WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical diffraction

  1. Diffraction coherence in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  2. Diffractive optics for industrial and commercial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turunen, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland); Wyrowski, F. [eds.] [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The following topics were dealt with: diffractive optics, diffraction gratings, optical system design with diffractive optics, continuous-relief diffractive lenses and microlens arrays, diffractive bifocal intraocular lenses, diffractive laser resonators, diffractive optics for semiconductor lasers, diffractive elements for optical image processing, photorefractive crystals in optical measurement systems, subwavelenth-structured elements, security applications, diffractive optics for solar cells, holographic microlithography. 999 refs.

  3. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-01-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known

  4. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  5. Diffractive nonimaging optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Economic use of energy often depends on efficient management of light. Power generation from solar energy, for example, can involve optical systems that concentrate incident sunlight onto a small area and thereby reduce the required surface area of photovoltaic elements. Similarly, efficient

  6. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  7. Electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    An electro-optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro-optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating is described. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro-optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating. (auth)

  8. Diffractive optical elements for space communication terminals

    OpenAIRE

    Herzig, Hans-Peter; Ehbets, Peter; Teijido, Juan M.; Weible, Kenneth J.; Heimbeck, Hans-Joerg

    2007-01-01

    The potential of diffractive optical elements for advanced laser communication terminals has been investigated. Applications include beam shaping of high- power laser diode arrays, optical filter elements for position detection and hybrid (refractive/diffractive) elements. In addition, we present a design example of a miniaturized terminal including diffractive optics.

  9. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  10. Non-diffractive optically variable security devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renesse, R.L. van

    1991-01-01

    At the past optical security conferences attention was focused on diffractive structures, e.g. holograms, embossed gratings and thin—film devices, as security elements on valuable documents. The main reasons for this emphasis are, that the iridescent effect of such diffractive optically variable

  11. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  12. Diffractive optics: design, fabrication, and test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Shea, Donald C

    2004-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the broad range of materials that were discussed in a series of short courses presented at Georgia Tech on the design, fabrication, and testing of diffractive optical elements (DOEs...

  13. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  14. Geometrical optics and the diffraction phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeev, Aleksandr V

    2005-01-01

    This note outlines the principles of the geometrical optics of inhomogeneous waves whose description necessitates the use of complex values of the wave vector. Generalizing geometrical optics to inhomogeneous waves permits including in its scope the analysis of the diffraction phenomenon. (methodological notes)

  15. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a 6 Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 μs. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  16. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect

  17. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  18. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  19. Diffractive optical elements written by photodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baal-Zedaka, I.; Hava, S.; Mirchin, N.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Azoulay, J.; Peled, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this work direct laser writing of diffractive optical elements (DOE) by photodeposition (PD) of amorphous selenium (a-Se) from colloid solutions has been investigated. We used a computer controlled laser scanner for patterning thin film micro-profiles creating thus planar optical elements by direct beam writing on surfaces immersed in a liquid phase PD cell. The laser employed was an argon ion laser at 488 nm wavelength, with powers up to 55 mW, for writing typically 25-250 μm wide lines of 200 nm thickness at rates of about 150 μm/s. Various elements made of photodeposited thin films on polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) substrates were produced for prototyping microlenses, linear grating arrays, cylindrical and circular profiled DOE patterns

  20. Propagation and diffraction of optical vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, Pascal; Skelton, Susan E.; Leburn, Christopher G.; Streuber, Casey T.; Wright, Ewan M.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2008-01-01

    We explore the propagation and diffraction of optical vortices (Laguerre-Gaussian beams) of varying azimuthal index past a circular obstacle and Young's double slits. When the beam and obstacle centers are aligned the famous spot of Arago, which arises for zero azimuthal index, is replaced for non-zero azimuthal indices by a dark spot of Arago, a simple consequence of the conserved phase singularity at the beam center. We explore how for larger azimuthal indices, as the beam and obstacle centers are progressively misaligned, the central dark spot breaks up into several dark spots of Arago. Using Young's double slits we can easily measure the azimuthal index of the vortex beam, even for polychromatic vortices generated by broadband supercontinuum radiation

  1. Light distribution in diffractive multifocal optics and its optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portney, Valdemar

    2011-11-01

    To expand a geometrical model of diffraction efficiency and its interpretation to the multifocal optic and to introduce formulas for analysis of far and near light distribution and their application to multifocal intraocular lenses (IOLs) and to diffraction efficiency optimization. Medical device consulting firm, Newport Coast, California, USA. Experimental study. Application of a geometrical model to the kinoform (single focus diffractive optical element) was expanded to a multifocal optic to produce analytical definitions of light split between far and near images and light loss to other diffraction orders. The geometrical model gave a simple interpretation of light split in a diffractive multifocal IOL. An analytical definition of light split between far, near, and light loss was introduced as curve fitting formulas. Several examples of application to common multifocal diffractive IOLs were developed; for example, to light-split change with wavelength. The analytical definition of diffraction efficiency may assist in optimization of multifocal diffractive optics that minimize light loss. Formulas for analysis of light split between different foci of multifocal diffractive IOLs are useful in interpreting diffraction efficiency dependence on physical characteristics, such as blaze heights of the diffractive grooves and wavelength of light, as well as for optimizing multifocal diffractive optics. Disclosure is found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Optical system storage design with diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostuk, Raymond K.; Haggans, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data storage systems are gaining widespread acceptance due to their high areal density and the ability to remove the high capacity hard disk from the system. In magneto-optical read-write systems, a small rotation of the polarization state in the return signal from the MO media is the signal which must be sensed. A typical arrangement used for detecting these signals and correcting for errors in tracking and focusing on the disk is illustrated. The components required to achieve these functions are listed. The assembly and alignment of this complex system has a direct impact on cost, and also affects the size, weight, and corresponding data access rates. As a result, integrating these optical components and improving packaging techniques is an active area of research and development. Most designs of binary optic elements have been concerned with optimizing grating efficiency. However, rigorous coupled wave models for vector field diffraction from grating surfaces can be extended to determine the phase and polarization state of the diffracted field, and the design of polarization components. A typical grating geometry and the phase and polarization angles associated with the incident and diffracted fields are shown. In our current stage of work, we are examining system configurations which cascade several polarization functions on a single substrate. In this design, the beam returning from the MO disk illuminates a cascaded grating element which first couples light into the substrate, then introduces a quarter wave retardation, then a polarization rotation, and finally separates s- and p-polarized fields through a polarization beam splitter. The input coupler and polarization beam splitter are formed in volume gratings, and the two intermediate elements are zero-order elements.

  3. An amplitude and phase hybrid modulation Fresnel diffractive optical element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Cheng, Jiangao; Wang, Mengyu; Jin, Xueying; Wang, Keyi

    2018-04-01

    An Amplitude and Phase Hybrid Modulation Fresnel Diffractive Optical Element (APHMFDOE) is proposed here. We have studied the theory of APHMFDOE and simulated the focusing properties of it along the optical axis, which show that the focus can be blazed to other positions with changing the quadratic phase factor. Moreover, we design a Composite Fresnel Diffraction Optical Element (CFDOE) based on the characteristics of APHMFDOE. It greatly increases the outermost zone width without changing the F-number, which brings a lot of benefits to the design and processing of diffraction device. More importantly, the diffraction efficiency of the CFDOE is almost unchanged compared with AFZP at the same focus.

  4. A pseudospectral collocation time-domain method for diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, P.G.; Hesthaven, J.S.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2000-01-01

    We present a pseudospectral method for the analysis of diffractive optical elements. The method computes a direct time-domain solution of Maxwell's equations and is applied to solving wave propagation in 2D diffractive optical elements. (C) 2000 IMACS. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights...

  5. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  6. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2015-11-23

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  7. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  8. Refractive and diffractive neutron optics with reduced chromatic aberration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Bentley, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    by the use of optics for focusing and imaging. Refractive and diffractive optical elements, e.g. compound refractive lenses and Fresnel zone plates, are attractive due to their low cost, and simple alignment. These optical elements, however, suffer from chromatic aberration, which limit their effectiveness...

  9. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  10. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  11. Optical diffraction from fractals with a structural transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Rodriguez, F.; Canessa, E.

    1994-04-01

    A macroscopic characterization of fractals showing up a structural transition from dense to multibranched growth is made using optical diffraction theory. Such fractals are generated via the numerical solution of the 2D Poisson and biharmonic equations and are compared to more 'regular' irreversible clusters such as diffusion limited and Laplacian aggregates. The optical diffraction method enables to identify a decrease of the fractal dimension above the structural point. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  12. Spatiotemporal optical pulse transformation by a resonant diffraction grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovastikov, N. V.; Bykov, D. A., E-mail: bykovd@gmail.com; Doskolovich, L. L., E-mail: leonid@smr.ru; Soifer, V. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Image Processing Systems Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    The diffraction of a spatiotemporal optical pulse by a resonant diffraction grating is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of the signal (the spatiotemporal incident pulse envelope) passage through a linear system. An analytic approximation in the form of a rational function of two variables corresponding to the angular and spatial frequencies has been obtained for the transfer function of the system. A hyperbolic partial differential equation describing the general form of the incident pulse envelope transformation upon diffraction by a resonant diffraction grating has been derived from the transfer function. A solution of this equation has been obtained for the case of normal incidence of a pulse with a central frequency lying near the guided-mode resonance of a diffraction structure. The presented results of numerical simulations of pulse diffraction by a resonant grating show profound changes in the pulse envelope shape that closely correspond to the proposed theoretical description. The results of the paper can be applied in creating new devices for optical pulse shape transformation, in optical information processing problems, and analog optical computations.

  13. Dedicated software for diffractive optics design and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firsov, A; Brzhezinskaya, M; Erko, A; Firsov, A; Svintsov, A

    2013-01-01

    An efficient software package for the structure design and simulation of imaging properties of diffraction optical elements has been developed. It operates with point source and consists of: the ZON software, to calculate the structure of an optical element in transmission and reflection; the KRGF software, to simulate the diffraction properties of an ideal optical element with point source; the DS software, to calculate the diffraction properties by taking into consideration material and shadowing effects. Optional software allows simulation with a real non-point source. Zone plate thickness profile, source shape as well as substrate curvature are considered in this calculation. This is especially important for the diffractive focusing elements and gratings at a total external reflection, given that the lateral size of the structure can be up to 1 m. The program package can be used in combination with the Nanomaker software to prepare data for ion and e-beam surface modifications and corrections.

  14. Diffractive Optics for Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunkowski, A; Burmeister, O; Clausnitzer, T; Kley, E-B; Tuennermann, A; Danzmann, K; Schnabel, R

    2006-01-01

    All-reflective interferometry based on nano-structured diffraction gratings offers new possibilities for gravitational wave detection. We investigate an all-reflective Fabry-Perot interferometer concept in 2nd order Littrow mount. The input-output relations for such a resonator are derived treating the grating coupler by means of a scattering matrix formalism. A low loss dielectric reflection grating has been designed and manufactured to test the properties of such a grating cavity

  15. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-02

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc.

  16. ADVANTAGES OF DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL ELEMENTS APPLICATION IN SIMPLE OPTICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Zoric

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the influence of diffractive optical elements on the optical aberrations. The correction of optical aberrations was investigated in the simple optical systems with one and two lenses (singlet and doublet. The advantages of diffractive optical elements are their ability to generate arbitrary complex wave fronts from a piece of optical material that is essentially flat. The optical systems consisting of the standard surfaces were designed and optimized by using the same starting points. Further, the diffractive and aspheric surfaces were introduced into the developed systems. The resulting hybrid systems were optimized. To compare the complicity of the development of narrow field systems and wide field optical systems, the optimization has been done separately for these two types of the instruments. The optical systems were designed by using special Optical Design Software. Тhe characteristics of designed diffractive surfaces were controlled in Software DIFSYS 2.30. Due to the application of diffractive optical elements the longitudinal chromatic aberration was 5 times reduced for the narrow field systems. The absolute value of Seidel coefficient related to the spherical aberration was reduced in the range of 0.03. Considering that diffractive optical elements have the known disadvantages, like possible parasitic diffraction orders and probable decrease of the transmission, we also developed and analyzed the optical systems with combined aspheric and diffractive surfaces. A combination of the aspheric and diffractive surfaces in the optical disk system of the disk reading lens, gave cutting down of the longitudinal color aberrations almost 15 times on-axis, comparing to the lens consisting of the aspherical and standard surfaces. All of the designed diffractive optical elements possess the parameters within the fabrication limits.

  17. Photodeposited diffractive optical elements of computer generated masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirchin, N.; Peled, A.; Baal-Zedaka, I.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Verdyan, A.; Azoulay, J.

    2005-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) were synthesized on plastic substrates using the photodeposition (PD) technique by depositing amorphous selenium (a-Se) films with argon lasers and UV spectra light. The thin films were deposited typically onto polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates at room temperature. Scanned beam and contact mask modes were employed using computer-designed DOE lenses. Optical and electron micrographs characterize the surface details. The films were typically 200 nm thick

  18. Teaching Diffraction with Hands-On Optical Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic…

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  20. Koch fractals in physical optics and their Fraunhofer diffraction patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horváth, P.; Šmíd, Petr; Vašková, I.; Hrabovský, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2010), s. 206-2134 ISSN 0030-4026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Koch fractal s * Fraunhofer diffraction patterns Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.454, year: 2010

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  2. Optical diffraction by ordered 2D arrays of silica microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, A.A.; Shavdina, O.; Tishchenko, A.V.; Veillas, C.; Verrier, I.; Dellea, O.; Jourlin, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents experimental and theoretical studies of angular dependent diffraction properties of 2D monolayer arrays of silica microspheres. High-quality large area defect-free monolayers of 1 μm diameter silica microspheres were deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique under an accurate optical control. Measured angular dependencies of zeroth and one of the first order diffraction efficiencies produced by deposited samples were simulated by the rigorous Generalized Source Method taking into account particle size dispersion and lattice nonideality. - Highlights: • High quality silica microsphere monolayer was fabricated. • Accurate measurements of diffraction efficiency angular dependencies. • Rigorous diffraction simulation of both ideal hexagonal and realistic microsphere arrangements. • Qualitative rationalization of the obtained results and the observed differences between the experiment and the theory.

  3. Optical diffraction by ordered 2D arrays of silica microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, A. A.; Shavdina, O.; Tishchenko, A. V.; Veillas, C.; Verrier, I.; Dellea, O.; Jourlin, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The article presents experimental and theoretical studies of angular dependent diffraction properties of 2D monolayer arrays of silica microspheres. High-quality large area defect-free monolayers of 1 μm diameter silica microspheres were deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique under an accurate optical control. Measured angular dependencies of zeroth and one of the first order diffraction efficiencies produced by deposited samples were simulated by the rigorous Generalized Source Method taking into account particle size dispersion and lattice nonideality.

  4. Indoor optical wireless communication system using beam-steering by cascaded diffractive optical elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oh, C.W.; Tangdiongga, E.; Koonen, A.M.J.; García-Blanco, S.M.; Boller, Kl.J.; Sefunc, M.A.; Geuzebroek, D.

    2014-01-01

    While the radio spectrum continues to struggle with a soaring bandwidth demand, the optical spectrum promises virtually unlimited license-free bandwidth. We report the feasibility of high-capacity point-to-point links for indoor optical wireless communication with cascaded diffractive optical

  5. The PIAA Coronagraph: Optical design and Diffraction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluzhnik, E. A.; Guyon, O.; Ridgway, S.; Martinache, F.; Woodruff, R.; Blain, C.; Galicher, R.

    2005-12-01

    Properly apodized pupils are suitable for high dynamical range imaging of extrasolar terrestrial planets. Phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA) of the telescope pupil (Guyon 2003) combines the advantages of classical pupil apodization with full throughput, no loss of angular resolution and low chromaticity. Diffraction propagation effects can decrease both the achieved contrast and the spectral bandwidth of the coronagraph. We show here how the diffraction effects in the PIAA optics can be corrected by an appropriate optical design. The proposed hybrid coronagraph design preserves the 10-10 PSF contrast at ≈ 1.5 λ /d required for efficient exoplanet imaging over the whole visible spectrum. This work was carried out under JPL contract numbers 1254445 and 1257767 for Development of Technologies for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission, with the support and hospitality of the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  6. X-ray diffraction microscopy based on refractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henning Friis; Jakobsen, A. C.; Simons, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    A formalism is presented for dark‐field X‐ray microscopy using refractive optics. The new technique can produce three‐dimensional maps of lattice orientation and axial strain within millimetre‐sized sampling volumes and is particularly suited to in situ studies of materials at hard X‐ray energies....... An objective lens in the diffracted beam magnifies the image and acts as a very efficient filter in reciprocal space, enabling the imaging of individual domains of interest with a resolution of 100 nm. Analytical expressions for optical parameters such as numerical aperture, vignetting, and the resolution...

  7. Manipulating qudits spatial using programmable diffractive optical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, G.; Neves, L.; Saavedra, C.; Vargas, A.; Guzman, R.

    2009-01-01

    The generation of high-dimensional quantum states (qudits) is justified by the advantages that they can bring for the field of quantum information. These states for practical application in quantum communication must be of simple manipulation. Qudits can be generated by controlling the transverse momentum of the parametric down-converted photons. In this work, we show a simple technique for modifying these sates based on the use of programmable diffractive optical devices, which can act as spatial light modulators. (Author)

  8. Optical forces in a non-diffracting vortex beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 126, September (2013), s. 78-83 ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/12/P868; GA MŠk LH12018; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : dielectric microparticle * non-diffracting vortex beam Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2013

  9. Takagi-Taupin description of x-ray dynamical diffraction from diffractive optics with large numerical aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Hanfei; Maser, Joerg; Macrander, Albert; Shen Qun; Vogt, Stefan; Stephenson, G. Brian; Kang, Hyon Chol

    2007-01-01

    We present a formalism of x-ray dynamical diffraction from volume diffractive optics with large numerical aperture and high aspect ratio, in an analogy to the Takagi-Taupin equations [Acta Crystallogr. 15, 1311 (1962); Bull. Soc. Fr. Mineral. Crystallogr. 87, 469 (1964)] for strained single crystals. We derive a set of basic equations for dynamical diffraction from volume diffractive optics, which enable us to study the focusing property of these optics with various grating profiles. We study volume diffractive optics that satisfy the Bragg condition to various degrees, namely, flat, tilted, and wedged geometries, and derive the curved geometries required for ultimate focusing. We show that the curved geometries satisfy both the Bragg condition everywhere and phase requirement for point focusing and effectively focus hard x rays to a scale close to the wavelength. Our calculations were made for an x-ray wavelength of 0.064 nm (19.5 keV)

  10. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.; Hunt, D.; Hahn, D.; Cradick, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Morgan, D. V. [National Security Technologies LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.

  11. Optical diffraction tomography: accuracy of an off-axis reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography is an increasingly popular method that allows for reconstruction of three-dimensional refractive index distribution of semi-transparent samples using multiple measurements of an optical field transmitted through the sample for various illumination directions. The process of assembly of the angular measurements is usually performed with one of two methods: filtered backprojection (FBPJ) or filtered backpropagation (FBPP) tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The former approach, although conceptually very simple, provides an accurate reconstruction for the object regions located close to the plane of focus. However, since FBPJ ignores diffraction, its use for spatially extended structures is arguable. According to the theory of scattering, more precise restoration of a 3D structure shall be achieved with the FBPP algorithm, which unlike the former approach incorporates diffraction. It is believed that with this method one is allowed to obtain a high accuracy reconstruction in a large measurement volume exceeding depth of focus of an imaging system. However, some studies have suggested that a considerable improvement of the FBPP results can be achieved with prior propagation of the transmitted fields back to the centre of the object. This, supposedly, enables reduction of errors due to approximated diffraction formulas used in FBPP. In our view this finding casts doubt on quality of the FBPP reconstruction in the regions far from the rotation axis. The objective of this paper is to investigate limitation of the FBPP algorithm in terms of an off-axis reconstruction and compare its performance with the FBPJ approach. Moreover, in this work we propose some modifications to the FBPP algorithm that allow for more precise restoration of a sample structure in off-axis locations. The research is based on extensive numerical simulations supported with wave-propagation method.

  12. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R., E-mail: g.chabrol@ecam-strasbourg.eu [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Ciceron, Adline [ECAM Strasbourg-Europe, Espace Européen de l’entreprise, 2, rue de Madrid – 67300 SCHILTIGHEIM, CS. 20013, 67012 Strasbourg CEDEX (France); Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre [Laboratoire des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, de l’Informatique et de l’Imagerie (ICube), UDS-CNRS, UMR 7357, 300 bld Sébastien Brant, CS 10413, 67412 Illkirch cedex (France); Télécom Physique Strasbourg – Pôle API – 300 Bd Sébastien Brant – CS 10413, Illkirch Graffenstaden F 67400 (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • A method for rapid manufacturing of optical diffractive element in BK7 is proposed. • A binary grating in BK7 was successfully machined by femtosecond laser pulses. • Process relying on nonlinear absorption in the dielectric due to photoionization. • The binary grating was analysed by SEM and interferometric microscopy. • Simulations by Fourier modal method supported the measured diffractive efficiency. - Abstract: This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  13. Effect of environmental temperature on diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optical elements in Mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of environmental temperature change on multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is evaluated from the viewpoint of the diffraction efficiency and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE). As environmental temperature changes, the microstructure heights of MLDOEs expand or contract, and refractive indices of substrate materials also change. Based on the changes in microstructure height and substrate material index with environmental temperature, the theoretical relation between diffraction efficiency of MLDOEs and environmental temperature is deduced. A practical 3-5μm Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) optical system designed with a MLDOE, which made of ZNSE and GE, is discussed to illustrate the influence of environmental temperature change. The result shows that diffraction efficiency reduction is no more than 85% and PIDE reduction is less than 50% when environmental temperature ranges from -20°C to 60°C. According to the calculated diffraction efficiency in different environmental temperatures, the MTF of hybrid optical system is modified and the modified MTF curve is compared with the original MTF curve. Although the hybrid optical system achieved passive athermalization in above environmental temperature range, the modified MTF curve also remarkably decline in environmental temperature extremes after the consideration of diffraction efficiency change of MLDOE. It is indicated that the image quality of hybrid optical system with ZNSE-GE MLDOE is significantly sensitive to environmental temperature change. The analysis result can be used for optical engineering design with MLDOEs in MWIR.

  14. Refractive and diffractive neutron optics with reduced chromatic aberration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, S.O., E-mail: stefan.poulsen@northwestern.edu [NEXMAP, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Anker Engelunds Vej 1, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Poulsen, H.F. [NEXMAP, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Anker Engelunds Vej 1, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bentley, P.M. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-12-11

    Thermal neutron beams are an indispensable tool in physics research. The spatial and the temporal resolution attainable in experiments are dependent on the flux and collimation of the neutron beam which remain relatively poor, even for modern neutron sources. These difficulties may be mitigated by the use of optics for focusing and imaging. Refractive and diffractive optical elements, e.g. compound refractive lenses and Fresnel zone plates, are attractive due to their low cost, and simple alignment. These optical elements, however, suffer from chromatic aberration, which limit their effectiveness to highly monochromatic beams. This paper presents two novel concepts for focusing and imaging non-monochromatic thermal neutron beams with well-known optical elements: (1) a fast mechanical transfocator based on a compound refractive lens, which actively varies the number of individual lenses in the beam path to focus and image a time-of-flight beam, and (2) a passive optical element consisting of a compound refractive lens, and a Fresnel zone plate, which may focus and image both continuous and pulsed neutron beams.

  15. Phase control effects in optical diffraction radiation from a slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Optical Diffraction Radiation (ODR) from a slit is becoming a real promising instrument for measuring the transverse beam size, or even the emittance of the very high brightness linacs driving SASE FELs or the future ILC which require non-intercepting diagnostic devices. But to correctly explain experimental data it is necessary to further develop the theory of this radiation emission. In this paper we discuss in particular the effects of a non-perfect coplanarity of the two halves of a slit, that introduces a phase difference in the field produced by the two half-planes. Such non-coplanarity can result from mechanical stress for instance.

  16. Aplanatic grazing incidence diffraction grating: a new optical element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hettrick, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    We present the theory of a grazing incidence reflection grating capable of imaging at submicron resolution. The optic is mechanically ruled on a spherical or cylindrical surface with varied groove spacings, delivering diffraction-limited response and a wide field of view at a selected wavelength. Geometrical aberrations are calculated on the basis of Fermat's principle, revealing significant improvements over a grazing incidence mirror. Aplanatic and quasi-aplanatic versions of the grating have applications in both imaging and scanning microscopes, microprobes, collimators, and telescopes. A 2-D crossed system of such gratings, similar to the grazing incidence mirror geometry of Kirkpatrick and Baez, could potentially provide spatial resolutions of --200 A

  17. Optical diffraction tomography in an inhomogeneous background medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaney, A; Cheng, J

    2008-01-01

    The filtered back-propagation algorithm (FBP algorithm) is a computationally fast and efficient inversion algorithm for reconstructing the 3D index of refraction distribution of weak scattering samples in free space from scattered field data collected in a set of coherent optical scattering experiments. This algorithm is readily derived using classical Fourier analysis applied to the Born or Rytov weak scattering models appropriate to scatterers embedded in a non-attenuating uniform background. In this paper, the inverse scattering problem for optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is formulated using the so-called distorted wave Born and Rytov approximations and a generalized version of the FBP algorithm is derived that applies to weakly scattering samples that are embedded in realistic, multiple scattering ODT experimental configurations. The new algorithms are based on the generalized linear inverse of the linear transformation relating the scattered field data to the complex index of refraction distribution of the scattering samples and are in the form of a superposition of filtered data, computationally back propagated into the ODT experimental configuration. The paper includes a computer simulation comparing the generalized Born and Rytov based FBP inversion algorithms as well as reconstructions generated using the generalized Born based FBP algorithm of a step index optical fiber from experimental ODT data

  18. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars

    2017-01-08

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  19. Blazed Grating Resonance Conditions and Diffraction Efficiency Optical Transfer Function

    KAUST Repository

    Stegenburgs, Edgars; Alias, Mohd Sharizal B.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a general approach to study diffraction harmonics or resonances and resonance conditions for blazed reflecting gratings providing knowledge of fundamental diffraction pattern and qualitative understanding of predicting parameters for the most efficient diffraction.

  20. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths

  1. STUDY ON HIGH RESOLUTION MEMBRANE-BASED DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL IMAGING ON GEOSTATIONARY ORBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jiao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diffractive optical imaging technology provides a new way to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. There are a lot of benefits to use the membrane-based diffractive optical element in ultra-large aperture optical imaging system, including loose tolerance, light weight, easy folding and unfolding, which make it easy to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. The implementation of this technology also faces some challenges, including the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the development of high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical elements, and the correction of the chromatic aberration of the diffractive optical elements. Aiming at the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the “6+1” petal-type unfold scheme is proposed, which consider the compression ratio, the blocking rate and the development complexity. For high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical element, a self-collimating method is proposed. The diffraction efficiency is more than 90 % of the theoretical value. For the chromatic aberration correction problem, an optimization method based on schupmann is proposed to make the imaging spectral bandwidth in visible light band reach 100 nm. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of ultra-large aperture diffractive optical imaging system.

  2. Study on High Resolution Membrane-Based Diffractive Optical Imaging on Geostationary Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, J.; Wang, B.; Wang, C.; Zhang, Y.; Jin, J.; Liu, Z.; Su, Y.; Ruan, N.

    2017-05-01

    Diffractive optical imaging technology provides a new way to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. There are a lot of benefits to use the membrane-based diffractive optical element in ultra-large aperture optical imaging system, including loose tolerance, light weight, easy folding and unfolding, which make it easy to realize high resolution earth observation on geostationary orbit. The implementation of this technology also faces some challenges, including the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the development of high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical elements, and the correction of the chromatic aberration of the diffractive optical elements. Aiming at the configuration of the diffractive primary lens, the "6+1" petal-type unfold scheme is proposed, which consider the compression ratio, the blocking rate and the development complexity. For high diffraction efficiency membrane-based diffractive optical element, a self-collimating method is proposed. The diffraction efficiency is more than 90 % of the theoretical value. For the chromatic aberration correction problem, an optimization method based on schupmann is proposed to make the imaging spectral bandwidth in visible light band reach 100 nm. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of ultra-large aperture diffractive optical imaging system.

  3. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  4. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limitedshort-wavelength optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman,Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli,Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-08-03

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-{angstrom} and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date.

  5. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limited short-wavelength optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman, Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli, Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-01-01

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-(angstrom) and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date

  6. Optical microparticle manipulation advances and new capabilities offered by diffractive optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sojfer, V.A.; Kotlyar, V.V.; Khonina, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    The review deals with a promising area in laser optics - optical manipulation. The object under manipulation can be of various nature: from a colloid particle to a molecule, from cell, virus, to a micromechanism part, etc. In the first part of this work a concise review of the articles on optical manipulation of microparticles and atoms published in the last two decades is presented. The second part is devoted t the production of laser beams with self-reproduction properties. Such beams can be most effectively produced using diffractive optical elements (DOEs). The DOE-generated self-reproducing laser beams (stable, axially periodic, rotating, and multiorder) offer new opportunities in optical manipulation of micro- and nano-objects [ru

  7. Effect of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction for the infrared optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunlian; Lv, He; Cao, Yang; Cai, Zhisong; Tan, Xiaojun

    2014-11-01

    With the development of infrared optics, infrared optical imaging systems play an increasingly important role in modern optical imaging systems. Infrared optical imaging is used in industry, agriculture, medical, military and transportation. But in terms of infrared optical imaging systems which are exposed for a long time, some contaminations will affect the infrared optical imaging. When the contamination contaminate on the lens surface of the optical system, it would affect diffraction. The lens can be seen as complementary multiple circular holes screen happen Fraunhofer diffraction. According to Babinet principle, you can get the diffraction of the imaging system. Therefore, by studying the multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction, conclusions can be drawn about the effect of infrared imaging. This paper mainly studies the effect of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction for the optical imaging. Firstly, we introduce the theory of Fraunhofer diffraction and Point Spread Function. Point Spread Function is a basic tool to evaluate the image quality of the optical system. Fraunhofer diffraction will affect Point Spread Function. Then, the results of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction are given for different hole size and hole spacing. We choose the hole size from 0.1mm to 1mm and hole spacing from 0.3mm to 0.8mm. The infrared wavebands of optical imaging are chosen from 1μm to 5μm. We use the MATLAB to simulate light intensity distribution of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction. Finally, three-dimensional diffraction maps of light intensity are given to contrast.

  8. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  9. Improved Resolution Optical Time Stretch Imaging Based on High Efficiency In-Fiber Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Yan, Zhijun; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Chao

    2018-01-12

    Most overlooked challenges in ultrafast optical time stretch imaging (OTSI) are sacrificed spatial resolution and higher optical loss. These challenges are originated from optical diffraction devices used in OTSI, which encode image into spectra of ultrashort optical pulses. Conventional free-space diffraction gratings, as widely used in existing OTSI systems, suffer from several inherent drawbacks: limited diffraction efficiency in a non-Littrow configuration due to inherent zeroth-order reflection, high coupling loss between free-space gratings and optical fibers, bulky footprint, and more importantly, sacrificed imaging resolution due to non-full-aperture illumination for individual wavelengths. Here we report resolution-improved and diffraction-efficient OTSI using in-fiber diffraction for the first time to our knowledge. The key to overcome the existing challenges is a 45° tilted fiber grating (TFG), which serves as a compact in-fiber diffraction device offering improved diffraction efficiency (up to 97%), inherent compatibility with optical fibers, and improved imaging resolution owning to almost full-aperture illumination for all illumination wavelengths. 50 million frames per second imaging of fast moving object at 46 m/s with improved imaging resolution has been demonstrated. This conceptually new in-fiber diffraction design opens the way towards cost-effective, compact and high-resolution OTSI systems for image-based high-throughput detection and measurement.

  10. Wave-guided Optical Waveguides tracked and coupled using dynamic diffractive optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael

    With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro-actuation requ......With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robotics down to the micro- and nano-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical forces and near-field light delivery in advanced actuation and control atthe smallest physical dimensions. Advancing light-driven nano- or micro...... waveguides (WOWs) [2]. As the WOWs are optically trapped and maneuvered in 3D-space, it is important to maintain efficient light-coupling through these free-standing waveguides within their operating volume [3]. We propose the use ofdynamic diffractive techniques to create focal spots that will track...... and couple to the WOWs during full volume operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking...

  11. Physical optics-based diffraction coefficient for a wedge with different face impedances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umul, Yusuf Ziya

    2018-03-20

    A new diffraction field expression is introduced with the aid of the modified theory of physical optics for a wedge with different face impedances. First, the scattered geometrical optics fields are determined when both faces of the wedge are illuminated by the incident wave. The geometrical optics waves are then expressed in terms of the sum of two different fields that occur for different impedance wedges. The diffracted fields are determined for the two cases separately, and the total diffracted field is obtained as a sum of these waves. Lastly, the uniform field expressions are obtained, and the resultant fields are numerically compared with the solution of Maliuzhinets.

  12. Design and fabrication of diffractive optical elements with MATLAB

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhattacharya, Shanti (Professor in Optics); Vijayakumar, Anand

    2017-01-01

    ... their diffraction patterns using MATLAB. The fundamentals of fabrication techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography with basic instructions for the beginner are presented...

  13. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly optimiza...... security applications and can be used to create phasebased information channels for enhanced information security....

  14. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Review of near-field optics and superlenses for sub-diffraction-limited nano-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Adams

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Near-field optics and superlenses for imaging beyond Abbe’s diffraction limit are reviewed. A comprehensive and contemporary background is given on scanning near-field microscopy and superlensing. Attention is brought to recent research leveraging scanning near-field optical microscopy with superlenses for new nano-imaging capabilities. Future research directions are explored for realizing the goal of low-cost and high-performance sub-diffraction-limited imaging systems.

  16. Computer controlling of writing beam in laser microfabrication of diffractive optics

    OpenAIRE

    Korolkov, V.; Shimansky, R.; Cherkashin, V.; Denk, D.

    2003-01-01

    Laser microfabrication of diffractive optics with continuous relief is based on the direct local action of focused laser radiation on the recording material. Control of writing beam parameters (beam power, spot size, waist position) is one of the main tasks in microfabrication using laser writing systems. Method of the control defines the correspondence between the fabricated microrelief of the diffractive optical element and a designed one. Complexity of this task consists in the necessity t...

  17. Fabrication of amplitude-phase type diffractive optical elements in aluminium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomchenkov, S. A.; Butt, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    In the course of studies have been conducted a method of forming the phase diffractive optical elements (DOEs) by direct laser writing in thin films of aluminum. The quality of the aluminum films were investigated depending on the parameters of magnetron sputtering process. Moreover, the parameters of the laser writing process in thin films of aluminum were optimized. The structure of phase diffractive optical elements was obtained by the proposed method.

