WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical cw atom

  1. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  2. CW fountain of laser-cooled Yb atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rathod, K D; Natarajan, Vasant

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate launching of laser-cooled Yb atoms in a continuous atomic fountain. The continuous fountain has significant advantages over the more common pulsed fountain, which was also demonstrated by us recently. The fountain is formed in the following steps---(i) Atoms from a thermal beam are first Zeeman slowed to a small final velocity, (ii) the slowed atoms are captured in a two-dimensional magneto-optic trap (2D-MOT), and (iii) atoms are launched {\\em continuously} in the vertical direction using two sets of moving-molasses beams, inclined at $\\pm 15^\\circ$ to the vertical. The cooling transition used is the strongly-allowed ${^1S}_0 \\rightarrow {^1P}_1$ transition at 399 nm. We capture about $7 \\times 10^6$ atoms in the 2D-MOT, and then launch them with a vertical velocity of 13 m/s at a longitudinal temperature of 125(6) mK.

  3. Nonlinear optical properties of methyl red under CW irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Ye, Qing; Wang, Chen; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhichao; Mei, Jianchun; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Organic materials have wide potential application in nonlinear optical devices. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of methyl red (MR) doped polymethyl methacrylate (MR-PMMA) are investigated under CW laser irradiation at 473 nm, 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. By combining Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relation and CW Z-scan technique, the effective refractive index n2 and the change of refractive index Δn are obtained under different scanning speed at 473 nm and 532 nm. Δn is positive at 473 nm, while Δn is negative at 532 nm. The experimental result is consistent with that of K-K relation. With the scanning speed decreasing, the NLO properties of MR-PMMA are enhanced. With different laser powers at 632.8 nm, MR-PMMA has only nonlinear absorption rather than nonlinear refraction. Meanwhile, the sample is investigated under pulse laser irradiation at 532 nm. Through the comparison of results of CW Z-scan and pulse Z-scan, the influence of the cumulative thermal effect on NLO properties of material is investigated. The results indicate that, under CW irradiation near the absorption peak wavelength, the cumulative thermal effect has great influence to the NLO properties of MR-PMMA.

  4. Fiber Optic Coupling of CW Linear Laser Diode Array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaowei; XIAO Jianwei; MA Xiaoyu; WANG Zhongming; FANG Gaozhan

    2002-01-01

    Based on a set of microoptics the output radiation from a continuous wave (CW) linear laser diode array is coupled into a multi-mode optical fiber of 400 μm diameter.The CW linear laser diode array is a 1 cm laser diode bar with 19 stripes with 100 μm aperture spaced on 500 μm centers.The coupling system contains packaged laser diode bar,fast axis collimator,slow axis collimation array,beam transformation system and focusing system.The high brightness,high power density and single fiber output of a laser diode bar is achieved.The coupling efficiency is 65% and the power density is up to 1.03×104 W/cm2.

  5. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  6. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  7. Optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, N; Gill, P; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femto-second optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in $10^{18}$. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  8. Optical-fiber-connected 300-GHz FM-CW radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2017-05-01

    300-GHz frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FM-CW) radar system operated by radio over fiber technologies is configured and demonstrated. Centralized signal generator, which is based on an optical frequency comb generation, provides high-precise FM-CW radar signal. The optical signal is easy to be transported to radar heads through an optical fiber network. Optical-modulator-based optical frequency comb generator is utilized as an optical frequency multiplier from a microwave signal to a 300-GHz terahertz signal by an optical modulation technique. In the study, we discuss the configuration of the network, signal generator and remote radar head for terahertz-wave multi-static radar system.

  9. Measurement of aerosol optical properties by cw cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Guo; Ye, Shan-Shan; Yang, Xiao; Han, Ye-Xing; Tang, Huai-Wu; Yu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The CAPS (Cavity Attenuated Phase shift Spectroscopy) system, which detects the extinction coefficients within a 10 nm bandpass centered at 532 nm, comprises a green LED with center wavelength in 532nm, a resonant optical cavity (36 cm length), a Photo Multiplier Tube detector, and a lock in amplifier. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the optical cavity and is detected as a distorted waveform which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. Extinction coefficients are determined from changes in the phase shift of the distorted waveform of the square wave modulated LED light that is transmitted through the optical cavity. The performance of the CAPS system was evaluated by using measurements of the stability and response of the system. The minima ( 0.1 Mm-1) in the Allan plots show the optimum average time ( 100s) for optimum detection performance of the CAPS system. In the paper, it illustrates that extinction coefficient was correlated with PM2.5 mass (0.91). These figures indicate that this method has the potential to become one of the most sensitive on-line analytical techniques for extinction coefficient detection. This work aims to provide an initial validation of the CAPS extinction monitor in laboratory and field environments. Our initial results presented in this paper show that the CAPS extinction monitor is capable of providing state-of-the-art performance while dramatically reducing the complexity of optical instrumentation for directly measuring the extinction coefficients.

