasoon; Wang, Xue; Parrish, Todd B; Opal, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Multisystem system atrophy and spinocerebellar ataxia are rare neurodegenerative ataxias that can be difficult to diagnose, with important prognostic and treatment implications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate various methods of diffusion imaging and tractography in their effectiveness at differentiating these diseases from control subjects. Our secondary aim is determining whether diffusion abnormalities correspond with clinical disease severity. Diffusion imaging and tractography were performed on five patients and seven age-matched controls. Fractional anisotropy, generalized fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values and corticospinal tract volumes were measured within various diffusion and probabilistic tractography models, including standard diffusion tensor and Q-ball tractography. Standard diffusion based fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly altered in patients versus controls in the middle cerebellar peduncles and central pons. Tractography based fractional anisotropy and generalized fractional anisotropy values were significantly lower in patients versus controls when corticospinal tracts were drawn in a craniocaudal direction (bilaterally using Q-ball imaging, only on the right using diffusion tensor imaging). The right corticospinal tract volume was significantly smaller in patients versus controls when created using Q-ball imaging in a caudocranial direction. There was no correlation between diffusion alteration and clinical symptomatology. In conclusion, various diffusion-based techniques can be effective in differentiating ataxic patients from control subjects, although the selection of diffusion algorithm and tract growth technique and direction is non-trivial.

  3. Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tyc, Tomas; Sarbort, Martin; Bering, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    We investigate imaging by spherically symmetric absolute instruments that provide perfect imaging in the sense of geometrical optics. We derive a number of properties of such devices, present a general method for designing them and use this method to propose several new absolute instruments, in particular a lens providing a stigmatic image of an optically homogeneous region and having a moderate refractive index range.

  4. Data of NODDI diffusion metrics in the brain and computer simulation of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI acquisition scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Kodiweera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides NODDI diffusion metrics in the brains of 52 healthy participants and computer simulation data to support compatibility of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI, “Hybrid diffusion imaging” [1] acquisition scheme in fitting neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI model, “NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain” [2]. HYDI is an extremely versatile diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI technique that enables various analyzes methods using a single diffusion dataset. One of the diffusion data analysis methods is the NODDI computation, which models the brain tissue with three compartments: fast isotropic diffusion (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid, anisotropic hindered diffusion (e.g., extracellular space, and anisotropic restricted diffusion (e.g., intracellular space. The NODDI model produces microstructural metrics in the developing brain, aging brain or human brain with neurologic disorders. The first dataset provided here are the means and standard deviations of NODDI metrics in 48 white matter region-of-interest (ROI averaging across 52 healthy participants. The second dataset provided here is the computer simulation with initial conditions guided by the first dataset as inputs and gold standard for model fitting. The computer simulation data provide a direct comparison of NODDI indices computed from the HYDI acquisition [1] to the NODDI indices computed from the originally proposed acquisition [2]. These data are related to the accompanying research article “Age Effects and Sex Differences in Human Brain White Matter of Young to Middle-Aged Adults: A DTI, NODDI, and q-Space Study” [3].

  5. Recovery of optical properties using interstitial cylindrical diffusers as source and detector fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Timothy M.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate recovery of optical properties using arrays of interstitial cylindrical diffusing fibers as sources and detectors. A single 1-cm diffuser delivered laser illumination at 665 nm, while seven 1- and 2-cm diffusers at 1-cm grid spacing acted as detectors. Extraction of optical properties from these measurements was based upon a diffusion model of emission and detection distributions for these diffuser fibers, informed by previous measurements of heterogeneous axial detection. Verification of the technique was performed in 15 liquid tissue-simulating phantoms consisting of deionized water, India ink as absorber, and Intralipid 20% as scatterer. For the range of optical properties tested, mean errors were 4.4% for effective attenuation coefficient, 12.6% for absorption coefficient, and 7.6% for reduced scattering coefficient. Error in recovery tended to increase with decreasing transport albedo. For therapeutic techniques involving the delivery of light to locations deep within the body, such as interstitial photodynamic and photothermal therapies, the methods described here would allow the treatment diffuser fibers also to be used as sources and detectors for recovery of optical properties. This would eliminate the need for separately inserted fibers for spectroscopy, reducing clinical complexity and improving the accuracy of treatment planning.

  6. Active optical zoom for space-based imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, David V.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Sweatt, William C.; Peterson, Gary L.; Martinez, Ty; Restaino, Sergio R.; Andrews, Jonathan R.; Wilcox, Christopher C.; Payne, Don M.; Romeo, Robert

    2006-08-01

    The development of sensors that are compact, lighter weight, and adaptive is critical for the success of future military initiatives. Space-based systems need the flexibility of a wide FOV for surveillance while simultaneously maintaining high-resolution for threat identification and tracking from a single, nonmechanical imaging system. In order to meet these stringent requirements, the military needs revolutionary alternatives to conventional imaging systems. We will present recent progress in active optical (aka nonmechanical) zoom for space applications. Active optical zoom uses multiple active optics elements to change the magnification of the imaging system. In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom systems require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of elements. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed, demonstrated, and patented imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts.

