WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical diffusion imaging

  1. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, and inexpensive imaging technique that uses near-infrared light to probe tissue optical properties. Regional variations in oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations as well as blood flow and oxygen consumption can be imaged by monitoring spatiotemporal variations in the absorption spectra. For brain imaging, this provides DOT unique abilities to directly measure the hemodynamic, metabolic, and neuronal responses to cells (neurons), and tissue and organ activations with high temporal resolution and good tissue penetration. DOT can be used as a stand-alone modality or can be integrated with other imaging modalities such as fMRI/MRI, PET/CT, and EEG/MEG in studying neurophysiology and pathology. This book chapter serves as an introduction to the basic theory and principles of DOT for neuroimaging. It covers the major aspects of advances in neural optical imaging including mathematics, physics, chemistry, reconstruction algorithm, instrumentation, image-guided spectroscopy, neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling, and clinical applications.

  2. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June; Hwang, Hee Youn

    2012-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  3. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

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    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  4. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  5. Table-top diffuse optical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturgeon, K.A.; Bakker, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the work done during a six months internshipat Philips Research for a Masters in Electronic and Electrical Engineering. An existing table-top tomography system for measuring lightin phantom breasts was restored. Updated software control and image reconstruction software was

  6. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  7. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

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    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of occult injury of optic radiation following optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiafeng; Zhu, Lijun; Li, He; Lu, Ziwen; Chen, Xin; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is easily detected by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is not possible to detect early or occult lesions in MS by routine MRI, and this may explain the inconsistency between the severity of the lesions found by MRI and the degree of clinical disability of patients with MS. The present study included 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 10 healthy volunteers. Each patient underwent routine 3.0 T MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Optic nerve and optic radiation were analyzed by DTI and DTT. The fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), λ // , and λ ┴ values were measured. In the 10 patients with MS, 7 optic nerves were affected, and 13 optic nerves were not affected. Cranial MRI showed that optic nerve thickening and hyperintensity occurred in 2 patients with MS. In the directionally encoded color maps, a hypointensive green signal in the optic nerve was observed in 3 patients with MS. The FA values were significantly lower and the MD, λ // , and λ ┴ values were significantly higher in the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiations in patients with MS in comparison with controls (P0.05). Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive in the detection of occult injury of the optic nerve and optic radiation following optic neuritis. Diffusion tensor imaging may be a useful tool for the early diagnosis, treatment and management of MS.

  9. Diffuse optical imaging using spatially and temporally modulated light

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Cuccia, David J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-07-01

    The authors describe the development of diffuse optical imaging (DOI) technologies, specifically the use of spatial and temporal modulation to control near infrared light propagation in thick tissues. We present theory and methods of DOI focusing on model-based techniques for quantitative, in vivo measurements of endogenous tissue absorption and scattering properties. We specifically emphasize the common conceptual framework of the scalar photon density wave for both temporal and spatial frequency-domain approaches. After presenting the history, theoretical foundation, and instrumentation related to these methods, we provide a brief review of clinical and preclinical applications from our research as well as our outlook on the future of DOI technology.

  10. Serial Diffusion Tensor Imaging of the Optic Radiations after Acute Optic Neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. Kolbe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported diffusion tensor imaging (DTI changes within the optic radiations of patients after optic neuritis (ON. We aimed to study optic radiation DTI changes over 12 months following acute ON and to study correlations between DTI parameters and damage to the optic nerve and primary visual cortex (V1. We measured DTI parameters [fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD, and mean diffusivity (MD] from the optic radiations of 38 acute ON patients at presentation and 6 and 12 months after acute ON. In addition, we measured retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, visual evoked potential amplitude, optic radiation lesion load, and V1 thickness. At baseline, FA was reduced and RD and MD were increased compared to control. Over 12 months, FA reduced in patients at an average rate of −2.6% per annum (control = −0.51%; p=0.006. Change in FA, RD, and MD correlated with V1 thinning over 12 months (FA: R=0.450, p=0.006; RD: R=-0.428, p=0.009; MD: R=-0.365, p=0.029. In patients with no optic radiation lesions, AD significantly correlated with RNFL thinning at 12 months (R=0.489, p=0.039. In conclusion, DTI can detect optic radiation changes over 12 months following acute ON that correlate with optic nerve and V1 damage.

  11. Patch-based anisotropic diffusion scheme for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography--part 2: image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Teresa; Koch, Maximilian; Ale, Angelique; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Arridge, Simon

    2016-02-21

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) provides 3D images of fluorescence distributions in biological tissue, which represent molecular and cellular processes. The image reconstruction problem is highly ill-posed and requires regularisation techniques to stabilise and find meaningful solutions. Quadratic regularisation tends to either oversmooth or generate very noisy reconstructions, depending on the regularisation strength. Edge preserving methods, such as anisotropic diffusion regularisation (AD), can preserve important features in the fluorescence image and smooth out noise. However, AD has limited ability to distinguish an edge from noise. We propose a patch-based anisotropic diffusion regularisation (PAD), where regularisation strength is determined by a weighted average according to the similarity between patches around voxels within a search window, instead of a simple local neighbourhood strategy. However, this method has higher computational complexity and, hence, we wavelet compress the patches (PAD-WT) to speed it up, while simultaneously taking advantage of the denoising properties of wavelet thresholding. Furthermore, structural information can be incorporated into the image reconstruction with PAD-WT to improve image quality and resolution. In this case, the weights used to average voxels in the image are calculated using the structural image, instead of the fluorescence image. The regularisation strength depends on both structural and fluorescence images, which guarantees that the method can preserve fluorescence information even when it is not structurally visible in the anatomical images. In part 1, we tested the method using a denoising problem. Here, we use simulated and in vivo mouse fDOT data to assess the algorithm performance. Our results show that the proposed PAD-WT method provides high quality and noise free images, superior to those obtained using AD.

  12. Glaucoma severity affects diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the optic nerve and optic radiation

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    Sidek, S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Medical Imaging Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selangor (Malaysia); Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Ramli, N.M.; Abdulrahman, F. [Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tan, L.K. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To evaluate whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiation in glaucoma patients provides parameters to discriminate between mild and severe glaucoma and to determine whether DTI derived indices correlate with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods: 3-Tesla DTI was performed on 90 subjects (30 normal, 30 mild glaucoma and 30 severe glaucoma subjects) and the FA and MD of the optic nerve and optic radiation were measured. The categorisation into mild and severe glaucoma was done using the Hodapp–Parrish–Anderson (HPA) classification. RNFL thickness was also assessed on all subjects using OCT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient was carried out. Results: FA and MD values in the optic nerve and optic radiation decreased and increased respectively as the disease progressed. FA at the optic nerve had the highest sensitivity (87%) and specificity (80%). FA values displayed the strongest correlation with RNFL thickness in the optic nerve (r = 0.684, p ≤ 0.001) while MD at the optic radiation showed the weakest correlation with RNFL thickness (r = −0.360, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: The high sensitivity and specificity of DTI-derived FA values in the optic nerve and the strong correlation between DTI-FA and RNFL thickness suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of disease severity.

  13. Glaucoma severity affects diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the optic nerve and optic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidek, S.; Ramli, N.; Rahmat, K.; Ramli, N.M.; Abdulrahman, F.; Tan, L.K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiation in glaucoma patients provides parameters to discriminate between mild and severe glaucoma and to determine whether DTI derived indices correlate with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods: 3-Tesla DTI was performed on 90 subjects (30 normal, 30 mild glaucoma and 30 severe glaucoma subjects) and the FA and MD of the optic nerve and optic radiation were measured. The categorisation into mild and severe glaucoma was done using the Hodapp–Parrish–Anderson (HPA) classification. RNFL thickness was also assessed on all subjects using OCT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient was carried out. Results: FA and MD values in the optic nerve and optic radiation decreased and increased respectively as the disease progressed. FA at the optic nerve had the highest sensitivity (87%) and specificity (80%). FA values displayed the strongest correlation with RNFL thickness in the optic nerve (r = 0.684, p ≤ 0.001) while MD at the optic radiation showed the weakest correlation with RNFL thickness (r = −0.360, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: The high sensitivity and specificity of DTI-derived FA values in the optic nerve and the strong correlation between DTI-FA and RNFL thickness suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of disease severity

  14. Characterizing Intraorbital Optic Nerve Changes on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Thyroid Eye Disease Before Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa; Lee, Young Hen; Suh, Sang-Il; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Baek, Sehyun; Seo, Hyung Suk

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the optic nerve is affected by thyroid eye disease (TED) before the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty TED patients and 20 controls were included. The mean, axial, and radial diffusivities and fractional anisotropy (FA) value were measured at the optic nerves in DTI. Extraocular muscle diameters were measured on computed tomography. The diffusivities and FA of the optic nerves were compared between TED and controls and between active and inactive stages of TED. The correlations between these DTI parameters and the clinical features were determined. The mean, axial, and radial diffusivities were lower in TED compared with the controls (P optic nerve before dysthyroid optic neuropathy in TED. The FA, in particular, reflected TED activity and severity.

  15. An instrument for small-animal imaging using time-resolved diffuse and fluorescence optical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montcel, Bruno; Poulet, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We describe time-resolved optical methods that use diffuse near-infrared photons to image the optical properties of tissues and their inner fluorescent probe distribution. The assembled scanner uses picosecond laser diodes at 4 wavelengths, an 8-anode photo-multiplier tube and time-correlated single photon counting. Optical absorption and reduced scattering images as well as fluorescence emission images are computed from temporal profiles of diffuse photons. This method should improve the spatial resolution and the quantification of fluorescence signals. We used the diffusion approximation of the radiation transport equation and the finite element method to solve the forward problem. The inverse problem is solved with an optimization algorithm such as ART or conjugate gradient. The scanner and its performances are presented, together with absorption, scattering and fluorescent images obtained with it

  16. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larin, K V; Tuchin, V V

    2008-01-01

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  17. Artificial neural networks based estimation of optical parameters by diffuse reflectance imaging under in vitro conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Ozan Gökkan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical parameters (properties of tissue-mimicking phantoms are determined through noninvasive optical imaging. Objective of this study is to decompose obtained diffuse reflectance into these optical properties such as absorption and scattering coefficients. To do so, transmission spectroscopy is firstly used to measure the coefficients via an experimental setup. Next, the optical properties of each characterized phantom are input for Monte Carlo (MC simulations to get diffuse reflectance. Also, a surface image for each single phantom with its known optical properties is obliquely captured due to reflectance-based geometrical setup using CMOS camera that is positioned at 5∘ angle to the phantoms. For the illumination of light, a laser light source at 633nm wavelength is preferred, because optical properties of different components in a biological tissue on that wavelength are nonoverlapped. During in vitro measurements, we prepared 30 different mixture samples adding clinoleic intravenous lipid emulsion (CILE and evans blue (EB dye into a distilled water. Finally, all obtained diffuse reflectance values are used to estimate the optical coefficients by artificial neural networks (ANNs in inverse modeling. For a biological tissue it is found that the simulated and measured values in our results are in good agreement.

  18. Linear image reconstruction for a diffuse optical mammography system in a noncompressed geometry using scattering fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Tim; Brendel, Bernhard; Ziegler, Ronny; Beek, Michiel van; Uhlemann, Falk; Bontus, Claas; Koehler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a potential new imaging modality to detect or monitor breast lesions. Recently, Philips developed a new DOT system capable of transmission and fluorescence imaging, where the investigated breast is hanging freely into the measurement cup containing scattering fluid. We present a fast and robust image reconstruction algorithm that is used for the transmission measurements. The algorithm is based on the Rytov approximation. We show that this algorithm can be used over a wide range of tissue optical properties if the reconstruction is adapted to each patient. We use estimates of the breast shape and average tissue optical properties to initialize the reconstruction, which improves the image quality significantly. We demonstrate the capability of the measurement system and reconstruction to image breast lesions by clinical examples

  19. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  20. A cost-effective LED and photodetector based fast direct 3D diffuse optical imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Manob Jyoti; Manjappa, Rakesh; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2017-07-01

    A cost-effective and high-speed 3D diffuse optical tomography system using high power LED light sources and silicon photodetectors has been designed and built, that can continuously scan and reconstruct spectroscopic images at a frame rate of 2 fps. The system is experimentally validated with tissue mimicking cylindrical resin phantom having light absorbing inhomogeneities of different size, shape and contrast, and at different locations.

  1. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  2. Spatio-temporal imaging of the hemoglobin in the compressed breast with diffuse optical tomography

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    Boverman, Gregory; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, Stefan A.; Miller, Eric L.; Brooks, Dana H.; Selb, Juliette; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.

    2007-07-01

    We develop algorithms for imaging the time-varying optical absorption within the breast given diffuse optical tomographic data collected over a time span that is long compared to the dynamics of the medium. Multispectral measurements allow for the determination of the time-varying total hemoglobin concentration and of oxygen saturation. To facilitate the image reconstruction, we decompose the hemodynamics in time into a linear combination of spatio-temporal basis functions, the coefficients of which are estimated using all of the data simultaneously, making use of a Newton-based nonlinear optimization algorithm. The solution of the extremely large least-squares problem which arises in computing the Newton update is obtained iteratively using the LSQR algorithm. A Laplacian spatial regularization operator is applied, and, in addition, we make use of temporal regularization which tends to encourage similarity between the images of the spatio-temporal coefficients. Results are shown for an extensive simulation, in which we are able to image and quantify localized changes in both total hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. Finally, a breast compression study has been performed for a normal breast cancer screening subject, using an instrument which allows for highly accurate co-registration of multispectral diffuse optical measurements with an x-ray tomosynthesis image of the breast. We are able to quantify the global return of blood to the breast following compression, and, in addition, localized changes are observed which correspond to the glandular region of the breast.

  3. Assessing the future of diffuse optical imaging technologies for breast cancer management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Boas, David A.; Cerussi, Albert E.

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a noninvasive optical technique that employs near-infrared (NIR) light to quantitatively characterize the optical properties of thick tissues. Although NIR methods were first applied to breast transillumination (also called diaphanography) nearly 80 years ago, quantitative DOI methods employing time- or frequency-domain photon migration technologies have only recently been used for breast imaging (i.e., since the mid-1990s). In this review, the state of the art in DOI for breast cancer is outlined and a multi-institutional Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging (NTROI) is described, which has been formed by the National Cancer Institute to advance diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging (DOSI) for the purpose of improving breast cancer detection and clinical management. DOSI employs broadband technology both in near-infrared spectral and temporal signal domains in order to separate absorption from scattering and quantify uptake of multiple molecular probes based on absorption or fluorescence contrast. Additional dimensionality in the data is provided by integrating and co-registering the functional information of DOSI with x-ray mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide structural information or vascular flow information, respectively. Factors affecting DOSI performance, such as intrinsic and extrinsic contrast mechanisms, quantitation of biochemical components, image formation/visualization, and multimodality co-registration are under investigation in the ongoing research NTROI sites. One of the goals is to develop standardized DOSI platforms that can be used as stand-alone devices or in conjunction with MRI, mammography, or ultrasound. This broad-based, multidisciplinary effort is expected to provide new insight regarding the origins of breast disease and practical approaches for addressing several key challenges in breast cancer, including: Detecting disease in mammographically dense tissue

  4. Towards real-time diffuse optical tomography for imaging brain functions cooperated with Kalman estimator

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    Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Dongyuan; Ding, Xuemei; Dan, Mai; Pan, Tiantian; Wang, Yihan; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging method to monitor the cerebral hemodynamic through the optical changes measured at the scalp surface. It has played a more and more important role in psychology and medical imaging communities. Real-time imaging of brain function using NIRS makes it possible to explore some sophisticated human brain functions unexplored before. Kalman estimator has been frequently used in combination with modified Beer-Lamber Law (MBLL) based optical topology (OT), for real-time brain function imaging. However, the spatial resolution of the OT is low, hampering the application of OT in exploring some complicated brain functions. In this paper, we develop a real-time imaging method combining diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and Kalman estimator, much improving the spatial resolution. Instead of only presenting one spatially distributed image indicating the changes of the absorption coefficients at each time point during the recording process, one real-time updated image using the Kalman estimator is provided. Its each voxel represents the amplitude of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) associated with this voxel. We evaluate this method using some simulation experiments, demonstrating that this method can obtain more reliable spatial resolution images. Furthermore, a statistical analysis is also conducted to help to decide whether a voxel in the field of view is activated or not.

  5. Performance assessment of diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in a 2-year multicenter breast cancer trial

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    Leproux, Anaïs; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Cerussi, Albert; Durkin, Amanda; Hill, Brian; Hylton, Nola; Yodh, Arjun G.; Carp, Stefan A.; Boas, David; Jiang, Shudong; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Yang, Wei; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    We present a framework for characterizing the performance of an experimental imaging technology, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI), in a 2-year multicenter American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) breast cancer study (ACRIN-6691). DOSI instruments combine broadband frequency-domain photon migration with time-independent near-infrared (650 to 1000 nm) spectroscopy to measure tissue absorption and reduced scattering spectra and tissue hemoglobin, water, and lipid composition. The goal of ACRIN-6691 was to test the effectiveness of optically derived imaging endpoints in predicting the final pathologic response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Sixty patients were enrolled over a 2-year period at participating sites and received multiple DOSI scans prior to and during 3- to 6-month NAC. The impact of three sources of error on accuracy and precision, including different operators, instruments, and calibration standards, was evaluated using a broadband reflectance standard and two different solid tissue-simulating optical phantoms. Instruments showed <0.0010 mm-1 (10.3%) and 0.06 mm-1 (4.7%) deviation in broadband absorption and reduced scattering, respectively, over the 2-year duration of ACRIN-6691. These variations establish a useful performance criterion for assessing instrument stability. The proposed procedures and tests are not limited to DOSI; rather, they are intended to provide methods to characterize performance of any instrument used in translational optical imaging.

  6. In vivo, noninvasive functional measurements of bone sarcoma using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Hannah M.; Hoang, Bang H.; Geller, David; Yang, Rui; Gorlick, Richard; Berger, Jeremy; Tingling, Janet; Roth, Michael; Gill, Jonathon; Roblyer, Darren

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) is an emerging near-infrared imaging technique that noninvasively measures quantitative functional information in thick tissue. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using DOSI to measure optical contrast from bone sarcomas. These tumors are rare and pose technical and practical challenges for DOSI measurements due to the varied anatomic locations and tissue depths of presentation. Six subjects were enrolled in the study. One subject was unable to be measured due to tissue contact sensitivity. For the five remaining subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, optical properties, and quantitative tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids from tumor and contralateral normal tissues were assessed. Statistical differences between tumor and contralateral normal tissue were found in chromophore concentrations and optical properties for four subjects. Low signal-to-noise was encountered during several subject's measurements, suggesting increased detector sensitivity will help to optimize DOSI for this patient population going forward. This study demonstrates that DOSI is capable of measuring optical properties and obtaining functional information in bone sarcomas. In the future, DOSI may provide a means to stratify treatment groups and monitor chemotherapy response for this disease.

  7. Impact of errors in experimental parameters on reconstructed breast images using diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Lundqvist, Mats; Fang, Qianqian; Carp, Stefan A

    2018-03-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (NIR-DOT) is an emerging technology that offers hemoglobin based, functional imaging tumor biomarkers for breast cancer management. The most promising clinical translation opportunities are in the differential diagnosis of malignant vs. benign lesions, and in early response assessment and guidance for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Accurate quantification of the tissue oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration across the field of view, as well as repeatability during longitudinal imaging in the context of therapy guidance, are essential for the successful translation of NIR-DOT to clinical practice. The ill-posed and ill-condition nature of the DOT inverse problem makes this technique particularly susceptible to model errors that may occur, for example, when the experimental conditions do not fully match the assumptions built into the image reconstruction process. To evaluate the susceptibility of DOT images to experimental errors that might be encountered in practice for a parallel-plate NIR-DOT system, we simulated 7 different types of errors, each with a range of magnitudes. We generated simulated data by using digital breast phantoms derived from five actual mammograms of healthy female volunteers, to which we added a 1-cm tumor. After applying each of the experimental error types and magnitudes to the simulated measurements, we reconstructed optical images with and without structural prior guidance and assessed the overall error in the total hemoglobin concentrations (HbT) and in the HbT contrast between the lesion and surrounding area vs. the best-case scenarios. It is found that slight in-plane probe misalignment and plate rotation did not result in large quantification errors. However, any out-of-plane probe tilting could result in significant deterioration in lesion contrast. Among the error types investigated in this work, optical images were the least likely to be impacted by breast shape inaccuracies but suffered the

  8. Brain activation and connectivity of social cognition using diffuse optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-02-01

    In the current research, diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is used for the first time towards studies related to sociocommunication impairments, which is a characteristic feature of autism. DOI studies were performed on normal adult volunteers to determine the differences in the brain activation (cognitive regions) in terms of the changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels in response to joint and non-joint attention based stimulus (i.e. socio-communicative paradigms shown as video clips). Functional connectivity models are employed to assess the extent of synchronization between the left and right pre-frontal regions of the brain in response to the above stimuli.

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging of the optic tracts in multiple sclerosis: association with retinal thinning and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H; Smith, Seth A; Ozturk, Arzu; Farrell, Sheena K; Calabresi, Peter A; Reich, Daniel S

    2011-04-01

    Visual disability is common in multiple sclerosis, but its relationship to abnormalities of the optic tracts remains unknown. Because they are only rarely affected by lesions, the optic tracts may represent a good model for assessing the imaging properties of normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis. Whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging was performed on 34 individuals with multiple sclerosis and 26 healthy volunteers. The optic tracts were reconstructed by tractography, and tract-specific diffusion indices were quantified. In the multiple-sclerosis group, peripapillary retinal nerve-fiber-layer thickness and total macular volume were measured by optical coherence tomography, and visual acuity at 100%, 2.5%, and 1.25% contrast was examined. After adjusting for age and sex, optic-tract mean and perpendicular diffusivity were higher (P=.002) in multiple sclerosis. Lower optic-tract fractional anisotropy was correlated with retinal nerve-fiber-layer thinning (r=.51, P=.003) and total-macular-volume reduction (r=.59, P=.002). However, optic-tract diffusion indices were not specifically correlated with visual acuity or with their counterparts in the optic radiation. Optic-tract diffusion abnormalities are associated with retinal damage, suggesting that both may be related to optic-nerve injury, but do not appear to contribute strongly to visual disability in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  10. Assessment of Optic Nerve Impairment in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica by MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiye Chen

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has been used for the evaluation of the white matter integrity. In this study, we evaluated optic nerve impairment in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO using DTI.Optic nerve DTI were performed on 28 NMO patients and 38 normal controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA values were measured in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the intraorbital optic nerve segment. For the posterior intraorbital optic nerve, FA values of BI (0.20±0.07, MI (0.24±0.16, and NA (0.25±0.14 decreased significantly compared with that of NC (0.43±0.07 (P<0.05, and ROC analysis demonstrated that the area under the curve (AUC measurements for BI vs. NC, MI vs. NC, NA vs. NC, and NMO (including BI, MI, and NA vs. NC were 0.99, 0.93, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively. The corresponding diagnostic sensitivities of ROC analysis were 100%, 80%, 80%, and 91%; and the specificities were 93%, 97%, 91%, and 93%.Decreased FA value in the intraorbital optic nerve, especially in the posterior part of the nerve, was demonstrated as a characteristic MR feature for NMO-related optic nerve impairment.

  11. Diffuse Optical Tomography for Brain Imaging: Continuous Wave Instrumentation and Linear Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a functional brain imaging technique that measures cerebral blood oxygenation and blood volume changes. This technique is particularly useful in human neuroimaging measurements because of the coupling between neural and hemodynamic activity in the brain. DOT is a multichannel imaging extension of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS uses laser sources and light detectors on the scalp to obtain noninvasive hemodynamic measurements from spectroscopic analysis of the remitted light. This review explains how NIRS data analysis is performed using a combination of the modified Beer-Lambert law (MBLL) and the diffusion approximation to the radiative transport equation (RTE). Laser diodes, photodiode detectors, and optical terminals that contact the scalp are the main components in most NIRS systems. Placing multiple sources and detectors over the surface of the scalp allows for tomographic reconstructions that extend the individual measurements of NIRS into DOT. Mathematically arranging the DOT measurements into a linear system of equations that can be inverted provides a way to obtain tomographic reconstructions of hemodynamics in the brain.

  12. Effective scattering coefficient of the cerebral spinal fluid in adult head models for diffuse optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custo, Anna; Wells, William M., III; Barnett, Alex H.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Boas, David A.

    2006-07-01

    An efficient computation of the time-dependent forward solution for photon transport in a head model is a key capability for performing accurate inversion for functional diffuse optical imaging of the brain. The diffusion approximation to photon transport is much faster to simulate than the physically correct radiative transport equation (RTE); however, it is commonly assumed that scattering lengths must be much smaller than all system dimensions and all absorption lengths for the approximation to be accurate. Neither of these conditions is satisfied in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Since line-of-sight distances in the CSF are small, of the order of a few millimeters, we explore the idea that the CSF scattering coefficient may be modeled by any value from zero up to the order of the typical inverse line-of-sight distance, or approximately 0.3 mm-1, without significantly altering the calculated detector signals or the partial path lengths relevant for functional measurements. We demonstrate this in detail by using a Monte Carlo simulation of the RTE in a three-dimensional head model based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging data, with realistic optode geometries. Our findings lead us to expect that the diffusion approximation will be valid even in the presence of the CSF, with consequences for faster solution of the inverse problem.

  13. Effect of Shot Noise on Simultaneous Sensing in Frequency Division Multiplexed Diffuse Optical Tomographic Imaging Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hansol; Lim, Gukbin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Cho, Jaedu; Gulsen, Gultekin; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2017-11-28

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has been studied for use in the detection of breast cancer, cerebral oxygenation, and cognitive brain signals. As optical imaging studies have increased significantly, acquiring imaging data in real time has become increasingly important. We have developed frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) DOT systems to analyze their performance with respect to acquisition time and imaging quality, in comparison with the conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM) DOT. A large tomographic area of a cylindrical phantom 60 mm in diameter could be successfully reconstructed using both TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems. In our experiment with 6 source-detector (S-D) pairs, the TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems required 6.18 and 1 s, respectively, to obtain a single tomographic data set. While the absorption coefficient of the reconstruction image was underestimated in the case of the FDM DOT, we experimentally confirmed that the abnormal region can be clearly distinguished from the background phantom using both methods.

  14. Effect of Shot Noise on Simultaneous Sensing in Frequency Division Multiplexed Diffuse Optical Tomographic Imaging Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansol Jang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT has been studied for use in the detection of breast cancer, cerebral oxygenation, and cognitive brain signals. As optical imaging studies have increased significantly, acquiring imaging data in real time has become increasingly important. We have developed frequency-division multiplexing (FDM DOT systems to analyze their performance with respect to acquisition time and imaging quality, in comparison with the conventional time-division multiplexing (TDM DOT. A large tomographic area of a cylindrical phantom 60 mm in diameter could be successfully reconstructed using both TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems. In our experiment with 6 source-detector (S-D pairs, the TDM DOT and FDM DOT systems required 6.18 and 1 s, respectively, to obtain a single tomographic data set. While the absorption coefficient of the reconstruction image was underestimated in the case of the FDM DOT, we experimentally confirmed that the abnormal region can be clearly distinguished from the background phantom using both methods.

  15. Dynamic studies of small animals with a four-color diffuse optical tomography imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Christoph H.; Graber, Harry L.; Pei Yaling; Farber, Mark; Stewart, Mark; Levina, Rita D.; Levin, Mikhail B.; Xu Yong; Barbour, Randall L.

    2005-01-01

    We present newly developed instrumentation for full-tomographic four-wavelength, continuous wave, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging on small animals. A small-animal imaging stage was constructed, from materials compatible with in-magnet studies, which offers stereotaxic fixation of the animal and precise, stable probe positioning. Instrument performance, based on calibration and phantom studies, demonstrates excellent long-term signal stability. DOT measurements of the functional rat brain response to electric paw stimulation are presented, and these demonstrate high data quality and excellent sensitivity to hemodynamic changes. A general linear model analysis on individual trials is used to localize and quantify the occurrence of functional behavior associated with the different hemoglobin state responses. Statistical evaluation of outcomes of individual trials is employed to identify significant regional response variations for different stimulation sites. Image results reveal a diffuse cortical response and a strong reaction of the thalamus, both indicative of activation of pain pathways by the stimulation. In addition, a weaker lateralized functional component is observed in the brain response, suggesting presence of motor activation. An important outcome of the experiment is that it shows that reactions to individual provocations can be monitored, without having to resort to signal averaging. Thus the described technology may be useful for studies of long-term trends in hemodynamic response, as would occur, for example, in behavioral studies involving freely moving animals

  16. Multimodal breast cancer imaging using coregistered dynamic diffuse optical tomography and digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Bernhard B.; Deng, Bin; Singh, Bhawana; Martino, Mark; Selb, Juliette; Fang, Qianqian; Sajjadi, Amir Y.; Cormier, Jayne; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.; Boas, David A.; Saksena, Mansi A.; Carp, Stefan A.

    2017-04-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is emerging as a noninvasive functional imaging method for breast cancer diagnosis and neoadjuvant chemotherapy monitoring. In particular, the multimodal approach of combining DOT with x-ray digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is especially synergistic as DBT prior information can be used to enhance the DOT reconstruction. DOT, in turn, provides a functional information overlay onto the mammographic images, increasing sensitivity and specificity to cancer pathology. We describe a dynamic DOT apparatus designed for tight integration with commercial DBT scanners and providing a fast (up to 1 Hz) image acquisition rate to enable tracking hemodynamic changes induced by the mammographic breast compression. The system integrates 96 continuous-wave and 24 frequency-domain source locations as well as 32 continuous wave and 20 frequency-domain detection locations into low-profile plastic plates that can easily mate to the DBT compression paddle and x-ray detector cover, respectively. We demonstrate system performance using static and dynamic tissue-like phantoms as well as in vivo images acquired from the pool of patients recalled for breast biopsies at the Massachusetts General Hospital Breast Imaging Division.

  17. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and optical polarization imaging of in-vivo biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Núñez, A.; Castillejos, Y.; García-Torales, G.; Martínez-Ponce, G.

    2013-11-01

    A number of optical techniques have been reported in the scientific literature as accomplishable methodologies to diagnose diseases in biological tissue, for instance, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and optical polarization imaging (OPI). The skin is the largest organ in the body and consists of three primary layers, namely, the epidermis (the outermost layer exposed to the world), the dermis, and the hypodermis. The epidermis changes from to site to site, mainly because of difference in hydration. A lower water content increase light scattering and reduce the penetration depth of radiation. In this work, two hairless mice have been selected to evaluate their skin features by using DRS and OPI. Four areas of the specimen body were chosen to realize the comparison: back, abdomen, tail, and head. From DRS, it was possible to distinguish the skin nature because of different blood irrigation at dermis. In the other hand, OPI shows pseudo-depolarizing regions in the measured Mueller images related to a spatially varying propagation of the scattered light. This provides information about the cell size in the irradiated skin.

  18. Diffusion-weighted imaging helps differentiate multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica-related acute optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hailin; He, Huijin; Zhang, Fang; Sha, Yan; Tian, Guohong

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values between multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO)-related acute optic neuritis (ON) patients and predict their optic nerve atrophy of optic coherence tomography (OCT) parameters. Nineteen MS and 15 NMO-related acute ON patients who underwent a diffusion-weighted imaging sequence in 3.0 Tesla MR scanner and a follow-up OCT examination after 6 months were included. The ADC values, thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and the macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) between MS and NMO related ON were assessed. The mean ADC value of the NMO-ON, (0.691 ± 0.195[SD]) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, was significantly smaller (P = 0.0133) than that of MS-ON. The mean ADC value of MS-ON, (0.879 ± 0.144) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, was significantly smaller (P < 0.0001) than that of control group, (1.025 ± 0.067) × 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Using an ADC value smaller than 0.830 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s as the threshold value for differentiating MS-ON from NMO-ON patients, the highest accuracy of 76.7%, with 75.0% sensitivity and 78.3% specificity, was obtained. The ADC value measured at the acute stage of ON was correlated with the thickness of the RNFL (r = 0.441; P = 0.006) and the GCC (r = 0.526; P < 0.0001) after 6 months. The ADC value might be helpful for differentiating MS-ON from NMO-ON patients. The decreased ADC value was correlated with optic nerve atrophy on OCT. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1780-1785. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Simultaneous in vivo imaging of diffuse optical reflectance, optoacoustic pressure and ultrasonic scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subochev, Pavel V.; Orlova, Anna G.; Turchin, Ilya V.

    2017-03-01

    We will present reflection-mode bioimaging system providing complementary optical, photoacsoutic and acoustic measurements by acoustic detector after each laser pulse with 2kHz repetition rate. The photons absorbed within the biological tissue provide optoacoustic (OA) signals, the photons absorbed by the external electrode of a detector provide the measurable diffuse reflectance (DR) from the sample and the probing ultrasonic (US) pulse. To demonstrate the in vivo capabilities of the system we performed complementary DR/OA/US imaging of small laboratory animals and human palm with 3.5mm/50μm/35μm lateral resolution at up to 3 mm diagnostic depth. Functional OA and DR imaging demonstrated the levels of tissue vascularization and blood supply. Structural US imaging was essential for understanding the position of vessels and zones with different perfusion. Before BiOS-2017 we plan to accomplish more in vivo experiments validating the developed triple-modality system as diagnostic tool to detect vascularization as well as mechanisms of vascular changes when monitoring response to therapy.

  20. Study of optic nerve in patients with neuromyelitis optica using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhiye; Zhu Lijun; Lou Xin; Li Jinfeng; Yang Yang; Ma Lin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the diagnostic value of optic diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in detecting the impairment of optic nerve in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) patients. Methods: Conventional MRI and optic DTI were performed in 28 NMO patients and 38 normal controls (NC). Fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in the anterior part, middle part and posterior part of intraorbital segment of optic nerve. The patients were classified into 3 groups based on the impairment of vision and visual evoked potential (VEP): monocular impairment (MI) group, 10 eyes; biocular impairment (BI) group, 36 eyes; and normal-appearing (NA) group, 10 eyes. All patients were performed with the evaluation of expanded disability status scale (EDSS). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and Spearman correlation analysis were performed among the subgroups of NMO and normal controls. Results: There was significantly statistical difference between the four groups (F=43.54, P<0.01). Decreased FA values were demonstrated in the MI group (0.29 ±0.08), BI group (0.27 ±0.08), and NA group (0.35 ±0.13) compared with NC (0.45 ±0.07) (P<0.01). FA value in BI group was significantly lower than that of NA group (P<0.01). Area under curve by ROC analysis in NC vs MI, NC vs BI, NC vs NA, and NC vs NMO was 0.92, 0.95, 0.74, and 0.91, respectively. The diagnostic sensitivity of ROC was 80%, 86%, 50%, and 79%, respectively. The diagnostic specificity of ROC was 95% for the each compared groups. FA value showed no correlation with EDSS for each NMO groups, and showed negative correlation with disease duration for BI group (r=-0.371, P<0.05). Conclusions: Various degrees of optic nerve injuries, indicated by decreased FA value,are present in NMO patients, and optic DTI may be a simple and effective tool for the quantitative evaluation of optic nerve in NMO patients. (authors)

  1. Preliminary study of the optic radiation in healthy adults by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jing; Guo Jing; Xu Han; Jiang Zhen; Xu Xiaoqiu; Shen Junkang; Liu Tao; Gong Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of optic radiation fibers and the variation of Meyer loop in healthy adults. Methods: Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images were obtained from 25 healthy volunteers using a 1.5 T MR scanner and postprocessed using the DTI Studio software. Multiple ROIs were used for fiber reconstruction. The distance between the anterior limit of Meyer loop and the temporal tip(MT) and the fraction of anisotropy (FA) at one side were compared with those at the contralateral side by paired t test. Results: Forty-nine optic radiation fibers were successfully reconstructed in 25 volunteers. The value of MT was (43.2±7.7) mm(ranged from 30.6 to 59.7 mm), and coefficient of variation was 18%. The values of MT and FA of optic radiation in the left side were (43.5±8.1) mm, (0.53±0.10) respectively, and those counterparts in the right side were (43.2±7.5) mm and (0.53± 0.07) respectively. There were no significance difference of MT or FA between the two sides (t=0.12, 0.00; P=0.91 and 1.00 respectively). Conclusions: The range of interindividual variation for MT was rather large in healthy volunteers. The preoperative measurement of the MT appears be helpful to predict the risk of the incidence of visual defect and to decrease the incidence of the complication. (authors)

  2. Diffusion tensor optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Daniel L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of diffusive particle transport provide insight into tissue architecture, drug delivery, and cellular function. Analogous to diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), where the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules is mapped on the millimeter scale to elucidate the fibrous structure of tissue, here we propose diffusion-tensor optical coherence tomography (DT-OCT) for measuring directional diffusivity and flow of optically scattering particles within tissue. Because DT-OCT is sensitive to the sub-resolution motion of Brownian particles as they are constrained by tissue macromolecules, it has the potential to quantify nanoporous anisotropic tissue structure at micrometer resolution as relevant to extracellular matrices, neurons, and capillaries. Here we derive the principles of DT-OCT, relating the detected optical signal from a minimum of six probe beams with the six unique diffusion tensor and three flow vector components. The optimal geometry of the probe beams is determined given a finite numerical aperture, and a high-speed hardware implementation is proposed. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess the ability of the proposed DT-OCT system to quantify anisotropic diffusion of nanoparticles in a collagen matrix, an extracellular constituent that is known to become highly aligned during tumor development.

  3. Prediction of post-operative necrosis after mastectomy: A pilot study utilizing optical diffusion imaging spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xian-Jin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Flap necrosis and epidermolysis occurs in 18-30% of all mastectomies. Complications may be prevented by intra-operative detection of ischemia. Currently, no technique enables quantitative valuation of mastectomy skin perfusion. Optical Diffusion Imaging Spectroscopy (ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter measures the ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin over a 1 × 1 cm area to obtain a non-invasive measurement of perfusion (StO2. Methods This study evaluates the ability of ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter to predict mastectomy flap necrosis. StO2 measurements were taken at five points before and at completion of dissection in 10 patients. Data collected included: demographics, tumor size, flap length/thickness, co-morbidities, procedure length, and wound complications. Results One patient experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Five patients underwent immediate reconstruction, including the patient with necrosis. Statistically significant factors contributing to necrosis included reduction in medial flap StO2 (p = 0.0189, reduction in inferior flap StO2 (p = 0.003, and flap length (p = 0.009. Conclusion StO2 reductions may be utilized to identify impaired perfusion in mastectomy skin flaps.

  4. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  5. Investigation of detection limits for diffuse optical tomography systems: II. Analysis of slab and cup geometry for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ronny; Brendel, Bernhard; Rinneberg, Herbert; Nielsen, Tim

    2009-01-21

    Using a statistical (chi-square) test on simulated data and a realistic noise model derived from the system's hardware we study the performance of diffuse optical tomography systems for fluorescence imaging. We compare the predicted smallest size of detectable lesions at various positions in slab and cup geometry and model how detection sensitivity depends on breast compression and lesion fluorescence contrast. Our investigation shows that lesion detection is limited by relative noise in slab geometry and by absolute noise in cup geometry.

  6. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J., E-mail: Gregory.Czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Vorauer, Eric [Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Chin, Lee [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tran, William T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Wright, Frances C. [Division of General Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Gandhi, Sonal [Division of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Yaffe, Martin J. [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images, accompanied by alterations in their mean values, are demonstrated here for the first time as early surrogates of ultimate treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). NAC, as a standard component of treatment for LABC patient, induces measurable heterogeneous changes in tumor metabolism which were evaluated using DOS-based metabolic maps. This study characterizes such inhomogeneous nature of response development, by determining alterations in textural properties of DOS images apparent at early stages of therapy, followed later by gross changes in mean values of these functional metabolic maps. Methods: Twelve LABC patients undergoing NAC were scanned before and at four times after treatment initiation, and tomographic DOS images were reconstructed at each time. Ultimate responses of patients were determined clinically and pathologically, based on a reduction in tumor size and assessment of residual tumor cellularity. The mean-value parameters and textural features were extracted from volumetric DOS images for several functional and metabolic parameters prior to the treatment initiation. Changes in these DOS-based biomarkers were also monitored over the course of treatment. The measured biomarkers were applied to differentiate patient responses noninvasively and compared to clinical and pathologic responses. Results: Responding and nonresponding patients demonstrated different changes in DOS-based textural and mean-value parameters during chemotherapy. Whereas none of the biomarkers measured prior the start of therapy demonstrated a significant difference between the two patient populations, statistically significant differences were observed at week one after treatment initiation using the relative change in contrast/homogeneity of seven functional maps (0.001 < p < 0.049), and mean value of water

  7. Correlated diffusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Alexander; Glaister, Jeffrey; Cameron, Andrew; Haider, Masoom

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer

  8. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomographic imaging for the provision of both anatomical and functional information about biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2005-04-01

    We present in vivo images of near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) of human lower legs and forearm to validate the dual functions of a time-resolved (TR) NIR DOT in clinical diagnosis, i.e., to provide anatomical and functional information simultaneously. The NIR DOT system is composed of time-correlated single-photon-counting channels, and the image reconstruction algorithm is based on the modified generalized pulsed spectral technique, which effectively incorporates the TR data with reasonable computation time. The reconstructed scattering images of both the lower legs and the forearm revealed their anatomies, in which the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscles. In the absorption images, some of the blood vessels were observable. In the functional imaging, a subject was requested to do handgripping exercise to stimulate physiological changes in the forearm tissue. The images of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin concentration changes in the forearm were obtained from the differential images of the absorption at three wavelengths between the exercise and the rest states, which were reconstructed with a differential imaging scheme. These images showed increases in both blood volume and oxyhemoglobin concentration in the arteries and simultaneously showed hypoxia in the corresponding muscles. All the results have demonstrated the capability of TR NIR DOT by reconstruction of the absolute images of the scattering and the absorption with a high spatial resolution that finally provided both the anatomical and functional information inside bulky biological tissues.

  9. Diffuse optical systems and methods to image physiological changes of the brain in response to focal TBI (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookasis, David; Volkov, Boris; Kofman, Itamar

    2017-02-01

    During the last four decades, various optical techniques have been proposed and intensively used for biomedical diagnosis and therapy both in animal model and in human. These techniques have several advantages over the traditional existing methods: simplicity in structure, low-cost, easy to handle, portable, can be used repeatedly over time near the patient bedside for continues monitoring, and offer high spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the use of two optical imaging modalities namely, spatially modulated illumination and dual-wavelength laser speckle to image the changes in brain tissue chromophores, morphology, and metabolic before, during, and after the onset of focal traumatic brain injury in intact mouse head (n=15). Injury was applied in anesthetized mice by weight-drop apparatus using 50gram metal rod striking the mouse's head. Following data analysis, we show a series of hemodynamic and structural changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation and blood flow, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. In addition, to validate the monitoring of cerebral blood flow by the imaging system, measurements with laser Doppler flowmetry were also performed (n=5), which confirmed reduction in blood flow following injury. Overall, our result demonstrates the capability of diffuse optical modalities to monitor and map brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain trauma.

  10. Functional imaging of the human brain using a modular, fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, Danial; Cooper, Robert J; Dempsey, Laura; Powell, Samuel; Quaggia, Simone; Highton, David; Elwell, Clare; Hebden, Jeremy C; Everdell, Nicholas L

    2016-10-01

    We present the first three-dimensional, functional images of the human brain to be obtained using a fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system. Our technology consists of independent, miniaturized, silicone-encapsulated DOT modules that can be placed directly on the scalp. Four of these modules were arranged to provide up to 128, dual-wavelength measurement channels over a scalp area of approximately 60 × 65 mm 2 . Using a series of motor-cortex stimulation experiments, we demonstrate that this system can obtain high-quality, continuous-wave measurements at source-detector separations ranging from 14 to 55 mm in adults, in the presence of hair. We identify robust haemodynamic response functions in 5 out of 5 subjects, and present diffuse optical tomography images that depict functional haemodynamic responses that are well-localized in all three dimensions at both the individual and group levels. This prototype modular system paves the way for a new generation of wearable, wireless, high-density optical neuroimaging technologies.

  11. Experimental and Monte Carlo investigation of visible diffuse-reflectance imaging sensitivity to diffusing particle size changes in an optical model of a bladder wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyagina, N.; Loschenov, V.; Wolf, D.; Daul, C.; Blondel, W.; Savelieva, T.

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the influence of scatterer size changes on the laser light diffusion, induced by collimated monochromatic laser irradiation, in tissue-like optical phantoms using diffuse-reflectance imaging. For that purpose, three-layer optical phantoms were prepared, in which nano- and microsphere size varied in order to simulate the scattering properties of healthy and cancerous urinary bladder walls. The informative areas of the surface diffuse-reflected light distributions were about 15×18 pixels for the smallest scattering particles of 0.05 μm, about 21×25 pixels for the medium-size particles of 0.53 μm, and about 25×30 pixels for the largest particles of 5.09 μm. The computation of the laser spot areas provided useful information for the analysis of the light distribution with high measurement accuracy of up to 92%. The minimal stability of 78% accuracy was observed for superficial scattering signals on the phantoms with the largest particles. The experimental results showed a good agreement with the results obtained by the Monte Carlo simulations. The presented method shows a good potential to be useful for a tissue-state diagnosis of the urinary bladder.

  12. Role of coronal high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging in acute optic neuritis: a comparison with axial orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping [Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai Institution of Medical Imaging, Shanghai (China); Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Sha, Yan; Wan, Hailin; Wang, Feng [Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Tian, Guohong [Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-08-15

    Through a comparison with the axial orientation, we aimed to evaluate the role of coronal high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in acute optic neuritis based on diagnostic accuracy and the reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Orbital DWI, using readout-segmented, parallel imaging, and 2D navigator-based reacquisition (RESOLVE-DWI), was performed on 49 patients with acute vision loss. The coronal (thickness = 3 mm) and axial (thickness = 2 mm) diffusion images were evaluated by two neuroradiologists retrospectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated through diagnostic test; the inter- and intra-observer reliabilities were assessed with a weighted Cohen's kappa test. In addition, the agreement of ADC measurement among observers was evaluated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV), and Bland-Altman plots. Comparison of ADC values was also performed by unpaired t test. Among the 49 patients, 47 clinically positive optic nerves and 51 clinically negative optic nerves were found. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 85.1/87.2%, 90.2/94.12%, and 87.8/90.8%, respectively, for coronal RESOLVE-DWI and 83.0/85.1%, 66.7/76.5%, and 75.5/79.6%, respectively, for axial RESOLVE-DWI. The inter-observer kappa values were 0.710 and 0.806 for axial and coronal RESOLVE-DWI, respectively, and the intra-observer kappa values were 0.822 and 0.909, respectively (each P < 0.0001). Regarding the reproducibility of ADC measurements on axial and coronal RESOLVE-DWI, the ICCs among observers were 0.846 and 0.941, respectively, and the CV values were 7.046 and 4.810%, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed smaller inter-observer variability on coronal RESOLVE-DWI. ADC values were significantly lower in positive group (each P < 0.0001). Higher specificity and better reproducibility of ADC measurements were found for coronal RESOLVE-DWI, which demonstrated the

  13. Whole-head functional brain imaging of neonates at cot-side using time-resolved diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Laura A.; Cooper, Robert J.; Powell, Samuel; Edwards, Andrea; Lee, Chuen-Wai; Brigadoi, Sabrina; Everdell, Nick; Arridge, Simon; Gibson, Adam P.; Austin, Topun; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2015-07-01

    We present a method for acquiring whole-head images of changes in blood volume and oxygenation from the infant brain at cot-side using time-resolved diffuse optical tomography (TR-DOT). At UCL, we have built a portable TR-DOT device, known as MONSTIR II, which is capable of obtaining a whole-head (1024 channels) image sequence in 75 seconds. Datatypes extracted from the temporal point spread functions acquired by the system allow us to determine changes in absorption and reduced scattering coefficients within the interrogated tissue. This information can then be used to define clinically relevant measures, such as oxygen saturation, as well as to reconstruct images of relative changes in tissue chromophore concentration, notably those of oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin. Additionally, the effective temporal resolution of our system is improved with spatio-temporal regularisation implemented through a Kalman filtering approach, allowing us to image transient haemodynamic changes. By using this filtering technique with intensity and mean time-of-flight datatypes, we have reconstructed images of changes in absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in a dynamic 2D phantom. These results demonstrate that MONSTIR II is capable of resolving slow changes in tissue optical properties within volumes that are comparable to the preterm head. Following this verification study, we are progressing to imaging a 3D dynamic phantom as well as the neonatal brain at cot-side. Our current study involves scanning healthy babies to demonstrate the quality of recordings we are able to achieve in this challenging patient population, with the eventual goal of imaging functional activation and seizures.

  14. Diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging as markers of clinical behavior in children with optic pathway glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Sarah C.; Ackerman, Joseph W.; Garbow, Joel R.; Manwaring, Linda P.; Gutmann, David H.; McKinstry, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) are common pediatric brain tumors that pose significant clinical challenges with regard to predicting which tumors are likely to become symptomatic and require treatment. These tumors can arise sporadically or in the context of the inherited cancer predisposition syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Few studies have suggested biological or imaging markers that predict the clinical course of this disease. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that the clinical behavior of OPGs in children can be differentiated by diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. A total of 27 children with OPG were studied using DW and DCE MRI protocols. Diffusivity and permeability were calculated and correlated with the clinical behavior the OPG. Mean diffusivity values of 1.39 μm 2 /ms and mean permeability values of 2.10 ml/min per 100 cm 3 of tissue were measured. Clinically aggressive OPGs had significantly higher mean permeability values (P = 0.05) than clinically stable tumors. In addition, there was a strong correlation between clinical aggressiveness and the absence of NF1 (P < 0.01). These results suggest that DCE MRI might be a useful biomarker for clinically aggressive OPG, which should be confirmed in larger prospective longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  15. A fast and accurate imaging algorithm in optical/diffusion tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, M. V.; Lucas, T. R.; Frank, R. M.

    1997-10-01

    An n-dimensional (n = 2,3) inverse problem for the parabolic/diffusion equation 0266-5611/13/5/015/img1, 0266-5611/13/5/015/img2, 0266-5611/13/5/015/img3, 0266-5611/13/5/015/img4 is considered. The problem consists of determining the function a(x) inside of a bounded domain 0266-5611/13/5/015/img5 given the values of the solution u(x,t) for a single source location 0266-5611/13/5/015/img6 on a set of detectors 0266-5611/13/5/015/img7, where 0266-5611/13/5/015/img8 is the boundary of 0266-5611/13/5/015/img9. A novel numerical method is derived and tested. Numerical tests are conducted for n = 2 and for ranges of parameters which are realistic for applications to early breast cancer diagnosis and the search for mines in murky shallow water using ultrafast laser pulses. The main innovation of this method lies in a new approach for a novel linearized problem (LP). Such a LP is derived and reduced to a well-posed boundary-value problem for a coupled system of elliptic partial differential equations. A principal advantage of this technique is in its speed and accuracy, since it leads to the factorization of well conditioned, sparse matrices with non-zero entries clustered in a narrow band near the diagonal. The authors call this approach the elliptic systems method (ESM). The ESM can be extended to other imaging modalities.

  16. Temporal comparison of functional brain imaging with diffuse optical tomography and fMRI during rat forepaw stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, Andrew M; Culver, Joseph P; Mandeville, Joseph B; Boas, David A

    2003-01-01

    The time courses of oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO 2 ]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HbR]) and total haemoglobin ([HbT]) concentration changes following cortical activation in rats by electrical forepaw stimulation were measured using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and compared to similar measurements performed previously with fMRI at 2.0 T and 4.7 T. We also explored the qualitative effects of varying stimulus parameters on the temporal evolution of the hemodynamic response. DOT images were reconstructed at a depth of 1.5 mm over a 1 cm square area from 2 mm anterior to bregma to 8 mm posterior to bregma. The measurement set included 9 sources and 16 detectors with an imaging frame rate of 10 Hz. Both DOT [HbR] and [HbO 2 ] time courses were compared to the fMRI BOLD time course during stimulation, and the DOT [HbT] time course was compared to the fMRI cerebral plasma volume (CPV) time course. We believe that DOT and fMRI can provide similar temporal information for both blood volume and deoxyhaemoglobin changes, which helps to cross-validate these two techniques and to demonstrate that DOT can be useful as a complementary modality to fMRI for investigating the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity

  17. Temporal comparison of functional brain imaging with diffuse optical tomography and fMRI during rat forepaw stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Andrew M [Tufts University Bioengineering Center, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Culver, Joseph P [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129 (United States); Mandeville, Joseph B [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129 (United States); Boas, David A [Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02129 (United States)

    2003-05-21

    The time courses of oxyhaemoglobin ([HbO{sub 2}]), deoxyhaemoglobin ([HbR]) and total haemoglobin ([HbT]) concentration changes following cortical activation in rats by electrical forepaw stimulation were measured using diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and compared to similar measurements performed previously with fMRI at 2.0 T and 4.7 T. We also explored the qualitative effects of varying stimulus parameters on the temporal evolution of the hemodynamic response. DOT images were reconstructed at a depth of 1.5 mm over a 1 cm square area from 2 mm anterior to bregma to 8 mm posterior to bregma. The measurement set included 9 sources and 16 detectors with an imaging frame rate of 10 Hz. Both DOT [HbR] and [HbO{sub 2}] time courses were compared to the fMRI BOLD time course during stimulation, and the DOT [HbT] time course was compared to the fMRI cerebral plasma volume (CPV) time course. We believe that DOT and fMRI can provide similar temporal information for both blood volume and deoxyhaemoglobin changes, which helps to cross-validate these two techniques and to demonstrate that DOT can be useful as a complementary modality to fMRI for investigating the hemodynamic response to neuronal activity.