  18. Theoretical description and design of nanomaterial slab waveguides: application to compensation of optical diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivijärvi, Ville; Nyman, Markus; Shevchenko, Andriy; Kaivola, Matti

    2018-04-02

    Planar optical waveguides made of designable spatially dispersive nanomaterials can offer new capabilities for nanophotonic components. As an example, a thin slab waveguide can be designed to compensate for optical diffraction and provide divergence-free propagation for strongly focused optical beams. Optical signals in such waveguides can be transferred in narrow channels formed by the light itself. We introduce here a theoretical method for characterization and design of nanostructured waveguides taking into account their inherent spatial dispersion and anisotropy. Using the method, we design a diffraction-compensating slab waveguide that contains only a single layer of silver nanorods. The waveguide shows low propagation loss and broadband diffraction compensation, potentially allowing transfer of optical information at a THz rate.

  19. Optical cryptography topology based on a three-dimensional particle-like distribution and diffractive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-05-09

    In recent years, coherent diffractive imaging has been considered as a promising alternative for information retrieval instead of conventional interference methods. Coherent diffractive imaging using the X-ray light source has opened up a new research perspective for the measurement of non-crystalline and biological specimens, and can achieve unprecedentedly high resolutions. In this paper, we show how a three-dimensional (3D) particle-like distribution and coherent diffractive imaging can be applied for a study of optical cryptography. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding approach is used, and the plaintext is considered as a series of particles distributed in a 3D space. A topology concept is also introduced into the proposed optical cryptosystem. During image decryption, a retrieval algorithm is developed to extract the plaintext from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed optical cryptography topology are also analyzed. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  20. Role of photonic angular momentum states in nonreciprocal diffraction from magneto-optical cylinder arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Jing Guo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical eigenstates in a concentrically symmetric resonator are photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs with quantized optical orbital angular momentums (OAMs. Nonreciprocal optical phenomena can be obtained if we lift the degeneracy of PAMSs. In this article, we provide a comprehensive study of nonreciprocal optical diffraction of various orders from a magneto-optical cylinder array. We show that nonreciprocal diffraction can be obtained only for these nonzero orders. Role of PAMSs, the excitation of which is sensitive to the directions of incidence, applied magnetic field, and arrangement of the cylinders, are studied. Some interesting phenomena such as a dispersionless quasi-omnidirectional nonreciprocal diffraction and spikes associated with high-OAM PAMSs are present and discussed.

  1. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part I - progress in the patent landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, diffractive optics experienced a strong research interest and was in the center of many development projects in applied optics. To offer a side view for optical engineers, here, we discuss selected, business-related aspects of the current status of the transfer process to bring diffractive optics into commercial products. The contribution is divided into two parts. Here, in part I, we focus on the patent landscape of diffractive optics with a closer look on the temporal development and the distribution over main players. As an important result, currently, new strong patent activities are observed especially in the context of imaging systems. In the second part, the business volumes of selected market segments are discussed.

  2. Diffraction of stochastic electromagnetic fields by a hole in a thin film with real optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeyev, Illarion

    2008-08-01

    The classical Kirchhoff theory of diffraction is extended to the case of real optical properties of a screen and its finite thickness. A spectral power density of diffracted electromagnetic fields by a hole in a thin film with real optical properties was calculated. The problem was solved by use of the vector Green theorems and related Green function of the boundary value problem. A spectral and spatial selectivity of the considered system was demonstrated. Diffracted patterns were calculated for the coherent and incoherent incident fields in case of holes array in a screen of perfect conductivity.

  3. Diffraction of stochastic electromagnetic fields by a hole in a thin film with real optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorofeyev, Illarion

    2008-01-01

    The classical Kirchhoff theory of diffraction is extended to the case of real optical properties of a screen and its finite thickness. A spectral power density of diffracted electromagnetic fields by a hole in a thin film with real optical properties was calculated. The problem was solved by use of the vector Green theorems and related Green function of the boundary value problem. A spectral and spatial selectivity of the considered system was demonstrated. Diffracted patterns were calculated for the coherent and incoherent incident fields in case of holes array in a screen of perfect conductivity

  4. Pattern formation without diffraction matching in optical parametric oscillators with a metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassin, Philippe; Van der Sande, Guy; Veretennicoff, Irina; Kockaert, Pascal; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2009-05-25

    We consider a degenerate optical parametric oscillator containing a left-handed material. We show that the inclusion of a left-handed material layer allows for controlling the strength and sign of the diffraction coefficient at either the pump or the signal frequency. Subsequently, we demonstrate the existence of stable dissipative structures without diffraction matching, i.e., without the usual relationship between the diffraction coefficients of the signal and pump fields. Finally, we investigate the size scaling of these light structures with decreasing diffraction strength.

  5. Quantum diffraction and interference of spatially correlated photon pairs and its Fourier-optical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Ryosuke; Edamatsu, Keiichi; Itoh, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    We present one- and two-photon diffraction and interference experiments involving parametric down-converted photon pairs. By controlling the divergence of the pump beam in parametric down-conversion, the diffraction-interference pattern produced by an object changes from a quantum (perfectly correlated) case to a classical (uncorrelated) one. The observed diffraction and interference patterns are accurately reproduced by Fourier-optical analysis taking into account the quantum spatial correlation. We show that the relation between the spatial correlation and the object size plays a crucial role in the formation of both one- and two-photon diffraction-interference patterns

  6. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G

    2001-01-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm sup 2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100-150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  7. Effect of substrate material selection on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optics in oblique incident situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu

    2018-05-01

    The effect of substrate material selection for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) is studied in the oblique incident situation. A mathematical model of substrate material selection is proposed to obtain the high PIDE with large incident angle. The extended expression of the microstructure heights with consideration of incident angle is deduced to calculate the PIDE difference Δ η bar(λ) for different substrate material combinations. The smaller value of Δ η bar(λ) indicates the more optimal substrate material combination in a wide incident angle range. Based on the deduced mathematical model, different MLDOEs are analyzed in visible and infrared wavebands. The results show that the three-layer DOEs can be applied in larger incident angle situation than the double-layer DOEs in visible waveband. When the two substrate materials are the same, polycarbonate (PC) is more reasonable than poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the middle filling optical material for the three-layer DOEs. In the infrared waveband, the PIDE decreases in the LWIR are obviously smaller than that in the MWIR for the same substrate material combination, and the PIDE cannot be calculated when the incident angle larger than critical angle. The analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid optical system design with MLDOEs.

  8. Simultaneous Replication of both Refractive and Diffractive Optical Components using Electroformed Tools and Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Christensen, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    This research project has demonstrated that with carefully selected processes it is possible to fabricate tools for injection moulding of both diffractive and refractive optical components. The fabrication procedure is based on an aluminium disc on which selected optical components (gratings and ...

  9. Development and applications of diffractive optical security devices for banknotes and high value documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkwater, John K.; Holmes, Brian W.; Jones, Keith A.

    2000-04-01

    Embossed holograms and othe rdiffractive optically variable devices are increasingly familiar security items on plastic cards, banknotes, securyt documetns and on branded gods and media to protect against counterfeit, protect copyright and to evidence tamper. This paper outlines some of the diffractive optical seuryt and printed security develoepd for this rapidly growing field and provides examles of some current security applications.

  10. Hybrid diffractive-refractive optical system design of head-mounted display for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan

    2005-02-01

    An optical see-through head-mounted display for augmented reality is designed in this paper. Considering the factors, such as the optical performance, the utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world, the feelings of users when he wears it and etc., a structure of the optical see-through is adopted. With the characteristics of the particular negative dispersive and the power of realizing random-phase modulation, the diffractive surface is helpful for optical system of reducing weight, simplifying structure and etc., and a diffractive surface is introduced in our optical system. The optical system with 25 mm eye relief, 12 mm exit pupil and 20° (H)x15.4° (V) field-of-view is designed. The utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world are 1/4 and 1/2, respectively. The angular resolution of display is 0.27 mrad and it less than that of the minimum of human eyes. The diameter of this system is less than 46mm, and it applies the binocular. This diffractive-refractive optical system of see-through head-mounted display not only satisfies the demands of user"s factors in structure, but also with high resolution, very small chromatic aberration and distortion, and satisfies the need of augmented reality. In the end, the parameters of the diffractive surface are discussed.

  11. Asymmetric diffraction by atomic gratings with optical PT symmetry in the Raman-Nath regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Tao; Yang, Wen-Xing; Liu, Shaopeng; Li, Ling; Zhu, Zhonghu

    2018-03-01

    We propose and analyze an efficient scheme for the lopsided Raman-Nath diffraction of one-dimensional (1 D ) and two-dimensional (2 D ) atomic gratings with periodic parity-time (PT )-symmetric refractive index. The atomic grating is constructed by the cold-atomic vapor with two isotopes of rubidium, which is driven by weak probe field and space-dependent control field. Using experimentally achievable parameters, we identify the conditions under which PT -symmetric refractive index allows us to observe the lopsided Raman-Nath diffraction phenomenon and improve the diffraction efficiencies beyond what is achievable in a conventional atomic grating. The nontrivial atomic grating is a superposition of an amplitude grating and a phase grating. It is found that the lopsided Raman-Nath diffraction at the exceptional point (EP) of PT -symmetric grating originates from constructive and destructive interferences between the amplitude and phase gratings. Furthermore, we show that the PT -phase transition from unbroken to broken PT -symmetric regimes can modify the asymmetric distribution of the diffraction spectrum and that the diffraction efficiencies in the non-negative diffraction orders can be significantly enhanced when the atomic grating is pushed into a broken PT -symmetric phase. In addition, we also analyze the influence of the grating thickness on the diffraction spectrum. Our scheme may provide the possibility to design a gain-beam splitter with tunable splitting ratio and other optical components in integrated optics.

  12. Focusing Optics for High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leinert, U.; Schulze, C.; Honkimäki, V.

    1998-01-01

    Novel focusing optical devices have been developed for synchrotron radiation in the energy range 40-100 keV. Firstly, a narrow-band-pass focusing energy-tuneable fixed-exit monochromator was constructed by combining meridionally bent Laue and Bragg crystals. Dispersion compensation was applied...

  13. Quantum Optics, Diffraction Theory, and Elementary Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2009-01-01

    Physical optics has expanded greatly in recent years. Though it remains part of the ancestry of elementary particle physics, there are once again lessons to be learned from it. I shall discuss several of these, including some that have emerged at CERN and Brookhaven.

  14. Transverse energy circulation and the edge diffraction of an optical vortex beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr Ya; Mohammed, Kadhim A; Kurka, Ivan A

    2014-04-01

    Edge diffraction of a circular Laguerre-Gaussian beam represents an example of the optical vortex symmetry breakdown in which the hidden "vortex" energy circulation is partially transformed into the visible "asymmetry" form. The diffracted beam evolution is studied in terms of the irradiance moments and the moment-based parameters. In spite of the limited applicability of the moment-based formalism, we show that the "vortex" and "asymmetry" parts of the orbital angular momentum can still be reasonably defined for the hard-edge diffracted beams and retain their physical role of quantifying the corresponding forms of the transverse energy circulation.

  15. Theoretical and numerical investigations of sub-wavelength diffractive optical structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dridi, Kim

    2000-01-01

    The work in this thesis concerns theoretical and numerical investigations of sub-wavelength diffractive optical structures, relying on advanced two-dimensional vectorial numerical models that have applications in Optics and Electromagnetics. Integrated Optics is predicted to play a major role......, such as in dielectric waveguides with gratings and periodic media or photonic crystal structures. The vectorial electromagnetic nature of light is therefore taken into account in the modeling of these diffractive structures. An electromagnetic vector-field model for optical components design based on the classical...... finite-difference time domain method and exact radiation integrals is implemented for the polarization where the electric field vector is perpendicular to the two dimentional plane of symmetry. The computational model solves the full vectorial time domain Maxwell equations with general sources...

  16. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, P.; Oberta, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2011), s. 299-301 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : diffractive-refractive optics * x-ray synchrotron radiation monochromator * x-ray crystal monochromator * harmonics separation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2011

  17. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials; Braggbeugung von Fermionen an optischen Potentialen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-10-27

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a {sup 6}Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 {mu}s. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  18. Evanescent Properties of Optical Diffraction from 2-Dimensional Hexagonal Photonic Crystals and Their Sensor Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yu-Yang; Chen, Yung-Tsan; Chen, Chien-Chun; Huang, Jian-Jang

    2018-04-03

    The sensitivity of traditional diffraction grating sensors is limited by the spatial resolution of the measurement setup. Thus, a large space is required to improve sensor performance. Here, we demonstrate a compact hexagonal photonic crystal (PhC) optical sensor with high sensitivity. PhCs are able to diffract optical beams to various angles in azimuthal space. The critical wavelength that satisfies the phase matching or becomes evanescent was used to benchmark the refractive index of a target analyte applied on a PhC sensor. Using a glucose solution as an example, our sensor demonstrated very high sensitivity and a low limit of detection. This shows that the diffraction mechanism of hexagonal photonic crystals can be used for sensors when compact size is a concern.

  19. Optical necklaces generated by the diffraction on a stack of dielectric wedges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izdebskaya, Yana [Nonlinear Physics Centre, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, V.I. Vernandsky Taurida National University, Simferopol 95007, Crimea (Ukraine)], E-mail: yvi124@rsphysse.anu.edu.au

    2008-05-19

    We demonstrate that the regular ring-shaped arrays of Gaussian beams, or optical necklaces, can be generated using diffraction on a stack of dielectric wedges. A condition for self-similarity and structural stability of the beams has been derived and shows good comparison with experimental data.

  20. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  1. Diffraction, self-focusing, and the geometrical optics limit in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Rankin, R.; Capjack, C.E.; Birnboim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of diffraction on the self-modulation of an intense laser beam in an initially uniform hydrogen plasma is investigated. A formalism is used in which the diffraction term in the paraxial wave equation can be arbitrarily reduced by the use of a weight factor iota. In the limit where iota approaches zero, it is shown that the paraxial wave equation correctly reduces to the geometrical optics limit and that the problem then becomes formally equivalent to solving the ray-tracing equations. When iota = 1, the paraxial wave equation takes its usual form and diffraction is fully accounted for. This formalism is applied to the simulation of self-modulation of an intense laser beam in a hydrogen plasma, for which diffraction is shown to be significant

  2. Ray optics for diffraction: a useful paradox in a path integral context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulman, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Geometrical diffraction theory uses ray tracing techniques to calculate diffraction and other properties of the electromagnetic field generally considered characteristically wave like. The author studies this dualism of the classical electromagnetic field so as to distinguish those aspects of quantum dualism that arise simply as properties of oscillatory integrals and those that may have deeper origins. By a series of transformations the solutions of certain optics problems are reduced to the evaluation of a Feynman path integral and the known semiclassical approximations for the path integral provide a justification for the geometrical diffraction theory. Particular attention is paid to the problem of edge diffraction and for a half plane barrier a closed form solution is obtained. A classical variational principle for barrier penetration is also presented. (Auth.)

  3. A method of combining STEM image with parallel beam diffraction and electron-optical conditions for diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haifeng; Nelson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method of combining STEM imaging functionalities with nanoarea parallel beam electron diffraction on a modern TEM. This facilitates the search for individual particles whose diffraction patterns are needed for diffractive imaging or structural studies of nanoparticles. This also lays out a base for 3D diffraction data collection

  4. Phase-sensitive detection of optical resonances by using an acousto-optic modulator in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, V N; Domnin, Yu S; Kopylov, L N

    2007-01-01

    A new method for frequency control of an external cavity diode laser without direct modulation of the injection current is proposed. The Pound - Drever optical heterodyne technique or the method of frequency control by frequency-modulated sidebands, in which an acousto-optic modulator operating in the Raman - Nath diffraction mode is used as an external phase modulator, can be employed to obtain error signals upon automatic frequency locking of the diode laser to the saturated absorption resonances within the D 2 line of cesium atoms or to the optical cavity resonances. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  5. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-09-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for very bright guide star AO with substantial increase of enclosed energy. Over the last two years PALAO was upgraded to PALM-3000: an extreme, high-order adaptive optics system with two deformable mirrors with more than 3000 actuators, promising diffraction limited performance in SWIFT's wavelength range. In order to take advantage of this increased spatial resolution we upgraded SWIFT with new pre-optics allowing us to spatially Nyquist sample the diffraction limited PALM-3000 point spread function with 16 mas resolution, reducing the spaxel scale by another factor of 5×. We designed, manufactured, integrated and tested the new pre-optics in the first half of 2011 and commissioned it in December 2011. Here we present the opto-mechanical design and assembly of the new scale changing optics, as well as laboratory and on-sky commissioning results. In optimal observing conditions we achieve substantial Strehl ratios, delivering the near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the I and z bands.

  6. Polarization control of non-diffractive helical optical beams through subwavelength metallic apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, E; Genet, C; Ebbesen, T W; Drezet, A

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a simple method for preparing non-diffractive vectorial optical beams that can display wave-front helicity. This method is based on space-variant modifications of the polarization of an optical beam transmitted through subwavelength annular rings perforating opaque metal films. We show how the description of the optical properties of such structures must account for the vectorial character of the polarization and how, in turn, these properties can be controlled by straightforward sequences of preparation and analysis of polarization states.

  7. Measurement of 3D refractive index distribution by optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Weining; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Zhao, Jie; Rong, Lu; Yuan, Yuanyuan

    2018-01-01

    Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT), as a novel 3D imaging technique, can obtain a 3D refractive index (RI) distribution to reveal the important optical properties of transparent samples. According to the theory of ODT, an optical diffraction tomography setup is built based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The propagation direction of object beam is controlled by a 2D translation stage, and 121 holograms based on different illumination angles are recorded by a Charge-coupled Device (CCD). In order to prove the validity and accuracy of the ODT, the 3D RI profile of microsphere with a known RI is firstly measured. An iterative constraint algorithm is employed to improve the imaging accuracy effectively. The 3D morphology and average RI of the microsphere are consistent with that of the actual situation, and the RI error is less than 0.0033. Then, an optical element fabricated by laser with a non-uniform RI is taken as the sample. Its 3D RI profile is obtained by the optical diffraction tomography system.

  8. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  9. Microscopy of biological sample through advanced diffractive optics from visible to X-ray wavelength regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cojoc, Dan; Emiliani, Valentina; Cabrini, Stefano; Coppey-Moisan, Maite; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Altissimo, Matteo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this report is to demonstrate a unified version of microscopy through the use of advanced diffractive optics. The unified scheme derives from the technical possibility of realizing front wave engineering in a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and nanofabrication of phase diffractive elements (PDE) through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular, we will show applications, by using biological samples, ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy combined with X-ray fluorescence. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that besides focusing also perform other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity, and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of micro-beads surrounding a cell as an array of tweezers and for arraying and sorting microscopic size biological samples. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gauss mode conversion, which allows for trapping and transfering orbital angular momentum of light to micro-particles immersed in a fluid. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for diffractive optics implementation. High-resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in x-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field x-ray microscopy. Besides the topographic information, fluorescence allows detection of certain chemical elements (Cl, P, Sc, K) in the same setup, by changing the photon energy of the x-ray beam. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The Gaussian beam mode analysis of classical phase aberrations in diffraction-limited optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J. Anthony; Withington, Stafford

    2003-07-01

    Gaussian beam mode analysis (GBMA) offers a more intuitive physical insight into how light beams evolve as they propagate than the conventional Fresnel diffraction integral approach. In this paper we illustrate that GBMA is a computationally efficient, alternative technique for tracing the evolution of a diffracting coherent beam. In previous papers we demonstrated the straightforward application of GBMA to the computation of the classical diffraction patterns associated with a range of standard apertures. In this paper we show how the GBMA technique can be expanded to investigate the effects of aberrations in the presence of diffraction by introducing the appropriate phase error term into the propagating quasi-optical beam. We compare our technique to the standard diffraction integral calculation for coma, astigmatism and spherical aberration, taking—for comparison—examples from the classic text 'Principles of Optics' by Born and Wolf. We show the advantages of GBMA for allowing the defocusing of an aberrated image to be evaluated quickly, which is particularly important and useful for probing the consequences of astigmatism and spherical aberration.

  11. The Gaussian beam mode analysis of classical phase aberrations in diffraction-limited optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J Anthony; Withington, Stafford

    2003-01-01

    Gaussian beam mode analysis (GBMA) offers a more intuitive physical insight into how light beams evolve as they propagate than the conventional Fresnel diffraction integral approach. In this paper we illustrate that GBMA is a computationally efficient, alternative technique for tracing the evolution of a diffracting coherent beam. In previous papers we demonstrated the straightforward application of GBMA to the computation of the classical diffraction patterns associated with a range of standard apertures. In this paper we show how the GBMA technique can be expanded to investigate the effects of aberrations in the presence of diffraction by introducing the appropriate phase error term into the propagating quasi-optical beam. We compare our technique to the standard diffraction integral calculation for coma, astigmatism and spherical aberration, taking - for comparison - examples from the classic text 'Principles of Optics' by Born and Wolf. We show the advantages of GBMA for allowing the defocusing of an aberrated image to be evaluated quickly, which is particularly important and useful for probing the consequences of astigmatism and spherical aberration

  12. Diffractive beam shaping, tracking and coupling for wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    techniques to create multiple focal spots that can be coupled into light manipulated WOWs. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to project the necessary phase to generate the multiple coupling light spots. We incorporate a diffractive setup in our Biophotonics Workstation (BWS) and demonstrate......We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). The full strength of this structure-mediated paradigm can be harnessed by addressing multiple WOWs and manipulating them to work in tandem. We propose the use of diffractive...

  13. Zone-boundary optimization for direct laser writing of continuous-relief diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolkov, Victor P; Nasyrov, Ruslan K; Shimansky, Ruslan V

    2006-01-01

    Enhancing the diffraction efficiency of continuous-relief diffractive optical elements fabricated by direct laser writing is discussed. A new method of zone-boundary optimization is proposed to correct exposure data only in narrow areas along the boundaries of diffractive zones. The optimization decreases the loss of diffraction efficiency related to convolution of a desired phase profile with a writing-beam intensity distribution. A simplified stepped transition function that describes optimized exposure data near zone boundaries can be made universal for a wide range of zone periods. The approach permits a similar increase in the diffraction efficiency as an individual-pixel optimization but with fewer computation efforts. Computer simulations demonstrated that the zone-boundary optimization for a 6 microm period grating increases the efficiency by 7% and 14.5% for 0.6 microm and 1.65 microm writing-spot diameters, respectively. The diffraction efficiency of as much as 65%-90% for 4-10 microm zone periods was obtained experimentally with this method.

  14. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans.

  15. Exact solution for four-order acousto-optic Bragg diffraction with arbitrary initial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Ron; Koslover, Deborah; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2009-03-01

    An exact solution to the four-order acousto-optic (AO) Bragg diffraction problem with arbitrary initial conditions compatible with exact Bragg angle incident light is developed. The solution, obtained by solving a 4th-order differential equation, is formalized into a transition matrix operator predicting diffracted light orders at the exit of the AO cell in terms of the same diffracted light orders at the entrance. It is shown that the transition matrix is unitary and that this unitary matrix condition is sufficient to guarantee energy conservation. A comparison of analytical solutions with numerical predictions validates the formalism. Although not directly related to the approach used to obtain the solution, it was discovered that all four generated eigenvalues from the four-order AO differential matrix operator are expressed simply in terms of Euclid's Divine Proportion.

  16. Diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by a straight edge leading to the formation of optical vortices and elliptical diffraction fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeylikovich, Iosif; Nikitin, Aleksandr

    2018-04-01

    The diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by a straight edge has been studied theoretically and experimentally for many years. In this paper, we have experimentally observed for the first time the formation of the cusped caustic (for the Fresnel number F ≈ 100) in the shadow region of the straight edge, with the cusp placed near the center of the circular laser beam(λ = 0 . 65 μm) overlapped with the elliptical diffraction fringes. These fringes are originated at the region near the cusp of the caustic where light intensity is zero and the wave phase is singular (the optical vortex). We interpret observed diffraction fringes as a result of interference between the helical wave created by the optical vortex and cylindrical wave diffracted at the straight edge. We have theoretically revealed that the number of high contrast diffraction fringes observable in a shadow region is determined by the square of the diffracted angles in the range of spatial frequencies of the scattered light field in excellent agreement with experiments. The extra phase singularities with opposite charges are also observed along the shadow boundary as the fork-like diffraction fringes.

  17. At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

    2003-08-01

    Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub{angstrom}-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed.

  18. At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub(angstrom)-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed

  19. Modeling focusing characteristics of low Fnumber diffractive optical elements with continuous relief fabricated by laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mingguang; Tan, Jiubin

    2007-12-10

    A theoretical model is established using Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory to describe the diffraction focusing characteristics of low F-number diffractive optical elements with continuous relief fabricated by laser direct writing, and continuous-relief diffractive optical elements with a design wavelength of 441.6nm and a F-number of F/4 are fabricated and measured to verify the validity of the diffraction focusing model. The measurements made indicate that the spot size is 1.75mum and the diffraction efficiency is 70.7% at the design wavelength, which coincide well with the theoretical results: a spot size of 1.66mum and a diffraction efficiency of 71.2%.

  20. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  1. Wave front engineering by means of diffractive optical elements for applications in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Cabrini, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Prasciolu, Mauro; Businaro, Luca; Kaulich, Burchard; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2006-05-01

    We present a unified view regarding the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for microscopy applications a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and fabrication of DOE through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular we show applications ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that beside focusing perform also other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of spherical micro beads and for direct trapping and manipulation of biological cells with non-spherical shapes. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gaussian mode conversion, which allows to trap and transfer orbital angular momentum of light to micro particles with high refractive index and to trap and manipulate low index particles. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for DOEs implementation. High resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in X-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field X-ray microscopy.

  2. Photon Sieve Bandwidth Broadening by Reduction of Chromatic Aberration Effects Using Second-Stage Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-086 PHOTON SIEVE BANDWIDTH BROADENING BY REDUCTION OF CHROMATIC ABERRATION...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-086 PHOTON SIEVE BANDWIDTH BROADENING BY REDUCTION OF CHROMATIC ABERRATION EFFECTS USING...A photon sieve is a lightweight diffractive optic which can be useful for space- based imaging applications. It is limited by chromatic

  3. Nano-fabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nano-structuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condenser-monochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing free-standing nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented. (author)

  4. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R; Keith Roper, D; Forcherio, Gregory T

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer–Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP–PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP–PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner–Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner–Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner–Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs. (paper)

  5. Diffractive optical devices produced by light-assisted trapping of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, J F; Jubera, M; Matarrubia, J; García-Cabañes, A; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2016-01-15

    One- and two-dimensional diffractive optical devices have been fabricated by light-assisted trapping and patterning of nanoparticles. The method is based on the dielectrophoretic forces appearing in the vicinity of a photovoltaic crystal, such as Fe:LiNbO3, during or after illumination. By illumination with the appropriate light distribution, the nanoparticles are organized along patterns designed at will. One- and two-dimensional diffractive components have been achieved on X- and Z-cut Fe:LiNbO3 crystals, with their polar axes parallel and perpendicular to the crystal surface, respectively. Diffraction gratings with periods down to around a few micrometers have been produced using metal (Al, Ag) nanoparticles with radii in the range of 70-100 nm. Moreover, several 2D devices, such as Fresnel zone plates, have been also produced showing the potential of the method. The diffractive particle patterns remain stable when light is removed. A method to transfer the diffractive patterns to other nonphotovoltaic substrates, such as silica glass, has been also reported.

  6. Advances in thin film diffraction instrumentation by X-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, A.

    1996-01-01

    The structural characterisation of thin films requires a parallel X-ray beam of high intensity. Parallel beam geometry is commonly used in high resolution and single crystal experiments, but also in the field of X-ray diffraction for polycrystalline material (e.g. in phase, texture and stress analysis). For grazing incidence diffraction (GID), the use of small slits on the primary side and of long soller slits with a flat monochromator on the secondary side is standard. New optical elements have been introduced with polychromatic or monochromatic radiation. By means of different applications the results are compared with those of classical beam optics. X-ray fiber optics utilize total external reflection of X-rays on smooth surfaces. Effects of monochromatization are presented. In many fields of application, fiber optics may replace conventional collimators. The use of primary and secondary channel cut crystals can also produce a high parallel monochromatic X-ray beam. A parabolically bent graded multilayer produces a monochromatic parallel beam of high intensity. Compared with classical Bragg-Brentano (focussing) geometry, excellent results have been obtained, especially for samples with an irregular shape. In combination with a channel cut monochromator there is a substantial gain in intensity leading to an increase of the dynamic intensity range of rocking curves

  7. Advances in thin film diffraction instrumentation by X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, A [Rich. Seifert and Co., Analytical X-ray Systems, Ahrensburg (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The structural characterisation of thin films requires a parallel X-ray beam of high intensity. Parallel beam geometry is commonly used in high resolution and single crystal experiments, but also in the field of X-ray diffraction for polycrystalline material (e.g. in phase, texture and stress analysis). For grazing incidence diffraction (GID), the use of small slits on the primary side and of long soller slits with a flat monochromator on the secondary side is standard. New optical elements have been introduced with polychromatic or monochromatic radiation. By means of different applications the results are compared with those of classical beam optics. X-ray fiber optics utilize total external reflection of X-rays on smooth surfaces. Effects of monochromatization are presented. In many fields of application, fiber optics may replace conventional collimators. The use of primary and secondary channel cut crystals can also produce a high parallel monochromatic X-ray beam. A parabolically bent graded multilayer produces a monochromatic parallel beam of high intensity. Compared with classical Bragg-Brentano (focussing) geometry, excellent results have been obtained, especially for samples with an irregular shape. In combination with a channel cut monochromator there is a substantial gain in intensity leading to an increase of the dynamic intensity range of rocking curves.

  8. Reducing aberration effect of Fourier transform lens by modifying Fourier spectrum of diffractive optical element in beam shaping optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Song, Qiang; Yue, Weirui; Liu, Jingdan; Wang, Jian; Situ, Guohai; Huang, Huijie

    2015-10-20

    In general, Fourier transform lenses are considered as ideal in the design algorithms of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). However, the inherent aberrations of a real Fourier transform lens disturb the far field pattern. The difference between the generated pattern and the expected design will impact the system performance. Therefore, a method for modifying the Fourier spectrum of DOEs without introducing other optical elements to reduce the aberration effect of the Fourier transform lens is proposed. By applying this method, beam shaping performance is improved markedly for the optical system with a real Fourier transform lens. The experiments carried out with a commercial Fourier transform lens give evidence for this method. The method is capable of reducing the system complexity as well as improving its performance.

  9. Achieving a high mode count in the exact electromagnetic simulation of diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, André; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2018-03-01

    The application of rigorous optical simulation algorithms, both in the modal as well as in the time domain, is known to be limited to the nano-optical scale due to severe computing time and memory constraints. This is true even for today's high-performance computers. To address this problem, we develop the fast rigorous iterative method (FRIM), an algorithm based on an iterative approach, which, under certain conditions, allows solving also large-size problems approximation free. We achieve this in the case of a modal representation by avoiding the computationally complex eigenmode decomposition. Thereby, the numerical cost is reduced from O(N 3 ) to O(N log N), enabling a simulation of structures like certain diffractive optical elements with a significantly higher mode count than presently possible. Apart from speed, another major advantage of the iterative FRIM over standard modal methods is the possibility to trade runtime against accuracy.

  10. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-02

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  11. A novel automotive headlight system based on digital micro-mirror devices and diffractive optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Song, Yuming; Ma, Jianshe

    2018-01-01

    The DMD (Digital Micro-mirror Device) has the advantages of high refresh rate and high diffraction efficiency, and these make it become an ideal loader of multiple modes illumination. DOEs (Diffractive Optical Element) have the advantages of high degree of freedom, light weight, easy to copy, low cost etc., and can be used to reduce the weight, complexity, cost of optical system. A novel automotive headlamp system using DMD as the light distribution element and a DOE as the light field modulation device is proposed in this paper. The pure phase DOE is obtained by the GS algorithm using Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral model. Based on the standard automotive headlamp light intensity distribution in the target plane, the amplitude distribution of DMD is obtained by numerical simulation, and the grayscale diagram loaded on the DMD can be obtained accordingly. Finally, according to simulation result, the light intensity distribution in the target plane is proportional to the national standard, hence verifies the validity of the novel system. The novel illumination system proposed in this paper provides a reliable hardware platform for the intelligent headlamps.

  12. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubec, Adam; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi_2/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi_2 forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  13. New optical scheme for differential measurements of diffraction reflection intensity on X-radiation sliding incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, A.L.; Mas', E.T.

    1989-01-01

    An X-ray optical scheme for differential measurements of X-ray diffraction under sliding incidence conditions is proposed and an attachment design realizng this scheme, using standard equipment, is described. The main feature of the scheme is the following: collimation according to the Bragg angle is carried out for the reflected beam rather than the incident one. Goniometers can be used from DRON, TRS, GS-5 and other spectrometers. The goniometer head carrying the sample is standard, it is a part of the DRON, TRS and DTS. The crystal analyzer is fixed on the attachment. The angular position of the crystal monochromator is controlled by an inductive sensor. The experimental differential curves of X-ray diffraction under conditions of sliding incidence, taken for a silicon crystal having the 111 orientation, are given as well

  14. Genetic local search algorithm for optimization design of diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G; Chen, Y; Wang, Z; Song, H

    1999-07-10

    We propose a genetic local search algorithm (GLSA) for the optimization design of diffractive optical elements (DOE's). This hybrid algorithm incorporates advantages of both genetic algorithm (GA) and local search techniques. It appears better able to locate the global minimum compared with a canonical GA. Sample cases investigated here include the optimization design of binary-phase Dammann gratings, continuous surface-relief grating array generators, and a uniform top-hat focal plane intensity profile generator. Two GLSA's whose incorporated local search techniques are the hill-climbing method and the simulated annealing algorithm are investigated. Numerical experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is highly efficient and robust. DOE's that have high diffraction efficiency and excellent uniformity can be achieved by use of the algorithm we propose.

  15. 'Diffraction-free' optical beams in inverse free electron laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Marshall, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    'Diffraction-free' optical beams correspond to exact solutions of the wave equation in free space with the remarkable property that they propagate with negligible transverse spreading for distances much larger than the Rayleigh range. The requirement for this to occur is a large aperture. Using a 2D computer code, we find that these optical beams will also propagate with negligible diffraction even when perturbed by the electron beam in an IFEL; indeed they match well the FEL requirement for the accelerator. The numerical simulations are performed for the proposed facility at Brookhaven in which λ s =10 μm, B=1.5 T (linearly tapered l w =1.31-6.28 cm) and the optical beam power is either 8x10 11 W or 2.3x10 10 W. Approximately 70% of the electrons constituting a beam of current 5 mA or 15 A, radius 0.14 mm and initial energy of 50 MeV is accelerated at 50 MeV/m. (orig.)

  16. Diffraction analysis of sidelobe characteristics of optical elements with ripple error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Luo, Yupeng; Bai, Jian; Zhou, Xiangdong; Du, Juan; Liu, Qun; Luo, Yujie

    2018-03-01

    The ripple errors of the lens lead to optical damage in high energy laser system. The analysis of sidelobe on the focal plane, caused by ripple error, provides a reference to evaluate the error and the imaging quality. In this paper, we analyze the diffraction characteristics of sidelobe of optical elements with ripple errors. First, we analyze the characteristics of ripple error and build relationship between ripple error and sidelobe. The sidelobe results from the diffraction of ripple errors. The ripple error tends to be periodic due to fabrication method on the optical surface. The simulated experiments are carried out based on angular spectrum method by characterizing ripple error as rotationally symmetric periodic structures. The influence of two major parameter of ripple including spatial frequency and peak-to-valley value to sidelobe is discussed. The results indicate that spatial frequency and peak-to-valley value both impact sidelobe at the image plane. The peak-tovalley value is the major factor to affect the energy proportion of the sidelobe. The spatial frequency is the major factor to affect the distribution of the sidelobe at the image plane.