  10. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Nieddu, Thomas; Chormaic, Sile Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed ...

  11. CW-OSL measurement protocols using optical fibre Al2O3:C dosemeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, J.M.; Andersen, C.E.; Marckmann, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    A new system for in vivo dosimetry during radiotherapy has been introduced. Luminescence signals from a small crystal of carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) are transmitted through an optical fibre cable to an instrument that contains optical filters, a photomultiplier tube and a green (532 nm......) laser. The prime output is continuous wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) used for the measurement of the integrated dose. We demonstrate a measurement protocol with high reproducibility and improved linearity, which is suitable for clinical dosimetry. A crystal-specific minimum pre...

  12. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieddu, Thomas; Gokhroo, Vandna; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-05-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed and, recently, several schemes to implement optical memories have been proposed. We also discuss some possible directions where this research field may head, in particular, in relation to the use of optical nanofibres that can support higher-order modes with an associated orbital angular momentum.

  13. CW seeded optical parametric amplifier providing wavelength and pulse duration tunable nearly transform limited pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädrich, S; Gottschall, T; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-02-01

    An optical parametric amplifier that delivers nearly transform limited pulses is presented. The center wavelength of these pulses can be tuned between 993 nm and 1070 nm and, at the same time, the pulse duration is varied between 206 fs and 650 fs. At the shortest pulse duration the pulse energy was increased up to 7.2 microJ at 50 kHz repetition rate. Variation of the wavelength is achieved by applying a tunable cw seed while the pulse duration can be varied via altering the pump pulse duration. This scheme offers superior flexibility and scaling possibilities.

  14. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Interstitial optical parameter quantification of turbid medium based on CW radiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Limin; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-10-01

    CW radiance measurements examine the light intensity at a single source-detector location from different detection directions to recover absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient of the turbid medium which is important in treatment planning of minimally invasive laser therapies. In this paper, P9 approximation for radiance is used as the forward model for fitting by considering the balance between computational time and the correctness of the forward model at low albedo and small source detector separation (SDS). By fitting P9 approximation for radiance to the angular radiance Monte Carlo (MC) simulations used as the angular radiance measurements, optical parameters are recovered over a wide range of reduced albedo between 0.69 and 0.99 at small SDS 2mm. The recovery errors of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient are less than 11.96% and 2.63%, respectively. The effects of the maximum angle used for fitting on optical parameter recovery have been further studied. The results show that the recovery errors of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient are less than 12% and 3% respectively when the maximum angle is greater than 70 degree.

  16. Optical lattice on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, D.; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2009-01-01

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high......-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice....

  17. Atoms, molecules and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hertel, Ingolf V

    2015-01-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginner...

  18. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Kris O.; McKellar, Thomas; Fekete, Julia; Rakonjac, Ana; Deb, Amita B.; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optical deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along the guide, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addres...

  19. Optical tweezer manipulation for atom tetris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-04-01

    Atoms can be individually captured and guided by light through optical dipole-trapping. However, applying this to many atoms simultaneously has been difficult due to the low inertia of atoms. Recently dynamically-controlled laser beams achieved such demonstrations, enabling a bottom-up approach to form arbitrary atom lattices, deterministic atom loading, atom-sorting, and even single-atom-level machinery. Here we report the latest improvements of the single-atom-level dynamic holographic optical tweezers. With the hardware and software upgrades to be explained in the text, the overall performance has improved to form arbitrary 2D lattices of a size about N=20, with success probability exceeding 50%.