  18. Image Reconstruction for Diffuse Optical Tomography Based on Radiative Transfer Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Bi

    2015-01-01

    L2 regularization. Results also show the competitive performance of the split Bregman algorithm for the DOT image reconstruction with sparsity regularization compared with other existing L1 algorithms.

  19. Massively parallel diffuse optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd A.

    2017-09-05

    Diffuse optical tomography systems and methods are described herein. In a general embodiment, the diffuse optical tomography system comprises a plurality of sensor heads, the plurality of sensor heads comprising respective optical emitter systems and respective sensor systems. A sensor head in the plurality of sensors heads is caused to act as an illuminator, such that its optical emitter system transmits a transillumination beam towards a portion of a sample. Other sensor heads in the plurality of sensor heads act as observers, detecting portions of the transillumination beam that radiate from the sample in the fields of view of the respective sensory systems of the other sensor heads. Thus, sensor heads in the plurality of sensors heads generate sensor data in parallel.

  20. Diffusion weighted imaging by MR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Naruse, Shoji; Ebisu, Toshihiko; Tokumitsu, Takuaki; Ueda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro.

    1993-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a recently developed technique used to examine the micromovement of water molecules in vivo. We have applied this technique to examine various kinds of brain diseases, both experimentally and clinically. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in vivo showed reliable values. In experimentally induced brain edema in rats, the pathophysiological difference of the type of edema (such as cytotoxic, and vasogenic) could be differentiated on the diffusion weighted MR images. Cytotoxic brain edema showed high intensity (slower diffusion) on the diffusion weighted images. On the other hand, vasogenic brain edema showed a low intensity image (faster diffusion). Diffusion anisotropy was demonstrated according to the direction of myelinated fibers and applied motion proving gradient (MPG). This anisotropy was also demonstrated in human brain tissue along the course of the corpus callosum, pyramidal tract and optic radiation. In brain ischemia cases, lesions were detected as high signal intensity areas, even one hour after the onset of ischemia. Diffusion was faster in brain tumor compared with normal brain. Histological differences were not clearly reflected by the ADC value. In epidermoid tumor cases, the intensity was characteristically high, was demonstrated, and the cerebrospinal fluid border was clearly demonstrated. New clinical information obtainable with this molecular diffusion method will prove to be useful in various clinical studies. (author)

  1. Near-Infrared Diffuse Optical Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Hielscher

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT is emerging as a viable new biomedical imaging modality. Using near-infrared (NIR light, this technique probes absorption as well as scattering properties of biological tissues. First commercial instruments are now available that allow users to obtain cross-sectional and volumetric views of various body parts. Currently, the main applications are brain, breast, limb, joint, and fluorescence/bioluminescence imaging. Although the spatial resolution is limited when compared with other imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or X-ray computerized tomography (CT, DOT provides access to a variety of physiological parameters that otherwise are not accessible, including sub-second imaging of hemodynamics and other fast-changing processes. Furthermore, DOT can be realized in compact, portable instrumentation that allows for bedside monitoring at relatively low cost. In this paper, we present an overview of current state-of-the -art technology, including hardware and image-reconstruction algorithms, and focus on applications in brain and joint imaging. In addition, we present recent results of work on optical tomographic imaging in small animals.

  2. Greedy algorithms for diffuse optical tomography reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dileep, B. P. V.; Das, Tapan; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2018-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive imaging modality that reconstructs the optical parameters of a highly scattering medium. However, the inverse problem of DOT is ill-posed and highly nonlinear due to the zig-zag propagation of photons that diffuses through the cross section of tissue. The conventional DOT imaging methods iteratively compute the solution of forward diffusion equation solver which makes the problem computationally expensive. Also, these methods fail when the geometry is complex. Recently, the theory of compressive sensing (CS) has received considerable attention because of its efficient use in biomedical imaging applications. The objective of this paper is to solve a given DOT inverse problem by using compressive sensing framework and various Greedy algorithms such as orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP), compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP), and stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), regularized orthogonal matching pursuit (ROMP) and simultaneous orthogonal matching pursuit (S-OMP) have been studied to reconstruct the change in the absorption parameter i.e, Δα from the boundary data. Also, the Greedy algorithms have been validated experimentally on a paraffin wax rectangular phantom through a well designed experimental set up. We also have studied the conventional DOT methods like least square method and truncated singular value decomposition (TSVD) for comparison. One of the main features of this work is the usage of less number of source-detector pairs, which can facilitate the use of DOT in routine applications of screening. The performance metrics such as mean square error (MSE), normalized mean square error (NMSE), structural similarity index (SSIM), and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) have been used to evaluate the performance of the algorithms mentioned in this paper. Extensive simulation results confirm that CS based DOT reconstruction outperforms the conventional DOT imaging methods in terms of

  3. Advances in optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremer, C.; Ntziachristos, V.; Mahmood, U.; Tung, C.H.; Weissleder, R.

    2001-01-01

    Different optical imaging technologies have significantly progressed over the last years. Besides advances in imaging techniques and image reconstruction, new 'smart' optical contrast agents have been developed which can be used to detect molecular targets (such as endogenous enzymes) in vivo. The combination of novel imaging technologies coupled with smart agents bears great diagnostic potential both clinically and experimentally. This overview outlines the basic principles of optical imaging and summarizes the current state of the art. (orig.) [de

  4. WE-H-206-01: Photoacoustic Tomography: Multiscale Imaging From Organelles to Patients by Ultrasonically Beating the Optical Diffusion Limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2016-01-01

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  5. WE-H-206-01: Photoacoustic Tomography: Multiscale Imaging From Organelles to Patients by Ultrasonically Beating the Optical Diffusion Limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. [Washington University (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Lihong V. Wang: Photoacoustic tomography (PAT), combining non-ionizing optical and ultrasonic waves via the photoacoustic effect, provides in vivo multiscale functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. Broad applications include imaging of the breast, brain, skin, esophagus, colon, vascular system, and lymphatic system in humans or animals. Light offers rich contrast but does not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as x-rays do. Consequently, high-resolution pure optical imaging (e.g., confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography) is limited to penetration within the optical diffusion limit (∼1 mm in the skin). Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, provides fine spatial resolution but suffers from both poor contrast in early-stage tumors and strong speckle artifacts. In PAT, pulsed laser light penetrates tissue and generates a small but rapid temperature rise, which induces emission of ultrasonic waves due to thermoelastic expansion. The ultrasonic waves, orders of magnitude less scattering than optical waves, are then detected to form high-resolution images of optical absorption at depths up to 7 cm, conquering the optical diffusion limit. PAT is the only modality capable of imaging across the length scales of organelles, cells, tissues, and organs (up to whole-body small animals) with consistent contrast. This rapidly growing technology promises to enable multiscale biological research and accelerate translation from microscopic laboratory discoveries to macroscopic clinical practice. PAT may also hold the key to label-free early detection of cancer by in vivo quantification of hypermetabolism, the quintessential hallmark of malignancy. Learning Objectives: To understand the contrast mechanism of PAT To understand the multiscale applications of PAT Benjamin M. W. Tsui: Multi-modality molecular imaging instrumentation and techniques have been major developments in small animal imaging that has contributed significantly

  6. Parallel, Rapid Diffuse Optical Tomography of Breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yodh, Arjun

    2001-01-01

    During the last year we have experimentally and computationally investigated rapid acquisition and analysis of informationally dense diffuse optical data sets in the parallel plate compressed breast geometry...

  7. Parallel, Rapid Diffuse Optical Tomography of Breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yodh, Arjun

    2002-01-01

    During the last year we have experimentally and computationally investigated rapid acquisition and analysis of informationally dense diffuse optical data sets in the parallel plate compressed breast geometry...

  8. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  9. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  10. Voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging of the optic pathway in primary open-angle glaucoma: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikou, A K; Kitsos, G; Tzarouchi, L C; Astrakas, L; Alexiou, G A; Argyropoulou, M I

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathologic studies in experimental and human glaucoma have demonstrated degenerative changes in the optic pathway. The purpose of this study was to assess the optic pathway in POAG by using VBM and DTI. Eighteen patients 57.05 ± 11.38 years of age with POAG of 8.30 ± 5.14 years' duration and 18 control subjects underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination, including quantification of the RNFLT by using Stratus OCT 3, and brain imaging. The imaging protocol consisted of a T1-weighted high-resolution 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence and a multisection spin-echo- planar diffusion-weighted sequence. Data preprocessing and analysis were performed by using Matlab 7.0 and SPM 5. Left temporal and right nasal RNFLTs were significantly thinner than right temporal and left nasal RNFLTs. In patients, VBM revealed a significant reduction in the left visual cortex volume, the left lateral geniculate nucleus, and the intracranial part of the ONs and the chiasma. In addition, a significant decrease of FA was observed in the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the longitudinal and inferior frontal fasciculi, the putamen, the caudate nucleus, the anterior and posterior thalamic radiations, and the anterior and posterior limbs of the internal capsule of the left hemisphere (P < .05). Neurodegenerative changes of the optic pathway and several brain areas associated with the visual system can be observed by using VBM and DTI in patients with POAG, suggesting that glaucoma is a complex neurologic disease.

  11. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  12. Development of quality control and instrumentation performance metrics for diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging instruments in the multi-center clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Samuel T.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Warren, Robert V.; Hill, Brian; Roblyer, Darren; Leproux, AnaÑ--s.; Durkin, Amanda F.; O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Haghany, Hosain; Mantulin, William W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Instrument equivalence and quality control are critical elements of multi-center clinical trials. We currently have five identical Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Imaging (DOSI) instruments enrolled in the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN, #6691) trial located at five academic clinical research sites in the US. The goal of the study is to predict the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 60 patients. In order to reliably compare DOSI measurements across different instruments, operators and sites, we must be confident that the data quality is comparable. We require objective and reliable methods for identifying, correcting, and rejecting low quality data. To achieve this goal, we developed and tested an automated quality control algorithm that rejects data points below the instrument noise floor, improves tissue optical property recovery, and outputs a detailed data quality report. Using a new protocol for obtaining dark-noise data, we applied the algorithm to ACRIN patient data and successfully improved the quality of recovered physiological data in some cases.

  13. Dynamic Optically Multiplexed Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-29

    Dynamic Optically Multiplexed Imaging Yaron Rachlin, Vinay Shah, R. Hamilton Shepard, and Tina Shih Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of...V. Shah, and T. Shih “Design Architectures for Optically Multiplexed Imaging,” in submission 9 R. Gupta , P. Indyk, E. Price, and Y. Rachlin

  14. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  15. Anomalous diffusion in a dynamical optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Cooper, Nigel R.

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by experimental progress in strongly coupled atom-photon systems in optical cavities, we study theoretically the quantum dynamics of atoms coupled to a one-dimensional dynamical optical lattice. The dynamical lattice is chosen to have a period that is incommensurate with that of an underlying static lattice, leading to a dynamical version of the Aubry-André model which can cause localization of single-particle wave functions. We show that atomic wave packets in this dynamical lattice generically spread via anomalous diffusion, which can be tuned between superdiffusive and subdiffusive regimes. This anomalous diffusion arises from an interplay between Anderson localization and quantum fluctuations of the cavity field.

  16. New imaging algorithm in diffusion tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klibanov, Michael V.; Lucas, Thomas R.; Frank, Robert M.

    1997-08-01

    A novel imaging algorithm for diffusion/optical tomography is presented for the case of the time dependent diffusion equation. Numerical tests are conducted for ranges of parameters realistic for applications to an early breast cancer diagnosis using ultrafast laser pulses. This is a perturbation-like method which works for both homogeneous a heterogeneous background media. Its main innovation lies in a new approach for a novel linearized problem (LP). Such an LP is derived and reduced to a boundary value problem for a coupled system of elliptic partial differential equations. As is well known, the solution of such a system amounts to the factorization of well conditioned, sparse matrices with few non-zero entries clustered along the diagonal, which can be done very rapidly. Thus, the main advantages of this technique are that it is fast and accurate. The authors call this approach the elliptic systems method (ESM). The ESM can be extended for other data collection schemes.

  17. On uniqueness in diffuse optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    A prominent result of Arridge and Lionheart (1998 Opt. Lett. 23 882–4) demonstrates that it is in general not possible to simultaneously recover both the diffusion (aka scattering) and the absorption coefficient in steady-state (dc) diffusion-based optical tomography. In this work we show that it suffices to restrict ourselves to piecewise constant diffusion and piecewise analytic absorption coefficients to regain uniqueness. Under this condition both parameters can simultaneously be determined from complete measurement data on an arbitrarily small part of the boundary

  18. Quantitative photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption coefficients from acoustic spectra in the optical diffusive regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zijian; Favazza, Christopher; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) microscopy (PAM) can image optical absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution in the optical diffusive regime. Conventionally, accurate quantification in PAM requires knowledge of the optical fluence attenuation, acoustic pressure attenuation, and detection bandwidth. We circumvent this requirement by quantifying the optical absorption coefficients from the acoustic spectra of PA signals acquired at multiple optical wavelengths. With the acoustic spectral method, the absorption coefficients of an oxygenated bovine blood phantom at 560, 565, 570, and 575 nm were quantified with errors of <3%. We also quantified the total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in a live mouse. Compared with the conventional amplitude method, the acoustic spectral method provides greater quantification accuracy in the optical diffusive regime. The limitations of the acoustic spectral method was also discussed.

  19. Diffuse optical tomography using semiautomated coregistered ultrasound measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Atahar; Vavadi, Hamed; Uddin, K. M. Shihab; Zhu, Quing

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has demonstrated huge potential in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment monitoring. DOT image reconstruction guided by ultrasound (US) improves the diffused light localization and lesion reconstruction accuracy. However, DOT reconstruction depends on tumor geometry provided by coregistered US. Experienced operators can manually measure these lesion parameters; however, training and measurement time are needed. The wide clinical use of this technique depends on its robustness and faster imaging reconstruction capability. This article introduces a semiautomated procedure that automatically extracts lesion information from US images and incorporates it into the optical reconstruction. An adaptive threshold-based image segmentation is used to obtain tumor boundaries. For some US images, posterior shadow can extend to the chest wall and make the detection of deeper lesion boundary difficult. This problem can be solved using a Hough transform. The proposed procedure was validated from data of 20 patients. Optical reconstruction results using the proposed procedure were compared with those reconstructed using extracted tumor information from an experienced user. Mean optical absorption obtained from manual measurement was 0.21±0.06 cm-1 for malignant and 0.12±0.06 cm-1 for benign cases, whereas for the proposed method it was 0.24±0.08 cm-1 and 0.12±0.05 cm-1, respectively.

  20. Applications of optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schellenberger, E.

    2005-01-01

    Optical imaging in the form of near infrared fluorescence and bioluminescence has proven useful for a wide range of applications in the field of molecular imaging. Both techniques provide a high sensitivity (in the nanomolar range), which is of particular importance for molecular imaging. Imaging with near infrared fluorescence is especially cost-effective and can be performed, in contrast to radioactivity-based methods, with fluorescence dyes that remain stable for months. The most important advantage of bioluminescence, in turn, is the lack of background signal. Although molecular imaging with these techniques is still in the experimental phase, an application of near infrared fluorescence is already foreseeable for the imaging of superficial structures. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of a time-resolved non-contact scanning diffuse optical imaging system exploiting fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Sieno, Laura, E-mail: laura.disieno@polimi.it; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Pifferi, Antonio [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Mazurenka, Mikhail [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Hannoversches Zentrum für Optische Technologien, Nienburger Str. 17, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Hoshi, Yoko [Department of Biomedical Optics, Medical Photonics Research Center, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 (Japan); Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Becker, Wolfgang [Becker and Hickl GmbH, Nahmitzer Damm 30, 12277 Berlin (Germany); Martelli, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia dell’Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via G. Sansone 1, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a system for non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging, based on small source-detector distance and high dynamic range measurements utilizing a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode. The system is suitable for imaging of diffusive media without any contact with the sample and with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm at 1 cm depth. In order to objectively assess its performances, we adopted two standardized protocols developed for time-domain brain imagers. The related tests included the recording of the instrument response function of the setup and the responsivity of its detection system. Moreover, by using liquid turbid phantoms with absorbing inclusions, depth-dependent contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio as well as lateral spatial resolution were measured. To illustrate the potentialities of the novel approach, the characteristics of the non-contact system are discussed and compared to those of a fiber-based brain imager.

  2. Characterization of a time-resolved non-contact scanning diffuse optical imaging system exploiting fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Sieno, Laura; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Contini, Davide; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Macdonald, Rainer; Pifferi, Antonio; Mazurenka, Mikhail; Hoshi, Yoko; Boso, Gianluca; Tosi, Alberto; Becker, Wolfgang; Martelli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We present a system for non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging, based on small source-detector distance and high dynamic range measurements utilizing a fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode. The system is suitable for imaging of diffusive media without any contact with the sample and with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm at 1 cm depth. In order to objectively assess its performances, we adopted two standardized protocols developed for time-domain brain imagers. The related tests included the recording of the instrument response function of the setup and the responsivity of its detection system. Moreover, by using liquid turbid phantoms with absorbing inclusions, depth-dependent contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio as well as lateral spatial resolution were measured. To illustrate the potentialities of the novel approach, the characteristics of the non-contact system are discussed and compared to those of a fiber-based brain imager.

  3. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect

  4. Bayesian regularization of diffusion tensor images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jesper; Hobolth, Asger; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a powerful tool in the study of the course of nerve fibre bundles in the human brain. Using DTI, the local fibre orientation in each image voxel can be described by a diffusion tensor which is constructed from local measurements of diffusion coefficients along...... several directions. The measured diffusion coefficients and thereby the diffusion tensors are subject to noise, leading to possibly flawed representations of the three dimensional fibre bundles. In this paper we develop a Bayesian procedure for regularizing the diffusion tensor field, fully utilizing...

  5. Multiple projection optical diffusion tomography with plane wave illumination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markel, Vadim A; Schotland, John C

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new data collection scheme for optical diffusion tomography in which plane wave illumination is combined with multiple projections in the slab imaging geometry. Multiple projection measurements are performed by rotating the slab around the sample. The advantage of the proposed method is that the measured data are more compatible with the dynamic range of most commonly used detectors. At the same time, multiple projections improve image quality by mutually interchanging the depth and transverse directions, and the scanned (detection) and integrated (illumination) surfaces. Inversion methods are derived for image reconstructions with extremely large data sets. Numerical simulations are performed for fixed and rotated slabs

  6. Holography Experiments on Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonczak, B.; Dabrowski, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes experiments intended to produce a better understanding of the holographic method of producing images and optical imaging by other optical systems. Application of holography to teaching physics courses is considered. (Author/SA)

  7. Diffuse axonal injury: detection of changes in anisotropy of water diffusion by diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.H.M.; Tsui, E.Y.K.; Yuen, M.K.; Peh, W.C.G.; Fong, D.; Fok, K.F.; Leung, K.M.; Fung, K.K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Myelinated axons of white matter demonstrate prominent directional differences in water diffusion. We performed diffusion-weighted imaging on ten patients with head injury to explore the feasibility of using water diffusion anisotropy for quantitating diffuse axonal injury. We showed significant decrease in diffusion anisotropy indices in areas with or without signal abnormality on T2 and T2*-weighted images. We conclude that the water diffusion anisotropy index a potentially useful, sensitive and quantitative way of diagnosing and assessing patients with diffuse axonal injury. (orig.)

  8. High angular resolution diffusion imaging : processing & visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prckovska, V.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can map the orientation architecture of neural tissues in a completely non-invasive way by measuring the directional specificity (anisotropy) of the local water diffusion. However, in areas of complex fiber

  9. Image denoising using non linear diffusion tensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benzarti, F.; Amiri, H.

    2011-01-01

    Image denoising is an important pre-processing step for many image analysis and computer vision system. It refers to the task of recovering a good estimate of the true image from a degraded observation without altering and changing useful structure in the image such as discontinuities and edges. In this paper, we propose a new approach for image denoising based on the combination of two non linear diffusion tensors. One allows diffusion along the orientation of greatest coherences, while the other allows diffusion along orthogonal directions. The idea is to track perfectly the local geometry of the degraded image and applying anisotropic diffusion mainly along the preferred structure direction. To illustrate the effective performance of our model, we present some experimental results on a test and real photographic color images.

  10. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2011-01-01

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  11. Reflectance diffuse optical tomography. Its application to human brain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yukio; Yamanaka, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Ohmae, Etsuko; Oda, Motoki; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    We report the successful application of reflectance diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light with the new reconstruction algorithm that we developed to the observation of regional hemodynamic changes in the brain under specific mental tasks. Our results reveal the heterogeneous distribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the brain, showing complementary images of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin changes in certain regions. We conclude that our reflectance DOT has practical potential for human brain mapping, as well as in the diagnostic imaging of brain diseases. (author)

  12. Advances in Retinal Optical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxiu Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Retinal imaging has undergone a revolution in the past 50 years to allow for better understanding of the eye in health and disease. Significant improvements have occurred both in hardware such as lasers and optics in addition to software image analysis. Optical imaging modalities include optical coherence tomography (OCT, OCT angiography (OCTA, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, adaptive optics (AO, fundus autofluorescence (FAF, and molecular imaging (MI. These imaging modalities have enabled improved visualization of retinal pathophysiology and have had a substantial impact on basic and translational medical research. These improvements in technology have translated into early disease detection, more accurate diagnosis, and improved management of numerous chorioretinal diseases. This article summarizes recent advances and applications of retinal optical imaging techniques, discusses current clinical challenges, and predicts future directions in retinal optical imaging.

  13. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data.

  14. Patch-based anisotropic diffusion scheme for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography—part 1: technical principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, Teresa; Arridge, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) provides 3D images of fluorescence distributions in biological tissue, which represent molecular and cellular processes. The image reconstruction problem is highly ill-posed and requires regularisation techniques to stabilise and find meaningful solutions. Quadratic regularisation tends to either oversmooth or generate very noisy reconstructions, depending on the regularisation strength. Edge preserving methods, such as anisotropic diffusion regularisation (AD), can preserve important features in the fluorescence image and smooth out noise. However, AD has limited ability to distinguish an edge from noise. In this two-part paper, we propose a patch-based anisotropic diffusion regularisation (PAD), where regularisation strength is determined by a weighted average according to the similarity between patches around voxels within a search window, instead of a simple local neighbourhood strategy. However, this method has higher computational complexity and, hence, we wavelet compress the patches (PAD-WT) to speed it up, while simultaneously taking advantage of the denoising properties of wavelet thresholding. The proposed method combines the nonlocal means (NLM), AD and wavelet shrinkage methods, which are image processing methods. Therefore, in this first paper, we used a denoising test problem to analyse the performance of the new method. Our results show that the proposed PAD-WT method provides better results than the AD or NLM methods alone. The efficacy of the method for fDOT image reconstruction problem is evaluated in part 2. (paper)

  15. Basic principles of diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bammer, Roland.

    2003-01-01

    In diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), image contrast is determined by the random microscopic motion of water protons. During the last years, DWI has become an important modality in the diagnostic work-up of acute ischemia in the CNS. There are also a few promising reports about the application of DWI to other regions in the human body, such as the vertebral column or the abdomen. This manuscript provides an introduction into the basics of DWI and Diffusion Tensor imaging. The potential of various MR sequences in concert with diffusion preparation are discussed with respect to acquisition speed, spatial resolution, and sensitivity to bulk physiologic motion. More advanced diffusion measurement techniques, such as high angular resolution diffusion imaging, are also addressed

  16. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus

    2018-01-01

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging ...

  17. TH-AB-209-03: Overcoming Resolution Limitations of Diffuse Optical Signals in X-Ray Induced Luminescence (XIL) Imaging Via Selective Plane Illumination and 2D Deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, B; Smith, C; La Riviere, P [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the resolution and sensitivity of XIL imaging using a surface radiance simulation based on optical diffusion and maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction. XIL imaging seeks to determine the distribution of luminescent nanophosphors, which could be used as nanodosimeters or radiosensitizers. Methods: The XIL simulation generated a homogeneous slab with optical properties similar to tissue. X-ray activated nanophosphors were placed at 1.0 cm depth in the tissue in concentrations of 10{sup −4} g/mL in two volumes of 10 mm{sup 3} with varying separations between each other. An analytical optical diffusion model determined the surface radiance from the photon distributions generated at depth in the tissue by the nanophosphors. The simulation then determined the detected luminescent signal collected with a f/1.0 aperture lens and back-illuminated EMCCD camera. The surface radiance was deconvolved using a MLEM algorithm to estimate the nanophosphors distribution and the resolution. To account for both Poisson and Gaussian noise, a shifted Poisson imaging model was used in the deconvolution. The deconvolved distributions were fitted to a Gaussian after radial averaging to measure the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the peak to peak distance between distributions was measured to determine the resolving power. Results: Simulated surface radiances for doses from 1mGy to 100 cGy were computed. Each image was deconvolved using 1000 iterations. At 1mGy, deconvolution reduced the FWHM of the nanophosphors distribution by 65% and had a resolving power is 3.84 mm. Decreasing the dose from 100 cGy to 1 mGy increased the FWHM by 22% but allowed for a dose reduction of a factor of 1000. Conclusion: Deconvolving the detected surface radiance allows for dose reduction while maintaining the resolution of the nanophosphors. It proves to be a useful technique in overcoming the resolution limitations of diffuse optical imaging in

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  19. Diffusion tensor and diffusion weighted imaging. Pictorial mathematics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, Tsutomu [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    A new imaging algorithm for the treatment of a second order apparent diffusion tensor, D{sub app}{sup {xi}} is described. The method calls for only mathematics of images (pictorial mathematics) without necessity of eigenvalues/eigenvectors estimation. Nevertheless, it is capable of extracting properties of D{sub app}{sup {xi}} invariant to observation axes. While trace image is an example of images weighted by invariance of the tensor matrix, three dimensional anisotropy (3DAC) contrast represents the imaging method making use to anisotropic direction of tensor ellipsoid producing color coded contrast of exceptionally high anatomic resolution. Contrary to intuition, the processes require only a simple algorithm directly applicable to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). As a contrast method which precisely represents physical characteristics of a target tissue, invariant D{sub app}{sup {xi}} images produced by pictorial mathematics possess significant potential for a number of biological and clinical applications. (author).

  20. Higher-order tensors in diffusion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, T.; Fuster, A.; Ghosh, A.; Deriche, R.; Florack, L.M.J.; Lim, L.H.; Westin, C.-F.; Vilanova, A.; Burgeth, B.

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion imaging is a noninvasive tool for probing the microstructure of fibrous nerve and muscle tissue. Higher-order tensors provide a powerful mathematical language to model and analyze the large and complex data that is generated by its modern variants such as High Angular Resolution Diffusion

  1. Edge-promoting reconstruction of absorption and diffusivity in optical tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannukainen, A.; Harhanen, Lauri Oskari; Hyvönen, N.

    2015-01-01

    In optical tomography a physical body is illuminated with near-infrared light and the resulting outward photon flux is measured at the object boundary. The goal is to reconstruct internal optical properties of the body, such as absorption and diffusivity. In this work, it is assumed that the imaged...... measurement noise model. The method is based on iteratively combining a lagged diffusivity step and a linearization of the measurement model of diffuse optical tomography with priorconditioned LSQR. The performance of the reconstruction technique is tested via three-dimensional numerical experiments...

  2. Basic consideration of diffusion/perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamagawa, Yoichi; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Kawamura, Yasutaka; Nakatsugawa, Shigekazu; Ishii, Yasushi; Sakuma, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Tetsuji.

    1990-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), microscopic motion of biological system such as molecular diffusion of water and microcirculation of blood in the capillary network (perfusion) has been proposed to cause signal attenuation as an intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM). Quantitative imaging of the IVIM phenomenon was attempted to generate from a set of spin-echo (SE) sequences with or without sensitization by motion probing gradient (MPG). The IVIM imaging is characterized by a parameter, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), which is an integration of both the diffusion and the perfusion factor on voxel-by-voxel basis. Hard ware was adjusted to avoid image artifact mainly produced by eddy current. Feasibility of the method was tested using bottle phantom filled with water at different temperature and acetone, and the calculated ADC values of these media corresponded well with accepted values of diffusion. The method was then applied to biological system to investigate mutual participation of diffusion/perfusion on the ADC value. The result of tumor model born on nude mouse suggested considerable participation of perfusion factor which immediately disappeared after sacrificing the animal. Meanwhile, lower value of sacrificed tissue without microcirculation was suggested to have some restriction of diffusion factor by biological tissue. To substantiate the restriction effect on the diffusion, a series of observation have made on a fiber phantom, stalk of celory with botanical fibers and human brain with nerve fibers, in applying unidirectional MPG along the course of these banch of fiber system. The directional restriction effect of diffusion along the course of fiber (diffusion anisotrophy) was clearly visualized as directional change of ADC value. The present method for tissue characterization by diffusion/perfusion on microscopic level will provide a new insight for evaluation of functional derangement in human brain and other organs. (author)

  3. An introduction to diffusion tensor image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lauren J; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2011-04-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) is a relatively new technology that is popular for imaging the white matter of the brain. This article provides a basic and broad overview of DTI to enable the reader to develop an intuitive understanding of these types of data, and an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optical Methods and Instrumentation in Brain Imaging and Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of optical approaches used in brain imaging and therapy. It covers a variety of imaging techniques including diffuse optical imaging, laser speckle imaging, photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography. A number of laser-based therapeutic approaches are reviewed, including photodynamic therapy, fluorescence guided resection and photothermal therapy. Fundamental principles and instrumentation are discussed for each imaging and therapeutic technique. Represents the first publication dedicated solely to optical diagnostics and therapeutics in the brain Provides a comprehensive review of the principles of each imaging/therapeutic modality Reviews the latest advances in instrumentation for optical diagnostics in the brain Discusses new optical-based therapeutic approaches for brain diseases

  5. Scanning, non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Johannes D; Mireles, Miguel; Morales-Dalmau, Jordi; Farzam, Parisa; Martínez-Lozano, Mar; Casanovas, Oriol; Durduran, Turgut

    2016-02-01

    A scanning system for small animal imaging using non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (ncDOS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (ncDCS) is presented. The ncDOS uses a two-dimensional spectrophotometer retrieving broadband (610-900 nm) spectral information from up to fifty-seven source-detector distances between 2 and 5 mm. The ncDCS data is simultaneously acquired from four source-detector pairs. The sample is scanned in two dimensions while tracking variations in height. The system has been validated with liquid phantoms, demonstrated in vivo on a human fingertip during an arm cuff occlusion and on a group of mice with xenoimplanted renal cell carcinoma.

  6. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Asymptomatic Lumbar Disc Herniation

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Yamabe, Eiko; Fujinaga, Yasunari; Bhatia, Nitin N.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performedon a healthy 31-year-old man with asymptomatic lumbar disc herniation. Althoughthe left S1 nerve root was obviously entrapped by a herniated mass, neither DWI nor DTI showed any significant findings for the nerve root. Decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and increased fractional anisotropy (FA) values were found. These results are contrary to those in previously published studies of symptomatic...

  7. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collaku, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: The use of diffusion weighted images when performing abdomen MRI has been increased during the last years; achieving high quality images for a short period of time remains still a challenge. Learning points: We present a literature review together with our experience in optimizing the DW imaging in the abdomen, focused on creating high density ADC maps and handling the uncooperative patients. Discussion: The factors that influence the image quality are discussed as well. Conclusion: The factors that influence the image quality are discussed as well

  8. Interpolation of diffusion weighted imaging datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim B; Lundell, Henrik; Burke, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    anatomical details and signal-to-noise-ratio for reliable fibre reconstruction. We assessed the potential benefits of interpolating DWI datasets to a higher image resolution before fibre reconstruction using a diffusion tensor model. Simulations of straight and curved crossing tracts smaller than or equal......Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is used to study white-matter fibre organisation, orientation and structural connectivity by means of fibre reconstruction algorithms and tractography. For clinical settings, limited scan time compromises the possibilities to achieve high image resolution for finer...... interpolation methods fail to disentangle fine anatomical details if PVE is too pronounced in the original data. As for validation we used ex-vivo DWI datasets acquired at various image resolutions as well as Nissl-stained sections. Increasing the image resolution by a factor of eight yielded finer geometrical...

  9. Low-cost diffuse optical tomography for the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Taisuke; Zirak, Peyman; Weigel, Udo M.; Kristoffersen, Anna K.; Mateos, Nicolas; Valencia, Alejandra; Durduran, Turgut

    2012-10-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is an emerging imaging modality with potential applications in oncology, neurology, and other clinical areas. It allows the non-invasive probing of the tissue function using relatively inexpensive and safe instrumentation. An educational laboratory setup of a DOT system could be used to demonstrate how photons propagate through tissues, basics of medical tomography, and the concepts of multiple scattering and absorption. Here, we report a DOT setup that could be introduced to the advanced undergraduate or early graduate curriculum using inexpensive and readily available tools. The basis of the system is the LEGO Mindstorms NXT platform which controls the light sources, the detectors (photo-diodes), a mechanical 2D scanning platform, and the data acquisition. A basic tomographic reconstruction is implemented in standard numerical software, and 3D images are reconstructed. The concept was tested and developed in an educational environment that involved a high-school student and a group of post-doctoral fellows.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in leukodystrophies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patay, Zoltan [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Radiology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-01

    Leukodystrophies are genetically determined metabolic diseases, in which the underlying biochemical abnormality interferes with the normal build-up and/or maintenance of myelin, which leads to hypo- (or arrested) myelination, or dysmyelination with resultant demyelination. Although conventional magnetic resonance imaging has significantly contributed to recent progress in the diagnostic work-up of these diseases, diffusion-weighted imaging has the potential to further improve our understanding of underlying pathological processes and their dynamics through the assessment of normal and abnormal diffusion properties of cerebral white matter. Evaluation of conventional diffusion-weighted and ADC map images allows the detection of major diffusion abnormalities and the identification of various edema types, of which the so-called myelin edema is particularly relevant to leukodystrophies. Depending on the nature of histopathological changes, stage and progression gradient of diseases, various diffusion-weighted imaging patterns may be seen in leukodystrophies. Absent or low-grade myelin edema is found in mucopolysaccharidoses, GM gangliosidoses, Zellweger disease, adrenomyeloneuropathy, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, classical phenylketonuria, Van der Knaap disease and the vanishing white matter, medium grade myelin edema in metachromatic leukodystrophy, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and HMG coenzyme lyase deficiency and high grade edema in Krabbe disease, Canavan disease, hyperhomocystinemias, maple syrup urine disease and leukodystrophy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate. (orig.)

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in leukodystrophies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patay, Zoltan

    2005-01-01

    Leukodystrophies are genetically determined metabolic diseases, in which the underlying biochemical abnormality interferes with the normal build-up and/or maintenance of myelin, which leads to hypo- (or arrested) myelination, or dysmyelination with resultant demyelination. Although conventional magnetic resonance imaging has significantly contributed to recent progress in the diagnostic work-up of these diseases, diffusion-weighted imaging has the potential to further improve our understanding of underlying pathological processes and their dynamics through the assessment of normal and abnormal diffusion properties of cerebral white matter. Evaluation of conventional diffusion-weighted and ADC map images allows the detection of major diffusion abnormalities and the identification of various edema types, of which the so-called myelin edema is particularly relevant to leukodystrophies. Depending on the nature of histopathological changes, stage and progression gradient of diseases, various diffusion-weighted imaging patterns may be seen in leukodystrophies. Absent or low-grade myelin edema is found in mucopolysaccharidoses, GM gangliosidoses, Zellweger disease, adrenomyeloneuropathy, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, classical phenylketonuria, Van der Knaap disease and the vanishing white matter, medium grade myelin edema in metachromatic leukodystrophy, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and HMG coenzyme lyase deficiency and high grade edema in Krabbe disease, Canavan disease, hyperhomocystinemias, maple syrup urine disease and leukodystrophy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate. (orig.)

  12. Diffusion weighted imaging in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Cher Heng [The University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Jihong [The University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Imaging Physics, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Kundra, Vikas [The University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas, M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging has generated substantial interest in the hope that it can be developed into a robust technique to improve the accuracy of MRI for the evaluation of prostate cancer. This technique has the advantages of short acquisition times, no need for intravenous administration of contrast medium, and the ability to study diffusion of water molecules that indirectly reflects tissue cellularity. In this article, we review the existing literature on the utility of DWI in tumour detection, localisation, treatment response, limitations of the technique, how it compares with other imaging techniques, technical considerations and future directions. (orig.)

  13. A combined reconstruction-classification method for diffuse optical tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltunen, P [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki University of Technology, PO Box 3310, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Prince, S J D; Arridge, S [Department of Computer Science, University College London, Gower Street London, WC1E 6B (United Kingdom)], E-mail: petri.hiltunen@tkk.fi, E-mail: s.prince@cs.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: s.arridge@cs.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-11-07

    We present a combined classification and reconstruction algorithm for diffuse optical tomography (DOT). DOT is a nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, some regularization is needed. We present a mixture of Gaussians prior, which regularizes the DOT reconstruction step. During each iteration, the parameters of a mixture model are estimated. These associate each reconstructed pixel with one of several classes based on the current estimate of the optical parameters. This classification is exploited to form a new prior distribution to regularize the reconstruction step and update the optical parameters. The algorithm can be described as an iteration between an optimization scheme with zeroth-order variable mean and variance Tikhonov regularization and an expectation-maximization scheme for estimation of the model parameters. We describe the algorithm in a general Bayesian framework. Results from simulated test cases and phantom measurements show that the algorithm enhances the contrast of the reconstructed images with good spatial accuracy. The probabilistic classifications of each image contain only a few misclassified pixels.

  14. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Eo, Hong; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So-Young; Jeon, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  15. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyoung Doo, E-mail: kdsong0308@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Hong, E-mail: rtombow@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye, E-mail: jhkate.kim@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, So-Young, E-mail: sy1131.yoo@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Tae Yeon, E-mail: hathor97.jeon@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  16. Diffused holographic information storage and retrieval using photorefractive optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Deanna Kay

    Holography offers a tremendous opportunity for dense information storage, theoretically one bit per cubic wavelength of material volume, with rapid retrieval, of up to thousands of pages of information simultaneously. However, many factors prevent the theoretical storage limit from being reached, including dynamic range problems and imperfections in recording materials. This research explores new ways of moving closer to practical holographic information storage and retrieval by altering the recording materials, in this case, photorefractive crystals, and by increasing the current storage capacity while improving the information retrieved. As an experimental example of the techniques developed, the information retrieved is the correlation peak from an optical recognition architecture, but the materials and methods developed are applicable to many other holographic information storage systems. Optical correlators can potentially solve any signal or image recognition problem. Military surveillance, fingerprint identification for law enforcement or employee identification, and video games are but a few examples of applications. A major obstacle keeping optical correlators from being universally accepted is the lack of a high quality, thick (high capacity) holographic recording material that operates with red or infrared wavelengths which are available from inexpensive diode lasers. This research addresses the problems from two positions: find a better material for use with diode lasers, and reduce the requirements placed on the material while maintaining an efficient and effective system. This research found that the solutions are new dopants introduced into photorefractive lithium niobate to improve wavelength sensitivities and the use of a novel inexpensive diffuser that reduces the dynamic range and optical element quality requirements (which reduces the cost) while improving performance. A uniquely doped set of 12 lithium niobate crystals was specified and

  17. Image hiding using optical interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Weining

    2010-09-01

    Optical image encryption technology has attracted a lot of attentions due to its large capacitance and fast speed. In conventional image encryption methods, the random phase masks are used as encryption keys to encode the images into white noise distribution. Therefore, this kind of methods requires interference technology to record complex amplitude and is vulnerable to attack techniques. The image hiding methods which employ the phase retrieve algorithm to encode the images into two or more phase masks are proposed, the hiding process is carried out within a computer using iterative algorithm. But the iterative algorithms are time consumed. All method mentioned above are based on the optical diffraction of the phase masks. In this presentation, a new optical image hiding method based on optical interference is proposed. The coherence lights which pass through two phase masks are combined by a beam splitter. Two beams interfere with each other and the desired image appears at the pre-designed plane. Two phase distribution masks are design analytically; therefore, the hiding speed can be obviously improved. Simulation results are carried out to demonstrate the novelty of the new proposed methods. This method can be expanded for double images hiding.

  18. Thermal diffusivity imaging with the thermal lens microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Oluwatosin O; Feist, Peter E; Dovichi, Norman J

    2011-12-01

    A coaxial thermal lens microscope was used to generate images based on both the absorbance and thermal diffusivity of histological samples. A pump beam was modulated at frequencies ranging from 50 kHz to 5 MHz using an acousto-optic modulator. The pump and a CW probe beam were combined with a dichroic mirror, directed into an inverted microscope, and focused onto the specimen. The change in the transmitted probe beam's center intensity was detected with a photodiode. The photodiode's signal and a reference signal from the modulator were sent to a high-speed lock-in amplifier. The in-phase and quadrature signals were recorded as a sample was translated through the focused beams and used to generate images based on the amplitude and phase of the lock-in amplifier's signal. The amplitude is related to the absorbance and the phase is related to the thermal diffusivity of the sample. Thin sections of stained liver and bone tissues were imaged; the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of the phase image was highest at frequencies from 0.1-1 MHz and dropped at higher frequencies. The spatial resolution was 2.5 μm for both amplitude and phase images, limited by the pump beam spot size. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  20. Imaging of the optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Masterson, Karen; Delavelle, Jacqueline; Viallon, Magalie; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Becker, Christoph D.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  1. MR imaging of diffuse thyroid disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaaki; Fujii, Koichi; Ohnishi, Takuya; Higashikawa, Motoki; Araki, Yutaka; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 38 diffuse goiters, including 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. MR findings were analyzed as to degree of swelling, margin, internal structures including homogeneity and low intensity bands. With regard to signal intensity, thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios on T1 and T2-weighted images were measured in 19 normal thyroid glands, 30 chronic thyroiditis and 8 Basedow disease. Additionally thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios were compared between 19 hypothyroid glands and 11 euthyroid glands in chronic thyroiditis. Chronic thyroiditis tended to show lobulated margins, inhomogeneous intensity, and low intensity bands connecting with vessels or not. Basedow disease tended to display smooth margins, inhomogeneous intensity and low intensity bands connecting with vessels. Thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of Basedow disease and chronic thyroiditis were significantly higher than those of normal thyroid gland at all sequences. In chronic thyroiditis thyroid-muscle-signal intensity ratios of euthyroid glands were significantly higher than those of hypothyroid glands. MR imaging could reflect pathologic features of diffuse goiters. Moreover, MR imaging is potentially contributory to speculate about thyroid function and degree of serious condition in diffuse thyroid disorders. (author)

  2. Edge-promoting reconstruction of absorption and diffusivity in optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannukainen, A; Hyvönen, N; Majander, H; Harhanen, L

    2016-01-01

    In optical tomography a physical body is illuminated with near-infrared light and the resulting outward photon flux is measured at the object boundary. The goal is to reconstruct internal optical properties of the body, such as absorption and diffusivity. In this work, it is assumed that the imaged object is composed of an approximately homogeneous background with clearly distinguishable embedded inhomogeneities. An algorithm for finding the maximum a posteriori estimate for the absorption and diffusion coefficients is introduced assuming an edge-preferring prior and an additive Gaussian measurement noise model. The method is based on iteratively combining a lagged diffusivity step and a linearization of the measurement model of diffuse optical tomography with priorconditioned LSQR. The performance of the reconstruction technique is tested via three-dimensional numerical experiments with simulated data. (paper)

  3. Fast imaging of mean, axial and radial diffusion kurtosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Brian; Shemesh, Noam; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is being increasingly reported to provide sensitive biomarkers of subtle changes in tissue microstructure. However, DKI also imposes larger data requirements than diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), hence, the widespread adaptation and exploration of DKI woul...

  4. Color Histogram Diffusion for Image Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taemin

    2011-01-01

    Various color histogram equalization (CHE) methods have been proposed to extend grayscale histogram equalization (GHE) for color images. In this paper a new method called histogram diffusion that extends the GHE method to arbitrary dimensions is proposed. Ranges in a histogram are specified as overlapping bars of uniform heights and variable widths which are proportional to their frequencies. This diagram is called the vistogram. As an alternative approach to GHE, the squared error of the vistogram from the uniform distribution is minimized. Each bar in the vistogram is approximated by a Gaussian function. Gaussian particles in the vistoram diffuse as a nonlinear autonomous system of ordinary differential equations. CHE results of color images showed that the approach is effective.

  5. Size dependent diffusive parameters and tensorial diffusion equations in neutronic models for optically small nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premuda, F.

    1983-01-01

    Two lines in improved neutron diffusion theory extending the efficiency of finite-difference diffusion codes to the field of optically small systems, are here reviewed. The firs involves the nodal solution for tensorial diffusion equation in slab geometry and tensorial formulation in parallelepiped and cylindrical gemometry; the dependence of critical eigenvalue from small slab thicknesses is also analitically investigated and finally a regularized tensorial diffusion equation is derived for slab. The other line refer to diffusion models formally unchanged with respect to the classical one, but where new size-dependent RTGB definitions for diffusion parameters are adopted, requiring that they allow to reproduce, in diffusion approach, the terms of neutron transport global balance; the trascendental equation for the buckling, arising in slab, sphere and parallelepiped geometry from the above requirement, are reported and the sizedependence of the new diffusion coefficient and extrapolated end point is investigated

  6. Multi-compartment microscopic diffusion imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kaden, Enrico; Kelm, Nathaniel D.; Carson, Robert P.; Does, Mark D.; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a multi-compartment model for microscopic diffusion anisotropy imaging. The aim is to estimate microscopic features specific to the intra- and extra-neurite compartments in nervous tissue unconfounded by the effects of fibre crossings and orientation dispersion, which are ubiquitous in the brain. The proposed MRI method is based on the Spherical Mean Technique (SMT), which factors out the neurite orientation distribution and thus provides direct estimates of the microsco...

  7. Imaging and assessment of diffusion coefficients by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tintera, J.; Dezortova, M.; Hajek, M.; Fitzek, C.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of assessment of molecular diffusion by magnetic resonance is highlighted and some typical applications of diffusion imaging in the diagnosis, e.g., of cerebral ischemia, changes in patients with phenylketonuria or multiple sclerosis are discussed. The images were obtained by using diffusion weighted spin echo Echo-Planar Imaging sequence with subsequent correction of the geometrical distortion of the images and calculation of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient map

  8. Review of diffusion tensor imaging and its application in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorona, Gregory A. [Children' s Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Radiology, Richmond, VA (United States); Berman, Jeffrey I. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Diffusion MRI is an imaging technique that uses the random motion of water to probe tissue microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can quantitatively depict the organization and connectivity of white matter. Given the non-invasiveness of the technique, DTI has become a widely used tool for researchers and clinicians to examine the white matter of children. This review covers the basics of diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging and discusses examples of their clinical application in children. (orig.)

  9. Diffusion-weighted MRI in acute posterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian; Moorthy, Srikant; Sreekumar, KP; Kulkarni, Chinmay

    2012-01-01

    Blindness following surgery, especially cardiac surgery, has been reported sporadically, the most common cause being ischemic optic neuropathy. The role of MRI in the diagnosis of this condition is not well established. We present a case of postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy that was diagnosed on diffusion-weighted MRI

  10. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  11. Detection of Photoacoustic Transients Originating from Microstructures in Optically Diffuse Media such as Biological Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoelen, C.G.A.; Dekker, Andre; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2001-01-01

    The generation and detection of broadband photoacoustic (PA) transients may be used for on-axis monitoring or for imaging of optically different structures in the interior of diffuse bodies such as biological tissue. Various piezoelectric sensors are characterized and compared in terms of

  12. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anil N; Chiang, Sharon; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Kasprian, Gregor; Vannucci, Marina; Lee, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal-Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain.

  13. Diffusion and perfusion imaging of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffar, Andreas; Dietrich, Olaf; Sourbron, Steven; Duerr, Hans-Roland; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), the observed MRI signal intensity is attenuated by the self-diffusion of water molecules. DWI provides information about the microscopic structure and organization of a biological tissue, since the extent and orientation of molecular motion is influenced by these tissue properties. The most common method to measure perfusion in the body using MRI is T1-weighted dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE-MRI). The analysis of DCE-MRI data allows determining the perfusion and permeability of a biological tissue. DWI as well as DCE-MRI are established techniques in MRI of the brain, while significantly fewer studies have been published in body imaging. In recent years, both techniques have been applied successfully in healthy bone marrow as well as for the characterization of bone marrow alterations or lesions; e.g., DWI has been used in particular for the differentiation of benign and malignant vertebral compression fractures. In this review article, firstly a short introduction to diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is given. Non-quantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DWI and semiquantitative and quantitative approaches for the analysis of DCE-MRI are introduced. Afterwards a detailed overview of the results of both techniques in healthy bone marrow and their applications for the diagnosis of various bone-marrow pathologies, like osteoporosis, bone tumors, and vertebral compression fractures are described.

  14. On some applications of diffusion processes for image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfu, S.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm inspired by the properties of diffusion processes for image filtering. We show that purely nonlinear diffusion processes ruled by Fisher equation allows contrast enhancement and noise filtering, but involves a blurry image. By contrast, anisotropic diffusion, described by Perona and Malik algorithm, allows noise filtering and preserves the edges. We show that combining the properties of anisotropic diffusion with those of nonlinear diffusion provides a better processing tool which enables noise filtering, contrast enhancement and edge preserving.

  15. Biomedical Optical Imaging Technologies Design and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to design of biomedical optical imaging technologies and their applications. The main topics include: fluorescence imaging, confocal imaging, micro-endoscope, polarization imaging, hyperspectral imaging, OCT imaging, multimodal imaging and spectroscopic systems. Each chapter is written by the world leaders of the respective fields, and will cover: principles and limitations of optical imaging technology, system design and practical implementation for one or two specific applications, including design guidelines, system configuration, optical design, component requirements and selection, system optimization and design examples, recent advances and applications in biomedical researches and clinical imaging. This book serves as a reference for students and researchers in optics and biomedical engineering.

  16. Diffusion imaging and tractography of congenital brain malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Michael; Barkovich, A.J.; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion imaging is an MRI modality that measures the microscopic molecular motion of water in order to investigate white matter microstructure. The modality has been used extensively in recent years to investigate the neuroanatomical basis of congenital brain malformations. We review the basic principles of diffusion imaging and of specific techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). We show how DTI and HARDI, and their application to fiber tractography, has elucidated the aberrant connectivity underlying a number of congenital brain malformations. Finally, we discuss potential uses for diffusion imaging of developmental disorders in the clinical and research realms. (orig.)

  17. Optics for mobile phone imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigier-Blanc, Emmanuelle E.

    2004-02-01

    Micro cameras for mobile phones require specific opto electronic designs using high-resolution micro technologies for compromising optical, electronical and mechanical requirements. The purpose of this conference is to present the optical critical parameters for imaging optics embedded into mobile phones. We will overview the optics critical parameters involved into micro optical cameras, as seen from user point of view, and their interdependence and relative influence onto optical performances of the product, as: -Focal length, field of view and array size. -Lens speed and depth of field: what is hidden behind lens speed, how to compromise small aperture, production tolerances, sensitivity, good resolution in corners and great depth of field -Relative illumination, this smooth fall off of intensity toward edge of array -Resolution; how to measure it, the interaction of pixel size, small dimensions -Sensitivity, insuring same sensitivity as human being under both twilight and midday sunny conditions. -Mischievous effects, as flare, glare, ghost effects and how to avoid them -How to match sensor spectrum and photopic eye curve: IR filter, and color balancing. We will compromise above parameters and see how to match with market needs and productivity insurance.