  7. Optical Coherence Tomography for Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    Recently, there has been growing interest in using OCT for brain imaging. A feasibility study of OCT for guiding deep brain probes has found that OCT can differentiate the white matter and gray matter because the white matter tends to have a higher peak reflectivity and steeper attenuation rate compared to gray matter. In vivo 3D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb with OCT has been demonstrated. OCT has been used for single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling. The refractive index in the rat somatosensory cortex has also been measured with OCT. In addition, functional extension of OCT, such as Doppler-OCT (D-OCT), polarization sensitive-OCT (PS-OCT), and phase-resolved-OCT (PR-OCT), can image and quantify physiological parameters in addition to the morphological structure image. Based on the scattering changes during neural activity, OCT has been used to measure the functional activation in neuronal tissues. PS-OCT, which combines polarization sensitive detection with OCT to determine tissue birefringence, has been used for the localization of nerve fiber bundles and the mapping of micrometer-scale fiber pathways in the brain. D-OCT, also named optical Doppler tomography (ODT), combines the Doppler principle with OCT to obtain high resolution tomographic images of moving constituents in highly scattering biological tissues. D-OCT has been successfully used to image cortical blood flow and map the blood vessel network for brain research. In this chapter, the principle and technology of OCT and D-OCT are reviewed and examples of potential applications are described.

  8. Experiments on turbulent diffusion of the gaseous phase in rectangular bubble column using image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Zaruba; Eckhard Krepper; Horst-Michael Prasser [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., P.O.Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The paper describes the application of high-speed video observation combined with digital image processing techniques to measure the turbulent diffusion coefficient of the gaseous phase in a bubble column. The test channel is a rectangular bubble column with a cross-section of 100 x 20 mm and a height of 1500 mm. Sequences of the images were taken at different heights of the column with a high-speed video system. A diffuse illumination from the backside of the column was found to produce bubble images with a characteristic bright spot in the center. This bright spot was used for a bubble tracking that tolerates some overlapping of the bubbles. This allows to enhance the applicability of the bubble tracking to higher gas fractions compared to the tracking of the entire bubble shadows. After the bubble trajectories were extracted from the image sequence, the lateral displacement of bubbles between two virtual horizontal measuring planes was calculated for each bubble that crosses both planes. This lateral displacement is caused by the turbulent fluctuations of the bubble velocity. It is analyzed statistically by constructing probability density functions of the lateral displacement, which can be well described by Gaussian standard distributions. The dispersion coefficient of the standard distributions that were fitted to the experimental data shows a linear dependency from the square-root of the vertical distance between the two control planes, which supports the assumption of a diffusion model for the lateral displacement. Deviations from the linear dependency were identified to be the result of deterministic oscillatory motions of the rising bubbles. This effect is typical for low-viscosity liquids, while the bubble oscillations are damped at higher viscosities. Results are presented for different gas flow rates (superficial gas velocity ranged from 0.5 to 4 mm/s), different primary bubble sizes produced by a variation of the

  9. Monomer diffusion in sustainable photopolymers for diffractive optics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego Rico, Sergi; Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Marini, Stephan; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Photopolymers have many applications in optics. However, one of the main drawbacks of these materials is the high toxicity of their components. One of the most widely studied photopolymers is polyvinyl-alcohol/acrylamide, and the carcinogenic potential of acrylamide is well known. In this paper we propose a new sustainable photopolymer as a substitute for acrylamide based photopolymers in the manufacture of diffractive optical elements. Diffraction efficiencies of around 40% were achieved for...

  10. Optical Tomography Imaging in Pneumatic Conveyor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzairi Abdul Rahim

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a tomographic system by employing optical sensors using low cost approach. The final aim of this project is achieving real-time monitoring of solid particles having low concentration flow when conveyed in vertical pneumatic conveyor. The developed tomography system consists of 32 pairs of Light Emitting Diode (LED and silicon PIN photodiode. These sensors are used to monitor the emitted radiation for fluctuations caused by particles interfering with the beam when passing through it. A good design of sensor fixture may increase the collimating of light beam from a light source that passes through a flow regime. The obtained information from sensors provided the cross-sectional material distribution in conveyor. By using this information, the relationships between particle distribution and light attenuation effects are investigated by using computer programming to reconstruct the image. The results obtained from this investigation shows that the low cost optical sensors are suitable for monitoring low and medium concentration flowing materials. Optical sensors provide an opportunity to design sensors with a very wide bandwidth, thus enabling the measurement of high speed flowing particles or droplets.

  11. Picosecond optical MCPI-based imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Robert A.; Guyton, Robert L.; Ross, Patrick W.

    2012-10-01

    We present the desired performance specifications for an advanced optical imager, which borrows practical concepts in high-speed microchannel plate (MCP) intensified x-ray stripline imagers and time-dilation techniques. With a four-fold speed improvement in state-of-the-art high-voltage impulse drivers, and novel atomic-layer deposition MCPs, we tender a design capable of 5 ps optical gating without the use of magnetic field confinement of the photoelectrons. We analyze the electron dispersion effects in the MCP and their implications for gating pulses shorter than the MCP transit time. We present a wideband design printed-circuit version of the Series Transmission Line Transformer (STLT) that makes use of 50-ohm coaxial 1.0 mm (110 GHz) and 1.85 mm (65 GHz) hermetically sealed vacuum feedthroughs and low-dispersion Teflon/Kapton circuit materials without the use of any vias. The STLT matches impedance at all interfaces with a 16:1 impedance (4:1 voltage) reduction, and delivers a dispersion-limited sharp impulse to the MCP strip. A comparison of microstrip design calculations is given, showing variances between method of moments, empirical codes, and finite element methods for broad, low-impedance traces. Prototype performance measurements are forthcoming.