  17. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chuyu [Peking Univ., Beijing (China)

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  18. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-01-01

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation

  19. Design and fabrication of continuous-profile diffractive micro-optical elements as a beam splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Di; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Fan, Shoushan

    2004-10-10

    An optimization algorithm that combines a rigorous electromagnetic computation model with an effective iterative method is utilized to design diffractive micro-optical elements that exhibit fast convergence and better design quality. The design example is a two-dimensional 1-to-2 beam splitter that can symmetrically generate two focal lines separated by 80 microm at the observation plane with a small angle separation of +/- 16 degrees. Experimental results are presented for an element with continuous profiles fabricated into a monocrystalline silicon substrate that has a width of 160 microm and a focal length of 140 microm at a free-space wavelength of 10.6 microm.

  20. Ellipsoidal diffraction grating as output coupler for quasi-optical gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogge, J.P.; Cao, H.; Tran, T.M.; Tran, M.Q.; Paris, P.J.; Kasparek, W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a diffraction grating arranged in the -1 Littrow mount as an output coupler for a quasi-optical Fabry-Perot resonator at microwave frequencies (100 GHz) was suggested in 1990. A planar grating with curvilinear grooves (in order to match the Littrow condition everywhere on the surface for a given Gaussian beam) gives a power coupling efficiency of 85% which is limited by the depolarization but gave approximately the same global efficiency because of distortion. We report low power tests on an improvement of the second scheme, based on curved grooves on an ellipsoidal surface, which gives a global efficiency of 94%. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs

  1. Amplitude-phase characteristics of electromagnetic fields diffracted by a hole in a thin film with realistic optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeyev, Illarion

    2009-03-01

    Characteristics of a quasi-spherical wave front of an electromagnetic field diffracted by a subwavelength hole in a thin film with real optical properties are studied. Related diffraction problem is solved in general by use of the scalar and vector Green's theorems and related Green's function of a boundary-value problem. Local phase deviations of a diffracted wave front from an ideal spherical front are calculated. Diffracted patterns are calculated for the coherent incident fields in case of holes array in a screen of perfect conductivity.

  2. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  3. Optical Design of COATLI: A Diffraction-Limited Visible Imager with Fast Guiding and Active Optics Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Watson, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the optical design of COATLI, a two channel visible imager for a comercial 50 cm robotic telescope. COATLI will deliver diffraction-limited images (approximately 0.3 arcsec FWHM) in the riz bands, inside a 4.2 arcmin field, and seeing limited images (approximately 0.6 arcsec FWHM) in the B and g bands, inside a 5 arcmin field, by means of a tip-tilt mirror for fast guiding, and a deformable mirror for active optics, both located on two optically transferred pupil planes. The optical design is based on two collimator-camera systems plus a pupil transfer relay, using achromatic doublets of CaF2 and S-FTM16 and one triplet of N-BK7 and CaF2. We discuss the effciency, tolerancing, thermal behavior and ghosts. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, Mexico, in 2018.

  4. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  5. Nanointaglio fabrication of optical lipid multilayer diffraction gratings with applications in biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Troy Warren

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at microscopic and nanoscopic levels. Exploiting the self-organization and innate biofunctionality of lyotropic liquid crystalline phospholipids, a novel nanofabrication process called "nanointaglio" was invented in order to rapidly and scalably integrate lipid nanopatterns onto the surface. The work presented here focuses on using nanointaglio fabricated lipid diffraction micro- and nanopatterns for the development of new sensing and bioactivity studies. The lipids are patterned as diffraction gratings for sensor functionality. The lipid multilayer gratings operate as nanomechanical sensor elements that are capable of transducing molecular binding to fluid lipid multilayers into optical signals in a label free manner due to shape changes in the lipid nanostructures. To demonstrate the label free detection capabilities, lipid nanopatterns are shown to be suitable for the integration of chemically different lipid multilayer gratings into a sensor array capable of distinguishing vapors by means of an optical nose. Sensor arrays composed of six different lipid formulations are integrated onto a surface and their optical response to three different vapors (water, ethanol and acetone) in air as well as pH under water is monitored as a function of time. Principal component analysis of the array response results in distinct clustering, indicating the suitability of the arrays for distinguishing these analytes. Importantly, the nanointaglio process used is capable of producing lipid gratings out of different materials with sufficiently uniform heights for the fabrication of an optical nose. A second main application is demonstrated for the study of membrane binding proteins. Although in vitro methods for assaying the catalytic activity of individual enzymes are well established, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of

  6. Correct interpretation of diffraction properties of quartz crystals for X-ray optics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xian-Rong; Gog, Thomas; Kim, Jungho; Kasman, Elina; Said, Ayman H.; Casa, Diego M.; Wieczorek, Michael; Hönnicke, Marcelo G.; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2018-02-01

    Quartz has hundreds of strong Bragg reflections that may offer a great number of choices for making fixed-angle X-ray analyzers and polarizers at virtually any hard X-ray energies with selectable resolution. However, quartz crystals, unlike silicon and germanium, are chiral and may thus appear in two different forms of handedness that are mirror images. Furthermore, because of the threefold rotational symmetry along thecaxis, the {h1h2h3L} and {h2h1h3L} Bragg reflections may have quite different Darwin bandwidth, reflectivity and angular acceptance, although they have the same Bragg angle. The design of X-ray optics from quartz crystals therefore requires unambiguous determination of the orientation, handedness and polarity of the crystals. The Laue method and single-axis diffraction technique can provide such information, but the variety of conventions used in the literature to describe quartz structures has caused widespread confusion. The current studies give detailed guidelines for design and fabrication of quartz X-ray optics, with special emphasis on the correct interpretation of Laue patterns in terms of the crystallography and diffraction properties of quartz. Meanwhile, the quartz crystals examined were confirmed by X-ray topography to have acceptably low densities of dislocations and other defects, which is the foundation for developing high-resolution quartz-based X-ray optics.

  7. An optical super-microscope for far-field, real-time imaging beyond the diffraction limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alex M H; Eleftheriades, George V

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy suffers from a fundamental resolution limitation arising from the diffractive nature of light. While current solutions to sub-diffraction optical microscopy involve combinations of near-field, non-linear and fine scanning operations, we hereby propose and demonstrate the optical super-microscope (OSM) - a superoscillation-based linear imaging system with far-field working and observation distances - which can image an object in real-time and with sub-diffraction resolution. With our proof-of-principle prototype we report a point spread function with a spot size clearly reduced from the diffraction limit, and demonstrate corresponding improvements in two-point resolution experiments. Harnessing a new understanding of superoscillations, based on antenna array theory, our OSM achieves far-field, sub-diffraction optical imaging of an object without the need for fine scanning, data post-processing or object pre-treatment. Hence the OSM can be used in a wide variety of imaging applications beyond the diffraction limit, including real-time imaging of moving objects.

  8. Multi-wavelength speckle reduction for laser pico-projectors using diffractive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Weston H.

    Personal electronic devices, such as cell phones and tablets, continue to decrease in size while the number of features and add-ons keep increasing. One particular feature of great interest is an integrated projector system. Laser pico-projectors have been considered, but the technology has not been developed enough to warrant integration. With new advancements in diode technology and MEMS devices, laser-based projection is currently being advanced for pico-projectors. A primary problem encountered when using a pico-projector is coherent interference known as speckle. Laser speckle can lead to eye irritation and headaches after prolonged viewing. Diffractive optical elements known as diffusers have been examined as a means to lower speckle contrast. Diffusers are often rotated to achieve temporal averaging of the spatial phase pattern provided by diffuser surface. While diffusers are unable to completely eliminate speckle, they can be utilized to decrease the resultant contrast to provide a more visually acceptable image. This dissertation measures the reduction in speckle contrast achievable through the use of diffractive diffusers. A theoretical Fourier optics model is used to provide the diffuser's stationary and in-motion performance in terms of the resultant contrast level. Contrast measurements of two diffractive diffusers are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental results. In addition, a novel binary diffuser design based on Hadamard matrices will be presented. Using two static in-line Hadamard diffusers eliminates the need for rotation or vibration of the diffuser for temporal averaging. Two Hadamard diffusers were fabricated and contrast values were subsequently measured, showing good agreement with theory and simulated values. Monochromatic speckle contrast values of 0.40 were achieved using the Hadamard diffusers. Finally, color laser projection devices require the use of red, green, and blue laser sources; therefore, using a

  9. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  10. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future

  11. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  12. Cost-effective large-scale fabrication of diffractive optical elements by using conventional semiconducting processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seunghwan; Song, Ho Young; Lee, Junghoon; Jang, Cheol-Yong; Jeong, Hakgeun

    2012-11-20

    In this article, we introduce a simple fabrication method for SiO(2)-based thin diffractive optical elements (DOEs) that uses the conventional processes widely used in the semiconductor industry. Photolithography and an inductively coupled plasma etching technique are easy and cost-effective methods for fabricating subnanometer-scale and thin DOEs with a refractive index of 1.45, based on SiO(2). After fabricating DOEs, we confirmed the shape of the output light emitted from the laser diode light source and applied to a light-emitting diode (LED) module. The results represent a new approach to mass-produce DOEs and realize a high-brightness LED module.

  13. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using MathematicaTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Beam shaping for multicolour light-emitting diodes with diffractive optical elements

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Chao

    2016-10-06

    An improved particle swarm optimization method is proposed for the design of ultra-thin diffractive optical elements (DOEs) enabling multicolour beam shaping functionality. We employ pre-optimized initial structures and adaptive weight strategy in the algorithm to achieve better and identical shaping performance for multiple colours. Accordingly, a DOE for shaping light from green and blue LEDs has been designed and fabricated. Both experiment and numerical simulations have been conducted and the results agree well with each other. 15.66% average root mean square error (RMSE) and 0.22% RMSE difference are achieved. In addition, the parameters closely related to the performance of the optimization are analysed, which can provide insights for future application designs.

  15. Increasing reconstruction quality of diffractive optical elements displayed with LC SLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-03-01

    Phase liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) are actively used in various applications. However, majority of scientific applications require stable phase modulation which might be hard to achieve with commercially available SLM due to its consumer origin. The use of digital voltage addressing scheme leads to phase temporal fluctuations, which results in lower diffraction efficiency and reconstruction quality of displayed diffractive optical elements (DOE). Due to high periodicity of fluctuations it should be possible to use knowledge of these fluctuations during DOE synthesis to minimize negative effect. We synthesized DOE using accurately measured phase fluctuations of phase LC SLM "HoloEye PLUTO VIS" to minimize its negative impact on displayed DOE reconstruction. Synthesis was conducted with versatile direct search with random trajectory (DSRT) method in the following way. Before DOE synthesis begun, two-dimensional dependency of SLM phase shift on addressed signal level and time from frame start was obtained. Then synthesis begins. First, initial phase distribution is created. Second, random trajectory of consecutive processing of all DOE elements is generated. Then iterative process begins. Each DOE element sequentially has its value changed to one that provides better value of objective criterion, e.g. lower deviation of reconstructed image from original one. If current element value provides best objective criterion value then it left unchanged. After all elements are processed, iteration repeats until stagnation is reached. It is demonstrated that application of SLM phase fluctuations knowledge in DOE synthesis with DSRT method leads to noticeable increase of DOE reconstruction quality.

  16. The use of holographic and diffractive optics for optimized machine vision illumination for critical dimension inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest

    2004-02-01

    Illuminators used in machine vision applications typically produce non-uniform illumination onto the targeted surface being observed, causing a variety of problems with machine vision alignment or measurement. In most circumstances the light source is broad spectrum, leading to further problems with image quality when viewed through a CCD camera. Configured with a simple light bulb and a mirrored reflector and/or frosted glass plates, these general illuminators are appropriate for only macro applications. Over the last 5 years newer illuminators have hit the market including circular or rectangular arrays of high intensity light emitting diodes. These diode arrays are used to create monochromatic flood illumination of a surface that is to be inspected. The problem with these illumination techniques is that most of the light does not illuminate the desired areas, but broadly spreads across the surface, or when integrated with diffuser elements, tend to create similar shadowing effects to the broad spectrum light sources. In many cases a user will try to increase the performance of these illuminators by adding several of these assemblies together, increasing the intensity or by moving the illumination source closer or farther from the surface being inspected. In this case these non-uniform techniques can lead to machine vision errors, where the computer machine vision may read false information, such as interpreting non-uniform lighting or shadowing effects as defects. This paper will cover a technique involving the use of holographic / diffractive hybrid optical elements that are integrated into standard and customized light sources used in the machine vision industry. The bulk of the paper will describe the function and fabrication of the holographic/diffractive optics and how they can be tailored to improve illuminator design. Further information will be provided a specific design and examples of it in operation will be disclosed.

  17. New experimental diffractive-optical data on E.Land's Retinex mechanism in human color vision: Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauinger, N.

    2007-09-01

    A better understanding of the color constancy mechanism in human color vision [7] can be reached through analyses of photometric data of all illuminants and patches (Mondrians or other visible objects) involved in visual experiments. In Part I [3] and in [4, 5 and 6] the integration in the human eye of the geometrical-optical imaging hardware and the diffractive-optical hardware has been described and illustrated (Fig.1). This combined hardware represents the main topic of the NAMIROS research project (nano- and micro- 3D gratings for optical sensors) [8] promoted and coordinated by Corrsys 3D Sensors AG. The hardware relevant to (photopic) human color vision can be described as a diffractive or interference-optical correlator transforming incident light into diffractive-optical RGB data and relating local RGB onto global RGB data in the near-field behind the 'inverted' human retina. The relative differences at local/global RGB interference-optical contrasts are available to photoreceptors (cones and rods) only after this optical pre-processing.

  18. Micromachined diffraction based optical microphones and intensity probes with electrostatic force feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicen, Baris

    Measuring acoustic pressure gradients is critical in many applications such as directional microphones for hearing aids and sound intensity probes. This measurement is especially challenging with decreasing microphone size, which reduces the sensitivity due to small spacing between the pressure ports. Novel, micromachined biomimetic microphone diaphragms are shown to provide high sensitivity to pressure gradients on one side of the diaphragm with low thermal mechanical noise. These structures have a dominant mode shape with see-saw like motion in the audio band, responding to pressure gradients as well as spurious higher order modes sensitive to pressure. In this dissertation, integration of a diffraction based optical detection method with these novel diaphragm structures to implement a low noise optical pressure gradient microphone is described and experimental characterization results are presented, showing 36 dBA noise level with 1mm port spacing, nearly an order of magnitude better than the current gradient microphones. The optical detection scheme also provides electrostatic actuation capability from both sides of the diaphragm separately which can be used for active force feedback. A 4-port electromechanical equivalent circuit model of this microphone with optical readout is developed to predict the overall response of the device to different acoustic and electrostatic excitations. The model includes the damping due to complex motion of air around the microphone diaphragm, and it calculates the detected optical signal on each side of the diaphragm as a combination of two separate dominant vibration modes. This equivalent circuit model is verified by experiments and used to predict the microphone response with different force feedback schemes. Single sided force feedback is used for active damping to improve the linearity and the frequency response of the microphone. Furthermore, it is shown that using two sided force feedback one can significantly suppress

  19. Switching waves dynamics in optical bistable cavity-free system at femtosecond laser pulse propagation in semiconductor under light diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Egorenkov, Vladimir A.; Loginova, Maria M.

    2018-02-01

    We consider a propagation of laser pulse in a semiconductor under the conditions of an occurrence of optical bistability, which appears due to a nonlinear absorption of the semiconductor. As a result, the domains of high concentration of free charged particles (electrons and ionized donors) occur if an intensity of the incident optical pulse is greater than certain intensity. As it is well-known, that an optical beam must undergo a diffraction on (or reflection from) the domains boundaries. Usually, the beam diffraction along a coordinate of the optical pulse propagation does not take into account by using the slowly varying envelope approximation for the laser pulse interaction with optical bistable element. Therefore, a reflection of the beam from the domains with abrupt boundary does not take into account under computer simulation of the laser pulse propagation. However, the optical beams, reflected from nonhomogeneities caused by the domains of high concentration of free-charged particles, can essentially influence on a formation of switching waves in a semiconductor. We illustrate this statement by computer simulation results provided on the base of nonlinear Schrödinger equation and a set of PDEs, which describe an evolution of the semiconductor characteristics (concentrations of free-charged particles and potential of an electric field strength), and taking into account the longitudinal and transverse diffraction effects.

  20. Observation of coherent optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser radiation in Sb films by ultrafast electron diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, B. N.; Kompanets, V. O.; Aseev, S. A., E-mail: isanfemto@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Ischenko, A. A. [Moscow Technological University, Institute of High Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Kochikov, I. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Misochko, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The generation of coherent optical phonons in a polycrystalline antimony film sample has been investigated using femtosecond electron diffraction method. Phonon vibrations have been induced in the Sb sample by the main harmonic of a femtosecond Ti:Sa laser (λ = 800 nm) and probed by a pulsed ultrashort photoelectron beam synchronized with the pump laser. The diffraction patterns recorded at different times relative to the pump laser pulse display oscillations of electron diffraction intensity corresponding to the frequencies of vibrations of optical phonons: totally symmetric (A{sub 1g}) and twofold degenerate (E{sub g}) phonon modes. The frequencies that correspond to combinations of these phonon modes in the Sb sample have also been experimentally observed.

  1. High-power fiber laser with a polarizing diffraction grating milled on the facet of an optical fiber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, Martin; Vaniš, Jan; Baravets, Yauhen; Todorov, Filip; Čtyroký, Jiří; Honzátko, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 26 (2016), s. 30225-30233 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-07908S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Optical fibers * Polarization * Diffraction gratings Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  2. High-power fiber laser with a polarizing diffraction grating milled on the facet of an optical fiber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaněk, Martin; Vaniš, Jan; Baravets, Yauhen; Todorov, Filip; Čtyroký, Jiří; Honzátko, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 26 (2016), s. 30225-30233 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-07908S Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Optical fiber s * Polarization * Diffraction gratings Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016

  3. Optical diffraction tomography microscopy with transport of intensity equation using a light-emitting diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaji; Chen, Qian; Zhang, Jialin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Yan; Zuo, Chao

    2017-08-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an effective label-free technique for quantitatively refractive index imaging, which enables long-term monitoring of the internal three-dimensional (3D) structures and molecular composition of biological cells with minimal perturbation. However, existing optical tomographic methods generally rely on interferometric configuration for phase measurement and sophisticated mechanical systems for sample rotation or beam scanning. Thereby, the measurement is suspect to phase error coming from the coherent speckle, environmental vibrations, and mechanical error during data acquisition process. To overcome these limitations, we present a new ODT technique based on non-interferometric phase retrieval and programmable illumination emitting from a light-emitting diode (LED) array. The experimental system is built based on a traditional bright field microscope, with the light source replaced by a programmable LED array, which provides angle-variable quasi-monochromatic illumination with an angular coverage of ±37 degrees in both x and y directions (corresponding to an illumination numerical aperture of ∼0.6). Transport of intensity equation (TIE) is utilized to recover the phase at different illumination angles, and the refractive index distribution is reconstructed based on the ODT framework under first Rytov approximation. The missing-cone problem in ODT is addressed by using the iterative non-negative constraint algorithm, and the misalignment of the LED array is further numerically corrected to improve the accuracy of refractive index quantification. Experiments on polystyrene beads and thick biological specimens show that the proposed approach allows accurate refractive index reconstruction while greatly reduced the system complexity and environmental sensitivity compared to conventional interferometric ODT approaches.

  4. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Liu, Zunping; Lang, Keenan; Huang, Xianrong; Wieczorek, Michael; Kasman, Elina; Hammonds, John; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity and spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.

  5. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, Petr; Oberta, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A new kind of two channel-cut crystals X-ray monochromator in dispersive (+,-,-,+) position which spatially separates harmonics is proposed. The diffracting surfaces are oriented so that the diffraction is inclined. Owing to refraction the diffracted beam is sagittally deviated. The deviation depends on wavelength and is much higher for the first harmonics than for higher harmonics. This leads to spatial harmonics separation. The idea is supported by ray-tracing simulation.

  6. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  7. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villangca, Mark Jayson; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use...... of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested...... for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements....

  8. Subreflector extension for improved efficiencies in Cassegrain antennas - GTD/PO analysis. [Geometrical Theory of Diffraction/Physical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1986-01-01

    Both offset and symmetric Cassegrain reflector antennas are used in satellite and ground communication systems. It is known that the subreflector diffraction can degrade the performance of these reflectors. A geometrical theory of diffraction/physical optics analysis technique is used to investigate the effects of the extended subreflector, beyond its optical rim, on the reflector efficiency and far-field patterns. Representative numerical results are shown for an offset Cassegrain reflector antenna with different feed illumination tapers and subreflector extensions. It is observed that for subreflector extensions as small as one wavelength, noticeable improvements in the overall efficiencies can be expected. Useful design data are generated for the efficiency curves and far-field patterns.

  9. Study of electron-beam-evaporated MgO films using electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelfotoh, M.O.; Ramsey, J.N.

    1982-05-21

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence were used to study MgO films deposited onto fused silica, single-crystal silicon and LiF substrates at various temperatures. Results showed that some of the same optical absorption and emission bands observed in X- or UV-irradiated, additively colored or mechanically deformed MgO crystals were observed in evaporated MgO films. The peak positions and the relative peak intensities of the optical absorption and emission bands depended on the substrate temperature during film deposition as well as on the structure of the film. The effect of heating the films in air and vacuum on the optical absorption and emission bands is also discussed.

  10. Near-diffraction-limited and low-haze electro-optical tunable liquid crystal lens with floating electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liwei; Bryant, Doug; Van Heugten, Tony; Bos, Philip J

    2013-04-08

    A near-diffraction-limited, low-haze and tunable liquid crystal (LC) lens is presented. Building on an understanding of the key factors that have limited the performance of lenses based on liquid crystals, we show a simple design whose optical quality is similar to a high quality glass lens. It uses 'floating' electrodes to provide a smooth, controllable applied potential profile across the aperture to manage the phase profile.

  11. Design of high-efficiency diffractive optical elements towards ultrafast mid-infrared time-stretched imaging and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongbo; Ren, Delun; Wang, Chao; Mao, Chensheng; Yang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast time stretch imaging offers unprecedented imaging speed and enables new discoveries in scientific research and engineering. One challenge in exploiting time stretch imaging in mid-infrared is the lack of high-quality diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which encode the image information into mid-infrared optical spectrum. This work reports the design and optimization of mid-infrared DOE with high diffraction-efficiency, broad bandwidth and large field of view. Using various typical materials with their refractive indices ranging from 1.32 to 4.06 in ? mid-infrared band, diffraction efficiencies of single-layer and double-layer DOEs have been studied in different wavelength bands with different field of views. More importantly, by replacing the air gap of double-layer DOE with carefully selected optical materials, one optimized ? triple-layer DOE, with efficiency higher than 95% in the whole ? mid-infrared window and field of view greater than ?, is designed and analyzed. This new DOE device holds great potential in ultrafast mid-infrared time stretch imaging and spectroscopy.

  12. Negative optical spin torque wrench of a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitri, F.G.

    2016-01-01

    An absorptive Rayleigh dielectric sphere in a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam experiences a spin torque. The axial and transverse radiation spin torque components are evaluated in the dipole approximation using the radiative correction of the electric field. Particular emphasis is given on the polarization as well as changing the topological charge α and the half-cone angle of the beam. When α is zero, the axial spin torque component vanishes. However, when α becomes a real positive number, the vortex beam induces left-handed (negative) axial spin torque as the sphere shifts off-axially from the center of the beam. The results show that a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam is capable of inducing a spin reversal of an absorptive Rayleigh sphere placed arbitrarily in its path. Potential applications are yet to be explored in particle manipulation, rotation in optical tweezers, optical tractor beams, and the design of optically-engineered metamaterials to name a few areas. - Highlights: • Optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam is considered. • Negative spin torque on an absorptive dielectric Rayleigh sphere is predicted numerically. • Negative spin torque occurs as the sphere departs from the center of the beam.

  13. Performance of an optical encoder based on a nondiffractive beam implemented with a specific photodetection integrated circuit and a diffractive optical element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintián, Fernando Perez; Calarco, Nicolás; Lutenberg, Ariel; Lipovetzky, José

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the incremental signal produced by an optical encoder based on a nondiffractive beam (NDB). The NDB is generated by means of a diffractive optical element (DOE). The detection system is composed by an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) sensor. The sensor consists of an array of eight concentric annular photodiodes, each one provided with a programmable gain amplifier. In this way, the system is able to synthesize a nonuniform detectivity. The contrast, amplitude, and harmonic content of the sinusoidal output signal are analyzed. The influence of the cross talk among the annular photodiodes is placed in evidence through the dependence of the signal contrast on the wavelength.

  14. Versatile digital micromirror device-based method for the recording of multilevel optical diffractive elements in photosensitive chalcogenide layers (AMTIR-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerg, Alexandre; Vignaux, Mael; Lumeau, Julien

    2016-08-01

    A new alternative and versatile method for the production of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) with up to four phase levels in AMTIR-1 (Ge33As12Se55) layers is demonstrated. The developed method proposes the use of the photosensitive properties of the layers and a specific in situ optical monitoring coupled with a reverse engineering algorithm to control the trigger points of the writing of the different diffractive patterns. Examples of various volume DOEs are presented.

  15. Initial idea to use optical flats for x-ray fluorescence analysis and recent applications to diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, T.

    1993-01-01

    Described in this work is the initial idea of using an optical flat for X-ray fluorescence analysis based upon studies of anomalous surface reflection (ASR). To develop total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) as one of the most powerful tools for microchemical analysis, various experiments such as the micro-determinations of uranium in sea-water, iron in human blood and rare earth elements in hot spring-water were attempted. Furthermore, the physically interesting experiment on Compton scattering under total-reflection conditions was conducted. Recent applications of the total-reflection phenomenon to diffraction studies, i.e. total-reflection X-ray diffraction (TXRD), are also presented. (author)

  16. Diffraction-limited real-time terahertz imaging by optical frequency up-conversion in a DAST crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Takida, Yuma; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2015-03-23

    Real-time terahertz (THz) wave imaging has wide applications in areas such as security, industry, biology, medicine, pharmacy, and the arts. This report describes real-time room-temperature THz imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in an organic 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal, with high resolution reaching the diffraction limit. THz-wave images were converted to the near infrared region and then captured using an InGaAs camera in a tandem imaging system. The resolution of the imaging system was analyzed. Diffraction and interference of THz wave were observed in the experiments. Videos are supplied to show the interference pattern variation that occurs with sample moving and tilting.

  17. Full-color, large area, transmissive holograms enabled by multi-level diffractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Nabil; Meem, Monjurul; Wan, Xiaowen; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-07-19

    We show that multi-level diffractive microstructures can enable broadband, on-axis transmissive holograms that can project complex full-color images, which are invariant to viewing angle. Compared to alternatives like metaholograms, diffractive holograms utilize much larger minimum features (>10 µm), much smaller aspect ratios (30 mm ×30 mm). We designed, fabricated and characterized holograms that encode various full-color images. Our devices demonstrate absolute transmission efficiencies of >86% across the visible spectrum from 405 nm to 633 nm (peak value of about 92%), and excellent color fidelity. Furthermore, these devices do not exhibit polarization dependence. Finally, we emphasize that our devices exhibit negligible absorption and are phase-only holograms with high diffraction efficiency.

  18. Negative optical spin torque wrench of a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-10-01

    An absorptive Rayleigh dielectric sphere in a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam experiences a spin torque. The axial and transverse radiation spin torque components are evaluated in the dipole approximation using the radiative correction of the electric field. Particular emphasis is given on the polarization as well as changing the topological charge α and the half-cone angle of the beam. When α is zero, the axial spin torque component vanishes. However, when α becomes a real positive number, the vortex beam induces left-handed (negative) axial spin torque as the sphere shifts off-axially from the center of the beam. The results show that a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam is capable of inducing a spin reversal of an absorptive Rayleigh sphere placed arbitrarily in its path. Potential applications are yet to be explored in particle manipulation, rotation in optical tweezers, optical tractor beams, and the design of optically-engineered metamaterials to name a few areas.

  19. Geometrical characterization of micro-optical cylindrical lens arrays using angular resolved diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Theis Faber Quist; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    been shown (Iversen et al 2009 J. Opt. A: Pure Appl. Opt. 11 054014 (6pp), B¨uttner and Zeitner 2002 Appl. Opt. 41 6841 8) that the average radius of curvature of an MLA structure can be extracted by observing the far-field diffraction pattern intensity distribution obtained from illumination....... By scanning the angle of incidence of the coherent illumination and simultaneously observing the diffracted intensity, information about the grating period and the radius of curvature can be extracted. The method is implemented with emphasis on further development for compact, high-speed dedicated systems. We...

  20. Optical forces induced behavior of a particle in a non-diffracting vortex beam

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Brzobohatý, Oto; Zemánek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 22 (2012), s. 24304-24319 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP205/11/P294; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk LH12018 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical vortex beam * tweezers * optical forces Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.546, year: 2012

  1. Rotating and standing waves in a diffractive nonlinear optical system with delayed feedback under O(2) Hopf bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinskiy, S. S.; Razgulin, A. V.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we study one-dimensional rotating and standing waves in a model of an O(2)-symmetric nonlinear optical system with diffraction and delay in the feedback loop whose dynamics is governed by a system of coupled delayed parabolic equation and linear Schrodinger-type equation. We elaborate a two-step approach: transition to a rotating coordinate system to obtain the profiles of the waves as small parameter expansions and the normal form technique to study their qualitative dynamic behavior and stability. Theoretical results stand in a good agreement with direct computer simulations presented.

  2. Diffractive-optics-based sensor as a tool for detection of biocompatibility of titanium and titanium-doped hydrocarbon samples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Silvennoinen, R.; Hasoň, Stanislav; Vetterl, Vladimír; Penttinen, N.; Silvennoinen, M.; Myller, K.; Černochová, P.; Bartáková, S.; Prachár, P.; Cvrček, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 29 (2010), s. 5583-5591 ISSN 0003-6935 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200040651; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/08/1688; GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/2378 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : fibrinogen adsorption * titanium dental implants * diffractive optical element Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.703, year: 2010

  3. Diffractive optics for reduction of hot cracking in pulsed mode Nd:YAG laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olesen, Søren; Roos, Sven-Olov

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the susceptibility to hot cracking in pulsed mode laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, an optical system for reduction of the cooling rate is sought developed. Based on intensive numerical simulations, an optical system producing three focused spots is made. In a number...

  4. Diffraction-unlimited optical imaging of unstained living cells in liquid by electron beam scanning of luminescent environmental cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kasaya, Takeshi; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2013-11-18

    An environmental cell with a 50-nm-thick cathodoluminescent window was attached to a scanning electron microscope, and diffraction-unlimited near-field optical imaging of unstained living human lung epithelial cells in liquid was demonstrated. Electrons with energies as low as 0.8 - 1.2 kV are sufficiently blocked by the window without damaging the specimens, and form a sub-wavelength-sized illumination light source. A super-resolved optical image of the specimen adhered to the opposite window surface was acquired by a photomultiplier tube placed below. The cells after the observation were proved to stay alive. The image was formed by enhanced dipole radiation or energy transfer, and features as small as 62 nm were resolved.

  5. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  6. Educational Software for Interference and Optical Diffraction Analysis in Fresnel and Fraunhofer Regions Based on MATLAB GUIs and the FDTD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, J.; Perez-Molina, M.; Bleda, S.; Fernandez, E.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Interference and diffraction of light are elementary topics in optics. The aim of the work presented here is to develop an accurate and cheap optical-system simulation software that provides a virtual laboratory for studying the effects of propagation in both time and space for the near- and far-field regions. In laboratory sessions, this software…

  7. Optimizing the coupling of output of a quasi-optical gyrotron owing to a diffraction grating with ellipsoidal support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogge, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The output scheme of a quasi-optical gyrotron has been optimized in order to produce a gaussian output microwave beam suitable for transmission over long distances. The technique which has been applied consists of substituting one of the mirrors of the Fabry-Perot resonator in which the particle-wave interaction takes place by a diffraction grating placed in the -1 order Littrow mount and designed such that only orders -1 and 0 can propagate. In such a configuration, the diffraction angle of the order -1 coincides exactly with the incidence direction, thus providing a feedback in the cavity, whereas the order 0 constitutes the output of the resonator. A theoretical study of the power content in each diffracted order of a planar grating of infinite extent with equally spaced linear grooves as a function of the grating parameters has been performed. It has been shown that parameter domains can be found, which provide appropriate efficiencies in both orders for an application on a quasi-optical gyrotron. The Littrow condition was then adapted in order to match the spherical wavefronts of a gaussian beam incident on a possibly non-planar surface. The grooves become thus curvilinear and are no longer equally spaced. Measurements made on a cold test stand have confirmed the validity of the Littrow condition extension and allowed to determine its limits. It has also been shown that this type of cavity provides a mode having an optimal gaussian content and giving a minimal cavity transmission. The angular dispersion of the grating leads to a higher cavity transmission and to a slightly lower gaussian content for the adjacent resonator modes. The fundamental eigenmode electric field profile has been measured inside the cavity and is similar to that of an equivalent resonator made with two spherical mirrors. (author) figs., tabs., 141 refs

  8. Improvements to optical performance in diffractive elements used for off-axis illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin; Fedor, Adam; Felder, Daniel; Childers, John; Emig, Tim

    2009-08-01

    As photolithographic tools are pressed to print the ever shrinking features required in today's devices, complex off-axis illumination is taking an ever increasing role in meeting this challenge. This, in turn, is driving tighter, more stringent requirements on the diffractive elements used in these illumination systems. Specifically, any imbalance in the poles of an off-axis illuminator will contribute to reductions in the ultimate imaging performance of a lithographic tool and increased complexity in tool-to-tool matching. The article will focus on improvements to the manufacturing process that achieve substantially better pole balance. The modeling of the possible process contributors will be discussed. Challenges resulting from the manufacturing methodology will be shared. Finally, the improvement in manufacturing process performance will be reported by means of a pole balance capability index.

  9. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  10. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power.

  11. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    OpenAIRE

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-01-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for ver...

  12. Performances for confocal X-ray diffraction technology based on polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hehe; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stxbeijing@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Sun, Weiyuan; Li, Yude; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Weigang; Zhao, Guangcui; Luo, Ping; Pan, Qiuli; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-09-21

    The confocal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology based on a polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray lens (PSFXRL) in excitation channel and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) with a long input focal distance in detection channel was developed. The output focal spot of the PSFXRL and the input focal spot of the PPXRL were adjusted in confocal configuration, and only the X-rays from the volume overlapped by these foci could be accordingly detected. This confocal configuration was helpful in decreasing background. The convergence of the beam focused by the PSFXRL and divergence of the beam which could be collected by the PPXRL with a long input focal distance were both about 9 mrad at 8 keV. This was helpful in improving the resolution of lattice spacing of this confocal XRD technology. The gain in power density of such PSFXRL and PPXRL was about 120 and 7 at 11 keV, respectively, which was helpful in using the low power source to perform XRD analysis efficiently. The performances of this confocal XRD technology were provided, and some common plastics were analyzed. The experimental results demonstrated that the confocal diffraction technology base on polycapillary slightly focusing X-ray optics had wide potential applications.