  18. The relevance of light diffusion profiles for interstitial PDT using light-diffusing optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringasci, Mirian D.; Fortunato, Thereza C.; Moriyama, Lilian T.; Vollet Filho, José Dirceu; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique used for several tumor types treatment. Light penetration on biological tissue is one limiting factor for PDT applied to large tumors. An alternative is using interstitial PDT, in which optical fibers are inserted into tumors. Cylindrical diffusers have been used in interstitial PDT. Light emission of different diffusers depends on the manufacturing process, size and optical properties of fibers, which make difficult to establish an adequate light dosimetry, since usually light profile is not designed for direct tissue-fiber contact. This study discusses the relevance of light distribution by a cylindrical diffuser into a turbid lipid emulsion solution, and how parts of a single diffuser contribute to illumination. A 2 cm-long cylindrical diffuser optical fiber was connected to a diode laser (630 nm), and the light spatial distribution was measured by scanning the solution with a collection probe. From the light field profile generated by a 1 mm-long intermediary element of a 20 mm-long cylindrical diffuser, recovery of light distribution for the entire diffuser was obtained. PDT was performed in rat healthy liver for a real treatment outcome analysis. By using computational tools, a typical necrosis profile generated by the irradiation with such a diffuser fiber was reconstructed. The results showed that it was possible predicting theoretically the shape of a necrosis profile in a healthy, homogeneous tissue with reasonable accuracy. The ability to predict the necrosis profile obtained from an interstitial illumination by optical diffusers has the potential improve light dosimetry for interstitial PDT.

  19. Discriminating Yogurt Microstructure Using Diffuse Reflectance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Jacob Lercke; Møller, Flemming; Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann

    2015-01-01

    The protein microstructure of many dairy products is of great importance for the consumers’ experience when eating the product. However, studies concerning discrimination between protein microstructures are limited. This paper presents preliminary results for discriminating different yogurt...... microstructures using hyperspectral (500-900nm) diffuse reflectance images (DRIs) – a technique potentially well suited for inline process control. Comparisons are made to quantified measures of the yogurt microstructure observed through confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). The output signal from both...... modalities is evaluated on a 24 factorial design covering four common production parameters, which significantly change the chemistry and the microstructure of the yogurt. It is found that the DRIs can be as discriminative as the CSLM images in certain cases, however the performance is highly governed...

  20. Viscous optical clearing agent for in vivo optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zijian; Jing, Lijia; Wu, Ning; lv, Pengyu; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-07-01

    By allowing more photons to reach deeper tissue, the optical clearing agent (OCA) has gained increasing attention in various optical imaging modalities. However, commonly used OCAs have high fluidity, limiting their applications in in vivo studies with oblique, uneven, or moving surfaces. In this work, we reported an OCA with high viscosity. We measured the properties of this viscous OCA, and tested its successful performances in the imaging of a living animal's skin with two optical imaging modalities: photoacoustic microscopy and optical coherence tomography. Our results demonstrated that the viscous OCA has a great potential in the study of different turbid tissues using various optical imaging modalities.

  1. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  3. Laboratory testing & measurement on optical imaging systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available on Optical Imaging Systems Bertus Theron 27 April 2013 presented at SIECPC 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Overview of Workshop Part 1. Introduction & Context  Some history of Arabic Optics  Context: Global vs Local optical testing... of Arabic Optics 1 See [4]  Arabic records of study of geometrical optics  Traced to Hellenistic (Greek) optics  Translated to Arabic  9th century  Arabic contribution to geometric optics  Not just translation to Arabic  Innovative research...

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of asymptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Miyagi, Ryo; Yamabe, Eiko; Fujinaga, Yasunari; N Bhatia, Nitin; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) were performed on a healthy 31-year-old man with asymptomatic lumbar disc herniation. Although the left S1 nerve root was obviously entrapped by a herniated mass, neither DWI nor DTI showed any significant findings for the nerve root. Decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and increased fractional anisotropy (FA) values were found. These results are contrary to those in previously published studies of symptomatic patients, in which a combination of increased ADC and decreased FA seem to have a relationship with nerve injury and subsequent symptoms, such as leg pain or palsy. Our results seen in an asymptomatic subject suggest that the compressed nerve with no injury, such as edema, demyelination, or persistent axonal injury, may be indicated by a combination of decreased ADC and increased FA. ADC and FA could therefore be potential tools to elucidate the pathomechanism of radiculopathy.

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the brain. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moritani, Toshio; Ekholm, Sven; Westesson, Per-Lennart

    2009-01-01

    This practical-minded text helps the radiologist and the clinician understand diffusion-weighted MR imaging. The book's 15 chapters range from basic principles to interpretation of diffusion-weighted MR imaging and specific disease. In this second edition, diffusion tensor imaging (fractional anisotropy, color map and fiber tractography) is covered and a new chapter, on ''Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of Scalp and Skull Lesions,'' is included. The volume is updated by newly added cases accompanied by radiological and pathological images along with the most recent references. It is aimed at all those who are involved in neuroimaging, including: residents, fellows, staff, as well as neurologists and neurosurgeons. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is widely accepted as a means to identify acute infarction but also to differentiate many other pathologic conditions. Understanding diffusion-weighted imaging is important for radiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons as well as radiology technologists. (orig.)

  6. Principles and implementation of diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Schwartz, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    We review the physiological basis of diffusion-weighted imaging and discuss the implementation of diffusion-weighted imaging pulse sequences and the subsequent postprocessing to yield quantitative estimations of diffusion parameters. We also introduce the concept of directionality of ''apparent'' diffusion in vivo and the means of assessing such anisotropy quantitatively. This in turn leads to the methodological application of diffusion tensor imaging and the subsequent postprocessing, known as tractography. The following articles deal with the clinical applications enabled by such methodologies. (orig.)

  7. Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging of Acute Infarction: Comparison with Routine Diffusion and Follow-up MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianzhong; Sun, Haizhen; Wang, Zhiyun; Ni, Hongyan; Shen, Wen; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in patients with acute stroke at admission and the tissue outcome 1 month after onset of stroke. Materials and Methods Patients with stroke underwent DWI (b values = 0, 1000 sec/mm 2 along three directions) and DKI (b values = 0, 1000, 2000 sec/mm 2 along 20 directions) within 24 hours after symptom onset and 1 month after symptom onset. For large lesions (diameter ≥ 1 cm), acute lesion volumes at DWI and DKI were compared with those at follow-up T2-weighted imaging by using Spearman correlation analysis. For small lesions (diameter the number of acute lesions at DWI and DKI and follow-up T2-weighted imaging was counted and compared by using the McNemar test. Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age, 58 years; range, 35-82 years) were included. There were 32 large lesions and 138 small lesions. For large lesions, the volumes of acute lesions on kurtosis maps showed no difference from those on 1-month follow-up T2-weighted images (P = .532), with a higher correlation coefficient than those on the apparent diffusion coefficient and mean diffusivity maps (R 2 = 0.730 vs 0.479 and 0.429). For small lesions, the number of acute lesions on DKI, but not on DWI, images was consistent with that on the follow-up T2-weighted images (P = .125). Conclusion DKI complements DWI for improved prediction of outcome of acute ischemic stroke. © RSNA, 2018.

  8. Vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) based optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    primary productivity, water clarity and determination of euphotic depth. Image data of the .... 3.1 Pre-processing of the IRS-P3 MOS-B data. IRS-P3 MOS-B .... any wavelength or spectral band is defined as. Kd = 1/E(z)∗ ... to the shallow bottom.

  9. Performances of diffusion kurtosis imaging and diffusion tensor imaging in detecting white matter abnormality in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI is an extension of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, exhibiting improved sensitivity and specificity in detecting developmental and pathological changes in neural tissues. However, little attention was paid to the performances of DKI and DTI in detecting white matter abnormality in schizophrenia. In this study, DKI and DTI were performed in 94 schizophrenia patients and 91 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. White matter integrity was assessed by fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD, mean kurtosis (MK, axial kurtosis (AK and radial kurtosis (RK of DKI and FA, MD, AD and RD of DTI. Group differences in these parameters were compared using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS (P  AK (20% > RK (3% and RD (37% > FA (24% > MD (21% for DKI, and RD (43% > FA (30% > MD (21% for DTI. DKI-derived diffusion parameters (RD, FA and MD were sensitive to detect abnormality in white matter regions (the corpus callosum and anterior limb of internal capsule with coherent fiber arrangement; however, the kurtosis parameters (MK and AK were sensitive to reveal abnormality in white matter regions (the juxtacortical white matter and corona radiata with complex fiber arrangement. In schizophrenia, the decreased AK suggests axonal damage; however, the increased RD indicates myelin impairment. These findings suggest that diffusion and kurtosis parameters could provide complementary information and they should be jointly used to reveal pathological changes in schizophrenia.

  10. An efficient method for model refinement in diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, A. R.; Khademi, M.

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a non-linear, ill-posed, boundary value and optimization problem which necessitates regularization. Also, Bayesian methods are suitable owing to measurements data are sparse and correlated. In such problems which are solved with iterative methods, for stabilization and better convergence, the solution space must be small. These constraints subject to extensive and overdetermined system of equations which model retrieving criteria specially total least squares (TLS) must to refine model error. Using TLS is limited to linear systems which is not achievable when applying traditional Bayesian methods. This paper presents an efficient method for model refinement using regularized total least squares (RTLS) for treating on linearized DOT problem, having maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator and Tikhonov regulator. This is done with combination Bayesian and regularization tools as preconditioner matrices, applying them to equations and then using RTLS to the resulting linear equations. The preconditioning matrixes are guided by patient specific information as well as a priori knowledge gained from the training set. Simulation results illustrate that proposed method improves the image reconstruction performance and localize the abnormally well.

  11. One step linear reconstruction method for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhrowiyah, N.; Yasin, M.

    2017-09-01

    The method one step linear reconstruction method for continuous wave diffuse optical tomography is proposed and demonstrated for polyvinyl chloride based material and breast phantom. Approximation which used in this method is selecting regulation coefficient and evaluating the difference between two states that corresponding to the data acquired without and with a change in optical properties. This method is used to recovery of optical parameters from measured boundary data of light propagation in the object. The research is demonstrated by simulation and experimental data. Numerical object is used to produce simulation data. Chloride based material and breast phantom sample is used to produce experimental data. Comparisons of results between experiment and simulation data are conducted to validate the proposed method. The results of the reconstruction image which is produced by the one step linear reconstruction method show that the image reconstruction almost same as the original object. This approach provides a means of imaging that is sensitive to changes in optical properties, which may be particularly useful for functional imaging used continuous wave diffuse optical tomography of early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  12. MR imaging evidence of anisotropic diffusion in the cat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, M.E.; Mintorovich, J.; Cohen, Y.; Chilevitt, L.; Tsuruda, J.; Norman, D.; Weinstein, P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a study of diffusion behavior of brain water in the cat. Diffusion-weighted images, acquired with large gradient b values of 1,000-2,000 sec/mm 2 , showed no clear evidence of anisotropic water diffusion in either gray matter or basal ganglia. Large directional differences in image intensities and diffusion values were observed in cortical and deep white matter. Faster diffusion was sen when the direction of the applied diffusion gradient was parallel to the orientation of the white matter. Diffusion perpendicular to the gradient direction was significantly lower. This effect was proportional to gradient duration and strength and was seen in both pre- and immediate post-mortem images in all axial, sagittal, and coronal images

  13. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  14. Towards the use of bioresorbable fibers in time-domain diffuse optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sieno, Laura; Boetti, Nadia G; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pugliese, Diego; Farina, Andrea; Konugolu Venkata Sekar, Sanathana; Ceci-Ginistrelli, Edoardo; Janner, Davide; Pifferi, Antonio; Milanese, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    In the last years bioresorbable materials are gaining increasing interest for building implantable optical components for medical devices. In this work we show the fabrication of bioresorbable optical fibers designed for diffuse optics applications, featuring large core diameter (up to 200 μm) and numerical aperture (0.17) to maximize the collection efficiency of diffused light. We demonstrate the suitability of bioresorbable fibers for time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy firstly checking the intrinsic performances of the setup by acquiring the instrument response function. We then validate on phantoms the use of bioresorbable fibers by applying the MEDPHOT protocol to assess the performance of the system in measuring optical properties (namely, absorption and scattering coefficients) of homogeneous media. Further, we show an ex-vivo validation on a chicken breast by measuring the absorption and scattering spectra in the 500-1100 nm range using interstitially inserted bioresorbable fibers. This work represents a step toward a new way to look inside the body using optical fibers that can be implanted in patients. These fibers could be useful either for diagnostic (e. g. for monitoring the evolution after surgical interventions) or treatment (e. g. photodynamic therapy) purposes. Picture: Microscopy image of the 100 μm core bioresorbable fiber. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. 3-D anisotropic neutron diffusion in optically thick media with optically thin channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trahan, Travis J.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2011-01-01

    Standard neutron diffusion theory accurately approximates the neutron transport process for optically thick, scattering-dominated systems in which the angular neutron flux is a weak (nearly linear) function of angle. Therefore, standard diffusion theory is not directly applicable for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) cores, which contain numerous narrow, axially-oriented, nearly-voided coolant channels. However, we have derived a new, accurate diffusion equation for such problems, which contains nonstandard anisotropic diffusion coefficients near and within the channels, but which reduces to the standard diffusion approximation away from the channels. The new diffusion approximation significantly improves the accuracy of VHTR diffusion simulations, while having lower computational cost than higher-order transport methods. (author)

  16. New diffusion imaging method with a single acquisition sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, Ph.S.; Bittoun, J.; Lefevre, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is related to the molecular diffusion coefficient and to physiologic information: microcirculation in the capillary network, incoherent slow flow, and restricted diffusion. The authors present a new MR imaging sequence that yields computed ADC images in only one acquisition of 9-minutes with a 1.5-T imager (GE Signa). Compared to the previous method, this sequence is at least two times faster and thus can be used as a routine examination to supplement T1-, T2-, and density-weighted images. The method was assessed by measurement of the molecular diffusion in liquids, and the first clinical images obtained in neurologic diseases demonstrate its efficiency for clinical investigation. The possibility of separately imaging diffusion and perfusion is supported by an algorithm

  17. Long-distance thermal temporal ghost imaging over optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Yidong

    2018-02-01

    A thermal ghost imaging scheme between two distant parties is proposed and experimentally demonstrated over long-distance optical fibers. In the scheme, the weak thermal light is split into two paths. Photons in one path are spatially diffused according to their frequencies by a spatial dispersion component, then illuminate the object and record its spatial transmission information. Photons in the other path are temporally diffused by a temporal dispersion component. By the coincidence measurement between photons of two paths, the object can be imaged in a way of ghost imaging, based on the frequency correlation between photons in the two paths. In the experiment, the weak thermal light source is prepared by the spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide. The temporal dispersion is introduced by single mode fibers of 50 km, which also could be looked as a fiber link. Experimental results show that this scheme can be realized over long-distance optical fibers.

  18. Diffusion and Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging:Fundamentals and Advances

    OpenAIRE

    Assili, Sanam

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a powerful imaging modality to evaluate the structure and function of various organs in the human body,such as the brain. Additionally, diffusion and perfusion MR imaging have been increasingly used in neurovascular clinical applications. In diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, the mobility of water molecules is explored in order to obtain information about the microscopic behavior of the tissues. In contrast...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  20. Design of optoelectronic system for optical diffusion tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erakhtin Igor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores issues connected with the circuit design of a device for optical diffusion tomography, which we are currently designing. We plan to use the device in experimental studies for the development of a faster method of brain hematoma detection. We reviewed currently existing methods for emergency diagnosis of hematomas, primarily the Infrascanner model 2000, for which we identified weaknesses, and outlined suggestions for improvements. This article describes the method of scanning tissues based on a triangulated arrangement of sources and receivers of optical radiation, and it discusses the optoelectronic system that implements that principle.

  1. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravtsenyuk Olga V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  2. Space-Varying Iterative Restoration of Diffuse Optical Tomograms Reconstructed by the Photon Average Trajectories Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Lyubimov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of improving the spatial resolution of diffuse optical tomograms reconstructed by the photon average trajectories (PAT method is substantiated. The PAT method recently presented by us is based on a concept of an average statistical trajectory for transfer of light energy, the photon average trajectory (PAT. The inverse problem of diffuse optical tomography is reduced to a solution of an integral equation with integration along a conditional PAT. As a result, the conventional algorithms of projection computed tomography can be used for fast reconstruction of diffuse optical images. The shortcoming of the PAT method is that it reconstructs the images blurred due to averaging over spatial distributions of photons which form the signal measured by the receiver. To improve the resolution, we apply a spatially variant blur model based on an interpolation of the spatially invariant point spread functions simulated for the different small subregions of the image domain. Two iterative algorithms for solving a system of linear algebraic equations, the conjugate gradient algorithm for least squares problem and the modified residual norm steepest descent algorithm, are used for deblurring. It is shown that a 27% gain in spatial resolution can be obtained.

  3. Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging (HROI) develops novel technologies for studying biological processes at unprecedented speed and resolution. Research...

  4. Signal filtering algorithm for depth-selective diffuse optical topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, M; Nakayama, K

    2009-01-01

    A compact filtered backprojection algorithm that suppresses the undesirable effects of skin circulation for near-infrared diffuse optical topography is proposed. Our approach centers around a depth-selective filtering algorithm that uses an inverse problem technique and extracts target signals from observation data contaminated by noise from a shallow region. The filtering algorithm is reduced to a compact matrix and is therefore easily incorporated into a real-time system. To demonstrate the validity of this method, we developed a demonstration prototype for depth-selective diffuse optical topography and performed both computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the proposed method significantly suppresses the noise from the shallow region with a minimal degradation of the target signal.

  5. Time domain diffuse optical spectroscopy: In vivo quantification of collagen in breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Farina, Andrea; Ieva, Francesca; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Abbate, Francesca; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy provides non-invasively the optical characterization of highly diffusive media, such as biological tissues. Light pulses are injected into the tissue and the effects of light propagation on re-emitted pulses are interpreted with the diffusion theory to assess simultaneously tissue absorption and reduced scattering coefficients. Performing spectral measurements, information on tissue composition and structure is derived applying the Beer law to the measured absorption and an empiric approximation to Mie theory to the reduced scattering. The absorption properties of collagen powder were preliminarily measured in the range of 600-1100 nm using a laboratory set-up for broadband time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy. Optical projection images were subsequently acquired in compressed breast geometry on 218 subjects, either healthy or bearing breast lesions, using a portable instrument for optical mammography that operates at 7 wavelengths selected in the range 635-1060 nm. For all subjects, tissue composition was estimated in terms of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipids, and collagen. Information on tissue microscopic structure was also derived. Good correlation was obtained between mammographic breast density (a strong risk factor for breast cancer) and an optical index based on collagen content and scattering power (that accounts mostly for tissue collagen). Logistic regression applied to all optically derived parameters showed that subjects at high risk for developing breast cancer for their high breast density can effectively be identified based on collagen content and scattering parameters. Tissue composition assessed in breast lesions with a perturbative approach indicated that collagen and hemoglobin content are significantly higher in malignant lesions than in benign ones.

  6. Diffuse optical tomography with physiological and spatial a priori constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intes, Xavier; Maloux, Clemence; Guven, Murat; Yazici, Birzen; Chance, Britton

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is a typical inverse problem plagued by ill-condition. To overcome this drawback, regularization or constraining techniques are incorporated in the inverse formulation. In this work, we investigate the enhancement in recovering functional parameters by using physiological and spatial a priori constraints. More accurate recovery of the two main functional parameters that are the blood volume and the relative saturation is demonstrated through simulations by using our method compared to actual techniques. (note)

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging of partial intractable epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas de la Roque, Anne; Oppenheim, Catherine; Rodrigo, Sebastian; Meder, Jean-Francois; Chassoux, Francine; Devaux, Bertrand; Beuvon, Frederic; Daumas-Duport, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the value of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with partial intractable epilepsy. We used DTI (25 non-collinear directions) in 15 patients with a cortical lesion on conventional MRI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured in the internal capsule, and in the normal-appearing white matter (WM), adjacent tothe lesion, and away from the lesion, at a set distance of 2-3 cm. In each patient, increased or decreased FA measurements were those that varied from mirror values using an arbitrary 10% threshold. Over the whole population, ipsi- and contralateral FA measurements were also compared using a Wilcoxon test (p<0.05). Over the whole population, FA was significantly reduced in the WM adjacent to and away from the lesion, whilst being normal in the internal capsule. FA was reduced by more than 10% in the WM adjacent to and distant from the lesion in 13 and 12 patients respectively. For nine of the ten patients for whom the surgical resection encompassed the limits of the lesion on conventional MRI, histological data showed WM alterations (gliosis, axonal loss, abnormal cells). DTI often reveals WM abnormalities that are undetected on conventional MRI in patients with partial intractable epilepsy. (orig.)

  9. Optical computed tomography for imaging the breast: first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grable, Richard J.; Ponder, Steven L.; Gkanatsios, Nikolaos A.; Dieckmann, William; Olivier, Patrick F.; Wake, Robert H.; Zeng, Yueping

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare computed tomography optical imaging with traditional breast imaging techniques. Images produced by computed tomography laser mammography (CTLMTM) scanner are compared with images obtained from mammography, and in some cases ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the CTLM procedure, a near infrared laser irradiates the breast and an array of photodiodes detectors records light scattered through the breast tissue. The laser and detectors rotate synchronously around the breast to acquire a series of slice data along the coronal place. The procedure is performed without any breast compression or optical matching fluid. Cross-sectional slices of the breast are produced using a reconstruction algorithm. Reconstruction based on the diffusion theory is used to produce cross-sectional slices of the breast. Multiple slice images are combined to produce a three dimensional volumetric array of the imaged breast. This array is used to derive axial and sagittal images of the breast corresponding to cranio-caudal and medio-lateral images used in mammography. Over 200 women and 3 men have been scanned in clinical trials. The most obvious features seen in images produced by the optical tomography scanner are vascularization and significant lesions. Breast features caused by fibrocystic changes and cysts are less obvious. Breast density does not appear to be a significant factor in the quality of the image. We see correlation of the optical image structure with that seen with traditional breast imaging techniques. Further testing is being conducted to explore the sensitivity and specificity of optical tomography of the breast.

  10. Stable dissipative optical vortex clusters by inhomogeneous effective diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huishan; Lai, Shiquan; Qui, Yunli; Zhu, Xing; Xie, Jianing; Mihalache, Dumitru; He, Yingji

    2017-10-30

    We numerically show the generation of robust vortex clusters embedded in a two-dimensional beam propagating in a dissipative medium described by the generic cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with an inhomogeneous effective diffusion term, which is asymmetrical in the two transverse directions and periodically modulated in the longitudinal direction. We show the generation of stable optical vortex clusters for different values of the winding number (topological charge) of the input optical beam. We have found that the number of individual vortex solitons that form the robust vortex cluster is equal to the winding number of the input beam. We have obtained the relationships between the amplitudes and oscillation periods of the inhomogeneous effective diffusion and the cubic gain and diffusion (viscosity) parameters, which depict the regions of existence and stability of vortex clusters. The obtained results offer a method to form robust vortex clusters embedded in two-dimensional optical beams, and we envisage potential applications in the area of structured light.

  11. Comparison of the diagnostic performances of diffusion parameters in diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakir, Ozgur; Arslan, Arzu; Inan, Nagihan; Anık, Yonca; Sarısoy, Tahsin; Gumustas, Sevtap; Akansel, Gur

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of the diffusion parameters measured by conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for discrimination of malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and the normal breast. Materials and methods: The study included 52 women with 55 breast lesions (30 malignant, 25 benign). DTI and DWI were performed complementary to dynamic contrast MRI at 3T. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of DWI, mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of DTI were measured for lesions and contralateral breast parenchyma in each patient. We used b factors of 0, 50, 850, 1000 and 1500 s/mm 2 for DWI and b 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 for DTI. ADC, MD and FA values were compared between malignant and benign lesions, and the normal parenchyma by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Diffusion parameters showed no difference according to menopausal status in the normal breast. ADC and MD values of the malignant lesions were significantly lower than benign lesions and normal parenchyma (p = 0.001). The FA showed no statistical significance. With the cut-off values of ≤1.23 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s (b 0–1000 s/mm 2 ) and ≤1.12 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s (b 0–1500 s/mm 2 ), ADC showed 92.85% and 96.15% sensitivity; 72.22% and 73.52% PPV, respectively. With a cut-off value of ≤1.27 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s (b 1000 s/mm 2 ), MD was 100% sensitive with a PPV of 65.90%. Comparing the diagnostic performance of the parameters in DTI with DWI, we obtained similar efficiency of ADC with b values of 0,1000 and 0,1500 s/mm 2 and MD with a b value of 0, 1000 s/mm 2 (AUC = 0.82 ± 0.07). Conclusion: ADC of DWI and MD of DTI values provide significant discriminative factors for benign and malignant breast lesions. FA measurement was not discriminative. Supported with clinical and dynamic contrast MRI findings, DWI and DTI findings provide significant contribution to the final radiologic decision

  12. Comparison of the diagnostic performances of diffusion parameters in diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakir, Ozgur, E-mail: cakirozgur@hotmail.com; Arslan, Arzu, E-mail: arzu.s.arslan@gmail.com; Inan, Nagihan, E-mail: nagihaninan@yahoo.com.tr; Anık, Yonca, E-mail: yoncaanik@yahoo.com; Sarısoy, Tahsin, E-mail: htsarisoy@yahoo.com; Gumustas, Sevtap, E-mail: svtgumustas@yahoo.com; Akansel, Gur, E-mail: gakansel@gmail.com

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of the diffusion parameters measured by conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for discrimination of malignant breast lesions from benign lesions and the normal breast. Materials and methods: The study included 52 women with 55 breast lesions (30 malignant, 25 benign). DTI and DWI were performed complementary to dynamic contrast MRI at 3T. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of DWI, mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of DTI were measured for lesions and contralateral breast parenchyma in each patient. We used b factors of 0, 50, 850, 1000 and 1500 s/mm{sup 2} for DWI and b 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} for DTI. ADC, MD and FA values were compared between malignant and benign lesions, and the normal parenchyma by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Diffusion parameters showed no difference according to menopausal status in the normal breast. ADC and MD values of the malignant lesions were significantly lower than benign lesions and normal parenchyma (p = 0.001). The FA showed no statistical significance. With the cut-off values of ≤1.23 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (b 0–1000 s/mm{sup 2}) and ≤1.12 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (b 0–1500 s/mm{sup 2}), ADC showed 92.85% and 96.15% sensitivity; 72.22% and 73.52% PPV, respectively. With a cut-off value of ≤1.27 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s (b 1000 s/mm{sup 2}), MD was 100% sensitive with a PPV of 65.90%. Comparing the diagnostic performance of the parameters in DTI with DWI, we obtained similar efficiency of ADC with b values of 0,1000 and 0,1500 s/mm{sup 2} and MD with a b value of 0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2} (AUC = 0.82 ± 0.07). Conclusion: ADC of DWI and MD of DTI values provide significant discriminative factors for benign and malignant breast lesions. FA measurement was not discriminative. Supported with clinical and dynamic contrast MRI findings, DWI and DTI findings provide significant

  13. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy

  14. Optically sectioned imaging by oblique plane microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Lin, Ziduo; Lyon, Alex R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. The first OPM results obtained using a high NA water immersion lens on a commercially available inverted microscope frame are presented, together with a measurement of the achievable optical resolution.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence

  16. Imaging granulomatous lesions with optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banzhaf, Christina; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2012-01-01

    To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors.......To investigate and compare the presentation of granulomatous lesions in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images and compare this to previous studies of nonmelanoma skin tumors....

  17. Imaging features of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmit, M.; Vogel, W.; Horger, M.

    2006-01-01

    There are diverse etiologies of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, so specific diagnosis may be difficult. Conventional radiography tends to be misleading as hemoptysis may lacking in patients with hemorrhagic anemia. Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage should be differentiated from focal pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, active infection (tuberculosis) neoplasia, trauma, or embolism. (orig.)

  18. Hyperspectral diffuse reflectance for determination of the optical properties of milk and fruit and vegetable juices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianwei; Lu, Renfu

    2005-11-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are two fundamental optical properties for turbid biological materials. This paper presents the technique and method of using hyperspectral diffuse reflectance for fast determination of the optical properties of fruit and vegetable juices and milks. A hyperspectral imaging system was used to acquire spatially resolved steady-state diffuse reflectance over the spectral region between 530 and 900 nm from a variety of fruit and vegetable juices (citrus, grapefruit, orange, and vegetable) and milks with different fat levels (full, skim and mixed). The system collected diffuse reflectance in the source-detector separation range from 1.1 to 10.0 mm. The hyperspectral reflectance data were analyzed by using a diffusion theory model for semi-infinite homogeneous media. The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of the fruit and vegetable juices and milks were extracted by inverse algorithms from the scattering profiles for wavelengths of 530-900 nm. Values of the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient at 650 nm were highly correlated to the fat content of the milk samples with the correlation coefficient of 0.990 and 0.989, respectively. The hyperspectral imaging technique can be extended to the measurement of other liquid and solid foods in which light scattering is dominant.

  19. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  20. Imaging and applied optics: introduction to the feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Arnison, Matthew R; Javidi, Bahram; Testorf, Markus

    2018-03-01

    This special issue of Applied Optics contains selected papers from OSA's Imaging Congress with particular emphasis on work from mathematics in imaging, computational optical sensing and imaging, imaging systems and applications, and 3D image acquisition and display.

  1. Algebraic reconstruction techniques for spectral reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, Bernhard; Ziegler, Ronny; Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) necessitates solving the diffusion equation, which is nonlinear with respect to the parameters that have to be reconstructed. Currently applied solving methods are based on the linearization of the equation. For spectral three-dimensional reconstruction, the emerging equation system is too large for direct inversion, but the application of iterative methods is feasible. Computational effort and speed of convergence of these iterative methods are crucial since they determine the computation time of the reconstruction. In this paper, the iterative methods algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and conjugated gradients (CGs) as well as a new modified ART method are investigated for spectral DOT reconstruction. The aim of the modified ART scheme is to speed up the convergence by considering the specific conditions of spectral reconstruction. As a result, it converges much faster to favorable results than conventional ART and CG methods

  2. Preclinical, fluorescence and diffuse optical tomography: non-contact instrumentation, modeling and time-resolved 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouizi, F.

    2011-09-01

    Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-DOT) is a new non-invasive imaging technique increasingly used in the clinical and preclinical fields. It yields optical absorption and scattering maps of the explored organs, and related physiological parameters. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-FDOT) is based on the detection of fluorescence photons. It provides spatio-temporal maps of fluorescent probe concentrations and life times, and allows access to metabolic and molecular imaging which is important for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, particularly in oncology. The main goal of this thesis was to reconstruct 3D TR-DOT/TR-FDOT images of small animals using time-resolved optical technology. Data were acquired using optical fibers fixed around the animal without contact with its surface. The work was achieved in four steps: 1)- Setting up an imaging device to record the 3D coordinates of an animal's surface; 2)- Modeling the no-contact approach to solve the forward problem; 3)- Processing of the measured signals taking into account the impulse response of the device; 4)- Implementation of a new image reconstruction method based on a selection of carefully chosen points. As a result, good-quality 3D optical images were obtained owing to reduced cross-talk between absorption and scattering. Moreover, the computation time was cut down, compared to full-time methods using whole temporal profiles. (author)

  3. Imaging of postthalamic visual fiber tracts by anisotropic diffusion weighted MRI and diffusion tensor imaging: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinges, Marcus H.T.; Schoth, Felix; Coenen, Volker A.; Krings, Timo

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion weighted MRI offers the possibility to study the course of the cerebral white matter tracts. In the present manuscript, the basics, the technique and the limitations of diffusion tensor imaging and anisotropic diffusion weighted MRI are presented and their applications in various neurological and neurosurgical diseases are discussed with special emphasis on the visual system. A special focus is laid on the combination of fiber tract imaging, anatomical imaging and functional MRI for presurgical planning and intraoperative neuronavigation of lesions near the visual system

  4. Contrast improvement of continuous wave diffuse optical tomography reconstruction by hybrid approach using least square and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Rusha; Dutta, Pranab K.

    2015-07-01

    Reconstruction of the absorption coefficient of tissue with good contrast is of key importance in functional diffuse optical imaging. A hybrid approach using model-based iterative image reconstruction and a genetic algorithm is proposed to enhance the contrast of the reconstructed image. The proposed method yields an observed contrast of 98.4%, mean square error of 0.638×10-3, and object centroid error of (0.001 to 0.22) mm. Experimental validation of the proposed method has also been provided with tissue-like phantoms which shows a significant improvement in image quality and thus establishes the potential of the method for functional diffuse optical tomography reconstruction with continuous wave setup. A case study of finger joint imaging is illustrated as well to show the prospect of the proposed method in clinical diagnosis. The method can also be applied to the concentration measurement of a region of interest in a turbid medium.

  5. Multi-distance diffuse optical spectroscopy with a single optode via hypotrochoidal scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applegate, Matthew B; Roblyer, Darren

    2018-02-15

    Frequency-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy (FD-DOS) is an established technique capable of determining optical properties and chromophore concentrations in biological tissue. Most FD-DOS systems use either manually positioned, handheld probes or complex arrays of source and detector fibers to acquire data from many tissue locations, allowing for the generation of 2D or 3D maps of tissue. Here, we present a new method to rapidly acquire a wide range of source-detector (SD) separations by mechanically scanning a single SD pair. The source and detector fibers are mounted on a scan head that traces a hypotrochoidal pattern over the sample that, when coupled with a high-speed FD-DOS system, enables the rapid collection of dozens of SD separations for depth-resolved imaging. We demonstrate that this system has an average error of 4±2.6% in absorption and 2±1.8% in scattering across all SD separations. Additionally, by linearly translating the device, the size and location of an absorbing inhomogeneity can be determined through the generation of B-scan images in a manner conceptually analogous to ultrasound imaging. This work demonstrates the potential of single optode diffuse optical scanning for depth resolved visualization of heterogeneous biological tissues at near real-time rates.

  6. Optical image hiding based on interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Bo

    2009-11-01

    Optical image processing has been paid a lot of attentions recently due to its large capacitance and fast speed. Many image encryption and hiding technologies have been proposed based on the optical technology. In conventional image encryption methods, the random phase masks are usually used as encryption keys to encode the images into random white noise distribution. However, this kind of methods requires interference technology such as holography to record complex amplitude. Furthermore, it is vulnerable to attack techniques. The image hiding methods employ the phase retrieve algorithm to encode the images into two or more phase masks. The hiding process is carried out within a computer and the images are reconstructed optically. But the iterative algorithms need a lot of time to hide the image into the masks. All methods mentioned above are based on the optical diffraction of the phase masks. In this presentation, we will propose a new optical image hiding method based on interference. The coherence lights pass through two phase masks and are combined by a beam splitter. Two beams interfere with each other and the desired image appears at the pre-designed plane. Two phase distribution masks are designed analytically; therefore, the hiding speed can be obviously improved. Simulation results are carried out to demonstrate the validity of the new proposed methods.

  7. Broadband diffuse optical characterization of elastin for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konugolu Venkata Sekar, Sanathana; Beh, Joo Sin; Farina, Andrea; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola

    2017-10-01

    Elastin is a key structural protein of dynamic connective tissues widely found in the extracellular matrix of skin, arteries, lungs and ligaments. It is responsible for a range of diseases related to aging of biological tissues. The optical characterization of elastin can open new opportunities for its investigation in biomedical studies. In this work, we present the absorption spectra of elastin using a broadband (550-1350nm) diffuse optical spectrometer. Distortions caused by fluorescence and finite bandwidth of the laser source on estimated absorption were effectively accounted for in measurements and data analysis and compensated. A comprehensive summary and comparison between collagen and elastin is presented, highlighting distinct features for its accurate quantification in biological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Image correction in magneto-optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Larsen, B.H.; Jacobsen, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    An image-processing procedure that assures correct determination of the magnetic field distribution of magneto-optical images is presented. The method remedies image faults resulting from sources that are proportional to the incident light intensity, such as different types of defects...

  9. Optics for Advanced Neutron Imaging and Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, David E.; Khaykovich, Boris

    2016-01-01

    During the report period, we continued the work as outlined in the original proposal. We have analyzed potential optical designs of Wolter mirrors for the neutron-imaging instrument VENUS, which is under construction at SNS. In parallel, we have conducted the initial polarized imaging experiment at Helmholtz Zentrum, Berlin, one of very few of currently available polarized-imaging facilities worldwide.

  10. Diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of transplanted kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmucci, Stefano; Cappello, Giuseppina; Attinà, Giancarlo; Foti, Pietro Valerio; Siverino, Rita Olivia Anna; Roccasalva, Federica; Piccoli, Marina; Sinagra, Nunziata; Milone, Pietro; Veroux, Massimiliano; Ettorre, Giovanni Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relation between renal indexes and functional MRI in a population of kidney transplant recipients who underwent MR with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the transplanted graft. Study population included 40 patients with single kidney transplant. The patients were divided into 3 groups, on the basis of creatinine clearance (CrCl) values calculated using Cockcroft-Gault formula: group A, including patients with normal renal function (CrCl ≥ 60 mL/min); group B, which refers to patients with moderate renal impairment (CrCl > 30 but <60 mL/min); and, finally, group C, which means severe renal deterioration (CrCl ≤ 30 mL/min). All patients were investigated with a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner, acquiring DWI and DTI sequences. A Mann–Whitney U test was adopted to compare apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and fractional anisotropy (FA) measurements between groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were created for prediction of normal renal function (group A) and renal failure (group C). Pearson correlation was performed between renal clearance and functional imaging parameter (ADC and FA), obtained for cortical and medullar regions. Mann–Whitney U test revealed a highly significant difference (p < 0.01) between patients with low CrCl (group C) and normal CrCl (group A) considering both medullar ADC and FA and cortical ADC. Regarding contiguous groups, the difference between group B and C was highly significant (p < 0.01) for medullar ADC and significant (p < 0.05) for cortical ADC and medullar FA. No difference between these groups was found considering cortical FA. Analyzing groups A and B, we found a significant difference (p < 0.05) for medullar both ADC and FA, while no difference was found for cortical ADC and FA. Strongest Pearson correlation was found between CrCl and medullar ADC (r = 0.65). For predicting normal renal function or severe renal impairment, highest

  11. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, T.; Schweigerer-Schroeter, G.; Wellnitz, J.; Wuerstle, T.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is one of the best methods in diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, particularly in disclosure of active demyelinating lesions. Aim of this study was to compare diffusion weighted imaging and contrast enhancement in the detection of active lesions. A MR study with a contrast enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequence with magnetization transfer presaturation and a diffusion weighted echoplanar pulse sequence (b=1000 s/mm 2 ) was performed in 17 patients (11 women, 6 men) with multiple sclerosis. 29 of 239 lesions showed an increased signal intensity in diffusion weighted imaging, 24 lesions a contrast enhancement, but only 16 lesions were visible in both pulse sequences. In patients with short clinical symptomatology significant more lesions could be detected with diffusion-weighted pulse sequence in comparison to patients with long standing symptomatology showing more lesions with contrast enhancement. Hence it is likely, that both pulse sequences detect different histopathologic changes. The early detection of demyelinating lesions in diffusion weighted imaging is attributed to the extracellular edema, however the contrast enhancement is caused by a blood brain barrier abnormality. It can be expected that diffusion weighted imaging will have a high impact on imaging of multiple sclerosis not only in therapeutic trials, but also in clinical routine. (orig.) [de

  12. Visualisation of details of a complicated inner structure of model objects by the method of diffusion optical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tret'yakov, Evgeniy V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V; Shutov, I V

    2002-01-01

    An approximate algorithm is tested for solving the problem of diffusion optical tomography in experiments on the visualisation of details of the inner structure of strongly scattering model objects containing scattering and semitransparent inclusions, as well as absorbing inclusions located inside other optical inhomogeneities. The stability of the algorithm to errors is demonstrated, which allows its use for a rapid (2 - 3 min) image reconstruction of the details of objects with a complicated inner structure. (laser biology and medicine)

  13. Optical image reconstruction using DC data: simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huabei Jiang; Paulsen, K.D.; Oesterberg, U.L.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explore optical image formation using a diffusion approximation of light propagation in tissue which is modelled with a finite-element method for optically heterogeneous media. We demonstrate successful image reconstruction based on absolute experimental DC data obtained with a continuous wave 633 nm He-Ne laser system and a 751 nm diode laser system in laboratory phantoms having two optically distinct regions. The experimental systems used exploit a tomographic type of data collection scheme that provides information from which a spatially variable optical property map is deduced. Reconstruction of scattering coefficient only and simultaneous reconstruction of both scattering and absorption profiles in tissue-like phantoms are obtained from measured and simulated data. Images with different contrast levels between the heterogeneity and the background are also reported and the results show that although it is possible to obtain qualitative visual information on the location and size of a heterogeneity, it may not be possible to quantitatively resolve contrast levels or optical properties using reconstructions from DC data only. Sensitivity of image reconstruction to noise in the measurement data is investigated through simulations. The application of boundary constraints has also been addressed. (author)

  14. Perspective of diffusion of imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariod, R.

    1984-10-01

    Medical imaging is dependant on the following techniques (ultra sounds, conventional radiology, digital radiology, X-ray computed tomography, NMR imaging, nuclear medicine). An overview of the forecast for world market evolution of medical imaging and the respective part taken by different techniques are presented

  15. Adaptive optics imaging of the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajani Battu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics is a relatively new tool that is available to ophthalmologists for study of cellular level details. In addition to the axial resolution provided by the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics provides an excellent lateral resolution, enabling visualization of the photoreceptors, blood vessels and details of the optic nerve head. We attempt a mini review of the current role of adaptive optics in retinal imaging. PubMed search was performed with key words Adaptive optics OR Retina OR Retinal imaging. Conference abstracts were searched from the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO meetings. In total, 261 relevant publications and 389 conference abstracts were identified.

  16. Fiberoptic microneedles: novel optical diffusers for interstitial delivery of therapeutic light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Hood, Robert L; Rossmeisl, John H; Grant, David C; Xu, Yong; Robertson, John L; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2011-11-01

    Photothermal therapies have limited efficacy and application due to the poor penetration depth of light inside tissue. In earlier work, we described the development of novel fiberoptic microneedles to provide a means to mechanically penetrate dermal tissue and deliver light directly into a localized target area.This paper presents an alternate fiberoptic microneedle design with the capability of delivering more diffuse, but therapeutically useful photothermal energy. Laser lipolysis is envisioned as a future clinical application for this design. A novel fiberoptic microneedle was developed using hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fiber to permit diffuse optical delivery. Microneedles etched for 10, 30, and 50 minutes, and an optical fiber control were compared with three techniques. First, red light delivery from the microneedles was evaluated by imaging the reflectance of the light from a white paper.Second, spatial temperature distribution of the paper in response to near-IR light (1,064 nm, 1 W CW) was recorded using infrared thermography. Third, ex vivo adipose tissue response during 1,064 nm, (5 W CW)irradiation was recorded with bright field microscopy. Acid etching exposed a 3 mm length of the fiber core, allowing circumferential delivery of light along this length. Increasing etching time decreased microneedle diameter, resulting in increased uniformity of red and 1,064 nm light delivery along the microneedle axis. For equivalent total energy delivery, thinner microneedles reduced carbonization in the adipose tissue experiments. We developed novel microscale optical diffusers that provided a more homogeneous light distribution from their surfaces, and compared performance to a flat-cleaved fiber, a device currently utilized in clinical practice. These fiberoptic microneedles can potentially enhance clinical laser procedures by providing direct delivery of diffuse light to target chromophores, while minimizing undesirable photothermal damage in adjacent

  17. Optical cell sorting with multiple imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Carrissemoux, Caro; Palima, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    healthy cells. With the richness of visual information, a lot of microscopy techniques have been developed and have been crucial in biological studies. To utilize their complementary advantages we adopt both fluorescence and brightfield imaging in our optical cell sorter. Brightfield imaging has...... the advantage of being non-invasive, thus maintaining cell viability. Fluorescence imaging, on the other hand, takes advantages of the chemical specificity of fluorescence markers and can validate machine vision results from brightfield images. Visually identified cells are sorted using optical manipulation...

  18. Two-color interpolation of the absorption response for quantitative acousto-optic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocoum, Maimouna; Gennisson, Jean Luc; Venet, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a reliable and widespread technique for monitoring qualitative changes in absorption inside highly scattering media. It has been shown, however, that acousto-optic (AO) imaging can provide significantly more qualitative information without the need for inversio...

  19. Love songs, bird brains and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groof, Geert; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2010-08-01

    The song control system of songbirds displays a remarkable seasonal neuroplasticity in species in which song output also changes seasonally. Thus far, this song control system has been extensively analyzed by histological and electrophysiological methods. However, these approaches do not provide a global view of the brain and/or do not allow repeated measurements, which are necessary to establish causal correlations between alterations in neural substrate and behavior. Research has primarily been focused on the song nuclei themselves, largely neglecting their interconnections and other brain regions involved in seasonally changing behavior. In this review, we introduce and explore the song control system of songbirds as a natural model for brain plasticity. At the same time, we point out the added value of the songbird brain model for in vivo diffusion tensor techniques and its derivatives. A compilation of the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data obtained thus far in this system demonstrates the usefulness of this in vivo method for studying brain plasticity. In particular, it is shown to be a perfect tool for long-term studies of morphological and cellular changes of specific brain circuits in different endocrine/photoperiod conditions. The method has been successfully applied to obtain quantitative measurements of seasonal changes of fiber tracts and nuclei from the song control system. In addition, outside the song control system, changes have been discerned in the optic chiasm and in an interhemispheric connection. DTI allows the detection of seasonal changes in a region analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex and in regions of the 'social behavior network', an interconnected group of structures that controls multiple social behaviors, including aggression and courtship. DTI allows the demonstration, for the first time, that the songbird brain in its entirety exhibits an extreme seasonal plasticity which is not merely limited to the song control

  20. Changes of Radial Diffusivity and Fractional Anisotopy in the Optic Nerve and Optic Radiation of Glaucoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engelhorn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study was to evaluate with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI changes of radial diffusivity (RD and fractional anisotropy (FA in the optic nerve (ON and optic radiation (OR in glaucoma and to determine whether changes in RD and FA correlate with disease severity. Therefore, glaucoma patients and controls were examined using 3T. Regions of interest were positioned on RD and FA maps, and mean values were calculated for ON and OR and correlated with optic nerve atrophy and reduced spatial-temporal contrast sensitivity (STCS of the retina. We found, that RD in glaucoma patients was significantly higher in the ON (0.74 ± 0.21 versus 0.58 ± 0.17⋅10−3 mm2 s−1; P0.77. In conclusion, DTI at 3 Tesla allows robust RD and FA measurements in the ON and OR. Hereby, the extent of RD increase and FA decrease in glaucoma correlate with established ophthalmological examinations.

  1. Optical imaging and magnetophoresis of nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jit Kang; Tan, David X.; Lanni, Frederick; Tilton, Robert D.; Majetich, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Peclet number analysis is performed to probe the convective motion of nanospheres and nanorods under the influence of magnetophoresis and diffusion. Under most circumstances, magnetophoretic behaviour dominates diffusion for nanorods, as the magnetic field lines tend to align the magnetic moment along the rod axis. The synthesis and dispersion of fluorophore-tagged nanorods are described. Fluorescence microscopy is employed to image the nanorod motion in a magnetic field gradient. The preliminary experimental data are consistent with the Peclet number analysis.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging for detection of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Xing-Yu; Chen, Hong-Wei; Cai, Song; Bao, Jian; Tang, Qun-Feng; Wu, Li-Yuan; Fang, Xiang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To measure the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and determine the most appropriate b value for DWI; to explore the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and the degree of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma differentiation. Methods: Preoperative diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance examinations were performed for 31 patients with extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Tumor ADC values were measured, and the signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, and signal-intensity ratio between the diffusion-weighted images with various b values as well as the T2-weighted images were calculated. Pathologically confirmed patients were pathologically graded to compare the ADC value with different b values of tumor at different degrees of differentiation, and the results were statistically analyzed by using the Friedman test. Results: A total of 29 cases of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma were detected by DWI. As the b value increased, tumor signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio between the tumor and normal liver gradually decreased, but the tumor signal-intensity ratio gradually increased. When b = 800 s/mm 2 , contrast-to-noise ratio between tumor and normal liver, tumor signal-intensity ratio, and tumor signal-to-noise ratio of diffusion-weighted images were all higher than those of T2-weighted images; the differences were statistically significant (P 2 was the best in DWI of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma; the lesion ADC value declined as the degree of cancerous tissue differentiation decreased.

  3. The added value of advanced neuro-imaging (MR diffusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Primary CNS lymphoma is difficult to diagnose with conventional imaging modalities. Magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy, dynamic susceptibility contrast DSC perfusion and diffusion weighted images have been recently investigated as a problem-solving tool for evaluation of primary CNS lymphoma with ...

  4. A simple polarized-based diffused reflectance colour imaging system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple polarized-based diffuse reflectance imaging system has been developed. The system is designed for both in vivo and in vitro imaging of agricultural specimen in the visible region. The system uses a commercial web camera and a halogen lamp that makes it relatively simple and less expensive for diagnostic ...

  5. A Riemannian scalar measure for diffusion tensor images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astola, L.J.; Fuster, A.; Florack, L.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    We study a well-known scalar quantity in Riemannian geometry, the Ricci scalar, in the context of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), which is an emerging non-invasive medical imaging modality. We derive a physical interpretation for the Ricci scalar and explore experimentally its significance in DTI.

  6. A novel image inpainting technique based on median diffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    numerical methods such as anisotropic diffusion and multiresolution schemes. Some steps ... Roth & Black (2005) have developed a framework for learning a generic and expressive image priors that ..... This paper presents a new approach for image inpainting by propagating median information .... J. Graphics Tools 9(1):.

  7. Validating atlas-guided DOT: a comparison of diffuse optical tomography informed by atlas and subject-specific anatomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robert J; Caffini, Matteo; Dubb, Jay; Fang, Qianqian; Custo, Anna; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Fischl, Bruce; Wells, William; Dan, Ippeita; Boas, David A

    2012-09-01

    We describe the validation of an anatomical brain atlas approach to the analysis of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Using MRI data from 32 subjects, we compare the diffuse optical images of simulated cortical activation reconstructed using a registered atlas with those obtained using a subject's true anatomy. The error in localization of the simulated cortical activations when using a registered atlas is due to a combination of imperfect registration, anatomical differences between atlas and subject anatomies and the localization error associated with diffuse optical image reconstruction. When using a subject-specific MRI, any localization error is due to diffuse optical image reconstruction only. In this study we determine that using a registered anatomical brain atlas results in an average localization error of approximately 18 mm in Euclidean space. The corresponding error when the subject's own MRI is employed is 9.1 mm. In general, the cost of using atlas-guided DOT in place of subject-specific MRI-guided DOT is a doubling of the localization error. Our results show that despite this increase in error, reasonable anatomical localization is achievable even in cases where the subject-specific anatomy is unavailable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photo-magnetic imaging: resolving optical contrast at MRI resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yuting; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L; Gulsen, Gultekin; Gao Hao

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely photo-magnetic imaging (PMI). PMI uses a laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of the optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite-element-based algorithm with an iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium are recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentrations are also recovered successfully. (paper)

  9. Advanced Imaging Optics Utilizing Wavefront Coding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrymgeour, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boye, Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Adelsberger, Kathleen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Image processing offers a potential to simplify an optical system by shifting some of the imaging burden from lenses to the more cost effective electronics. Wavefront coding using a cubic phase plate combined with image processing can extend the system's depth of focus, reducing many of the focus-related aberrations as well as material related chromatic aberrations. However, the optimal design process and physical limitations of wavefront coding systems with respect to first-order optical parameters and noise are not well documented. We examined image quality of simulated and experimental wavefront coded images before and after reconstruction in the presence of noise. Challenges in the implementation of cubic phase in an optical system are discussed. In particular, we found that limitations must be placed on system noise, aperture, field of view and bandwidth to develop a robust wavefront coded system.