  12. Extreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager: XAOPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J; Poyneer, L; Sommargren, G; Wilhelmsen, J; Gavel, D; Jones, S; Kalas, P; Lloyd, J; Makidon, R; Olivier, S; Palmer, D; Patience, J; Perrin, M; Severson, S; Sheinis, A; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Troy, M; Wallace, K

    2003-09-17

    Ground based adaptive optics is a potentially powerful technique for direct imaging detection of extrasolar planets. Turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere imposes some fundamental limits, but the large size of ground-based telescopes compared to spacecraft can work to mitigate this. We are carrying out a design study for a dedicated ultra-high-contrast system, the eXtreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager (XAOPI), which could be deployed on an 8-10m telescope in 2007. With a 4096-actuator MEMS deformable mirror it should achieve Strehl >0.9 in the near-IR. Using an innovative spatially filtered wavefront sensor, the system will be optimized to control scattered light over a large radius and suppress artifacts caused by static errors. We predict that it will achieve contrast levels of 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} at angular separations of 0.2-0.8 inches around a large sample of stars (R<7-10), sufficient to detect Jupiter-like planets through their near-IR emission over a wide range of ages and masses. We are constructing a high-contrast AO testbed to verify key concepts of our system, and present preliminary results here, showing an RMS wavefront error of <1.3 nm with a flat mirror.

  13. Habitable Exoplanet Imager Optical Telescope Concept Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H Philip

    2017-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is one of four missions under study for the 2020 Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Its goal is to directly image and spectroscopically characterize planetary systems in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Additionally, HabEx will perform a broad range of general astrophysics science enabled by 100 to 2500 nm spectral range and 3 x 3 arc-minute FOV. Critical to achieving the HabEx science goals is a large, ultra-stable UV/Optical/Near-IR (UVOIR) telescope. The baseline HabEx telescope is a 4-meter off-axis unobscured three-mirror-anastigmatic, diffraction limited at 400 nm with wavefront stability on the order of a few 10s of picometers. This paper summarizes the opto-mechanical design of the HabEx baseline optical telescope assembly, including a discussion of how science requirements drive the telescope's specifications, and presents analysis that the baseline telescope structure meets its specified tolerances.

  14. Mapping cortical haemodynamics during neonatal seizures using diffuse optical tomography: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimrat Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures in the newborn brain represent a major challenge to neonatal medicine. Neonatal seizures are poorly classified, under-diagnosed, difficult to treat and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Video-EEG is the current gold-standard approach for seizure detection and monitoring. Interpreting neonatal EEG requires expertise and the impact of seizures on the developing brain remains poorly understood. In this case study we present the first ever images of the haemodynamic impact of seizures on the human infant brain, obtained using simultaneous diffuse optical tomography (DOT and video-EEG with whole-scalp coverage. Seven discrete periods of ictal electrographic activity were observed during a 60 minute recording of an infant with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy. The resulting DOT images show a remarkably consistent, high-amplitude, biphasic pattern of changes in cortical blood volume and oxygenation in response to each electrographic event. While there is spatial variation across the cortex, the dominant haemodynamic response to seizure activity consists of an initial increase in cortical blood volume prior to a large and extended decrease typically lasting several minutes. This case study demonstrates the wealth of physiologically and clinically relevant information that DOT–EEG techniques can yield. The consistency and scale of the haemodynamic responses observed here also suggest that DOT–EEG has the potential to provide improved detection of neonatal seizures.

  15. Image denoising via fundamental anisotropic diffusion and wavelet shrinkage: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Bulent; Analoui, Mostafa

    2004-05-01

    Noise removal faces a challenge: Keeping the image details. Resolving the dilemma of two purposes (smoothing and keeping image features in tact) working inadvertently of each other was an almost impossible task until anisotropic dif-fusion (AD) was formally introduced by Perona and Malik (PM). AD favors intra-region smoothing over inter-region in piecewise smooth images. Many authors regularized the original PM algorithm to overcome its drawbacks. We compared the performance of denoising using such 'fundamental' AD algorithms and one of the most powerful multiresolution tools available today, namely, wavelet shrinkage. The AD algorithms here are called 'fundamental' in the sense that the regularized versions center around the original PM algorithm with minor changes to the logic. The algorithms are tested with different noise types and levels. On top of the visual inspection, two mathematical metrics are used for performance comparison: Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and universal image quality index (UIQI). We conclude that some of the regu-larized versions of PM algorithm (AD) perform comparably with wavelet shrinkage denoising. This saves a lot of compu-tational power. With this conclusion, we applied the better-performing fundamental AD algorithms to a new imaging modality: Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).

  16. Application and further development of diffusion based 2D chemical imaging techniques in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Christoph; Santner, Jakob; Borisov, Sergey; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Wenzel, Walter; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Two dimensional chemical imaging of root processes refers to novel in situ methods to investigate and map solutes at a high spatial resolution (sub-mm). The visualization of these solutes reveals new insights in soil biogeochemistry and root processes. We derive chemical images by using data from DGT-LA-ICP-MS (Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and POS (Planar Optode Sensors). Both technologies have shown promising results when applied in aqueous environment but need to be refined and improved for imaging at the soil-plant interface. Co-localized mapping using combined DGT and POS technologies and the development of new gel combinations are in our focus. DGTs are smart and thin (images of the target area are plotted using imaging software. POS are, similar to DGT, thin sensor foils containing a fluorophore coating depending on the target analyte. The measurement principle is based on excitation of the flourophore by a specific wavelength and emission of the fluorophore depending on the presence of the analyte. The emitted signal is captured using optical filters and a DSLR camera. While DGT analysis is destructive, POS measurements can be performed continuously during the application. Both semi-quantitative techniques allow an in situ application to visualize chemical processes directly at the soil-plant interface. Here, we present a summary of results from rhizotron experiments with different plants in metal contaminated and agricultural soils.