  13. Extraordinary optical transmission with tapered slits: effect of higher diffraction and slit resonance orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, T.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Beermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission through thin metal films with a periodic arrangement of tapered slits is considered. Transmission maps covering a wide range of periods, film thicknesses, and taper angles are presented. The maps show resonant transmission when fundamental and higher-order slit resonances are excited...... to be in the range of 6 degrees-10 degrees. Both theory and experiments show split-peak spectra and shifted-peak spectra due to interference between a slit resonance and Rayleigh-Wood anomalies. (C) 2011 Optical Society of America...

  14. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rofouie, P.; Rey, A. D.; Pasini, D.

    2015-01-01

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations’ amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC’s surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices

  15. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rofouie, P.; Rey, A. D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mail.mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 3610 University Street, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B2 (Canada); Pasini, D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrook West, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0C3 (Canada)

    2015-09-21

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations’ amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC’s surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  16. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  17. Evaluation of Optical Quality: Ocular Scattering and Aberrations in Eyes Implanted with Diffractive Multifocal or Monofocal Intraocular Lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuan; Lin, Jia; Tian, Jing; Wen, BaiWei; Tan, QingQing; Lan, ChangJun

    2018-06-01

    To compare objective optical quality, ocular scattering and aberrations of eyes implanted with an aspheric monofocal intraocular lens (IOL) or an aspheric apodized diffractive multifocal IOL three months after surgery. Prospective consecutive nonrandomized comparative cohort study. A total of 80 eyes from 57 cataract patients were bilaterally or unilaterally implanted with monofocal (AcrySof IQ SN60WF) or multifocal (AcrySof IQ ReSTOR SN6AD1) IOLs. Respectively, 40 eyes of 27 patients were implanted with monofocal IOLs, and 40 eyes of 30 patients were implanted with multifocal IOLs. Ocular high-order aberration (HOA) values were obtained using Hartmann-Shack aberrometer; objective scatter index (OSI), modulation transfer function (MTF) cutoff, Strehl ratio (SR), and contrast visual acuity OV at 100%, 20%, and 9% were measured using Objective Quality Analysis System II (OQAS II). Ocular aberrations performed similar in both groups (p > 0.05). However, significantly higher values of OSI and lower values of MTF cutoff, SR and OV were found in the SN6AD1 group (p < 0.05). Both ocular scattering and wave-front aberrations play essential role in retinal image quality, which may be overestimated when only aberrations were taken into account. Combining the effect of ocular scattering with HOA will result in a more accurate assessment of the visual and optical quality.

  18. Improvement of diffraction efficiency of three-dimensional magneto-optic spatial light modulator with magnetophotonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Takagi, H., E-mail: takagi@ee.tut.ac.jp; Lim, P. B.; Inoue, M., E-mail: inoue@tut.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441 8580 (Japan); Goto, Taichi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441 8580 (Japan); JST, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Horimai, H. [HolyMine Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243 0813 (Japan); Yoshikawa, H. [Department of Computer Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Funabashi, Chiba 274 8501 (Japan); Bove, V. M. [MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed three-dimensional magneto-optic spatial light modulators (3D-MOSLMs) that use magnetic domains as submicron scale pixels to represent holograms. Our display system uses a submicron-scale magnetic pixel array on an amorphous TbFe film to create a wide viewing angle hologram. However, in previous work the reconstructed images had a low intensity and a low optical contrast; brightness of the reconstructed image was 4.4 × 10{sup −2 }cd/m{sup 2} with 532 nm illumination light at 10.8 mW/cm{sup 2}, while display standard ISO13406 recommends 100 cd/m{sup 2} or more. In this paper, we describe our development of a 3D-MOSLM composed of an artificial magnetic lattice structure of magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs). The MPCs enhance the diffraction efficiency of reconstructed 3D images and reduce the power consumption for controlling the magnetic pixels by a light localization effect. We demonstrate reconstructed 3D images using the MPC and show significant brightness improvement.

  19. Comparison of the visual and intraocular optical performance of a refractive multifocal IOL with rotational asymmetry and an apodized diffractive multifocal IOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alió, Jorge L; Plaza-Puche, Ana B; Javaloy, Jaime; Ayala, María José

    2012-02-01

    To compare the visual outcomes and intraocular optical quality observed postoperatively in patients implanted with a rotationally asymmetric multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) and an apodized diffractive multifocal IOL. Seventy-four consecutive eyes of 40 cataract patients (age range: 36 to 79 years) were divided into two groups: zonal refractive group, 39 eyes implanted with a rotationally asymmetric multifocal IOL (Lentis Mplus LS-312 IOL, Oculentis GmbH); and diffractive group, 35 eyes implanted with an apodized diffractive multifocal IOL (ReSTOR SN6AD3, Alcon Laboratories Inc). Distance and near visual acuity outcomes, contrast sensitivity, intraocular optical quality, and defocus curves were evaluated during 3-month follow-up. Calculation of the intraocular aberrations was performed by subtracting corneal aberrations from total ocular aberrations. Uncorrected near visual acuity and distance-corrected near visual acuity were better in the diffractive group than in the zonal refractive group (P=.01), whereas intermediate visual acuity (defocus +1.00 and +1.50 diopters) was better in the zonal refractive group. Photopic contrast sensitivity was significantly better in the zonal refractive group (P=.04). Wavefront aberrations (total, higher order, tilt, primary coma) were significantly higher in the zonal refractive group than in the diffractive group (P=.02). Both multifocal IOLs are able to successfully restore visual function after cataract surgery. The zonal refractive multifocal IOL provides better results in contrast sensitivity and intermediate vision, whereas the diffractive multifocal IOL provides better near vision at a closer distance. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Diffraction of a Gaussian beam in a three-dimensional smoothly inhomogeneous medium: an eikonal-based complex geometrical-optics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berczynski, Pawel; Bliokh, Konstantin Yu; Kravtsov, Yuri A; Stateczny, Andrzej

    2006-06-01

    We present an ab initio account of the paraxial complex geometrical optics (CGO) in application to scalar Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction in a 3D smoothly inhomogeneous medium. The paraxial CGO deals with quadratic expansion of the complex eikonal and reduces the wave problem to the solution of ordinary differential equations of the Riccati type. This substantially simplifies the description of Gaussian beam diffraction as compared with full-wave or parabolic (quasi-optics) equations. For a Gaussian beam propagating in a homogeneous medium or along the symmetry axis in a lenslike medium, the CGO equations possess analytical solutions; otherwise, they can be readily solved numerically. As a nontrivial example we consider Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction along a helical ray in an axially symmetric waveguide medium. It is shown that the major axis of the beam's elliptical cross section grows unboundedly; it is oriented predominantly in the azimuthal (binormal) direction and does not obey the parallel-transport law.

  1. Measurement of grain size of polycrystalline materials with confocal energy dispersive micro-X-ray diffraction technology based on polycapillary X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Li, Fangzuo; Sun, Xuepeng; Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-11-11

    The confocal energy dispersive micro-X-ray diffraction (EDMXRD) based on polycapillary X-ray optics was used to determine the grain size of polycrystalline materials. The grain size of a metallographic specimen of nickel base alloy was measured by using the confocal EDMXRD. The experimental results demonstrated that the confocal EDMXRD had potential applications in measuring large grain size.

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  3. X-ray diffraction and imaging with a coherent beam: application to X-ray optical elements and to crystals exhibiting phase inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiello, F.

    2011-05-01

    The exceptional properties of synchrotron light sources have been exploited in very different disciplines, from archaeology to chemistry, from material science to biology, from medicine to physics. Among these properties it is important to mention the high brilliance, continuum spectrum, high degree of polarization, time structure, small source size and divergence of the beam, the last resulting in a high transversal coherence of the produced radiation. This high transversal coherence of the synchrotron sources has permitted the development of new techniques, e.g. phase contrast imaging, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI). This thesis work will consist essentially of three parts. In the first part it will be presented the work done as a member of the X-ray Optics Group of ESRF in the characterization of high quality diamond crystals foreseen as X-ray optical elements. The characterization has been done using different complementary X-ray techniques, such as high resolution diffraction, topography, grazing incidence diffraction, reflectivity and measurements of the coherence preservation using the Talbot effect. In the second part, I will show the result obtained in the study of the temperature behaviours of the domain in periodically poled ferroelectrics crystals. This type of measurements, based on Bragg-Fresnel diffraction, are possible only thanks to the high degree of coherence of the beam. In the third part, I will present the results obtained in the characterization of diamonds foreseen for applications other than X-ray optical elements. (author)

  4. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  5. X-ray diffraction study on the structure of concentrated aqueous solutions involving alanine molecules with different optical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Yasuo; Okuyama, Aya; Amo, Yuko; Usuki, Takeshi; Kohara, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction measurements on aqueous 2.5 mol% DL-, L-, and D-alanine solutions in D 2 O were carried out at 26±2degC in order to obtain information concerning the difference in the hydrogen-bonded structure between aqueous solutions involving amino acid molecules with different optical activities. The difference function, Δi inter (Q), between intermolecular interference term observed for DL- and L-alanine and between DL- and D-alanine solutions both exhibited a first peak at Q=1.6 A -1 , followed by oscillatory features extending to higher-Q region, implying that there is a difference in the intermolecular structure is present between these solutions. The difference distribution function, Δg inter (r), obtained from the Fourier transform of the Δi inter (Q) between DL- and L-, and between DL- and D-alanine solutions showed an obvious negative peak at r=2.8 A, which was attributed to the nearest neighbor hydrogen-bonded O...O interaction. The least squares fitting analysis of the observed Δi inter (Q) showed that the intermolecular O...O distance and the difference in the coordination number between DL- and L-, and between DL- and D-alanine solutions are 2.76(2) A and -0.18(1), and 2.81(3) A and -0.18(1), respectively. It was concluded that the intermolecular hydrogen-bonded network in aqueous L- and D-alanine solutions is stronger than that in the DL-alanine solution. (author)

  6. A uniform geometrical optics and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for evaluating high frequency EM fields near smooth caustics and composite shadow boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniform geometrical optics (UGO) and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (EUTD) are developed for evaluating high frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields within transition regions associated with a two and three dimensional smooth caustic of reflected rays and a composite shadow boundary formed by the caustic termination or the confluence of the caustic with the reflection shadow boundary (RSB). The UGO is a uniform version of the classic geometrical optics (GO). It retains the simple ray optical expressions of classic GO and employs a new set of uniform reflection coefficients. The UGO also includes a uniform version of the complex GO ray field that exists on the dark side of the smooth caustic. The EUTD is an extension of the classic uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) and accounts for the non-ray optical behavior of the UGO reflected field near caustics by using a two-variable transition function in the expressions for the edge diffraction coefficients. It also uniformly recovers the classic UTD behavior of the edge diffracted field outside the composite shadow boundary transition region. The approach employed for constructing the UGO/EUTD solution is based on a spatial domain physical optics (PO) radiation integral representation for the fields which is then reduced using uniform asymptotic procedures. The UGO/EUTD analysis is also employed to investigate the far-zone RCS problem of plane wave scattering from two and three dimensional polynomial defined surfaces, and uniform reflection, zero-curvature, and edge diffraction coefficients are derived. Numerical results for the scattering and diffraction from cubic and fourth order polynomial strips are also shown and the UGO/EUTD solution is validated by comparison to an independent moment method (MM) solution. The UGO/EUTD solution is also compared with the classic GO/UTD solution. The failure of the classic techniques near caustics and composite shadow boundaries is clearly

  7. The applicability of physical optics in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral region. Part I: The ray tracing with diffraction on facets method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, A.J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Sourdeval, Odran

    2017-01-01

    Future satellite missions, from 2022 onwards, will obtain near-global measurements of cirrus at microwave and sub-millimetre frequencies. To realise the potential of these observations, fast and accurate light-scattering methods are required to calculate scattered millimetre and sub-millimetre intensities from complex ice crystals. Here, the applicability of the ray tracing with diffraction on facets method (RTDF) in predicting the bulk scalar optical properties and phase functions of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns and hexagonal ice aggregates at millimetre frequencies is investigated. The applicability of RTDF is shown to be acceptable down to size parameters of about 18, between the frequencies of 243 and 874 GHz. It is demonstrated that RTDF is generally well within about 10% of T-matrix solutions obtained for the scalar optical properties assuming hexagonal ice columns. Moreover, on replacing electromagnetic scalar optical property solutions obtained for the hexagonal ice aggregate with the RTDF counterparts at size parameter values of about 18 or greater, the bulk scalar optical properties can be calculated to generally well within ±5% of an electromagnetic-based database. The RTDF-derived bulk scalar optical properties result in brightness temperature errors to generally within about ±4 K at 874 GHz. Differing microphysics assumptions can easily exceed such errors. Similar findings are found for the bulk scattering phase functions. This finding is owing to the scattering solutions being dominated by the processes of diffraction and reflection, both being well described by RTDF. The impact of centimetre-sized complex ice crystals on interpreting cirrus polarisation measurements at sub-millimetre frequencies is discussed. - Highlights: • A method of physical optics is shown to apply to size parameters as low as 18 in the mm and sub-mm-wave spectral regions. • Including ray tracing with diffraction on facets and diffraction at the cross-section of

  8. Diffraction gauging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  9. 1-W quasi-cw near-diffraction-limited semiconductor laser pumped optically by a fibre-coupled diode bar

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanjal, S.; Hoogland, S.; Roberts, J.S.; Hayward, R.A.; Clarkson, W.A.; Tropper, Anne

    2000-01-01

    We describe a diode-bar-pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser, which in quasi-cw operation emitted a peak power of >1 W at 1020 nm in a circular, near diffraction-limited beam.

  10. Comparison between ray-tracing and physical optics for the computation of light absorption in capillaries--the influence of diffraction and interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Michalowski, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Yang, Sen; Graf, Thomas; Ni, Xiaowu

    2012-11-19

    Ray-tracing is the commonly used technique to calculate the absorption of light in laser deep-penetration welding or drilling. Since new lasers with high brilliance enable small capillaries with high aspect ratios, diffraction might become important. To examine the applicability of the ray-tracing method, we studied the total absorptance and the absorbed intensity of polarized beams in several capillary geometries. The ray-tracing results are compared with more sophisticated simulations based on physical optics. The comparison shows that the simple ray-tracing is applicable to calculate the total absorptance in triangular grooves and in conical capillaries but not in rectangular grooves. To calculate the distribution of the absorbed intensity ray-tracing fails due to the neglected interference, diffraction, and the effects of beam propagation in the capillaries with sub-wavelength diameter. If diffraction is avoided e.g. with beams smaller than the entrance pupil of the capillary or with very shallow capillaries, the distribution of the absorbed intensity calculated by ray-tracing corresponds to the local average of the interference pattern found by physical optics.

  11. Errors in the universal and sufficient heuristic criteria of estimating validity limits of geometric optics and of the geometric theory of diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovikov, V.A.; Kinber, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    The heuristic criteria (HC) of validity of geometric optics (GO) and of the geometric theory of diffraction (GTD), suggested in [2-7, 13, 14] and based on identifying the physical volume occupied by the ray with the Fresnel volume (FV) introduced in these papers (i.e., the envelope of the first Fresnel zone), are analyzed. Numerous examples of HC invalidity are given, as well as the reasons. In particular, HC provide an incorrect answer for all GO problems with caustics, since in these problems there always exists a ray, whose FV is nonlocal and covers the FV of other rays. The HC are shown to be unsuitable for multiple ray GTD problems, as well as for the simplest problems of diffraction of a cylindrical wave by a half-plane and of a plane wave by a curved half-plane

  12. Characterization of CuCl quantum dots grown in NaCl single crystals via optical measurements, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Kensuke; Akatsu, Tatsuro; Itoh, Ken

    2018-05-01

    We evaluated the crystal size, shape, and alignment of the lattice planes of CuCl quantum dots (QDs) embedded in NaCl single crystals by optical measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We obtained, for the first time, an XRD pattern and TEM images for CuCl QDs in NaCl crystals. The XRD pattern showed that the lattice planes of the CuCl QDs were parallel to those of the NaCl crystals. In addition, the size of the QDs was estimated from the diffraction width. It was apparent from the TEM images that almost all CuCl QDs were polygonal, although some cubic QDs were present. The mean size and size distribution of the QDs were also obtained. The dot size obtained from optical measurements, XRD, and TEM image were almost consistent. Our new findings can help to reveal the growth mechanism of semiconductor QDs embedded in a crystallite matrix. In addition, this work will play an important role in progressing the study of optical phenomena originating from assembled semiconductor QDs.

  13. The applicability of physical optics in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral region. Part I: The ray tracing with diffraction on facets method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, A. J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Sourdeval, Odran

    2017-03-01

    Future satellite missions, from 2022 onwards, will obtain near-global measurements of cirrus at microwave and sub-millimetre frequencies. To realise the potential of these observations, fast and accurate light-scattering methods are required to calculate scattered millimetre and sub-millimetre intensities from complex ice crystals. Here, the applicability of the ray tracing with diffraction on facets method (RTDF) in predicting the bulk scalar optical properties and phase functions of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns and hexagonal ice aggregates at millimetre frequencies is investigated. The applicability of RTDF is shown to be acceptable down to size parameters of about 18, between the frequencies of 243 and 874 GHz. It is demonstrated that RTDF is generally well within about 10% of T-matrix solutions obtained for the scalar optical properties assuming hexagonal ice columns. Moreover, on replacing electromagnetic scalar optical property solutions obtained for the hexagonal ice aggregate with the RTDF counterparts at size parameter values of about 18 or greater, the bulk scalar optical properties can be calculated to generally well within ±5% of an electromagnetic-based database. The RTDF-derived bulk scalar optical properties result in brightness temperature errors to generally within about ±4 K at 874 GHz. Differing microphysics assumptions can easily exceed such errors. Similar findings are found for the bulk scattering phase functions. This finding is owing to the scattering solutions being dominated by the processes of diffraction and reflection, both being well described by RTDF. The impact of centimetre-sized complex ice crystals on interpreting cirrus polarisation measurements at sub-millimetre frequencies is discussed.

  14. Optical Effects Accompanying the Dynamical Bragg Diffraction in Linear 1D Photonic Crystals Based on Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Maydykovskiy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We survey our recent results on the observation and studies of the effects accompanying the dynamical Bragg diffraction in one-dimensional photonic crystals (PhC. Contrary to the kinematic Bragg diffraction, the dynamical one considers a continuous interaction between the waves travelling within a spatially-periodic structure and is the most pronounced in the so called Laue geometry, leading to a number of exciting phenomena. In the described experiments, we study the PhC based on porous silicon or porous quartz, made by the electrochemical etching of crystalline silicon with the consequent thermal annealing. Importantly, these PhC are approximately hundreds of microns thick and contain a few hundreds of periods, so that the experiments in the Laue diffraction scheme are available. We discuss the effect of the temporal splitting of femtosecond laser pulses and show that the effect is quite sensitive to the polarization and the phase of a femtosecond laser pulse. We also show the experimental realization of the Pendular effect in porous quartz PhC and demonstrate the experimental conditions for the total spatial switching of the output radiation between the transmitted and diffracted directions. All described effects are of high interest for the control over the light propagation based on PhC structures.

  15. The magneto-optical gradient effect in anexchange-biased thin film: experimental evidencefor classical diffraction theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schäfer, R.; Hamann, C.; McCord, J.; Schultz, L.; Kamberský, Vladimír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 5 (2010), 053006/1-053006/10 ISSN 1367-2630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : magnetooptics * magnetic domains * light diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.849, year: 2010

  16. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-01-01

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  17. Optical electromagnetic vector-field modeling for the accurate analysis of finite diffractive structures of high complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dridi, Kim; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    1999-01-01

    An electromagnetic vector-field modle for design of optical components based on the finite-difference-time-domain method and radiation integrals in presented. Its ability to predict the optical electromagnetic dynamics in structures with complex material distribution is demonstrated. Theoretical...

  18. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: Effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Diaz, J.; Lindsay, I.D.; de Beer, Sissi; Duvigneau, Joost; Schön, Peter Manfred; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2015-01-01

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal

  19. Ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in exosporium of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A revealed by electron microscopy using optical diffraction and filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, K; Kawata, T; Takumi, K; Kinouchi, T

    1980-01-01

    The ultrastructure of a hexagonal array in the exosporium from spores of a highly sporogenic mutant of Clostridium botulinum type A strain 190L was studied by electron microscopy of negatively stained exosporium fragments using optical diffraction and filtration. The exosporium was composed of three or more lamellae showing and equilateral, hexagonal periodicity. Images of the single exosporium layer from which the noise had been filtered optically revealed that the hexagonally arranged, morphological unit of the exosporium was composed of three globular subunits about 2.1 nm in diameter which were arranged at the vertices of an equilateral triangle with sides of about 2.4 nm. The morphological units were arranged with a spacing of about 4.5 nm. the adjacent globular subunits appeared to be interconnected by delicate linkers.

  20. Extended ABCD matrix formalism for the description of femtosecond diffraction patterns; application to femtosecond digital in-line holography with anamorphic optical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Marc; Shen, Huanhuan; Coetmellec, Sebastien; Lebrun, Denis

    2012-03-10

    We present a new model to predict diffraction patterns of femtosecond pulses through complex optical systems. The model is based on the extension of an ABCD matrix formalism combined with generalized Huygens-Fresnel transforms (already used in the CW regime) to the femtosecond regime. The model is tested to describe femtosecond digital in-line holography experiments realized in situ through a cylindrical Plexiglas pipe. The model allows us to establish analytical relations that link the holographic reconstruction process to the experimental parameters of the pipe and of the incident beam itself. Simulations and experimental results are in good concordance. Femtosecond digital in-line holography is shown to allow significant coherent noise reduction, and this model will be particularly efficient to describe a wide range of optical geometries. More generally, the model developed can be easily used in any experiment where the knowledge of the precise evolution of femtosecond transverse patterns is required.

  1. Diffractive interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  2. Diffraction theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwkamp, C.J.

    1954-01-01

    A critical review is presented of recent progress in classical diffraction theory. Both scalar and electromagnetic problems are discussed. The report may serve as an introduction to general diffraction theory although the main emphasis is on diffraction by plane obstacles. Various modifications of

  3. Measuring the nematic order of suspensions of colloidal fd virus by x-ray diffraction and optical birefringence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdy, Kirstin R.; Dogic, Zvonimir; Fraden, Seth; Ruehm, Adrian; Lurio, Lawrence; Mochrie, Simon G. J.

    2003-01-01

    The orientational distribution function of the nematic phase of suspensions of the semiflexible rodlike virus fd is measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of concentration and ionic strength. X-ray diffraction from a single-domain nematic phase of fd is influenced by interparticle correlations at low angle, while only intraparticle scatter contributes at high angle. Consequently, the angular distribution of the scattered intensity arises from only the single-particle orientational distribution function at high angle but it also includes spatial and orientational correlations at low angle. Experimental measurements of the orientational distribution function from both the interparticle (structure factor) and intraparticle (form factor) scattering were made to test whether the correlations present in interparticle scatter influence the measurement of the single-particle orientational distribution function. It was found that the two types of scatter yield consistent values for the nematic order parameter. It was also found that x-ray diffraction is insensitive to the orientational distribution function's precise form, and the measured angular intensity distribution is described equally well by both Onsager's trial function and a Gaussian. At high ionic strength, the order parameter S of the nematic phase coexisting with the isotropic phase approaches theoretical predictions for long semiflexible rods S=0.55, but deviations from theory increase with decreasing ionic strength. The concentration dependence of the nematic order parameter also better agrees with theoretical predictions at high ionic strength indicating that electrostatic interactions have a measurable effect on the nematic order parameter. The x-ray order parameters are shown to be proportional to the measured birefringence, and the saturation birefringence of fd is determined enabling a simple, inexpensive way to measure the order parameter. Additionally, the spatial ordering of nematic fd was probed

  4. Demonstrations of Wave Optics (Interference and Diffraction of Light) for Large Audiences Using a Laser and a Multimedia Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a new technique for performing most well-known demonstrations of wave optics. Demonstrations which are normally very hard to show to more than a few people can be presented easily to very large audiences with excellent visibility for everyone. The proposed setup is easy to put together and use and can be very useful for…

  5. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: Effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands); Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), P.O. Box 902, 5600 AX, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diaz, Jordi [Scientific and Technological Centers of the University of Barcelona, C/ Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lindsay, Ian D. [Nanophysics and Soft Matter Group, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Beer, Sissi de; Duvigneau, Joost [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands); Schön, Peter [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands); NanoBioInterface, Research Center Design and Technology, Saxion University of Applied Sciences, 7500 KB Enschede (Netherlands); Julius Vancso, G., E-mail: g.j.vancso@utwente.nl [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede NL-7500 (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal coated tip. Here, we demonstrate that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of ethanethiol (EtSH) is an effective means of protecting gold-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips from accumulation of surface contaminants during prolonged exposure to ambient air. The period over which they yield consistent and reproducible results for scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) imaging is thus extended. SNEM optical images of a microphase separated polystyrene-block-poly (methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer film, which were captured with bare and SAM-protected gold-coated AFM probes, both immediately after coating and following five days of storage in ambient air, were compared. During this period the intensity of the optical signals from the untreated gold tip fell by 66%, while those from the SAM protected tip fell by 14%. Additionally, gold coated AFM probe tips were modified with various lengths of alkanethiols to measure the change in intensity variation in the optical images with SAM layer thickness. The experimental results were compared to point dipole model calculations. While a SAM of 1-dodecanethiol (DoSH) was found to strongly suppress field enhancement we find that it can be locally removed from the tip apex by deforming the molecules under load, restoring SNEM image contrast. - Highlights: • SAM of ethanethiol is used to prevent contamination of gold coated tips. • Functionalizing gold coated tips with a SAM lead to reproducible SNEM imaging. • Point dipole model agreed with the experimental results of the SNEM images. • SAM of 1-dodecanethiol was found to strongly suppress field enhancement in SNEM. • SAM of 1-dodecanethiol

  6. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Diaz, Jordi; Lindsay, Ian D; de Beer, Sissi; Duvigneau, Joost; Schön, Peter; Julius Vancso, G

    2015-03-01

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal coated tip. Here, we demonstrate that a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of ethanethiol (EtSH) is an effective means of protecting gold-coated atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tips from accumulation of surface contaminants during prolonged exposure to ambient air. The period over which they yield consistent and reproducible results for scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) imaging is thus extended. SNEM optical images of a microphase separated polystyrene-block-poly (methylmethacrylate) (PS-b-PMMA) diblock copolymer film, which were captured with bare and SAM-protected gold-coated AFM probes, both immediately after coating and following five days of storage in ambient air, were compared. During this period the intensity of the optical signals from the untreated gold tip fell by 66%, while those from the SAM protected tip fell by 14%. Additionally, gold coated AFM probe tips were modified with various lengths of alkanethiols to measure the change in intensity variation in the optical images with SAM layer thickness. The experimental results were compared to point dipole model calculations. While a SAM of 1-dodecanethiol (DoSH) was found to strongly suppress field enhancement we find that it can be locally removed from the tip apex by deforming the molecules under load, restoring SNEM image contrast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High-pressure optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on synthetic cobalt aluminum silicate garnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    N. Taran, Michail; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ohashi, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The pressure-induced behavior of spin-allowed dd-bands of VIIICo2+ in the absorption spectra of synthetic Co3Al2Si3O12 garnet was studied from 10-4 to 13 GPa. The plots of the peak energy vs. pressure for the three sharpest well resolved bands at ca. 5160, 17 680, and 18 740 cm-1 display small...... but discernible breaks in linear relations between 4 and 5 GPa. Datafromsingle-crystalX-raydiffractionData from single-crystal X-ray diffraction likewise show discontinuities in trends of CoO8 polyhedral volume and distortion, and Co-O and Si-O bond distances over this pressure range. These effects are related...... to a pressure-induced phase transition from the ß- to a-isostructural polymorph of Co3Al2Si3O12....

  8. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  9. Molecular structure of hybrid imino-chalcone in the solid state: X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy study and third-order nonlinear optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodio, J. M. F.; Santos, F. G.; Vaz, W. F.; Cunha, C. E. P.; Silveira, R. G.; Anjos, M. M.; Campos, C. E. M.; Oliveira, G. R.; Martins, F. T.; da Silva, C. C.; Valverde, C.; Baseia, B.; Napolitano, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive structural study of the compound (2E)-1-((E)-4-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)phenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was carried out in this work. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), NMR, Raman and Infrared spectroscopies, and DFT calculations were performed for characterization of this iminochalcone hybrid. Intermolecular interactions were described by Hirshfeld surface analysis derived from crystal structure. Reactivity and intramolecular charge transfer were investigated using the frontier molecular orbitals and molecular electrostatic potential. In addition, we have calculated the Nonlinear Optical Properties at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311+g(d) level of theory in the presence of different solvents (gas-phase, acetone, chloroform, dichloromethane, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethanol, methanol, and water), being found meaningful NLO parameters for our compound. At last, there is a good agreement between calculated and experimental IR spectrum, allowing the assignment of some of normal vibrational modes of the iminochalcone hybrid.

  10. The at-wavelength metrology facility for UV- and XUV-reflection and diffraction optics at BESSY-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfers, F.; Bischoff, P.; Eggenstein, F.; Erko, A.; Gaupp, A.; Künstner, S.; Mast, M.; Schmidt, J.-S.; Senf, F.; Siewert, F.; Sokolov, A.; Zeschke, Th.

    2016-01-01

    A technology center for the production of high-precision reflection gratings has been established. Within this project a new optics beamline and a versatile reflectometer for at-wavelength characterization of UV- and XUV-reflection gratings and other (nano-) optical elements has been set up at BESSY-II. The Plane Grating Monochromator beamline operated in collimated light (c-PGM) is equipped with an SX700 monochromator, of which the blazed gratings (600 and 1200 lines mm−1) have been recently exchanged for new ones of improved performance produced in-house. Over the operating range from 10 to 2000 eV this beamline has very high spectral purity achieved by (i) a four-mirror arrangement of different coatings which can be inserted into the beam at different angles and (ii) by absorber filters for high-order suppression. Stray light and scattered radiation is removed efficiently by double sets of in situ exchangeable apertures and slits. By use of in- and off-plane bending-magnet radiation the beamline can be adjusted to either linear or elliptical polarization. One of the main features of a novel 11-axes reflectometer is the possibility to incorporate real life-sized gratings. The samples are adjustable within six degrees of freedom by a newly developed UHV-tripod system carrying a load up to 4 kg, and the reflectivity can be measured between 0 and 90° incidence angle for both s- and p-polarization geometry. This novel powerful metrology facility has gone into operation recently and is now open for external users. First results on optical performance and measurements on multilayer gratings will be presented here. PMID:26698047

  11. Diffraction dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  12. Diffraction attraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'

  13. Diffractive scattering

    CERN Document Server

    De Wolf, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken-x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed.

  14. Diffractive Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, E.A. de

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken - x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed. (author)

  15. Diffraction attraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'.

  16. The role of Tin Oxide Concentration on The X-ray Diffraction, Morphology and Optical Properties of In2O3:SnO2 Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Bushra A.; Abdallah, Rusul M.

    2018-05-01

    Alloys were performed from In2O3 doped SnO2 with different doping ratio by quenching from the melt technique. Pulsed Laser Deposition PLD was used to deposit thin films of different doping ratio In2O3 : SnO2 (0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 % wt.) on glass substrate at ambient temperature under vacuum of 10-3 bar thickness of ∼100nm. The structural type,grain size and morphology of the prepared alloys compounds and thin films were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that all alloys have polycrystalline structures and the peaks belonged to the preferred plane for crystal growth were identical with the ITO (Indium – Tin –Oxide) standard cards also another peaks were observed belonged to SnO2 phase. The structures of thin films was also polycrystalline, and the predominate peaks are identical with standard cards ITO. On the other side the prepared thin films declared decrease a reduction of degree of crystallinity with the increase of doping ratio. Atomic Force Microscopy AFM measurements showed the average grain size and average surface roughness exhibit to change in systematic manner with the increase of doping ratio with tin oxide. The optical measurements show that the In2O3:SnO2 thin films have a direct energy gap Eg opt in the first stage decreases with the increase of doping ratio and then get to increase with further increase of doping ration, whereas reverse to that the optical constants such as refractive index (n), extinction coefficient (k) and dielectric constant (εr, εi) have a regular increase with the doping ratio by tin oxide and then decreases.

  17. Contribution to diffraction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  18. Diffractive centrosymmetric 3D-transmission phase gratings positioned at the image plane of optical systems transform lightlike 4D-WORLD as tunable resonators into spectral metrics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1999-08-01

    Diffractive 3D phase gratings of spherical scatterers dense in hexagonal packing geometry represent adaptively tunable 4D-spatiotemporal filters with trichromatic resonance in visible spectrum. They are described in the (lambda) - chromatic and the reciprocal (nu) -aspects by reciprocal geometric translations of the lightlike Pythagoras theorem, and by the direction cosine for double cones. The most elementary resonance condition in the lightlike Pythagoras theorem is given by the transformation of the grating constants gx, gy, gz of the hexagonal 3D grating to (lambda) h1h2h3 equals (lambda) 111 with cos (alpha) equals 0.5. Through normalization of the chromaticity in the von Laue-interferences to (lambda) 111, the (nu) (lambda) equals (lambda) h1h2h3/(lambda) 111-factor of phase velocity becomes the crucial resonance factor, the 'regulating device' of the spatiotemporal interaction between 3D grating and light, space and time. In the reciprocal space equal/unequal weights and times in spectral metrics result at positions of interference maxima defined by hyperbolas and circles. A database becomes built up by optical interference for trichromatic image preprocessing, motion detection in vector space, multiple range data analysis, patchwide multiple correlations in the spatial frequency spectrum, etc.

  19. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Scoby

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV<10  pC electron bunch on the spatial profile of the laser pulse. The electric field lines inside the dielectric bend at an angle due to a relatively large (n∼3 index of refraction of the ZnTe crystal. We found theoretically and experimentally that the EOS signal can be maximized with a proper choice of incoming laser polarization angle. We achieved single-shot nondestructive measurement of the relative time of arrival between the pump and the probe beams thus improving the temporal resolution of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction experiments.

  20. Diffractive optical element-based glossmeter for the on-line measurement of normal reflectance on a printed porous coated paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksman, Antti; Kuivalainen, Kalle; Ta˚G, Carl-Mikael; Juuti, Mikko; Mattila, Rauno; Hietala, Eero; Gane, Patrick A. C.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2011-04-01

    Gloss of a product, such as print gloss, is mainly inspected with conventional white light glossmeters both at laboratory or production facilities. However, problems occur in conventional gloss measurement when the inspected surface is vertically moved in the plane of incidence and reflection or when the measurement area is small or curved. For a partial solution to these problems, we have previously introduced diffractive optical element-based glossmeters (DOGs) for the gloss inspection in laboratories and off-line use. We present a new construction of DOG, termed μDOG 1D, for the one-dimensional on-line print gloss measurement, in the form of the reflectance determination normal to the surface. The function of the glossmeter is demonstrated by laboratory tests and on-line measurements at a heat-set web offset printing machine. It is shown that gloss (i.e., normal reflectance) and minute gloss variation of papers and prints can be measured at the printing line using the glossmeter. This glossmeter is expected to be useful in real-time monitoring of the gloss and surface-specific absorption not only in the printing industry but also in inspection of products in other industrial sectors, such as metal finishing, laminating, paper, and construction materials manufacturing.