  20. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  1. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Truong, V. G.; Phelan, C. F.; Deasy, K.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2014-05-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold, neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow, rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140-200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  2. Preparation of an Exponentially Rising Optical Pulse for Efficient Excitation of Single Atoms in Free Space

    CERN Document Server

    Dao, Hoang Lan; Maslennikov, Gleb; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We report on a simple method to prepare optical pulses with exponentially rising envelope on the time scale of a few ns. The scheme is based on the exponential transfer function of a fast transistor, which generates an exponentially rising envelope that is transferred first on a radio frequency carrier, and then on a coherent cw laser beam with an electro-optical phase modulator (EOM). The temporally shaped sideband is then extracted with an optical resonator and can be used to efficiently excite a single Rb-87 atom.

  3. Diffraction limited optics for single atom manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sortais, Y R P; Browaeys, A; Fournet, P; Grangier, P; Lamare, M; Lance, A M; Marion, H; Mercier, R; Messin, G; Tuchendler, C

    2006-01-01

    We present an optical system designed to capture and observe a single neutral atom in an optical dipole trap, created by focussing a laser beam using a large numerical aperture N.A.=0.5 aspheric lens. We experimentally evaluate the performance of the optical system and show that it is diffraction limited over a broad spectral range (~ 200 nm) with a large transverse field (+/- 25 microns). The optical tweezer created at the focal point of the lens is able to trap single atoms of 87Rb and to detect them individually with a large collection efficiency. We measure the oscillation frequency of the atom in the dipole trap, and use this value as an independent determination of the waist of the optical tweezer. Finally, we produce with the same lens two dipole traps separated by 2.2 microns and show that the imaging system can resolve the two atoms.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics in atom optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wenyu; Dyrting, S.; Milburn, G.J. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia, QLD (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    In this paper theoretical work on classical and quantum nonlinear dynamics of cold atoms is reported. The basic concepts in nonlinear dynamics are reviewed and then applied to the motion of atoms in time-dependent standing waves and to the atomic bouncer. The quantum dynamics for the cases of regular and chaotic classical dynamics is described. The effect of spontaneous emission and external noise is also discussed. 104 refs., 1 tab., 21 figs.

  5. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  6. Miniaturized optical system for atomic fountain clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü De-Sheng; Qu Qiu-Zhi; Wang Bin; Zhao Jian-Bo; Li Tang; Liu Liang; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    Using modularized components, we have built a miniaturized optical system for 87Rb atomic fountain clock that is fitted on an 80 cm × 60 cm optical breadboard. Compared with the conventional optical setup on the table, our system is more compact, more robust and miniaturized. Taking advantage of this system, laser beams are transmitted through eight optical fibre patch cords from the optical breadboard to an ultra high vacuum system. This optical setup has operated for five months in our fountain system and required no alignment.

  7. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bederson, Benjamin

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, established in 1965, continues its tradition of excellence with Volume 32, published in honor of Founding Editor Sir David Bates upon his retirement as editorof the series. This volume presents reviews of topics related to the applications of atomic and molecular physics to atmospheric physics and astrophysics.

  8. Delocalized Entanglement of Atoms in optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    Vollbrecht, K. G. H.; Cirac, J. I.

    2006-01-01

    We show how to detect and quantify entanglement of atoms in optical lattices in terms of correlations functions of the momentum distribution. These distributions can be measured directly in the experiments. We introduce two kinds of entanglement measures related to the position and the spin of the atoms.

  9. Designing Zeeman slower for strontium atoms - towards optical atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Bober, Marcin; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    We report on design and construction of a Zeeman slower for strontium atoms which will be used in an optical atomic clock experiment. The paper describes briefly required specifications of the device, possible solutions, and concentrates on the chosen design. The magnetic field produced by the built Zeeman slower has been measured and compared with the simulations. The system consisting of an oven and Zeeman slower are designed to produce an atomic beam of 10-12 s-1 flux and final velocity of ~30 m/s.

  10. Designing Zeeman slower for strontium atoms - towards optical atomic clock

    OpenAIRE

    Bober, Marcin; Zachorowski, Jerzy; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2010-01-01

    We report on design and construction of a Zeeman slower for strontium atoms which will be used in an optical atomic clock experiment. The paper describes briefly required specifications of the device, possible solutions, and concentrates on the chosen design. The magnetic field produced by the built Zeeman slower has been measured and compared with the simulations. The system consisting of an oven and Zeeman slower are designed to produce an atomic beam of 10-12 s-1 flux and final velocity of...