  17. T2-enhanced tensor diffusion trace-weighted image in the detection of hyper-acute cerebral infarction: Comparison with isotropic diffusion-weighted image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, M.-C. [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, W.-S. [Department of Radiology, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chung, H.-W.; Wang, C.-Y.; Liu, H.-S.; Juan, C.-J. [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lo, C.-P. [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, C.-J. [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-Y., E-mail: sandy0928@seed.net.t [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2010-06-15

    Background and purpose: Although isotropic diffusion-weighted imaging (isoDWI) is very sensitive to the detection of acute ischemic stroke, it may occasionally show diffusion negative result in hyper-acute stroke. We hypothesize that high diffusion contrast diffusion trace-weighted image with enhanced T2 may improve stroke lesion conspicuity. Methods: Five hyper acute stroke patients (M:F = 0:5, average age = 61.8 {+-} 20.5 y/o) and 16 acute stroke patients (M:F = 11:5, average age = 67.7 {+-} 12 y/o) were examined six-direction tensor DWIs at b = 707 s/mm{sup 2}. Three different diffusion-weighted images, including isotropic (isoDWI), diffusion trace-weighted image (trDWI) and T2-enhanced diffusion trace-weighted image (T2E{sub t}rDWI), were generated. Normalized lesion-to-normal ratio (nLNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of three diffusion images were calculated from each patient and statistically compared. Results: The trDWI shows better nLNR than isoDWI on both hyper-acute and acute stroke lesions, whereas no significant improvement in CNR. Nevertheless, the T2E{sub t}rDWI has statistically superior CNR and nLNR than those of isoDWI and trDWI in both hyper-acute and acute stroke. Conclusions: We concluded that tensor diffusion trace-weighted image with T2 enhancement is more sensitive to stroke lesion detection, and can provide higher lesion conspicuity than the conventional isotropic DWI for early stroke lesion delineation without the need of high-b-value technique.

  18. Exploiting Optical Contrasts for Cervical Precancer Diagnosis via Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Vivide Tuan-Chyan

    collagen without altering the amount of collagen present. Further work would be required to elucidate the exact sources of scattering contrast observed. Common confounding variables that limit the accuracy and clinical acceptability of optical spectroscopic systems are calibration requirements and variable probe-tissue contact pressures. Our results suggest that using a real-time self-calibration channel, as opposed to conventional post-experiment diffuse reflectance standard calibration measurements, significantly improved data integrity for the extraction of scattering contrast. Extracted [total Hb] and scattering were also significantly associated with applied contact probe pressure in colposcopically normal sites. Hence, future contact probe spectroscopy or imaging systems should incorporate a self-calibration channel and ensure spectral acquisition at a consistent contact pressure to collect reliable data with enhanced absorption and scattering contrasts. Another method to enhance optical contrast is to selectively interrogate different depths in the dysplastic cervix. For instance, scattering has been shown to increase in the epithelium (increase in nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio) while decrease in the stroma (re-organization of the extra-cellular matrix and changes in of collagen fiber cross-links). A fiber-optic probe with 45° illumination and collection fibers with a separation distance of 330 μm was designed and constructed to selectively interrogate the cervical epithelium. Mean extraction errors from liquid phantoms with optical properties mimicking the cervical epithelium for μa and μs' were 11.3 % and 12.7 %, respectively. Diffuse reflectance spectra from 9 sites in four loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) patients were analyzed. Preliminary data demonstrate the utility of the oblique fiber geometry in extracting scattering contrast in the cervical epithelium. Further work is needed to study the systematic error in optical property extraction and

  19. Optical image processing by using a photorefractive spatial soliton waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bao-Lai; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Su-Heng; Guo, Qing-Lin; Wang, Shu-Fang; Fu, Guang-Sheng; Simmonds, Paul J.; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2017-04-01

    By combining the photorefractive spatial soliton waveguide of a Ce:SBN crystal with a coherent 4-f system we are able to manipulate the spatial frequencies of an input optical image to perform edge-enhancement and direct component enhancement operations. Theoretical analysis of this optical image processor is presented to interpret the experimental observations. This work provides an approach for optical image processing by using photorefractive spatial solitons.

  20. In-depth quantification by using multispectral time-resolved diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouaoui, Judy; Hervé, Lionel; Di Sieno, Laura; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Berger, Michel; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Derouard, Jacques; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-07-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a medical imaging which gives the distribution of the optical properties of biological tissues. To obtain endogenous chromophore features in the depth of a scattering medium, a multiwavelength/time-resolved (MW/TR) DOT setup was used. Reconstructions of the three-dimensional maps of chromophore concentrations of probed media were obtained by using a data processing technique which manages Mellin-Laplace Transforms of their MW/TR optical signals and those of a known reference medium. The point was to put a constraint on the medium absorption coefficient by using a material basis composed of a given set of chromophores of known absorption spectra. Experimental measurements were conducted by injecting the light of a picosecond near- infrared laser in the medium of interest and by collecting, for several wavelengths and multiple positions, the backscattered light via two fibers (with a source-detector separation of 15 mm) connected to fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) and coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) system. Validations of the method were performed in simulation in the same configuration as the experiments for different combination of chromophores. Evaluation of the technique in real conditions was investigated on liquid phantoms composed of an homogenous background and a 10 mm depth inclusion formed of combination of intralipid and inks scanned at 30 positions and at three wavelengths. Both numerical and preliminary phantom experiments confirm the potential of this method to determine chromophore concentrations in the depth of biological tissues.