  1. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glijer, D.

    2006-12-01

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  2. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  3. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  4. Uniform asymptotic theory of edge diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, R.M.; Boersma, J.; Oughstun, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    Geometrical optics fails to account for the phenomenon of diffraction, i.e., the existence of nonzero fields in the geometrical shadow. Keller's geometrical theory of diffraction accounts for this phenomenon by providing correction terms to the geometrical optics field, in the form of a

  5. Uniform asymptotic theory of edge diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, R.M.; Boersma, J.

    1969-01-01

    Geometrical optics fails to account for the phenomenon of diffraction, i.e., the existence of nonzero fields in the geometrical shadow. Keller's geometrical theory of diffraction accounts for this phenomenon by providing correction terms to the geometrical optics field, in the form of a

  6. Visual outcome and optical quality after bilateral implantation of aspheric diffractive multifocal, aspheric monofocal and spherical monofocal intraocular lenses: a prospective comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the visual function after bilateral implantation of aspheric diffractive multifocal Tecnis ZMA00, aspheric monofocal ZA9003 versus spherical monofocal Akreos Adapt intraocular lenses (IOLs.METHODS: Tecnis ZMA00, Tecnis ZA9003 or Akreos Adapt IOLs were bilaterally implanted in 180 eyes from 90 patients. The following parameters were assessed 3 months postoperatively: monocular and binocular uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA and distance-corrected visual acuity (DCVA for distance, intermediate and near, spherical aberration (SA, contrast and glare sensitivity, near point refractive power, uncorrected and best-corrected near stereoscopic acuity (NSA. Patient satisfaction was assessed by a questionnaire.RESULTS: Three months postoperatively, the monocular and binocular UCVA and DCVA at near of Tecnis ZMA00 were significantly better than other two groups. The mean SA for 5.0mm optical zone in Tecnis ZMA00 and Tecnis ZA9003 was significantly lower than that in Akreos Adapt. Mean contrast sensitivity and glare sensitivity were better for Tecnis ZA9003 group than for other two groups. Patients with Tecnis ZMA00 had higher monocular and binocular near point refractive power and uncorrected NSA than monofocal groups. The patients in Tecnis ZMA00 had higher mean values for halo compared with other two groups.CONCLUSION: Tecnis ZMA00 provided better near VA and uncorrected NSA and higher near point refractive power than monofocal IOLs and patients were spectacle independent. The IOLs with Tecnis aspheric design improved contrast and glare sensitivity. Patients with Tecnis ZMA00 reported more disturbances on visual phenomena of halo.

  7. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  8. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  9. Undergraduate experiment with fractal diffraction gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsoriu, Juan A; Furlan, Walter D; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C; Gimenez, Marcos H

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics laboratories and compared with those obtained with conventional periodic gratings. It is shown that fractal gratings produce self-similar diffraction patterns which can be evaluated analytically. Good agreement is obtained between experimental and numerical results.

  10. Diffraction and signal processing experiments with a liquid crystal microdisplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, Jose Luis; Moreno, Ignacio; Ahouzi, Esmail

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we show some diffraction experiments performed with a liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows how useful this device can be to teach and experience diffraction optics and signal processing experiments. The LCD acts as a programmable pixelated diffractive mask. The Fourier spectrum of the image displayed in the LCD is visualized through a simple free propagation diffraction experiment. This optical system allows easy testing of different diffractive elements. As a demonstration we include experimental results with well-known diffractive elements like diffraction gratings or Fresnel lenses, and with more complicated elements like computer-generated holograms

  11. Diffraction and signal processing experiments with a liquid crystal microdisplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, Jose Luis [Departamento de Ciencia y TecnologIa de Materiales, Universidad Miguel Hernandez de Elche, Alicante (Spain); Moreno, Ignacio [Departamento de Ciencia y TecnologIa de Materiales, Universidad Miguel Hernandez de Elche, Alicante (Spain); Ahouzi, Esmail [Institut National des Postes et Telecomunications (INTP), Madinat Al Irfane, Rabat (Morocco)

    2006-09-01

    In this work, we show some diffraction experiments performed with a liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows how useful this device can be to teach and experience diffraction optics and signal processing experiments. The LCD acts as a programmable pixelated diffractive mask. The Fourier spectrum of the image displayed in the LCD is visualized through a simple free propagation diffraction experiment. This optical system allows easy testing of different diffractive elements. As a demonstration we include experimental results with well-known diffractive elements like diffraction gratings or Fresnel lenses, and with more complicated elements like computer-generated holograms.

  12. X-ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal : Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristanovic, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single-particle level. For the first time, one X-ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm-resolved X-ray diffraction

  13. Diffractive variable beam splitter: optimal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, R; Cincotti, G; Santarsiero, M

    2000-01-01

    The analytical expression of the phase profile of the optimum diffractive beam splitter with an arbitrary power ratio between the two output beams is derived. The phase function is obtained by an analytical optimization procedure such that the diffraction efficiency of the resulting optical element is the highest for an actual device. Comparisons are presented with the efficiency of a diffractive beam splitter specified by a sawtooth phase function and with the pertinent theoretical upper bound for this type of element.

  14. Physical optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Il Gon; Lee, Seong Su; Jang, Gi Wan

    2012-07-01

    This book indicates physical optics with properties and transmission of light, mathematical expression of wave like harmonic wave and cylindrical wave, electromagnetic theory and light, transmission of light with Fermat principle and Fresnel equation, geometrical optics I, geometrical optics II, optical instrument such as stops, glasses and camera, polarized light like double refraction by polarized light, interference, interference by multiple reflections, diffraction, solid optics, crystal optics such as Faraday rotation and Kerr effect and measurement of light. Each chapter has an exercise.

  15. Physical optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim Il Gon; Lee, Seong Su; Jang, Gi Wan

    2012-07-15

    This book indicates physical optics with properties and transmission of light, mathematical expression of wave like harmonic wave and cylindrical wave, electromagnetic theory and light, transmission of light with Fermat principle and Fresnel equation, geometrical optics I, geometrical optics II, optical instrument such as stops, glasses and camera, polarized light like double refraction by polarized light, interference, interference by multiple reflections, diffraction, solid optics, crystal optics such as Faraday rotation and Kerr effect and measurement of light. Each chapter has an exercise.

  16. A comparative study with a 755 nm picosecond Alexandrite laser with a diffractive lens array and a 532 nm/1064 nm Nd:YAG with a holographic optic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanghetti Md, Emil; Jennings, John

    2018-01-01

    This study was performed to better understand the cutaneous effects of using a fractional picosecond laser at 755 nm with a diffractive lens array and a picosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 mn and 1064 nm with a holographic optic. We characterized the injuries created by these devices on skin clinically and histologically over 24 hours. With this information we modeled the effects of these devices on a cutaneous target. Eight patients, representing Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI, were treated on their backs with a picosecond Alexandrite laser with a diffractive lens array, as well as a picosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and 1064 nm with a holographic optic. Photographs were taken 15 minutes and 24 hours after treatments. Punch biopsies were obtained at 24 hours and examined histologically. Treatment with the picosecond Nd:YAG laser at both 532 nm and 1064 nm with the holographic optic revealed erythema and small scatted areas of petechial hemorrhage areas immediately and in many cases at 24 hours after treatment. The 755 nm picosecond Alexandrite laser with diffractive lens array produced erythema immediately after treatment, which largely dissipated 24 hours later. Histologies revealed intra-epidermal vacuoles with all three wavelengths. Fractional picosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm and 1064 nm with the holographic optic showed focal areas of dermal and intra-epidermal hemorrhage with areas of vascular damage in some patients. This study demonstrates that both fractional picosecond devices produce vacuoles in the skin, which are most likely due to areas of laser induced optical breakdown (LIOB). In the patients (skin type II-IV) we observed scatter areas of hemorrhage in the skin, due to vascular damage with the 532 nm and 1064 nm, but not with 755 nm wavelengths. Lasers Surg. Med. 50:37-44, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Tunable Beam Diffraction in Infiltrated Microstructured Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H.; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites.......We experimentally study beam propagation in two dimensional photonic lattices in microstructured optical fibers infiltrated with high index liquids. We demonstrate strongly tunable beam diffraction by dynamically varying the coupling between individual lattice sites....

  18. Superlattice structure of Ce{sup 3+}-doped BaMgF{sub 4} fluoride crystals - x-ray diffraction, electron spin-resonance, and optical investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, M.; Hattori, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Kodama, N. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, Akita (Japan); Ishizawa, N. [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Honda, M. [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Fukuda, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2001-09-14

    The x-ray diffraction patterns for Ce{sup 3+}-doped BaMgF{sub 4} (BMF) crystals suggest the existence of superlattice structure. The superlattice model is consistent with the characterization of the 4f{sup 1} ground state of Ce{sup 3+} as a probe ion using the electron spin-resonance (ESR) technique. The distinct Ce{sup 3+} luminescence spectra with different peak energies and lifetimes also support the superlattice model. Although the detailed superlattice structure could not be analysed using the diffraction spots, a model has been proposed, taking into account the eight Ce{sup 3+} polyhedra with different anion coordinations in the unit cell of the BMF crystal obtained from the ESR experiments. (author)

  19. Dynamical theory of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    We present a review of the dynamical theory of neutron diffraction by macroscopic bodies which provides the theoretical basis for the study of neutron optics. We consider both the theory of dispersion, in which it is shown that the coherent wave in the medium satisfies a macroscopic one-body Schroedinger equation, and the theory of reflection, refraction, and diffraction in which the above equation is solved for a number of special cases of interest. The theory is illustrated with the help of experimental results obtained over the past 10 years by a number of new techniques such as neutron gravity refractometry. Pendelloesung interference, and neutron interferometry. (author)

  20. Diffraction from the perspective of the spatial coherence wavelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, R.; Carrasquilla-Alvarez, J.; Garcia-Sucerquia, J.

    2005-10-01

    The diffraction of spatially partially coherent optical fields is analysed by using two concepts recently introduced by the authors: the spatial coherence wavelets and the effective diffracting aperture. Within this framework, the intimate link between the spatial properties of the optical field and the aperture's edges in the diffraction phenomena is studied. New insight is proposed in regard to the diffraction in the Fresnel - Fraunhofer approximation. Our ideas are supported by numerical calculations and analysis of the diffraction patterns obtained when an optical field with adjustable spatial coherence impinges upon a circular aperture (author)

  1. Diffraction efficiency calculations of polarization diffraction gratings with surface relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, D.; Sharlandjiev, P.; Berberova, N.; Blagoeva, B.; Stoykova, E.; Nedelchev, L.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the optical response of a stack of two diffraction gratings of equal one-dimensional periodicity. The first one is a surface-relief grating structure; the second, a volume polarization grating. This model is based on our experimental results from polarization holographic recordings in azopolymer films. We used films of commercially available azopolymer (poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylazo) benzenesulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt]), shortly denoted as PAZO. During the recording process, a polarization grating in the volume of the material and a relief grating on the film surface are formed simultaneously. In order to evaluate numerically the optical response of this “hybrid” diffraction structure, we used the rigorous coupled-wave approach (RCWA). It yields stable numerical solutions of Maxwell’s vector equations using the algebraic eigenvalue method.

  2. Approximate analytical method to evaluate diffraction crosstalk in free-space optical interconnects systems that use circular microlenses with finite uniform apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ababneh, Nedal

    2014-07-01

    We propose an accurate analytical model to calculate the optical crosstalk of a first-order free space optical interconnects system that uses microlenses with circular apertures. The proposed model is derived by evaluating the resulted finite integral in terms of an infinite series of Bessel functions. Compared to the model that uses complex Gaussian functions to expand the aperture function, it is shown that the proposed model is superior in estimating the crosstalk and provides more accurate results. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed model gives results close to that of the numerical model with superior computational efficiency.

  3. High-energy particle diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barone, V.; Predazzi, E.

    2002-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of soft and hard diffraction processes in strong interaction physics. The first part covers the general formalism (the optical analogy, the eikonal picture, high-energy kinematics, S-matrix theory) and soft hadron-hadron scattering (including the Regge theory) in a complete and mature presentation. It can be used as a textbook in particle physics classes. The remainder of the book is devoted to the 'new diffraction': the pomeron in QCD, low-x physics, diffractive deep inelastic scattering and related processes, jet production etc. It presents recent results and experimental findings and their phenomenological interpretations. This part addresses graduate students as well as researchers. (orig.)

  4. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  5. Diffraction of polarized light on periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukanina, V; Divakov, D; Tyutyunnik, A; Hohlov, A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures as photonic crystals are widely used in modern laser devices, communication technologies and for creating various beam splitters and filters. Diffraction gratings are applied for creating 3D television sets, DVD and Blu-ray drives and reflective structures (Berkley mirror). It is important to simulate diffraction on such structures to design optical systems with predetermined properties based on photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Methods of simulating diffraction on periodic structures uses theory of Floquet-Bloch and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Current work is dedicated to analysis of photonic band gaps and simulating diffraction on one-dimensional binary diffraction grating using RCWA. The Maxwell's equations for isotropic media and constitutive relations based on the cgs system were used as a model.

  6. Electro-optic sampling at 90 degree interaction geometry for time-of-arrival stamping of ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. Scoby; P. Musumeci; J. T. Moody; M. S. Gutierrez

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a new geometry setup for electro-optic sampling (EOS) where the electron beam runs parallel to the ⟨110⟩ face of a ZnTe crystal and the probe laser is perpendicular to it and to the beam path. The simple setup is used to encode the time-of-arrival information of a 3.5  MeV

  7. Characterization of the structural and optical properties of CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} QJ;thin films by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ya-Fen, E-mail: yfwu@mail.mcut.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, New Taipei City 243, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hung-Pin [Department of Electronic Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, New Taipei City 243, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hung-Ing [Department of Electronic Engineering, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    The structural and optical properties of Cu-poor CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films with different gallium contents grown using the co-evaporated technique were studied. Measurements of X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL), and photoreflectance (PR) were performed on the samples. The emission peaks in the PL spectra and PR spectra observed around 1.0–1.2 eV are attributed to donor–acceptor pairs and defect-related luminescence. With increasing gallium content, the linewidths of the luminescence spectra for the samples become wider, which we attribute to greater statistical disordering between indium and gallium. The structural properties of the CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films are further characterized by simulation of the XRD spectra with a theoretical model. It is found that the sample with higher gallium content exhibits less uniformity of microstructure size. The X-ray diffraction line profile analysis also shows a stronger internal strain in the sample with the higher gallium content, which is consistent with its broader microstructure size distribution. The conversion efficiency of the CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}-based solar cells is also obtained and investigated through theoretical analysis. The experimental results coincide with the inferences given by the X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. -- Highlights: • Co-evaporated CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin films with different gallium contents were studied. • XRD line profiles from the samples are analyzed by a theoretical model. • Less size uniformity and higher internal strain are obtained for high gallium sample. • The efficiency of CIGS solar cells is investigated through theoretical analysis. • The inferences from XRD spectra analysis coincide with experimental measurements.

  8. Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hao; Madaan, Nitesh; Bagley, Jacob; Diwan, Anubhav [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Liu, Yiqun [Department of Chemistry, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Davis, Robert C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Lunt, Barry M. [Department of Information Technology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Smith, Stacey J., E-mail: ssmith@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Linford, Matthew R., E-mail: mrlinford@chem.byu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-31

    Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The

  9. Axial and focal-plane diffraction catastrophe integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, M V; Howls, C J

    2010-01-01

    Exact expressions in terms of Bessel functions are found for some of the diffraction catastrophe integrals that decorate caustics in optics and mechanics. These are the axial and focal-plane sections of the elliptic and hyperbolic umbilic diffraction catastrophes, and symmetric elliptic and hyperbolic unfoldings of the X 9 diffraction catastrophes. These representations reveal unexpected relations between the integrals.

  10. Spider diffraction: a comparison of curved and straight legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    It has been known for some time that, if curved legs rather than the usual straight ones are used in the spider that supports the secondary optics in certain telescopes, the visible diffraction effect is reduced. Fraunhofer theory is used to calculate the diffraction effects due to the curved leg spider. Calculated and photographic diffraction patterns are compared for straight and curved leg spiders

  11. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected

  12. Phase behavior in diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  13. The dynamics of diffracted rays in foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufaile, A., E-mail: tufaile@usp.br; Tufaile, A.P.B.

    2015-12-18

    We have studied some aspects of the optics of the light scattering in foams. This paper describes the difference between rays and diffracted rays from the point of view of geometrical theory of diffraction. We have represented some bifurcations of light rays using dynamical systems. Based on our observations of foams, we created a solid optical device. The interference patterns of light scattering in foams forming Airy fringes were explored observing the pattern named as the eye of Horus. In the cases we examine, these Airy fringes are associated with light scattering in curved surfaces, while the halo formation is related to the law of edge diffraction. We are proposing a Pohl interferometer using a three-sided bubble/Plateau border system. - Highlights: • We obtained halos scattering light in foams. • We model the light scattering in foams using the geometrical theory of diffraction. • We examine the difference between rays and the diffracted rays. • We developed optical devices for diffracted rays.

  14. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  15. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibilities currently offered and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades has been mainly the emergence of third generation pulsed sources with a MW time-averaged power and advances in neutron-optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method by F.L.Shapiro whose 100th birth anniversary was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on output beams is reviewed in a special section. [ru

  16. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  17. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Giani, S; Niewiadomski, H; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage...

  18. Diffraction at TOTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral...

  19. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction; Effets photo-induits cooperatifs: du photomagnetisme sous irradiation continue aux phenomenes ultrarapides - etude par spectroscopie optique et diffraction X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glijer, D

    2006-12-15

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  20. Zeno dynamics in wave-packet diffraction spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras, Miguel A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, ES-28003 Madrid (Spain); Luis, Alfredo; Gonzalo, Isabel [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, ES-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Angel S. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental-CSIC, Serrano 123, ES-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    We analyze a simple and feasible practical scheme displaying Zeno, anti-Zeno, and inverse-Zeno effects in the observation of wave-packet spreading caused by free evolution. The scheme is valid both in spatial diffraction of classical optical waves and in time diffraction of a quantum wave packet. In the optical realization, diffraction spreading is observed by placing slits between a light source and a light-power detector. We show that the occurrence of Zeno or anti-Zeno effects depends just on the frequency of observations between the source and detector. These effects are seen to be related to the diffraction mode theory in Fabry-Perot resonators.

  1. Observables of QCD diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  2. Engineering Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  3. Fluidic optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, George M.; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2006-09-01

    Fluidic optics is a new class of optical system with real-time tunability and reconfigurability enabled by the introduction of fluidic components into the optical path. We describe the design, fabrication, operation of a number of fluidic optical systems, and focus on three devices, liquid-core/liquid-cladding (L2) waveguides, microfluidic dye lasers, and diffraction gratings based on flowing, crystalline lattices of bubbles, to demonstrate the integration of microfluidics and optics. We fabricate these devices in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with soft-lithographic techniques. They are simple to construct, and readily integrable with microanalytical or lab-on-a-chip systems.

  4. Borehole radar diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Yi, Myeong Jong; Chung, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hee Il [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Tomography is widely used as imaging method for determining subsurface structure. Among the reconstruction algorithms for tomographic imaging, travel time tomography is almost applied to imaging subsurface. But isolated small body comparable with the wavelength could not be well recognized by travel time tomography. Other tomographic method are need to improve the imaging process. In the study of this year, diffraction tomography was investigated. The theory for diffraction tomography is based on the 1st-order Born approximation. Multisource holography, which is similar to Kirchihoff migration, is compared with diffraction tomography. To improve 1st-order Born diffraction tomography, two kinds of filter designed from multisource holography and 2-D green function, respectively, applied on the reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested for the numerical modeling data of which algorithm consists of the analytic computation of radar signal in transmitter and receiver regions and 2-D FDM scheme for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media. The air-filled cavity model to show a typical diffraction pattern was applied to diffraction tomography imaging, and the result shows accurate location and area of cavity. But the calculated object function is not well matched the real object function, because the air-filled cavity model is not satisfied week scattered inhomogeneity for 1st born approximation, and the error term is included in estimating source wavelet from received signals. In spite of the object function error, the diffraction tomography assist for interpretation of subsurface as if conducted with travel time tomography. And the fracture model was tested, 1st born diffraction tomographic image is poor because of limited view angle coverage and violation of week scatter assumption, but the filtered image resolve the fracture somewhat better. The tested diffraction tomography image confirms effectiveness of filter for enhancing resolution. (author). 14

  5. Gaussian mode selection with intracavity diffractive optics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available discrimination good, but this is at the expense of high intrinsic loss for the oscillating modes, making such cavities suitable only for lasers with high gain. A major advance to overcome such problems was the introduction of so–called graded–phase mirrors [1... half the peak intensity when the order N >> 1. This is important when considering practical issues such as thermally induced stress OSA Published by 6 fracture, and thermal aberrations, in solid state gain materials. However, the disadvantage...

  6. Diffraction. Powder, amorphous, liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnowska, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a unique tool to observe all possible diffraction effects appearing in crystal. High-resolution neutron diffractometers have to be used in this study. Analysis of the magnetic structure of polycrystalline materials requires the use of high-resolution neutron diffraction in the range of large interplanar distances. As distinguished from the double axis diffractometers (DAS), which show high resolution only at small interplanar distances, TOF (time-of-flight) diffractometry offers the best resolution at large interplanar distances. (K.A.)

  7. Non-diffractive waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  8. High energy diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.

    1995-11-01

    Recent experiments on total hadronic cross sections are reviewed together with results on photo- and electroproduction of vector mesons. New data on diffractive deep inelastic scattering shed light on the nature of the pomeron. (orig.)

  9. Diffraction at TOTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Magazzu, G.; Meucci, M.; Minutoli, S.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Notarnicola, G.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Petajajarvi, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Rella, G.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Rummel, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sanguinetti, G.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Ster, A.; Taylor, C.; Trummal, A.; Turini, N.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximize its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs. In addition, a novel scheme to extend the diffractive proton acceptance for high luminosity runs by installing proton detectors at IP3 is described.

  10. Diffraction at TOTEM

    CERN Document Server

    Giani, S; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Cecchi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dadel, P; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; García, F; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hildén, T; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, R; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macrí, M; Magazzù, G; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Notarnicola, G; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Rella, G; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Rostkowski, M; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Ster, A; Taylor, C; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Whitmore, J; Wu, J; Zalewski, M

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximise its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM diffractive physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs.

  11. Duality in diffraction dissociations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto.

    1977-01-01

    Diffractive dissociations (aN→a*πN) are naturally explained and a model that accounts for the three-variable correlation (mass-transfer-Jackson angle correlation) is presented. This model takes into account the three possible exchanges: t (pion), u(a*) and s(a) channel exchanger. The physical consequences of the model are: a strong mass-slope correlation due to the zeros of the amplitude, a factorization of diffractive dissociations (factorization of the Pomeron), the possibility of extending this model to double diffractive dissociation and diffraction by nuclei. This model was applied to the NN→NπN reaction. Using the usual parameters of the Deck model, a comparison is made with experiments for all available distributions. the strong slope of the peak at 1400 MeV is naturally explained [fr

  12. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  13. Design and fabrication of advanced EUV diffractive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Salmassi, Farhad; Anderson, Erik H.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2003-11-16

    As extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography approaches commercial reality, the development of EUV-compatible diffractive structures becomes increasingly important. Such devices are relevant to many aspects of EUV technology including interferometry, illumination, and spectral filtering. Moreover, the current scarcity of high power EUV sources makes the optical efficiency of these diffractive structures a paramount concern. This fact has led to a strong interest in phase-enhanced diffractive structures. Here we describe recent advancements made in the fabrication of such devices.

  14. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  15. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, T.M.; de Boer, D.K.G.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the

  16. Gravitational wave detector on the basis of light diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segizboev, T.I.; Uzhinskij, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method for detection of gravitational waves by means of light diffraction at the first maximum on oscillations in optically transparent matter under effect of gravitational waves is considered. Intensity of light flux scattering on oscillations of elastic rod is calculated. A possibility of using the diffraction method for detection of gravitational waves is disclosed

  17. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  18. Explanation and observability of diffraction in time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Munoz, J.; Ban, Yue

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction in time (DIT) is a fundamental phenomenon in quantum dynamics due to time-dependent obstacles and slits. It is formally analogous to diffraction of light, and is expected to play an increasing role in the design of coherent matter wave sources, as in the atom laser, to analyze time-of-flight information and emission from ultrafast pulsed excitations, and in applications of coherent matter waves in integrated atom-optical circuits. We demonstrate that DIT emerges robustly in quantum waves emitted by an exponentially decaying source and provide a simple explanation of the phenomenon, as an interference of two characteristic velocities. This allows for its controllability and optimization.

  19. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro arc seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed atmospheric absorption

  20. Encapsulation process for diffraction gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzsch, Stephan; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Szeghalmi, Adriana

    2015-07-13

    Encapsulation of grating structures facilitates an improvement of the optical functionality and/or adds mechanical stability to the fragile structure. Here, we introduce novel encapsulation process of nanoscale patterns based on atomic layer deposition and micro structuring. The overall size of the encapsulated structured surface area is only restricted by the size of the available microstructuring and coating devices; thus, overcoming inherent limitations of existing bonding processes concerning cleanliness, roughness, and curvature of the components. Finally, the process is demonstrated for a transmission grating. The encapsulated grating has 97.5% transmission efficiency in the -1st diffraction order for TM-polarized light, and is being limited by the experimental grating parameters as confirmed by rigorous coupled wave analysis.

  1. Dynamical diffraction in periodic multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Sears, V F

    1997-01-01

    Exact reflectivity curves are calculated numerically for various periodic multilayers using the optical matrix method in order to test the dynamical theory of diffraction. The theory is generally valid for values of the bilayer thickness d up to about 100 A. For somewhat larger values of d, where the theory begins to break down, the initial discrepancy is in the phase of the oscillations in the wings of the peaks. For very large values of d, where the first-order Bragg peak approaches the edge of the mirror reflection, two general types of multilayers can be distinguished. In the first (typified in the present work by Ni/Ti), there is a large (30% or more) reduction in the actual value of the critical wave vector for total reflection while, in the second (typified here by Fe/Ge), there is very little reduction (3 % or so). The origin of these two very different types of behavior is explained. It is also shown that, within the dynamical theory of diffraction, the change in the position of the center of the Dar...

  2. Diffraction. Single crystal, magnetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heger, G.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of crystal structure and magnetic ordering is usually based on diffraction phenomena caused by the interaction of matter with X-rays, neutrons, or electrons. Complementary information is achieved due to the different character of X-rays, neutrons and electrons, and hence their different interactions with matter and further practical aspects. X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (K.A.)

  3. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  4. Dynamics from diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Cope, Elizabeth R.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that detailed dynamical information might be extracted from powder diffraction data. Our focus is a recently reported technique that employs statistical analysis of atomistic configurations to calculate dynamical properties from neutron total scattering data. We show that it is possible to access the phonon dispersion of low-frequency modes using such an approach, without constraining the results in terms of some pre-defined dynamical model. The high-frequency regions of the phonon spectrum are found to be less well preserved in the diffraction data

  5. Adaptable Diffraction Gratings With Wavefront Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.; Greiner, Christoph M.

    2010-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are optical components with regular patterns of grooves, which angularly disperse incoming light by wavelength. Traditional diffraction gratings have static planar, concave, or convex surfaces. However, if they could be made so that they can change the surface curvature at will, then they would be able to focus on particular segments, self-calibrate, or perform fine adjustments. This innovation creates a diffraction grating on a deformable surface. This surface could be bent at will, resulting in a dynamic wavefront transformation. This allows for self-calibration, compensation for aberrations, enhancing image resolution in a particular area, or performing multiple scans using different wavelengths. A dynamic grating gives scientists a new ability to explore wavefronts from a variety of viewpoints.

  6. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, J; Duque, D; Alean, A; Toledo, M; Meneses, J; Gharbi, T

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  7. Comparative study on optical performance and visual outcomes between two diffractive multifocal lenses: AMO Tecnis ® ZMB00 and AcrySof ® IQ ReSTOR ® Multifocal IOL SN6AD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Augusto Pereira Dias Chaves

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare the optical performance and visual outcomes between two diffractive multifocal lenses: AMO Tecnis® ZMB00 and AcrySof® ReSTOR® SN6AD1. Methods: This prospective, non-randomized comparative study included the assessment of 74 eyes in 37 patients referred for cataract surgery and candidates for multifocal intraocular lens implants. Exclusion criteria included existence of any other eye disease, previous eye surgery, high axial myopia, preoperative corneal astigmatism of >1.00 cylindrical diopter (D, and intraoperative or postoperative complications. Ophthalmological evaluation included the measurement of uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, distance-corrected near visual acuity (DCNVA, and distance-corrected intermediate visual acuity (DCIVA, with analysis of contrast sensitivity (CS, wavefront, and visual defocus curve. Results: Postoperative UDVA was 0.09 and 0.08 logMAR in the SN6AD1 and ZMB00 groups, respectively (p=0.868; postoperative CDVA was 0.04 and 0.02 logMAR in the SN6AD1 and ZMB00 groups, respectively (p=0.68; DCIVA was 0.17 and 0.54 logMAR in the SN6AD1 and ZMB00 groups, respectively (p=0.000; and DCNVA was 0.04 and 0.09 logMAR in the SN6AD1 and ZMB00 groups, respectively (p=0.001. In both cases, there was an improvement in the spherical equivalent and UDVA (p<0.05. Under photopic conditions, the SN6AD1 group had better CS at low frequencies without glare (p=0.04; however, the ZMB00 group achieved better sensitivity at high frequencies with glare (p=0.003. The SN6AD1 and ZMB00 lenses exhibited similar behavior for intermediate vision, according to the defocus curve; however, the ZMB00 group showed a shorter reading distance than the SN6AD1 group. There were no significant differences regarding aberrometry between the two groups. Conclusion: Both lenses promoted better quality of vision for both long and short distances and exhibited a similar behavior for

  8. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  9. Diffraction through partial identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  10. Interference and Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Marc H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics, held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. The measurement of very small distances and sizes, and the concept of models are discussed in the introduction. The optics of slits is dealt with in chapter 2. Chapter 3 presents the optics of holes.…

  11. Modern optical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This book deals with modern optical science, which gives description of properties of light and transmission, ray tracing like Gaussian image, ray tracing and optical system, properties about light wave, a vector properties of light, interference and an interferometer, transform and application of interferometer, diffraction, application on diffraction, solid optical science, measurement of light and laser such as basic principle of laser, kinds of laser, pulse laser, resonator and single mode and multimode.

  12. Identifying diffraction effects in measured reflectances

    OpenAIRE

    Holzschuch , Nicolas; Pacanowski , Romain

    2015-01-01

    International audience; There are two different physical models connecting the micro-geometry of a surface and its physical reflectance properties (BRDF). The first, Cook-Torrance, assumes geometrical optics: light is reflected and masked by the micro-facets. In this model, the BRDF depends on the probability distribution of micro-facets normals. The second, Church-Takacs, assumes diffraction by the micro-geometry. In this model, the BRDF depends on the power spectral distribution of the surf...

  13. Experimental method for testing diffraction properties of reflection waveguide holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Kang, Ming-Wu; Wang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Waveguide holograms' diffraction properties include peak wavelength and diffraction efficiency, which play an important role in determining their display performance. Based on the record and reconstruction theory of reflection waveguide holograms, a novel experimental method for testing diffraction properties is introduced and analyzed in this paper, which uses a plano-convex lens optically contacted to the surface of the substrate plate of the waveguide hologram, so that the diffracted light beam can be easily detected. Then an experiment is implemented. The designed reconstruction wavelength of the test sample is 530 nm, and its diffraction efficiency is 100%. The experimental results are a peak wavelength of 527.7 nm and a diffraction efficiency of 94.1%. It is shown that the tested value corresponds well with the designed value.

  14. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  15. Evolution of diffraction and self-diffraction phenomena in thin films of Gelite Bloom/Hibiscus Sabdariffa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Lara, Miroslava; Severiano-Carrillo, Israel; Trejo-Durán, Mónica; Alvarado-Méndez, Edgar

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we present a study of non-linear optical response in thin films elaborated with Gelite Bloom and extract of Hibiscus Sabdariffa. Non-linear refraction and absorption effects were studied experimentally (Z-scan technique) and numerically, by considering the transmittance as non-linear absorption and refraction contribution. We observe large phase shifts to far field, and diffraction due to self-phase modulation of the sample. Diffraction and self-diffraction effects were observed as time function. The aim of studying non-linear optical properties in thin films is to eliminate thermal vortex effects that occur in liquids. This is desirable in applications such as non-linear phase contrast, optical limiting, optics switches, etc. Finally, we find good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  16. Optical holography

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, Robert J; Lin, Lawrence H

    1971-01-01

    Optical Holography deals with the use of optical holography to solve technical problems, with emphasis on the properties of holograms formed with visible light. Topics covered include the Fourier transform, propagation and diffraction, pulsed-laser holography, and optical systems with spherical lenses. A geometric analysis of point-source holograms is also presented, and holograms and hologram spatial filters formed with spatially modulated reference waves are described. This book is comprised of 20 chapters and begins with an introduction to concepts that are basic to understanding hologr

  17. Diffraction by disordered polycrystalline fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, W.J.; Millane, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from some polycrystalline fibers show that the constituent microcrystallites are disordered. The relationship between the crystal structure and the diffracted intensities is then quite complicated and depends on the precise kind and degree of disorder present. The effects of disorder on diffracted intensities must be included in structure determinations using diffraction data from such specimens. Theory and algorithms are developed here that allow the full diffraction pattern to be calculated for a disordered polycrystalline fiber made up of helical molecules. The model accommodates various kinds of disorder and includes the effects of finite crystallite size and cylindrical averaging of the diffracted intensities from a fiber. Simulations using these methods show how different kinds, or components, of disorder produce particular diffraction effects. General properties of disordered arrays of helical molecules and their effects on diffraction patterns are described. Implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  18. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  19. Developments in diffraction databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of databases available to the diffraction community. Two of the more important of these are the Powder Diffraction File (PDF) maintained by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) maintained by Fachsinformationzentrum (FIZ, Karlsruhe). In application, the PDF has been used as an indispensable tool in phase identification and identification of unknowns. The ICSD database has extensive and explicit reference to the structures of compounds: atomic coordinates, space group and even thermal vibration parameters. A similar database, but for organic compounds, is maintained by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. These databases are often used as independent sources of information. However, little thought has been given on how to exploit the combined properties of structural database tools. A recently completed agreement between ICDD and FIZ, plus ICDD and Cambridge, provides a first step in complementary use of the PDF and the ICSD databases. The focus of this paper (as indicated below) is to examine ways of exploiting the combined properties of both databases. In 1996, there were approximately 76,000 entries in the PDF and approximately 43,000 entries in the ICSD database. The ICSD database has now been used to calculate entries in the PDF. Thus, to derive d-spacing and peak intensity data requires the synthesis of full diffraction patterns, i.e., we use the structural data in the ICSD database and then add instrumental resolution information. The combined data from PDF and ICSD can be effectively used in many ways. For example, we can calculate PDF data for an ideally random crystal distribution and also in the absence of preferred orientation. Again, we can use systematic studies of intermediate members in solid solutions series to help produce reliable quantitative phase analyses. In some cases, we can study how solid solution properties vary with composition and

  20. Diffractive DIS: Where are we?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, N.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of the modern QCD theory of diffractive DIS is given. The recent progress has been remarkably rapid, all the principal predictions from the color dipole approach to diffraction - the (Q 2 + m V 2 ) scaling, the pattern of SCHNC, shrinkage of the diffraction cone in hard diffractive DIS, the strong impact of longitudinal gluons in inclusive J/Ψ production at Tevatron - have been confirmed experimentally

  1. Opto-mechanical design and development of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bo; Wang, Lihua; Cui, Zhangang; Bian, Jiang; Xiang, Sihua; Ma, Haotong; Fan, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Using lightweight, replicated diffractive optics, we can construct extremely large aperture telescopes in space.The transmissive primary significantly reduces the sensitivities to out of plane motion as compared to reflective systems while reducing the manufacturing time and costs. This paper focuses on the design, fabrication and ground demonstration of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope the primary F/# is 6, optical field of view is 0.2° imagine bandwidth is 486nm 656nm.The design method of diffractive optical system was verified, the ability to capture a high-quality image using diffractive telescope collection optics was tested.The results show that the limit resolution is 94lp/mm, the diffractive system has a good imagine performance with broad bandwidths. This technology is particularly promising as a means to achieve extremely large optical primaries from compact, lightweight packages.