  11. Transverse optical and atomic pattern formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L

    2016-01-01

    The study of transverse optical pattern formation has been studied extensively in nonlinear optics, with a recent experimental interest in studying the phenomenon using cold atoms, which can undergo real-space self-organization. Here, we describe our experimental observation of pattern formation in cold atoms, which occurs using less than 1 microWatt of applied power. We show that the optical patterns and the self-organized atomic structures undergo continuous symmetry-breaking, which is characteristic of non-equilibrium phenomena in a multimode system. To theoretically describe pattern formation in cold atoms, we present a self-consistent model that allows for tight atomic bunching in the applied optical lattice. We derive the nonlinear refractive index of a gas of multi-level atoms in an optical lattice, and we derive the threshold conditions under which pattern formation occurs. We show that, by using small detunings and sub-Doppler temperatures, one achieves two orders of magnitude reduced intensity thres...

  12. Magneto-Optical Trap for Thulium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Chebakov, K; Akimov, A; Kanorsky, S; Kolachevsky, N; Sorokin, V

    2010-01-01

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to $7\\times10^{4}$ atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40 cm long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the MOT which varies between 0.3 -1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s$^{-1}$. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  13. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R; Arimondo, Ennio

    2006-01-01

    Volume 54 of the Advances Series contains ten contributions, covering a diversity of subject areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics. The article by Regal and Jin reviews the properties of a Fermi degenerate gas of cold potassium atoms in the crossover regime between the Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules and the condensation of fermionic atom pairs. The transition between the two regions can be probed by varying an external magnetic field. Sherson, Julsgaard and Polzik explore the manner in which light and atoms can be entangled, with applications to quantum information processing

  14. Optical trapping assembling of clusters and nanoparticles in solution by CW and femtosecond lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Laser trapping of molecular systems in solution is classified into three cases: JUST TRAPPING, EXTENDED TRAPPING, and NUCLEATION and GROWTH. The nucleation in amino acid solutions depends on where the 1064-nm CW trapping laser is focused, and crystallization and liquid–liquid phase separation are induced by laser trapping at the solution/air surface and the solution/glass interface, respectively. Laser trapping crystallization is achieved even in unsaturated solution, on which unique controls of crystallization are made possible. Crystal size is arbitrarily controlled by tuning laser power for a plate-like anhydrous crystal of l-phenylalanine. The α- or γ-crystal polymorph of glycine is selectively prepared by changing laser power and polarization. Further efficient trapping of nanoparticles and their following ejection induced by femtosecond laser pulses are introduced as unique trapping phenomena and finally future perspective is presented.

  15. Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, James [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) is a standing activity of the National Research Council (NRC) that operates under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy. CAMOS is one of five standing committees of the BPA that are charged with assisting it in achieving its goals—monitoring the health of physics and astronomy, identifying important new developments at the scientific forefronts, fostering interactions with other fields, strengthening connections to technology, facilitating effective service to the nation, and enhancing education in physics. CAMOS provides these capabilities for the atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) sciences.

  16. Crystal growth, optical properties, and CW laser operation at 1.06 μm of Nd:GAGG crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Tao, X. T.; Dong, C. M.; Jia, Z. T.; Yu, H. H.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Zhi, Y. C.; Jiang, M. H.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, the crystal growth and characterization of Nd:Gd3AlxGa5-xO12 (x = 0.94) (Nd:GGAG) was reported. The X-ray powder diffraction studies confirm that the Nd:Gd3AlxGa5-xO12 crystal is isostructural with Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG) with unit cell parameter of 1.2319 nm. The absorption and emission spectra of the Nd:GGAG crystal at room temperature have been studied. With a laser-diode (LD) as the pump source, continuous-wave (CW) laser performance at 1.06 μm of Nd:GAGG crystal was demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. The maximum power of 2.44 W from Nd:GAGG laser was obtained with the optical conversion efficiency 28.5%, and slope efficiency of 28.8%.