  1. Optical Image Classification Using Optical/digital Hybrid Image Processing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyang

    1990-01-01

    Offering parallel and real-time operations, optical image classification is becoming a general technique in the solution of real-life image classification problems. This thesis investigates several algorithms for optical realization. Compared to other statistical pattern recognition algorithms, the Kittler-Young transform can provide more discriminative feature spaces for image classification. We shall apply the Kittler-Young transform to image classification and implement it on optical systems. A feature selection criterion is designed for the application of the Kittler -Young transform to image classification. The realizations of the Kittler-Young transform on both a joint transform correlator and a matrix multiplier are successively conducted. Experiments of applying this technique to two-category and three-category problems are demonstrated. To combine the advantages of the statistical pattern recognition algorithms and the neural network models, processes using the two methods are studied. The Karhunen-Loeve Hopfield model is developed for image classification. This model has significant improvement in the system capacity and the capability of using image structures for more discriminative classification processes. As another such hybrid process, we propose the feature extraction perceptron. The application of feature extraction techniques to the perceptron shortens its learning time. An improved activation function of neurons (dynamic activation function), its design and updating rule for fast learning process and high space-bandwidth product image classification are also proposed. We have shortened by two-thirds the learning time on the feature extraction perceptron as compared with the original perceptron. By using this architecture, we have shown that the classification performs better than both the Kittler-Young transform and the original perceptron.

  2. Optical encryption for large-sized images using random phase-free method

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Satoki; Nagahama, Yuki; Sano, Marie; Sugie, Takashige; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We propose an optical encryption framework that can encrypt and decrypt large-sized images beyond the size of the encrypted image using our two methods: random phase-free method and scaled diffraction. In order to record the entire image information on the encrypted image, the large-sized images require the random phase to widely diffuse the object light over the encrypted image; however, the random phase gives rise to the speckle noise on the decrypted images, and it may be difficult to recognize the decrypted images. In order to reduce the speckle noise, we apply our random phase-free method to the framework. In addition, we employ scaled diffraction that calculates light propagation between planes with different sizes by changing the sampling rates.

  3. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Of the Brain in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Ann V. Antenor-Dorsey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM are required to carefully manage their insulin dosing, dietary intake, and activity levels in order to maintain optimal blood sugar levels. Over time, exposure to hyperglycaemia is known to cause significant damage to the peripheral nervous system, but its impact on the central nervous system has been less well studied. Researchers have begun to explore the cumulative impact of commonly experienced blood glucose fluctuations on brain structure and function in patient populations. To date, these studies have typically used magnetic resonance imaging to measure regional grey and white matter volumes across the brain. However, newer methods, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can measure the microstructural properties of white matter, which can be more sensitive to neurological effects than standard volumetric measures. Studies are beginning to use DTI to understand the impact of T1DM on white matter structure in the human brain. This work, its implications, future directions, and important caveats, are the focus of this review.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute bacterial meningitis in infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, W.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V.; Simon, E.M.; Haselgrove, J. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Bacterial meningitis is frequently fatal or leads to severe neurological impairment. Complications such as vasculitis, resulting in infarcts, should be anticipated and dealt with promptly. Our aim was to demonstrate the complications of meningitis by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in patients who deteriorated despite therapy. We studied 13 infants between the ages of 1 day and 32 months who presented with symptoms ranging from fever and vomiting to seizures, encephalopathy and coma due to bacterial meningitis, performing MRI, including DWI, 2-5 days after presentation. Multiple infarcts were found on DWI in 12 of the 13, most commonly in the frontal lobes (in 10). Global involvement was seen in four children, three of whom died; the fourth had a very poor outcome. In one case abnormalities on DWI were due to subdural empyemas. We diagnosed vasculitis in three of five patients studied with MRA. We think DWI an important part of an MRI study in infants with meningitis. Small cortical or deep white-matter infarcts due to septic vasculitis can lead to tissue damage not easily recognized on routine imaging and DWI can be used to confirm that extra-axial collections represent empyemas. (orig.)

  5. Corticospinal tract degeneration and possible pathogenesis in ALS evaluated by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Wiegell, Mette R.;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) appears to be a powerful method to investigate the neuronal and axonal fibre distribution in the human brain. Changes in diffusion characteristics of water molecules in the white matter can be estimated as the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and ...

  6. Corticospinal tract degeneration and possible pathogenesis in ALS evaluated by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Wiegell, Mette R.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) appears to be a powerful method to investigate the neuronal and axonal fibre distribution in the human brain. Changes in diffusion characteristics of water molecules in the white matter can be estimated as the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and ...

  7. Diffusion coefficients of water in biobased hydrogel polymer matrices by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diffusion coefficient of water in biobased hydrogels were measured utilizing a simple NMR method. This method tracks the migration of deuterium oxide through imaging data that is fit to a diffusion equation. The results show that a 5 wt% soybean oil based hydrogel gives aqueous diffusion of 1.37...

  8. Corticospinal tract degeneration and possible pathogenesis in ALS evaluated by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Wiegell, Mette R.;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) appears to be a powerful method to investigate the neuronal and axonal fibre distribution in the human brain. Changes in diffusion characteristics of water molecules in the white matter can be estimated as the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC...