  2. Astrophysical targets of the Fresnel diffractive imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koechlin, L.; Deba, P.; Raksasataya, T.

    2017-11-01

    The Fresnel Diffractive imager is an innovative concept of distributed space telescope, for high resolution (milli arc-seconds) spectro-imaging in the IR, visible and UV domains. This paper presents its optical principle and the science that can be done on potential astrophysical targets. The novelty lies in the primary optics: a binary Fresnel array, akin to a binary Fresnel zone plate. The main interest of this approach is the relaxed manufacturing and positioning constraints. While having the resolution and imaging capabilities of lens or mirrors of equivalent size, no optical material is involved in the focusing process: just vacuum. A Fresnel array consists of millions void subapertures punched into a large and thin opaque membrane, that focus light by diffraction into a compact and highly contrasted image. The positioning law of the aperture edges drives the image quality and contrast. This optical concept allows larger and lighter apertures than solid state optics, aiming to high angular resolution and high dynamic range imaging, in particular for UV applications. Diffraction focusing implies very long focal distances, up to dozens of kilometers, which requires at least a two-vessel formation flying in space. The first spacecraft, "the Fresnel Array spacecraft", holds the large punched foil: the Fresnel Array. The second, the "Receiver spacecraft" holds the field optics and focal instrumentation. A chromatism correction feature enables moderately large (20%) relative wavebands, and fields of a few to a dozen arc seconds. This Fresnel imager is adapted to high contrast stellar environments: dust disks, close companions and (we hope) exoplanets. Specific to the particular grid-like pattern of the primary focusing zone plate, is the very high dynamic range achieved in the images, in the case of compact objects. Large stellar photospheres may also be mapped with Fresnel arrays of a few meters opertaing in the UV. Larger and more complex fields can be imaged with

  3. Three-dimensional Bragg diffraction in growth-disordered opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, A. V.; Kaplyanskii, Alexander A.; Kosobukin, Vladimir A.; Limonov, M. F.; Samusev, K. B.; Usvyat, D. E.

    2003-06-01

    After artificial opals as well as opal-based infilled and inverted composites are considered to be promising representatives of photonic crystal materials. Earlier, photonic stop gaps in opals were studied mainly in transmission or specular reflection geometries corresponding to "one-dimensional" Bragg diffraction. On the contrary, this work was aimed at observing the typical patterns of optical Bragg diffraction in which phenomenon opal crystal structure acts as a three-dimensional diffraction grating. Although our experiments were performed for artificial opals possessing unavoidable imperfections a well-pronounced diffraction peaks were observed characteristic of a crystal structure. Each of the diffraction maxima reveals a photonic stop gap in the specified direction, while the spectral width of the peak is a measure of the photonic stop gap width.

  4. Optics for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Duree, Galen C

    2011-01-01

    The easy way to shed light on Optics In general terms, optics is the science of light. More specifically, optics is a branch of physics that describes the behavior and properties of light?including visible, infrared, and ultraviolet?and the interaction of light with matter. Optics For Dummies gives you an approachable introduction to optical science, methods, and applications. You'll get plain-English explanations of the nature of light and optical effects; reflection, refraction, and diffraction; color dispersion; optical devices, industrial, medical, and military applicatio

  5. Problems in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Rousseau, Madeleine; Ter Haar, D

    1973-01-01

    This collection of problems and accompanying solutions provide the reader with a full introduction to physical optics. The subject coverage is fairly traditional, with chapters on interference and diffraction, and there is a general emphasis on spectroscopy.

  6. Angle-resolved diffraction grating biosensor based on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Changwu; Li, Peng [School of Physical Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China); Jia, Zhenhong, E-mail: jzhh@xju.edu.cn; Liu, Yajun; Mo, Jiaqing; Lv, Xiaoyi [College of Information Science and Engineering, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046 (China)

    2016-03-07

    In this study, an optical biosensor based on a porous silicon composite structure was fabricated using a simple method. This structure consists of a thin, porous silicon surface diffraction grating and a one-dimensional porous silicon photonic crystal. An angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum was obtained by measuring the diffraction efficiency at a range of incident angles. The angle-resolved diffraction efficiency of the 2nd and 3rd orders was studied experimentally and theoretically. The device was sensitive to the change of refractive index in the presence of a biomolecule indicated by the shift of the diffraction efficiency spectrum. The sensitivity of this sensor was investigated through use of an 8 base pair antifreeze protein DNA hybridization. The shifts of the angle-resolved diffraction efficiency spectrum showed a relationship with the change of the refractive index, and the detection limit of the biosensor reached 41.7 nM. This optical device is highly sensitive, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate. Using shifts in diffraction efficiency spectrum to detect biological molecules has not yet been explored, so this study establishes a foundation for future work.

  7. Diffraction and Unitarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  8. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravtsov, Yu.A., E-mail: kravtsov@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland); Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 117 997 (Russian Federation); Berczynski, P., E-mail: pawel.berczynski@ps.p [Institute of Physics, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin 70-310 (Poland); Bieg, B., E-mail: b.bieg@am.szczecin.p [Institute of Physics, Maritime University of Szczecin, Szczecin 70-500 (Poland)

    2009-08-10

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  9. Gaussian beam diffraction in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, Yu.A.; Berczynski, P.; Bieg, B.

    2009-01-01

    Combination of quasi-isotropic approximation (QIA) of geometric optics with paraxial complex geometric optics (PCGO) is suggested, which allows describing both diffraction and polarization evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic beams in weakly anisotropic inhomogeneous media. Combination QIA/PCGO reduces Maxwell equations to the system of the ordinary differential equations of the first order and radically simplifies solution of various problems, related to microwave plasma diagnostics, including plasma polarimetry, interferometry and refractometry in thermonuclear reactors. Efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the example of electromagnetic beam diffraction in a linear layer of magnetized plasma with parameters, modeling tokamak plasma in the project ITER.

  10. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters

    OpenAIRE

    Cady, E.

    2012-01-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly...

  11. Coherent diffractive imaging methods for semiconductor manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Rajeev, Rajendran; Fernandez, Sara; Ekinci, Yasin

    2017-12-01

    The paradigm shift of the semiconductor industry moving from deep ultraviolet to extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) brought about new challenges in the fabrication of illumination and projection optics, which constitute one of the core sources of cost of ownership for many of the metrology tools needed in the lithography process. For this reason, lensless imaging techniques based on coherent diffractive imaging started to raise interest in the EUVL community. This paper presents an overview of currently on-going research endeavors that use a number of methods based on lensless imaging with coherent light.

  12. Fast, inexpensive, diffraction limited cylindrical microlenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synder, J.J.; Reichert, P.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a technique for fabricating fast, well corrected cylindrical microlenses. With this technique we have made a number of different microlenses with dimensions and focal lengths in the range of few hundred μm, and diffraction limited numerical apertures as high as 0.9. The microlenses are specifically designed for applications where they can increase the radiance or otherwise enhance the optical characteristics of laser diode light. The fabrication method we use is very versatile, and the microlenses produced this way would be very inexpensive in production quantities. 6 refs., 4 figs

  13. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  14. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  15. CMS results on hard diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00107098

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings we present CMS results on hard diffraction. Diffractive dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV is discussed. The cross section for dijet production is presented as a function of $\\tilde{\\xi}$, representing the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The observation of W and Z boson production in events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap is also presented.

  16. Causal aspects of diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis is directed at a causal description of photon diffraction, which is explained in terms of a wave exerting real forces and providing actual guidance to each quantum of energy. An undulatory PSI wave is associated with each photon, and this wave is assumed to imply more than an informative probability function, so that it actually carries real energy, in much the same way as does an electro-magnetic wave. Whether or not it may be in some way related to the electromagnetic wave is left as a matter of on-going concern. A novel application of the concept of a minimum energy configuration is utilized; that is, a system of energy quanta seeks out relative positions and orientations of least mutual energy, much as an electron seeks its Bohr radius as a position of least mutual energy. Thus the concept implies more a guiding interaction of the PSI waves than an interfering cancellation of these waves. Similar concepts have been suggested by L. de Broglie and D. Bohm

  17. Gluon radiation in diffractive electroproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W.; McDermott, M.F.; Hebecker, A.

    1996-07-01

    Order α s -correlations to the diffractive structure functions F L D and F 2 D at large Q 2 and small x are evaluated in the semiclassical approach, where the initial proton is treated as a classical colour field. The diffractive final state contains a fast gluon in addition to a quark-antiquark pair. Two of these partons may have large transverse momentum. Our calculations lead to an intuitive picture of deep-inelastic diffractive processes which is very similar to Bjorken's aligned-jet model. Both diffractive structure functions contain leading twist contributions from high-p perpendicular to jets. (orig.)

  18. On the representation of the diffracted field of Hermite-Gaussian modes in an alien basis and the young diffraction principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.N.; Strokovskii, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical form of expansion coefficients of a diffracted field for an arbitrary Hermite-Gaussian beam in an alien Hermite-Gaussian basis is obtained. A possible physical interpretation of the well-known Young phenomenological diffraction principle and experiments on diffraction of Hermite-Gaussian beams of the lowest types (n = 0 - 5) from half-plane are discussed. The case of nearly homogenous expansion corresponding to misalignment and mismatch of optical systems is also analyzed. 7 refs., 2 figs

  19. Evaluating diffraction-based overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Tan, Asher; Jung, JinWoo; Goelzer, Gary; Smith, Nigel; Hu, Jiangtao; Ham, Boo-Hyun; Kwak, Min-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Nam, Suk-Woo

    2012-03-01

    We evaluate diffraction-based overlay (DBO) metrology using two test wafers. The test wafers have different film stacks designed to test the quality of DBO data under a range of film conditions. We present DBO results using traditional empirical approach (eDBO). eDBO relies on linear response of the reflectance with respect to the overlay displacement within a small range. It requires specially designed targets that consist of multiple pads with programmed shifts. It offers convenience of quick recipe setup since there is no need to establish a model. We measure five DBO targets designed with different pitches and programmed shifts. The correlations of five eDBO targets and the correlation of eDBO to image-based overlay are excellent. The targets of 800nm and 600nm pitches have better dynamic precision than targets of 400nm pitch, which agrees with simulated results on signal/noise ratio. 3σ of less than 0.1nm is achieved for both wafers using the best configured targets. We further investigate the linearity assumption of eDBO algorithm. Simulation results indicate that as the pitch of DBO targets gets smaller, the nonlinearity error, i.e., the error in the overlay measurement results caused by deviation from ideal linear response, becomes bigger. We propose a nonlinearity correction (NLC) by including higher order terms in the optical response. The new algorithm with NLC improves measurement consistency for DBO targets of same pitch but different programmed shift, due to improved accuracy. The results from targets with different pitches, however, are improved marginally, indicating the presence of other error sources.

  20. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  1. Time-domain Brillouin scattering assisted by diffraction gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Pezeril, Thomas; Chaban, Ievgeniia; Fujita, Kentaro; Gusev, Vitalyi

    2018-02-01

    Absorption of ultrashort laser pulses in a metallic grating deposited on a transparent sample launches coherent compression/dilatation acoustic pulses in directions of different orders of acoustic diffraction. Their propagation is detected by delayed laser pulses, which are also diffracted by the metallic grating, through the measurement of the transient intensity change of the first-order diffracted light. The obtained data contain multiple frequency components, which are interpreted by considering all possible angles for the Brillouin scattering of light achieved through multiplexing of the propagation directions of light and coherent sound by the metallic grating. The emitted acoustic field can be equivalently presented as a superposition of plane inhomogeneous acoustic waves, which constitute an acoustic diffraction grating for the probe light. Thus the obtained results can also be interpreted as a consequence of probe light diffraction by both metallic and acoustic gratings. The realized scheme of time-domain Brillouin scattering with metallic gratings operating in reflection mode provides access to wide range of acoustic frequencies from minimal to maximal possible values in a single experimental optical configuration for the directions of probe light incidence and scattered light detection. This is achieved by monitoring the backward and forward Brillouin scattering processes in parallel. Potential applications include measurements of the acoustic dispersion, simultaneous determination of sound velocity and optical refractive index, and evaluation of samples with a single direction of possible optical access.

  2. Neutron diffraction from holographic gratings in PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havermeyer, F.; Kraetzig, E.; Rupp, R.A.; Schubert, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. By definition photorefractive materials change the refractive index for light under the action of light. Using the spatially modulated light intensity pattern from the interference of two plane waves, volume phase gratings with accurately defined spacings can be produced. Depending on the material there are many physical origins for these gratings, but in most cases they are linked to a density modulation and, consequently, to a refractive index grating for neutrons. By diffraction of light or neutrons from such gratings even small refractive index changes down to Δn ∼ 10 -7 - 10 -9 can be measured. In our photopolymer system PMMA/MMA (poly(methyl methacrylate) with a content of 10-20% of the residual monomer methyl methacrylate) inhomogeneous illumination leads to local post-polymerisation processes of the residual monomer. The resulting light-optical refractive index grating is caused by the modulation of the monomer/polymer ratio as well as by the modulation of the total density. Only by the unique combination of methods for light and neutron diffraction, available at HOLONS (Holography and Neutron Scattering, instrument at the GKSS research centre), both contributions can be separated. We discuss the angular dependence of the neutron diffraction efficiency for weakly and strongly (efficiencies up to 60% have been achieved) modulated gratings and propose a simple model for the evaluation of the gratings. (author)

  3. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure method has been revisited by applying this measurement technique to polycrystalline samples and using an analytical method with the logarithmic dispersion relation. The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe 3 O 4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method

  4. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  5. Useful Solutions for Plane Wave Diffraction by Dielectric Slabs and Wedges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gennarelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an overview of available uniform asymptotic physical optics solutions for evaluating the plane wave diffraction by some canonical geometries of large interest: dielectric slabs and wedges. Such solutions are based on a physical optics approximation of the electric and magnetic equivalent surface currents in the involved scattering integrals. The resulting diffraction coefficients are expressed in terms of the geometrical optics response of the considered structure and the standard transition function of the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction. Numerical tests and comparisons make evident the effectiveness and reliability of the presented solutions.

  6. Projecting non-diffracting waves with intermediate-plane holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Argha; Yevick, Aaron; Blackburn, Lauren C; Kanellakopoulos, Nikitas; Grier, David G

    2018-02-19

    We introduce intermediate-plane holography, which substantially improves the ability of holographic trapping systems to project propagation-invariant modes of light using phase-only diffractive optical elements. Translating the mode-forming hologram to an intermediate plane in the optical train can reduce the need to encode amplitude variations in the field, and therefore complements well-established techniques for encoding complex-valued transfer functions into phase-only holograms. Compared to standard holographic trapping implementations, intermediate-plane holograms greatly improve diffraction efficiency and mode purity of propagation-invariant modes, and so increase their useful non-diffracting range. We demonstrate this technique through experimental realizations of accelerating modes and long-range tractor beams.

  7. Small area analysis using micro-diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goehner, Raymond P.; Tissot, Ralph G. Jr.; Michael, Joseph R.

    2000-01-01

    An overall trend toward smaller electronic packages and devices makes it increasingly important and difficult to obtain meaningful diffraction information from small areas. X-ray micro-diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and Kossel are micro-diffraction techniques used for crystallographic analysis including texture, phase identification and strain measurements. X-ray micro-diffraction primarily is used for phase analysis and residual strain measurements. X-ray micro-diffraction primarily is used for phase analysis and residual strain measurements of areas between 10 microm to 100 microm. For areas this small glass capillary optics are used for producing a usable collimated x-ray beam. These optics are designed to reflect x-rays below the critical angle therefore allowing for larger solid acceptance angle at the x-ray source resulting in brighter smaller x-ray beams. The determination of residual strain using micro-diffraction techniques is very important to the semiconductor industry. Residual stresses have caused voiding of the interconnect metal which then destroys electrical continuity. Being able to determine the residual stress helps industry to predict failures from the aging effects of interconnects due to this stress voiding. Stress measurements would be impossible using a conventional x-ray diffractometer; however, utilizing a 30 microm glass capillary these small areas are readily assessable for analysis. Kossel produces a wide angle diffraction pattern from fluorescent x-rays generated in the sample by an e-beam in a SEM. This technique can yield very precise lattice parameters for determining strain. Fig. 2 shows a Kossel pattern from a Ni specimen. Phase analysis on small areas is also possible using an energy dispersive spectrometer (EBSD) and x-ray micro-diffraction techniques. EBSD has the advantage of allowing the user to observe the area of interest using the excellent imaging capabilities of the SEM. An EDS detector has been

  8. Primordial black hole detection through diffractive microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, T.; Mehrabi, A.; Rahvar, S.

    2018-05-01

    Recent observations of gravitational waves motivate investigations for the existence of primordial black holes (PBHs). We propose the observation of gravitational microlensing of distant quasars for the range of infrared to the submillimeter wavelengths by sublunar PBHs as lenses. The advantage of observations in the longer wavelengths, comparable to the Schwarzschild radius of the lens (i.e., Rsch≃λ ) is the detection of the wave optics features of the gravitational microlensing. The observation of diffraction pattern in the microlensing light curve of a quasar can break the degeneracy between the lens parameters and determine directly the lens mass as well as the distance of the lens from the observer. We estimate the wave optics optical-depth, also calculate the rate of ˜0.1 to ˜0.3 event per year per a quasar, assuming that hundred percent of dark matter is made of sublunar PBHs. Also, we propose a long-term survey of quasars with the cadence of almost one hour to few days to resolve the wave optics features of the light curves to discover PBHs and determine the fraction of dark matter made of sublunar PBHs as well as their mass function.

  9. Diffractive ''semioptical'' model for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Musulmanbekov, Zh.Zh.

    1979-01-01

    Diffraction Glauber theory for nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered in approximation when the initial nucleus interacts as a whole with nucleons of the target nucleus. Such an approach, being intermediate between precise Glauber theory and its optical limit, essentially simplifies numerical calculations and gives a good agreement with experiments as well. (author)

  10. Diffractive sub-picosecond manipulation of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, B.

    2004-01-01

    A class of X-ray optical elements for the sub-picosecond manipulation of X-rays is proposed. The design of these elements is based upon a time-dependent dynamical diffraction theory that synthesizes the eikonal theory with the Takagi-Taupin theory. A brief outline of the theory is given

  11. X-Ray diffraction Investigation of Electrochemically Deposited Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Jensen, Jens Dahl; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    by the determination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) pole figures and the calculation of the orientation distribution functions. XRD results are discussed in relation to the morphologies of the electrodeposits as investigated with light optical microscopy and correlated with the process parameters during electrodeposition....

  12. Diffraction: what do we know; what can we learn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randa, J.

    1983-05-01

    High energy diffractive scattering is reviewed. We first summarize experimental results and information gleaned from geometric and optical models. We then discuss dynamics from the perspectives of hadron structure and Pomeron structure. Particular emphasis is placed on investigating hadron structure using a simple model of the Pomeron. 58 references

  13. Vectorial diffraction properties of THz vortex Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Wang, Xinke; Sun, Wenfeng; Feng, Shengfei; Han, Peng; Ye, Jiasheng; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Yan

    2018-01-22

    A vortex Bessel beam combines the merits of an optical vortex and a Bessel beam, including a spiral wave front and a non-diffractive feature, which has immense application potentials in optical trapping, optical fabrication, optical communications, and so on. Here, linearly and circularly polarized vortex Bessel beams in the terahertz (THz) frequency range are generated by utilizing a THz quarter wave plate, a spiral phase plate, and Teflon axicons with different opening angles. Taking advantage of a THz focal-plane imaging system, vectorial diffraction properties of the THz vortex Bessel beams are comprehensively characterized and discussed, including the transverse (Ex, Ey) and longitudinal (Ez) polarization components. The experimental phenomena are accurately simulated by adopting the vectorial Rayleigh diffraction integral. By varying the opening angle of the axicon, the characteristic parameters of these THz vortex Bessel beams are exhibited and compared, including the light spot size, the diffraction-free range, and the phase evolution process. This work provides the precise experimental and theoretical bases for the comprehension and application of a THz vortex Bessel beam.

  14. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Raphael A.; Aranas, Erika B.

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  15. Loss of coherence in double-slit diffraction experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanz, A.S.; Borondo, F.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    By using optical models based on the theory of partially coherent light, and the quantum decoherence model proposed by Joos and Zeh [Z. Phys. B 59, 223 (1985)], we explore incoherence and decoherence in interference phenomena. The problem chosen to study is that of the double-slit diffraction

  16. When holography meets coherent diffraction imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2012-12-17

    The phase problem is inherent to crystallographic, astronomical and optical imaging where only the intensity of the scattered signal is detected and the phase information is lost and must somehow be recovered to reconstruct the object's structure. Modern imaging techniques at the molecular scale rely on utilizing novel coherent light sources like X-ray free electron lasers for the ultimate goal of visualizing such objects as individual biomolecules rather than crystals. Here, unlike in the case of crystals where structures can be solved by model building and phase refinement, the phase distribution of the wave scattered by an individual molecule must directly be recovered. There are two well-known solutions to the phase problem: holography and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI). Both techniques have their pros and cons. In holography, the reconstruction of the scattered complex-valued object wave is directly provided by a well-defined reference wave that must cover the entire detector area which often is an experimental challenge. CDI provides the highest possible, only wavelength limited, resolution, but the phase recovery is an iterative process which requires some pre-defined information about the object and whose outcome is not always uniquely-defined. Moreover, the diffraction patterns must be recorded under oversampling conditions, a pre-requisite to be able to solve the phase problem. Here, we report how holography and CDI can be merged into one superior technique: holographic coherent diffraction imaging (HCDI). An inline hologram can be recorded by employing a modified CDI experimental scheme. We demonstrate that the amplitude of the Fourier transform of an inline hologram is related to the complex-valued visibility, thus providing information on both, the amplitude and the phase of the scattered wave in the plane of the diffraction pattern. With the phase information available, the condition of oversampling the diffraction patterns can be relaxed, and the

  17. Stray light characteristics of the diffractive telescope system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dun; Wang, Lihua; Yang, Wei; Wu, Shibin; Fan, Bin; Wu, Fan

    2018-02-01

    Diffractive telescope technology is an innovation solution in construction of large light-weight space telescope. However, the nondesign orders of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) may affect the imaging performance as stray light. To study the stray light characteristics of a diffractive telescope, a prototype was developed and its stray light analysis model was established. The stray light characteristics including ghost, point source transmittance, and veiling glare index (VGI) were analyzed. During the star imaging test of the prototype, the ghost images appeared around the star image as the exposure time of the charge-coupled device improving, consistent with the simulation results. The test result of VGI was 67.11%, slightly higher than the calculated value 57.88%. The study shows that the same order diffraction of the diffractive primary lens and correcting DOE is the main factor that causes ghost images. The stray light sources outside the field of view can illuminate the image plane through nondesign orders diffraction of the primary lens and contributes to more than 90% of the stray light flux on the image plane. In summary, it is expected that these works will provide some guidance for optimizing the imaging performance of diffractive telescopes.

  18. Principles of Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Max; Wolf, Emil

    1999-10-01

    Principles of Optics is one of the classic science books of the twentieth century, and probably the most influential book in optics published in the past forty years. This edition has been thoroughly revised and updated, with new material covering the CAT scan, interference with broad-band light and the so-called Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory. This edition also details scattering from inhomogeneous media and presents an account of the principles of diffraction tomography to which Emil Wolf has made a basic contribution. Several new appendices are also included. This new edition will be invaluable to advanced undergraduates, graduate students and researchers working in most areas of optics.

  19. Grazing incidence diffraction : A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilles, B [LTPCM, ENSEEG. St. Martin d` Heres. (France)

    1996-09-01

    Different Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) methods for the analysis of thin films and multilayer structures are reviewed in three sections: the reflectivity is developed in the first one, which includes the non-specular diffuse scattering. The second one is devoted to the extremely asymmetric Bragg diffraction and the third one to the in-plane Bragg diffraction. Analytical formulations of the scattered intensities are developed for each geometry, in the framework of the kinetical analysis as well as the dynamical theory. Experimental examples are given to illustrate the quantitative possibility of the GID techniques.

  20. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680, Ukraine and Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Orava, Risto [Institute of Physics, Division of Elementary Particle Physics, P.O. Box 64 (Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2a), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Salii, Andrii [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  1. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  2. Mathematical concepts of optical superresolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, Jari

    2012-01-01

    Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit, i.e., optical superresolution, has been studied extensively in various contexts. This paper presents an overview of some mathematical concepts relevant to superresolution in linear optical systems. Properties of bandlimited functions are surveyed and are related to both instrumental and computational aspects of superresolution. The phenomenon of superoscillation and its relation to superresolution are discussed. (review article)

  3. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  4. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 5. Diffraction at a Straight Edge: A Gem from Sommerfeld's Work in Classical Physics. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 20 Issue 5 May 2015 pp 389-400 ...

  5. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  6. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  7. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    teaching and understanding physics. ... and mathematical footing, using electromagnetic theory and the proper ... this article, we will use the word diffraction to cover all experiments ..... PES Institute of Technology. Campus ... communication!)

  8. Experimental studies of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    The coherent inelastic scattering process, usually called inclusive diffraction dissociation, is discussed. Topics include: t and M/sub x/ dependence, factorization, finite mass sum rule and charged particle multiplicities. 6 references, 14 figures

  9. Paraxial diffractive elements for space-variant linear transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teiwes, Stephan; Schwarzer, Heiko; Gu, Ben-Yuan

    1998-06-01

    Optical linear transform architectures bear good potential for future developments of very powerful hybrid vision systems and neural network classifiers. The optical modules of such systems could be used as pre-processors to solve complex linear operations at very high speed in order to simplify an electronic data post-processing. However, the applicability of linear optical architectures is strongly connected with the fundamental question of how to implement a specific linear transform by optical means and physical imitations. The large majority of publications on this topic focusses on the optical implementation of space-invariant transforms by the well-known 4f-setup. Only few papers deal with approaches to implement selected space-variant transforms. In this paper, we propose a simple algebraic method to design diffractive elements for an optical architecture in order to realize arbitrary space-variant transforms. The design procedure is based on a digital model of scalar, paraxial wave theory and leads to optimal element transmission functions within the model. Its computational and physical limitations are discussed in terms of complexity measures. Finally, the design procedure is demonstrated by some examples. Firstly, diffractive elements for the realization of different rotation operations are computed and, secondly, a Hough transform element is presented. The correct optical functions of the elements are proved in computer simulation experiments.

  10. Compact diffraction phase microscopy for quantitative visualization of cells in biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talaikova, N A; Ryabukho, V P

    2016-01-01

    We consider a simplified and compact scheme of interference phase microscopy using a diffraction grating and spatial filtering of the diffracted field, i.e., diffraction phase microscopy. The scheme and the parameters of the device with the possibility of using the optical system of a smartphone and its software are analysed. The results of experimental determination of the spatial structure parameters of erythrocytes are presented. (paper)

  11. Diffractive production and hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussinov, S.; Szwed, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of diffractive production on nuclei implied cross sections of the diffractively produced system on nucleons which are smaller than the corresponding projectile nucleon cross sections. A natural explanation for this feature is provided in the Good-Walker coherent production formalism. A specific realization of the Good-Walker formalism stated in terms of quarks and connecting electric flux tubes and some ensuing consequences are also discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  12. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Alan

    1989-09-15

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago.

  13. Theoretical review of diffractive phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golec-Biernat, K.

    2005-01-01

    We review QCD based descriptions of diffractive deep inelastic scattering emphasising the role of models with parton saturation. These models provide natural explanation of such experimentally observed facts as the constant ratio of σ diff /σ tot as a function of the Bjorken variable x, and Regge factorization of diffractive parton distributions. The Ingelman-Schlein model and the soft color interaction model are also presented

  14. The Diffraction Response Interpolation Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Søren Kragh; Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Pedersen, Peder C.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modeling of the output voltage in a pulse-echo system is computationally very demanding, particularly whenconsidering reflector surfaces of arbitrary geometry. A new, efficient computational tool, the diffraction response interpolationmethod (DRIM), for modeling of reflectors in a fluid...... medium, is presented. The DRIM is based on the velocity potential impulseresponse method, adapted to pulse-echo applications by the use of acoustical reciprocity. Specifically, the DRIM operates bydividing the reflector surface into planar elements, finding the diffraction response at the corners...

  15. Multiplexing schemes for an achromatic programmable diffractive lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, M S; Perez-Cabre, E; Oton, J [Technical University of Catalonia, Dep. Optics and Optometry, Terrassa-Barcelona, 08222 (Spain)], E-mail: millan@oo.upc.edu

    2008-11-01

    A multiplexed programmable diffractive lens, displayed on a pixelated liquid crystal device under broadband illumination, is proposed to compensate for the severe chromatic aberration that affects diffractive elements. The proposed lens is based on multiplexing a set of sublenses with a common focal length for different wavelengths. We consider different types of integration of the optical information (spatial only, temporal only and hybrid spatial-temporal) combined with a proper selection of the spectral bandwidth. The properties and limits of the achromatic programmable multiplexed lens are described. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  16. Multiplexing schemes for an achromatic programmable diffractive lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millan, M S; Perez-Cabre, E; Oton, J

    2008-01-01

    A multiplexed programmable diffractive lens, displayed on a pixelated liquid crystal device under broadband illumination, is proposed to compensate for the severe chromatic aberration that affects diffractive elements. The proposed lens is based on multiplexing a set of sublenses with a common focal length for different wavelengths. We consider different types of integration of the optical information (spatial only, temporal only and hybrid spatial-temporal) combined with a proper selection of the spectral bandwidth. The properties and limits of the achromatic programmable multiplexed lens are described. Experimental results are presented and discussed.

  17. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, Amand A; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized

  18. Neutron diffraction and oxide research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.; Howard, C.J.; Kennedy, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide compounds form a large class of interesting materials that have a diverse range of mechanical and electronic properties. This diversity and its commercial implications has had a significant impact on physics research. This is particularly evident in the fields of superconductivity magnetoresistivity and ferroelectricity, where discoveries in the last 15 years have given rise to significant shifts in research activities. Historically, oxides have been studied for many years, but it is only recently that significant effort has been diverted to the study of oxide materials for their application to mechanical and electronic devices. An important property of such materials is the atomic structure, for the determination of which diffraction techniques are ideally suited. Recent examples of structure determinations using neutron diffraction in oxide based systems are high temperature superconductors, where oxygen defects are a key factor. Here, neutron diffraction played a major role in determining the effect of oxygen on the superconducting properties. Similarly, neutron diffraction has enjoyed much success in the determination of the structures of the manganate based colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) materials. In both these cases the structure plays a pivotal role in determining theoretical models of the electronic properties. The neutron scattering group at ANSTO has investigated several oxide systems using neutron powder diffraction. Two such systems are presented in this paper; the zirconia-based materials that are used as engineering materials, and the perovskite-based oxides that include the well known cuprate superconductors and the manganate CMR materials

  19. Acoustic non-diffracting Airy beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhou; Guo, Xiasheng; Tu, Juan; Ma, Qingyu; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic non-diffracting Airy beam as its optical counterpart has unique features of self-bending and self-healing. The complexity of most current designs handicaps its applications. A simple design of an acoustic source capable of generating multi-frequency and broad-band acoustic Airy beam has been theoretically demonstrated by numerical simulations. In the design, a piston transducer is corrugated to induce spatial phase variation for transducing the Airy function. The piston's surface is grooved in a pattern that the width of each groove corresponds to the half wavelength of Airy function. The resulted frequency characteristics and its dependence on the size of the piston source are also discussed. This simple design may promote the wide applications of acoustic Airy beam particularly in the field of medical ultrasound

  20. Contribution to diffraction theory; Contribution a la theorie de la diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chako, N [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  1. Contribution to diffraction theory; Contribution a la theorie de la diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chako, N. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  2. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, A.

    1995-09-01

    The field of hard diffraction, which studies events with a rapidity gap and a hard scattering, has expanded dramatically recently. A review of new results from CDF, D OE, H1 and ZEUS will be given. These results include diffractive jet production, deep-inelastic scattering in large rapidity gap events, rapidity gaps between high transverse energy jets, and a search for diffractive W-boson production. The combination of these results gives new insight into the exchanged object, believed to be the pomeron. The results axe consistent with factorization and with a hard pomeron that contains both quarks and gluons. There is also evidence for the exchange of a strongly interacting color singlet in high momentum transfer (36 2 ) events

  3. Light diffraction through a feather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez García, Hugo;

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used a feather to study light diffraction, in a qualitative as well as in a quantitative manner. Experimental measurement of the separation between the bright spots obtained with a laser pointer allowed the determination of the space between feather's barbs and barbules. The results we have obtained agree satisfactorily with those corresponding to a typical feather. Due to the kind of materials, the related concepts and the experimental results, this activity becomes an excellent didactic resource suitable for studying diffraction, both in introductory undergraduate as well as in secondary school physics courses.

  4. CONFERENCE: Elastic and diffractive scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering, when particles appear to 'bounce' off each other, and the related phenomena of diffractive scattering are currently less fashionable than the study of hard scattering processes. However this could change rapidly if unexpected results from the UA4 experiment at the CERN Collider are confirmed and their implications tested. These questions were highlighted at the third 'Blois Workshop' on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering, held early in May on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, near Chicago

  5. Diffractive dissociation and new quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1983-04-01

    We argue that the chiral limit of QCD can be identified with the strong (diffractive dissociation) coupling limit of reggeon field theory. Critical Pomeron scaling at high energy must then be directly related to an infra-red fixed-point of massless QCD and so requires a large number of flavors. This gives a direct argument that the emergence of diffraction-peak scaling, KNO scaling etc. at anti p-p colliders are evidence of a substantial quark structure still to be discovered

  6. Non-Diffractive Tractor Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novitsky, Andrey; Gao, Dongliang; Gorlach, Alexey A.