  10. Optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and noninterferometric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-11-01

    Information security has attracted much current attention due to the rapid development of modern technologies, such as computer and internet. We propose a novel method for optical image encryption using multilevel Arnold transform and rotatable-phase-mask noninterferometric imaging. An optical image encryption scheme is developed in the gyrator transform domain, and one phase-only mask (i.e., phase grating) is rotated and updated during image encryption. For the decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is proposed to extract high-quality plaintexts. Conventional encoding methods (such as digital holography) have been proven vulnerably to the attacks, and the proposed optical encoding scheme can effectively eliminate security deficiency and significantly enhance cryptosystem security. The proposed strategy based on the rotatable phase-only mask can provide a new alternative for data/image encryption in the noninterferometric imaging.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio; Wetzel, Stephan; Santini, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Neurologia e Neuroradiologia, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Wetzel, Stephan [Swiss Neuro Institute (SNI), Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Hirslanden Klinik Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Santini, Francesco [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  13. CCD-camera-based diffuse optical tomography to study ischemic stroke in preclinical rat models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Jing; Niu, Haijing; Liu, Yueming; Su, Jianzhong; Liu, Hanli

    2011-02-01

    Stroke, due to ischemia or hemorrhage, is the neurological deficit of cerebrovasculature and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. More than 80 percent of stroke patients are ischemic stroke due to blockage of artery in the brain by thrombosis or arterial embolism. Hence, development of an imaging technique to image or monitor the cerebral ischemia and effect of anti-stoke therapy is more than necessary. Near infrared (NIR) optical tomographic technique has a great potential to be utilized as a non-invasive image tool (due to its low cost and portability) to image the embedded abnormal tissue, such as a dysfunctional area caused by ischemia. Moreover, NIR tomographic techniques have been successively demonstrated in the studies of cerebro-vascular hemodynamics and brain injury. As compared to a fiberbased diffuse optical tomographic system, a CCD-camera-based system is more suitable for pre-clinical animal studies due to its simpler setup and lower cost. In this study, we have utilized the CCD-camera-based technique to image the embedded inclusions based on tissue-phantom experimental data. Then, we are able to obtain good reconstructed images by two recently developed algorithms: (1) depth compensation algorithm (DCA) and (2) globally convergent method (GCM). In this study, we will demonstrate the volumetric tomographic reconstructed results taken from tissuephantom; the latter has a great potential to determine and monitor the effect of anti-stroke therapies.

  14. Fiber optic neutron imaging system: calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, R.M.; Gow, C.E.; Thayer, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Two neutron imaging experiments using fiber optics have been performed at the Nevada Test Site. In each experiment, an array of scintillator fluor tubes is exposed to neutrons. Light is coupled out through radiation resistant PCS fibers (8-m long) into high-bandwidth, graded index fibers. For image reconstruction to be accurate, common timing differences and transmission variations between fiber optic channels are needed. The calibration system featured a scanning pulsed dye laser, a specially designed fiber optic star coupler, a tektronix 7912AD transient digitizer, and a DEC PDP 11/34 computing system

  15. Diffusion weighted imaging in cystic fibrosis disease: beyond morphological imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands); Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Andrinopoulou, Eleni Rosalina [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Colagrande, Stefano [University of Florence - Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Radiodiagnostic Unit n. 2, Florence (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To explore the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess inflammatory lung changes in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) CF patients referred for their annual check-up had spirometry, chest-CT and MRI on the same day. MRI was performed in a 1.5 T scanner with BLADE and EPI-DWI sequences (b = 0-600 s/mm{sup 2}). End-inspiratory and end-expiratory scans were acquired in multi-row scanners. DWI was scored with an established semi-quantitative scoring system. DWI score was correlated to CT sub-scores for bronchiectasis (CF-CT{sub BE}), mucus (CF-CT{sub mucus}), total score (CF-CT{sub total-score}), FEV{sub 1}, and BMI. T-test was used to assess differences between patients with and without DWI-hotspots. Thirty-three CF patients were enrolled (mean 21 years, range 6-51, 19 female). 4 % (SD 2.6, range 1.5-12.9) of total CF-CT alterations presented DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots coincided with mucus plugging (60 %), consolidation (30 %) and bronchiectasis (10 %). DWI{sub total-score} correlated (all p < 0.0001) positively to CF-CT{sub BE} (r = 0.757), CF-CT{sub mucus} (r = 0.759) and CF-CT{sub total-score} (r = 0.79); and negatively to FEV{sub 1} (r = 0.688). FEV{sub 1} was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients without DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots strongly correlated with radiological and clinical parameters of lung disease severity. Future validation studies are needed to establish the exact nature of DWI-hotspots in CF patients. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion weighted imaging in cystic fibrosis disease: beyond morphological imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo; Andrinopoulou, Eleni Rosalina; Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni; Ros, Mirco; Colagrande, Stefano; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess inflammatory lung changes in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) CF patients referred for their annual check-up had spirometry, chest-CT and MRI on the same day. MRI was performed in a 1.5 T scanner with BLADE and EPI-DWI sequences (b = 0-600 s/mm 2 ). End-inspiratory and end-expiratory scans were acquired in multi-row scanners. DWI was scored with an established semi-quantitative scoring system. DWI score was correlated to CT sub-scores for bronchiectasis (CF-CT BE ), mucus (CF-CT mucus ), total score (CF-CT total-score ), FEV 1 , and BMI. T-test was used to assess differences between patients with and without DWI-hotspots. Thirty-three CF patients were enrolled (mean 21 years, range 6-51, 19 female). 4 % (SD 2.6, range 1.5-12.9) of total CF-CT alterations presented DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots coincided with mucus plugging (60 %), consolidation (30 %) and bronchiectasis (10 %). DWI total-score correlated (all p < 0.0001) positively to CF-CT BE (r = 0.757), CF-CT mucus (r = 0.759) and CF-CT total-score (r = 0.79); and negatively to FEV 1 (r = 0.688). FEV 1 was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients without DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots strongly correlated with radiological and clinical parameters of lung disease severity. Future validation studies are needed to establish the exact nature of DWI-hotspots in CF patients. (orig.)

  17. Predicting patterns of glioma recurrence using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Stephen J.; Pickard, John D.; Jena, Rajesh; Burnet, Neil G.; Carpenter, T.A.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2007-01-01

    Although multimodality therapy for high-grade gliomas is making some improvement in outcome, most patients will still die from their disease within a short time. We need tools that allow treatments to be tailored to an individual. In this study we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a technique sensitive to subtle disruption of white-matter tracts due to tumour infiltration, to see if it can be used to predict patterns of glioma recurrence. In this study we imaged 26 patients with gliomas using DTI. Patients were imaged after 2 years or on symptomatic tumour recurrence. The diffusion tensor was split into its isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components, and these were plotted on T 2 -weighted images to show the pattern of DTI abnormality. This was compared to the pattern of recurrence. Three DTI patterns could be identified: (a) a diffuse pattern of abnormality where p exceeded q in all directions and was associated with diffuse increase in tumour size; (b) a localised pattern of abnormality where the tumour recurred in one particular direction; and (c) a pattern of minimal abnormality seen in some patients with or without evidence of recurrence. Diffusion tensor imaging is able to predict patterns of tumour recurrence and may allow better individualisation of tumour management and stratification for randomised controlled trials. (orig.)

  18. Predicting patterns of glioma recurrence using diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Stephen J.; Pickard, John D. [University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Academic Neurosurgery Unit (United Kingdom); University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences (United Kingdom); Jena, Rajesh; Burnet, Neil G. [University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Oncology (United Kingdom); Carpenter, T.A. [University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences (United Kingdom); Gillard, Jonathan H. [University of Cambridge and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    Although multimodality therapy for high-grade gliomas is making some improvement in outcome, most patients will still die from their disease within a short time. We need tools that allow treatments to be tailored to an individual. In this study we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a technique sensitive to subtle disruption of white-matter tracts due to tumour infiltration, to see if it can be used to predict patterns of glioma recurrence. In this study we imaged 26 patients with gliomas using DTI. Patients were imaged after 2 years or on symptomatic tumour recurrence. The diffusion tensor was split into its isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components, and these were plotted on T{sub 2}-weighted images to show the pattern of DTI abnormality. This was compared to the pattern of recurrence. Three DTI patterns could be identified: (a) a diffuse pattern of abnormality where p exceeded q in all directions and was associated with diffuse increase in tumour size; (b) a localised pattern of abnormality where the tumour recurred in one particular direction; and (c) a pattern of minimal abnormality seen in some patients with or without evidence of recurrence. Diffusion tensor imaging is able to predict patterns of tumour recurrence and may allow better individualisation of tumour management and stratification for randomised controlled trials. (orig.)

  19. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  20. Simultaneous characterization of rotational and translational diffusion of optically anisotropic particles by optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Cerbino, Roberto; Haro-Pérez, Catalina

    2016-01-01

    We probe the roto-translational Brownian motion of optically anisotropic particles suspended in water with a simple and straightforward optical microscopy experiment that does not require positional or rotational particle tracking. We acquire a movie of the suspension placed between two polarizing elements and we extract the translational diffusion coefficient D T and the rotational diffusion coefficient D R from the analysis of the temporal correlation properties of the spatial Fourier modes of the intensity fluctuations in the movie. Our method is successfully tested with a dilute suspension of birefringent spherical colloidal particles obtained by polymerizing an emulsion of droplets of liquid crystal in a nematic phase, whose roto-translational dynamics is found to be well described by theory. The simplicity of our approach makes our method a viable alternative to particle tracking and depolarized dynamic light scattering. (paper)

  1. Voxel-based clustered imaging by multiparameter diffusion tensor images for glioma grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inano, Rika; Oishi, Naoya; Kunieda, Takeharu; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Yamao, Yukihiro; Shibata, Sumiya; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Miyamoto, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common intra-axial primary brain tumour; therefore, predicting glioma grade would influence therapeutic strategies. Although several methods based on single or multiple parameters from diagnostic images exist, a definitive method for pre-operatively determining glioma grade remains unknown. We aimed to develop an unsupervised method using multiple parameters from pre-operative diffusion tensor images for obtaining a clustered image that could enable visual grading of gliomas. Fourteen patients with low-grade gliomas and 19 with high-grade gliomas underwent diffusion tensor imaging and three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging before tumour resection. Seven features including diffusion-weighted imaging, fractional anisotropy, first eigenvalue, second eigenvalue, third eigenvalue, mean diffusivity and raw T2 signal with no diffusion weighting, were extracted as multiple parameters from diffusion tensor imaging. We developed a two-level clustering approach for a self-organizing map followed by the K-means algorithm to enable unsupervised clustering of a large number of input vectors with the seven features for the whole brain. The vectors were grouped by the self-organizing map as protoclusters, which were classified into the smaller number of clusters by K-means to make a voxel-based diffusion tensor-based clustered image. Furthermore, we also determined if the diffusion tensor-based clustered image was really helpful for predicting pre-operative glioma grade in a supervised manner. The ratio of each class in the diffusion tensor-based clustered images was calculated from the regions of interest manually traced on the diffusion tensor imaging space, and the common logarithmic ratio scales were calculated. We then applied support vector machine as a classifier for distinguishing between low- and high-grade gliomas. Consequently, the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic

  2. Optical encryption with selective computational ghost imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafari, Mohammad; Kheradmand, Reza; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab

    2014-01-01

    Selective computational ghost imaging (SCGI) is a technique which enables the reconstruction of an N-pixel image from N measurements or less. In this paper we propose an optical encryption method based on SCGI and experimentally demonstrate that this method has much higher security under eavesdropping and unauthorized accesses compared with previous reported methods. (paper)

  3. Resolving Fast, Confined Diffusion in Bacteria with Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David J; Tuson, Hannah H; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-05-24

    By following single fluorescent molecules in a microscope, single-particle tracking (SPT) can measure diffusion and binding on the nanometer and millisecond scales. Still, although SPT can at its limits characterize the fastest biomolecules as they interact with subcellular environments, this measurement may require advanced illumination techniques such as stroboscopic illumination. Here, we address the challenge of measuring fast subcellular motion by instead analyzing single-molecule data with spatiotemporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) with a focus on measurements of confined motion. Our SPT and STICS analysis of simulations of the fast diffusion of confined molecules shows that image blur affects both STICS and SPT, and we find biased diffusion rate measurements for STICS analysis in the limits of fast diffusion and tight confinement due to fitting STICS correlation functions to a Gaussian approximation. However, we determine that with STICS, it is possible to correctly interpret the motion that blurs single-molecule images without advanced illumination techniques or fast cameras. In particular, we present a method to overcome the bias due to image blur by properly estimating the width of the correlation function by directly calculating the correlation function variance instead of using the typical Gaussian fitting procedure. Our simulation results are validated by applying the STICS method to experimental measurements of fast, confined motion: we measure the diffusion of cytosolic mMaple3 in living Escherichia coli cells at 25 frames/s under continuous illumination to illustrate the utility of STICS in an experimental parameter regime for which in-frame motion prevents SPT and tight confinement of fast diffusion precludes stroboscopic illumination. Overall, our application of STICS to freely diffusing cytosolic protein in small cells extends the utility of single-molecule experiments to the regime of fast confined diffusion without requiring advanced

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teksam, M.; Casey, S.O.; Michel, E.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) of two patients with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning demonstrated white matter and cortical hyperintensities. In one patient, the changes on the FLAIR sequence were more subtle than those on DWI. The DWI abnormality in this patient represented true restriction. In the second patient, repeated exposure to CO caused restricted diffusion. DWI may be helpful for earlier identification of the changes of acute CO poisoning. (orig.)

  5. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in MELAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Watanabe, C.; Katayama, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kajima, T.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S.

    2000-01-01

    Clinical features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) resemble those of cerebral infarcts, but the pathogenesis of infarct-like lesions is not fully understood. To characterise these infarct-like lesions, we studied two patients with MELAS using diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI before and after stroke-like episodes and measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the new infarct-like lesions. These gave high signal on DWI and had much higher ADC than normal-appearing regions. The ADC remained high even 30 days after a stroke-like episode then decreased in lesions, with or without abnormality as shown by conventional MRI. We speculate that early elevation of ADC in the acute or subacute phase reflects vasogenic rather than cytotoxic edema. The ADC of the lesions, which disappeared almost completely with clinical improvement, returned to normal levels, which may reflect tissue recovery without severe damage. To our knowledge, this is the first study of DWI in MELAS. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author)

  7. Use of diffusive optical fibers for plant lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozai, T.; Kitaya, Y.; Fujiwara, K. [Chiba Univ., Matsudo (Japan); Kino, S.; Kinowaki, M. [Topy Green Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Lighting is one of the most critical aspects in plant production and environmental research with plants. Much research has been repeated on the effect of light intensity, spectral distribution of light and lighting cycle, but comparatively little research done on the effect of lighting direction on the growth, development and morphology of plants. When plants are grown with lamps above, light is directed downward to the plants. Downward or overhead lighting is utilized in almost all cases. However, downward lighting does not always give the best result in terms of lighting efficiency, growth, development and morphology of plants. Kitaya et al. (1988) developed a lighting system in which two rooting beds were arranged; one above and the other under fluorescent lamps. Lettuce plants grew normally in the lower bed and suspended upside-down under the upper bed. The lettuce plants suspended upside-down were given the light in upward direction (upward lighting). No significant difference in growth, development and morphology was found between the lettuce plants grown by the downward and upward lighting. Combining upward and downward lighting, improved spacing efficiency and reduced electricity cost per plant compared with conventional, downward lighting. From the above example, when designing a lighting system for plants with lamps more lighting direction should be considered. In the present study, a sideward lighting system was developed using diffusive optical fiber belts. More higher quality tissue-cultured transplants could be produced in reduced space with sideward lighting system than with a downward lighting system. An application of the sideward lighting system using diffusive optical fiber belts is described and advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  8. Electrochemical Impedance Imaging via the Distribution of Diffusion Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2018-03-01

    We develop a mathematical framework to analyze electrochemical impedance spectra in terms of a distribution of diffusion times (DDT) for a parallel array of random finite-length Warburg (diffusion) or Gerischer (reaction-diffusion) circuit elements. A robust DDT inversion method is presented based on complex nonlinear least squares regression with Tikhonov regularization and illustrated for three cases of nanostructured electrodes for energy conversion: (i) a carbon nanotube supercapacitor, (ii) a silicon nanowire Li-ion battery, and (iii) a porous-carbon vanadium flow battery. The results demonstrate the feasibility of nondestructive "impedance imaging" to infer microstructural statistics of random, heterogeneous materials.

  9. Advanced Secure Optical Image Processing for Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Falou, Ayman

    2018-04-01

    New image processing tools and data-processing network systems have considerably increased the volume of transmitted information such as 2D and 3D images with high resolution. Thus, more complex networks and long processing times become necessary, and high image quality and transmission speeds are requested for an increasing number of applications. To satisfy these two requests, several either numerical or optical solutions were offered separately. This book explores both alternatives and describes research works that are converging towards optical/numerical hybrid solutions for high volume signal and image processing and transmission. Without being limited to hybrid approaches, the latter are particularly investigated in this book in the purpose of combining the advantages of both techniques. Additionally, pure numerical or optical solutions are also considered since they emphasize the advantages of one of the two approaches separately.

  10. Digital optical tomography system for dynamic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Khalil, Michael A.; Al Abdi, Rabah; Kim, Hyun K.; Fong, Christopher J.; Desperito, Elise; Hershman, Dawn L.; Barbour, Randall L.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse optical tomography has shown promising results as a tool for breast cancer screening and monitoring response to chemotherapy. Dynamic imaging of the transient response of the breast to an external stimulus, such as pressure or a respiratory maneuver, can provide additional information that can be used to detect tumors. We present a new digital continuous-wave optical tomography system designed to simultaneously image both breasts at fast frame rates and with a large number of sources and detectors. The system uses a master-slave digital signal processor-based detection architecture to achieve a dynamic range of 160 dB and a frame rate of 1.7 Hz with 32 sources, 64 detectors, and 4 wavelengths per breast. Included is a preliminary study of one healthy patient and two breast cancer patients showing the ability to identify an invasive carcinoma based on the hemodynamic response to a breath hold.

  11. Positron emission tomography and optical tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falen, Steven W [Carmichael, CA; Hoefer, Richard A [Newport News, VA; Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; McKisson, John [Hampton, VA; Kross, Brian [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Stolin, Alexander [Newport News, VA; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2012-05-22

    A mobile compact imaging system that combines both PET imaging and optical imaging into a single system which can be located in the operating room (OR) and provides faster feedback to determine if a tumor has been fully resected and if there are adequate surgical margins. While final confirmation is obtained from the pathology lab, such a device can reduce the total time necessary for the procedure and the number of iterations required to achieve satisfactory resection of a tumor with good margins.

  12. Geometrical optics in correlated imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Dezhong; Xiong Jun; Wang Kaige

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the geometrical optics of correlated imaging for two kinds of spatial correlations corresponding, respectively, to a classical thermal light source and a quantum two-photon entangled source. Due to the different features in the second-order spatial correlation, the two sources obey different imaging equations. The quantum entangled source behaves as a mirror, whereas the classical thermal source looks like a phase-conjugate mirror in the correlated imaging

  13. The Stellar Populations of Two Ultra-diffuse Galaxies from Optical and Near-infrared Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Viraj; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Laine, Seppo; Brodie, Jean P.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Glaccum, William; Villaume, Alexa; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Gwyn, Stephen; Krick, Jessica; Lasker, Ronald; Martín-Navarro, Ignacio; Martinez-Delgado, David; van Dokkum, Pieter

    2018-05-01

    We present observational constraints on the stellar populations of two ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) using optical through near-infrared (NIR) spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. Our analysis is enabled by new Spitzer-IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm imaging, archival optical imaging, and the prospector fully Bayesian SED fitting framework. Our sample contains one field UDG (DGSAT I), one Virgo cluster UDG (VCC 1287), and one Virgo cluster dwarf elliptical for comparison (VCC 1122). We find that the optical–NIR colors of the three galaxies are significantly different from each other. We infer that VCC 1287 has an old (≳7.7 Gyr) and surprisingly metal-poor ([Z/Z ⊙] ≲ ‑1.0) stellar population, even after marginalizing over uncertainties on diffuse interstellar dust. In contrast, the field UDG DGSAT I shows evidence of being younger than the Virgo UDG, with an extended star formation history and an age posterior extending down to ∼3 Gyr. The stellar metallicity of DGSAT I is sub-solar but higher than that of the Virgo UDG, with [Z/{Z}ȯ ]=-{0.63}-0.62+0.35; in the case of exactly zero diffuse interstellar dust, DGSAT I may even have solar metallicity. With VCC 1287 and several Coma UDGs, a general picture is emerging where cluster UDGs may be “failed” galaxies, but the field UDG DGSAT I seems more consistent with a stellar feedback-induced expansion scenario. In the future, our approach can be applied to a large and diverse sample of UDGs down to faint surface brightness limits, with the goal of constraining their stellar ages, stellar metallicities, and circumstellar and diffuse interstellar dust content.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of the human calf: Variation of inter- and intramuscle-specific diffusion parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaffke, Lara; Rehmann, Robert; Froeling, Martijn; Kley, Rudolf; Tegenthoff, Martin; Vorgerd, Matthias; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias

    2017-10-01

    To investigate to what extent inter- and intramuscular variations of diffusion parameters of human calf muscles can be explained by age, gender, muscle location, and body mass index (BMI) in a specific age group (20-35 years). Whole calf muscles of 18 healthy volunteers were evaluated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed using a 3T scanner and a 16-channel Torso XL coil. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired to perform fiber tractography and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis for each muscle of both legs. Fiber tractography was used to separate seven lower leg muscles. Associations between DTI parameters and confounds were evaluated. All muscles were additionally separated in seven identical segments along the z-axis to evaluate intramuscular differences in diffusion parameters. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were obtained for each muscle with low standard deviations (SDs) (SD FA : 0.01-0.02; SD MD : 0.07-0.14(10 -3 )). We found significant differences in FA values of the tibialis anterior muscle (AT) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles between men and women for whole muscle FA (two-sample t-tests; AT: P = 0.0014; EDL: P = 0.0004). We showed significant intramuscular differences in diffusion parameters between adjacent segments in most calf muscles (P < 0.001). Whereas muscle insertions showed higher (SD 0.03-0.06) than muscle bellies (SD 0.01-0.03), no relationships between FA or MD with age or BMI were found. Inter- and intramuscular variations in diffusion parameters of the calf were shown, which are not related to age or BMI in this age group. Differences between muscle belly and insertion should be considered when interpreting datasets not including whole muscles. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1137-1148. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. High sensitivity optical molecular imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yu; Yuan, Gao; Huang, Chao; Jiang, Shixin; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Kun; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Optical Molecular Imaging (OMI) has the advantages of high sensitivity, low cost and ease of use. By labeling the regions of interest with fluorescent or bioluminescence probes, OMI can noninvasively obtain the distribution of the probes in vivo, which play the key role in cancer research, pharmacokinetics and other biological studies. In preclinical and clinical application, the image depth, resolution and sensitivity are the key factors for researchers to use OMI. In this paper, we report a high sensitivity optical molecular imaging system developed by our group, which can improve the imaging depth in phantom to nearly 5cm, high resolution at 2cm depth, and high image sensitivity. To validate the performance of the system, special designed phantom experiments and weak light detection experiment were implemented. The results shows that cooperated with high performance electron-multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera, precision design of light path system and high efficient image techniques, our OMI system can simultaneously collect the light-emitted signals generated by fluorescence molecular imaging, bioluminescence imaging, Cherenkov luminance and other optical imaging modality, and observe the internal distribution of light-emitting agents fast and accurately.

  16. Conspicuity of diffuse axonal injury lesions on diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Moritani, Toshio; Hiwatashi, Akio; Wang, Henry Z.; Shrier, David A.; Numaguchi, Yuji; Westesson, Per-Lennart A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: (1) To detect diffuse axonal injury (DAI) lesions by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), as compared with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging and (2) to evaluate hemorrhagic DAI lesions by b 0 images obtained from DWI, as compared with gradient-echo (GRE) imaging. Methods: We reviewed MR images of 36 patients with a diagnosis of DAI. MR imaging was performed 20 h to 14 days (mean, 3.7 days) after traumatic brain injury. We evaluated: (1) conspicuity of lesions on DWI and FLAIR and (2) conspicuity of hemorrhage in DAI lesions on b 0 images and GRE imaging. Results: DWI clearly depicted high-signal DAI lesions. The sensitivity of DWI to lesional conspicuity in DAI lesions was almost equal to that of FLAIR. The sensitivity of b 0 images to identification of hemorrhagic DAI lesions was inferior to that of GRE. Conclusion: DWI is as useful as FLAIR in detecting DAI lesions. GRE imaging is still the superior tool for the evaluation of hemorrhagic DAI

  17. Conspicuity of diffuse axonal injury lesions on diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Toshibumi [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)]. E-mail: kino@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp; Moritani, Toshio [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Hiwatashi, Akio [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Wang, Henry Z. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Shrier, David A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Numaguchi, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Westesson, Per-Lennart A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 648, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Objective: (1) To detect diffuse axonal injury (DAI) lesions by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), as compared with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging and (2) to evaluate hemorrhagic DAI lesions by b{sub 0} images obtained from DWI, as compared with gradient-echo (GRE) imaging. Methods: We reviewed MR images of 36 patients with a diagnosis of DAI. MR imaging was performed 20 h to 14 days (mean, 3.7 days) after traumatic brain injury. We evaluated: (1) conspicuity of lesions on DWI and FLAIR and (2) conspicuity of hemorrhage in DAI lesions on b{sub 0} images and GRE imaging. Results: DWI clearly depicted high-signal DAI lesions. The sensitivity of DWI to lesional conspicuity in DAI lesions was almost equal to that of FLAIR. The sensitivity of b{sub 0} images to identification of hemorrhagic DAI lesions was inferior to that of GRE. Conclusion: DWI is as useful as FLAIR in detecting DAI lesions. GRE imaging is still the superior tool for the evaluation of hemorrhagic DAI.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging of the nigrostriatal fibers in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wu, I-Wei; Buckley, Shannon; Coffey, Christopher S; Foster, Eric; Mendick, Susan; Seibyl, John; Schuff, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is histopathologically characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The depletion of these neurons is thought to reduce the dopaminergic function of the nigrostriatal pathway, as well as the neural fibers that link the substantia nigra to the striatum (putamen and caudate), causing a dysregulation in striatal activity that ultimately leads to lack of movement control. Based on diffusion tensor imaging, visualizing this pathway and measuring alterations of the fiber integrity remain challenging. The objectives were to 1) develop a diffusion tensor tractography protocol for reliably tracking the nigrostriatal fibers on multicenter data; 2) test whether the integrities measured by diffusion tensor imaging of the nigrostriatal fibers are abnormal in PD; and 3) test whether abnormal integrities of the nigrostriatal fibers in PD patients are associated with the severity of motor disability and putaminal dopamine binding ratios. Diffusion tensor tractography was performed on 50 drug-naïve PD patients and 27 healthy control subjects from the international multicenter Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative. Tractography consistently detected the nigrostriatal fibers, yielding reliable diffusion measures. Fractional anisotropy, along with radial and axial diffusivity of the nigrostriatal tract, showed systematic abnormalities in patients. In addition, variations in fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity of the nigrostriatal tract were associated with the degree of motor deficits in PD patients. Taken together, the findings imply that the diffusion tensor imaging characteristic of the nigrostriatal tract is potentially an index for detecting and staging of early PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  19. Highly-sensitive and large-dynamic diffuse optical tomography system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenwen; Zhang, Limin; Yin, Guoyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a new functional imaging has important clinical applications in many aspects such as benign and malignant breast tumor detection, tumor staging and so on. For quantitative detection of breast tumor, a three-wavelength continuous-wave DOT prototype system combined the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique was developed to provide high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, large dynamic detection range and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, a CT-analogous scanning mode was proposed to cost-effectively increase the detection data. To evaluate the feasibility of the system, a series of assessments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the system can obtain high linearity, stability and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. The preliminary phantom experiments show the absorption coefficient is able to be successfully reconstructed, indicating that the system is one of the ideal platforms for optical breast tumor detection.

  20. The direct tensor solution and higher-order acquisition schemes for generalized diffusion tensor imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Erik M.

    2010-01-01

    Both in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and in generalized diffusion tensor imaging (GDTI) the relation between the diffusion tensor and the measured apparent diffusion coefficients is given by a tensorial equation, which needs to be inverted in order to solve the diffusion tensor. The traditional

  1. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadhira, Vebi, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, Deddy, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Juliastuti, E., E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Sutiswan, Adeline, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id [Instrumentation and Control Research Group, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10 40132 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  2. Acoustic-noise-optimized diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Martin; Blaimer, Martin; Grodzki, David M; Breuer, Felix A; Roesch, Julie; Dörfler, Arnd; Heismann, Björn; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    This work was aimed at reducing acoustic noise in diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) that might reach acoustic noise levels of over 100 dB(A) in clinical practice. A diffusion-weighted readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence was optimized for acoustic noise by utilizing small readout segment widths to obtain low gradient slew rates and amplitudes instead of faster k-space coverage. In addition, all other gradients were optimized for low slew rates. Volunteer and patient imaging experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Acoustic noise measurements were performed and analyzed for four different DWI measurement protocols at 1.5T and 3T. An acoustic noise reduction of up to 20 dB(A) was achieved, which corresponds to a fourfold reduction in acoustic perception. The image quality was preserved at the level of a standard single-shot (ss)-EPI sequence, with a 27-54% increase in scan time. The diffusion-weighted imaging technique proposed in this study allowed a substantial reduction in the level of acoustic noise compared to standard single-shot diffusion-weighted EPI. This is expected to afford considerably more patient comfort, but a larger study would be necessary to fully characterize the subjective changes in patient experience.

  3. Application of diffusion tensor imaging in neurosurgery; Anwendung der Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung in der Neurochirurgie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saur, R. [Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany); Augenklinik des Universitaetsklinikums Tuebingen (Germany); Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie des Universitaetsklinikums Tuebingen (Germany); Gharabaghi, A. [Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie des Universitaetsklinikums Tuebingen (Germany); Erb, M. [Sektion fuer Experimentelle Kernspinresonanz des ZNS, Abt. Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Knowledge about integrity and location of fibre tracts arising from eloquent cortical areas is important to plan neurosurgical interventions and to allow maximization of resection of pathological tissue while preserving vital white matter tracts. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is so far the only method to get preoperatively an impression of the individual complexity of nerve bundles. Thereby nerve fibres are not mapped directly. They are derived indirectly by analysis of the directional distribution of diffusion of water molecules which is influenced mainly by large fibre tracts. From acquisition to reconstruction and visualisation of the fibre tracts many representational stages and working steps have to be passed. Exact knowledge about problems of Diffusion Imaging is important for interpretation of the results. Particularly, brain tumor edema, intraoperative brain shift, MR-artefacts and limitations of the mathematical models and algorithms challenge DTI-developers and applicants. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion Tensor Imaging for the Differentiation of Microangiopathy, Infarction and Perfusion-Diffusion Mismatch Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dong Ho; Choi, Sun Seob; Kang, Myong Jin; Lee, Jin Hwa; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyung Jin

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and the DTI indices for differentiating between microangiopathy lesions, acute infarction lesions and perfusion-diffusion mismatch areas. DTI was performed in 35 patients with the use of a 1.5 Tesla MRI system. The MRI parameters were as follows: a spin echo EPI sequence with a bvalue = 1000 s/mm 2 , 25 diffusion directions, a repetition time of 8400 msec, an echo time of 75 msec, a matrix size of 128 x 128, a FOV of 22 cm and a 4 mm slice thickness. From the diffusion tensor images, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), volume ratio (VR), relative anisotropy (RA), anisotropy index (AI), exponential ADC (eADC) and magnitude diffusion coefficient (MDC) were measured for the contra-lateral normal area (28 cases), the microangiopathy lesions (10 cases), the infarction lesions (17 cases) and the perfusion-diffusion mismatch area (8 cases). As compared to the normal area, the microangiopathy lesions showed increased ADC and MDC values and decreased FA, VR, RA, AI and eADC values. The infarction lesions showed increased VR, RA and eADC values, a normal FA, a decreased AI and decreased ADC and MDC values. The mismatch area showed a similar pattern as that for the microangiopathy lesions; however, the differences were not prominent, with an increase of the ADC and MDC values and a decrease of FA, VR, RA, AI and eADC values. The DTI indices could have a role in making the differential diagnosis of microangiopathy, acute infarction and perfusion-diffusion mismatch lesions

  5. Current contribution of diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of diffuse axonal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphine Centola Grassi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury (TBI is the number one cause of death and morbidity among young adults. Moreover, survivors are frequently left with functional disabilities during the most productive years of their lives. One main aspect of TBI pathology is diffuse axonal injury, which is increasingly recognized due to its presence in 40% to 50% of all cases that require hospital admission. Diffuse axonal injury is defined as widespread axonal damage and is characterized by complete axotomy and secondary reactions due to overall axonopathy. These changes can be seen in neuroimaging studies as hemorrhagic focal areas and diffuse edema. However, the diffuse axonal injury findings are frequently under-recognized in conventional neuroimaging studies. In such scenarios, diffuse tensor imaging (DTI plays an important role because it provides further information on white matter integrity that is not obtained with standard magnetic resonance imaging sequences. Extensive reviews concerning the physics of DTI and its use in the context of TBI patients have been published, but these issues are still hazy for many allied-health professionals. Herein, we aim to review the current contribution of diverse state-of-the-art DTI analytical methods to the understanding of diffuse axonal injury pathophysiology and prognosis, to serve as a quick reference for those interested in planning new studies and who are involved in the care of TBI victims. For this purpose, a comprehensive search in Pubmed was performed using the following keywords: “traumatic brain injury”, “diffuse axonal injury”, and “diffusion tensor imaging”.

  6. Design of optically stable image reflector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Yu

    2013-08-01

    The design of a partially optically stable (POS) reflector system, in which the exit ray direction and image pose are unchanged as the reflector system rotates about a specific directional vector, was presented in an earlier study by the current group [Appl. Phys. B100, 883-890 (2010)]. The present study further proposes an optically stable image (OSI) reflector system, in which not only is the optical stability property of the POS system retained, but the image position and total ray path length are also fixed. An analytical method is proposed for the design of OSI reflector systems comprising multiple reflectors. The validity of the proposed approach is demonstrated by means of two illustrative examples.

  7. Time evolution of negative binomial optical field in a diffusion channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tang-Kun; Wu Pan-Pan; Shan Chuan-Jia; Liu Ji-Bing; Fan Hong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    We find the time evolution law of a negative binomial optical field in a diffusion channel. We reveal that by adjusting the diffusion parameter, the photon number can be controlled. Therefore, the diffusion process can be considered a quantum controlling scheme through photon addition. (paper)

  8. Oriented diffusion filtering for enhancing low-quality fingerprint images

    KAUST Repository

    Gottschlich, C.; Schönlieb, C.-B.

    2012-01-01

    To enhance low-quality fingerprint images, we present a novel method that first estimates the local orientation of the fingerprint ridge and valley flow and next performs oriented diffusion filtering, followed by a locally adaptive contrast enhancement step. By applying the authors' new approach to low-quality images of the FVC2004 fingerprint databases, the authors are able to show its competitiveness with other state-of-the-art enhancement methods for fingerprints like curved Gabor filtering. A major advantage of oriented diffusion filtering over those is its computational efficiency. Combining oriented diffusion filtering with curved Gabor filters led to additional improvements and, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the lowest equal error rates achieved so far using MINDTCT and BOZORTH3 on the FVC2004 databases. The recognition performance and the computational efficiency of the method suggest to include oriented diffusion filtering as a standard image enhancement add-on module for real-time fingerprint recognition systems. In order to facilitate the reproduction of these results, an implementation of the oriented diffusion filtering for Matlab and GNU Octave is made available for download. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  9. Oriented diffusion filtering for enhancing low-quality fingerprint images

    KAUST Repository

    Gottschlich, C.

    2012-01-01

    To enhance low-quality fingerprint images, we present a novel method that first estimates the local orientation of the fingerprint ridge and valley flow and next performs oriented diffusion filtering, followed by a locally adaptive contrast enhancement step. By applying the authors\\' new approach to low-quality images of the FVC2004 fingerprint databases, the authors are able to show its competitiveness with other state-of-the-art enhancement methods for fingerprints like curved Gabor filtering. A major advantage of oriented diffusion filtering over those is its computational efficiency. Combining oriented diffusion filtering with curved Gabor filters led to additional improvements and, to the best of the authors\\' knowledge, the lowest equal error rates achieved so far using MINDTCT and BOZORTH3 on the FVC2004 databases. The recognition performance and the computational efficiency of the method suggest to include oriented diffusion filtering as a standard image enhancement add-on module for real-time fingerprint recognition systems. In order to facilitate the reproduction of these results, an implementation of the oriented diffusion filtering for Matlab and GNU Octave is made available for download. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  10. System for diffusing light from an optical fiber or light guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Duncan J [Pleasant Hill, CA; Wilson, Thomas S [San Leandro, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Small, IV, Ward [

    2008-06-10

    A system for diffusing light from an optical fiber wherein the optical fiber is coupled to a light source, comprising forming a polymer element adapted to be connected to the optical fiber and incorporating a scattering element with the polymer element wherein the scattering element diffuses the light from the polymer element. The apparatus of the present invention comprises a polymer element operatively connected to the optical fiber and a scattering element operatively connected with the shape polymer element that diffuses the light from the polymer element.

  11. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  12. Interstitial near-infrared photoimmunotherapy: effective treatment areas and light doses needed for use with fiber optic diffusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Shuhei; Nagaya, Tadanobu; Sato, Kazuhide; Ogata, Fusa; Maruoka, Yasuhiro; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2018-02-16

    Near-infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT), a promising cancer therapy utilizing an antibody-photoabsorber conjugate (APC) and NIR light, which induces rapid necrotic cell death only in APC-bound cells. Effective NIR-PIT in mouse models has been achieved using superficial light illumination (SLI) with light emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, but in the clinical setting, fiber optic diffusers have been employed to deliver light to deeper tumors. However, the performance of NIR light in tissue delivered by fiber optic diffusers is poorly understood. Here, we investigated NIR-PIT using a cylindrical fiber optic diffuser in a mouse model of A431 tumors. NIR-PIT with 100 J/cm, the same light dose used in clinical trials of NIR-PIT, was applied after insertion of the diffuser within the tumor bed, and then both bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging were analyzed to assess the therapeutic efficacy. The diffuser can deliver adequate NIR light dose for effective NIR-PIT to the A431 tumor at a distance of approximately 1 cm around the light source at 100 J/cm. At 50 J/cm NIR light effective NIR-PIT was reduced to a distance of 5 - 7 mm diameter around the light source. These results indicate that the energy of interstitial light (measured in Joules/cm) administered via a fiber diffuser determines the depth of effective NIR-PIT around the diffuser and determines the spacing at which such diffusers should be placed to entirely cover the tumor. Thermal measurements demonstrate that interstitial light for NIR-PIT does not cause damage to the skin overlying the diffuser.

  13. Planetary optical and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrile, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to obtain and analyze high spatial resolution charge coupled device (CCD) coronagraphic images of extra-solar planetary material and solar system objects. These data will provide information on the distribution of planetary and proto-planetary material around nearby stars leading to a better understanding of the origin and evolution of the solar system. Imaging within our solar system will provide information on the current cloud configurations on the outer planets, search for new objects around the outer planets, and provide direct support for Voyager, Galileo, and CRAF by imaging material around asteroids and clouds on Neptune. Over the last year this program acquired multispectral and polarization images of the disk of material around the nearby star Beta Pictoris. This material is believed to be associated with the formation of planets and provides a first look at a planetary system much younger than our own. Preliminary color and polarization data suggest that the material is very low albedo and similar to dark outer solar system carbon rich material. A coronagraphic search for other systems is underway and has already examined over 100 nearby stars. Coronagraphic imaging provided the first clear look at the rings of Uranus and albedo limits for the ring arcs around Neptune

  14. MRI-Guided Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy of Malignant and Benign Breast Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Ntziachristos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the clinical implementation of a novel hybrid system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and near-infrared (NIR optical measurements for the noninvasive study of breast cancer in vivo. Fourteen patients were studied with a MR-NIR prototype imager and spectrometer. A diffuse optical tomographic scheme employed the MR images as a priori information to implement an image-guided NIR localized spectroscopic scheme. All patients who entered the study also underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRI and biopsy so that the optical findings were crossvalidated with MR readings and histopathology. The technique quantified the oxy-and deoxyhemoglobin of five malignant and nine benign breast lesions in vivo. Breast cancers were found with decreased oxygen saturation and higher blood concentration than most benign lesions. The average hemoglobin concentration ([H] of cancers was 0.130±0.100 mM, and the average hemoglobin saturation (Y was 60±9% compared to [H]=0.018±0.005 mM and Y=69±6% of background tissue. Fibroadenomas exhibited high hemoglobin concentration [H]=0.060±0.010 mM and mild decrease in oxygen saturation Y=67±2%. Cysts and other normal lesions were easily differentiated based on intrinsic contrast information. This novel optical technology can be a significant add-on in MR examinations and can be used to characterize functional parameters of cancers with diagnostic and treatment prognosis potential. It is foreseen that the technique can play a major role in functional activation studies of brain and muscle as well.

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain in relapsing neuromyelitis optica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Chunshui; Li Kuncheng; Qin Wen; Lin Fuchun; Jiang Tianzi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the presence of occult brain tissue damage in patients with relapsing neuromyelitis optica (RNMO) and its possible mechanism by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods: DTI scans were performed in 16 patients with RNMO and 16 sex- and age-matched healthy controls. Histogram analysis of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) was performed in brain tissue (BT), white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) to detect the presence of occult brain tissue damage in RNMO patients. Region of interest (ROI) analysis of MD and FA was also performed in 6 dedicated regions with or without direct connection with spinal cord or optic nerve to determine the relationship between occult brain tissue damage and the damage of spinal cord and optic nerve. Results Patients with RNMO had a significantly higher average MD of the BT [RNMO (0.95 ± 0.02) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.91 ± 0.03) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=3.940, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls(0.80 ± 0.02) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=3.117, P=0.004] an.d GM [RNMO (1.06 ± 0.04) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.88 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=4.031, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.81 ± 0.02) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=4.373, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls (1.11 ± 0.10) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=4.260, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.87 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t4.391, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.72 ± O.01) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=4.683, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.82+0.03) x 10-3 mm2/s, t = 4. 619, P -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.73±0.03) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t =2.804, P=0.009 and splenium of corpus callosum: RNMO(0.77 ± 0.05) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, controls (0.73 ± 0.04) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, t=2.234, P=0.033] and FA [genu of corpus callosum: RNMO 0.82± 0.03 ,controls 0.82 ± 0.03, t=0.196, P=0.846 and splenium of corpus caltosum: RNMO 0.83±0.03, controls 0.83 ± 0.02, t=0.333, P=0.741] between RNMO patients and controls. Conclusion: RNMO patients have occult brain tissue damage, which might be related to the antegrade and retrograde degeneration secondary to lesions in

  16. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim of the work: To demonstrate the role of Diffusion Weighted Imaging and ADC maps in assessing normal progression of the infantile brain myelination. Patients and methods: The present work included 30 infants with normal MRI study of the brain, normal psychomotor development and normal neurological examination.

  17. Image quality transfer and applications in diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C.; Zikic, Darko; Ghosh, Aurobrata

    2017-01-01

    and the uniquely rich diffusion MRI data set from the human connectome project (HCP). Results highlight potential benefits of IQT in both brain connectivity mapping and microstructure imaging. In brain connectivity mapping, IQT reveals, from standard data sets, thin connection pathways that tractography normally...

  18. [An Improved Spectral Quaternion Interpolation Method of Diffusion Tensor Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong; Gao, Shangce; Hao, Xiaofei

    2016-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging(DTI)is a rapid development technology in recent years of magnetic resonance imaging.The diffusion tensor interpolation is a very important procedure in DTI image processing.The traditional spectral quaternion interpolation method revises the direction of the interpolation tensor and can preserve tensors anisotropy,but the method does not revise the size of tensors.The present study puts forward an improved spectral quaternion interpolation method on the basis of traditional spectral quaternion interpolation.Firstly,we decomposed diffusion tensors with the direction of tensors being represented by quaternion.Then we revised the size and direction of the tensor respectively according to different situations.Finally,we acquired the tensor of interpolation point by calculating the weighted average.We compared the improved method with the spectral quaternion method and the Log-Euclidean method by the simulation data and the real data.The results showed that the improved method could not only keep the monotonicity of the fractional anisotropy(FA)and the determinant of tensors,but also preserve the tensor anisotropy at the same time.In conclusion,the improved method provides a kind of important interpolation method for diffusion tensor image processing.

  19. Three-dimensional in vivo fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlu, Alper; Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut; Rosen, Mark A.; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-05-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) in vivo images of human breast cancer based on fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT). To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported 3D fluorescence tomography of human breast cancer in vivo. In our protocol, the fluorophore Indocyanine Green (ICG) is injected intravenously. Fluorescence excitation and detection are accomplished in the soft-compression, parallel-plane, transmission geometry using laser sources at 786 nm and spectrally filtered CCD detection. Phantom and in vivo studies confirm the signals are due to ICG fluorescence, rather than tissue autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. Fluorescence images of breast tumors were in good agreement with those of MRI, and with DOT based on endogenous contrast. Tumorto- normal tissue contrast based on ICG fluorescence was two-to-four-fold higher than contrast based on hemoglobin and scattering parameters. In total the measurements demonstrate that FDOT of breast cancer is feasible and promising.

  20. Biological elements carry out optical tasks in coherent imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, P.; Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Marchesano, V.

    2016-03-01

    We show how biological elements, like live bacteria species and Red Blood Cells (RBCs) can accomplish optical functionalities in DH systems. Turbid media allow coherent microscopy despite the strong light scattering these provoke, acting on light just as moving diffusers. Furthermore, a turbid medium can have positive effects on a coherent imaging system, providing resolution enhancement and mimicking the action of noise decorrelation devices, thus yielding an image quality significantly higher than the quality achievable through a transparent medium in similar recording conditions. Besides, suspended RBCs are demonstrated to behave as controllable liquid micro-lenses, opening new possibilities in biophotonics for endoscopy imaging purposes, as well as telemedicine for point-of-care diagnostics in developing countries and low-resource settings.

  1. PANDA: a pipeline toolbox for analyzing brain diffusion images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zaixu; Zhong, Suyu; Xu, Pengfei; He, Yong; Gong, Gaolang

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is widely used in both scientific research and clinical practice in in-vivo studies of the human brain. While a number of post-processing packages have been developed, fully automated processing of dMRI datasets remains challenging. Here, we developed a MATLAB toolbox named "Pipeline for Analyzing braiN Diffusion imAges" (PANDA) for fully automated processing of brain diffusion images. The processing modules of a few established packages, including FMRIB Software Library (FSL), Pipeline System for Octave and Matlab (PSOM), Diffusion Toolkit and MRIcron, were employed in PANDA. Using any number of raw dMRI datasets from different subjects, in either DICOM or NIfTI format, PANDA can automatically perform a series of steps to process DICOM/NIfTI to diffusion metrics [e.g., fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD)] that are ready for statistical analysis at the voxel-level, the atlas-level and the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS)-level and can finish the construction of anatomical brain networks for all subjects. In particular, PANDA can process different subjects in parallel, using multiple cores either in a single computer or in a distributed computing environment, thus greatly reducing the time cost when dealing with a large number of datasets. In addition, PANDA has a friendly graphical user interface (GUI), allowing the user to be interactive and to adjust the input/output settings, as well as the processing parameters. As an open-source package, PANDA is freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/panda/. This novel toolbox is expected to substantially simplify the image processing of dMRI datasets and facilitate human structural connectome studies.

  2. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of the pancreas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Nissan

    Full Text Available To develop a diffusion-tensor-imaging (DTI protocol that is sensitive to the complex diffusion and perfusion properties of the healthy and malignant pancreas tissues.Twenty-eight healthy volunteers and nine patients with pancreatic-ductal-adenocacinoma (PDAC, were scanned at 3T with T2-weighted and DTI sequences. Healthy volunteers were also scanned with multi-b diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI, whereas a standard clinical protocol complemented the PDAC patients' scans. Image processing at pixel resolution yielded parametric maps of three directional diffusion coefficients λ1, λ2, λ3, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and fractional anisotropy (FA, as well as a λ1-vector map, and a main diffusion-direction map.DTI measurements of healthy pancreatic tissue at b-values 0,500 s/mm² yielded: λ1 = (2.65±0.35×10⁻³, λ2 = (1.87±0.22×10⁻³, λ3 = (1.20±0.18×10⁻³, ADC = (1.91±0.22×10⁻³ (all in mm²/s units and FA = 0.38±0.06. Using b-values of 100,500 s/mm² led to a significant reduction in λ1, λ2, λ3 and ADC (p<.0001 and a significant increase (p<0.0001 in FA. The reduction in the diffusion coefficients suggested a contribution of a fast intra-voxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM component at b≤100 s/mm², which was confirmed by the multi-b DWI results. In PDACs, λ1, λ2, λ3 and ADC in both 0,500 s/mm² and 100,500 s/mm² b-values sets, as well as the reduction in these diffusion coefficients between the two sets, were significantly lower in comparison to the distal normal pancreatic tissue, suggesting higher cellularity and diminution of the fast-IVIM component in the cancer tissue.DTI using two reference b-values 0 and 100 s/mm² enabled characterization of the water diffusion and anisotropy of the healthy pancreas, taking into account a contribution of IVIM. The reduction in the diffusion coefficients of PDAC, as compared to normal pancreatic tissue, and the smaller change in these coefficients in PDAC

  3. Diffusion-weighted imaging of skeletal muscle lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surov, Alexey; Behrmann, Curd

    2014-01-01

    Muscle lymphoma (ML) is a relatively uncommon condition. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ML can manifest with a broad spectrum of radiological features. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the features of DW images of muscle lymphoma (ML). In our database, ten patients (six women and four men) with ML were identified who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging including acquisition of DW images. DW images were obtained using a multi-shot SE-EPI pulse sequence. Apparent diffusion constant (ADC) maps were also calculated. Furthermore, fusion images were generated manually from DW and HASTE or T2W images. On T2W images, all recognized lesions were hyperintense in comparison to unaffected musculature and on T1W images they were homogeneously hypointense. All lesions demonstrated low signal intensity on ADC images. The calculated ADC values ranged from 0.60 to 0.90 mm 2 s -1 (mean value 0.76 ± 0.10; median value 0.78). On fusion images, all lesions showed high signal intensity. ML demonstrated low ADC values and high signal intensity on fusion images suggesting high cellularity of the lesions. (orig.)

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the musculoskeletal system in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Reiser, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the principles of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and recent results in DWI of the musculoskeletal system. The potential of DWI in the diagnosis of pathology of the musculoskeletal system is discussed. DWI is a relatively new MR imaging technique that has already been established in neuroradiology, especially in the early detection of brain ischemia. The random motion of water protons on a molecular basis can be measured with DWI. To date DWI of the abdomen and of the musculoskeletal system has only been employed in scientific studies, but first results indicate that it may also be beneficial in these fields. Different diffusion characteristics have been found in normal tissues such as muscle, fat and bone marrow. Also, pathologic entities such as neoplasms, post-therapeutic soft tissue changes and inflammatory processes can be differentiated. Normal muscle shows significantly higher diffusion values than subcutaneous fat and bone marrow, due to a higher mobility of water protons within muscle. Soft tissue tumors exhibit a significantly lower diffusion value compared with post-therapeutic soft tissue changes and inflammatory processes. Necrotic tumor tissue can be distinguished from viable tumor due to significantly higher diffusion of water protons within necrotic tissue. (orig.)

  5. Small-Animal Imaging Using Diffuse Fluorescence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Scott C; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) has been developed to image the spatial distribution of fluorescence-tagged tracers in living tissue. This capability facilitates the recovery of any number of functional parameters, including enzymatic activity, receptor density, blood flow, and gene expression. However, deploying DFT effectively is complex and often requires years of know-how, especially for newer mutlimodal systems that combine DFT with conventional imaging systems. In this chapter, we step through the process of using MRI-DFT imaging of a receptor-targeted tracer in small animals.

  6. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  7. Parametric uncertainty in optical image modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potzick, James; Marx, Egon; Davidson, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Optical photomask feature metrology and wafer exposure process simulation both rely on optical image modeling for accurate results. While it is fair to question the accuracies of the available models, model results also depend on several input parameters describing the object and imaging system. Errors in these parameter values can lead to significant errors in the modeled image. These parameters include wavelength, illumination and objective NA's, magnification, focus, etc. for the optical system, and topography, complex index of refraction n and k, etc. for the object. In this paper each input parameter is varied over a range about its nominal value and the corresponding images simulated. Second order parameter interactions are not explored. Using the scenario of the optical measurement of photomask features, these parametric sensitivities are quantified by calculating the apparent change of the measured linewidth for a small change in the relevant parameter. Then, using reasonable values for the estimated uncertainties of these parameters, the parametric linewidth uncertainties can be calculated and combined to give a lower limit to the linewidth measurement uncertainty for those parameter uncertainties.