  9. Retrieving direct and diffuse radiation with the use of sky imager pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Kalisch, John; Lorenz, Elke

    2015-04-01

    A machine-learning approach for retrieving direct and diffuse irradiance from pictures taken by a ground-based whole-sky imagery (sky imager) is investigated in the present work. The use of sky imagers for shortest-term local solar irradiance forecasts is a growing field in research and industry. Accurate predictions of surface solar irradiance fluctuations up to 30 minutes ahead are important for a variety of solar energy and power grid applications. Sky imager picture analyses provide very high resolution binary cloud masks, but have limitations in deriving aerosol and cloud optical properties. In a first approach, surface solar irradiance was retrieved from the binary cloud masks with the use of clear sky and overcast irradiance calculations. With this method, forecast performance improvements over persistence could be achieved especially for broken cloud situations. These situations are characterized by inhomogeneous cloud patterns contributing to surface solar irradiance deviating from the clear sky or overcast levels. The accurate estimation of the radiative components will therefore improve the irradiance retrievals. One year of measurements at the University of Oldenburg was used as a robust data basis for this new approach. The data sets consists of direct, diffuse and global horizontal irradiance measured with a sample rate of 1 Hz. In order to account for diurnal and seasonal variations radiation measurements are normalized to the clear-sky conditions. Hemispheric images were taken every 10 s by a sky imager mounted close to the radiometers. The proposed approach uses image features like the average pixel intensity of the whole image and the circumsolar area, analyses of the gray-level co-occurence matrix (GLCM), information of the RGB and HSV color space and the analysed cloud fraction. In order to estimate normalized direct and diffuse radiation, a k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) regression algorithm is applied. The performance of this model is evaluated by

  10. Noninvasive optical cytochrome c oxidase redox state measurements using diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Yoon, David; Boss, Gerry R.; Patterson, Steven E.; Rockwood, Gary; Isom, Gary; Brenner, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A major need exists for methods to assess organ oxidative metabolic states in vivo. By contrasting the responses to cyanide (CN) poisoning versus hemorrhage in animal models, we demonstrate that diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) can detect cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) redox states. Intermittent decreases in inspired O2 from 100% to 21% were applied before, during, and after CN poisoning, hemorrhage, and resuscitation in rabbits. Continuous DOS measurements of total hemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and oxidized and reduced CcO from muscle were obtained. Rabbit hemorrhage was accomplished with stepwise removal of blood, followed by blood resuscitation. CN treated rabbits received 0.166 mg/min NaCN infusion. During hemorrhage, CcO redox state became reduced concurrently with decreases in oxyhemoglobin, resulting from reduced tissue oxygen delivery and hypoxia. In contrast, during CN infusion, CcO redox state decreased while oxyhemoglobin concentration increased due to CN binding and reduction of CcO with resultant inhibition of the electron transport chain. Spectral absorption similarities between hemoglobin and CcO make noninvasive spectroscopic distinction of CcO redox states difficult. By contrasting physiological perturbations of CN poisoning versus hemorrhage, we demonstrate that DOS measured CcO redox state changes are decoupled from hemoglobin concentration measurement changes.

  11. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) offer unique insight into acute ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These techniques may offer the ability to apply pathophysiology to accurately individualize acute stroke reperfusion treatment, including ...

  12. An integral design strategy combining optical system and image processing to obtain high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaoyang; Wang, Lin; Yang, Ying; Gong, Rui; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liang, Chao; Xu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an integral design that combines optical system with image processing is introduced to obtain high resolution images, and the performance is evaluated and demonstrated. Traditional imaging methods often separate the two technical procedures of optical system design and imaging processing, resulting in the failures in efficient cooperation between the optical and digital elements. Therefore, an innovative approach is presented to combine the merit function during optical design together with the constraint conditions of image processing algorithms. Specifically, an optical imaging system with low resolution is designed to collect the image signals which are indispensable for imaging processing, while the ultimate goal is to obtain high resolution images from the final system. In order to optimize the global performance, the optimization function of ZEMAX software is utilized and the number of optimization cycles is controlled. Then Wiener filter algorithm is adopted to process the image simulation and mean squared error (MSE) is taken as evaluation criterion. The results show that, although the optical figures of merit for the optical imaging systems is not the best, it can provide image signals that are more suitable for image processing. In conclusion. The integral design of optical system and image processing can search out the overall optimal solution which is missed by the traditional design methods. Especially, when designing some complex optical system, this integral design strategy has obvious advantages to simplify structure and reduce cost, as well as to gain high resolution images simultaneously, which has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  13. Anterior Eye Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David; Li, Yan; Tang, Maolong

    The development of corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology has advanced rapidly in recently years. The scan geometry and imaging wavelength are both important choices to make in designing anterior segment OCT systems. Rectangular scan geometry offers the least image distortion and is now used in most anterior OCT systems. The wavelength of OCT light source affects resolution and penetration. An optimal choice of the OCT imaging wavelength (840, 1,050, or 1,310 nm) depends on the application of interest. Newer generation Fourier-domain OCT technology can provide scan speed 100-1000 times faster than the time-domain technology. Various commercial anterior OCT systems are available on the market. A wide spectrum of diagnostic and surgical applications using anterior segment OCT had been investigated, including mapping of corneal and epithelial thicknesses, keratoconus screening, measuring corneal refractive power, corneal surgery planning and evaluation in LASIK, intracorneal ring implantation, assessment of angle closure glaucoma, anterior chamber biometry and intraocular lens implants, intraocular lens power calculation, and eye bank donor cornea screening.