  17. An Atom Trap Relying on Optical Pumping

    CERN Document Server

    Bouyer, P; Dahan, M B; Michaud, A; Salomon, C; Dalibard, J

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated a new radiation pressure trap which relies on optical pumping and does not require any magnetic field. It employs six circularly polarized divergent beams and works on the red of a $J_{g} \\longrightarrow J_{e} = J_{g} + 1$ atomic transition with $J_{g} \\geq 1/2$. We have demonstrated this trap with cesium atoms from a vapour cell using the 852 nm $J_{g} = 4 \\longrightarrow J_{e} = 5$ resonance transition. The trap contained up to $3 \\cdot 10^{7}$ atoms in a cloud of $1/\\sqrt{e}$ radius of 330 $\\mu$m.

  18. Atomically thin nonreciprocal optical isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao; Wang, Zuojia; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile; Chen, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Optical isolators will play a critical role in next-generation photonic circuits, but their on-chip integration requires miniaturization with suitable nonreciprocal photonic materials. Here, we theoretically demonstrate the thinnest possible and polarization-selective nonreciprocal isolation for circularly polarized waves by using graphene monolayer under an external magnetic field. The underlying mechanism is that graphene electron velocity can be largely different for the incident wave propagating in opposite directions at cyclotron frequency, making graphene highly conductive and reflective in one propagation direction while transparent in the opposite propagation direction under an external magnetic field. When some practical loss is introduced, nonreciprocal isolation with graphene monolayer still possesses good performance in a broad bandwidth. Our work shows the first study on the extreme limit of thickness for optical isolation and provides theoretical guidance in future practical applications. PMID:24569672

  19. Demonstration of frequency control and CW diode laser injection control of a titanium-doped sapphire ring laser with no internal optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Clayton H.; Brockman, Philip; Hess, Robert V.; Modlin, Edward A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental frequency narrowing studies of a Ti:sapphire ring laser with no intracavity optical elements are reported. Frequency narrowing has been achieved using a birefringent filter between a partially reflecting reverse wave suppressor mirror and the ring cavity output mirror. Results of CW diode laser injection seeding are reported.

  20. Far-infrared laser action in vinyl chloride, vinyl bromide, and vinyl fluoride optically pumped by a CW N2O laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastaud, C.; Redon, M.; Belland, P.; Fourrier, M.

    1984-06-01

    This paper reports the first use of a N2O laser for optically pumping vinyl halides, to obtain new cw submillimeter laser lines. Eighteen far-infrared (FIR) emissions have been observed in vinyl chloride, twenty five in vinyl bromide and thirty eight in vinyl flouride.

  1. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics.

  2. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  3. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  4. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  5. Deterministic Entanglement via Molecular Dissociation in Integrated Atom Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Bo; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schmiedmayer, J.; Recati, Alessio; Astrakharchik, Grigory E.; Calarco, Tommaso

    2005-01-01

    Deterministic entanglement of neutral cold atoms can be achieved by combining several already available techniques like the creation/dissociation of neutral diatomic molecules, manipulating atoms with micro fabricated structures (atom chips) and detecting single atoms with almost 100% efficiency. Manipulating this entanglement with integrated/linear atom optics will open a new perspective for quantum information processing with neutral atoms.

  6. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  7. Optical method of atomic ordering estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Attolini, G. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A - 43010, Parma (Italy); Lantratov, V.; Kalyuzhnyy, N. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    It is well known that within metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown semiconductor III-V ternary alloys atomically ordered regions are spontaneously formed during the epitaxial growth. This ordering leads to bandgap reduction and to valence bands splitting, and therefore to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission polarization. The same phenomenon occurs within quaternary semiconductor alloys. While the ordering in ternary alloys is widely studied, for quaternaries there have been only a few detailed experimental studies of it, probably because of the absence of appropriate methods of its detection. Here we propose an optical method to reveal atomic ordering within quaternary alloys by measuring the PL emission polarization.

  8. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinto-Su, P; Tscherneck, M; Holmes, M; Bigelow, N

    2004-10-18

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  9. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10(-20) As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10(-20), that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Optical atomic phase reference and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L.; Cornell, E. H.; Abdelrahmann, A.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10-20. As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10-20, that could make an important impact in gravity wave science. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  11. Delivering pulsed and phase stable light to atoms of an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Stephan; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In optical clocks, transitions of ions or neutral atoms are interrogated using pulsed ultra-narrow laser fields. Systematic phase chirps of the laser or changes of the optical path length during the measurement cause a shift of the frequency seen by the interrogated atoms. While the stabilization of cw-optical links is now a well established technique even on long distances, phase stable links for pulsed light pose additional challanges and have not been demonstrated so far. In addition to possible temperature or pressure drift of the laboratory, which may lead to a Doppler shift by steadily changing the optical path length, the pulsing of the clock laser light calls for short settling times of stabilization locks. Our optical path length stabilization uses retro-reflected light from a mirror that is fixed with respect to the interrogated atoms and synthetic signals during the dark time. Length changes and frequency chirps are compensated for by the switching AOM. For our strontium optical lattice clock we ha...