  8. PANDA: a pipeline toolbox for analyzing brain diffusion images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaixu eCui

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI is widely used in both scientific research and clinical practice in in-vivo studies of the human brain. While a number of post-processing packages have been developed, fully automated processing of dMRI datasets remains challenging. Here, we developed a MATLAB toolbox named Pipeline for Analyzing braiN Diffusion imAges (PANDA for fully automated processing of brain diffusion images. The processing modules of a few established packages, including FMRIB Software Library (FSL, Pipeline System for Octave and Matlab (PSOM, Diffusion Toolkit and MRIcron, were employed in PANDA. Using any number of raw dMRI datasets from different subjects, in either DICOM or NIfTI format, PANDA can automatically perform a series of steps to process DICOM/NIfTI to diffusion metrics (e.g., FA and MD that are ready for statistical analysis at the voxel-level, the atlas-level and the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS-level and can finish the construction of anatomical brain networks for all subjects. In particular, PANDA can process different subjects in parallel, using multiple cores either in a single computer or in a distributed computing environment, thus greatly reducing the time cost when dealing with a large number of datasets. In addition, PANDA has a friendly graphical user interface (GUI, allowing the user to be interactive and to adjust the input/output settings, as well as the processing parameters. As an open-source package, PANDA is freely available at http://www.nitrc.org/projects/panda/. This novel toolbox is expected to substantially simplify the image processing of dMRI datasets and facilitate human structural connectome studies.

  9. A New Optical Design for Imaging Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. L.

    2002-05-01

    We present an optical design concept for imaging spectroscopy, with some advantages over current systems. The system projects monochromatic images onto the 2-D array detector(s). Faint object and crowded field spectroscopy can be reduced first using image processing techniques, then building the spectrum, unlike integral field units where one must first extract the spectra, build data cubes from these, then reconstruct the target's integrated spectral flux. Like integral field units, all photons are detected simultaneously, unlike tunable filters which must be scanned through the wavelength range of interest and therefore pay a sensitivity pentalty. Several sample designs are presented, including an instrument optimized for measuring intermediate redshift galaxy cluster velocity dispersions, one designed for near-infrared ground-based adaptive optics, and one intended for space-based rapid follow-up of transient point sources such as supernovae and gamma ray bursts.

  10. Parallel Solver for Diffuse Optical Tomography on Realistic Head Models With Scattering and Clear Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placati, Silvio; Guermandi, Marco; Samore, Andrea; Scarselli, Eleonora Franchi; Guerrieri, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse optical tomography is an imaging technique, based on evaluation of how light propagates within the human head to obtain the functional information about the brain. Precision in reconstructing such an optical properties map is highly affected by the accuracy of the light propagation model implemented, which needs to take into account the presence of clear and scattering tissues. We present a numerical solver based on the radiosity-diffusion model, integrating the anatomical information provided by a structural MRI. The solver is designed to run on parallel heterogeneous platforms based on multiple GPUs and CPUs. We demonstrate how the solver provides a 7 times speed-up over an isotropic-scattered parallel Monte Carlo engine based on a radiative transport equation for a domain composed of 2 million voxels, along with a significant improvement in accuracy. The speed-up greatly increases for larger domains, allowing us to compute the light distribution of a full human head ( ≈ 3 million voxels) in 116 s for the platform used.

  11. Assessment of tissue heterogeneity using diffusion tensor and diffusion kurtosis imaging for grading gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Rajikha; Sinha, Neelam [International Institute of Information Technology-Bangalore, Bangalore (India); Saini, Jitender; Mahadevan, Anita; Rao, K.V.L. Narasinga; Swaminathan, Aarthi [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore (India)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we aim to assess the significance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) parameters in grading gliomas. Retrospective studies were performed on 53 subjects with gliomas belonging to WHO grade II (n = 19), grade III (n = 20) and grade IV (n = 14). Expert marked regions of interest (ROIs) covering the tumour on T2-weighted images. Statistical texture measures such as entropy and busyness calculated over ROIs on diffusion parametric maps were used to assess the tumour heterogeneity. Additionally, we propose a volume heterogeneity index derived from cross correlation (CC) analysis as a tool for grading gliomas. The texture measures were compared between grades by performing the Mann-Whitney test followed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for evaluating diagnostic accuracy. Entropy, busyness and volume heterogeneity index for all diffusion parameters except fractional anisotropy and anisotropy of kurtosis showed significant differences between grades. The Mann-Whitney test on mean diffusivity (MD), among DTI parameters, resulted in the highest discriminability with values of P = 0.029 (0.0421) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.0312 (0.0415) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). In DKI, mean kurtosis (MK) showed the highest discriminability, P = 0.018 (0.038) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.022 (0.04) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). Results of CC analysis illustrate the existence of homogeneity in volume (uniformity across slices) for lower grades, as compared to higher grades. Hypothesis testing performed on volume heterogeneity index showed P values of 0.0002 (0.0001) and 0.0003 (0.0003) between grades II vs. III and III vs. IV, respectively, for MD (MK). In summary, the studies demonstrated great potential towards automating grading gliomas by employing tumour heterogeneity measures on DTI and DKI parameters. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of tissue heterogeneity using diffusion tensor and diffusion kurtosis imaging for grading gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, Rajikha; Sinha, Neelam; Saini, Jitender; Mahadevan, Anita; Rao, K.V.L. Narasinga; Swaminathan, Aarthi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aim to assess the significance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) parameters in grading gliomas. Retrospective studies were performed on 53 subjects with gliomas belonging to WHO grade II (n = 19), grade III (n = 20) and grade IV (n = 14). Expert marked regions of interest (ROIs) covering the tumour on T2-weighted images. Statistical texture measures such as entropy and busyness calculated over ROIs on diffusion parametric maps were used to assess the tumour heterogeneity. Additionally, we propose a volume heterogeneity index derived from cross correlation (CC) analysis as a tool for grading gliomas. The texture measures were compared between grades by performing the Mann-Whitney test followed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for evaluating diagnostic accuracy. Entropy, busyness and volume heterogeneity index for all diffusion parameters except fractional anisotropy and anisotropy of kurtosis showed significant differences between grades. The Mann-Whitney test on mean diffusivity (MD), among DTI parameters, resulted in the highest discriminability with values of P = 0.029 (0.0421) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.0312 (0.0415) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). In DKI, mean kurtosis (MK) showed the highest discriminability, P = 0.018 (0.038) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.022 (0.04) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). Results of CC analysis illustrate the existence of homogeneity in volume (uniformity across slices) for lower grades, as compared to higher grades. Hypothesis testing performed on volume heterogeneity index showed P values of 0.0002 (0.0001) and 0.0003 (0.0003) between grades II vs. III and III vs. IV, respectively, for MD (MK). In summary, the studies demonstrated great potential towards automating grading gliomas by employing tumour heterogeneity measures on DTI and DKI parameters. (orig.)

  13. Fast Dictionary-Based Reconstruction for Diffusion Spectrum Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Setsompop, Kawin; Cauley, Stephen F.; Yendiki, Anastasia; Wald, Lawrence L.; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (DSI) reveals detailed local diffusion properties at the expense of substantially long imaging times. It is possible to accelerate acquisition by undersampling in q-space, followed by image reconstruction that exploits prior knowledge on the diffusion probability density functions (pdfs). Previously proposed methods impose this prior in the form of sparsity under wavelet and total variation (TV) transforms, or under adaptive dictionaries that are trained on example datasets to maximize the sparsity of the representation. These compressed sensing (CS) methods require full-brain processing times on the order of hours using Matlab running on a workstation. This work presents two dictionary-based reconstruction techniques that use analytical solutions, and are two orders of magnitude faster than the previously proposed dictionary-based CS approach. The first method generates a dictionary from the training data using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), and performs the reconstruction in the PCA space. The second proposed method applies reconstruction using pseudoinverse with Tikhonov regularization with respect to a dictionary. This dictionary can either be obtained using the K-SVD algorithm, or it can simply be the training dataset of pdfs without any training. All of the proposed methods achieve reconstruction times on the order of seconds per imaging slice, and have reconstruction quality comparable to that of dictionary-based CS algorithm. PMID:23846466

  14. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI: practicality and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus; Zhang, Hui

    2017-11-29

    This article gives an overview of microstructure imaging of the brain with diffusion MRI and reviews the state of the art. The microstructure-imaging paradigm aims to estimate and map microscopic properties of tissue using a model that links these properties to the voxel scale MR signal. Imaging techniques of this type are just starting to make the transition from the technical research domain to wide application in biomedical studies. We focus here on the practicalities of both implementing such techniques and using them in applications. Specifically, the article summarizes the relevant aspects of brain microanatomy and the range of diffusion-weighted MR measurements that provide sensitivity to them. It then reviews the evolution of mathematical and computational models that relate the diffusion MR signal to brain tissue microstructure, as well as the expanding areas of application. Next we focus on practicalities of designing a working microstructure imaging technique: model selection, experiment design, parameter estimation, validation, and the pipeline of development of this class of technique. The article concludes with some future perspectives on opportunities in this topic and expectations on how the field will evolve in the short-to-medium term. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Fast dictionary-based reconstruction for diffusion spectrum imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgic, Berkin; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Setsompop, Kawin; Cauley, Stephen F; Yendiki, Anastasia; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2013-11-01

    Diffusion spectrum imaging reveals detailed local diffusion properties at the expense of substantially long imaging times. It is possible to accelerate acquisition by undersampling in q-space, followed by image reconstruction that exploits prior knowledge on the diffusion probability density functions (pdfs). Previously proposed methods impose this prior in the form of sparsity under wavelet and total variation transforms, or under adaptive dictionaries that are trained on example datasets to maximize the sparsity of the representation. These compressed sensing (CS) methods require full-brain processing times on the order of hours using MATLAB running on a workstation. This work presents two dictionary-based reconstruction techniques that use analytical solutions, and are two orders of magnitude faster than the previously proposed dictionary-based CS approach. The first method generates a dictionary from the training data using principal component analysis (PCA), and performs the reconstruction in the PCA space. The second proposed method applies reconstruction using pseudoinverse with Tikhonov regularization with respect to a dictionary. This dictionary can either be obtained using the K-SVD algorithm, or it can simply be the training dataset of pdfs without any training. All of the proposed methods achieve reconstruction times on the order of seconds per imaging slice, and have reconstruction quality comparable to that of dictionary-based CS algorithm.

  16. Semiautomated spleen volumetry with diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Kyoung Won; Lee, Ho; Lee, So Jung; Choi, Sanghyun; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Kye, Heewon; Song, Gi-Won; Hwang, Shin; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we determined the relative accuracy of semiautomated spleen volumetry with diffusion-weighted (DW) MR images compared to standard manual volumetry with DW-MR or CT images. Semiautomated spleen volumetry using simple thresholding followed by 3D and 2D connected component analysis was performed with DW-MR images. Manual spleen volumetry was performed on DW-MR and CT images. In this study, 35 potential live liver donor candidates were included. Semiautomated volumetry results were highly correlated with manual volumetry results using DW-MR (r = 0.99; P volumetry was significantly shorter compared to that of manual volumetry with DW-MR (P volumetry with DW-MR images can be performed rapidly and accurately when compared with standard manual volumetry. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Oxygenation level and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor estimated by diffuse optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu.; Volovetsky, A. B.; Shilyagina, N. Yu.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    Using diffuse optical spectroscopy the level of oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration in experimental tumor in comparison with normal muscle tissue of mice have been studied. Subcutaneously growing SKBR-3 was used as a tumor model. Continuous wave fiber probe diffuse optical spectroscopy system was employed. Optical properties extraction approach was based on diffusion approximation. Decreased blood oxygen saturation level and increased total hemoglobin content were demonstrated in the neoplasm. The main reason of such differences between tumor and norm was significant elevation of deoxyhemoglobin concentration in SKBR-3. The method can be useful for diagnosis of tumors as well as for study of blood flow parameters of tumor models with different angiogenic properties.

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of intracranial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bydder, G.M.; Baudouin, C.J.; Steiner, R.E.; Hajnal, J.V.; Young, I.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the effect of anisotropic diffusion weighting on the appearances of cerebral tumors as well as vasogenic and interstitial edema. Diffusion weighting produced a reduction in signal intensity in all or part of the tumors in the majority of cases. However, a relative increase in signal intensity was apparent in four cases. The decrease in signal intensity in vasogenic edema depended on the site and direction of gradient sensitization. Marked increase in conspicuity between tumor and edema was apparent in three cases. Changes in interstitial edema depended in detail in fiber direction. Differentiation between tumor and edema can be improved with diffusion-weighted imaging. Anisotropic change is seen in both vasogenic and interstitial edema

  19. Phase correction of MR perfusion/diffusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenevert, T.L.; Pipe, J.G.; Brunberg, J.A.; Yeung, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and perfusion MR sequences are exceptionally sensitive to minute motion and, therefore, are prone to bulk motions that hamper ADC/perfusion quantification. The authors have developed a phase correction algorithm to substantially reduce this error. The algorithm uses a diffusion-insensitive data set to correct data that are diffusion sensitive but phase corrupt. An assumption of the algorithm is that bulk motion phase shifts are uniform in one dimension, although they may be arbitrarily large and variable from acquisition to acquisition. This is facilitated by orthogonal section selection. The correction is applied after one Fourier transform of a two-dimensional Fourier transform reconstruction. Imaging experiments on rat and human brain demonstrate significant artifact reduction in ADC and perfusion measurements

  20. Harmonization of multi-site diffusion tensor imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jean-Philippe; Parker, Drew; Tunç, Birkan; Watanabe, Takanori; Elliott, Mark A; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Schultz, Robert T; Verma, Ragini; Shinohara, Russell T

    2017-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a well-established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique used for studying microstructural changes in the white matter. As with many other imaging modalities, DTI images suffer from technical between-scanner variation that hinders comparisons of images across imaging sites, scanners and over time. Using fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps of 205 healthy participants acquired on two different scanners, we show that the DTI measurements are highly site-specific, highlighting the need of correcting for site effects before performing downstream statistical analyses. We first show evidence that combining DTI data from multiple sites, without harmonization, may be counter-productive and negatively impacts the inference. Then, we propose and compare several harmonization approaches for DTI data, and show that ComBat, a popular batch-effect correction tool used in genomics, performs best at modeling and removing the unwanted inter-site variability in FA and MD maps. Using age as a biological phenotype of interest, we show that ComBat both preserves biological variability and removes the unwanted variation introduced by site. Finally, we assess the different harmonization methods in the presence of different levels of confounding between site and age, in addition to test robustness to small sample size studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diffuse reflectance imaging: a tool for guided biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Subhash, Narayanan; Manju, Stephen; Nisha, Unni G.; Beena, Valappil T.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of premalignant or malignant oral lesions depends on the quality of the biopsy, adequate clinical information and correct interpretation of the biopsy results. The major clinical challenge is to precisely locate the biopsy site in a clinically suspicious lesion. Dips due to oxygenated hemoglobin absorption have been noticed at 545 and 575 nm in the diffusely reflected white light spectra of oral mucosa and the intensity ratio R545/R575 has been found suited for early detection of oral pre-cancers. A multi-spectral diffuse reflectance (DR) imaging system has been developed consisting of an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera and a liquid crystal tunable filter for guiding the clinician to an optimal biopsy site. Towards this DR images were recorded from 27 patients with potentially malignant lesions on their tongue (dorsal, lateral and ventral sides) and from 44 healthy controls at 545 and 575 nm with the DR imaging system. False colored ratio image R545/R575 of the lesion provides a visual discerning capability that helps in locating the most malignant site for biopsy. Histopathological report of guided biopsy showed that out of the 27 patients 16 were cancers, 9 pre-cancers and 2 lichen planus. In this clinical trial DR imaging has correctly guided 25 biopsy sites, yielding a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 98%, thereby establishing the potential of DR imaging as a tool for guided biopsy.

  2. Spinal diffusion tensor imaging: a comprehensive review with emphasis on spinal cord anatomy and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Cauley, Keith A; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Pezeshk, Parham; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging technology allows for in vivo visualization of fiber tracts of the central nervous system using diffusion-weighted imaging sequences and data processing referred to as "diffusion tensor imaging" and "diffusion tensor tractography." While protocols for high-fidelity diffusion tensor imaging of the brain are well established, the spinal cord has proven a more difficult target for diffusion tensor methods. Here, we review the current literature on spinal diffusion tensor imaging and tractography with special emphasis on neuroanatomical correlations and clinical applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging in children and adolescents with tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich Schiller University, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Jena (Germany); Kirikkale Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kirirkale (Turkey); Mentzel, Hans-J.; Loebel, Ulrike; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Kaiser, Werner A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich Schiller University, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Jena (Germany); Guellmar, Daniel [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Friedrich Schiller University, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Jena (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University, Biomagnetic Centre, Clinic of Neurology, Jena (Germany); Rating, Tina; Brandl, Ulrich [Friedrich Schiller University, Department of Paediatric Neurology, Jena (Germany)

    2005-10-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is characterised by benign hamartomatous lesions in many organs. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can detect microstructural changes in pathological processes. To determine apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps in children with TS and to investigate the diffusion properties in cortical tubers, white-matter lesions, perilesional white matter, and contralateral normal-appearing white matter, and to compare the results with ADC and FA maps of normal age- and sex-matched volunteers. Seven children and adolescents (age range 2-20 years) suffering from TS were included. MRI was performed on a 1.5-T scanner using a transmit/receive coil with T1-W and T2-W spin-echo and FLAIR sequences. DT images were acquired by using a single-shot echo-planar pulse sequence. Diffusion gradients were applied in six different directions with a b value of 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADC was higher in cortical tubers than in the corresponding cortical location of controls. ADC values were higher and FA values were lower in white-matter lesions and perilesional white matter than in both the contralateral normal-appearing white matter of patients and in controls. There were no significant differences for both ADC and FA values in the normal-appearing white matter of patients with TS compared to controls. DTI provides important information about cortical tubers, white-matter abnormalities, and perilesional white matter in patients with TS. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion imaging: technology and clinical application; Diffusionsbildgebung. Technik und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukuk, Guido Matthias; Greschus, Susanne; Pieper, Claus Christian [Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Goldstein, Jan [Staedtisches Klinikum Solingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2017-03-15

    While diffusion imaging was predominantly used for cerebral ischemia diagnostics it is now a widely applied MR diagnostic tool for oncologic or inflammatory diseases. The contribution is focused on the fundamentals of diffusion imaging and the most important indications.

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging features in spinal cord infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingsong; Huan Yi; Sun Lijun; Chang Yingjuan; Zhao Haitao; Yang Chunmin; Zhang Guangyun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in ischemic spinal cord lesions and discuss the value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in differentiating diagnosis with inflammatory diseases and tumors. Methods: Six patients (2 male, 4 female) with typical sudden onset of neurological deficits caused by spinal cord ischemia were evaluated. There were no definite etiologies in all patients. DW imaging was performed within 1 to 30 days after the initial neurological symptoms using a Philips Gyroscan 1.5 TMR system. Four patients had other scans including contrast-enhanced MR imaging (CE-MRI) and/or FLAIR scans. Two of them followed up with MR images in three months. All six patients were imaged using a multi-shot, navigator-corrected, echo-planar pulse sequence, and ADC values were calculated in sagittal-oriented plane. Results: MR abnormalities were demonstrated on sagittal T 2 -weighted images with 'patch-like' or 'strip-like' hyperintensities (6/6) and cord enlargement (5/6). Axial T 2 -weighted images showed bilateral (6/6) hyperintensities. In one patient only the posterior spinal artery (PSA) territory was involved. Spinal cord was mainly affected at the cervical (2/6) and thoracolumbar (4/6) region, two of them included the conus medullaris (T10-L1). DW images showed high signals in all infarct lesions, degree of intensity depended on scanning time from ill-onset and progress of illness and whether companied with hemorrhage. In this group, except one case with closely normal ADC value due to one month course of illness, the five others ADC values of lesions calculated from ADC maps arranged from 0.23 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s to 0.47 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s [average value (0.37 ± 0.10) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s], markedly lower than normal parts [ average value (0.89 ± 0.08) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s]. There were marked difference between lesions and normal regions (t=4.71, P 2 W images. Meanwhile, lesions could be displayed much better in DW images than in T 2 W images because

  7. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Renal Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karadeli

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: The technique has the advantage that it is non-invasive without need for gadolinium administration, takes about 2 minute. This method provides qualitative and quantitative infomation on tissue characterization. DA-MRI and ADC values are important for characterization of renal lesions. Especially, utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the patients with risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF could be beneficial. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1: 27-36

  8. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed dur...

  9. Diffusion MR imaging in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcak Cakir Pekoz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare dementing disease and is thought to caused by a prion. It is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia, myoclonus, akinetic mutism and eventual death. Brain biopsy or autopsy is required for a definitive diagnosis of CJD. Diffusion-weighted imaging became an important tool for early diagnosis of CJD because of the high sensitivity. We present 59-year-old female patient diagnosed as sporadic CJD with typical MR imagings. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 880-883

  10. Volume illustration of muscle from diffusion tensor images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Zhicheng; Zhang, Song; Crow, John Allen; Ebert, David S; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Mullins, Katie B; Cooper, Robert; Ding, Zi'ang; Liao, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Medical illustration has demonstrated its effectiveness to depict salient anatomical features while hiding the irrelevant details. Current solutions are ineffective for visualizing fibrous structures such as muscle, because typical datasets (CT or MRI) do not contain directional details. In this paper, we introduce a new muscle illustration approach that leverages diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data and example-based texture synthesis techniques. Beginning with a volumetric diffusion tensor image, we reformulate it into a scalar field and an auxiliary guidance vector field to represent the structure and orientation of a muscle bundle. A muscle mask derived from the input diffusion tensor image is used to classify the muscle structure. The guidance vector field is further refined to remove noise and clarify structure. To simulate the internal appearance of the muscle, we propose a new two-dimensional example based solid texture synthesis algorithm that builds a solid texture constrained by the guidance vector field. Illustrating the constructed scalar field and solid texture efficiently highlights the global appearance of the muscle as well as the local shape and structure of the muscle fibers in an illustrative fashion. We have applied the proposed approach to five example datasets (four pig hearts and a pig leg), demonstrating plausible illustration and expressiveness.

  11. Spatio-temporal diffusion of dynamic PET images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauber, C; Chalon, S; Guilloteau, D; Stute, S; Buvat, I; Chau, M; Spiteri, P

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are corrupted by noise. This is especially true in dynamic PET imaging where short frames are required to capture the peak of activity concentration after the radiotracer injection. High noise results in a possible bias in quantification, as the compartmental models used to estimate the kinetic parameters are sensitive to noise. This paper describes a new post-reconstruction filter to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging. It consists in a spatio-temporal robust diffusion of the 4D image based on the time activity curve (TAC) in each voxel. It reduces the noise in homogeneous areas while preserving the distinct kinetics in regions of interest corresponding to different underlying physiological processes. Neither anatomical priors nor the kinetic model are required. We propose an automatic selection of the scale parameter involved in the diffusion process based on a robust statistical analysis of the distances between TACs. The method is evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations of brain activity distributions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the method and its superior performance over two other post-reconstruction spatial and temporal filters. Our simulations suggest that the proposed method can be used to significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic PET imaging.

  12. Edge-Based Image Compression with Homogeneous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainberger, Markus; Weickert, Joachim

    It is well-known that edges contain semantically important image information. In this paper we present a lossy compression method for cartoon-like images that exploits information at image edges. These edges are extracted with the Marr-Hildreth operator followed by hysteresis thresholding. Their locations are stored in a lossless way using JBIG. Moreover, we encode the grey or colour values at both sides of each edge by applying quantisation, subsampling and PAQ coding. In the decoding step, information outside these encoded data is recovered by solving the Laplace equation, i.e. we inpaint with the steady state of a homogeneous diffusion process. Our experiments show that the suggested method outperforms the widely-used JPEG standard and can even beat the advanced JPEG2000 standard for cartoon-like images.

  13. Image recovery using diffusion equation embedded neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torkamani-Azar, F.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neural networks with their inherent parallelism have been shown to perform well in many processing applications. In this paper, a new self-organizing approach for the recovery of gray level images degraded by additive noise based on embedding the diffusion equation in a neural network (without using a priori knowledge about the image point spread function, noise or original image) is described which enhances and restores gray levels of degraded images and is for application in low-level processing. Two learning features have been proposed which would be effective in the practical implementation of such a network. The recovery procedure needs some parameter estimation such as different error goals. While the required computation is not excessive, the procedure dose not require too many iterations and convergence is very fast. In addition, through the simulation the new network showed that it has superior ability to give a better quality result with a minimum of the sum of the squared error

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of the brainstem in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Orman, Gunes; Carson, Kathryn A; Meoded, Avner; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to compare, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brainstem, microstructural integrity of the white matter in children with achondroplasia and age-matched participants and to correlate the severity of craniocervical junction (CCJ) narrowing and neurological findings with DTI scalars in children with achondroplasia. This study also aimed to assess the potential role of fibroblast growth factor receptor type 3 on white matter microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed using a 1.5T magnetic resonance scanner and balanced pairs of diffusion gradients along 20 non-collinear directions. Measurements were obtained from regions of interest, sampled in each pontine corticospinal tract (CST), medial lemniscus, and middle cerebellar peduncle, as well as in the lower brainstem and centrum semiovale, for fractional anisotropy and for mean, axial, and radial diffusivity. In addition, a severity score for achondroplasia was assessed by measuring CCJ narrowing. Eight patients with achondroplasia (seven males, one female; mean age 5y 6mo, range 1y 1mo-15y 1mo) and eight age- and sex-matched comparison participants (mean age 5y 2mo, range 1y 1mo-14y 11mo) were included in this study. Fractional anisotropy was lower and mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in the lower brainstem of patients with achondroplasia than in age-matched comparison participants. The CST and middle cerebellar peduncle of the participants showed increases in mean, axial, and radial diffusivity. Fractional anisotropy in the lower brainstem was negatively correlated with the degree of CCJ narrowing. No differences in the DTI metrics of the centrum semiovale were observed between the two groups. The reduction in fractional anisotropy and increase in diffusivities in the lower brainstem of participants with achondroplasia may reflect secondary encephalomalacic degeneration and cavitation of the affected white matter tracts as shown by histology. In

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Pieter; Froeling, Martijn; De Smet, Eline; Pullens, Pim; Torfs, Michaël; Verdonk, Peter; Sijbers, Jan; Parizel, Paul M; Jeurissen, Ben

    2017-11-01

    A great need exists for objective biomarkers to assess graft healing following ACL reconstruction to guide the time of return to sports. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to delineate the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft and to investigate its diffusion properties using a clinical 3T scanner. DTI of the knee (b = 0, 400, and 800 s/mm 2 , 10 diffusion directions, repeated 16 times for a total of 336 diffusion-weighted volumes) was performed at 3T in 17 patients between 3 and 7 months (mean, 4 months) following ACL reconstruction. Tractography was performed by two independent observers to delineate the ACL graft. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were calculated within the graft. Interrater reliability was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and the scan-rescan reproducibility was evaluated based on the percentage coefficient of variance (%CV) across 20 repetition bootknife samples. In all subjects, tractography of the ACL graft was feasible. Quantitative evaluation of the diffusion properties of the ACL graft yielded the following mean ± SD values: FA = 0.23 ± 0.04; MD = 1.30 ± 0.11 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s; AD = 1.61 ± 0.12 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s, and RD = 1.15 ± 0.11 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s. Interrater reliability for the DTI parameters was excellent (ICC = 0.91-0.98). Mean %CVs for FA, MD, AD, and RD were 4.6%, 3.5%, 3.7%, and 4.4%, respectively. We demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of DTI for the visualization and quantitative evaluation of the ACL graft at 3T. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1423-1432. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. 7th International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of the FRINGE Workshop Series this Proceeding contains all contributions presented at the 7. International Workshop on Advanced Optical Imaging and Metrology. The FRINGE Workshop Series is dedicated to the presentation, discussion and dissemination of recent results in Optical Imaging and Metrology. Topics of particular interest for the 7. Workshop are: - New methods and tools for the generation, acquisition, processing, and evaluation of data in Optical Imaging and Metrology (digital wavefront engineering, computational imaging, model-based reconstruction, compressed sensing, inverse problems solution) - Application-driven technologies in Optical Imaging and Metrology (high-resolution, adaptive, active, robust, reliable, flexible, in-line, real-time) - High-dynamic range solutions in Optical Imaging and Metrology (from macro to nano) - Hybrid technologies in Optical Imaging and Metrology (hybrid optics, sensor and data fusion, model-based solutions, multimodality) - New optical sensors, imagi...

  17. Homogeneity based segmentation and enhancement of Diffusion Tensor Images : a white matter processing framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    In diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (DMRI) the Brownian motion of the water molecules, within biological tissue, is measured through a series of images. In diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) this diffusion is represented using tensors. DTI describes, in a non-invasive way, the local anisotropy

  18. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  19. A time-domain fluorescence diffusion optical tomography system for breast tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Feng; Wu, LinHui; Ma, Wenjuan; Yang, Fang; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan

    2011-02-01

    A prototype time-domain fluorescence diffusion optical tomography (FDOT) system using near-infrared light is presented. The system employs two pulsed light sources, 32 source fibers and 32 detection channels, working separately for acquiring the temporal distribution of the photon flux on the tissue surface. The light sources are provided by low power picosecond pulsed diode lasers at wavelengths of 780 nm and 830 nm, and a 1×32-fiber-optic-switch sequentially directs light sources to the object surface through 32 source fibers. The light signals re-emitted from the object are collected by 32 detection fibers connected to four 8×1 fiber-optic-switch and then routed to four time-resolved measuring channels, each of which consists of a collimator, a filter wheel, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) photon-counting head and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) channel. The performance and efficacy of the designed multi-channel PMT-TCSPC system are assessed by reconstructing the fluorescent yield and lifetime images of a solid phantom.

  20. Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography and multimodality physiological monitoring system for muscle and exercise applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gang; Zhang, Quan; Ivkovic, Vladimir; Strangman, Gary E.

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography (aDOT) is based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and enables three-dimensional imaging of regional hemodynamics and oxygen consumption during a person's normal activities. Although NIRS has been previously used for muscle assessment, it has been notably limited in terms of the number of channels measured, the extent to which subjects can be ambulatory, and/or the ability to simultaneously acquire synchronized auxiliary data such as electromyography (EMG) or electrocardiography (ECG). We describe the development of a prototype aDOT system, called NINscan-M, capable of ambulatory tomographic imaging as well as simultaneous auxiliary multimodal physiological monitoring. Powered by four AA size batteries and weighing 577 g, the NINscan-M prototype can synchronously record 64-channel NIRS imaging data, eight channels of EMG, ECG, or other analog signals, plus force, acceleration, rotation, and temperature for 24+ h at up to 250 Hz. We describe the system's design, characterization, and performance characteristics. We also describe examples of isometric, cycle ergometer, and free-running ambulatory exercise to demonstrate tomographic imaging at 25 Hz. NINscan-M represents a multiuse tool for muscle physiology studies as well as clinical muscle assessment.

  1. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  2. Scintillating Optical Fiber Imagers for biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrippolito, R.

    1990-01-01

    S.O.F.I (Scintillating Optical Fiber Imager) is a detector developed to replace the autoradiographic films used in molecular biology for the location of radiolabelled ( 32 P) DNA molecules in blotting experiments. It analyses samples on a 25 x 25 cm 2 square area still 25 times faster than autoradiographic films, with a 1.75 and 3 mm resolution for two orthogonal directions. This device performs numerised images with a dynamic upper than 100 which allows the direct quantitation of the analysed samples. First, this thesis describes the S.O.F.I. development (Scintillating Optical Fibers, coding of these fibers and specific electronic for the treatment of the Multi-Anode Photo-Multiplier signals) and experiments made in collaboration with molecular biology laboratories. In a second place, we prove the feasibility of an automatic DNA sequencer issued from S.O.F.I [fr

  3. Electro-optic imaging Fourier transform spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Znod, Hanying (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An Electro-Optic Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (EOIFTS) for Hyperspectral Imaging is described. The EOIFTS includes an input polarizer, an output polarizer, and a plurality of birefringent phase elements. The relative orientations of the polarizers and birefringent phase elements can be changed mechanically or via a controller, using ferroelectric liquid crystals, to substantially measure the spectral Fourier components of light propagating through the EIOFTS. When achromatic switches are used as an integral part of the birefringent phase elements, the EIOFTS becomes suitable for broadband applications, with over 1 micron infrared bandwidth.

  4. Renal water molecular diffusion characteristics in healthy native kidneys: assessment with diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfeng Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the characteristics of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and magnetic resonance (MR imaging in healthy native kidneys. METHODS: Seventy-three patients without chronic kidney disease underwent DTI-MRI with spin echo-echo planar (SE-EPI sequences accompanied by an array spatial sensitivity encoding technique (ASSET. Cortical and medullary mean, axial and radial diffusivity (MD, AD and RD, fractional anisotropy (FA and primary, secondary and tertiary eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, λ3 were analysed in both kidneys and in different genders. RESULTS: Cortical MD, λ2, λ3, and RD values were higher than corresponding medullary values. The cortical FA value was lower than the medullary FA value. Medullary λ1 and RD values in the left kidney were lower than in the right kidney. Medullary λ2, and λ3 values in women were higher than those in men. Medullary FA values in women were lower than those in men. Medullary FA (r = 0.351, P = 0.002 and λ1 (r = 0.277, P = 0.018 positively correlated with eGFR. Medullary FA (r = -0.25, P = 0.033 negatively correlated with age. CONCLUSIONS: Renal water molecular diffusion differences exist in human kidneys and genders. Age and eGFR correlate with medullary FA and primary eigenvalue.

  5. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of brachial plexus diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okinaga, Shuji; Korenaga, Tateo; Tekemura, Atsushi; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Kawano, Ken-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted image (DWI) can specifically give running of nerve fibers as they have diffusion anisotropic property and DW whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) procedure, which being capable of imaging cervical and lumber nerve roots, is thus suggested to be useful for diagnosis of diseases related to brachial plexus (BP). The purpose of the present study is to confirm the usefulness of DWIBS by comparison of its images of the normal and sick plexuses. Subjects are 5 normal healthy males (27-36 y), 29 patients (19 M/10 F, 7-73 y) with BP diseases (10 cases of external injury, 6 of obstetric palsy, 2 of paralysis by dysfunctional position, 6 by Schwannoma, 2 by metastasis of breast cancer and 3 by radiation) and, to see the diagnostic specificity, 9 patients (M 7/F 2, 15-64 y) with severely reduced hand force by nervous causes other than BP ones. MRI with Philips Gyroscan INTERA 1.5T machine is conducted for DWIBS by DWI with single shot EPI (echo planar imaging) with the coil of either sensitivity encoding (SENSE) Cardiac, Flex-M or -S. Images are reconstructed 3D by a radiological technician possessing no information concerning patient's conditions, with Philips software Soap-bubble tool on the workstation, and are then evaluated by a radiologist and an orthopedist separately. It is found that BP disorders by injury, obstetric palsy and tumors, of which diagnosis has been difficult hitherto, can be imaged either negatively or positively depending on their history. In radiation paralysis, only 1/3 cases give a reduced signal intensity in the whole BP. DWIBS will be a new diagnostic mean for systemic peripheral nerve diseases as well as BP ones. (T.T.)

  6. Application of ultrasound processed images in space: assessing diffuse affectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Poch, A.; Bru, C.; Nicolau, C.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate diffuse affectations in the liver using texture image processing techniques. Ultrasound diagnose equipments are the election of choice to be used in space environments as they are free from hazardous effects on health. However, due to the need for highly trained radiologists to assess the images, this imaging method is mainly applied on focal lesions rather than on non-focal ones. We have conducted a clinical study on 72 patients with different degrees of chronic hepatopaties and a group of control of 18 individuals. All subjects' clinical reports and results of biopsies were compared to the degree of affectation calculated by our computer system , thus validating the method. Full statistical results are given in the present paper showing a good correlation (r=0.61) between pathologist's report and analysis of the heterogenicity of the processed images from the liver. This computer system to analyze diffuse affectations may be used in-situ or via telemedicine to the ground.

  7. Optical Probes for Neurobiological Sensing and Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric H; Chin, Gregory; Rong, Guoxin; Poskanzer, Kira E; Clark, Heather A

    2018-04-13

    Fluorescent nanosensors and molecular probes are next-generation tools for imaging chemical signaling inside and between cells. Electrophysiology has long been considered the gold standard in elucidating neural dynamics with high temporal resolution and precision, particularly on the single-cell level. However, electrode-based techniques face challenges in illuminating the specific chemicals involved in neural cell activation with adequate spatial information. Measuring chemical dynamics is of fundamental importance to better understand synergistic interactions between neurons as well as interactions between neurons and non-neuronal cells. Over the past decade, significant technological advances in optical probes and imaging methods have enabled entirely new possibilities for studying neural cells and circuits at the chemical level. These optical imaging modalities have shown promise for combining chemical, temporal, and spatial information. This potential makes them ideal candidates to unravel the complex neural interactions at multiple scales in the brain, which could be complemented by traditional electrophysiological methods to obtain a full spatiotemporal picture of neurochemical dynamics. Despite the potential, only a handful of probe candidates have been utilized to provide detailed chemical information in the brain. To date, most live imaging and chemical mapping studies rely on fluorescent molecular indicators to report intracellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) dynamics, which correlates with neuronal activity. Methodological advances for monitoring a full array of chemicals in the brain with improved spatial, temporal, and chemical resolution will thus enable mapping of neurochemical circuits with finer precision. On the basis of numerous studies in this exciting field, we review the current efforts to develop and apply a palette of optical probes and nanosensors for chemical sensing in the brain. There is a strong impetus to further develop technologies capable of

  8. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  9. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in musculoskeletal infections: Current perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Khaleel, Mohammad; Boothe, Ethan; Awdeh, Haitham; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and prompt therapy of musculoskeletal infections are important prognostic factors. In most cases, clinical history, examination and laboratory findings help one make the diagnosis, and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to identify the extent of the disease process. However, in many situations, a routine MRI may not be specific enough especially if the patient cannot receive contrast intravenously, thereby delaying the appropriate treatment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help in many such situations by providing additional information, accurate characterization and defining the extent of the disease, so that prompt treatment can be initiated. In this article, we illustrate the imaging findings of the spectrum of musculoskeletal infections, emphasizing the role of DWI in this domain. (orig.)

  10. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in musculoskeletal infections: Current perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Yogesh [Yale New Haven Health System at Bridgeport Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Khaleel, Mohammad [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Boothe, Ethan; Awdeh, Haitham [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Accurate diagnosis and prompt therapy of musculoskeletal infections are important prognostic factors. In most cases, clinical history, examination and laboratory findings help one make the diagnosis, and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to identify the extent of the disease process. However, in many situations, a routine MRI may not be specific enough especially if the patient cannot receive contrast intravenously, thereby delaying the appropriate treatment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help in many such situations by providing additional information, accurate characterization and defining the extent of the disease, so that prompt treatment can be initiated. In this article, we illustrate the imaging findings of the spectrum of musculoskeletal infections, emphasizing the role of DWI in this domain. (orig.)

  11. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis.

  12. Ischemic lesion volume determination on diffusion weighted images vs. apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bråtane, Bernt Tore; Bastan, Birgul; Fisher, Marc; Bouley, James; Henninger, Nils

    2009-07-07

    Though diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is frequently used for identifying the ischemic lesion in focal cerebral ischemia, the understanding of spatiotemporal evolution patterns observed with different analysis methods remains imprecise. DWI and calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were serially obtained in rat stroke models (MCAO): permanent, 90 min, and 180 min temporary MCAO. Lesion volumes were analyzed in a blinded and randomized manner by 2 investigators using (i) a previously validated ADC threshold, (ii) visual determination of hypointense regions on ADC maps, and (iii) visual determination of hyperintense regions on DWI. Lesion volumes were correlated with 24 hour 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC)-derived infarct volumes. TTC-derived infarct volumes were not significantly different from the ADC and DWI-derived lesion volumes at the last imaging time points except for significantly smaller DWI lesions in the pMCAO model (p=0.02). Volumetric calculation based on TTC-derived infarct also correlated significantly stronger to volumetric calculation based on last imaging time point derived lesions on ADC maps than DWI (pdetermined lesion volumes on ADC maps and DWI by both investigators correlated significantly with threshold-derived lesion volumes on ADC maps with the former method demonstrating a stronger correlation. There was also a better interrater agreement for ADC map analysis than for DWI analysis. Ischemic lesion determination by ADC was more accurate in final infarct prediction, rater independent, and provided exclusive information on ischemic lesion reversibility.

  13. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy of Human Skin Using a Commercial Fiber Optic Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atencio, J. A. Delgado; Rodriguez, M. Cunill; Montiel, S. Vazquez y; Castro, Jorge; Rodriguez, A. Cornejo; Gutierrez, J. L.; Martinez, F.; Gutierrez, B.; Orozco, E.

    2008-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a reliable and easy to implement technique in human tissue characterization. In this work we evaluate the performance of the commercial USB4000 miniature fiber optic spectrometer in the in-vivo measurement of the diffuse reflectance spectra of different healthy skin sites and lesions in a population of 54 volunteers. Results show, that this spectrometer reproduces well the typical signatures of skin spectra over the 400-1000 nm region. Remarkable spectral differences exist between lesions and normal surrounding skin. A diffusion-based model was used to simulate reflectance spectra collected by the optical probe of the system

  14. Diffusion kurtosis imaging of the liver at 3 Tesla: in vivo comparison to standard diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budjan, Johannes; Sauter, Elke A; Zoellner, Frank G; Lemke, Andreas; Wambsganss, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2018-01-01

    Background Functional techniques like diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) are gaining more and more importance in liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is an advanced technique that might help to overcome current limitations of DWI. Purpose To evaluate DKI for the differentiation of hepatic lesions in comparison to conventional DWI at 3 Tesla. Material and Methods Fifty-six consecutive patients were examined using a routine abdominal MR protocol at 3 Tesla which included DWI with b-values of 50, 400, 800, and 1000 s/mm 2 . Apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated applying a standard mono-exponential fit, while a non-Gaussian kurtosis fit was used to obtain DKI maps. ADC as well as Kurtosis-corrected diffusion ( D) values were quantified by region of interest analysis and compared between lesions. Results Sixty-eight hepatic lesions (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] [n = 25]; hepatic adenoma [n = 4], cysts [n = 18]; hepatic hemangioma [HH] [n = 18]; and focal nodular hyperplasia [n = 3]) were identified. Differentiation of malignant and benign lesions was possible based on both DWI ADC as well as DKI D-values ( P values were in the range of 0.04 to < 0.0001). Conclusion In vivo abdominal DKI calculated using standard b-values is feasible and enables quantitative differentiation between malignant and benign liver lesions. Assessment of conventional ADC values leads to similar results when using b-values below 1000 s/mm 2 for DKI calculation.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of epidermoid, including diffusion weighted images and an atypical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shoki; Higano, Shuichi; Kurihara, Noriko

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing intracranial epidermoid, we evaluated the MRI findings on five cases with such tumor, all of which were surgically verified. In addition to standard spin-echo (SE) images obtained in all cases, diffusion-weighted images were acquired in two patients. In four patients, the tumor revealed to be almost isointense relative to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on both T 1 -and T 2 -weighted images, while it tended to show slightly hyperintense to CSF on proton-density-weighted images; thus, based on the signal intensity on standard SE images the distinction between epidermoid and arachnoid cyst may be difficult. Furthermore, the presence of the tumor which has a tendency to grow in and along the subarachnoid space causing relatively minimal mass effect may be overlooked. Diffusion-weighted images were shown to have advantages in such cases by demonstrating the tumor unequivocally as a mass of high signal, and differentiating it from arachnoid cysts. In the remaining patient, its appearance was atypical, showing bright signal on both T 1 -and T 2 -weighted images. In conclusion free of bone artifacts, multiplanar MRI with additional diffusion-weighted images provides a clear demonstration of epidermoid, and its differentiation from arachnoid cyst, thus obviating the need for CT cisternography. (author)

  16. Differences in Gaussian diffusion tensor imaging and non-Gaussian diffusion kurtosis imaging model-based estimates of diffusion tensor invariants in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, S; Giannelli, M; Garaci, F; Floris, R; Duggento, A; Guerrisi, M; Toschi, N

    2016-05-01

    An increasing number of studies have aimed to compare diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-related parameters [e.g., mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD)] to complementary new indexes [e.g., mean kurtosis (MK)/radial kurtosis (RK)/axial kurtosis (AK)] derived through diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in terms of their discriminative potential about tissue disease-related microstructural alterations. Given that the DTI and DKI models provide conceptually and quantitatively different estimates of the diffusion tensor, which can also depend on fitting routine, the aim of this study was to investigate model- and algorithm-dependent differences in MD/FA/RD/AD and anisotropy mode (MO) estimates in diffusion-weighted imaging of human brain white matter. The authors employed (a) data collected from 33 healthy subjects (20-59 yr, F: 15, M: 18) within the Human Connectome Project (HCP) on a customized 3 T scanner, and (b) data from 34 healthy subjects (26-61 yr, F: 5, M: 29) acquired on a clinical 3 T scanner. The DTI model was fitted to b-value =0 and b-value =1000 s/mm(2) data while the DKI model was fitted to data comprising b-value =0, 1000 and 3000/2500 s/mm(2) [for dataset (a)/(b), respectively] through nonlinear and weighted linear least squares algorithms. In addition to MK/RK/AK maps, MD/FA/MO/RD/AD maps were estimated from both models and both algorithms. Using tract-based spatial statistics, the authors tested the null hypothesis of zero difference between the two MD/FA/MO/RD/AD estimates in brain white matter for both datasets and both algorithms. DKI-derived MD/FA/RD/AD and MO estimates were significantly higher and lower, respectively, than corresponding DTI-derived estimates. All voxelwise differences extended over most of the white matter skeleton. Fractional differences between the two estimates [(DKI - DTI)/DTI] of most invariants were seen to vary with the invariant value itself as well as with MK

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosottini, M. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy); Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Tavarelli, C.; De Cori, S.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Del Bono, L.; Doria, G. [Unit of Infectious Diseases AO, Pisa (Italy); Giannelli, M. [Unit of Medical Physics, Pisa (Italy); Michelassi, M.C. [Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Murri, L. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the central nervous system due to JC polyoma virus infection of oligodendrocytes. PML develops in patients with impaired T-cell function as occurs in HIV, malignancy or immunosuppressive drugs users. Until now no imaging methods have been reported to correlate with clinical status. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a robust MRI tool in investigating white matter architecture and diseases. The aim of our work was to assess diffusion abnormalities in focal white matter lesions in patients with PML and to correlate the lesion load measured with conventional MRI and DWI to clinical variables. We evaluated eight patients with a biopsy or laboratory-supported diagnosis of PML. All patients underwent MRI including conventional sequences (fluid attenuated inversion recovery-FLAIR) and DWI. Mean diffusivity (MD) maps were used to quantify diffusion on white matter lesions. Global lesion load was calculated by manually tracing lesions on FLAIR images, while total, central core and peripheral lesion loads were calculated by manually tracing lesions on DWI images. Lesion load obtained with the conventional or DWI-based methods were correlated with clinical variables such as disease duration, disease severity and survival. White matter focal lesions are characterized by a central core with low signal on DWI images and high MD (1.853 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s), surrounded by a rim of high signal intensity on DWI and lower MD (1.1 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). The MD value of normal-appearing white matter is higher although not statistically significant (0.783 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s) with respect to control subjects (0.750 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). Inter-rater correlations of global lesion load between FLAIR (3.96%) and DWI (3.43%) was excellent (ICC =0.87). Global lesion load on FLAIR and DWI correlates with disease duration and severity (respectively, p = 0.037, p = 0.0272 with Karnofsky scale and p = 0.0338 with

  18. Hyperspectral and multispectral bioluminescence optical tomography for small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J; Darvas, Felix; Bading, James R; Moats, Rex A; Conti, Peter S; Smith, Desmond J; Cherry, Simon R; Leahy, Richard M

    2005-01-01

    For bioluminescence imaging studies in small animals, it is important to be able to accurately localize the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the underlying bioluminescent source. The spectrum of light produced by the source that escapes the subject varies with the depth of the emission source because of the wavelength-dependence of the optical properties of tissue. Consequently, multispectral or hyperspectral data acquisition should help in the 3D localization of deep sources. In this paper, we describe a framework for fully 3D bioluminescence tomographic image acquisition and reconstruction that exploits spectral information. We describe regularized tomographic reconstruction techniques that use semi-infinite slab or FEM-based diffusion approximations of photon transport through turbid media. Singular value decomposition analysis was used for data dimensionality reduction and to illustrate the advantage of using hyperspectral rather than achromatic data. Simulation studies in an atlas-mouse geometry indicated that sub-millimeter resolution may be attainable given accurate knowledge of the optical properties of the animal. A fixed arrangement of mirrors and a single CCD camera were used for simultaneous acquisition of multispectral imaging data over most of the surface of the animal. Phantom studies conducted using this system demonstrated our ability to accurately localize deep point-like sources and show that a resolution of 1.5 to 2.2 mm for depths up to 6 mm can be achieved. We also include an in vivo study of a mouse with a brain tumour expressing firefly luciferase. Co-registration of the reconstructed 3D bioluminescent image with magnetic resonance images indicated good anatomical localization of the tumour

  19. Antibiogramj: A tool for analysing images from disk diffusion tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C A; Domínguez, C; Heras, J; Mata, E; Pascual, V; Torres, C; Zarazaga, M

    2017-05-01

    Disk diffusion testing, known as antibiogram, is widely applied in microbiology to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of microorganisms. The measurement of the diameter of the zone of growth inhibition of microorganisms around the antimicrobial disks in the antibiogram is frequently performed manually by specialists using a ruler. This is a time-consuming and error-prone task that might be simplified using automated or semi-automated inhibition zone readers. However, most readers are usually expensive instruments with embedded software that require significant changes in laboratory design and workflow. Based on the workflow employed by specialists to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of microorganisms, we have designed a software tool that, from images of disk diffusion tests, semi-automatises the process. Standard computer vision techniques are employed to achieve such an automatisation. We present AntibiogramJ, a user-friendly and open-source software tool to semi-automatically determine, measure and categorise inhibition zones of images from disk diffusion tests. AntibiogramJ is implemented in Java and deals with images captured with any device that incorporates a camera, including digital cameras and mobile phones. The fully automatic procedure of AntibiogramJ for measuring inhibition zones achieves an overall agreement of 87% with an expert microbiologist; moreover, AntibiogramJ includes features to easily detect when the automatic reading is not correct and fix it manually to obtain the correct result. AntibiogramJ is a user-friendly, platform-independent, open-source, and free tool that, up to the best of our knowledge, is the most complete software tool for antibiogram analysis without requiring any investment in new equipment or changes in the laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Coskun, Sonay; Ogur, Erkin; Dagli, A.F.; Ozkan, Yusuf; Sahpaz, Fatih

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the diagnostic role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the differentiating of malignant and benign thyroid nodules by using fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology criteria as a reference standard. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the normal-looking thyroid parenchyma were also evaluated both in normal patients and in patients with nodules. Between March 2007 and February 2008, 76 consecutive patients with ultrasound-diagnosed thyroid nodules and 20 healthy subjects underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging by using single-shot spin echo, echo planar imaging. A total of 93 nodules were included in the study using the following b factors 100, 200, and 300 mm 2 /s. ADC values of thyroid nodules and normal area in all subjects were calculated and compared using suitable statistical analysis. Mean ADC values for malignant and benign nodules were 0.96±0.65 x 10 -3 and 3.06±0.71 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. for b-300 factor, 0.56±0.43 x 10 -3 and 1.80±0.60 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s for b-200, and 0.30±0.20 x 10 -3 and 1.15±0.43 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, for b-300, respectively. Mean ADC values of malignant nodules were lower than benign nodules. There were significant differences in ADC values between benign and malignant nodules. ADC values among normal-appearing thyroid parenchyma of patients and normal-appearing thyroid parenchyma of healthy subjects were insignificant at all b factors. Benign nodules have higher ADC values than malignant ones. DWI may be helpful in differentiating malign and benign thyroid nodules. (orig.)