    2017-01-01

    Pulling optical force discovered recently in the theory and experiment has drawn great attention owing to its counterintuitive nature and promising applications. Pulling force originates from the enhanced forward light scattering that in accordance with the momentum conservation conveys light...... demonstrate how to ease the conditions required in experiment for realization of the optical tractor beams using the cylindrical objects. We pay a particular attention to the case of the pulling optical force due to the interaction of magnetic dipole and quadrupole moments....

  7. Phase retrieval from diffraction data utilizing pre-determined partial information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Marathe, S.; Kim, S.N.; Kang, H.C.; Noh, D.Y.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a phase retrieval algorithm that utilizes pre-determined partial phase information to overcome insufficient oversampling ratio in diffraction data. Implementing the Fourier modulus projection and the modified support projection manifesting the pre-determined information, a generalized difference map and HIO (Hybrid Input-Output) algorithms are developed. Optical laser diffraction data as well as simulated X-ray diffraction data are used to illustrate the validity of the proposed algorithm, which revealed the strength and the limitations of the algorithm. The proposed algorithm can expand the applicability of the diffraction based image reconstruction

  8. Trapezoidal diffraction grating beam splitters in single crystal diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Marcell; Graziosi, Teodoro; Quack, Niels

    2018-02-01

    Single Crystal Diamond has been recognized as a prime material for optical components in high power applications due to low absorption and high thermal conductivity. However, diamond microstructuring remains challenging. Here, we report on the fabrication and characterization of optical diffraction gratings exhibiting a symmetric trapezoidal profile etched into a single crystal diamond substrate. The optimized grating geometry diffracts the transmitted optical power into precisely defined proportions, performing as an effective beam splitter. We fabricate our gratings in commercially available single crystal CVD diamond plates (2.6mm x 2.6mm x 0.3mm). Using a sputter deposited hard mask and patterning by contact lithography, the diamond is etched in an inductively coupled oxygen plasma with zero platen power. The etch process effectively reveals the characteristic {111} diamond crystal planes, creating a precisely defined angled (54.7°) profile. SEM and AFM measurements of the fabricated gratings evidence the trapezoidal shape with a pitch of 3.82μm, depth of 170 nm and duty cycle of 35.5%. Optical characterization is performed in transmission using a 650nm laser source perpendicular to the sample. The recorded transmitted optical power as function of detector rotation angle shows a distribution of 21.1% in the 0th order and 23.6% in each +/-1st order (16.1% reflected, 16.6% in higher orders). To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of diffraction gratings with trapezoidal profile in single crystal diamond. The fabrication process will enable beam splitter gratings of custom defined optical power distribution profiles, while antireflection coatings can increase the efficiency.

  9. Microarcsecond relative astrometry from the ground with a diffractive pupil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammons, S M; Bendek, E; Guyon, O

    2011-09-08

    The practical use of astrometry to detect exoplanets via the reflex motion of the parent star depends critically on the elimination of systematic floors in imaging systems. In the diffractive pupil technique proposed for space-based detection of exo-earths, extended diffraction spikes generated by a dotted primary mirror are referenced against a wide-field grid of background stars to calibrate changing optical distortion and achieve microarcsecond astrometric precision on bright targets (Guyon et al. 2010). We describe applications of this concept to ground-based uncrowded astrometry using a diffractive, monopupil telescope and a wide-field camera to image as many as {approx}4000 background reference stars. Final relative astrometric precision is limited by differential tip/tilt jitter caused by high altitude layers of turbulence. A diffractive 3-meter telescope is capable of reaching {approx}35 {micro}as relative astrometric error per coordinate perpendicular to the zenith vector in three hours on a bright target star (I < 10) in fields of moderate stellar density ({approx}40 stars arcmin{sup -2} with I < 23). Smaller diffractive apertures (D < 1 m) can achieve 100-200 {micro}as performance with the same stellar density and exposure time and a large telescope (6.5-10 m) could achieve as low as 10 {micro}as, nearly an order of magnitude better than current space-based facilities. The diffractive pupil enables the use of larger fields of view through calibration of changing optical distortion as well as brighter target stars (V < 6) by preventing star saturation. Permitting the sky to naturally roll to average signals over many thousands of pixels can mitigate the effects of detector imperfections.

  10. Coherent Rabi oscillations in a molecular system and sub-diffraction-limited pattern generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Zeyang; Al-Amri, M; Zubairy, M Suhail

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of a photolithography and optical imaging system is restricted by the diffraction limit. Coherent Rabi oscillations have been shown to be able to overcome the diffraction limit in a simple two-level atomic system (Z Liao, M Al-amri, and M S Zubairy 2010 Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 183601). In this paper, we numerically calculate the wave packet dynamics of a molecular system interacting with an ultrashort laser pulse and show that coherent Rabi oscillations in a molecular system are also possible. Moreover, a sub-diffraction-limited pattern can be generated in this system by introducing spatially modulated Rabi oscillations. We also discuss several techniques to improve the visibility of the sub-diffraction-limited pattern. Our result may have important applications in super-resolution optical lithography and optical imaging. (paper)

  11. CMS results on soft diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00086121

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of soft single- and double-diffractive cross sections, as well as of forward rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV at the LHC, and compare the results to other measurements and to theoretical predictions implemented in various Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. LEED (Low Energy Electron Diffraction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberdam, M.

    1973-01-01

    The various types of systems studied by LEED, and for which the geometry of diffraction patterns is exploited, are reviewed, intensity profiles being another source of information. Two representative approaches of the scattering phenomenon are examined; the band structure theory and the T matrix approach [fr

  13. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  14. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-11-01

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  15. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  16. X-Ray Diffraction Project Final Report, Fiscal Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dane V. Morgan

    2006-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction diagnostic system was developed for determining real-time shock-driven lattice parameter shifts in single crystals at the gas gun at TA-IV at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The signal-to-noise ratio and resolution of the system were measured using imaging plates as the detector and by varying the slit width. This report includes tests of the x-ray diffraction system using a phosphor coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera by a coherent fiber-optic bundle. The system timing delay was measured with a newly installed transistor-transistor logic (TTL) bypass designed to reduce the x-ray delay time. The axial misalignment of the Bragg planes was determined with respect to the optical axis for a set of eight LiF [lithium fluoride] crystals provided by SNL to determine their suitability for gas gun experiments

  17. Elementary wave optics

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    This undergraduate textbook presents thorough coverage of the standard topics of classical optics and optical instrument design; it also offers significant details regarding the concepts of modern optics. Its survey of the mathematical tools of optics grants students insights into the physical principles of quantum mechanics.Two principal concepts occur throughout: a treatment of scattering from real scatterers (leading to Huygens' principles, diffraction theory, the index of refraction, and related topics); and the difference between coherent and noncoherent wave phenomena. Examinations of su

  18. Overlay improvement methods with diffraction based overlay and integrated metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Young-Sun; Kim, Sunny; Shin, Ju Hee; Choi, Young Sin; Yun, Sang Ho; Kim, Young Hoon; Shin, Si Woo; Kong, Jeong Heung; Kang, Young Seog; Ha, Hun Hwan

    2015-03-01

    To accord with new requirement of securing more overlay margin, not only the optical overlay measurement is faced with the technical limitations to represent cell pattern's behavior, but also the larger measurement samples are inevitable for minimizing statistical errors and better estimation of circumstance in a lot. From these reasons, diffraction based overlay (DBO) and integrated metrology (IM) were mainly proposed as new approaches for overlay enhancement in this paper.

  19. Flatland Photonics: Circumventing Diffraction with Planar Plasmonic Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Jennifer Anne

    On subwavelength scales, photon-matter interactions are limited by diffraction. The diffraction limit restricts the size of optical devices and the resolution of conventional microscopes to wavelength-scale dimensions, severely hampering our ability to control and probe subwavelength-scale optical phenomena. Circumventing diffraction is now a principle focus of integrated nanophotonics. Surface plasmons provide a particularly promising approach to sub-diffraction-limited photonics. Surface plasmons are hybrid electron-photon modes confined to the interface between conductors and transparent materials. Combining the high localization of electronic waves with the propagation properties of optical waves, plasmons can achieve extremely small mode wavelengths and large local electromagnetic field intensities. Through their unique dispersion, surface plasmons provide access to an enormous phase space of refractive indices and propagation constants that can be readily tuned with material or geometry. In this thesis, we explore both the theory and applications of dispersion in planar plasmonic architectures. Particular attention is given to the modes of metallic core and plasmon slot waveguides, which can span positive, near-zero, and even negative indices. We demonstrate how such basic plasmonic geometries can be used to develop a suite of passive and active plasmonic components, including subwavelength waveguides, color filters, negative index metamaterials, and optical MOS field effect modulators. Positive index modes are probed by near- and far-field techniques, revealing plasmon wavelengths as small as one-tenth of the excitation wavelength. Negative index modes are characterized through direct visualization of negative refraction. By fabricating prisms comprised of gold, silicon nitride, and silver multilayers, we achieve the first experimental demonstration of a negative index material at visible frequencies, with potential applications for sub-diffraction

  20. Automated optical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, John L.

    1995-08-01

    Automation and polymer science represent fundamental new technologies which can be directed toward realizing the goal of establishing a domestic, world-class, commercial optics business. Use of innovative optical designs using precision polymer optics will enable the US to play a vital role in the next generation of commercial optical products. The increased cost savings inherent in the utilization of optical-grade polymers outweighs almost every advantage of using glass for high volume situations. Optical designers must gain experience with combined refractive/diffractive designs and broaden their knowledge base regarding polymer technology beyond a cursory intellectual exercise. Implementation of a fully automated assembly system, combined with utilization of polymer optics, constitutes the type of integrated manufacturing process which will enable the US to successfully compete with the low-cost labor employed in the Far East, as well as to produce an equivalent product.

  1. Optical system design

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Honed for more than 20 years in an SPIE professional course taught by renowned optical systems designer Robert E. Fischer, Optical System Design, Second Edition brings you the latest cutting-edge design techniques and more than 400 detailed diagrams that clearly illustrate every major procedure in optical design. This thoroughly updated resource helps you work better and faster with computer-aided optical design techniques, diffractive optics, and the latest applications, including digital imaging, telecommunications, and machine vision. No need for complex, unnecessary mathematical derivations-instead, you get hundreds of examples that break the techniques down into understandable steps. For twenty-first century optical design without the mystery, the authoritative Optical Systems Design, Second Edition features: Computer-aided design use explained through sample problems Case studies of third-millennium applications in digital imaging, sensors, lasers, machine vision, and more New chapters on optomechanic...

  2. Intraocular camera for retinal prostheses: Refractive and diffractive lens systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Michelle Christine

    The focus of this thesis is on the design and analysis of refractive, diffractive, and hybrid refractive/diffractive lens systems for a miniaturized camera that can be surgically implanted in the crystalline lens sac and is designed to work in conjunction with current and future generation retinal prostheses. The development of such an intraocular camera (IOC) would eliminate the need for an external head-mounted or eyeglass-mounted camera. Placing the camera inside the eye would allow subjects to use their natural eye movements for foveation (attention) instead of more cumbersome head tracking, would notably aid in personal navigation and mobility, and would also be significantly more psychologically appealing from the standpoint of personal appearances. The capability for accommodation with no moving parts or feedback control is incorporated by employing camera designs that exhibit nearly infinite depth of field. Such an ultracompact optical imaging system requires a unique combination of refractive and diffractive optical elements and relaxed system constraints derived from human psychophysics. This configuration necessitates an extremely compact, short focal-length lens system with an f-number close to unity. Initially, these constraints appear highly aggressive from an optical design perspective. However, after careful analysis of the unique imaging requirements of a camera intended to work in conjunction with the relatively low pixellation levels of a retinal microstimulator array, it becomes clear that such a design is not only feasible, but could possibly be implemented with a single lens system.

  3. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs

  4. Neutron diffraction and Vitamin E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harroun, T A; Marquardt, D; Katsaras, J; Atkinson, J, E-mail: tharroun@brocku.ca

    2010-11-01

    It is generally accepted that neutron diffraction from model membrane systems is an effective biophysical technique for determining membrane structure. Here we describe an example of how deuterium labelling can elucidate the location of specific membrane soluble molecules, including a brief discussion of the technique itself. We show that deuterium labelled {alpha}-tocopherol sits upright in the bilayer, as might be expected, but at very different locations within the bilayer, depending on the degree of lipid chain unsaturation.

  5. Diffraction dissociation and elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verebryusov, V.S.; Ponomarev, L.A.; Smorodinskaya, N.Ya.

    1987-01-01

    In the framework of Regge scheme with supercritical pomeron a model is suggested for the NN-scattering amplitude which takes into account the contribution introduced to the intermediate state by diffraction dissociation (DD) processes. The DD amplitude is written in terms of the Deck model which has been previously applied to describing the main DD features. The calculated NN cross sections are compared with those obtained experimentally. Theoretical predictions for higher energy are presented

  6. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample

  7. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:27248784

  8. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  9. Ophthalmic compensation of visual ametropia based on a programmable diffractive lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, Maria S.; Pérez-Cabré, Elisabet; Romero, Lenny A.; Ramírez, Natalia

    2013-11-01

    Pixelated liquid crystal displays have been widely used as spatial light modulators to implement programmable diffractive optical elements (DOEs), particularly diffractive lenses. Many different applications of such components have been developed in information optics and optical processors that take advantage of their properties of great flexibility, easy and fast refreshment, and multiplexing capability in comparison with equivalent conventional refractive lenses. In this paper, we explore the application of programmable diffractive lenses displayed on the pixelated screen of a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator (LCoS-SLM) to ophthalmic optics. In particular, we consider the use of programmable diffractive lenses for the visual compensation of some refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia). The theoretical principles of compensation are described and sketched using geometrical optics and paraxial ray tracing. A series of experiments with artificial eye in optical bench are conducted to analyze the compensation accuracy in terms of optical power and to compare the results with those obtained by means of conventional ophthalmic lenses. Practical considerations oriented to feasible applications are provided.

  10. Microscale optical cryptography using a subdiffraction-limit optical key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yusuke; Aino, Masahiko; Tanida, Jun

    2018-04-01

    We present microscale optical cryptography using a subdiffraction-limit optical pattern, which is finer than the diffraction-limit size of the decrypting optical system, as a key and a substrate with a reflectance distribution as an encrypted image. Because of the subdiffraction-limit spatial coding, this method enables us to construct a secret image with the diffraction-limit resolution. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, that the secret image becomes recognizable when and only when the substrate is illuminated with the designed key pattern.

  11. Phonon-induced optical superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M M; Hey, R; Santos, P V; Cantarero, A

    2005-04-01

    We demonstrate the formation of a dynamic optical superlattice through the modulation of a semiconductor microcavity by stimulated acoustic phonons. The high coherent phonon population produces a folded optical dispersion relation with well-defined energy gaps and renormalized energy levels, which are accessed using reflection and diffraction experiments.

  12. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    The ability to correlate the atomic- and nanoscale-structure of condensed matter with physical properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and optical) and functionality forms the core of many disciplines. Directing and controlling materials at the quantum-, atomic-, and molecular-levels creates enormous challenges and opportunities across a wide spectrum of critical technologies, including those involving the generation and use of energy. The workshop identified next generation electron scattering and diffraction instruments that are uniquely positioned to address these grand challenges. The workshop participants identified four key areas where the next generation of such instrumentation would have major impact: A – Multidimensional Visualization of Real Materials B – Atomic-scale Molecular Processes C – Photonic Control of Emergence in Quantum Materials D – Evolving Interfaces, Nucleation, and Mass Transport Real materials are comprised of complex three-dimensional arrangements of atoms and defects that directly determine their potential for energy applications. Understanding real materials requires new capabilities for three-dimensional atomic scale tomography and spectroscopy of atomic and electronic structures with unprecedented sensitivity, and with simultaneous spatial and energy resolution. Many molecules are able to selectively and efficiently convert sunlight into other forms of energy, like heat and electric current, or store it in altered chemical bonds. Understanding and controlling such process at the atomic scale require unprecedented time resolution. One of the grand challenges in condensed matter physics is to understand, and ultimately control, emergent phenomena in novel quantum materials that necessitate developing a new generation of instruments that probe the interplay among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with intrinsic time- and length-scale resolutions. Molecules and soft matter require imaging and

  13. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-01-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

  14. A theoretical overview on single hard diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuesthoff, M.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of the Pomeron structure function and its application in Single Hard Diffraction at hadron colliders and in diffractive Deep Inelastic Scattering is critically reviewed. Some alternative approaches are briefly surveyed with a focus on QCD inspired models

  15. Teaching Fraunhofer diffraction via experimental and simulated images in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Alba; Vidal, Josep; Escalera, Juan Carlos; Lizana, Angel; Campos, Juan; Yzuel, Maria

    2012-10-01

    Diffraction is an important phenomenon introduced to Physics university students in a subject of Fundamentals of Optics. In addition, in the Physics Degree syllabus of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, there is an elective subject in Applied Optics. In this subject, diverse diffraction concepts are discussed in-depth from different points of view: theory, experiments in the laboratory and computing exercises. In this work, we have focused on the process of teaching Fraunhofer diffraction through laboratory training. Our approach involves students working in small groups. They visualize and acquire some important diffraction patterns with a CCD camera, such as those produced by a slit, a circular aperture or a grating. First, each group calibrates the CCD camera, that is to say, they obtain the relation between the distances in the diffraction plane in millimeters and in the computer screen in pixels. Afterwards, they measure the significant distances in the diffraction patterns and using the appropriate diffraction formalism, they calculate the size of the analyzed apertures. Concomitantly, students grasp the convolution theorem in the Fourier domain by analyzing the diffraction of 2-D gratings of elemental apertures. Finally, the learners use a specific software to simulate diffraction patterns of different apertures. They can control several parameters: shape, size and number of apertures, 1-D or 2-D gratings, wavelength, focal lens or pixel size.Therefore, the program allows them to reproduce the images obtained experimentally, and generate others by changingcertain parameters. This software has been created in our research group, and it is freely distributed to the students in order to help their learning of diffraction. We have observed that these hands on experiments help students to consolidate their theoretical knowledge of diffraction in a pedagogical and stimulating learning process.

  16. Coherent Diffractive Imaging at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Soft x-ray FEL light sources produce ultrafast x-ray pulses with outstanding high peak brilliance. This might enable the structure determination of proteins that cannot be crystallized. The deposited energy would destroy the molecules completely, but owing to the short pulses the destruction will ideally only happen after the termination of the pulse. In order to address the many challenges that we face in attempting molecular diffraction, we have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The periodicity of these objects gives us much higher scattering signals than uncrystallized proteins would. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a liquid jet. The effects of pulse duration and fluence on the high-resolution structure of the crystals have been studied. Diffraction patterns are recorded at a repetition rate of 30 Hz with pnCCD detectors. This allows us to take 108,000 images per hour. With 2-mega-pixel-detectors this gives a data-rate of more than 400 GB per hour. The automated sorting and evaluation of hundreds of thousands images is another challenge of this kind of experiments. Preliminary results will be presented on our first LCLS experiments. This work was carried out as part of a collaboration, for which Henry Chapman is the spokesperson. The collaboration consists of CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, SLAC, Uppsala University, LLNL, The University of Melbourne, LBNL, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the CFEL. The experiments were carried out using the CAMP apparatus, which was designed and built by the Max Planck ASG at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde; Bouchon, Patrick; Jaeck, Julien; Pelouard, Jean-Luc; Haïdar, Riad

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing

  18. Shaping the spatial and spectral emissivity at the diffraction limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhsiyan, Mathilde [MiNaO, ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, 91761 Palaiseau (France); MiNaO, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN), CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France); Bouchon, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.bouchon@onera.fr; Jaeck, Julien [MiNaO, ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Pelouard, Jean-Luc [MiNaO, Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN), CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, route de Nozay, F-91460 Marcoussis (France); Haïdar, Riad [MiNaO, ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, 91761 Palaiseau (France); École Polytechnique, Département de Physique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-12-21

    Metasurfaces have attracted a growing interest for their ability to artificially tailor an electromagnetic response on various spectral ranges. In particular, thermal sources with unprecedented abilities, such as directionality or monochromaticity, have been achieved. However, these metasurfaces exhibit homogeneous optical properties whereas the spatial modulation of the emissivity up to the wavelength scale is at the crux of the design of original emitters. In this letter, we study an inhomogeneous metasurface made of a nonperiodic set of optical nano-antennas that spatially and spectrally control the emitted light up to the diffraction limit. Each antenna acts as an independent deep subwavelength emitter for given polarization and wavelength. Their juxtaposition at the subwavelength scale encodes far field multispectral and polarized images. This opens up promising breakthroughs for applications such as optical storage, anti-counterfeit devices, and multispectral emitters for biochemical sensing.

  19. Optical asymmetric watermarking using modified wavelet fusion and diffractive imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Isha; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2015-05-01

    In most of the existing image encryption algorithms the generated keys are in the form of a noise like distribution with a uniform distributed histogram. However, the noise like distribution is an apparent sign indicating the presence of the keys. If the keys are to be transferred through some communication channels, then this may lead to a security problem. This is because; the noise like features may easily catch people's attention and bring more attacks. To address this problem it is required to transfer the keys to some other meaningful images to disguise the attackers. The watermarking schemes are complementary to image encryption schemes. In most of the iterative encryption schemes, support constraints play an important role of the keys in order to decrypt the meaningful data. In this article, we have transferred the support constraints which are generated by axial translation of CCD camera using amplitude-, and phase- truncation approach, into different meaningful images. This has been done by developing modified fusion technique in wavelet transform domain. The second issue is, in case, the meaningful images are caught by the attacker then how to solve the copyright protection. To resolve this issue, watermark detection plays a crucial role. For this purpose, it is necessary to recover the original image using the retrieved watermarks/support constraints. To address this issue, four asymmetric keys have been generated corresponding to each watermarked image to retrieve the watermarks. For decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is applied to extract the plain-texts from corresponding retrieved watermarks.

  20. An experiment in diffractive physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this talk is to show one of the next future experiment in diffractive Physics which will be installed at the DO experiment at Tevatron/Fermilab for run II, and the importance for Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) as the theory of the strong interactions. The apparatus that we have developed is the Forward Proton Detector (FPD) to be introduced on the beam line of the Tevatron at both sides of the DO detector. The FPD is composed by a set of Roman Pots as we will see in the text below

  1. Magnetic structures: neutron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouree-Vigneron, F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is often an unequivocal method for determining magnetic structures. Here we present some typical examples, stressing the sequence through experiments, data analysis, interpretation and modelisation. Two series of compounds are chosen: Tb Ni 2 Ge 2 and RBe 13 (R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er). Depending on the nature of the elements, the magnetic structures produced can be commensurate, incommensurate or even show a transition between two such phases as a function of temperature. A model, taking magnetic exchange and anisotropy into account, will be presented in the case of commensurate-incommensurate magnetic transitions in RBe 13

  2. Hard scattering and a diffractive trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-02-01

    Conclusions concerning the properties of hard scattering in diffractively produced systems are summarized. One motivation for studying diffractive hard scattering is to investigate the interface between Regge theory and perturbative QCD. Another is to see whether diffractive triggering can result in an improvement in the signal-to-background ratio of measurements of production of very heavy quarks. 5 refs

  3. Optical computing, optical memory, and SBIRs at Foster-Miller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domash, Lawrence H.

    1994-03-01

    A desktop design and manufacturing system for binary diffractive elements, MacBEEP, was developed with the optical researcher in mind. Optical processing systems for specialized tasks such as cellular automation computation and fractal measurement were constructed. A new family of switchable holograms has enabled several applications for control of laser beams in optical memories. New spatial light modulators and optical logic elements have been demonstrated based on a more manufacturable semiconductor technology. Novel synthetic and polymeric nonlinear materials for optical storage are under development in an integrated memory architecture. SBIR programs enable creative contributions from smaller companies, both product oriented and technology oriented, and support advances that might not otherwise be developed.

  4. A modified phase diversity wavefront sensor with a diffraction grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Qun; Huang Lin-Hai; Gu Nai-Ting; Rao Chang-Hui

    2012-01-01

    The phase diversity wavefront sensor is one of the tools used to estimate wavefront aberration, and it is often used as a wavefront sensor in adaptive optics systems. However, the performance of the traditional phase diversity wavefront sensor is limited by the accuracy and dynamic ranges of the intensity distribution at the focus and defocus positions of the CCD camera. In this paper, a modified phase diversity wavefront sensor based on a diffraction grating is proposed to improve the ability to measure the wavefront aberration with larger amplitude and higher spatial frequency. The basic principle and the optics construction of the proposed method are also described in detail. The noise propagation property of the proposed method is also analysed by using the numerical simulation method, and comparison between the diffraction grating phase diversity wavefront sensor and the traditional phase diversity wavefront sensor is also made. The simulation results show that the diffraction grating phase diversity wavefront sensor can obviously improve the ability to measure the wavefront aberration, especially the wavefront aberration with larger amplitude and higher spatial frequency

  5. Wave-guided optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Vizsnyiczai, George

    2012-01-01

    This work primarily aims to fabricate and use two photon polymerization (2PP) microstructures capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. We have integrated optical waveguides into the structures and therefore have freestanding waveguides, which can be positioned anywhe...... bridge the diffraction barrier. This structure-mediated paradigm may be carried forward to open new possibilities for exploiting beams from far-field optics down to the subwavelength domain....

  6. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  7. Growth, optical, thermal and mechanical characterization of an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Growth from solution; X-ray diffraction; organic compounds; optical properties. 1. Introduction. Materials exhibiting nonlinear optical (NLO) properties have been studied ..... The fracture toughness (Kc) (Marshall and Lawn 1986) is given by.

  8. Biological applications of near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, Marco H.P.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, Alain; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) is a true optical microscopic technique allowing fluorescence, absorption, reflection and polarization contrast with the additional advantage of nanometer lateral resolution, unlimited by diffraction and operation at ambient conditions. NSOM based on

  9. An engineered design of a diffractive mask for high precision astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Kaitlin; Ammons, S. Mark; Garrel, Vincent; Marin, Eduardo; Sivo, Gaetano; Bendek, Eduardo; Guyon, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    AutoCAD, Zemax Optic Studio 15, and Interactive Data Language (IDL) with the Proper Library are used to computationally model and test a diffractive mask (DiM) suitable for use in the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on the Gemini South Telescope. Systematic errors in telescope imagery are produced when the light travels through the adaptive optics system of the telescope. DiM is a transparent, flat optic with a pattern of miniscule dots lithographically applied to it. It is added ahead of the adaptive optics system in the telescope in order to produce diffraction spots that will encode systematic errors in the optics after it. Once these errors are encoded, they can be corrected for. DiM will allow for more accurate measurements in astrometry and thus improve exoplanet detection. The mechanics and physical attributes of the DiM are modeled in AutoCAD. Zemax models the ray propagation of point sources of light through the telescope. IDL and Proper simulate the wavefront and image results of the telescope. Aberrations are added to the Zemax and IDL models to test how the diffraction spots from the DiM change in the final images. Based on the Zemax and IDL results, the diffraction spots are able to encode the systematic aberrations.

  10. Measurement system for diffraction efficiency of convex gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Xin-hua; Zhou, Jian-kang; Zhao, Zhi-cheng; Liu, Quan; Luo, Chao; Wang, Xiao-feng; Tang, Min-xue; Shen, Wei-min

    2017-08-01

    A measurement system for diffraction efficiency of convex gratings is designed. The measurement system mainly includes four components as a light source, a front system, a dispersing system that contains a convex grating, and a detector. Based on the definition and measuring principle of diffraction efficiency, the optical scheme of the measurement system is analyzed and the design result is given. Then, in order to validate the feasibility of the designed system, the measurement system is set up and the diffraction efficiency of a convex grating with the aperture of 35 mm, the curvature-radius of 72mm, the blazed angle of 6.4°, the grating period of 2.5μm and the working waveband of 400nm-900nm is tested. Based on GUM (Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement), the uncertainties in the measuring results are evaluated. The measured diffraction efficiency data are compared to the theoretical ones, which are calculated based on the grating groove parameters got by an atomic force microscope and Rigorous Couple Wave Analysis, and the reliability of the measurement system is illustrated. Finally, the measurement performance of the system is analyzed and tested. The results show that, the testing accuracy, the testing stability and the testing repeatability are 2.5%, 0.085% and 3.5% , respectively.

  11. A review and reassessment of diffraction, scattering, and shadows in electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Matthew J.; Sorensen, Christopher M.

    2018-05-01

    The concepts of diffraction and scattering are well known and considered fundamental in optics and other wave phenomena. For any type of wave, one way to define diffraction is the spreading of waves, i.e., no change in the average propagation direction, while scattering is the deflection of waves with a clear change of propagation direction. However, the terms "diffraction" and "scattering" are often used interchangeably, and hence, a clear distinction between the two is difficult to find. This review considers electromagnetic waves and retains the simple definition that diffraction is the spreading of waves but demonstrates that all diffraction patterns are the result of scattering. It is shown that for electromagnetic waves, the "diffracted" wave from an object is the Ewald-Oseen extinction wave in the far-field zone. The intensity distribution of this wave yields what is commonly called the diffraction pattern. Moreover, this is the same Ewald-Oseen wave that cancels the incident wave inside the object and thereafter continues to do so immediately behind the object to create a shadow. If the object is much wider than the beam but has a hole, e.g., a screen with an aperture, the Ewald-Oseen extinction wave creates the shadow behind the screen and the incident light that passes through the aperture creates the diffraction pattern. This point of view also illustrates Babinet's principle. Thus, it is the Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem that binds together diffraction, scattering, and shadows.

  12. The analysis of powder diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, W.I.F.; Harrison, W.T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews neutron powder diffraction data analysis, with emphasis on the structural aspects of powder diffraction and the future possibilities afforded by the latest generation of very high resolution neutron and x-ray powder diffractometers. Traditional x-ray powder diffraction techniques are outlined. Structural studies by powder diffraction are discussed with respect to the Rietveld method, and a case study in the Rietveld refinement method and developments of the Rietveld method are described. Finally studies using high resolution powder diffraction at the Spallation Neutron Source, ISIS at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are summarized. (U.K.)

  13. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masahiko, E-mail: masahiko@spring8.or.jp; Katsuya, Yoshio, E-mail: katsuya@spring8.or.jp; Sakata, Osami, E-mail: SAKATA.Osami@nims.go.jp [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} crystal structure.

  14. Rietveld analysis using powder diffraction data with anomalous scattering effect obtained by focused beam flat sample method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masahiko; Katsuya, Yoshio; Sakata, Osami

    2016-01-01

    Focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM) is a new trial for synchrotron powder diffraction method, which is a combination of beam focusing optics, flat shape powder sample and area detectors. The method has advantages for X-ray diffraction experiments applying anomalous scattering effect (anomalous diffraction), because of 1. Absorption correction without approximation, 2. High intensity X-rays of focused incident beams and high signal noise ratio of diffracted X-rays 3. Rapid data collection with area detectors. We applied the FFM to anomalous diffraction experiments and collected synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of CoFe_2O_4 (inverse spinel structure) using X-rays near Fe K absorption edge, which can distinguish Co and Fe by anomalous scattering effect. We conducted Rietveld analyses with the obtained powder diffraction data and successfully determined the distribution of Co and Fe ions in CoFe_2O_4 crystal structure.

  15. Spatial and spectral image distortions caused by diffraction of an ordinary polarised light beam by an ultrasonic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machikhin, A S; Pozhar, V E [Scientific and Technological Centre of Unique Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    We consider the problem of determining the spatial and spectral image distortions arising from anisotropic diffraction by ultrasonic waves in crystals with ordinary polarised light (o → e). By neglecting the small-birefringence approximation, we obtain analytical solutions that describe the dependence of the diffraction angles and wave mismatch on the acousto-optic (AO) interaction geometry and crystal parameters. The formulas derived allow one to calculate and analyse the magnitude of diffraction-induced spatial and spectral image distortions and to identify the main types of distortions: chromatic compression and trapezoidal deformation. A comparison of the values of these distortions in the diffraction of ordinary and extraordinary polarised light shows that they are almost equal in magnitude and opposite in signs, so that consistent diffraction (o → e → o or e → o → e) in two identical AO cells rotated through 180° in the plane of diffraction can compensate for these distortions. (diffraction of radiation)

  16. Self-diffraction and Z-scan studies in organic dye doped thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhana Sundari, R.; Palanisamy, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    Self-diffraction in Acid Red 87 (eosin Y) dye doped thin films is studied using argon ion laser (514.5 nm). Growth of self-diffraction grating is monitored by measuring intensities of various diffraction orders. This study has resulted in the observation of phase variation between the contributing beams in any diffracted order. This change of phase is measured at various stages of grating formation. Due to self-phase modulation, circular concentric rings pattern is obtained in the far field. The observed fluctuation in this pattern may be due to the phase variation between the contributing beams in any diffracted order. Z-scan technique is used to study the optical non-linearity of the sample

  17. Characterization of diffraction gratings by use of a tabletop soft-x-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminario, Max; Rocca, Jorge J.; Depine, Ricardo A.; Bach, Benny; Bach, Bernie

    2001-01-01

    We have demonstrated the use of a high-repetition-rate 46.9-mm tabletop laser to characterize diffraction gratings designed for grazing-incidence operation in the soft-x-ray spectral region. The efficiencies for various diffraction orders were measured as a function of angle of incidence and compared with the results of model simulations. This measurement technique provides benchmarks with which to improve electromagnetic codes used in the design of soft-x-ray diffraction gratings. The results illustrate the potential of compact tabletop soft-x-ray lasers for use as a new tool for characterization of short-wavelength optics at the manufacturer's site

  18. Axial channeling in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, A.; Lehmpfuhl, G.

    1978-01-01

    Kossel patterns from Silicon and Niobium were obtained with a convergent electron beam. An intensity maximum in the direction of the zone axes [001] and [111] of Nb was interpreted as axial channeling. The intensity distribution in Kossel patterns was calculated by means of the Bloch wave picture of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Particularly zone axis patterns were calculated for different substance-energy combinations and they were compared with experimental observations. The intensity distribution in the calculated Kossel patterns was very sensitive to the model of absorption and it was found that a treatment of the absorption close to the model of Humphreys and Hirsch [Phil. Mag. 18, 115 (1968)] gave the best agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore it is shown which Bloch waves are important for the intensity distribution in the Kossel patterns, how they are absorbed and how they change with energy. (orig.) [de

  19. Optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poker, D.B.; Ortiz, C.

    1989-01-01

    This book reports on: Diamond films, Synthesis of optical materials, Structure related optical properties, Radiation effects in optical materials, Characterization of optical materials, Deposition of optical thin films, and Optical fibers and waveguides

  20. Anisotropic light diffraction in crystals with a large acoustic-energy walk-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakshy, V. I.; Voloshin, A. S.; Molchanov, V. Ya.

    2014-11-01

    The influence of energy walk-off in an acoustic beam on the characteristic of anisotropic Bragg diffraction of light has been investigated by the example of paratellurite crystal. The angular and frequency characteristics of acousto-optic diffraction have been calculated in wide ranges of ultrasound frequencies and Bragg angles using the modified Raman-Nath equations. It is shown that the walk-off of an acoustic beam may change (either widen or narrow) significantly the frequency and angular ranges. The calculation results have been experimentally checked on an acousto-optic cell made of 10.5°-cut paratellurite crystal.