  12. Optical phase locking of two infrared CW lasers separated by 100 THz

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodo, Nicola; Hrabina, Jan; Lours, Michel; Chea, Erick; Acef, Ouali

    2014-01-01

    We report on phase-locking of two continuous wave infrared laser sources separated by 100 THz emitting around 1029 nm and 1544 nm respectively. Our approach uses three independent harmonic generation processes of the IR laser frequencies in periodically poled MgO: LiNbO3 crystals to generate second and third harmonic of that two IR sources. The beat note between the two independent green radiations generated around 515 nm is used to phase-lock one IR laser to the other, with tunable radio frequency offset. In this way, the whole setup operates as a mini frequency comb (MFC) emitting four intense optical radiations (1544 nm, 1029 nm, 772 nm and 515 nm), with output powers at least 3 orders of magnitude higher than the available power from each mode emitted by femtosecond lasers.

  13. Optical synchronization and electron bunch diagnostic at the quasi-cw accelerator ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntzsch, Michael [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Lehnert, Ulf; Roeser, Fabian [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Czwalinna, Marie Kristin; Schulz, Sebastian; Schlarb, Holger; Vilcins, Silke [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The continuous wave electron accelerator ELBE is upgraded to generate short and highly charged electron bunches (200 fs duration, up to 1 nC) with an energy of up to 40 MeV. In the last years a prototype of an optical synchronization system using a mode locked fiber laser has been build up which is now in commissioning phase. The stabilized pulse train can be used for new methods of electron bunch diagnostics like bunch arrival time measurement with the resolution down to a few femtoseconds. At ELBE a bunch arrival time monitor (BAM) has been designed and tested at the accelerator. The contribution shows the concept of the femtosecond synchronization system, the design of the BAM and first measurement results.

  14. Nonadiabatic quantum chaos in atom optics

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of atomic matter waves in a standing-wave laser field is studied. In the dressed-state picture, wave packets of ballistic two-level atoms propagate simultaneously in two optical potentials. The probability to make a transition from one potential to another one is maximal when centroids of wave packets cross the field nodes and is given by a simple formula with the single exponent, the Landau--Zener parameter $\\kappa$. If $\\kappa \\gg 1$, the motion is essentially adiabatic. If $\\kappa \\ll 1$, it is (almost) resonant and periodic. If $\\kappa \\simeq 1$, atom makes nonadiabatic transitions with a splitting of its wave packet at each node and strong complexification of the wave function as compared to the two other cases. This effect is referred as nonadiabatic quantum chaos. Proliferation of wave packets at $\\kappa \\simeq 1$ is shown to be connected closely with chaotic center-of-mass motion in the semiclassical theory of point-like atoms with positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. Th...

  15. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Holmium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, J; Stratis, G; Saffman, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare earth element Holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam $\\sigma_+ - \\sigma_-$ molasses using a strong $J=15/2 \\leftrightarrow J=17/2$ cycling transition at $\\lambda=410.5~\\rm nm$. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Land\\'e $g$-factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio $\\sim 10^{-5}$ which is adequate for state resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