  14. Probing biological nanotopology via diffusion of weakly constrained plasmonic nanorods with optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Wu, Wei-Chen; Hill, David B.; Button, Brian; Casbas-Hernandez, Patricia; Troester, Melissa A; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Many diseases are characterized by nanostructural changes in connective fibers and soluble proteins, which can indicate or drive disease progression. Noninvasive methods sensitive to nanotopological changes in 3D tissue models can elucidate biophysical changes associated with disease progression. Nanoparticles probe their environment via their diffusion, which is impacted by the size and connectivity of pores into which they freely diffuse. Here, we show that optical coherence tomography prov...

  15. Determination of Optical Properties of Turbid Media from Spatially Resolved Diffuse Reflectance by Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Hongwu; FANG Zujie

    2000-01-01

    A backpropagation (BP) network is applied to the inversion of spatially resolved diffuse reflectance from turbid media and then to determine its optical properties. A standard BP network may be trapped to the local minimum. A BP network with variable momentum and variable leaning rate can reduce this effect. After being trained, this network will produce reduced scattering coefficients and absorption coefficients when the spatially resolved diffuse reflectance are fed to its input.

  16. Diffusion weighted imaging and estimation of prognosis using apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun, E-mail: aysunbalc@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, State Hospital, Eski Cami district, Hastane street, N:1, 59300, Tekirdag (Turkey); Simsek, Mehmet Masum, E-mail: radyoloji@haydapasanumune.gov.tr [Department of Radiology, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Tibbiye street, Uskudar 34200, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: Estimation of the prognosis of infarction by using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Methods: 23 patients having acute stroke symptoms with verified infarction in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. Their MRI studies were performed between 6 and 12 h after the onset of their symptoms and were repeated on the fifth day. The infarction volumes were calculated by using DWI and the patients were divided into two groups as the ones having an expansion in the infarction area (group 1, n = 16) and the others having no expansion in the infarction area (group 2, n = 7). Quantitative ADC values were estimated. The groups were compared in terms of the ADC values on ADC maps obtained from DWI, performed during the between 6 and 12 h from the onset of the symptoms, referring to the core of the infarction (ADC{sub IC}), ischemic penumbra (ADC{sub P}) and the nonischemic parenchymal tissue (ADC{sub N}). P values < 0.05 were accepted to be statistically significant. Results: During the between 6 and 12 h mean infarction volume calculated by DWI was 23.3 cm{sup 3} for group 1 patients (ranging from 1.1 to 68.6) and this was found to be 40.3 cm{sup 3} (ranging from 1.8 to 91.5) on the fifth day. For the group 2 patients these values were found to be 42.1 cm{sup 3} (ranging from 1 to 94.7) and 41.9 (ranging from 1 to 94.7) for the same intervals respectively. A significant statistical result was failed to be demonstrated between the mean ADC{sub IC} and ADC{sub N} values (p = 0.350 and p = 0.229 respectively). However the comparison of the ADC{sub P} values between the groups was found to be highly significant (p < 0.001). When the differences between the ADC{sub P} and ADC{sub IC} and ADC{sub N} and ADC{sub P} were compared the results proved to be statistically significant (p = 0.038 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions: We believe that ADC results that would be obtained from

  17. Spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging in patients with sensory neuronopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Casseb, Raphael [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Neurophysics Group, Department of Cosmic Rays and Chronology, Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ribeiro de Paiva, Jean Levi; Teixeira Branco, Lucas Melo; Muro Martinez, Alberto Rolim; Cavalcante Franca, Marcondes Jr. [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reis, Fabiano [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Lima-Junior, Jose Carlos de [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Laboratory of Cell Signaling, Department of Internal Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Castellano, Gabriela [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Neurophysics Group, Department of Cosmic Rays and Chronology, Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    We investigated whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis of the cervical spinal cord could aid the (differential) diagnosis of sensory neuronopathies, an underdiagnosed group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. We obtained spinal cord DTI and T2WI at 3 T from 28 patients, 14 diabetic subjects with sensory-motor distal polyneuropathy, and 20 healthy controls. We quantified DTI-based parameters and looked at the hyperintense T2W signal at the spinal cord posterior columns. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity values at C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels were compared between groups. We also compared average fractional anisotropy (mean of values at C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy of average fractional anisotropy, and we compared its sensitivity against the hyperintense signal in segregating patients from the other subjects. Mean age and disease duration were 52 ± 10 and 11.4 ± 9.3 years in the patient group. Eighteen subjects had idiopathic disease and 6 dysimmune etiology. Fractional anisotropy at C3-C4 level and average fractional anisotropy were significantly different between patients and healthy controls (p < 0.001 and <0.001) and between patients and diabetic subjects (p = 0.019 and 0.027). Average fractional anisotropy presented an area under the curve of 0.838. Moreover, it had higher sensitivity than visual detection of the hyperintense signal (0.86 vs. 0.54), particularly for patients with short disease duration. DTI-based analysis enables in vivo detection of posterior column damage in sensory neuronopathy patients and is a useful diagnostic test for this condition. It also helps the differential diagnosis between sensory neuronopathy and distal polyneuropathies. (orig.)