  1. Color image cryptosystem using Fresnel diffraction and phase modulation in an expanded fractional Fourier transform domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hang; Liu, Zhengjun; Chen, Qi; Blondel, Walter; Varis, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    In this letter, what we believe is a new technique for optical color image encryption by using Fresnel diffraction and a phase modulation in an extended fractional Fourier transform domain is proposed. Different from the RGB component separation based method, the color image is converted into one component by improved Chirikov mapping. The encryption system is addressed with Fresnel diffraction and phase modulation. A pair of lenses is placed into the fractional Fourier transform system for the modulation of beam propagation. The structure parameters of the optical system and parameters in Chirikov mapping serve as extra keys. Some numerical simulations are given to test the validity of the proposed cryptosystem.

  2. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of ∼0.04 o and an elastic strain resolution of ∼7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  3. An improved ptychographical phase retrieval algorithm for diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiden, Andrew M.; Rodenburg, John M.

    2009-01-01

    The ptychographical iterative engine (or PIE) is a recently developed phase retrieval algorithm that employs a series of diffraction patterns recorded as a known illumination function is translated to a set of overlapping positions relative to a target sample. The technique has been demonstrated successfully at optical and X-ray wavelengths and has been shown to be robust to detector noise and to converge considerably faster than support-based phase retrieval methods. In this paper, the PIE is extended so that the requirement for an accurate model of the illumination function is removed.

  4. Near diffraction limited mid-IR spectromicroscopy using frequency upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    morphological and spectral imaging. Recent developments in nonlinear frequency upconversion, have demonstrated the potential to perform both imaging and spectroscopy in the mid-IR range at unparalleled low levels of illumination, the low upconversion detector noise being orders of magnitude below competing...... technologies. With these applications in mind, we have incorporated microscopy optics into an image upconversion system, achieving near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the 3 μm range. Spectroscopic information is further acquired by appropriate control of the phase match condition of the upconversion...

  5. LAPU2: a laser pulse propagation code with diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, J.C.; Dickman, D.O.

    1978-03-01

    Complete descriptions of the mathematical models and numerical methods used in the code LAPU2 are presented. This code can be used to study the propagation with diffraction of a temporally finite pulse through a sequence of resonant media and simple optical components. The treatment assumes cylindrical symmetry and allows nonlinear refractive indices. An unlimited number of different media can be distributed along the propagation path of the pulse. A complete users guide to input data is given as well as a FORTRAN listing of the code

  6. Introduction to the theory of low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerland, A.; Tomasek, M.

    1975-01-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic principles of the theory of low-energy electron diffraction is presented. General scattering theory is used to classify the hitherto known approaches to the problem (optical potential and one-electron approximation; formal scattering theory: Born expansion and multiple scattering; translational symmetry: Ewald construction; classification of LEED theories by means of the T matrix; pseudokinematical theory for crystal with clean surface and with an adsorbed monomolecular layer; dynamical theory; inclusion of inelastic collisions; discussion of a simple example by means of the band-structure approach)

  7. Micron-scale lens array having diffracting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2013-10-29

    A novel micron-scale lens, a microlens, is engineered to concentrate light efficiently onto an area of interest, such as a small, light-sensitive detector element in an integrated electronic device. Existing microlens designs imitate the form of large-scale lenses and are less effective at small sizes. The microlenses described herein have been designed to accommodate diffraction effects, which dominate the behavior of light at small length scales. Thus a new class of light-concentrating optical elements with much higher relative performance has been created. Furthermore, the new designs are much easier to fabricate than previous designs.

  8. Diffraction efficiency enhancement of femtosecond laser-engraved diffraction gratings due to CO2 laser polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hun-Kook; Jung, Deok; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Yong-Tak; Kim, Jin-Tae; Ahsan, Shamim

    2014-01-01

    This research demonstrates laser-assisted fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in fused-silica glass samples. Initially, femtosecond laser pulses are used to engrave diffraction gratings on the glass surfaces. Then, these micro-patterned glass samples undergo CO 2 laser polishing process. unpolished diffraction gratings encoded in the glass samples show an overall diffraction efficiency of 18.1%. diffraction gratings imprinted on the glass samples and then polished four times by using a CO 2 laser beam attain a diffraction efficiency of 32.7%. We also investigate the diffraction patterns of the diffraction gratings encoded on fused-silica glass surfaces. The proposed CO 2 laser polishing technique shows great potential in patterning high-efficiency diffraction gratings on the surfaces of various transparent materials.

  9. Inelastic nucleon diffraction at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goggi, G.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments carried out at ISR and at FNAL which have yielded a substantial amount of data on double diffraction processes, which were unambiguously indentified and measured and which provide new tools to study the dynamical properties shared by different classes of diffractive reactions are identified. In this review interest is focused on the experimental aspects of inclusive and exclusive results both on single and double diffraction and on the problems arising from their comparison. Problems covered include; inclusive and semi-inclusive diffraction, multiparticle inclusive studies, single-particle inclusive studies, resonance region, high mass region, exclusive single diffractive reactions, mass spectra, cross sections, t-dependence, decay angular properties, and double diffraction. (U.K.)

  10. Handbook of nano-optics and nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    In the 1990s, optical technology and photonics industry developed fast, but further progress became difficult due to a fundamental limit of light known as the diffraction limit. This limit could be overcome using the novel technology of nano-optics or nanophotonics in which the size of the electromagnetic field is decreased down to the nanoscale and is used as a carrier for signal transmission, processing, and fabrication. Such a decrease beyond the diffraction limit is possible by using optical near-fields. The true nature of nano-optics and nanophotonics involves not only their abilities to meet the above requirements but also their abilities to realize qualitative innovations in photonic devices, fabrication techniques, energy conversion and information processing systems. The objective of this work is to review the innovations of optical science and technology by nano-optics and nanophotonics. While in conventional optical science and technology, light and matter are discussed separately, in nano-optics a...

  11. Theory of edge diffraction in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Ufimtsev, Pyotr

    2009-01-01

    This book is an essential resource for researchers involved in designing antennas and RCS calculations. It is also useful for students studying high frequency diffraction techniques. It contains basic original ideas of the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), examples of its practical application, and its validation by the mathematical theory of diffraction. The derived analytic expressions are convenient for numerical calculations and clearly illustrate the physical structure of the scattered field.

  12. Nonlinear diffraction from a virtual beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saltiel, Solomon M.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    We observe experimentally a novel type of nonlinear diffraction in the process of two-wave mixing on a nonlinear quadratic grating.We demonstrate that when the nonlinear grating is illuminated simultaneously by two noncollinear beams, a second-harmonic diffraction pattern is generated by a virtual...... beam propagating along the bisector of the two pump beams. The observed iffraction phenomena is a purely nonlinear effect that has no analogue in linear diffraction...

  13. Diffraction limit of refractive compound lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A compound X-ray and neutron lenses is an array of lenses with a common axis. The resolution limited by aberration and by diffraction. Diffraction limit comes from theory based on absorption aperture of the compound refractive lenses. Beam passing through transparent lenses form Airy pattern. Results of calculation of diffraction resolution limit for non-transparent X-ray and neutron lenses are discussed. (authors)

  14. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  15. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  16. Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.; Rockefeller U.

    2005-01-01

    Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron (bar p)p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held

  17. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Prospect for application of compact accelerator-based neutron source to neutron engineering diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Yoshimasa, E-mail: yoshimasa.ikeda@riken.jp [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Taketani, Atsushi; Takamura, Masato; Sunaga, Hideyuki [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kumagai, Masayoshi [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8857 (Japan); Oba, Yojiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Otake, Yoshie [Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [Materials Sciences Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2016-10-11

    A compact accelerator-based neutron source has been lately discussed on engineering applications such as transmission imaging and small angle scattering as well as reflectometry. However, nobody considers using it for neutron diffraction experiment because of its low neutron flux. In this study, therefore, the neutron diffraction experiments are carried out using Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source (RANS), to clarify the capability of the compact neutron source for neutron engineering diffraction. The diffraction pattern from a ferritic steel was successfully measured by suitable arrangement of the optical system to reduce the background noise, and it was confirmed that the recognizable diffraction pattern can be measured by a large sampling volume with 10 mm in cubic for an acceptable measurement time, i.e. 10 min. The minimum resolution of the 110 reflection for RANS is approximately 2.5% at 8 μs of the proton pulse width, which is insufficient to perform the strain measurement by neutron diffraction. The moderation time width at the wavelength corresponding to the 110 reflection is estimated to be approximately 30 μs, which is the most dominant factor to determine the resolution. Therefore, refinements of the moderator system to decrease the moderation time by decreasing a thickness of the moderator or by applying the decoupler system or application of the angular dispersive neutron diffraction technique are important to improve the resolution of the diffraction experiment using the compact neutron source. In contrast, the texture evolution due to plastic deformation was successfully observed by measuring a change in the diffraction peak intensity by RANS. Furthermore, the volume fraction of the austenitic phase in the dual phase mock specimen was also successfully evaluated by fitting the diffraction pattern using a Rietveld code. Consequently, RANS has been proved to be capable for neutron engineering diffraction aiming for the easy access

  19. Modified Linnik microscopic interferometry for quantitative depth evaluation of diffraction-limited microgroove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shiwei; Takahashi, Satoru; Michihata, Masaki; Takamasu, Kiyoshi

    2018-05-01

    The quality control of microgrooves is extremely crucial to ensure the performance and stability of microstructures and improve their fabrication efficiency. This paper introduces a novel optical inspection method and a modified Linnik microscopic interferometer measurement system to detect the depth of microgrooves with a width less than the diffraction limit. Using this optical method, the depth of diffraction-limited microgrooves can be related to the near-field optical phase difference, which cannot be practically observed but can be computed from practical far-field observations. Thus, a modified Linnik microscopic interferometer system based on three identical objective lenses and an optical path reversibility principle were developed. In addition, experiments for standard grating microgrooves on the silicon surface were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility and repeatability of the proposed method and developed measurement system.

  20. Diffractive charm and jet production at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savin, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    A new high precision inclusive measurement of the diffractive production of D* ± (2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in the kinematic region Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 , 0.02 IP 2 2 , 165 2 , χ IP < 0.03 are presented. Diffractive parton densities extracted using a NLO DGLAP QCD fit are used for comparisons with diffractive DIS and PHP dijet and open charm cross sections at HERA and the Tevatron, thus testing the factorization properties of hard diffraction

  1. Diffractive interactions of hadrons at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulianos, K.

    1982-01-01

    Elastic scattering, inclusive single diffraction dissociation and total cross section results are reviewed, with emphasis on the inter-relationship among the parameters that characterize these processes

  2. Advanced optical instruments technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mike; Chrisp, Michael; Cheng, Li-Jen; Eng, Sverre; Glavich, Thomas; Goad, Larry; Jones, Bill; Kaarat, Philip; Nein, Max; Robinson, William

    1992-08-01

    The science objectives for proposed NASA missions for the next decades push the state of the art in sensitivity and spatial resolution over a wide range of wavelengths, including the x-ray to the submillimeter. While some of the proposed missions are larger and more sensitive versions of familiar concepts, such as the next generation space telescope, others use concepts, common on the Earth, but new to space, such as optical interferometry, in order to provide spatial resolutions impossible with other concepts. However, despite their architecture, the performance of all of the proposed missions depends critically on the back-end instruments that process the collected energy to produce scientifically interesting outputs. The Advanced Optical Instruments Technology panel was chartered with defining technology development plans that would best improve optical instrument performance for future astrophysics missions. At this workshop the optical instrument was defined as the set of optical components that reimage the light from the telescope onto the detectors to provide information about the spatial, spectral, and polarization properties of the light. This definition was used to distinguish the optical instrument technology issues from those associated with the telescope, which were covered by a separate panel. The panel identified several areas for optical component technology development: diffraction gratings; tunable filters; interferometric beam combiners; optical materials; and fiber optics. The panel also determined that stray light suppression instruments, such as coronagraphs and nulling interferometers, were in need of general development to support future astrophysics needs.

  3. Diffraction phase microscopy realized with an automatic digital pinhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cheng; Zhou, Renjie; Kuang, Cuifang; Zhao, Guangyuan; Zhang, Zhimin; Liu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    We report a novel approach to diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) with automatic pinhole alignment. The pinhole, which serves as a spatial low-pass filter to generate a uniform reference beam, is made out of a liquid crystal display (LCD) device that allows for electrical control. We have made DPM more accessible to users, while maintaining high phase measurement sensitivity and accuracy, through exploring low cost optical components and replacing the tedious pinhole alignment process with an automatic pinhole optical alignment procedure. Due to its flexibility in modifying the size and shape, this LCD device serves as a universal filter, requiring no future replacement. Moreover, a graphic user interface for real-time phase imaging has been also developed by using a USB CMOS camera. Experimental results of height maps of beads sample and live red blood cells (RBCs) dynamics are also presented, making this system ready for broad adaption to biological imaging and material metrology.

  4. The application of diffraction grating in the design of virtual reality (VR) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiekang; Huang, Qitai; Guan, Min

    2017-10-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) products serve for human eyes ultimately, and the optical properties of VR optical systems must be consistent with the characteristic of human eyes. The monocular coaxial VR optical system is simulated in ZEMAX. A diffraction grating is added to the optical surface next to the eye, and the lights emitted from the diffraction grating are deflected, which can forming an asymmetrical field of view(FOV). Then the lateral chromatic aberration caused by the diffraction grating was corrected by the chromatic dispersion of the prism. Finally, the aspheric surface was added to further optimum design. During the optical design of the system, how to balance the dispersion of the diffraction grating and the prism is the main problem. The balance was achieved by adjusting the parameters of the grating and the prism constantly, and then using aspheric surfaces finally. In order to make the asymmetric FOV of the system consistent with the angle of the visual axis, and to ensure the stereo vision area clear, the smaller half FOV of monocular system is required to reach 30°. Eventually, a system with asymmetrical FOV of 30°+40° was designed. In addition, the aberration curve of the system was analyzed by ZEMAX, and the binocular FOV was calculated according to the principle of binocular overlap. The results show that the asymmetry of FOV of VR monocular optical system can fit to human eyes and the imaging quality match for the human visual characteristics. At the same time, the diffraction grating increases binocular FOV, which decreases the requirement for the design FOV of monocular system.

  5. Optic neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  6. Experimental observation of acoustic sub-harmonic diffraction by a grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jingfei, E-mail: benjamin.jf.liu@gatech.edu; Declercq, Nico F., E-mail: declercqdepatin@gatech.edu [Laboratory for Ultrasonic Nondestructive Evaluation “LUNE,” Georgia Tech Lorraine, Georgia Tech-CNRS UMI2958, Georgia Institute of Technology, 2, rue Marconi, Metz 57070 (France)

    2014-06-28

    A diffraction grating is a spatial filter causing sound waves or optical waves to reflect in directions determined by the frequency of the waves and the period of the grating. The classical grating equation is the governing principle that has successfully described the diffraction phenomena caused by gratings. However, in this work, we show experimental observation of the so-called sub-harmonic diffraction in acoustics that cannot be explained by the classical grating equation. Experiments indicate two physical phenomena causing the effect: internal scattering effects within the corrugation causing a phase shift and nonlinear acoustic effects generating new frequencies. This discovery expands our current understanding of the diffraction phenomenon, and it also makes it possible to better design spatial diffraction spectra, such as a rainbow effect in optics with a more complicated color spectrum than a traditional rainbow. The discovery reveals also a possibly new technique to study nonlinear acoustics by exploitation of the natural spatial filtering effect inherent to an acoustic diffraction grating.

  7. X-ray diffraction of multilayers and superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, W.J.; Hornstra, J.; Lobeek, D.J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion formulae for calculating the reflected amplitude ratio of multilayers and superlattices have been derived from the Takagi-Taupin differential equations, which describe the dynamical diffraction of X-rays in deformed crystals. Calculated rocking curves of complicated layered structures, such as non-ideal superlattices on perfect crystals, are shown to be in good agreement with observed diffraction profiles. The kinematical theory can save computing time only in the case of an ideal superlattice, for which a geometric series can be used, but the reflections must be below 10% so that multiple reflections can be neglected. For a perfect crystal of arbitrary thickness the absorption at the center of the dynamical reflection is found to be proportional to the square root of the reflectivity. Sputter-deposited periodic multilayers of tungsten and carbon can be considered as an artificial crystal, for which dynamical X-ray diffraction calculations give results very similar to those of a macroscopic optical description in terms of the complex index of refraction and Fresnel reflection coefficients. (orig.)

  8. Fundamentals of powder x-ray diffraction practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The goal of powder Xray diffraction is to gain information about a specimen or sample. Key aspects of this goal are 1. the sample selection, preparation and presentation; 2. the data collection process and conditions; 3. the interaction between these and the interpretation of the data. The 'ideal' powder (or polycrystalline) xray diffraction sample is fine grained, randomly orientated, homogenous and representative. There exists standard sample selection and preparation techniques for powders - sometimes however, the required information must be gained by alternate sample selection and preparation techniques. While there are few variables in the data collection process, there are some significant ones such as matching diffractometer resolution and intensity to the data collection goal whether that is phase identity, quantitative analysis or structure refinement, etc. There are also options of optical arrangement (Bragg-Brintano versus parallel beam versus Debye-Scherrer). One important aspect of the collection process is the assessment of the data quality. Powder xray diffraction has many applications from the straight-forward confirmation of phase identity and purity to structural analysis. Some of these applications will be considered and the interaction between the goal of the application and aspects of sample selection. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  9. Structure determination of modulated structures by powder X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, Z.Y.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Sun, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 11 (2016), s. 1351-1362 ISSN 2052-1553 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * incommensurate structure * powder diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  10. X-ray topography and multiple diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A short summary on X-ray topography, which is based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, is made. The applications and properties related to the use of the multiple diffraction technique are analized and discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  11. Diffraction of radiation from channelled charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskij, V.G.; Grubich, A.O.; Dubovskaya, I.Ya.

    1978-01-01

    An explicit expression for cross-section and radiation spectrum at diffraction is calculated. It is shown that photons emitted by channelled particles form a typical diffraction pattern which contains information about the crystal structure. It is also shown that the change of the longitudinal energy of the particle caused by the radiation braking becomes important when the particle energy is increased. (author)

  12. Classical system underlying a diffracting quantum billiard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manan Jain

    2018-01-05

    Jan 5, 2018 ... Wave equation; rays; quantum chaos. PACS Nos 03.65.Ge; 05.45.Mt; 42.25.Fx. 1. Introduction. Diffraction [1] is a complex wave phenomenon which manifests classically and quantum mechanically. Among a wide range of systems where diffraction becomes important, there is an interesting situation of.

  13. Correlations in the hadronic double diffractive dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldegol, Alexandre.

    1991-05-01

    A given reaction of double diffractive dissociation is studied based on the three-component Deck Model. The correlations among the diffractive slope, the effective mass of the dissociated particle sub-system and the dissociation angle in the Gottfried-Jackson are studied based in this model. 9 refs, 19 figs

  14. Restoration of diffracted far field at the output of circular diffraction waveplate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovhannisyan, D; Margaryan, H; Abrahamyan, V; Hakobyan, N; Tabiryan, N

    2014-01-01

    The light propagation in an anisotropic periodic media, such us circular diffraction waveplate (CDW) by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique is studied. The FDTD numerical simulation and the subsequent Fourier transform of the diffracted electric near field was been used for study of ability of CDW to diffract a laser beam and simultaneously convert polarization state. The FDTD simulation results used to restore the diffracted electric far field at the CDW output. an abstract

  15. Uniting Electron Crystallography and Powder Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shankland, Kenneth; Meshi, Louisa; Avilov, Anatoly; David, William

    2012-01-01

    The polycrystalline and nanocrystalline states play an increasingly important role in exploiting the properties of materials, encompassing applications as diverse as pharmaceuticals, catalysts, solar cells and energy storage. A knowledge of the three-dimensional atomic and molecular structure of materials is essential for understanding and controlling their properties, yet traditional single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods lose their power when only polycrystalline and nanocrystalline samples are available. It is here that powder diffraction and single-crystal electron diffraction techniques take over, substantially extending the range of applicability of the crystallographic principles of structure determination.  This volume, a collection of teaching contributions presented at the Crystallographic Course in Erice in 2011, clearly describes the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of powder diffraction and electron diffraction methods in materials characterisation, encompassing a diverse range of discipl...

  16. Extinction properties of metallic nanowires: Quantum diffraction and retardation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Afshin, E-mail: a.moradi@kut.ac.ir [Department of Engineering Physics, Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nano Sciences, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-09

    The standard Mie theory for the extinction of electromagnetic radiation by a metal cylinder that is irradiated by a normally incident plane wave is extended to the case of a metallic nanowire, where two quantum longitudinal waves are excited. The modification of the Mie theory due to quantum diffraction effects is included by employing the quantum hydrodynamic approximation and applying the appropriate quantum additional boundary conditions. The extinction properties of the system and their differences with previous treatments based on the standard local and nonlocal models are shown. Also, as an example the validity of the nonretarded approximation in the quantum nonlocal optical response of a sodium nanowire is discussed. - Highlights: • Extinction properties of metallic nanowires in the presence of quantum diffraction and retardation effects are studied. • The differences of new results with previous findings based on the standard local and nonlocal models are shown. • The validity of the nonretarded approximation in the quantum nonlocal optical response of a sodium nanowire is discussed.

  17. A credit card verifier structure using diffraction and spectroscopy concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Intaravanne, Yuttana

    2008-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an angle-multiplexing based optical structure for verifying a credit card. Our key idea comes from the fact that the fine detail of the embossed hologram stamped on the credit card is hard to duplicate and therefore its key color features can be used for distinguishing between the real and counterfeit ones. As the embossed hologram is a diffractive optical element, we choose to shine one at a time a number of broadband lightsources, each at different incident angle, on the embossed hologram of the credit card in such a way that different color spectra per incident angle beam is diffracted and separated in space. In this way, the number of pixels of each color plane is investigated. Then we apply a feed forward back propagation neural network configuration to separate the counterfeit credit card from the real one. Our experimental demonstration using two off-the-shelf broadband white light emitting diodes, one digital camera, a 3-layer neural network, and a notebook computer can identify all 69 counterfeit credit cards from eight real credit cards.

  18. Diffraction patterns in Fresnel approximation of periodic objects for a colorimeter of two apertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Reynoso, Jose-German R.; Suarez-Romero, Jose G.; Hurtado-Ramos, Juan B.; Tepichin-Rodriguez, Eduardo; Solorio-Leyva, Juan Carlos

    2004-10-01

    In this work, we present a study of Fresnel diffraction of periodic structures in an optical system of two apertures. This system of two apertures was used successfully for measuring color in textile samples solving the problems of illumination and directionality that present current commercial equipments. However, the system is sensible to the spatial frequency of the periodic sample"s area enclosed in its optical field of view. The study of Fresnel diffraction allows us to establish criteria for geometrical parameters of measurements in order to assure invariance in angular rotations and spatial positions. In this work, we use the theory of partial coherence to calculate the diffraction through two continuous apertures. In the calculation process, we use the concept of point-spread function of the system for partial coherence, in this way we avoid complicated statistical processes commonly used in the partial coherence theory.

  19. Fresnel diffraction at an opaque strip expressed by means of asymptotic representations of Fresnel integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Petr; Horváth, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 6 (2012), s. 1071-1077 ISSN 1084-7529 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002; GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Fresnel integrals * Fresnel diffraction Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.665, year: 2012

  20. Measuring the Shock Stage of Asteroid Regolith Grains by Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Martinez, James; Sitzman, Scott; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Ozawa, Hikaru; hide

    2018-01-01

    We have been analyzing Itokawa samples in order to definitively establish the degree of shock experienced by the regolith of asteroid Itokawa, and to devise a bridge between shock determinations by standard light optical petrography, crystal structures as determined by electron and X-ray diffraction. These techniques would then be available for samples returned from other asteroid regoliths.

  1. Fraunhofer diffraction from a ring aperture with a spiral phase transmission function: numerical and analytical studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Ivo; Miler, Miroslav; Pala, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, 2-3 (2003), s. 225-235 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : optica l elements * Fraunhofer diffraction Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.221, year: 2003

  2. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di; Neves Petersen, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demons......, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed. (C) 2010 Optical Society of America...

  3. Complex method for angular-spectral analysis of volume phase diffraction gratings recorded in photopolymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, M.; Richter, I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, February (2016), č. článku 16009. ISSN 1990-2573 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Photopolymers * diffraction gratings * angular-spectral maps * spectral selectivity * angular selectivity Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2016

  4. Imaging Molecular Structure through Femtosecond Photoelectron Diffraction on Aligned and Oriented Gas-Phase Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzee, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray Free-Electron Laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular...

  5. Development of splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdellier, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Röder, Falk [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Triebenberg Lab, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Snoeck, Etienne [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using a combination of condenser electrostatic biprism with dedicated electron optic conditions for sample illumination, we were able to split a convergent beam electron probe focused on the sample in two half focused probes without introducing any tilt between them. As a consequence, a combined convergent beam electron diffraction pattern is obtained in the back focal plane of the objective lens arising from two different sample areas, which could be analyzed in a single pattern. This splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED) pattern has been tested first on a well-characterized test sample of Si/SiGe multilayers epitaxially grown on a Si substrate. The SCBED pattern contains information from the strained area, which exhibits HOLZ lines broadening induced by surface relaxation, with fine HOLZ lines observed in the unstrained reference part of the sample. These patterns have been analyzed quantitatively using both parts of the SCBED transmitted disk. The fine HOLZ line positions are used to determine the precise acceleration voltage of the microscope while the perturbed HOLZ rocking curves in the stained area are compared to dynamical simulated ones. The combination of these two information leads to a precise evaluation of the sample strain state. Finally, several SCBED setups are proposed to tackle fundamental physics questions as well as applied materials science ones and demonstrate how SCBED has the potential to greatly expand the range of applications of electron diffraction and electron holography. - Highlights: • Using a condenser biprism, we split the CBED pattern in two half-CBED disks. • We have determined the electron optical conditions used to perform various SCBED. • We propose new applications possible for this new SCBED configuration.

  6. New imaging technique based on diffraction of a focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimirov, A [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kohn, V G [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cai, Z-H [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: ayk7@cornell.edu

    2009-01-07

    We present first experimental results from a new diffraction depth-sensitive imaging technique. It is based on the diffraction of a focused x-ray beam from a crystalline sample and recording the intensity pattern on a high-resolution CCD detector positioned at a focal plane. Structural non-uniformity inside the sample results in a region of enhanced intensity in the diffraction pattern. The technique was applied to study silicon-on-insulator thin layers of various thicknesses which revealed a complex strain profile within the layers. A circular Fresnel zone plate was used as a focusing optic. Incoherent diffuse scattering spreads out of the diffraction plane and results in intensity recorded outside of the focal spot providing a new approach to separately register x-rays scattered coherently and incoherently from the sample. (fast track communication)

  7. Natural quasy-periodic binary structure with focusing property in near field diffraction pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Mona

    2010-06-07

    A naturally-inspired phase-only diffractive optical element with a circular symmetry given by a quasi-periodic structure of the phyllotaxis type is presented in this paper. It is generated starting with the characteristic parametric equations which are optimal for the golden angle interval. For some ideal geometrical parameters, the diffracted intensity distribution in near-field has a central closed ring with almost zero intensity inside. Its radius and intensity values depend on the geometry or non-binary phase distribution superposed onto the phyllotaxis geometry. Along propagation axis, the transverse diffraction patterns from the binary-phase diffractive structure exhibit a self-focusing behavior and a rotational motion.

  8. Stress induced modulation of magnetic domain diffraction of single crystalline yttrium iron garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mito, Shinichiro; Yoshihara, Yuki; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2018-05-01

    Stress induced modulation of the diffraction angle and efficiency of the light reflected from a stripe-domain magnetic garnet was demonstrated. The spacing of the magnetic domain was changed using the inverse magnetostriction effect. The sample structure was a piezo actuator/Al reflection layer/magnetic garnet substrate. A diffraction angle between the 0th and 1st ordered light was changed from 9.12 deg. to 10.20 deg. This result indicates that the domain spacing was changed from 3.3 μm to 3.0 μm. The change of the diffraction angle was irreversible for the voltage. However, reversible, linear and continuous change of the diffraction efficiency was observed. These results could be applicable for a voltage-driven optical solid state light deflector with low power consumption and high switching speed.

  9. Solar Adaptive Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Rimmele

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive optics (AO has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO will be given.

  10. Solar Adaptive Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Thomas R; Marino, Jose

    Adaptive optics (AO) has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO) will be given. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrsp-2011-2.

  11. Fourier-Based Diffraction Analysis of Live Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnes, Jenny; Hastings, Harold M; Raley-Susman, Kathleen M; Alivisatos, Clara; Warner, Adam; Hulsey-Vincent, Miranda

    2017-09-13

    This manuscript describes how to classify nematodes using temporal far-field diffraction signatures. A single C. elegans is suspended in a water column inside an optical cuvette. A 632 nm continuous wave HeNe laser is directed through the cuvette using front surface mirrors. A significant distance of at least 20-30 cm traveled after the light passes through the cuvette ensures a useful far-field (Fraunhofer) diffraction pattern. The diffraction pattern changes in real time as the nematode swims within the laser beam. The photodiode is placed off-center in the diffraction pattern. The voltage signal from the photodiode is observed in real time and recorded using a digital oscilloscope. This process is repeated for 139 wild type and 108 "roller" C. elegans. Wild type worms exhibit a rapid oscillation pattern in solution. The "roller" worms have a mutation in a key component of the cuticle that interferes with smooth locomotion. Time intervals that are not free of saturation and inactivity are discarded. It is practical to divide each average by its maximum to compare relative intensities. The signal for each worm is Fourier transformed so that the frequency pattern for each worm emerges. The signal for each type of worm is averaged. The averaged Fourier spectra for the wild type and the "roller" C. elegans are distinctly different and reveal that the dynamic worm shapes of the two different worm strains can be distinguished using Fourier analysis. The Fourier spectra of each worm strain match an approximate model using two different binary worm shapes that correspond to locomotory moments. The envelope of the averaged frequency distribution for actual and modeled worms confirms the model matches the data. This method can serve as a baseline for Fourier analysis for many microscopic species, as every microorganism will have its unique Fourier spectrum.

  12. Diffraction and interference–-a standard teaching topic using non-standard diffracting objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gröber, S; Vetter, M; Eckert, B; Jodl, H-J

    2014-01-01

    This topic-–diffraction and interference-–is a standard topic in teaching wave optics in schools and universities as well as in physics practical labs. The theoretical presentation needs some knowledge in mathematics; the final formula for the intensity pattern as a function of all parameters such as number of slits N, slit width b, slit distance d, wavelength λ of light used is not too complicated. The experimental setup is standard and well known. In our opinion the shortage comes here from the relatively poor quality of scattering objects produced by photolithography and by the small number of various objects in N, b and d. We on the contrary offer objects produced by electron beam lithography with much higher contrast and larger resolution. As a consequence, students are allowed to study not only positions of a few maxima and minima of the interference pattern, but determine relative intensities of maxima and minima with respect to central maximum, details around sub-maxima, band shape and bandwidth. In addition, we generated 150 objects with a variety in N, b and d and also offer five different wavelengths. Since these objects are hardly available and not so easy to copy we offer this experiment as a remotely controlled laboratory experiment which means the real experiment located in A can be used by everyone with his or her computer located in B via the Internet. (paper)

  13. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V.; Liebscher, Christian H.; Minor, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast. - Highlights: • A dataset containing all structural information of a given position is recorded. • The dataset allows reconstruction of virtual diffraction patterns or images. • Specific virtual apertures are designed to image precipitates in a complex alloy. • Virtual diffraction patterns from arbitrarily small regions can be established. • Using STEM diffraction to record the dataset is more efficient than TEM dark-field

  14. Electrochemical Design of Optical Nanoantennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilchenko V.E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical techniques for fabricating tapered gold nanoantennas (tips are discussed. In the paper, the tunable design of nanoantennas is demonstrated. Tip parameters such as a tip apex curvature, mesoscopic morphology, aspect ratio and enhancement factor can be varied with etching electrolyte and applied voltage. The low-cost method makes tipehnahced optical spectroscopy and microscopy feasible for routine optical measurements beyond the diffraction limit.

  15. Paper on Designing Costless THz Paper Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Siemion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing diffractive optical elements is crucial for efficient development of THz techniques. Here, we consider paper structures and we analyze their advantages and disadvantages in fast prototyping. The discussion about using material parameters like refractive index and absorption coefficient in designing diffractive optical elements is shown. We analyze the influence of phase step mismatch, of attenuation of real structure, and of nonuniform illumination on the efficiency of the structure. All these features result in worsening of the diffraction efficiency but they do not seem to have such significant influence as shadow effect introduced by fast varying zones. Diffractive elements can be designed with very good accordance with experimental results which makes them ideal for possible applications. Paper optics scan be used more for fast prototyping; nevertheless its performance can be increased by placing it inside water protecting foil.

  16. A scattering approach to sea wave diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, M. L., E-mail: letizia.corradini@unicam.it; Garbuglia, M., E-mail: milena.garbuglia@unicam.it; Maponi, P., E-mail: pierluigi.maponi@unicam.it [University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, 62032, Camerino (Italy); Ruggeri, M., E-mail: ru.marco@faggiolatipumps.it [Faggiolati Pumps S.p.A., Z.Ind Sforzacosta, 62100, Macerata (Italy)

    2016-06-08

    This paper intends to show a model for the diffraction of sea waves approaching an OWC device, which converts the sea waves motion into mechanical energy and then electrical energy. This is a preliminary study to the optimisation of the device, in fact the computation of sea waves diffraction around the device allows the estimation of the sea waves energy which enters into the device. The computation of the diffraction phenomenon is the result of a sea waves scattering problem, solved with an integral equation method.

  17. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  18. Diffraction enhanced x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.; Zhong, Z.; Johnston, R.E.; Sayers, D.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is a new x-ray radiographic imaging modality using synchrotron x-rays which produces images of thick absorbing objects that are almost completely free of scatter. They show dramatically improved contrast over standard imaging applied to the same phantoms. The contrast is based not only on attenuation but also the refraction and diffraction properties of the sample. The diffraction component and the apparent absorption component (absorption plus extinction contrast) can each be determined independently. This imaging method may improve the image quality for medical applications such as mammography

  19. Accurate Charge Densities from Powder Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindzus, Niels; Wahlberg, Nanna; Becker, Jacob

    Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has in recent years advanced to a level, where it has become realistic to probe extremely subtle electronic features. Compared to single-crystal diffraction, it may be superior for simple, high-symmetry crystals owing to negligible extinction effects and minimal...... peak overlap. Additionally, it offers the opportunity for collecting data on a single scale. For charge densities studies, the critical task is to recover accurate and bias-free structure factors from the diffraction pattern. This is the focal point of the present study, scrutinizing the performance...

  20. Diffraction and diffusion in room acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit

    1996-01-01

    Diffraction and diffusion are two phenomena that are both related to the wave nature of sound. Diffraction due to the finite size of reflecting surfaces and the design of single reflectors and reflector arrays are discussed. Diffusion is the result of scattering of sound reflected from surfaces...... that are not plane but curved or irregular. The importance of diffusion has been demonstrated in concert halls. Methods for the design of diffusing surfaces and the development of new types of diffusers are reviewed. Finally, the importance of diffraction and diffusion in room acoustic computer models is discussed....