  1. Ultrasound-mediated Optical Imaging and Focusing in Scattering Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuta

    Because of its non-ionizing and molecular sensing nature, light has been an attractive tool in biomedicine. Scanning an optical focus allows not only high-resolution imaging but also manipulation and therapy. However, due to multiple photon scattering events, conventional optical focusing using an ordinary lens is limited to shallow depths of one transport mean free path (lt'), which corresponds to approximately 1 mm in human tissue. To overcome this limitation, ultrasonic modulation (or encoding ) of diffuse light inside scattering media has enabled us to develop both deep-tissue optical imaging and focusing techniques, namely, ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) and time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing. While UOT measures the power of the encoded light to obtain an image, TRUE focusing generates a time-reversed (or phase-conjugated) copy of the encoded light, using a phase-conjugate mirror to focus light inside scattering media beyond 1 lt'. However, despite extensive progress in both UOT and TRUE focusing, the low signal-to-noise ratio in encoded-light detection remains a challenge to meeting both the speed and depth requirements for in vivo applications. This dissertation describes technological advancements of both UOT and TRUE focusing, in terms of their signal detection sensitivities, operational depths, and operational speeds. The first part of this dissertation describes sensitivity improvements of encoded-light detection in UOT, achieved by using a large area (˜5 cm x 5 cm) photorefractive polymer. The photorefractive polymer allowed us to improve the detection etendue by more than 10 times that of previous detection schemes. It has enabled us to resolve absorbing objects embedded inside diffused media thicker than 80 lt', using moderate light power and short ultrasound pulses. The second part of this dissertation describes energy enhancement and fluorescent excitation using TRUE focusing in turbid media, using

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging for target volume definition in glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberat, Jatta; Remonda, Luca [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Neuro-radiology, Aarau (Switzerland); McNamara, Jane; Rogers, Susanne [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); Bodis, Stephan [Cantonal Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aarau (Switzerland); University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR-based technique that may better detect the peritumoural region than MRI. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of using DTI for target volume delineation in glioblastoma patients. MR tensor tracts and maps of the isotropic (p) and anisotropic (q) components of water diffusion were coregistered with CT in 13 glioblastoma patients. An in-house image processing program was used to analyse water diffusion in each voxel of interest in the region of the tumour. Tumour infiltration was mapped according to validated criteria and contralateral normal brain was used as an internal control. A clinical target volume (CTV) was generated based on the T{sub 1}-weighted image obtained using contrast agent (T{sub 1Gd}), tractography and the infiltration map. This was compared to a conventional T{sub 2}-weighted CTV (T{sub 2}-w CTV). Definition of a diffusion-based CTV that included the adjacent white matter tracts proved highly feasible. A statistically significant difference was detected between the DTI-CTV and T{sub 2}-w CTV volumes (p < 0.005, t = 3.480). As the DTI-CTVs were smaller than the T{sub 2}-w CTVs (tumour plus peritumoural oedema), the pq maps were not simply detecting oedema. Compared to the clinical planning target volume (PTV), the DTI-PTV showed a trend towards volume reduction. These diffusion-based volumes were smaller than conventional volumes, yet still included sites of tumour recurrence. Extending the CTV along the abnormal tensor tracts in order to preserve coverage of the likely routes of dissemination, whilst sparing uninvolved brain, is a rational approach to individualising radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma patients. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusions-Tensor-Bildgebung (DTI) ist eine MR-Technik, die dank der Erfassung des peritumoralen Bereichs eine Verbesserung bezueglich MRI bringt. Unser Ziel war die Pruefung der Machbarkeit der Verwendung der DTI fuer die Zielvolumenabgrenzung fuer Patienten mit

  3. Contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging with an optical wavelength of 1064 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Park, Gyeong Bae; Choi, Wonseok; Jeong, Unyong; Kim, Chulhong

    2018-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging method that can provide both structural and functional information of living tissues beyond the optical diffusion limit by combining the concepts of conventional optical and ultrasound imaging methods. Although endogenous chromophores can be utilized to acquire PA images of biological tissues, exogenous contrast agents that absorb near-infrared (NIR) lights have been extensively explored to improve the contrast and penetration depth of PA images. Here, we demonstrate Bi2Se3 nanoplates, that strongly absorbs NIR lights, as a contrast agent for PA imaging. In particularly, the Bi2Se3 nanoplates produce relatively strong PA signals with an optical wavelength of 1064 nm, which has several advantages for deep tissue imaging including: (1) relatively low absorption by other intrinsic chromophores, (2) cost-effective light source using Nd:YAG laser, and (3) higher available energy than other NIR lights according to American National Standards Institute (ANSI) safety limit. We have investigated deep tissue imaging capability of the Bi2Se3 nanoplates by acquiring in vitro PA images of microtubes under chicken breast tissues. We have also acquired in vivo PA images of bladders, gastrointestinal tracts, and sentinel lymph nodes in mice after injection of the Bi2Se3 nanoplates to verify their applicability to a variety of biomedical research. The results show the promising potential of the Bi2Se3 nanoplates as a PA contrast agent for deep tissue imaging with an optical wavelength of 1064 nm.

  4. Imaging Appearance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis on the Diffusion Weighted Images: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu; Oh, Keon Se

    2011-01-01

    Imaging finding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis contain bilateral, symmetric, patchy, or diffuse increased T2WI signal intensities in the basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, and centrum semiovale. In particular, the centrum semiovale is most commonly involved. Most of the HIV encephalitis cases are accompanied by brain atrophy. No previous study has reported symmetric increased signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale without brain atrophy on diffusion weighted images in HIV encephalitis patients. Here, we report a case of this. We suggest that radiologists should consider the possibility of HIV encephalitis if there are symmetric increases in signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale on diffusion weighted images of patients with a history of HIV infection.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging of the normal prostate at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerses, Bengi; Kabakci, Neslihan; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Firat, Zeynep; Bayram, Ali; Kovanlikaya, Ilhami; Ulud, Aziz M.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the prostate and to determine normative fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of healthy prostate with a 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Thirty volunteers with a mean age of 28 (25-35) years were scanned with a 3-Tesla MRI (Intera Achieva; Philips, The Netherlands) system using a six-channel phased array coil. Initially, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) axial images of the prostate were obtained. In two subjects, a millimetric hypointense signal change was detected in the peripheral zones on T2-weighted TSE images. These two subjects were excluded from the study. DTI with single-shot echo-planar imaging (ssEPI) was performed in the remaining 28 subjects. ADC and FA values were measured using the manufacturer supplied software by positioning 9-pixel ROIs on each zone. Differences between parameters of the central and peripheral zones were assessed. Mean ADC value of the central (1.220 ± 0.271 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was found to be significantly lower when compared with the peripheral gland (1.610 ± 0.347 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (P < 0.01). Mean FA of the central gland was significantly higher (0.26), compared with the peripheral gland (0.16) (P < 0.01). This study shows the feasibility of prostate DTI with a 3-Tesla MR system and the normative FA and ADC values of peripheral and central zones of the normal prostate. The results are compatible with the microstructural organization of the gland. (orig.)

  6. Cloned images and the optical unconscious

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romic, Bojana

    unconscious. The camera conveys the virtuality of vision, through which the eye learns about the spatio-temporal arrangements of the photographic object 'with its devices of slow motion and enlargement' (Benjamin, 1931, pp. 510). In reference to this, Rosalind Krauss wrote in her book Optical unconscious...... contribute its special status. When Walter Benjamin coined the term optical unconscious, he was primarily referring to the psychoanalytical perspective: photography opened a new realm of experience that was not accessible to the naked eye – the same way that psychoanalysis provided an access to the physic......, because this young woman had no political/activist record – it was her image that communicated with the world. References: Benjamin, W. (1999) Little History of Photography. in: Jennings, M.W., Eiland, H., Smith, G. (eds) Selected Writings: Volume 2 1927-1934. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press...

  7. Diffusion tensor imaging using multiple coils for mouse brain connectomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouls, John C; Badea, Alexandra; Anderson, Robert B J; Cofer, Gary P; Allan Johnson, G

    2018-04-19

    The correlation between brain connectivity and psychiatric or neurological diseases has intensified efforts to develop brain connectivity mapping techniques on mouse models of human disease. The neural architecture of mouse brain specimens can be shown non-destructively and three-dimensionally by diffusion tensor imaging, which enables tractography, the establishment of a connectivity matrix and connectomics. However, experiments on cohorts of animals can be prohibitively long. To improve throughput in a 7-T preclinical scanner, we present a novel two-coil system in which each coil is shielded, placed off-isocenter along the axis of the magnet and connected to a receiver circuit of the scanner. Preservation of the quality factor of each coil is essential to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance and throughput, because mouse brain specimen imaging at 7 T takes place in the coil-dominated noise regime. In that regime, we show a shielding configuration causing no SNR degradation in the two-coil system. To acquire data from several coils simultaneously, the coils are placed in the magnet bore, around the isocenter, in which gradient field distortions can bias diffusion tensor imaging metrics, affect tractography and contaminate measurements of the connectivity matrix. We quantified the experimental alterations in fractional anisotropy and eigenvector direction occurring in each coil. We showed that, when the coils were placed 12 mm away from the isocenter, measurements of the brain connectivity matrix appeared to be minimally altered by gradient field distortions. Simultaneous measurements on two mouse brain specimens demonstrated a full doubling of the diffusion tensor imaging throughput in practice. Each coil produced images devoid of shading or artifact. To further improve the throughput of mouse brain connectomics, we suggested a future expansion of the system to four coils. To better understand acceptable trade-offs between imaging throughput and connectivity

  8. Diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging for pediatric musculoskeletal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, John D.; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Hernandez, Andrea; Ruppert, Kai; Jaramillo, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool that has recently been applied to evaluate several pediatric musculoskeletal disorders. DWI probes abnormalities of tissue structure by detecting microscopic changes in water mobility that develop when disease alters the organization of normal tissue. DWI provides tissue characterization at a cellular level beyond what is available with other imaging techniques, and can sometimes identify pathology before gross anatomic alterations manifest. These features of early detection and tissue characterization make DWI particularly appealing for probing diseases that affect the musculoskeletal system. This article focuses on the current and future applications of DWI in the musculoskeletal system, with particular attention paid to pediatric disorders. Although most of the applications are experimental, we have emphasized the current state of knowledge and the main research questions that need to be investigated. (orig.)

  9. Optimal Parameters to Determine the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in Diffusion Weighted Imaging via Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dimuthu

    Diffusion weighted (DW) Imaging is a non-invasive MR technique that provides information about the tissue microstructure using the diffusion of water molecules. The diffusion is generally characterized by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) parametric map. The purpose of this study is to investigate in silico how the calculation of ADC is affected by image SNR, b-values, and the true tissue ADC. Also, to provide optimal parameter combination depending on the percentage accuracy and precision for prostate peripheral region cancer application. Moreover, to suggest parameter choices for any type of tissue, while providing the expected accuracy and precision. In this research DW images were generated assuming a mono-exponential signal model at two different b-values and for known true ADC values. Rician noise of different levels was added to the DWI images to adjust the image SNR. Using the two DWI images, ADC was calculated using a mono-exponential model for each set of b-values, SNR, and true ADC. 40,000 ADC data were collected for each parameter setting to determine the mean and the standard-deviation of the calculated ADC, as well as the percentage accuracy and precision with respect to the true ADC. The accuracy was calculated using the difference between known and calculated ADC. The precision was calculated using the standard-deviation of calculated ADC. The optimal parameters for a specific study was determined when both the percentage accuracy and precision were minimized. In our study, we simulated two true ADCs (ADC 0.00102 for tumor and 0.00180 mm2/s for normal prostate peripheral region tissue). Image SNR was varied from 2 to 100 and b-values were varied from 0 to 2000s/mm2. The results show that the percentage accuracy and percentage precision were minimized with image SNR. To increase SNR, 10 signal-averagings (NEX) were used considering the limitation in total scan time. The optimal NEX combination for tumor and normal tissue for prostate

  10. An introduction to visualization of diffusion tensor imaging and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilanova, A.; Zhang, S.; Kindlmann, G.; Laidlaw, D.H.; Weickert, J.; Hagen, H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary. Water diffusion is anisotropic in organized tissues such as white matter and muscle. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a non-invasive MR technique, measures water self-diffusion rates and thus gives an indication of the underlying tissue microstructure. The diffusion rate is often expressed

  11. Confocal imaging of protein distributions in porous silicon optical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Stefano, Luca; D'Auria, Sabato

    2007-01-01

    The performances of porous silicon optical biosensors depend strongly on the arrangement of the biological probes into their sponge-like structures: it is well known that in this case the sensing species do not fill the pores but instead cover their internal surface. In this paper, the direct imaging of labelled proteins into different porous silicon structures by using a confocal laser microscope is reported. The distribution of the biological matter in the nanostructured material follows a Gaussian behaviour which is typical of the diffusion process in the porous media but with substantial differences between a porous silicon monolayer and a multilayer such as a Bragg mirror. Even if semi-quantitative, the results can be very useful in the design of the porous silicon based biosensing devices

  12. Measuring Connectivity in the Primary Visual Pathway in Human Albinism Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Anahit; McKetton, Larissa; Schneider, Keith A

    2016-08-11

    In albinism, the number of ipsilaterally projecting retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is significantly reduced. The retina and optic chiasm have been proposed as candidate sites for misrouting. Since a correlation between the number of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) relay neurons and LGN size has been shown, and based on previously reported reductions in LGN volumes in human albinism, we suggest that fiber projections from LGN to the primary visual cortex (V1) are also reduced. Studying structural differences in the visual system of albinism can improve the understanding of the mechanism of misrouting and subsequent clinical applications. Diffusion data and tractography are useful for mapping the OR (optic radiation). This manuscript describes two algorithms for OR reconstruction in order to compare brain connectivity in albinism and controls.An MRI scanner with a 32-channel head coil was used to acquire structural scans. A T1-weighted 3D-MPRAGE sequence with 1 mm(3) isotropic voxel size was used to generate high-resolution images for V1 segmentation. Multiple proton density (PD) weighted images were acquired coronally for right and left LGN localization. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans were acquired with 64 diffusion directions. Both deterministic and probabilistic tracking methods were run and compared, with LGN as the seed mask and V1 as the target mask. Though DTI provides relatively poor spatial resolution, and accurate delineation of OR may be challenging due to its low fiber density, tractography has been shown to be advantageous both in research and clinically. Tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) revealed areas of significantly reduced white matter integrity within the OR in patients with albinism compared to controls. Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant reduction in LGN to V1 connectivity in albinism compared to controls. Comparing both tracking algorithms revealed common findings, strengthening the reliability of the technique.

  13. Intravoxel water diffusion heterogeneity MR imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using stretched exponential diffusion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Vincent; Khong, Pek Lan [University of Hong Kong, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam (China); Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lam, Ka On; Sze, Henry Chun Kin [University of Hong Kong, Department of Clinical Oncology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (China)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the utility of stretched exponential diffusion model in characterisation of the water diffusion heterogeneity in different tumour stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty patients with newly diagnosed NPC were prospectively recruited. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging was performed using five b values (0-2,500 s/mm{sup 2}). Respective stretched exponential parameters (DDC, distributed diffusion coefficient; and alpha (α), water heterogeneity) were calculated. Patients were stratified into low and high tumour stage groups based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging for determination of the predictive powers of DDC and α using t test and ROC curve analyses. The mean ± standard deviation values were DDC = 0.692 ± 0.199 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for low stage group vs 0.794 ± 0.253 (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for high stage group; α = 0.792 ± 0.145 for low stage group vs 0.698 ± 0.155 for high stage group. α was significantly lower in the high stage group while DDC was negatively correlated. DDC and α were both reliable independent predictors (p < 0.001), with α being more powerful. Optimal cut-off values were (sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio) DDC = 0.692 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (94.4 %, 64.3 %, 2.64, 0.09), α = 0.720 (72.2 %, 100 %, -, 0.28). The heterogeneity index α is robust and can potentially help in staging and grading prediction in NPC. (orig.)

  14. Intravoxel water diffusion heterogeneity MR imaging of nasopharyngeal carcinoma using stretched exponential diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Vincent; Khong, Pek Lan; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Lam, Ka On; Sze, Henry Chun Kin; Chan, Queenie

    2015-01-01

    To determine the utility of stretched exponential diffusion model in characterisation of the water diffusion heterogeneity in different tumour stages of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Fifty patients with newly diagnosed NPC were prospectively recruited. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging was performed using five b values (0-2,500 s/mm 2 ). Respective stretched exponential parameters (DDC, distributed diffusion coefficient; and alpha (α), water heterogeneity) were calculated. Patients were stratified into low and high tumour stage groups based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging for determination of the predictive powers of DDC and α using t test and ROC curve analyses. The mean ± standard deviation values were DDC = 0.692 ± 0.199 (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) for low stage group vs 0.794 ± 0.253 (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) for high stage group; α = 0.792 ± 0.145 for low stage group vs 0.698 ± 0.155 for high stage group. α was significantly lower in the high stage group while DDC was negatively correlated. DDC and α were both reliable independent predictors (p < 0.001), with α being more powerful. Optimal cut-off values were (sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio) DDC = 0.692 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (94.4 %, 64.3 %, 2.64, 0.09), α = 0.720 (72.2 %, 100 %, -, 0.28). The heterogeneity index α is robust and can potentially help in staging and grading prediction in NPC. (orig.)

  15. Optically trapped atomic resonant devices for narrow linewidth spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lipeng

    This thesis focuses on the development of atomic resonant devices for spectroscopic applications. The primary emphasis is on the imaging properties of optically thick atomic resonant fluorescent filters and their applications. In addition, this thesis presents a new concept for producing very narrow linewidth light as from an atomic vapor lamp pumped by a nanosecond pulse system. This research was motivated by application for missile warning system, and presents an innovative approach to a wide angle, ultra narrow linewidth imaging filter using a potassium vapor cell. The approach is to image onto and collect the fluorescent photons emitted from the surface of an optically thick potassium vapor cell, generating a 2 GHz pass-band imaging filter. This linewidth is narrow enough to fall within a Fraunhefer dark zone in the solar spectrum, thus make the detection solar blind. Experiments are conducted to measure the absorption line shape of the potassium resonant filter, the quantum efficiency of the fluorescent behavior, and the resolution of the fluorescent image. Fluorescent images with different spatial frequency components are analyzed by using a discrete Fourier transform, and the imaging capability of the fluorescent filter is described by its Modulation Transfer Function. For the detection of radiation that is spectrally broader than the linewidth of the potassium imaging filter, the fluorescent image is seen to be blurred by diffuse fluorescence from the slightly off resonant photons. To correct this, an ultra-thin potassium imaging filter is developed and characterized. The imaging property of the ultra-thin potassium imaging cell is tested with a potassium seeded flame, yielding a resolution image of ˜ 20 lines per mm. The physics behind the atomic resonant fluorescent filter is radiation trapping. The diffusion process of the resonant photons trapped in the atomic vapor is theoretically described in this thesis. A Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the

  16. Diffusion tensor image registration using hybrid connectivity and tensor features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yap, Pew-Thian; Wu, Guorong; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-07-01

    Most existing diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) registration methods estimate structural correspondences based on voxelwise matching of tensors. The rich connectivity information that is given by DTI, however, is often neglected. In this article, we propose to integrate complementary information given by connectivity features and tensor features for improved registration accuracy. To utilize connectivity information, we place multiple anchors representing different brain anatomies in the image space, and define the connectivity features for each voxel as the geodesic distances from all anchors to the voxel under consideration. The geodesic distance, which is computed in relation to the tensor field, encapsulates information of brain connectivity. We also extract tensor features for every voxel to reflect the local statistics of tensors in its neighborhood. We then combine both connectivity features and tensor features for registration of tensor images. From the images, landmarks are selected automatically and their correspondences are determined based on their connectivity and tensor feature vectors. The deformation field that deforms one tensor image to the other is iteratively estimated and optimized according to the landmarks and their associated correspondences. Experimental results show that, by using connectivity features and tensor features simultaneously, registration accuracy is increased substantially compared with the cases using either type of features alone. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Comparison of quality control software tools for diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilan; Zhu, Tong; Zhong, Jianhui

    2015-04-01

    Image quality of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is critical for image interpretation, diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. However, DTI is susceptible to numerous detrimental artifacts that may impair the reliability and validity of the obtained data. Although many quality control (QC) software tools are being developed and are widely used and each has its different tradeoffs, there is still no general agreement on an image quality control routine for DTIs, and the practical impact of these tradeoffs is not well studied. An objective comparison that identifies the pros and cons of each of the QC tools will be helpful for the users to make the best choice among tools for specific DTI applications. This study aims to quantitatively compare the effectiveness of three popular QC tools including DTI studio (Johns Hopkins University), DTIprep (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Iowa and University of Utah) and TORTOISE (National Institute of Health). Both synthetic and in vivo human brain data were used to quantify adverse effects of major DTI artifacts to tensor calculation as well as the effectiveness of different QC tools in identifying and correcting these artifacts. The technical basis of each tool was discussed, and the ways in which particular techniques affect the output of each of the tools were analyzed. The different functions and I/O formats that three QC tools provide for building a general DTI processing pipeline and integration with other popular image processing tools were also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Utility of Digital Stereo Images for Optic Disc Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Gui-shuang; Pearson, Denise J.; Bansal, Mayank; Puri, Manika; Miller, Eydie; Alexander, Judith; Piltz-Seymour, Jody; Nyberg, William; Maguire, Maureen G.; Eledath, Jayan; Sawhney, Harpreet

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the suitability of digital stereo images for optic disc evaluations in glaucoma. Methods. Stereo color optic disc images in both digital and 35-mm slide film formats were acquired contemporaneously from 29 subjects with various cup-to-disc ratios (range, 0.26–0.76; median, 0.475). Using a grading scale designed to assess image quality, the ease of visualizing optic disc features important for glaucoma diagnosis, and the comparative diameters of the optic disc cup, experienced observers separately compared the primary digital stereo images to each subject's 35-mm slides, to scanned images of the same 35-mm slides, and to grayscale conversions of the digital images. Statistical analysis accounted for multiple gradings and comparisons and also assessed image formats under monoscopic viewing. Results. Overall, the quality of primary digital color images was judged superior to that of 35-mm slides (P digital color images were mostly equivalent to the scanned digitized images of the same slides. Color seemingly added little to grayscale optic disc images, except that peripapillary atrophy was best seen in color (P digital over film images was maintained under monoscopic viewing conditions. Conclusions. Digital stereo optic disc images are useful for evaluating the optic disc in glaucoma and allow the application of advanced image processing applications. Grayscale images, by providing luminance distinct from color, may be informative for assessing certain features. PMID:20505199

  19. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of pancreatic islet cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Baris; Salmaslioglu, Artur; Poyanli, Arzu; Rozanes, Izzet; Acunas, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study is to demonstrate the feasibility of body diffusion weighted (DW) MR imaging in the evaluation of pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) and to define apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for these tumors. Materials and methods: 12 normal volunteers and 12 patients with histopathologically proven pancreatic ICT by surgery were included in the study. DW MR images were obtained by a body-phased array coil using a multisection single-shot echo planar sequence on the axial plane without breath holding. In addition, the routine abdominal imaging protocol for pancreas was applied in the patient group. We measured the ADC value within the normal pancreas in control group, pancreatic ICT, and surrounding pancreas parenchyma. Mann-Whitney U-test has been used to compare ADC values between tumoral tissues and normal pancreatic tissues of the volunteers. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was preferred to compare ADC values between tumoral tissues and surrounding pancreatic parenchyma of the patients. Results: In 11 patients out of 12, conventional MR sequences were able to demonstrate ICTs successfully. In 1 patient an indistinct suspicious lesion was noted at the pancreatic tail. DW sequence was able to demonstrate the lesions in all of the 12 patients. On the DW images, all ICTs demonstrated high signal intensity relative to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma. The mean and standard deviations of the ADC values (x10 -3 mm 2 /s) were as follows: ICT (n = 12), 1.51 ± 0.35 (0.91-2.11), surrounding parenchyma (n = 11) 0.76 ± 0.15 (0.51-1.01) and normal pancreas in normal volunteers (n = 12), 0.80 ± 0.06 (0.72-0.90). ADC values of the ICT were significantly higher compared with those of surrounding parenchyma (p < 0.01) and normal pancreas (p < 0.001). Conclusion: DW MR imaging does not appear to provide significant contribution to routine MR imaging protocol in the evaluation of pancreatic islet cell tumors. But it can be added to MR imaging

  20. Solid tissue simulating phantoms having absorption at 970 nm for diffuse optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gordon T.; Lentsch, Griffin R.; Trieu, Brandon; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Saager, Rolf B.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2017-07-01

    Tissue simulating phantoms can provide a valuable platform for quantitative evaluation of the performance of diffuse optical devices. While solid phantoms have been developed for applications related to characterizing exogenous fluorescence and intrinsic chromophores such as hemoglobin and melanin, we report the development of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) tissue phantom that mimics the spectral characteristics of tissue water. We have developed these phantoms to mimic different water fractions in tissue, with the purpose of testing new devices within the context of clinical applications such as burn wound triage. Compared to liquid phantoms, cured PDMS phantoms are easier to transport and use and have a longer usable life than gelatin-based phantoms. As silicone is hydrophobic, 9606 dye was used to mimic the optical absorption feature of water in the vicinity of 970 nm. Scattering properties are determined by adding titanium dioxide, which yields a wavelength-dependent scattering coefficient similar to that observed in tissue in the near-infrared. Phantom properties were characterized and validated using the techniques of inverse adding-doubling and spatial frequency domain imaging. Results presented here demonstrate that we can fabricate solid phantoms that can be used to simulate different water fractions.

  1. Modeling the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging signal inside neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D V; Li, J R; Grebenkov, D S; Le Bihan, D

    2014-01-01

    The Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation (PDE) describes the complex transverse water proton magnetization due to diffusion-encoding magnetic field gradient pulses. The integral of the solution of this PDE yields the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) signal. In a complex medium such as cerebral tissue, it is difficult to explicitly link the dMRI signal to biological parameters such as the cellular geometry or the cellular volume fraction. Studying the dMRI signal arising from a single neuron can provide insight into how the geometrical structure of neurons influences the measured signal. We formulate the Bloch-Torrey PDE inside a single neuron, under no water exchange condition with the extracellular space, and show how to reduce the 3D simulation in the full neuron to a 3D simulation around the soma and 1D simulations in the neurites. We show that this latter approach is computationally much faster than full 3D simulation and still gives accurate results over a wide range of diffusion times

  2. Heterodyne frequency-domain multispectral diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer in the parallel-plane transmission geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, H. Y.; Kavuri, V. C., E-mail: venk@physics.upenn.edu; Cochran, J. M.; Pathak, S.; Chung, S. H.; Yodh, A. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Schweiger, M.; Arridge, S. R. [Department of Computer Science, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Xie, L. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Busch, D. R. [Division of Neurology, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Katrašnik, J. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000 (Slovenia); Lee, K. [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu 711-813 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Czerniecki, B. J. [Department of Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: The authors introduce a state-of-the-art all-optical clinical diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging instrument which collects spatially dense, multispectral, frequency-domain breast data in the parallel-plate geometry. Methods: The instrument utilizes a CCD-based heterodyne detection scheme that permits massively parallel detection of diffuse photon density wave amplitude and phase for a large number of source–detector pairs (10{sup 6}). The stand-alone clinical DOT instrument thus offers high spatial resolution with reduced crosstalk between absorption and scattering. Other novel features include a fringe profilometry system for breast boundary segmentation, real-time data normalization, and a patient bed design which permits both axial and sagittal breast measurements. Results: The authors validated the instrument using tissue simulating phantoms with two different chromophore-containing targets and one scattering target. The authors also demonstrated the instrument in a case study breast cancer patient; the reconstructed 3D image of endogenous chromophores and scattering gave tumor localization in agreement with MRI. Conclusions: Imaging with a novel parallel-plate DOT breast imager that employs highly parallel, high-resolution CCD detection in the frequency-domain was demonstrated.

  3. Noninvasive optical imaging of resistance training adaptations in human muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert V.; Cotter, Joshua; Ganesan, Goutham; Le, Lisa; Agustin, Janelle P.; Duarte, Bridgette; Cutler, Kyle; O'Sullivan, Thomas; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2017-12-01

    A quantitative and dynamic analysis of skeletal muscle structure and function can guide training protocols and optimize interventions for rehabilitation and disease. While technologies exist to measure body composition, techniques are still needed for quantitative, long-term functional imaging of muscle at the bedside. We evaluate whether diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) can be used for long-term assessment of resistance training (RT). DOSI measures of tissue composition were obtained from 12 adults before and after 5 weeks of training and compared to lean mass fraction (LMF) from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Significant correlations were detected between DXA LMF and DOSI-measured oxy-hemo/myoglobin, deoxy-hemo/myoglobin, total-hemo/myoglobin, water, and lipid. RT-induced increases of ˜6% in oxy-hemo/myoglobin (3.4±1.0 μM, p=0.00314) and total-hemo/myoglobin (4.9±1.1 μM, p=0.00024) from the medial gastrocnemius were detected with DOSI and accompanied by ˜2% increases in lean soft tissue mass (36.4±12.4 g, p=0.01641) and ˜60% increases in 1 rep-max strength (41.5±6.2 kg, p = 1.9E-05). DOSI measures of vascular and/or muscle changes combined with correlations between DOSI and DXA suggest that quantitative diffuse optical methods can be used to evaluate body composition, provide feedback on long-term interventions, and generate new insight into training-induced muscle adaptations.

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid-Tannwald, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Zech, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) provides qualitative and quantitative information of tissue cellularity and the integrity of cellular membranes. Since DW-MRI can be performed without ionizing radiation exposure and contrast media application, DW-MRI is a particularly attractive tool for patients with allergies for gadolinium-based contrast agents or renal failure. Recent technical developments have made DW-MRI a robust and feasible technique for abdominal imaging. DW-MRI provides information on the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions and can also visualize treatment effects and early changes in chronic liver disease. In addition DW-MRI is a promising tool for the detection of inflammatory changes in patients with Crohn's disease. (orig.) [de

  5. Application and further development of diffusion based 2D chemical imaging techniques in the rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Christoph; Santner, Jakob; Borisov, Sergey; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Wenzel, Walter; Puschenreiter, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Two dimensional chemical imaging of root processes refers to novel in situ methods to investigate and map solutes at a high spatial resolution (sub-mm). The visualization of these solutes reveals new insights in soil biogeochemistry and root processes. We derive chemical images by using data from DGT-LA-ICP-MS (Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and POS (Planar Optode Sensors). Both technologies have shown promising results when applied in aqueous environment but need to be refined and improved for imaging at the soil-plant interface. Co-localized mapping using combined DGT and POS technologies and the development of new gel combinations are in our focus. DGTs are smart and thin (hydrogels; containing a binding resin for the targeted analytes (e.g. trace metals, phosphate, sulphide or radionuclides). The measurement principle is passive and diffusion based. The present analytes are diffusing into the gel and are bound by the resin. Thereby, the resin acts as zero sink. After application, DGTs are retrieved, dried, and analysed using LA-ICP-MS. The data is then normalized by an internal standard (e.g. 13C), calibrated using in-house standards and chemical images of the target area are plotted using imaging software. POS are, similar to DGT, thin sensor foils containing a fluorophore coating depending on the target analyte. The measurement principle is based on excitation of the flourophore by a specific wavelength and emission of the fluorophore depending on the presence of the analyte. The emitted signal is captured using optical filters and a DSLR camera. While DGT analysis is destructive, POS measurements can be performed continuously during the application. Both semi-quantitative techniques allow an in situ application to visualize chemical processes directly at the soil-plant interface. Here, we present a summary of results from rhizotron experiments with different plants in metal contaminated and

  6. Optical motion detection using image partitioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessel, K.R.; Stalker, K.T.; McCarthy, A.E.

    1976-08-01

    An optical system for surveillance or intrusion detection, based upon image partitioning, is proposed. The scene of interest is imaged onto a checkerboard pattern of transmissive and reflective areas and the transmitted and reflected light components are measured by detectors. Changes in the scene disturb the light balance and can cause an alarm indication. Several system configurations are proposed. Measurements and computer simulations are used to determine the operating characteristics of the several configurations. Depth of focus problems at the patterned reflector is the primary concern. Noise considerations determine the theoretical limitation of system performance and are analyzed in some detail. Indications are that, under good scene radiance conditions, a change in the scene of approximately one part in 10 3 is detectable with a signal-to-noise ratio sufficient for a false alarm rate of one every few months

  7. Multi-spectral and fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlu, Alper

    Multi-spectral and fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (DOT) techniques are explored and applied to image human breast cancer in vivo. Image reconstruction algorithms that utilize first and second order gradient information are described in detail. Breast DOT requires large computational memory and long run times. To this end, parallel computation techniques were developed appropriate to each reconstruction algorithm. A parallel plate DOT instrument developed for breast cancer imaging is described. The system relies heavily on continuous-wave (CW) transmission measurements and utilizes frequency domain (FD) measurements on the reemission side. However, traditional DOT image reconstruction methods based on CW measurements fail to separate tissue absorption and scattering uniquely. In this manuscript, multi-spectral DOT is shown to be capable of minimizing cross-talk and retrieving spectral parameters almost uniquely when the measurement wavelengths are optimized. A theoretical framework to select optimum wavelengths is provided, and tested with computer simulations. Results from phantom spectroscopy experiments and in vivo patient measurements support the notion that multi-spectral methods are superior to traditional DOT image reconstruction schemes. The same breast DOT instrument is improved and utilized to obtain the first in vivo images of human breast cancer based on fluorescence DOT (FDOT). To this end the fluorophore Indocyanine Green (ICG) is injected intravenously and fluorescence excitation and detection are accomplished in the soft-compression, parallel-plane, transmission geometry using laser sources at 786 nm and spectrally filtered CCD detection. Careful phantom and in vivo measurements are carried on to assure that the signals are due to ICG fluorescence, rather than tissue autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. An in vivo measurement protocol is designed to maximize the ICG contrast by acquiring full fluorescence tomographic scan during

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in transient ischaemic attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C.; Calvet, D.; Domigo, V.; Mas, J. [de l' Hopital Sainte-Anne, Service de Neurologie, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Oppenheim, C.; Naggara, O.; Meder, J.F. [Hoepital Sainte-Anne, Departement d' Imagere Morphologique et Fonchonnille, Paris (France)

    2006-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency and the characteristics of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We analysed data of 98 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.6{+-}15.4 years, 56 men) admitted between January 2003 and April 2004 for TIA. Age, gender, symptom type and duration, delay from onset to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), probable or possible TIA and cause of TIA were compared in patients with (DWI+) and without (DWI-) lesions on DWI. Volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI lesions were computed. DWI revealed ischaemic lesions in 34 patients (34.7%). Lesions were small (mean volume: 1.9 cm{sup 3}{+-}3.3), and ADC was moderately decreased (mean ADC ratio: 79.5%). The diagnosis of TIA was considered as probable in all DWI+ patients. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that TIA duration greater than or equal to 60 min (OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.3-25.7), aphasia (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 2.7-31.4) and motor deficit (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.5-17.8) were independent predictors of DWI lesions. Prolonged TIA duration, aphasia and motor deficits are associated with DWI lesions. More than half of TIA patients with symptoms lasting more than 60 min have DWI lesions. (orig.)

  9. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in transient ischaemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamy, C.; Calvet, D.; Domigo, V.; Mas, J.; Oppenheim, C.; Naggara, O.; Meder, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency and the characteristics of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We analysed data of 98 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.6±15.4 years, 56 men) admitted between January 2003 and April 2004 for TIA. Age, gender, symptom type and duration, delay from onset to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), probable or possible TIA and cause of TIA were compared in patients with (DWI+) and without (DWI-) lesions on DWI. Volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI lesions were computed. DWI revealed ischaemic lesions in 34 patients (34.7%). Lesions were small (mean volume: 1.9 cm 3 ±3.3), and ADC was moderately decreased (mean ADC ratio: 79.5%). The diagnosis of TIA was considered as probable in all DWI+ patients. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that TIA duration greater than or equal to 60 min (OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.3-25.7), aphasia (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 2.7-31.4) and motor deficit (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.5-17.8) were independent predictors of DWI lesions. Prolonged TIA duration, aphasia and motor deficits are associated with DWI lesions. More than half of TIA patients with symptoms lasting more than 60 min have DWI lesions. (orig.)

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of transplanted kidneys: Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wypych-Klunder, Katarzyna; Adamowicz, Andrzej; Lemanowicz, Adam; Szczęsny, Wojciech; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    An aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DWI in the early period after kidney transplantation. We also aimed to compare ADC and eADC values in the cortex and medulla of the kidney, to estimate image noise and variability of measurements, and to verify possible relation between selected labolatory results and diffusion parameters in the transplanted kidney. Examinations were performed using a 1.5 T MR unit. DWI (SE/EPI) was performed in the axial plane using b-values of 600 and 1000. ADC and eADC measurements were performed in four regions of interest within the renal cortex and in three regions within the medulla. Relative variability of results and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated. The analysis included 15 patients (mean age 52 years). The mean variability of ADC was significantly lower than that of eADC (6.8% vs. 10.8%, respectively; p30 ml/min./1.73 m(2) (p<0.05). Diffusion-weighted imaging of transplanted kidneys is technically challenging, especially in patients in the early period after transplantation. From a technical point of view, the best quality parameters offer quality ADC measurement in the renal cortex using b1000. ADC and eADC values in the renal cortex measured at b1000 present a relationship with eGFR.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging in normal fetal brain maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F. [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Confort-Gouny, S.; Le Fur, Y.; Viout, P.; Cozzone, P. [UMR-CNRS 6612, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Bennathan, M.; Chapon, F.; Fogliarini, C.; Girard, N. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Department of Neuroradiology AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information about tissue maturation not seen on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution over time of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal fetal brain in utero. DWI was performed on 78 fetuses, ranging from 23 to 37 gestational weeks (GW). All children showed at follow-up a normal neurological evaluation. ADC values were obtained in the deep white matter (DWM) of the centrum semiovale, the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe, in the cerebellar hemisphere, the brainstem, the basal ganglia (BG) and the thalamus. Mean ADC values in supratentorial DWM areas (1.68 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s) were higher compared with the cerebellar hemisphere (1.25 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 2}/s) and lowest in the pons (1.11 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s). Thalamus and BG showed intermediate values (1.25 {+-} 0.04 mm{sup 2}/s). Brainstem, cerebellar hemisphere and thalamus showed a linear negative correlation with gestational age. Supratentorial areas revealed an increase in ADC values, followed by a decrease after the 30th GW. This study provides a normative data set that allows insights in the normal fetal brain maturation in utero, which has not yet been observed in previous studies on premature babies. (orig.)

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging in characterization of cystic pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K., E-mail: ksandras@iupui.edu [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Akisik, F.M.; Patel, A.A.; Rydberg, M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cramer, H.M.; Agaram, N.P. [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Schmidt, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can characterize or predict the malignant potential of cystic pancreatic lesions. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database over a 2-year period revealed 136 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions. Patients with DWI studies and histological confirmation of cystic mass were included. In patients with known pancreatitis, lesions with amylase content of >1000 IU/l that resolved on subsequent scans were included as pseudocysts. ADC of cystic lesions was measured by two independent reviewers. These values were then compared to categorize these lesions as benign or malignant using conventional MRI sequences. Results: Seventy lesions were analysed: adenocarcinoma (n = 4), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; n = 28), mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN; n = 9), serous cystadenoma (n = 16), and pseudocysts (n = 13). There was no difference between ADC values of malignant and non-malignant lesions (p = 0.06), between mucinous and serous tumours (p = 0.12), or between IPMN and MCN (p = 0.42). ADC values for low-grade IPMN were significantly higher than those for high-grade or invasive IPMN (p = 0.03). Conclusion: ADC values may be helpful in deciding the malignant potential of IPMN. However, they are not useful in differentiating malignant from benign lesions or for characterizing cystic pancreatic lesions.

  13. Assessment of vasogenic edema in eclampsia using diffusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelter, S.T. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Division of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Provenzale, J.M.; Petrella, J.R. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2000-11-01

    We qualitatively assessed the regional distribution of vasogenic edema in a case of postpartum eclampsia. Although diffusion-weighted imaging showed no abnormalities, bilateral high signal was seen on T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. ADC of 1.45 {+-} 0.10 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3} for the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) territory and 1.22 {+-} 0.12 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3} for the watershed areas were significantly higher than those in the territories of the anterior (0.85 {+-} 0.07 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) and middle cerebral (0.79 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3})arteries (P < 0.05). The predilection of ADC changes within the PCA territory and in a previously undescribed watershed distribution supports the hypothesis that vasogenic edema in eclampsia is due to hypertension-induced failure of vascular autoregulation. (orig.)

  14. Metasurface optics for full-color computational imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2018-02-01

    Conventional imaging systems comprise large and expensive optical components that successively mitigate aberrations. Metasurface optics offers a route to miniaturize imaging systems by replacing bulky components with flat and compact implementations. The diffractive nature of these devices, however, induces severe chromatic aberrations, and current multiwavelength and narrowband achromatic metasurfaces cannot support full visible spectrum imaging (400 to 700 nm). We combine principles of both computational imaging and metasurface optics to build a system with a single metalens of numerical aperture ~0.45, which generates in-focus images under white light illumination. Our metalens exhibits a spectrally invariant point spread function that enables computational reconstruction of captured images with a single digital filter. This work connects computational imaging and metasurface optics and demonstrates the capabilities of combining these disciplines by simultaneously reducing aberrations and downsizing imaging systems using simpler optics.

  15. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in autoimmune pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Takao; Kobayashi, Hisato; Nishikawa, Koji; Iida, Etsushi; Michigami, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Emiko; Yamashita, Rikiya; Miyagi, Ken; Okamoto, Motozumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI MRI) for the diagnosis and evaluation of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). A total of 4 consecutive patients with AIP, 5 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (CP), and 13 patients without pancreatic disease (controls) were studied. DWI was performed in the axial plane with spin-echo echo-planar imaging single-shot sequence. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured in circular regions of interest in the pancreas. In AIP patients, abdominal MRI was performed before, and 2-4 weeks after steroid treatment. Follow-up study was performed chronologically for up to 11 months in two patients. The correlation between ADCs of the pancreas and the immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) index (serum IgG4 value/serum IgG4 value before steroid treatment) was evaluated. In the AIP patients, DWI of the pancreas showed high signal intensity, and the ADCs of the pancreas (mean±standard deviation (SD): 0.97±0.18 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) were significantly lower than those in patients with CP (1.45±0.10 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) or the controls (1.45±0.16 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) (Mann-Whitney U-test, P s =-0.80, P<0.05). Autoimmune pancreatitis showed high signal intensity on DWI, which improved after steroid treatment. ADCs reflected disease activity. Thus, diffusion-weighted MRI might be useful for diagnosing AIP, determining the affected area, and evaluating the effect of treatment. (author)

  16. Non-linear optical imaging – Introduction and pharmaceutical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Isomaki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J.

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging is an emerging technology with much potential in pharmaceutical analysis. The technique encompasses a range of optical phenomena, including coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG), and twophoton excited fluorescence (TPEF). The

  17. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  18. SPECIAL ASPECTS OF INITIAL OPTICAL SCHEME SELECTION FOR DESIGN OF NON-IMAGING OPTICAL SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    R. V. Anitropov; P. Benitez; I. L. Livshits S. K. Stafeev; S. K. Stafeev; V. N. Vasilev; M. V. Letunovskaya; A. S. Zaitceva

    2016-01-01

    Subject of Research. The research results, structural composition analysis and the parametric synthesis of the projected imaging and non-imaging optical systems were presented. We made an attempt to use the gained experience about imaging systems while designing non-imaging systems, by adapting the composition theory for the calculations of non-imaging systems. Several patterns were revealed, which provide a deeper understanding of the design process of non-imaging optical systems; measures ...

  19. Imaging carbon nanotube interactions, diffusion, and stability in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Shannon L; Smith, Billy; Meric, Gulsum; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2011-07-26

    We report optical microscopy measurements of three-dimensional trajectories of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in nanoscale silica slit pores. Trajectories are analyzed to nonintrusively measure MWCNT interactions, diffusion, and stability as a function of pH and ionic strength. Evanescent wave scattering is used to track MWCNT positions normal to pore walls with nanometer-scale resolution, and video microscopy is used to track lateral positions with spatial resolution comparable to the diffraction limit. Analysis of MWCNT excursions normal to pore walls yields particle-wall potentials that agree with theoretical electrostatic and van der Waals potentials assuming a rotationally averaged potential of mean force. MWCNT lateral mean square displacements are used to quantify translational diffusivities, which are comparable to predictions based on the best available theories. Finally, measured MWCNT pH and ionic strength dependent stabilities are in excellent agreement with predictions. Our findings demonstrate novel measurement and modeling tools to understand the behavior of confined MWCNTs relevant to a broad range of applications.

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the pancreas; Diffusionsbildgebung des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, K. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, E010, Heidelberg (Germany); Grenacher, L.; Klauss, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has increasingly gained in importance over the last 10 years especially in cancer imaging for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. Through development of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences DWI is not only applicable in neuroradiology but also in abdominal imaging. As a diagnostic tool of the pancreas DWI enables a differentiation between normal tissue, cancer and chronic pancreatitis. The ADC values (apparent diffusion coefficient, the so-called effective diffusion coefficient) reported in the literature for healthy pancreatic tissue are in the range from 1.49 to 1.9 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, for pancreatic cancer in the range from 1.24 to 1.46 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and for autoimmune pancreatitis an average ADC value of 1.012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. There are controversial data in the literature concerning the differentiation between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Using DWI-derived IVIM (intravoxel incoherent motion) the parameter f (perfusion fraction) seems to be advantageous but it is important to use several b values. In the literature the mean f value in chronic pancreatitis is around 16%, in pancreatic cancer 8% and in healthy pancreatic tissue around 25%. So far, DWI has not been helpful for differentiating cystic lesions of the pancreas. There are many references with other tumor entities and in animal models which indicate that there is a possible benefit of DWI in monitoring therapy of pancreatic cancer but so far no original work has been published. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusionsbildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) gewann in den letzten 10 Jahren insbesondere in der Tumorbildgebung zur Unterscheidung zwischen malignen und benignen Laesionen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Durch Entwicklung schnellerer MR-Sequenzen ist sie nicht nur in der Neuroradiologie, sondern auch in der Abdomenbildgebung einsetzbar. In der Pankreasdiagnostik ermoeglicht sie

  1. Habitable Exoplanet Imager Optical Telescope Concept Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H Philip

    2017-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is one of four missions under study for the 2020 Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Its goal is to directly image and spectroscopically characterize planetary systems in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. Additionally, HabEx will perform a broad range of general astrophysics science enabled by 100 to 2500 nm spectral range and 3 x 3 arc-minute FOV. Critical to achieving the HabEx science goals is a large, ultra-stable UV/Optical/Near-IR (UVOIR) telescope. The baseline HabEx telescope is a 4-meter off-axis unobscured three-mirror-anastigmatic, diffraction limited at 400 nm with wavefront stability on the order of a few 10s of picometers. This paper summarizes the opto-mechanical design of the HabEx baseline optical telescope assembly, including a discussion of how science requirements drive the telescope's specifications, and presents analysis that the baseline telescope structure meets its specified tolerances.

  2. Habitable exoplanet imager optical telescope concept design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2017-09-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is one of four missions under study for the 2020 Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Its goal is to directly image and spectroscopically characterize planetary systems in the habitable zone of Sunlike stars. Additionally, HabEx will perform a broad range of general astrophysics science enabled by 100 to 2500 nm spectral range and 3 x 3 arc-minute FOV. Critical to achieving the HabEx science goals is a large, ultra-stable UV/Optical/Near-IR (UVOIR) telescope. The baseline HabEx telescope is a 4-meter off-axis unobscured three-mirroranastigmatic, diffraction limited at 400 nm with wavefront stability on the order of a few 10s of picometers. This paper summarizes the opto-mechanical design of the HabEx baseline optical telescope assembly, including a discussion of how science requirements drive the telescope's specifications, and presents analysis that the baseline telescope structure meets its specified tolerances.

  3. Mapping cortical haemodynamics during neonatal seizures using diffuse optical tomography: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimrat Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures in the newborn brain represent a major challenge to neonatal medicine. Neonatal seizures are poorly classified, under-diagnosed, difficult to treat and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Video-EEG is the current gold-standard approach for seizure detection and monitoring. Interpreting neonatal EEG requires expertise and the impact of seizures on the developing brain remains poorly understood. In this case study we present the first ever images of the haemodynamic impact of seizures on the human infant brain, obtained using simultaneous diffuse optical tomography (DOT and video-EEG with whole-scalp coverage. Seven discrete periods of ictal electrographic activity were observed during a 60 minute recording of an infant with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy. The resulting DOT images show a remarkably consistent, high-amplitude, biphasic pattern of changes in cortical blood volume and oxygenation in response to each electrographic event. While there is spatial variation across the cortex, the dominant haemodynamic response to seizure activity consists of an initial increase in cortical blood volume prior to a large and extended decrease typically lasting several minutes. This case study demonstrates the wealth of physiologically and clinically relevant information that DOT–EEG techniques can yield. The consistency and scale of the haemodynamic responses observed here also suggest that DOT–EEG has the potential to provide improved detection of neonatal seizures.

  4. Artifact reduction method in ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography using exogenous contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Biswal, Nrusingh; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2011-04-01

    In diffuse optical tomography (DOT), a typical perturbation approach requires two sets of measurements obtained at the lesion breast (lesion or target site) and a contra-lateral location of the normal breast (reference site) for image reconstruction. For patients who have a small amount of breast tissue, the chest-wall underneath the breast tissue at both sites affects the imaging results. In this group of patients, the perturbation, which is the difference between measurements obtained at the lesion and reference sites, may include the information of background mismatch which can generate artifacts or affect the reconstructed quantitative absorption coefficient of the lesion. Also, for patients who have a single breast due to prior surgery, the contra-lateral reference is not available. To improve the DOT performance or overcome its limitation, we introduced a new method based on an exogenous contrast agent and demonstrate its performance using animal models. Co-registered ultrasound was used to guide the lesion localization. The results have shown that artifacts caused by background mismatch can be reduced significantly by using this new method.

  5. Exploiting Optical Contrasts for Cervical Precancer Diagnosis via Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Vivide Tuan-Chyan

    collagen without altering the amount of collagen present. Further work would be required to elucidate the exact sources of scattering contrast observed. Common confounding variables that limit the accuracy and clinical acceptability of optical spectroscopic systems are calibration requirements and variable probe-tissue contact pressures. Our results suggest that using a real-time self-calibration channel, as opposed to conventional post-experiment diffuse reflectance standard calibration measurements, significantly improved data integrity for the extraction of scattering contrast. Extracted [total Hb] and scattering were also significantly associated with applied contact probe pressure in colposcopically normal sites. Hence, future contact probe spectroscopy or imaging systems should incorporate a self-calibration channel and ensure spectral acquisition at a consistent contact pressure to collect reliable data with enhanced absorption and scattering contrasts. Another method to enhance optical contrast is to selectively interrogate different depths in the dysplastic cervix. For instance, scattering has been shown to increase in the epithelium (increase in nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio) while decrease in the stroma (re-organization of the extra-cellular matrix and changes in of collagen fiber cross-links). A fiber-optic probe with 45° illumination and collection fibers with a separation distance of 330 μm was designed and constructed to selectively interrogate the cervical epithelium. Mean extraction errors from liquid phantoms with optical properties mimicking the cervical epithelium for μa and μs' were 11.3 % and 12.7 %, respectively. Diffuse reflectance spectra from 9 sites in four loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) patients were analyzed. Preliminary data demonstrate the utility of the oblique fiber geometry in extracting scattering contrast in the cervical epithelium. Further work is needed to study the systematic error in optical property extraction and

  6. A Quantitative Diffuse Reflectance Imaging (QDRI) System for Comprehensive Surveillance of the Morphological Landscape in Breast Tumor Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brandon S; Schindler, Christine E; Brown, Jonathon Q; Wilke, Lee G; Mulvey, Christine S; Krieger, Marlee S; Gallagher, Jennifer; Geradts, Joseph; Greenup, Rachel A; Von Windheim, Jesko A; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to address the clear clinical unmet needs surrounding breast conserving surgery (BCS), our group has developed a next-generation multiplexed optical-fiber-based tool to assess breast tumor margin status during initial surgeries. Specifically detailed in this work is the performance and clinical validation of a research-grade intra-operative tool for margin assessment based on diffuse optical spectroscopy. Previous work published by our group has illustrated the proof-of-concept generations of this device; here we incorporate a highly optimized quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (QDRI) system utilizing a wide-field (imaging area = 17 cm(2)) 49-channel multiplexed fiber optic probe, a custom raster-scanning imaging platform, a custom dual-channel white LED source, and an astronomy grade imaging CCD and spectrograph. The system signal to noise ratio (SNR) was found to be greater than 40 dB for all channels. Optical property estimation error was found to be less than 10%, on average, over a wide range of absorption (μa = 0-8.9 cm(-1)) and scattering (μs' = 7.0-9.7 cm(-1)) coefficients. Very low inter-channel and CCD crosstalk was observed (2% max) when used on turbid media (including breast tissue). A raster-scanning mechanism was developed to achieve sub-pixel resolution and was found to be optimally performed at an upsample factor of 8, affording 0.75 mm spatially resolved diffuse reflectance images (λ = 450-600 nm) of an entire margin (area = 17 cm(2)) in 13.8 minutes (1.23 cm(2)/min). Moreover, controlled pressure application at the probe-tissue interface afforded by the imaging platform reduces repeated scan variability, providing operative time scales with improved sensitivity to regions of focal disease that may otherwise be overlooked.