  18. Prognostic Value of Brain Diffusion Weighted Imaging After Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijman, Christine A.C.; Mlynash, Michael; Caulfield, Anna Finley; Hsia, Amie W.; Eyngorn, Irina; Bammer, Roland; Fischbein, Nancy; Albers, Gregory W.; Moseley, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objective Outcome prediction is challenging in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors. We assessed the feasibility and prognostic utility of brain diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) during the first week. Methods Consecutive comatose post-cardiac arrest patients were prospectively enrolled. MRI data of patients who met predefined specific prognostic criteria were used to determine distinguishing ADC thresholds. Group 1: death at 6 months and absent motor response or absent pupillary reflexes or bilateral absent cortical responses at 72 hours, or vegetative at 1 month. Group 2A: Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score of 4 or 5 at 6 months. Group 2B: GOS of 3 at 6 months. The percentage of voxels below different apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) thresholds was calculated at 50 × 10−6 mm2/sec intervals. Results Overall, 86% of patients underwent MR imaging. Fifty-one patients with 62 brain MRIs were included in the analyses. Forty patients met the specific prognostic criteria. The percentage of brain volume with an ADC value below 650–700 × 10−6 mm2/sec best differentiated between group 1 and groups 2A and 2B combined (p<0.001), while the 400–450 × 10−6 mm2/sec threshold best differentiated between groups 2A and 2B (p=0.003). The ideal time window for prognostication using DWI was between 49 to 108 hours after the arrest. When comparing MRI in this time window with the 72 hour neurological examination MRI improved the sensitivity for predicting poor outcome by 38% while maintaining 100% specificity (p=0.021). Interpretation Quantitative DWI in comatose post-cardiac arrest survivors holds great promise as a prognostic adjunct. PMID:19399889

  19. Diffuse optical monitoring of hemodynamic changes in piglet brain with closed head injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Eucker, Stephanie A.; Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Ralston, Jill; Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Margulies, Susan S.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2009-05-01

    We used a nonimpact inertial rotational model of a closed head injury in neonatal piglets to simulate the conditions following traumatic brain injury in infants. Diffuse optical techniques, including diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), were used to measure cerebral blood oxygenation and blood flow continuously and noninvasively before injury and up to 6 h after the injury. The DCS measurements of relative cerebral blood flow were validated against the fluorescent microsphere method. A strong linear correlation was observed between the two techniques (R=0.89, p<0.00001). Injury-induced cerebral hemodynamic changes were quantified, and significant changes were found in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, total hemoglobin concentration, blood oxygen saturation, and cerebral blood flow after the injury. The diffuse optical measurements were robust and also correlated well with recordings of vital physiological parameters over the 6-h monitoring period, such as mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation, and heart rate. Finally, the diffuse optical techniques demonstrated sensitivity to dynamic physiological events, such as apnea, cardiac arrest, and hypertonic saline infusion. In total, the investigation corraborates potential of the optical methods for bedside monitoring of pediatric and adult human patients in the neurointensive care unit.

  20. Diffusion-weighted MR images and pineoblastoma. Diagnosis and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Cruz Junior, L. Celso Hygino; Doring, Thomas M.; Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com; Araujo, Bertha; Dantas, Mario Alberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. of Radiology; Chimelli, Leila [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. of Pathology

    2008-07-01

    Pineoblastomas are uncommon pineal tumors, which demonstrate rapid growing and poor prognosis. We report the case of a 43-year-old man with an enhancing pineal region mass, which showed restriction of the diffusion on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR images. The surgical biopsy defined the diagnosis of pineoblastoma and the therapy was initiated with radiation and chemotherapy. Three months later, the follow-up MR imaging showed areas suggestive of necrosis and the DW images demonstrate no significant areas of restricted diffusion. The differential diagnosis of pineal region masses that could show restriction of diffusion is discussed. (author)

  1. Time-domain diffuse optical tomography using silicon photomultipliers: feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sieno, Laura; Zouaoui, Judy; Hervé, Lionel; Pifferi, Antonio; Farina, Andrea; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Derouard, Jacques; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Mora, Alberto Dalla

    2016-11-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been very recently introduced as the most promising detectors in the field of diffuse optics, in particular due to the inherent low cost and large active area. We also demonstrate the suitability of SiPMs for time-domain diffuse optical tomography (DOT). The study is based on both simulations and experimental measurements. Results clearly show excellent performances in terms of spatial localization of an absorbing perturbation, thus opening the way to the use of SiPMs for DOT, with the possibility to conceive a new generation of low-cost and reliable multichannel tomographic systems.

  2. Role of diffusion-weighted imaging in early ankylosing spondylitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Chu; HU Dao-yu; ZHANG Wei; LI Xiao-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background With the advanced MRI techniques,pathologic features can be detected at an early stage and quantitatively evaluated,resulting in the advantages of early diagnosis and prompt treatment.This study aimed to determine the value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWl) in detection of early ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and investigate the characteristic manifestations of AS on whole body DWl (WB-DWl).Methods Twenty patients with the diagnosis of early AS,twenty patients with low back pain (LBP),and twenty-five healthy volunteers were included in this study.The subchondral bone apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) among these groups in the bilateral ilia and sacrum along the sacroiliac joints were compared.An independent sample t-test was utilized to analyze ADC value differences among groups.P-values less than 0.05 denoted statistical significance.The mean ADC values of focal DWI lesions in AS patients were also measured.Whole body diffusion-weighted imaging was performed in fifteen additional AS patients,and analyzed with MIP and MPR techniques in comparison to conventional MR images in order to evaluate the ability to detect AS lesions with whole body DWI.Results Mean ADC values in AS patients were (0.518±0.122)x10-3 mm2/s in the ilium and (0.503±0.168)x10-3 mm2/s in the sacrum.These were significantly greater than the values measured in the ilium and sacrum of LBP patients,(0.328±0.053)x10-3 mm2/s in the ilium and (0.311±0.081)x10-3 m2/s in the sacrum,and control group,(0.325±0.015)x10-3 mm2/s in the ilium and (0.318±0.011)x10-3 mm2/s in the sacrum respectively.No statistically si