  7. Early and progressive microstructural brain changes in mice overexpressing human alpha-Synuclein detected by diffusion kurtosis imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khairnar, A.; Rudá-Kučerová, J.; Szabó, N.; Dražanová, Eva; Arab, A.; Hutter-Paier, B.; Neddens, J.; Latta, P.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Rektorová, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, MAR (2017), s. 197-208 ISSN 0889-1591 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : MRI * diffusion kurtosis imaging * substantia nigra * sriatum * thalamus * TNWT-61 * parkinson's disease * transgenic mice * animal model Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: 1.7 Other natural sciences Impact factor: 5.964, year: 2016

  8. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of transient ischemic attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Seung Ik; Yoon, Pyung Ho; Heo, Ji Hoe; Lee, Byung In

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the findings of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in patients with transient ischemic attacks (TIA). Between August 1996 and June 1999, 41 TIA patients (M:F =3D 28:13, mean age 57 (range, 27-75) years) with neurologic symptoms lasting less than 24 hours underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging. The time interval between the onset of symptoms and MR examination was less than one week in 29 patients, from one week to one month in eight, and undetermined in four. Conventional MR and DWI were compared in terms of location of infarction and lesion size (less than 1 cm, 1-3 cm, greater than 3 cm), and we also determined the anatomical vascular territory of acute stroke lesions and possible etiologic mechanisms. The findings of DWI were normal in 24/41 patients (58.5%), while 15 (36.6%) showed acute ischemic lesions. The other two showed old lacunar infarcts. All acute and old DWI lesions were revealed by conventional MR imaging. Among the 15 acute stroke patients, seven had small vessel lacunar disease. In three patients, the infarction was less than 1 cm in size. Six patients showed large vessel infarction in the territory of the MCA, PCA, and PICA; the size of this was less than 1 cm in three patients, 1-3 cm in two, and more than 3 cm in one. In two patients, embolic infarction of cardiac origin in the territory of the MCA and AICA was diagnosed. The possible mechanism of TIA is still undetermined, but acute lesions revealed by DWI in TIA patients tend, in any case, to be small and multiple. (author)

  9. Simultaneous analysis and quality assurance for diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn B Lauzon

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI enables non-invasive, cyto-architectural mapping of in vivo tissue microarchitecture through voxel-wise mathematical modeling of multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI acquisitions, each differently sensitized to water diffusion. DTI computations are fundamentally estimation processes and are sensitive to noise and artifacts. Despite widespread adoption in the neuroimaging community, maintaining consistent DTI data quality remains challenging given the propensity for patient motion, artifacts associated with fast imaging techniques, and the possibility of hardware changes/failures. Furthermore, the quantity of data acquired per voxel, the non-linear estimation process, and numerous potential use cases complicate traditional visual data inspection approaches. Currently, quality inspection of DTI data has relied on visual inspection and individual processing in DTI analysis software programs (e.g. DTIPrep, DTI-studio. However, recent advances in applied statistical methods have yielded several different metrics to assess noise level, artifact propensity, quality of tensor fit, variance of estimated measures, and bias in estimated measures. To date, these metrics have been largely studied in isolation. Herein, we select complementary metrics for integration into an automatic DTI analysis and quality assurance pipeline. The pipeline completes in 24 hours, stores statistical outputs, and produces a graphical summary quality analysis (QA report. We assess the utility of this streamlined approach for empirical quality assessment on 608 DTI datasets from pediatric neuroimaging studies. The efficiency and accuracy of quality analysis using the proposed pipeline is compared with quality analysis based on visual inspection. The unified pipeline is found to save a statistically significant amount of time (over 70% while improving the consistency of QA between a DTI expert and a pool of research associates. Projection of QA

  10. Characterization of Soft Tissue Tumors by Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kahya, Mehmet Onur; Kaya, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive method for investigation of tumor histological content. It has been applied for some musculoskeletal tumors and reported to be useful. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of benign and malignant soft tissue tumors and to determine if ADC can help differentiate these tumors. DWI was performed on 25 histologically proven soft tissue masses. It was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging technique using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) machine. The mean ADC values were calculated. We grouped soft tissue tumors as benign cystic, benign solid or mixed, malignant cystic and malignant solid or mixed tumors and compared mean ADC values between these groups. There was only one patient with a malignant cystic tumor and was not included in the statistical analysis. The median ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 2.31 ± 1.29 and 0.90 ± 0.70 (median ± interquartile range), respectively. The mean ADC values were different between benign and malignant tumors (P = 0.031). Benign cystic tumors had significantly higher ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors and malignant solid or mixed tumors (p values were < 0.001 and 0.003, respectively). Malignant solid or mixed tumors had lower ADC values than benign solid or mixed tumors (P = 0.02). Our preliminary results have shown that although there is some overlap between benign and malignant tumors, adding DWI, MR imaging to routine soft tissue tumor protocols may improve diagnostic accuracy

  11. Transcranial diffuse optical assessment of the microvascular reperfusion after thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Gregori-Pla, Clara; Zirak, Peyman; Blanco, Igor; Dinia, Lavinia; Marín, Rebeca; Durduran, Turgut; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2018-03-01

    In this pilot study, we have evaluated bedside diffuse optical monitoring combining diffuse correlation spectroscopy and near-infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy to assess the effect of thrombolysis with an intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) on cerebral hemodynamics in an acute ischemic stroke. Frontal lobes of five patients with an acute middle cerebral artery occlusion were measured bilaterally during rtPA treatment. Both ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres showed significant increases in cerebral blood flow, total hemoglobin concentration and oxy-hemoglobin concentration during the first 2.5 hours after rtPA bolus. The increases were faster and higher in the ipsilesional hemisphere. The results show that bedside optical monitoring can detect the effect of reperfusion therapy for ischemic stroke in real-time.

  12. Diagnostic performance of conventional diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging for the liver fibrosis and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosun, Mesude; Inan, Nagihan; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin; Akansel, Gur; Gumustas, Sevtap; Gürbüz, Yeşim; Demirci, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of liver apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured with conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (CDI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis and inflammation. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with histologic diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis and 34 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. All patients and healthy volunteers were examined by 3 T MRI. CDI and DTI were performed using a breath-hold single-shot echo-planar spin echo sequence with b factors of 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 . ADCs were obtained with CDI and DTI. Histopathologically, fibrosis of the liver parenchyma was classified with the use of a 5-point scale (0–4) and inflammation was classified with use of a 4-point scale (0–3) in accordance with the METAVIR score. Quantitatively, signal intensity and the ADCs of the liver parenchyma were compared between patients stratified by fibrosis stage and inflammation grade. Results: With a b factor of 1000 s/mm 2 , the signal intensity of the cirrhotic livers was significantly higher than those of the normal volunteers. In addition, ADCs reconstructed from CDI and DTI of the patients were significantly lower than those of the normal volunteers. Liver ADC values inversely correlated with fibrosis and inflammation but there was only statistically significant for inflammatory grading. CDI performed better than DTI for the diagnosis of fibrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: ADC values measured with CDI and DTI may help in the detection of liver fibrosis. They may also give contributory to the inflammatory grading, particularly in distinguishing high from low grade

  13. Diagnostic performance of conventional diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging for the liver fibrosis and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosun, Mesude, E-mail: mesude.tosun@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Inan, Nagihan, E-mail: inannagihan@ekolay.net [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin, E-mail: htssarisoy@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Akansel, Gur, E-mail: gakansel@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Gumustas, Sevtap, E-mail: svtgumustas@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Gürbüz, Yeşim, E-mail: yesimgurbuz2002@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Demirci, Ali, E-mail: alidemirci@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of liver apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured with conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (CDI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis and inflammation. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with histologic diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis and 34 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. All patients and healthy volunteers were examined by 3 T MRI. CDI and DTI were performed using a breath-hold single-shot echo-planar spin echo sequence with b factors of 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADCs were obtained with CDI and DTI. Histopathologically, fibrosis of the liver parenchyma was classified with the use of a 5-point scale (0–4) and inflammation was classified with use of a 4-point scale (0–3) in accordance with the METAVIR score. Quantitatively, signal intensity and the ADCs of the liver parenchyma were compared between patients stratified by fibrosis stage and inflammation grade. Results: With a b factor of 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, the signal intensity of the cirrhotic livers was significantly higher than those of the normal volunteers. In addition, ADCs reconstructed from CDI and DTI of the patients were significantly lower than those of the normal volunteers. Liver ADC values inversely correlated with fibrosis and inflammation but there was only statistically significant for inflammatory grading. CDI performed better than DTI for the diagnosis of fibrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: ADC values measured with CDI and DTI may help in the detection of liver fibrosis. They may also give contributory to the inflammatory grading, particularly in distinguishing high from low grade.

  14. Miniaturized pulsed laser source for time-domain diffuse optics routes to wearable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sieno, Laura; Nissinen, Jan; Hallman, Lauri; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Contini, Davide; Pifferi, Antonio; Kostamovaara, Juha; Mora, Alberto Dalla

    2017-08-01

    We validate a miniaturized pulsed laser source for use in time-domain (TD) diffuse optics, following rigorous and shared protocols for performance assessment of this class of devices. This compact source (12×6  mm2) has been previously developed for range finding applications and is able to provide short, high energy (∼100  ps, ∼0.5  nJ) optical pulses at up to 1 MHz repetition rate. Here, we start with a basic level laser characterization with an analysis of suitability of this laser for the diffuse optics application. Then, we present a TD optical system using this source and its performances in both recovering optical properties of tissue-mimicking homogeneous phantoms and in detecting localized absorption perturbations. Finally, as a proof of concept of in vivo application, we demonstrate that the system is able to detect hemodynamic changes occurring in the arm of healthy volunteers during a venous occlusion. Squeezing the laser source in a small footprint removes a key technological bottleneck that has hampered so far the realization of a miniaturized TD diffuse optics system, able to compete with already assessed continuous-wave devices in terms of size and cost, but with wider performance potentialities, as demonstrated by research over the last two decades. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  15. Portable, Fiber-Based, Diffuse Reflection Spectroscopy (DRS) Systems for Estimating Tissue Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Chang, Kevin; Klein, Daniel; Deng, Yu Feng; Chang, Vivide; Phelps, Janelle E; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2011-02-01

    Steady-state diffuse reflection spectroscopy is a well-studied optical technique that can provide a noninvasive and quantitative method for characterizing the absorption and scattering properties of biological tissues. Here, we compare three fiber-based diffuse reflection spectroscopy systems that were assembled to create a light-weight, portable, and robust optical spectrometer that could be easily translated for repeated and reliable use in mobile settings. The three systems were built using a broadband light source and a compact, commercially available spectrograph. We tested two different light sources and two spectrographs (manufactured by two different vendors). The assembled systems were characterized by their signal-to-noise ratios, the source-intensity drifts, and detector linearity. We quantified the performance of these instruments in extracting optical properties from diffuse reflectance spectra in tissue-mimicking liquid phantoms with well-controlled optical absorption and scattering coefficients. We show that all assembled systems were able to extract the optical absorption and scattering properties with errors less than 10%, while providing greater than ten-fold decrease in footprint and cost (relative to a previously well-characterized and widely used commercial system). Finally, we demonstrate the use of these small systems to measure optical biomarkers in vivo in a small-animal model cancer therapy study. We show that optical measurements from the simple portable system provide estimates of tumor oxygen saturation similar to those detected using the commercial system in murine tumor models of head and neck cancer.

  16. Optical design of the lightning imager for MTG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, S.; Bardazzi, R.; Di Giampietro, M.; Feresin, F.; Taccola, M.; Cuevas, L. P.

    2017-11-01

    The Lightning Imager for Meteosat Third Generation is an optical payload with on-board data processing for the detection of lightning. The instrument will provide a global monitoring of lightning events over the full Earth disk from geostationary orbit and will operate in day and night conditions. The requirements of the large field of view together with the high detection efficiency with small and weak optical pulses superimposed to a much brighter and highly spatial and temporal variable background (full operation during day and night conditions, seasonal variations and different albedos between clouds oceans and lands) are driving the design of the optical instrument. The main challenge is to distinguish a true lightning from false events generated by random noise (e.g. background shot noise) or sun glints diffusion or signal variations originated by microvibrations. This can be achieved thanks to a `multi-dimensional' filtering, simultaneously working on the spectral, spatial and temporal domains. The spectral filtering is achieved with a very narrowband filter centred on the bright lightning O2 triplet line (777.4 nm +/- 0.17 nm). The spatial filtering is achieved with a ground sampling distance significantly smaller (between 4 and 5 km at sub satellite pointing) than the dimensions of a typical lightning pulse. The temporal filtering is achieved by sampling continuously the Earth disk within a period close to 1 ms. This paper presents the status of the optical design addressing the trade-off between different configurations and detailing the design and the analyses of the current baseline. Emphasis is given to the discussion of the design drivers and the solutions implemented in particular concerning the spectral filtering and the optimisation of the signal to noise ratio.

  17. Optical coherence tomography in anterior segment imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev-Landoy, Maya; Day, Alexander C.; Cordeiro, M. Francesca; Migdal, Clive

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability of optical coherence tomography (OCT), designed primarily to image the posterior segment, to visualize the anterior chamber angle (ACA) in patients with different angle configurations. Methods In a prospective observational study, the anterior segments of 26 eyes of 26 patients were imaged using the Zeiss Stratus OCT, model 3000. Imaging of the anterior segment was achieved by adjusting the focusing control on the Stratus OCT. A total of 16 patients had abnormal angle configurations including narrow or closed angles and plateau irides, and 10 had normal angle configurations as determined by prior full ophthalmic examination, including slit-lamp biomicroscopy and gonioscopy. Results In all cases, OCT provided high-resolution information regarding iris configuration. The ACA itself was clearly visualized in patients with narrow or closed angles, but not in patients with open angles. Conclusions Stratus OCT offers a non-contact, convenient and rapid method of assessing the configuration of the anterior chamber. Despite its limitations, it may be of help during the routine clinical assessment and treatment of patients with glaucoma, particularly when gonioscopy is not possible or difficult to interpret. PMID:17355288

  18. Diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  19. Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Acute Attacks of Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davoudi, Yasmin; Foroughipour, Mohsen; Torabi, Reza; Layegh, Parvaneh; Matin, Nassim; Shoeibi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common autoimmune disorders of the central nervous system. In spite of various imaging modalities, the definitive diagnosis of MS remains challenging. This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute MS attack and to compare its results with contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI). In this cross sectional study, seventy patients with definite diagnosis of relapsing-remitting MS were included. CE-MRI using 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium as well as DWI sequences were performed for all patients. The percentage of patients with positive DWI was compared with the results of CE-MRI and the consistency between the two imaging modalities was evaluated. Moreover, the relationship between the time of onset of patient’s symptoms and test results for both methods were investigated. CE-MRI yielded positive results for 61 (87%) patients and DWI yielded positive for 53 (76%) patients. In fifty patients (71.42%), both tests were positive and in six cases (8.57%), both were negative. The test results of three patients turned out to be positive in DWI, while they tested negative in CE-MRI. There was no significant relationship between the results of CE-MRI as well as DWI and the time of imaging from the onset of symptoms. These data indicate that while CE-MRI will depict more positive results, there are cases in which DWI will show a positive result while CE-MRI is negative. We suggest that the combination of these two imaging modalities might yield more positive results in diagnosing acute MS attack giving rise to a more accurate diagnosis

  20. Pseudodynamic systems approach based on a quadratic approximation of update equations for diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Roy, Debasish

    2011-08-01

    We explore a pseudodynamic form of the quadratic parameter update equation for diffuse optical tomographic reconstruction from noisy data. A few explicit and implicit strategies for obtaining the parameter updates via a semianalytical integration of the pseudodynamic equations are proposed. Despite the ill-posedness of the inverse problem associated with diffuse optical tomography, adoption of the quadratic update scheme combined with the pseudotime integration appears not only to yield higher convergence, but also a muted sensitivity to the regularization parameters, which include the pseudotime step size for integration. These observations are validated through reconstructions with both numerically generated and experimentally acquired data.

  1. Cerebral Fat Embolism: Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To demonstrate the diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and the follow-up MRI findings, of cerebral fat embolism in the acute stage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The initial DWI and clinical findings of six patients with cerebral fat embolism were retrospectively evaluated. The finding of DWI with a b-value of 1000 s/mm 2 (b=1000) was compared with that of DWI with a b-value of 0 s/mm 2 (b=0). In three patients who underwent follow-up MRI, the interval change of the lesion on T2-weighted images was investigated. RESULTS: The characteristic DWI finding of cerebral fat embolism in the acute stage was multiple, hyperintense, dot-like lesions disseminated in the brain. These lesions were distributed dominantly in the bilateral border-zone areas. Some lesions had an ancillary location including the cortex, deep white matter, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. The lesions were more intense and numerous in DWI (b=1000) than in DWI (b=0). The findings on the follow-up T2-weighted images were multiple confluent hyperintense lesions in the white matter with progression since the initial MRI. CONCLUSION: DWI could be a sensitive tool for detecting cerebral fat embolism in the acute phase. It is recommended that DWI be included in the initial evaluation of cerebral fat embolism with MRI

  2. Homogeneity based segmentation and enhancement of Diffusion Tensor Images : a white matter processing framework

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    In diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (DMRI) the Brownian motion of the water molecules, within biological tissue, is measured through a series of images. In diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) this diffusion is represented using tensors. DTI describes, in a non-invasive way, the local anisotropy pattern enabling the reconstruction of the nervous fibers - dubbed tractography. DMRI constitutes a powerful tool to analyse the structure of the white matter within a voxel, but also to investigate the...

  3. An integral design strategy combining optical system and image processing to obtain high resolution images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaoyang; Wang, Lin; Yang, Ying; Gong, Rui; Shao, Xiaopeng; Liang, Chao; Xu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an integral design that combines optical system with image processing is introduced to obtain high resolution images, and the performance is evaluated and demonstrated. Traditional imaging methods often separate the two technical procedures of optical system design and imaging processing, resulting in the failures in efficient cooperation between the optical and digital elements. Therefore, an innovative approach is presented to combine the merit function during optical design together with the constraint conditions of image processing algorithms. Specifically, an optical imaging system with low resolution is designed to collect the image signals which are indispensable for imaging processing, while the ultimate goal is to obtain high resolution images from the final system. In order to optimize the global performance, the optimization function of ZEMAX software is utilized and the number of optimization cycles is controlled. Then Wiener filter algorithm is adopted to process the image simulation and mean squared error (MSE) is taken as evaluation criterion. The results show that, although the optical figures of merit for the optical imaging systems is not the best, it can provide image signals that are more suitable for image processing. In conclusion. The integral design of optical system and image processing can search out the overall optimal solution which is missed by the traditional design methods. Especially, when designing some complex optical system, this integral design strategy has obvious advantages to simplify structure and reduce cost, as well as to gain high resolution images simultaneously, which has a promising perspective of industrial application.

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal fetal lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Bankier, Alexander; Herold, Christian J.; Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Csapo, Bence; Bammer, Roland

    2008-01-01

    To quantify apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in fetuses with normal lungs and to determine whether ADC can be used in the assessment of fetal lung development. In 53 pregnancies (20-37th weeks of gestation), we measured ADC on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the apical, middle, and basal thirds of the right lung. ADCs were correlated with gestational age. Differences between the ADCs were assessed. Fetal lung volumes were measured on T2-weighted sequences and correlated with ADCs and with age. ADCs were 2.13 ± 0.44 μm 2 /ms (mean ± SD) in the apex, 1.99 ± 0.42 μm 2 /ms (mean ± SD) in the middle third, and 1.91 ± 0.41 μm 2 /ms (mean ± SD) in the lung base. Neither the individual ADC values nor average ADC values showed a significant correlation with gestational age or with lung volumes. Average ADCs decreased significantly from the lung apex toward the base. Individual ADCs showed little absolute change and heterogeneity. Lung volumes increased significantly during gestation. We have not been able to identify a pattern of changes in the ADC values that correlate with lung maturation. Furthermore, the individual, gravity-related ADC changes are subject to substantial variability and show nonuniform behavior. ADC can therefore not be used as an indicator of lung maturity. (orig.)

  5. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keil Carsten

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, caused by progressive loss of motor neurons. Changes are widespread in the subcortical white matter in ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI detects pathological changes in white matter fibres in vivo, based on alterations in the degree (diffusivity, ADC and directedness (fractional anisotropy, FA of proton movement. Methods 24 patients with ALS and 24 age-matched controls received 1.5T DTI. FA and ADC were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping. In 15 of the 24 ALS patients, a second DTI was obtained after 6 months. Results Decreased FA in the corticospinal tract (CST and frontal areas confirm existing results. With a direct comparison of baseline and follow-up dataset, the progression of upper motor neuron degeneration, reflected in FA decrease, could be captured along the CST and in frontal areas. The involvement of cerebellum in the pathology of ALS, as suspected from functional MRI studies, could be confirmed by a reduced FA (culmen, declive. These structural changes correlated well with disease duration, ALSFRS-R, and physical and executive functions. Conclusion DTI detects changes that are regarded as prominent features of ALS and thus, shows promise in its function as a biomarker. Using the technique herein, we could demonstrate DTI changes at follow-up which correlated well with clinical progression.

  6. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal fetal lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Weber, Michael; Hoermann, Marcus; Bankier, Alexander; Herold, Christian J.; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Csapo, Bence [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Obstetrics and Gyneocology, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [University of Stanford, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2008-04-15

    To quantify apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in fetuses with normal lungs and to determine whether ADC can be used in the assessment of fetal lung development. In 53 pregnancies (20-37th weeks of gestation), we measured ADC on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the apical, middle, and basal thirds of the right lung. ADCs were correlated with gestational age. Differences between the ADCs were assessed. Fetal lung volumes were measured on T2-weighted sequences and correlated with ADCs and with age. ADCs were 2.13 {+-} 0.44 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms (mean {+-} SD) in the apex, 1.99 {+-} 0.42 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms (mean {+-} SD) in the middle third, and 1.91 {+-} 0.41 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms (mean {+-} SD) in the lung base. Neither the individual ADC values nor average ADC values showed a significant correlation with gestational age or with lung volumes. Average ADCs decreased significantly from the lung apex toward the base. Individual ADCs showed little absolute change and heterogeneity. Lung volumes increased significantly during gestation. We have not been able to identify a pattern of changes in the ADC values that correlate with lung maturation. Furthermore, the individual, gravity-related ADC changes are subject to substantial variability and show nonuniform behavior. ADC can therefore not be used as an indicator of lung maturity. (orig.)

  7. Thin-Section Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain with Parallel Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A.Y.; Celik, H.; Tali, T.; Akpek, S.; Tokgoz, N.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Thin-section diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is known to improve lesion detectability, with long imaging time as a drawback. Parallel imaging (PI) is a technique that takes advantage of spatial sensitivity information inherent in an array of multiple-receiver surface coils to partially replace time-consuming spatial encoding and reduce imaging time. Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 3-mm-thin-section DWI technique combined with PI by means of qualitative and quantitative measurements. Material and Methods: 30 patients underwent conventional echo-planar (EPI) DWI (5-mm section thickness, 1-mm intersection gap) without parallel imaging, and thin-section EPI-DWI with PI (3-mm section thickness, 0-mm intersection gap) for a b value of 1000 s/mm 2 , with an imaging time of 40 and 80 s, respectively. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), relative signal intensity (rSI), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured over a lesion-free cerebral region on both series by two radiologists. A quality score was assigned for each set of images to assess the image quality. When a brain lesion was present, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and corresponding ADC were also measured. Student t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean SNR values of the normal brain were 33.61±4.35 and 32.98±7.19 for conventional and thin-slice DWI (P>0.05), respectively. Relative signal intensities were significantly higher on thin-section DWI (P 0.05). Quality scores and overall lesion CNR were found to be higher in thin-section DWI with parallel imaging. Conclusion: A thin-section technique combined with PI improves rSI, CNR, and image quality without compromising SNR and ADC measurements in an acceptable imaging time. Keywords: Brain; DWI; parallel imaging; thin section

  8. Correlation of optical emission and turbulent length scale in a coaxial jet diffusion flame

    OpenAIRE

    松山, 新吾; Matsuyama, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the correlation between optical emission and turbulent length scale in a coaxial jet diffusion flame. To simulate the H2O emission from an H2/O2 diffusion flame, radiative transfer is calculated on flame data obtained by numerical simulation. H2O emission characteristics are examined for a one-dimensional opposed-flow diffusion flame. The results indicate that H2O emission intensity is linearly dependent on flame thickness. The simulation of H2O emission is then exte...

  9. Neuropsychological Correlates of Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Paul G.; Kubicki, Marek; Gurrera, Ronald J.; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Frumin, Melissa; McCarley, Robert W.; Shenton, Martha E.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia (n = 41) and healthy comparison participants (n = 46) completed neuropsychological measures of intelligence, memory, and executive function. A subset of each group also completed magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies (fractional anisotropy and cross-sectional area) of the uncinate fasciculus (UF) and cingulate bundle (CB). Patients with schizophrenia showed reduced levels of functioning across all neuropsychological measures. In addition, selective neuropsychological–DTI relationships emerged. Among patients but not controls, lower levels of declarative–episodic verbal memory correlated with reduced left UF, whereas executive function errors related to performance monitoring correlated with reduced left CB. The data suggested abnormal DTI patterns linking declarative–episodic verbal memory deficits to the left UF and executive function deficits to the left CB among patients with schizophrenia. PMID:15506830

  10. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in transient global amnesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godeiro-Junior, Clecio; Miranda-Alves, Maramelia Araujo de [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo SP (Brazil). Dept. of Neurology and Neurosurgery], e-mail: cleciojunior@yahoo.com.br; Massaro, Ayrton Roberto [Fleury Diagnostic Center, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a well known clinical entity characterized by anterograde memory disturbance of sudden onset that lasts 1 to 24 hours. Orientation in space and time is impaired while consciousness remains undisturbed. TGA may refer to a single expression of several physiopathological phenomena. Conceptually, cerebral ischemia, epileptic discharge, and migraine constitute the main pathogenic hypothesis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a powerful tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected stroke owing to its high sensitivity and specificity, even for small areas of acute ischemia. Consequently, this method has also been applied to TGA to gain further insights into the ischemic hypothesis of this condition. We report a patient with a typical TGA presentation and MRI findings suggestive of an ischemic insult. We further discuss the ischemic hypothesis of TGA. (author)

  11. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in transient global amnesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godeiro-Junior, Clecio; Miranda-Alves, Maramelia Araujo de

    2009-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a well known clinical entity characterized by anterograde memory disturbance of sudden onset that lasts 1 to 24 hours. Orientation in space and time is impaired while consciousness remains undisturbed. TGA may refer to a single expression of several physiopathological phenomena. Conceptually, cerebral ischemia, epileptic discharge, and migraine constitute the main pathogenic hypothesis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a powerful tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected stroke owing to its high sensitivity and specificity, even for small areas of acute ischemia. Consequently, this method has also been applied to TGA to gain further insights into the ischemic hypothesis of this condition. We report a patient with a typical TGA presentation and MRI findings suggestive of an ischemic insult. We further discuss the ischemic hypothesis of TGA. (author)

  12. Data of NODDI diffusion metrics in the brain and computer simulation of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI acquisition scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandana Kodiweera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides NODDI diffusion metrics in the brains of 52 healthy participants and computer simulation data to support compatibility of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI, “Hybrid diffusion imaging” [1] acquisition scheme in fitting neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI model, “NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain” [2]. HYDI is an extremely versatile diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI technique that enables various analyzes methods using a single diffusion dataset. One of the diffusion data analysis methods is the NODDI computation, which models the brain tissue with three compartments: fast isotropic diffusion (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid, anisotropic hindered diffusion (e.g., extracellular space, and anisotropic restricted diffusion (e.g., intracellular space. The NODDI model produces microstructural metrics in the developing brain, aging brain or human brain with neurologic disorders. The first dataset provided here are the means and standard deviations of NODDI metrics in 48 white matter region-of-interest (ROI averaging across 52 healthy participants. The second dataset provided here is the computer simulation with initial conditions guided by the first dataset as inputs and gold standard for model fitting. The computer simulation data provide a direct comparison of NODDI indices computed from the HYDI acquisition [1] to the NODDI indices computed from the originally proposed acquisition [2]. These data are related to the accompanying research article “Age Effects and Sex Differences in Human Brain White Matter of Young to Middle-Aged Adults: A DTI, NODDI, and q-Space Study” [3].

  13. In-utero three dimension high resolution fetal brain diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuzhou; Xue, Hui; Counsell, Serena; Anjari, Mustafa; Allsop, Joanna; Rutherford, Mary; Rueckert, Daniel; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2007-01-01

    We present a methodology to achieve 3D high resolution in-utero fetal brain DTI that shows excellent ADC as well as promising FA maps. After continuous DTI scanning to acquire a repeated series of parallel slices with 15 diffusion directions, image registration is used to realign the images to correct for fetal motion. Once aligned, the diffusion images are treated as irregularly sampled data where each voxel is associated with an appropriately rotated diffusion direction, and used to estimate the diffusion tensor on a regular grid. The method has been tested successful on eight fetuses and has been validated on adults imaged at 1.5T.

  14. Clinical study of diffusion weighted imaging in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yunbin; Mao Yu; Pan Jianji; Hu Chunmiao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) for primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma(NPC) and metastatic lymph nodes, and to establish the diagnostic threshold of apparent diffusion coefficients(ADCs). Methods: Conventional MR scans and DWI scans were continuously performed in 56 patients with newly diagnosed NPC and 55 healthy volunteers. All patients received primary tumor biopsy and MR image-guided cervical lymph node fine-needle biopsy. ADC and eADC values of both primary lesions and lymph nodes were calculated and compared. Results: According to the pathological diagnosis, all the 56 patients had non-keratinizing carcinoma and 51 had lymph node metastasis. In the control group, 75 cervical lymph nodes were found. ADC values of both primary NPC and metastatic lymph nodes were significantly lower, while eADC values were higher than those of normal controls. Setting the ADC value threshold at 0.809 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, the sensitivity and specificity for primary NPC detection were 80.4% and 74.5%, respectively. The negative and positive predictive values were 79.2% and 77.6%, respectively. The accuracy was 78.4%. Setting the ADC value threshold at 0.708 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s, the sensitivity and specificity in the detection of metastatic cervical lymph nodes were 43.1% and 93.3%, respectively. The negative and positive predictive values were 70.7% and 81.5%, respectively. The accuracy was 73.0%. Conclusions: DWI might be a new diagnostic approach in the detection of primary NPC as well as metastatic lymph nodes. (authors)

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging in polymicrogyria: a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, R.; Gupta, R.K.; Prasad, K.N.; Hasan, K.M.; Hou, P.; Narayana, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG), a neuronal migration disorder, commonly manifests as a seizure disorder. The aim of this study was to look for the abnormalities in the underlying white matter using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) that appeared normal on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with PMG. DTI was performed in three patients with PMG and eight age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated for the cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter in both controls and patients. We observed a significantly decreased mean FA value with no significant change in the MD value in subcortical white matter underlying polymicrogyric cortex (FA=0.23±0.04, MD=1.0±0.05 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) as compared to both contralateral (FA=0.32±0.04, MD=1.0±0.05 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and normal control (FA=0.32±0.04, MD=1.0±0.06 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) white matter. Significantly increased MD and decreased FA values were also observed in the polymicrogyric cortex (FA=0.08±0.01, MD=1.2±0.10 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) as compared to normal contralateral (FA=0.12±0.04, MD=1.1±0.09 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and normal control (FA=0.12±0.01, MD=1.1±0.09 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) cortex. Significantly decreased FA values with no change in MD values in the subcortical white matter subjacent to polymicrogyric cortex reflect microstructural changes in the white matter probably due to the presence of ectopic neurons. (orig.)

  16. Adaptive optics imaging of inherited retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michalis; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Patterson, Emily J; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-11-15

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy allows for non-invasive retinal phenotyping on a microscopic scale, thereby helping to improve our understanding of retinal diseases. An increasing number of natural history studies and ongoing/planned interventional clinical trials exploit AO ophthalmoscopy both for participant selection, stratification and monitoring treatment safety and efficacy. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolution of AO ophthalmoscopy, recent developments and its application to a broad range of inherited retinal diseases, including Stargardt disease, retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia. Finally, we describe the impact of this in vivo microscopic imaging on our understanding of disease pathogenesis, clinical trial design and outcome metrics, while recognising the limitation of the small cohorts reported to date. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Reconstruction of Optical Thickness from Hoffman Modulation Contrast Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Holm; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2003-01-01

    Hoffman microscopy imaging systems are part of numerous fertility clinics world-wide. We discuss the physics of the Hoffman imaging system from optical thickness to image intensity, implement a simple, yet fast, reconstruction algorithm using Fast Fourier Transformation and discuss the usability...... of the method on a number of cells from a human embryo. Novelty is identifying the non-linearity of a typical Hoffman imaging system, and the application of Fourier Transformation to reconstruct the optical thickness....

  18. Craniocerebral trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging of diffuse axonal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallouhi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Acceleration-deceleration rotational brain trauma is a common cause of disability or death in young adults and often leads to a focal destruction of axons. The resulting pathology, axonal shear injury is referred to as diffuse axonal injury (DAI). The DAI-associated lesions occur bilaterally, are widely dispersed and have been observed in the surface and deep white matter. They are found near to and far from the impact site. When DAI is clinically suspected, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the method of choice for further clarification, especially in patients where cranial computed tomography (CT) is inconspicuous. To investigate the presence of DAI after traumatic brain injury (TBI), a multimodal MRI approach is applied including the common structural and also functional imaging sequences. For structural MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) weighted and susceptibility contrast imaging (SWI) are the sequences mainly used. The SWI technique is extremely sensitive to blood breakdown products, which appear as small signal voids at three locations, at the gray-white interface, in the corpus callosum and in the brain stem. Functional MRI comprises a group of constantly developing techniques that have great potential in optimal evaluation of the white matter in patients after craniocerebral trauma. These imaging techniques allow the visualization of changes associated with shear injuries, such as functional impairment of axons and decreased blood flow and abnormal metabolic activity of the brain parts affected. The multimodal MRI approach in patients with DAI results in a more detailed and differentiated representation of the underlying pathophysiological changes of the injured nerve tracts and helps to improve the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of MRI. When DAI is suspected multimodal MRI should be performed as soon as possible after craniocerebral injury. (orig.) [de

  19. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Sullivan, James [Pulmonary Laboratories, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  20. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James; Wei, Jie; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV torso = ΔV thorax + ΔV abdomen ) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP v = ΔV thorax /ΔV torso ) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume differences measured using OSI

  1. The optical-mechanical design of DMD modulation imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianting; Xu, Xiping; Qiao, Yang; Li, Lei; Pan, Yue

    2014-09-01

    In order to avoid the phenomenon of some image information were lost, which is due to the jamming signals, such as incident laser, make the pixels dot on CCD saturated. In this article a device of optical-mechanical structure was designed, which utilized the DMD (Digital Micro mirror Device) to modulate the image. The DMD reflection imaging optical system adopts the telecentric light path. However, because the design is not only required to guarantee a 66° angle between the optical axis of the relay optics and the DMD, but also to ensure that the optical axis of the projection system keeps parallel with the perpendicular bisector of the micro-mirror which is in the "flat" state, so the TIR prism is introduced,and making the relay optics and the DMD satisfy the optical institution's requirements. In this paper, a mechanical structure of the imaging optical system was designed and at the meanwhile the lens assembly has been well connected and fixed and fine-tuned by detailed structural design, which included the tilt decentered lens, wedge flanges, prisms. By optimizing the design, the issues of mutual restraint between the inverting optical system and the projecting system were well resolved, and prevented the blocking of the two systems. In addition, the structure size of the whole DMD reflection imaging optical system was minimized; it reduced the energy loss and ensured the image quality.

  2. Quantitative functional optical imaging of the human skin using multi-spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainerstorfer, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Light tissue interactions can be described by the physical principles of absorption and scattering. Based on those parameters, different tissue types and analytes can be distinguished. Extracting blood volume and oxygenation is of particular interest in clinical routines for tumor diagnostics and treatment follow up, since they are parameters of angiogenic processes. The quantification of those analytes in tissue can be done by physical modeling of light tissue interaction. The physical model used here is the random walk theory. However, for quantification and clinical usefulness, one has to account for multiple challenges. First, one must consider the effect of topology of the sample on measured physical parameters. Second, diffusion of light inside the tissue is dependent on the structure of the sample imaged. Thus, the structural conformation has to be taken into account. Third, clinical translation of imaging modalities is often hindered due to the complicated post-processing of data, not providing results in real-time. In this thesis, two imaging modalities are being utilized, where the first one, diffuse multi-spectral imaging, is based on absorption contrast and spectral characteristics and the second one, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is based on scattering changes within the tissue. Multi-spectral imaging can provide spatial distributions of blood volume and blood oxygenation and OCT yields 3D structural images with micrometer resolution. In order to address the challenges mentioned above, a curvature correction algorithm for taking the topology into account was developed. Without taking curvature of the object into account, reconstruction of optical properties is not accurate. The method developed removes this artifact and recovers the underlying data, without the necessity of measuring the object's shape. The next step was to recover blood volume and oxygenation values in real time. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on multi spectral images is

  3. Imaging Freeform Optical Systems Designed with NURBS Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    reflective, anastigmat 1 Introduction The imaging freeform optical systems described here are designed using non-uniform rational basis-spline (NURBS...code, but to succeed in designing NURBS freeform optical systems an optimization code is required. The motivation for developing the optical design

  4. Self-imaging in first-order optical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.; Nijhawan, O.P.; Guota, A.K.; Musla, A.K.; Singh, Kehar

    1998-01-01

    The structure and main properties of coherent and partially coherent optical fields that are self-reproducible under propagation through a first-order optical system are investigated. A phase space description of self-imaging in first-order optical systems is presented. The Wigner distribution

  5. Histogram analysis of noise performance on fractional anisotropy brain MR image with different diffusion gradient numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yong Min; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Lee, Young Joo; Sohn, Chul Ho; Woo, Seung Koo; Suh, Kyung Jin

    2005-01-01

    We wished to analyze, qualitatively and quantitatively, the noise performance of fractional anisotropy brain images along with the different diffusion gradient numbers by using the histogram method. Diffusion tensor images were acquired using a 3.0 T MR scanner from ten normal volunteers who had no neurological symptoms. The single-shot spin-echo EPI with a Stejskal-Tanner type diffusion gradient scheme was employed for the diffusion tensor measurement. With a b-valuee of 1000 s/mm 2 , the diffusion tensor images were obtained for 6, 11, 23, 35 and 47 diffusion gradient directions. FA images were generated for each DTI scheme. The histograms were then obtained at selected ROIs for the anatomical structures on the FA image. At the same ROI location, the mean FA value and the standard deviation of the mean FA value were calculated. The quality of the FA image was improved as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased by showing better contrast between the WM and GM. The histogram showed that the variance of FA values was reduced as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased. This histogram analysis was in good agreement with the result obtained using quantitative analysis. The image quality of the FA map was significantly improved as the number of diffusion gradient directions increased. The histogram analysis well demonstrated that the improvement in the FA images resulted from the reduction in the variance of the FA values included in the ROI

  6. T2-enhanced tensor diffusion trace-weighted image in the detection of hyper-acute cerebral infarction: Comparison with isotropic diffusion-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, M.-C.; Tzeng, W.-S.; Chung, H.-W.; Wang, C.-Y.; Liu, H.-S.; Juan, C.-J.; Lo, C.-P.; Hsueh, C.-J.; Chen, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although isotropic diffusion-weighted imaging (isoDWI) is very sensitive to the detection of acute ischemic stroke, it may occasionally show diffusion negative result in hyper-acute stroke. We hypothesize that high diffusion contrast diffusion trace-weighted image with enhanced T2 may improve stroke lesion conspicuity. Methods: Five hyper acute stroke patients (M:F = 0:5, average age = 61.8 ± 20.5 y/o) and 16 acute stroke patients (M:F = 11:5, average age = 67.7 ± 12 y/o) were examined six-direction tensor DWIs at b = 707 s/mm 2 . Three different diffusion-weighted images, including isotropic (isoDWI), diffusion trace-weighted image (trDWI) and T2-enhanced diffusion trace-weighted image (T2E t rDWI), were generated. Normalized lesion-to-normal ratio (nLNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of three diffusion images were calculated from each patient and statistically compared. Results: The trDWI shows better nLNR than isoDWI on both hyper-acute and acute stroke lesions, whereas no significant improvement in CNR. Nevertheless, the T2E t rDWI has statistically superior CNR and nLNR than those of isoDWI and trDWI in both hyper-acute and acute stroke. Conclusions: We concluded that tensor diffusion trace-weighted image with T2 enhancement is more sensitive to stroke lesion detection, and can provide higher lesion conspicuity than the conventional isotropic DWI for early stroke lesion delineation without the need of high-b-value technique.

  7. Novel optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Aimin; Sun, Jianfeng; Hu, Zhijuan; Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Liren

    2015-07-13

    We propose a new method called modified optical scanning cryptography using Fresnel telescope imaging technique for encryption and decryption of remote objects. An image or object can be optically encrypted on the fly by Fresnel telescope scanning system together with an encryption key. For image decryption, the encrypted signals are received and processed with an optical coherent heterodyne detection system. The proposed method has strong performance through use of secure Fresnel telescope scanning with orthogonal polarized beams and efficient all-optical information processing. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results.

  8. Effects of MR parameter changes on the quantification of diffusion anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient in diffusion tensor imaging: Evaluation using a diffusional anisotropic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Jeong Kon [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sung Cheol [Dept. of Biostatistics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ha Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, East-West Neomedical Center, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Clinical Scientist, MR, Philips Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To validate the usefulness of a diffusional anisotropic capillary array phantom and to investigate the effects of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameter changes on diffusion fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using the phantom. Diffusion tensor imaging of a capillary array phantom was performed with imaging parameter changes, including voxel size, number of sensitivity encoding (SENSE) factor, echo time (TE), number of signal acquisitions, b-value, and number of diffusion gradient directions (NDGD), one-at-a-time in a stepwise-incremental fashion. We repeated the entire series of DTI scans thrice. The coefficients of variation (CoV) were evaluated for FA and ADC, and the correlation between each MR imaging parameter and the corresponding FA and ADC was evaluated using Spearman's correlation analysis. The capillary array phantom CoVs of FA and ADC were 7.1% and 2.4%, respectively. There were significant correlations between FA and SENSE factor, TE, b-value, and NDGD, as well as significant correlations between ADC and SENSE factor, TE, and b-value. A capillary array phantom enables repeated measurements of FA and ADC. Both FA and ADC can vary when certain parameters are changed during diffusion experiments. We suggest that the capillary array phantom can be used for quality control in longitudinal or multicenter clinical studies.

  9. Analysis of contour images using optics of spiral beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volostnikov, V. G.; Kishkin, S. A.; Kotova, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    An approach is outlined to the recognition of contour images using computer technology based on coherent optics principles. A mathematical description of the recognition process algorithm and the results of numerical modelling are presented. The developed approach to the recognition of contour images using optics of spiral beams is described and justified.

  10. Multispectral and phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qizhi; Staal, Stephen; Grobmyer, Stephen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-02-01

    Multispectral and phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography are used to track treatment progress in a patient with locally advanced invasive carcinoma of the breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Two types of chemotherapy treatment including four cycles of Adriamycin/Cytoxin (AC cycles) and twelve cycles of Taxol/Herceptin (TH cycles) were applied to patient. A total of eight optical exams were performed before and within the chemotherapy. Images of tissue refractive index, and absorption and scattering coefficients, as well as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations along with scattering particle volume fraction and mean diameter of cellular components were all obtained. The tumor was identified through absorption and scattering images. Tumor shrinkage was observed during the course of chemotherapy from all the optical images. Our results show that oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin and total hemoglobin in tumor decreased after chemotherapy compared to that of before chemotherapy. Significant changes in tumor refractive index along with tumor cellular morphology during the entire chemotherapy are also observed.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute bacterial meningitis in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, W.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V.; Simon, E.M.; Haselgrove, J.

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is frequently fatal or leads to severe neurological impairment. Complications such as vasculitis, resulting in infarcts, should be anticipated and dealt with promptly. Our aim was to demonstrate the complications of meningitis by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in patients who deteriorated despite therapy. We studied 13 infants between the ages of 1 day and 32 months who presented with symptoms ranging from fever and vomiting to seizures, encephalopathy and coma due to bacterial meningitis, performing MRI, including DWI, 2-5 days after presentation. Multiple infarcts were found on DWI in 12 of the 13, most commonly in the frontal lobes (in 10). Global involvement was seen in four children, three of whom died; the fourth had a very poor outcome. In one case abnormalities on DWI were due to subdural empyemas. We diagnosed vasculitis in three of five patients studied with MRA. We think DWI an important part of an MRI study in infants with meningitis. Small cortical or deep white-matter infarcts due to septic vasculitis can lead to tissue damage not easily recognized on routine imaging and DWI can be used to confirm that extra-axial collections represent empyemas. (orig.)

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute bacterial meningitis in infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, W.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V.; Simon, E.M.; Haselgrove, J. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Bacterial meningitis is frequently fatal or leads to severe neurological impairment. Complications such as vasculitis, resulting in infarcts, should be anticipated and dealt with promptly. Our aim was to demonstrate the complications of meningitis by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in patients who deteriorated despite therapy. We studied 13 infants between the ages of 1 day and 32 months who presented with symptoms ranging from fever and vomiting to seizures, encephalopathy and coma due to bacterial meningitis, performing MRI, including DWI, 2-5 days after presentation. Multiple infarcts were found on DWI in 12 of the 13, most commonly in the frontal lobes (in 10). Global involvement was seen in four children, three of whom died; the fourth had a very poor outcome. In one case abnormalities on DWI were due to subdural empyemas. We diagnosed vasculitis in three of five patients studied with MRA. We think DWI an important part of an MRI study in infants with meningitis. Small cortical or deep white-matter infarcts due to septic vasculitis can lead to tissue damage not easily recognized on routine imaging and DWI can be used to confirm that extra-axial collections represent empyemas. (orig.)

  13. Corticospinal tract degeneration and possible pathogenesis in ALS evaluated by MR diffusion tensor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Wiegell, Mette R.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) appears to be a powerful method to investigate the neuronal and axonal fibre distribution in the human brain. Changes in diffusion characteristics of water molecules in the white matter can be estimated as the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC...

  14. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelsky, Oleg V; Desyatnikov, Anton S; Gbur, Gregory J; Hanson, Steen G; Lee, Tim; Miyamoto, Yoko; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Wyant, James C

    2016-04-20

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers.

  15. Changing image of correlation optics: introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, Oleg V.; Desyatnikov, Anton S.; Gbur, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    This feature issue of Applied Optics contains a series of selected papers reflecting recent progress of correlation optics and illustrating current trends in vector singular optics, internal energy flows at light fields, optical science of materials, and new biomedical applications of lasers. (C...

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of non-complicated hepatic cysts: Value of 3T computed diffusion-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru; Akiyama, Yuji; Fukumoto, Wataru; Kajiwara, Kenji; Kaichi, Yoko; Honda, Yukiko; Komoto, Daisuke; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Iida, Makoto; Ohmoto, Toshifumi; Date, Shuji; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the utility of computed 3T diffusion-weighted imaging (c-DWI) for the diagnosis of non-complicated hepatic cysts with a focus on the T2 shine-through effect. In 50 patients with non-complicated hepatic cysts we acquired one set of DWIs (b-value 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 ) at 1.5T, and two sets at 3T (b-value 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 , TE 70 ms; b-value 0 and 600 s/mm 2 , TE 60 ms). We defined the original DWIs acquired with b = 1000 s/mm 2 at 1.5T and 3T as “o-1.5T-1000” and “o-3T-1000”. c-DWIs were calculated with 3T DWI at b-values of 0 and 600 s/mm 2 . c-DWI with b = 1000 and 1500 s/mm 2 were defined as “c-1000” and “c-1500”. Radiologists evaluated the signal intensity (SI) of the cysts using a 3-point score where 1 = not visible, 2 = discernible, and 3 = clearly visible. They calculated the contrast ratio (CR) between the cysts and the surrounding liver parenchyma on each DWIs and recorded the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with a b-value = 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 on 1.5T- and 3T DWIs. Compared with o-1.5T-1000 DWI, the visual scores of all but the c-1500 DWIs were higher (p = 0.07 for c-1500- and p < 0.01 for the other DWIs). The CR at b = 1000 s/mm 2 was higher on o-3T-1000- than on o-1.5T-1000- (p < 0.01) but not higher than on c-1500 DWIs (p = 0.96). The CR at b = 0 s/mm 2 on 3T images with TE 70 ms was higher than on 1.5T images (p < 0.01). The ADC value was higher for 3T- than 1.5T images (p < 0.01). Non-complicated hepatic cysts showed higher SI on o-3T-1000- than o-1.5T-1000 DWIs due to the T2-shine through effect. This high SI was suppressed on c-1500 DWIs

  17. Resting-state functional connectivity assessed with two diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haijing; Khadka, Sabin; Tian, Fenghua; Lin, Zi-Jing; Lu, Chunming; Zhu, Chaozhe; Liu, Hanli

    2011-04-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is recently utilized as a new approach to assess resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in the human brain. For any new technique or new methodology, it is necessary to be able to replicate similar experiments using different instruments in order to establish its liability and reproducibility. We apply two different diffuse optical tomographic (DOT) systems (i.e., DYNOT and CW5), with various probe arrangements to evaluate RSFC in the sensorimotor cortex by utilizing a previously published experimental protocol and seed-based correlation analysis. Our results exhibit similar spatial patterns and strengths in RSFC between the bilateral motor cortexes. The consistent observations are obtained from both DYNOT and CW5 systems, and are also in good agreement with the previous fNIRS study. Overall, we demonstrate that the fNIRS-based RSFC is reproducible by various DOT imaging systems among different research groups, enhancing the confidence of neuroscience researchers and clinicians to utilize fNIRS for future applications.

  18. Diffuse optical tomography with structured-light patterns to quantify breast density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Jessica; Nouizi, Farouk; Cho, Jaedu; Zheng, Jie; Li, Yifan; Chen, Jeon-hor; Su, Min-Ying; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-02-01

    Breast density is an independent risk factor for breast cancer, where women with denser breasts are more likely to develop cancer. By identifying women at higher risk, healthcare providers can suggest screening at a younger age to effectively diagnose and treat breast cancer in its earlier stages. Clinical risk assessment models currently do not incorporate breast density, despite its strong correlation with breast cancer. Current methods to measure breast density rely on mammography and MRI, both of which may be difficult to use as a routine risk assessment tool. We propose to use diffuse optical tomography with structured-light to measure the dense, fibroglandular (FGT) tissue volume, which has a different chromophore signature than the surrounding adipose tissue. To test the ability of this technique, we performed simulations by creating numerical breast phantoms from segmented breast MR images. We looked at two different cases, one with a centralized FGT distribution and one with a dispersed distribution. As expected, the water and lipid volumes segmented at half-maximum were overestimated for the dispersed case. However, it was noticed that the recovered water and lipid concentrations were lower and higher, respectively, than the centralized case. This information may provide insight into the morphological distribution of the FGT and can be a correction in estimating the breast density.

  19. Optic radiation structure and anatomy in the normally developing brain determined using diffusion MRI and tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Michael; Munoz, Monica; Jentschke, Sebastian; Chadwick, Martin J; Cooper, Janine M; Riney, Kate; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Clark, Chris A

    2015-01-01

    The optic radiation (OR) is a component of the visual system known to be myelin mature very early in life. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its unique ability to reconstruct the OR in vivo were used to study structural maturation through analysis of DTI metrics in a cohort of 90 children aged 5-18 years. As the OR is at risk of damage during epilepsy surgery, we measured its position relative to characteristic anatomical landmarks. Anatomical distances, DTI metrics and volume of the OR were investigated for age, gender and hemisphere effects. We observed changes in DTI metrics with age comparable to known trajectories in other white matter tracts. Left lateralization of DTI metrics was observed that showed a gender effect in lateralization. Sexual dimorphism of DTI metrics in the right hemisphere was also found. With respect to OR dimensions, volume was shown to be right lateralised and sexual dimorphism demonstrated for the extent of the left OR. The anatomical results presented for the OR have potentially important applications for neurosurgical planning.

  20. Ballistic and snake photon imaging for locating optical endomicroscopy fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, M. G.; Choudhary, T. R.; Craven, T. H.; Mills, B.; Bradley, M.; Henderson, R. K.; Dhaliwal, K.; Thomson, R. R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate determination of the location of the distal-end of a fibre-optic device deep in tissue through the imaging of ballistic and snake photons using a time resolved single-photon detector array. The fibre was imaged with centimetre resolution, within clinically relevant settings and models. This technique can overcome the limitations imposed by tissue scattering in optically determining the in vivo location of fibre-optic medical instruments. PMID:28966848

  1. Impact of Gradient Number and Voxel Size on Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography for Resective Brain Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefnagels, Friso W. A.; de Witt Hamer, Philip C.; Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Barkhof, Frederik; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2017-01-01

    To explore quantitatively and qualitatively how the number of gradient directions (NGD) and spatial resolution (SR) affect diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in patients planned for brain tumor surgery, using routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging protocols. Of 67 patients with

  2. RNA aptamer probes as optical imaging agents for the detection of amyloid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available Optical imaging using multiphoton microscopy and whole body near infrared imaging has become a routine part of biomedical research. However, optical imaging methods rely on the availability of either small molecule reporters or genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, which are challenging and time consuming to develop. While directly labeled antibodies can also be used as imaging agents, antibodies are species specific, can typically not be tagged with multiple fluorescent reporters without interfering with target binding, and are bioactive, almost always eliciting a biological response and thereby influencing the process that is being studied. We examined the possibility of developing highly specific and sensitive optical imaging agents using aptamer technology. We developed a fluorescently tagged anti-Aβ RNA aptamer, β55, which binds amyloid plaques in both ex vivo human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue and in vivo APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Diffuse β55 positive halos, attributed to oligomeric Aβ, were observed surrounding the methoxy-XO4 positive plaque cores. Dot blots of synthetic Aβ aggregates provide further evidence that β55 binds both fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ. The high binding affinity, the ease of probe development, and the ability to incorporate multiple and multimodal imaging reporters suggest that RNA aptamers may have complementary and perhaps advantageous properties compared to conventional optical imaging probes and reporters.

  3. Osteosarcoma subtypes: Magnetic resonance and quantitative diffusion weighted imaging criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, Rania; Shokry, Ahmed M; Ahmed Khaleel, Sahar; Mogahed, Shaimaa M

    2018-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a primary bone malignancy, characterized by spindle cells producing osteoid. The objective of this study is to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of different OS subtypes, record their attenuation diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and to point to the relation of their pathologic base and their corresponding ADC value. We performed a retrospective observational lesion-based analysis for 31 pathologically proven osteosarcoma subtypes: osteoblastic (n = 9), fibroblastic (n = 8), chondroblastic (n = 6), para-osteal (n = 3), periosteal (n = 1), telangiectatic (n = 2), small cell (n = 1) and extra-skeletal (n = 1). On conventional images we recorded: bone of origin, epicenter, intra-articular extension, and invasion of articulating bones, skip lesions, distant metastases, pathological fractures, ossified matrix, hemorrhage and necrosis. We measured the mean ADC value for each lesion. Among the included OS lesions, 51.6% originated at the femur, 29% showed intra-articular extension, 16% invaded neighboring bone, 9% were associated with pathological fracture and 25.8% were associated with distant metastases. On MRI, all lesions showed ossified matrix, 35.5% showed hemorrhage and 58% showed necrosis. The mean ADC values for OS lesions ranged from 0.74 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s (recorded for conventional osteoblastic OS) to 1.50 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s (recorded for telangiectatic OS) with an average value of 1.16 ± 0.18 × 10 -3  mm 2 /s. Conventional chondroblastic OS recorded higher values compared to the other two conventional subtypes. Osteosarcoma has different pathologic subtypes which correspondingly vary in their imaging criteria and their ADC values. Copyright © 2018. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Diffusion weighted imaging and estimation of prognosis using apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun, E-mail: aysunbalc@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, State Hospital, Eski Cami district, Hastane street, N:1, 59300, Tekirdag (Turkey); Simsek, Mehmet Masum, E-mail: radyoloji@haydapasanumune.gov.tr [Department of Radiology, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Tibbiye street, Uskudar 34200, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: Estimation of the prognosis of infarction by using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Methods: 23 patients having acute stroke symptoms with verified infarction in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. Their MRI studies were performed between 6 and 12 h after the onset of their symptoms and were repeated on the fifth day. The infarction volumes were calculated by using DWI and the patients were divided into two groups as the ones having an expansion in the infarction area (group 1, n = 16) and the others having no expansion in the infarction area (group 2, n = 7). Quantitative ADC values were estimated. The groups were compared in terms of the ADC values on ADC maps obtained from DWI, performed during the between 6 and 12 h from the onset of the symptoms, referring to the core of the infarction (ADC{sub IC}), ischemic penumbra (ADC{sub P}) and the nonischemic parenchymal tissue (ADC{sub N}). P values < 0.05 were accepted to be statistically significant. Results: During the between 6 and 12 h mean infarction volume calculated by DWI was 23.3 cm{sup 3} for group 1 patients (ranging from 1.1 to 68.6) and this was found to be 40.3 cm{sup 3} (ranging from 1.8 to 91.5) on the fifth day. For the group 2 patients these values were found to be 42.1 cm{sup 3} (ranging from 1 to 94.7) and 41.9 (ranging from 1 to 94.7) for the same intervals respectively. A significant statistical result was failed to be demonstrated between the mean ADC{sub IC} and ADC{sub N} values (p = 0.350 and p = 0.229 respectively). However the comparison of the ADC{sub P} values between the groups was found to be highly significant (p < 0.001). When the differences between the ADC{sub P} and ADC{sub IC} and ADC{sub N} and ADC{sub P} were compared the results proved to be statistically significant (p = 0.038 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions: We believe that ADC results that would be obtained from

  5. Diffusion weighted imaging and estimation of prognosis using apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun; Simsek, Mehmet Masum

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Estimation of the prognosis of infarction by using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Methods: 23 patients having acute stroke symptoms with verified infarction in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. Their MRI studies were performed between 6 and 12 h after the onset of their symptoms and were repeated on the fifth day. The infarction volumes were calculated by using DWI and the patients were divided into two groups as the ones having an expansion in the infarction area (group 1, n = 16) and the others having no expansion in the infarction area (group 2, n = 7). Quantitative ADC values were estimated. The groups were compared in terms of the ADC values on ADC maps obtained from DWI, performed during the between 6 and 12 h from the onset of the symptoms, referring to the core of the infarction (ADC IC ), ischemic penumbra (ADC P ) and the nonischemic parenchymal tissue (ADC N ). P values 3 for group 1 patients (ranging from 1.1 to 68.6) and this was found to be 40.3 cm 3 (ranging from 1.8 to 91.5) on the fifth day. For the group 2 patients these values were found to be 42.1 cm 3 (ranging from 1 to 94.7) and 41.9 (ranging from 1 to 94.7) for the same intervals respectively. A significant statistical result was failed to be demonstrated between the mean ADC IC and ADC N values (p = 0.350 and p = 0.229 respectively). However the comparison of the ADC P values between the groups was found to be highly significant (p P and ADC IC and ADC N and ADC P were compared the results proved to be statistically significant (p = 0.038 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions: We believe that ADC results that would be obtained from the core and the penumbra of the infarction area will be beneficial in the estimation of the infarction prognosis and in the planning of a treatment protocol.

  6. Handbook of 3D machine vision optical metrology and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Song

    2013-01-01

    With the ongoing release of 3D movies and the emergence of 3D TVs, 3D imaging technologies have penetrated our daily lives. Yet choosing from the numerous 3D vision methods available can be frustrating for scientists and engineers, especially without a comprehensive resource to consult. Filling this gap, Handbook of 3D Machine Vision: Optical Metrology and Imaging gives an extensive, in-depth look at the most popular 3D imaging techniques. It focuses on noninvasive, noncontact optical methods (optical metrology and imaging). The handbook begins with the well-studied method of stereo vision and

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: 'starry sky' appearance with diffusion-weighted imaging in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapp, Seth; Harrar, Dana; Strother, Megan; Wushensky, Curtis; Pruthi, Sumit

    2012-04-01

    We present a case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever encephalitis in a child imaged utilizing diffusion-weighted MRI. Although the imaging and clinical manifestations of this entity have been previously described, a review of the literature did not reveal any such cases reported in children utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging. The imaging findings and clinical history are presented as well as a brief review of this disease.

  8. Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Correlated Spin Orbit Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Unlimited UU UU UU UU 14-06-2016 15-Mar-2013 14-Mar-2016 Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging of Correlated Spin-Orbit Phases The views...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ultrafast optical spectroscopy , nonlinear optical spectroscopy , iridates, cuprates REPORT...California Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91125 -0001 ABSTRACT Number of Papers published in peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy and

  9. Spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging in patients with sensory neuronopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Casseb, Raphael [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Neurophysics Group, Department of Cosmic Rays and Chronology, Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ribeiro de Paiva, Jean Levi; Teixeira Branco, Lucas Melo; Muro Martinez, Alberto Rolim; Cavalcante Franca, Marcondes Jr. [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reis, Fabiano [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Lima-Junior, Jose Carlos de [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Laboratory of Cell Signaling, Department of Internal Medicine, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Castellano, Gabriela [University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Neurophysics Group, Department of Cosmic Rays and Chronology, Institute of Physics Gleb Wataghin, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    We investigated whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis of the cervical spinal cord could aid the (differential) diagnosis of sensory neuronopathies, an underdiagnosed group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. We obtained spinal cord DTI and T2WI at 3 T from 28 patients, 14 diabetic subjects with sensory-motor distal polyneuropathy, and 20 healthy controls. We quantified DTI-based parameters and looked at the hyperintense T2W signal at the spinal cord posterior columns. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity values at C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels were compared between groups. We also compared average fractional anisotropy (mean of values at C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy of average fractional anisotropy, and we compared its sensitivity against the hyperintense signal in segregating patients from the other subjects. Mean age and disease duration were 52 ± 10 and 11.4 ± 9.3 years in the patient group. Eighteen subjects had idiopathic disease and 6 dysimmune etiology. Fractional anisotropy at C3-C4 level and average fractional anisotropy were significantly different between patients and healthy controls (p < 0.001 and <0.001) and between patients and diabetic subjects (p = 0.019 and 0.027). Average fractional anisotropy presented an area under the curve of 0.838. Moreover, it had higher sensitivity than visual detection of the hyperintense signal (0.86 vs. 0.54), particularly for patients with short disease duration. DTI-based analysis enables in vivo detection of posterior column damage in sensory neuronopathy patients and is a useful diagnostic test for this condition. It also helps the differential diagnosis between sensory neuronopathy and distal polyneuropathies. (orig.)

  10. Spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging in patients with sensory neuronopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Casseb, Raphael; Ribeiro de Paiva, Jean Levi; Teixeira Branco, Lucas Melo; Muro Martinez, Alberto Rolim; Cavalcante Franca, Marcondes Jr.; Reis, Fabiano; Lima-Junior, Jose Carlos de; Castellano, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis of the cervical spinal cord could aid the (differential) diagnosis of sensory neuronopathies, an underdiagnosed group of diseases of the peripheral nervous system. We obtained spinal cord DTI and T2WI at 3 T from 28 patients, 14 diabetic subjects with sensory-motor distal polyneuropathy, and 20 healthy controls. We quantified DTI-based parameters and looked at the hyperintense T2W signal at the spinal cord posterior columns. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity values at C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels were compared between groups. We also compared average fractional anisotropy (mean of values at C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy of average fractional anisotropy, and we compared its sensitivity against the hyperintense signal in segregating patients from the other subjects. Mean age and disease duration were 52 ± 10 and 11.4 ± 9.3 years in the patient group. Eighteen subjects had idiopathic disease and 6 dysimmune etiology. Fractional anisotropy at C3-C4 level and average fractional anisotropy were significantly different between patients and healthy controls (p < 0.001 and <0.001) and between patients and diabetic subjects (p = 0.019 and 0.027). Average fractional anisotropy presented an area under the curve of 0.838. Moreover, it had higher sensitivity than visual detection of the hyperintense signal (0.86 vs. 0.54), particularly for patients with short disease duration. DTI-based analysis enables in vivo detection of posterior column damage in sensory neuronopathy patients and is a useful diagnostic test for this condition. It also helps the differential diagnosis between sensory neuronopathy and distal polyneuropathies. (orig.)

  11. Measuring Restriction Sizes Using Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Martin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews a new concept in magnetic resonance as applied to cellular and biological systems. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging can be used to infer information about restriction sizes of samples being measured. The measurements rely on the apparent diffusion coefficient changing with diffusion times as measurements move from restricted to free diffusion regimes. Pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE measurements are limited in the ability to shorten diffusion times and thus are limited in restriction sizes which can be probed. Oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE measurements could provide shorter diffusion times so smaller restriction sizes could be probed.

  12. Relationship between timed 25-foot walk and diffusion tensor imaging in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klineova, Sylvia; Farber, Rebecca; Saiote, Catarina; Farrell, Colleen; Delman, Bradley N; Tanenbaum, Lawrence N; Friedman, Joshua; Inglese, Matilde; Lublin, Fred D; Krieger, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The majority of multiple sclerosis patients experience impaired walking ability, which impacts quality of life. Timed 25-foot walk is commonly used to gauge gait impairment but results can be broadly variable. Objective biological markers that correlate closely with patients' disability are needed. Diffusion tensor imaging, quantifying fiber tract integrity, might provide such information. In this project we analyzed relationships between timed 25-foot walk, conventional and diffusion tensor imaging magnetic resonance imaging markers. A cohort of gait impaired multiple sclerosis patients underwent brain and cervical spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging. Diffusion tensor imaging mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were measured on the brain corticospinal tracts and spinal restricted field of vision at C2/3. We analyzed relationships between baseline timed 25-foot walk, conventional and diffusion tensor imaging magnetic resonance imaging markers. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant association between several magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging metrics and timed 25-foot walk: brain mean diffusivity corticospinal tracts (p = 0.004), brain corticospinal tracts axial and radial diffusivity (P = 0.004 and 0.02), grey matter volume (p = 0.05), white matter volume (p = 0.03) and normalized brain volume (P = 0.01). The linear regression model containing mean diffusivity corticospinal tracts and controlled for gait assistance was the best fit model (p = 0.004). Our results suggest an association between diffusion tensor imaging metrics and gait impairment, evidenced by brain mean diffusivity corticospinal tracts and timed 25-foot walk.

  13. Translational research of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C; Ma, X; Tian, J

    2013-12-01

    In the medical imaging field, molecular imaging is a rapidly developing discipline and forms many imaging modalities, providing us effective tools to visualize, characterize, and measure molecular and cellular mechanisms in complex biological processes of living organisms, which can deepen our understanding of biology and accelerate preclinical research including cancer study and medicine discovery. Among many molecular imaging modalities, although the penetration depth of optical imaging and the approved optical probes used for clinics are limited, it has evolved considerably and has seen spectacular advances in basic biomedical research and new drug development. With the completion of human genome sequencing and the emergence of personalized medicine, the specific drug should be matched to not only the right disease but also to the right person, and optical molecular imaging should serve as a strong adjunct to develop personalized medicine by finding the optimal drug based on an individual's proteome and genome. In this process, the computational methodology and imaging system as well as the biomedical application regarding optical molecular imaging will play a crucial role. This review will focus on recent typical translational studies of optical molecular imaging for personalized medicine followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future development of optical molecular imaging are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the review is then concluded.

  14. Diffusion-weighted MR images and pineoblastoma. Diagnosis and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Cruz Junior, L. Celso Hygino; Doring, Thomas M.; Domingues, Romeu C.; Araujo, Bertha; Dantas, Mario Alberto; Chimelli, Leila

    2008-01-01

    Pineoblastomas are uncommon pineal tumors, which demonstrate rapid growing and poor prognosis. We report the case of a 43-year-old man with an enhancing pineal region mass, which showed restriction of the diffusion on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR images. The surgical biopsy defined the diagnosis of pineoblastoma and the therapy was initiated with radiation and chemotherapy. Three months later, the follow-up MR imaging showed areas suggestive of necrosis and the DW images demonstrate no significant areas of restricted diffusion. The differential diagnosis of pineal region masses that could show restriction of diffusion is discussed. (author)

  15. Optical Imaging of Ionizing Radiation from Clinical Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Travis M; Drain, Charles Michael; Grimm, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Nuclear medicine uses ionizing radiation for both in vivo diagnosis and therapy. Ionizing radiation comes from a variety of sources, including x-rays, beam therapy, brachytherapy, and various injected radionuclides. Although PET and SPECT remain clinical mainstays, optical readouts of ionizing radiation offer numerous benefits and complement these standard techniques. Furthermore, for ionizing radiation sources that cannot be imaged using these standard techniques, optical imaging offers a unique imaging alternative. This article reviews optical imaging of both radionuclide- and beam-based ionizing radiation from high-energy photons and charged particles through mechanisms including radioluminescence, Cerenkov luminescence, and scintillation. Therapeutically, these visible photons have been combined with photodynamic therapeutic agents preclinically for increasing therapeutic response at depths difficult to reach with external light sources. Last, new microscopy methods that allow single-cell optical imaging of radionuclides are reviewed. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  16. The relationship between functional magnetic resonance imaging activation, diffusion tensor imaging, and training effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Danielle; Budson, Andrew E

    2017-04-01

    While the relationship between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements and training effects is explored by Voelker et al. (this issue), a cursory discussion of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements categorizes increased activation with findings of greater white matter integrity. Evidence of the relationship between fMRI activation and white matter integrity is conflicting, as is the relationship between fMRI activation and training effects. An examination of the changes in fMRI activation in response to training is helpful, but the relationship between DTI and fMRI activation, particularly in the context of white matter changes, must be examined further before general conclusions can be drawn.

  17. Ultrasound elastic tensor imaging: comparison with MR diffusion tensor imaging in the myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Ning; Larrat, Benoît; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickaël

    2012-08-01

    We have previously proven the feasibility of ultrasound-based shear wave imaging (SWI) to non-invasively characterize myocardial fiber orientation in both in vitro porcine and in vivo ovine hearts. The SWI-estimated results were in good correlation with histology. In this study, we proposed a new and robust fiber angle estimation method through a tensor-based approach for SWI, coined together as elastic tensor imaging (ETI), and compared it with magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a current gold standard and extensively reported non-invasive imaging technique for mapping fiber architecture. Fresh porcine (n = 5) and ovine (n = 5) myocardial samples (20 × 20 × 30 mm3) were studied. ETI was firstly performed to generate shear waves and to acquire the wave events at ultrafast frame rate (8000 fps). A 2.8 MHz phased array probe (pitch = 0.28 mm), connected to a prototype ultrasound scanner, was mounted on a customized MRI-compatible rotation device, which allowed both the rotation of the probe from -90° to 90° at 5° increments and co-registration between two imaging modalities. Transmural shear wave speed at all propagation directions realized was firstly estimated. The fiber angles were determined from the shear wave speed map using the least-squares method and eigen decomposition. The test myocardial sample together with the rotation device was then placed inside a 7T MRI scanner. Diffusion was encoded in six directions. A total of 270 diffusion-weighted images (b = 1000 s mm-2, FOV = 30 mm, matrix size = 60 × 64, TR = 6 s, TE = 19 ms, 24 averages) and 45 B0 images were acquired in 14 h 30 min. The fiber structure was analyzed by the fiber-tracking module in software, MedINRIA. The fiber orientation in the overlapped myocardial region which both ETI and DTI accessed was therefore compared, thanks to the co-registered imaging system. Results from all ten samples showed good correlation (r2 = 0.81, p 0.05, unpaired, one-tailed t-test, N = 10). In

  18. SPECIAL ASPECTS OF INITIAL OPTICAL SCHEME SELECTION FOR DESIGN OF NON-IMAGING OPTICAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Anitropov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The research results, structural composition analysis and the parametric synthesis of the projected imaging and non-imaging optical systems were presented. We made an attempt to use the gained experience about imaging systems while designing non-imaging systems, by adapting the composition theory for the calculations of non-imaging systems. Several patterns were revealed, which provide a deeper understanding of the design process of non-imaging optical systems; measures of its optimization were proposed. Method. We investigated the applicability of the theory of composition and synthesis of non-imaging optical systems. The main provisions of the theory of composition are based on the division of all available optical elements in four types depending on their functionality, which corresponds to a modular design. Similar items were identified in non-imaging optical systems and adaptation of composition theory to their design became possible. Main Results. General design patterns of imaging and non-imaging optical systems were studied. Classification of systems, components, as well as technical and generic characteristics of imaging and non-imaging optical systems was determined. Search mechanism of the initial optical system by means of structural and parametric synthesis of non-imaging optical system was formalized. The basic elements were determined included in non-imaging systems and their classification by functionality was done. They were subdivided into basic, corrective, wide angle and high aperture ones. The rules for formation of these elements and their composition were determined: surface reflecting, refracting, spherical and nonspherical elements with total internal reflection. The foundations of composition theory for non-imaging optical systems were laid. The approbation of this method was carried out on the example of the illumination system calculation for surgical room. A 3D model of an illumination optical

  19. Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Application to the Study of the Developing Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Carissa J.; Gerig, Guido; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and its application to the study of white matter in the developing brain in both healthy and clinical samples. Method: The development of DTI and its application to brain imaging of white matter tracts is discussed. Forty-eight studies using DTI to examine diffusion properties of…

  20. Hemorrhagic brain metastases with high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, H.; Abe, O.; Aoki, S.; Masumoto, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kunimatsu, A; Hayashi, N.; Ohtomo, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging has been applicable to the differential diagnosis of abscesses and necrotic or cystic brain tumors. However, restricted water diffusion is not necessarily specific for brain abscess. We describe ring-enhancing metastases of lung carcinoma characterized by high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. The signal pattern probably reflected intralesional hemorrhage. The present report adds to the growing literature regarding the differential diagnosis of ring-enhancing brain lesions.

  1. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, M. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S. [Technical Univ. of Muenchen, (Germany). Childrens' Hospital; Auer, D.P. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma.

  2. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatipoglu, H.G.; Onbasioglu Gurbuz, M.; Sakman, B.; Yuksel, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We present diffusion-weighted imaging findings of a case of rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes. It is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The diagnosis is difficult by clinical findings only. In this report, we aim to draw attention to the role of conventional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature with apparent diffusion coefficient values of diseased brain parenchyma.

  3. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S.; Auer, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma

  4. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of transplanted kidneys: Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wypych-Klunder, Katarzyna; Adamowicz, Andrzej; Lemanowicz, Adam; Szczęsny, Wojciech; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    An aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DWI in the early period after kidney transplantation. We also aimed to compare ADC and eADC values in the cortex and medulla of the kidney, to estimate image noise and variability of measurements, and to verify possible relation between selected labolatory results and diffusion parameters in the transplanted kidney. Examinations were performed using a 1.5 T MR unit. DWI (SE/EPI) was performed in the axial plane using b-values of 600 and 1000. ADC and eADC measurements were performed in four regions of interest within the renal cortex and in three regions within the medulla. Relative variability of results and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated. The analysis included 15 patients (mean age 52 years). The mean variability of ADC was significantly lower than that of eADC (6.8% vs. 10.8%, respectively; p<0.0001). The mean variability of measurements performed in the cortex was significantly lower than that in the medulla (6.2% vs. 11.5%, respectively; p<0.005). The mean SNR was higher in the measurements using b600 than b1000, it was higher in ADC maps than in the eADC maps, and it was higher in the cortex than in the medulla. ADC and eADC measured at b1000 in the cortex were higher in the group of the patients with eGFR ≤30 ml/min./1.73 m 2 as compared to patients with eGFR >30 ml/min./1.73 m 2 (p<0.05). Diffusion-weighted imaging of transplanted kidneys is technically challenging, especially in patients in the early period after transplantation. From a technical point of view, the best quality parameters offer quality ADC measurement in the renal cortex using b1000. ADC and eADC values in the renal cortex measured at b1000 present a relationship with eGFR

  5. Clinical feasibility of simultaneous multi-slice imaging with blipped-CAIPI for diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion-tensor imaging of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hajime; Sakai, Koji; Tazoe, Jun; Goto, Mariko; Imai, Hiroshi; Teramukai, Satoshi; Yamada, Kei

    2017-12-01

    Background Simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) imaging is starting to be used in clinical situation, although evidence of clinical feasibility is scanty. Purpose To prospectively assess the clinical feasibility of SMS diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) with blipped-controlled aliasing in parallel imaging for brain lesions. Material and Methods The institutional review board approved this study. This study included 156 hyperintense lesions on DWI from 32 patients. A slice acceleration factor of 2 was applied for SMS scans, which allowed shortening of the scan time by 41.3%. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was calculated for brain tissue of a selected slice. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated in 36 hyperintense lesions with a diameter of three pixels or more. Visual assessment was performed for all 156 lesions. Tractography of the corticospinal tract of 29 patients was evaluated. The number of tracts and averaged tract length were used for quantitative analysis, and visual assessment was evaluated by grading. Results The SMS scan showed no bias and acceptable 95% limits of agreement compared to conventional scans in SNR, CNR, and ADC on Bland-Altman analyses. Only FA of the lesions was higher in the SMS scan by 9% ( P = 0.016), whereas FA of the surrounding tissues was similar. Quantitative analysis of tractography showed similar values. Visual assessment of DWI hyperintense lesions and tractography also resulted in comparable evaluation. Conclusion SMS imaging was clinically feasible for imaging quality and quantitative values compared with conventional DWI and DTI.

  6. Joint Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters feature introduction: digital holography and three-dimensional imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2011-01-01

    This feature issue serves as a pilot issue promoting the joint issue of Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters. It focuses upon topics of current relevance to the community working in the area of digital holography and 3-D imaging. (C) 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Joint Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters feature introduction: digital holography and three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2011-12-01

    This feature issue serves as a pilot issue promoting the joint issue of Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters. It focuses upon topics of current relevance to the community working in the area of digital holography and 3-D imaging. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  8. Visual pathway impairment by pituitary adenomas: quantitative diagnostics by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Ylva; Gustafsson, Oscar; Ljungberg, Maria; Starck, Göran; Lindblom, Bertil; Skoglund, Thomas; Bergquist, Henrik; Jakobsson, Karl-Erik; Nilsson, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite ample experience in surgical treatment of pituitary adenomas, little is known about objective indices that may reveal risk of visual impairment caused by tumor growth that leads to compression of the anterior visual pathways. This study aimed to explore diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a means for objective assessment of injury to the anterior visual pathways caused by pituitary adenomas. METHODS Twenty-three patients with pituitary adenomas, scheduled for transsphenoidal tumor resection, and 20 healthy control subjects were included in the study. A minimum suprasellar tumor extension of Grade 2-4, according to the SIPAP (suprasellar, infrasellar, parasellar, anterior, and posterior) scale, was required for inclusion. Neuroophthalmological examinations, conventional MRI, and DTI were completed in all subjects and were repeated 6 months after surgery. Quantitative assessment of chiasmal lift, visual field defect (VFD), and DTI parameters from the optic tracts was performed. Linear correlations, group comparisons, and prediction models were done in controls and patients. RESULTS Both the degree of VFD and chiasmal lift were significantly correlated with the radial diffusivity (r = 0.55, p visual pathways that were compressed by pituitary adenomas. The correlation between radial diffusivity and visual impairment may reflect a gradual demyelination in the visual pathways caused by an increased tumor effect. The low level of axial diffusivity found in the patient group may represent early atrophy in the visual pathways, detectable on DTI but not by conventional methods. DTI may provide objective data, detect early signs of injury, and be an additional diagnostic tool for determining indication for surgery in cases of pituitary adenomas.

  9. A Quantitative Diffuse Reflectance Imaging (QDRI System for Comprehensive Surveillance of the Morphological Landscape in Breast Tumor Margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Nichols

    Full Text Available In an ongoing effort to address the clear clinical unmet needs surrounding breast conserving surgery (BCS, our group has developed a next-generation multiplexed optical-fiber-based tool to assess breast tumor margin status during initial surgeries. Specifically detailed in this work is the performance and clinical validation of a research-grade intra-operative tool for margin assessment based on diffuse optical spectroscopy. Previous work published by our group has illustrated the proof-of-concept generations of this device; here we incorporate a highly optimized quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (QDRI system utilizing a wide-field (imaging area = 17 cm(2 49-channel multiplexed fiber optic probe, a custom raster-scanning imaging platform, a custom dual-channel white LED source, and an astronomy grade imaging CCD and spectrograph. The system signal to noise ratio (SNR was found to be greater than 40 dB for all channels. Optical property estimation error was found to be less than 10%, on average, over a wide range of absorption (μa = 0-8.9 cm(-1 and scattering (μs' = 7.0-9.7 cm(-1 coefficients. Very low inter-channel and CCD crosstalk was observed (2% max when used on turbid media (including breast tissue. A raster-scanning mechanism was developed to achieve sub-pixel resolution and was found to be optimally performed at an upsample factor of 8, affording 0.75 mm spatially resolved diffuse reflectance images (λ = 450-600 nm of an entire margin (area = 17 cm(2 in 13.8 minutes (1.23 cm(2/min. Moreover, controlled pressure application at the probe-tissue interface afforded by the imaging platform reduces repeated scan variability, providing <1% variation across repeated scans of clinical specimens. We demonstrate the clinical utility of this device through a pilot 20-patient study of high-resolution optical parameter maps of the ratio of the β-carotene concentration to the reduced scattering coefficient. An empirical cumulative

  10. Improving CT-guided transthoracic biopsy of mediastinal lesions by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; TyngI, Chiang Cheng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard, E-mail: marcosduarte500@gmail.com [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Benveniste, Marcelo Felipe Kuperman; Odisio, Bruno Calazans [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Objectives: to evaluate the preliminary results obtained using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient for planning computed tomography-guided biopsies of selected mediastinal lesions. Methods: eight patients with mediastinal lesions suspicious for malignancy were referred for computed tomography-guided biopsy. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient measurement were performed to assist in biopsy planning with diffusion/computed tomography fused images. We selected mediastinal lesions that could provide discordant diagnoses depending on the biopsy site, including large heterogeneous masses, lesions associated with lung atelectasis or consolidation, lesions involving large mediastinal vessels and lesions for which the results of biopsy using other methods and histopathological examination were divergent from the clinical and radiological suspicion. Results: in all cases, the biopsy needle was successfully directed to areas of higher signal intensity on diffusion weighted sequences and the lowest apparent diffusion coefficient within the lesion (mean, 0.8 [range, 0.6–1.1]610{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), suggesting high cellularity. All biopsies provided adequate material for specific histopathological diagnoses of four lymphomas, two sarcomas and two thymoma s. Conclusion: functional imaging tools, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient, are promising for implementation in noninvasive and imaging-guided procedures. However, additional studies are needed to confirm that mediastinal biopsy can be improved with these techniques. (author)

  11. Perfusion and diffusion MR imaging in enhancing malignant cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calli, Cem; Kitis, Omer; Yunten, Nilgun; Yurtseven, Taskin; Islekel, Sertac; Akalin, Taner

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Common contrast-enhancing malignant tumors of the brain are glioblastoma multiforme (GBMs), anaplastic astrocytomas (AAs), metastases, and lymphomas, all of which have sometimes similar conventional MRI findings. Our aim was to evaluate the role of perfusion MR imaging (PWI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the differentiation of these contrast-enhancing malignant cerebral tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-eight patients with contrast-enhancing and histologically proven brain tumors, 14 AAs, 17 GBMs, nine metastases, and eight lymphomas, were included in the study. All patients have undergone routine MR examination where DWI and PWI were performed in the same session. DWI was performed with b values of 0, 500, and 1000 mm 2 /s. Minimum ADC values (ADC min ) of each tumor was later calculated from ADC map images. PWI was applied using dynamic susceptibility contrast technique and maximum relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV max ) was calculated from each tumor, given in ratio with contralateral normal white matter. Comparisons of ADC min and rCBV max values with the histological types of the enhancing tumors were made with a one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni test. A P value less than 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. Results: The ADC min values (mean ± S.D.) in GBMs, AAs, lymphomas, and metastases were 0.79 ± 0.21 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), 0.75 ± 0.21 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), 0.51 ± 0.09 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), and 0.68 ± 0.11 (x10 -3 mm 2 /s), respectively. The difference in ADC min values were statistically significant between lymphomas and GBMs (P max ratio (mean ± S.D.) in GBMs were 6.33 ± 2.03, whereas it was 3.66 ± 1.79 in AAs, 2.33 ± 0.68 in lymphomas, and 4.45 ± 1.87 in metastases. These values were statistically different between GBMs and AAs (P min and rCBV max calculations, may aid routine MR imaging in the differentiation of common cerebral contrast-enhancing malignant tumors

  12. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  13. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  14. Equipment for Aero-Optical Flow Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Catrakis, Haris

    2004-01-01

    The AFOSR/DURIP Grant has provided the funds to develop a new Aero-Optics Laboratory at UC Irvine, in order to do basic research on aero-optical laser beam propagation through high-speed turbulent flows...

  15. Meaning of visualizing retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Julie; Paques, Michel; Krivosic, Valérie; Dupas, Bénédicte; Couturier, Aude; Kulcsar, Caroline; Tadayoni, Ramin; Massin, Pascale; Gaudric, Alain

    2015-01-01

    To explore the anatomic correlation of the retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. Retrospective nonconsecutive observational case series. A retrospective review of the multimodal imaging charts of 6 patients with focal alteration of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics was performed. Retinal diseases included acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (n = 1), hydroxychloroquine retinopathy (n = 1), and macular telangiectasia type 2 (n = 4). High-resolution retinal images were obtained using a flood-illumination adaptive optics camera. Images were recorded using standard imaging modalities: color and red-free fundus camera photography; infrared reflectance scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. On OCT, in the marginal zone of the lesions, a disappearance of the interdigitation zone was observed, while the ellipsoid zone was preserved. Image recording demonstrated that such attenuation of the interdigitation zone co-localized with the disappearance of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. In 1 case, the restoration of the interdigitation zone paralleled that of the cone mosaic after a 2-month follow-up. Our results suggest that the interdigitation zone could contribute substantially to the reflectance of the cone photoreceptor mosaic. The absence of cones on adaptive optics images does not necessarily mean photoreceptor cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A simple multipurpose double-beam optical image analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowicz, A., E-mail: adam.popowicz@polsl.pl [Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Akademicka Str. 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Blachowicz, T. [Institute of Physics - Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, S. Konarskiego 22B Str., 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-07-15

    In the paper we present a low cost optical device which splits the light in the focal plane into two separate optical paths and collimates it back into a single image plane, and where a selective information processing can be carried out. The optical system is straightforward and easily implementable as it consists of only three lenses and two mirrors. The system is dedicated for imaging in low-light-level conditions in which widely used optical devices, based on beam splitters or dichroic mirrors, suffer from light loss. We expose examples of applications of our device, using a prototype model. The proposed optical system may be employed for: monitoring the objects located at different distances from observer (1), creating regions of different magnification within a single image plane (2), high dynamic range photometry (3), or imaging in two wavelength bands simultaneously (4).

  17. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2015-11-23

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  18. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  19. Deep Into the Fibers! Postmortem Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Forensic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Patricia Mildred; Schroth, Sarah; Schweitzer, Wolf; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Slotboom, Johannes; Kiefer, Claus; Germerott, Tanja; Thali, Michael J; El-Koussy, Marwan

    2015-09-01

    In traumatic brain injury, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging of the brain are essential techniques for determining the pathology sustained and the outcome. Postmortem cross-sectional imaging is an established adjunct to forensic autopsy in death investigation. The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate postmortem diffusion tensor imaging in forensics for its feasibility, influencing factors and correlation to the cause of death compared with autopsy. Postmortem computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion tensor imaging with fiber tracking were performed in 10 deceased subjects. The Likert scale grading of colored fractional anisotropy maps was correlated to the body temperature and intracranial pathology to assess the diagnostic feasibility of postmortem diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking. Optimal fiber tracking (>15,000 fiber tracts) was achieved with a body temperature at 10°C. Likert scale grading showed no linear correlation (P > 0.7) to fiber tract counts. No statistically significant correlation between total fiber count and postmortem interval could be observed (P = 0.122). Postmortem diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking allowed for radiological diagnosis in cases with shearing injuries but was impaired in cases with pneumencephalon and intracerebral mass hemorrhage. Postmortem diffusion tensor imaging with fiber tracking provides an exceptional in situ insight "deep into the fibers" of the brain with diagnostic benefit in traumatic brain injury and axonal injuries in the assessment of the underlying cause of death, considering influencing factors for optimal imaging technique.

  20. Chronic Effects of Boxing: Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Cognitive Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hunter, Jill V; Li, Xiaoqi; Amador, Cristian; Hanten, Gerri; Newsome, Mary R; Wu, Trevor C; McCauley, Stephen R; Vogt, Gregory S; Chu, Zili David; Biekman, Brian; Levin, Harvey S

    2016-04-01

    We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to evaluate the effects of boxing on brain structure and cognition in 10 boxers (8 retired, 2 active; mean age = 45.7 years; standard deviation [SD] = 9.71) and 9 participants (mean age = 43.44; SD = 9.11) in noncombative sports. Evans Index (maximum width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles/maximal width of the internal diameter of the skull) was significantly larger in the boxers (F = 4.52; p = 0.050; Cohen's f = 0.531). Word list recall was impaired in the boxers (F(1,14) = 10.70; p = 0.006; f = 0.84), whereas implicit memory measured by faster reaction time (RT) to a repeating sequence of numbers than to a random sequence was preserved (t = 2.52; p boxing had the most consistent, negative correlations with FA, ranging from -0.65 for the right ventral striatum to -0.92 for the right cerebral peduncle. Years of boxing was negatively related to the number of words consistently recalled over trials (r = -0.74; p = 0.02), delayed recall (r = -0.83; p = 0.003), and serial RT (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). We conclude that microstructural integrity of white matter tracts is related to declarative memory and response speed in boxers and to the extent of boxing exposure. Implications for chronic traumatic encephalopathy are discussed.

  1. Some applications of nonlinear diffusion to processing of dynamic evolution images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltsov, Alexey N.; Nikishov, Sergey A.

    1997-01-01

    Model nonlinear diffusion equation with the most simple Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional was applied to locate boundaries between meaningful regions of low-level images. The method is oriented to processing images of objects that are a result of dynamic evolution: images of different organs and tissues obtained by radiography and NMR methods, electron microscope images of morphogenesis fields, etc. In the methods developed by us, parameters of the nonlinear diffusion model are chosen on the basis of the preliminary treatment of the images. The parameters of the Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional are extracted from the structure factor of the images. Owing to such a choice of the model parameters, the image to be processed is located in the vicinity of the steady-state of the diffusion equation. The suggested method allows one to separate distinct structures having specific space characteristics from the whole image. The method was applied to processing X-ray images of the lung

  2. MR imaging of skeletal muscle injury in rabbit : comparison between diffusion and T2-weighted MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Sung Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwon Oh Han; Lee, Jae Mun; Lim, Yeon Soo

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply the diffusion-weighted MR imaging technique to the early detection of skeletal muscle injury and to evaluate the usefulness of this imaging sequence. Thirty rabbits, divided into two groups, were included in this study . Skeletal muscle injury was experimentally induced in the right thigh muscles of each rabbit by clamping with a hemostat for one minute. Four-stage clamping was applied to the rabbits in group I, but for group II there was only one stage. Diffusion and T2-weighted MR images were obtained using a 1.5T MR unit. Serial 5-and 30-minute, and 2-, 24-, and 48- hour delayed images were obtained after injury. The initial time of signal intensity change was recorded and the signal intensities of the injured sites and corresponding normal sites were measured and compared. On 5-minute delayed images in group I, diffusion-weighted MR images showed signal intensity changes in injured muscle in all 15 cases, but on T2-weighted images, change was not detected in three cases. In group II, 5-minute delayed T2-weighted images failed to depict the lesion in six cases, but on diffusion-weighted images, all lesions were detected. In addition, one lesion was not detected on 30-minute delayed T2-weighted images. In group II, the sensitivity of lesion detection was significantly higher on diffusion-weighted than on T2-weighted images (p=3D0.0169). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging was shown to be more sensitive than T2-weighted imaging for the detection of signal intensity changes immediately after artificial injury, especially when this was of a lesser degree. These results suggest that diffusion-weighted MR imaging may be useful for the detection of early stage skeletal muscle injury. (author)

  3. A surgical navigation system for non-contact diffuse optical tomography and intraoperative cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Michael J.; Muhanna, Nidal; Chan, Harley; Wilson, Brian C.; Irish, Jonathan C.; Jaffray, David A.

    2014-02-01

    A freehand, non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system has been developed for multimodal imaging with intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) during minimally-invasive cancer surgery. The DOT system is configured for near-infrared fluorescence imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) using a collimated 780 nm laser diode and a nearinfrared CCD camera (PCO Pixelfly USB). Depending on the intended surgical application, the camera is coupled to either a rigid 10 mm diameter endoscope (Karl Storz) or a 25 mm focal length lens (Edmund Optics). A prototype flatpanel CBCT C-Arm (Siemens Healthcare) acquires low-dose 3D images with sub-mm spatial resolution. A 3D mesh is extracted from CBCT for finite-element DOT implementation in NIRFAST (Dartmouth College), with the capability for soft/hard imaging priors (e.g., segmented lymph nodes). A stereoscopic optical camera (NDI Polaris) provides real-time 6D localization of reflective spheres mounted to the laser and camera. Camera calibration combined with tracking data is used to estimate intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) lens parameters. Source/detector boundary data is computed from the tracked laser/camera positions using radiometry models. Target registration errors (TRE) between real and projected boundary points are ~1-2 mm for typical acquisition geometries. Pre-clinical studies using tissue phantoms are presented to characterize 3D imaging performance. This translational research system is under investigation for clinical applications in head-and-neck surgery including oral cavity tumour resection, lymph node mapping, and free-flap perforator assessment.

  4. Transcranial diffuse optical monitoring of microvascular cerebral hemodynamics after thrombolysis in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, Peyman; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Dinia, Lavinia; Carrera, David; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Durduran, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke is to reestablish the blood flow to the ischemic region of the brain. However, currently, the local cerebral hemodynamics (microvascular) is almost entirely inaccessible for stroke clinicians at the patient bed-side, and the recanalization of the major cerebral arteries (macrovascular) is the only available measure to evaluate the therapy, which does not always reflect the local conditions. Here we report the case of an ischemic stroke patient whose microvascular cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were monitored by a compact hybrid diffuse optical monitor during thrombolytic therapy. This monitor combined diffuse correlation spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy. The reperfusion assessed by hybrid diffuse optics temporally correlated with the recanalization of the middle cerebral artery (assessed by transcranial-Doppler) and was in agreement with the patient outcome. This study suggests that upon further investigation, diffuse optics might have a potential for bed-side acute stroke monitoring and therapy guidance by providing hemodynamics information at the microvascular level.

  5. Evaluating contextual processing in diffusion MRI: application to optic radiation reconstruction for epilepsy surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal M W Tax

    Full Text Available Diffusion MRI and tractography allow for investigation of the architectural configuration of white matter in vivo, offering new avenues for applications like presurgical planning. Despite the promising outlook, there are many pitfalls that complicate its use for (clinical application. Amongst these are inaccuracies in the geometry of the diffusion profiles on which tractography is based, and poor alignment with neighboring profiles. Recently developed contextual processing techniques, including enhancement and well-posed geometric sharpening, have shown to result in sharper and better aligned diffusion profiles. However, the research that has been conducted up to now is mainly of theoretical nature, and so far these techniques have only been evaluated by visual inspection of the diffusion profiles. In this work, the method is evaluated in a clinically relevant application: the reconstruction of the optic radiation for epilepsy surgery. For this evaluation we have developed a framework in which we incorporate a novel scoring procedure for individual pathways. We demonstrate that, using enhancement and sharpening, the extraction of an anatomically plausible reconstruction of the optic radiation from a large amount of probabilistic pathways is greatly improved in three healthy controls, where currently used methods fail to do so. Furthermore, challenging reconstructions of the optic radiation in three epilepsy surgery candidates with extensive brain lesions demonstrate that it is beneficial to integrate these methods in surgical planning.

  6. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the abdomen with pulse triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muertz, P.; Pauleit, D.; Traeber, F.; Kreft, B.P.; Schild, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to reduce the influence of motion on diffusion-weighted MR images of the abdomen by pulse triggering of single-shot sequences. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were examined both without and with finger pulse-triggering of a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo planar MR imaging sequence at 1.5 T. Series of diffusion-weighted images were acquired at different phases of the cardiac cycle by varying the time delay between finger pulse and sequence acquisition. The measurements were repeated three times. The diffusion weighted images were analysed by measuring the signal intensities and by determining the ADC values within the spleen, kidney and liver. Results: The magnitude of motion artifacts on diffusion weighted images shows a strong dependence on the trigger delay. The optimum trigger delay is found to be between 500 and 600 ms. For these values the abdominal organs appear homogeneous on all diffusion weighted images and the strongest signal intensities are detected. At optimum triggering the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients is up to 10 times better than without triggering. Moreover, the standard deviation of the repeated measurements is smaller than 12% for all volunteers and for all organs. Without triggering the standard deviation is larger by a factor of 4 on average. Conclusion: Pulse triggering of single-shot sequences leads to significant reduction of motion related artifacts on diffusion weighted images of the abdomen and provides more accurate and reproducible ADC values. (orig.) [de

  7. Classification of Error-Diffused Halftone Images Based on Spectral Regression Kernel Discriminant Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigao Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel algorithm to solve the challenging problem of classifying error-diffused halftone images. We firstly design the class feature matrices, after extracting the image patches according to their statistics characteristics, to classify the error-diffused halftone images. Then, the spectral regression kernel discriminant analysis is used for feature dimension reduction. The error-diffused halftone images are finally classified using an idea similar to the nearest centroids classifier. As demonstrated by the experimental results, our method is fast and can achieve a high classification accuracy rate with an added benefit of robustness in tackling noise.

  8. UWGSP7: a real-time optical imaging workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John E.; Kim, Yongmin; Pennington, Stan D.; Alleman, Andrew P.

    1995-04-01

    With the development of UWGSP7, the University of Washington Image Computing Systems Laboratory has a real-time workstation for continuous-wave (cw) optical reflectance imaging. Recent discoveries in optical science and imaging research have suggested potential practical use of the technology as a medical imaging modality and identified the need for a machine to support these applications in real time. The UWGSP7 system was developed to provide researchers with a high-performance, versatile tool for use in optical imaging experiments with the eventual goal of bringing the technology into clinical use. One of several major applications of cw optical reflectance imaging is tumor imaging which uses a light-absorbing dye that preferentially sequesters in tumor tissue. This property could be used to locate tumors and to identify tumor margins intraoperatively. Cw optical reflectance imaging consists of illumination of a target with a band-limited light source and monitoring the light transmitted by or reflected from the target. While continuously illuminating the target, a control image is acquired and stored. A dye is injected into a subject and a sequence of data images are acquired and processed. The data images are aligned with the control image and then subtracted to obtain a signal representing the change in optical reflectance over time. This signal can be enhanced by digital image processing and displayed in pseudo-color. This type of emerging imaging technique requires a computer system that is versatile and adaptable. The UWGSP7 utilizes a VESA local bus PC as a host computer running the Windows NT operating system and includes ICSL developed add-on boards for image acquisition and processing. The image acquisition board is used to digitize and format the analog signal from the input device into digital frames and to the average frames into images. To accommodate different input devices, the camera interface circuitry is designed in a small mezzanine board

  9. Asymptotic solutions of numerical transport problems in optically thick, diffusive regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.W.; Morel, J.E.; Miller, W.F. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    We present an asymptotic analysis of spatial differencing schemes for the discrete-ordinates equations, for diffusive media with spatial cells that are not optically thin. Our theoretical tool is an asymptotic expansion that has previously been used to describe the transform from analytic transport to analytic diffusion theory for such media. To introduce this expansion and its physical rationale, we first describe it for the analytic discrete-ordinates equations. Then, we apply the expansion to the spatially discretized discrete-ordinates equations, with the spatial mesh scaled in either of two physically relevant ways such that the optical thickness of the spatial cells is not small. If the result of either expansion is a legitimate diffusion description for either the cell-averaged or cell-edge fluxes, then we say that the approximate flux has the appropriate diffusion limit; otherwise, we say it does not. We consider several transport differencing schemes that are applicable in neutron transport and thermal radiation applications. We also include numerical results which demonstrate the validity of our theory and show that differencing schemes that do have a particular diffusion limit are substantially more accurate, in the regime described by the limit, than those that do not. copyright 1987 Academic Press, Inc

  10. Measurements of the Fe3+ diffusion coefficient in Fricke Xylenol gel using optical density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato de Oliveira, Lucas; Sampaio, Francisco Glaildo Almeida; Moreira, Marcos Vasques; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2014-01-01

    In Fricke dosimetry, optical density measurements are performed some time after dosimeter irradiation. Values of the diffusion coefficient of Fe 3+ in Fricke Xylenol gel (FXG) are necessary for determining the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose from measurements of the optical density. Five sets of FXG dosimeters, kept at different constant temperatures, were exposed to collimated 6 MV photons. The optical density profile, proportional to the Fe 3+ concentration, at the boundary between irradiated and non-irradiated parts of each dosimeter was measured periodically over a period of 60 h. By comparing the experimental data with a function that accounts for the unobserved initial concentration profile of Fe 3+ in the FXG, we obtained diffusion coefficients 0.30±0.05, 0.40±0.05, 0.50±0.05, 0.60±0.05 and 0.80±0.05 mm 2 /h for the temperatures 283.0±0.5, 286.0±0.5, 289.0±0.5, 292.0±0.5, and 296.0±0.5 K, respectively. The activation energy of Fe 3+ diffusion in the gel, 0.54±0.06 eV, was determined from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients. - Highlights: • A new analytical method to determine diffusion coefficients of ions in gels is proposed. • The method is applied for measurements of the diffusion coefficients of Fe 3+ ions in a Fricke gel dosimeter. • Activation energy of the Fe 3+ ions in the gel was found to be 0.54 ±0.06 eV

  11. Design of a multimodal fibers optic system for small animal optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Pagliazzi, Marco; Boschi, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Small animals optical imaging systems are widely used in pre-clinical research to image in vivo the bio-distribution of light emitting probes using fluorescence or bioluminescence modalities. In this work we presented a set of simulated results of a novel small animal optical imaging module based on a fibers optics matrix, coupled with a position sensitive detector, devoted to acquire bioluminescence and Cerenkov images. Simulations were performed using GEANT 4 code with the GAMOS architecture using the tissue optics plugin. Results showed that it is possible to image a 30 × 30 mm region of interest using a fiber optics array containing 100 optical fibers without compromising the quality of the reconstruction. The number of fibers necessary to cover an adequate portion of a small animal is thus quite modest. This design allows integrating the module with magnetic resonance (MR) in order to acquire optical and MR images at the same time. A detailed model of the mouse anatomy, obtained by segmentation of 3D MRI images, will improve the quality of optical 3D reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The imaging diagnosis of diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jianqiang; Hu Jiawang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical and pathological characteristics and the imaging types of the diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma. Methods: The clinical data and CT and MR images on 48 cases with diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma were analyzed. Results: Among these 48 cases of the diffuse brain swelling due to severe brain trauma, 33 cases were complicated with brain contusions (including 12 cases brain diffuse axonal injury, 1 case infarct of the right basal ganglion), 31 cases were complicated with hematoma (epidural, subdural or intracerebral), 27 cases were complicated with skull base fracture, and 10 cases were complicated with subarachnoid hematoma. The CT and MR imaging of the diffuse brain swelling included as followed: (1) Symmetrically diffuse brain swelling in both cerebral hemispheres with cerebral ventricles decreased or disappeared, without median line shift. (2)Diffuse brain swelling in one side cerebral hemisphere with cerebral ventricles decreased or disappeared at same side, and median line shift to other side. (3) Subarachnoid hematoma or little subcortex intracerebral hematoma were complicated. (4) The CT value of the cerebral could be equal, lower or higher comparing with normal. Conclusion: The pathological reason of diffuse brain swelling was the brain vessel expanding resulting from hypothalamus and brainstem injured in severe brain trauma. There were four CT and MR imaging findings in diffuse brain swelling. The diffuse brain swelling without hematoma may be caused by ischemical reperfusion injury. (authors)

  13. Analysis and optimization of a diffuse photon optical tomography of turbid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, David L.; Wei, Sung-po; Zhu, X. D.

    2000-01-01

    In a numerical study, we investigate a diffuse-photon computed tomography of a turbid medium. Using a perturbation approach, we relate through a matrix K a bulk heterogeneous distribution of the optical absorption coefficient μ a that characterizes the heterogeneity in an otherwise homogeneous turbid medium to the diffuse photon flux that emerges from its surface. By studying the condition number (N C ) of the matrix K as a function of illumination-det