  16. Continuous optical measurement of cold atomic spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory A.

    Quantum measurement is one of the most important features of quantum theory. Although mathematical predictions have been verified in great detail, practical implementation has lagged behind. Only recently have people begun to take advantage of quantum measurement properties to produce new technologies. This research helps fill that technological gap by experimental examination of a continuous, optical measurement for an ensemble of cold atomic spins. The essential physics reduces to the interaction between an atomic ensemble and a weak optical field, which has many well known results. While this work demonstrates many novel applications of the interaction, it also shows that the whole can be more than the sum of the individual parts. Starting with basic characterization of the measurement system using laser-cooled caesium atoms, the mean value of a spin component is obtained in real time. In essence, the angular momentum of the atomic spins creates a Faraday-like rotation in the polarization of a laser probe beam. With slight modifications, additional spin components are also observed, and are shown to be in good agreement with predictions. In measuring spin dynamics, it is important to account for effects of the probe on the spin states as well. Capitalizing on this as a resource, the probe-induced ac-Stark shift is used to transform a quasi-classical spin-coherent state into a highly quantum Schrodinger cat type of superposition between two spin states. Finally, this work combines all the previous results to demonstrate how a continuous measurement of the spin with a carefully crafted evolution created in part by the probe, allows for nearly real-time determination of the complete spin density matrix. In a single 1.5 millisecond run, a spin density matrix is determined with fidelities ranging from about 85% to 90% across a wide spectrum of test states.

  17. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics charged particles

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B

    1995-01-01

    With this volume, Methods of Experimental Physics becomes Experimental Methods in the Physical Sciences, a name change which reflects the evolution of todays science. This volume is the first of three which will provide a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics; the three volumes as a set will form an excellent experimental handbook for the field. The wide availability of tunable lasers in the pastseveral years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  18. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  19. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2000-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  20. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material and detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  1. Atomic, molecular, and optical physics electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning, F B; Lucatorto, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Combined with Volumes 29A and 29B, this volume is a comprehensive treatment of the key experimental methods of atomic, molecular, and optical physics, as well as an excellent experimental handbook for the field. Thewide availability of tunable lasers in the past several years has revolutionized the field and lead to the introduction of many new experimental methods that are covered in these volumes. Traditional methods are also included to ensure that the volumes will be a complete reference source for the field.

  2. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1998-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics. Articles are written by distinguished experts who are active in their research fields. The articles contain both relevant review material as well as detailed descriptions of important recent developments.

  3. Few Atom Detection and Manipulation Using Optical Nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Kieran; Watkins, Amy; Morrissey, Michael; Schmidt, Regine; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    We study the coupling of spontaneously emitted photons from laser-cooled 85Rb atoms to the guided modes of an optical nanofibre to demonstrate the potential such fibres offer as tools for detecting and manipulating cold atoms, even when the number of atoms is very small. We also demonstrate the integration of an optical nanofibre into an absorption spectroscopy setup, showcasing the ability of the evanescent field around nanofibres to interact with atoms in close proximity to the fibre. In principle, trapping of single atoms in engineered optical potentials on the surface of the fibre should facilitate entanglement between distant atoms mediated via the guided modes of the nanofibre.

  4. Runaway evaporation for optically dressed atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkowski, David

    2010-01-01

    Forced evaporative cooling in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap is proved to be an efficient method to produce fermionic- or bosonic-degenerated gases. However in most of the experiences, the reduction of the potential height occurs with a diminution of the collision elastic rate. Taking advantage of a long-living excited state, like in two-electron atoms, I propose a new scheme, based on an optical knife, where the forced evaporation can be driven independently of the trap confinement. In this context, the runaway regime might be achieved leading to a substantial improvement of the cooling efficiency. The comparison with the different methods for forced evaporation is discussed in the presence or not of three-body recombination losses.

  5. Generation of acoustic waves by cw laser radiation at the tip of an optical fiber in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, V. I.; Konovalov, A. N.; Ul'yanov, V. A.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the specific features of acoustic signals generated in water under the action of cw laser radiation with a power of 3 W at wavelengths of 0.97, 1.56, and 1.9 μm, emerging from an optical fiber. It is established that when a fiber tip without an absorbing coating is used, quasi-periodic pulse signals are generated according to the thermocavitation mechanism due to the formation and collapse of vapor-gas bubbles of millimeter size. In this case, the maximum energy of a broadband (up to 10 MHz) acoustic signal generated only at wavelengths of 1.56 and 1.9 μm is concentrated in the range of 4-20 kHz. It is shown that when there is no absorbing coating, an increase in the laser-radiation absorption coefficient in water leads to an increase in the frequency of generated acoustic pulses, while the maximum pressure amplitudes in them remain virtually constant. If there is an absorbing coating on the laser-fiber tip, a large number of small vapor-gas bubbles are generated at all laser-radiation wavelengths used. This leads to the appearance of a continuous amplitude-modulated acoustic signal, whose main energy is concentrated in the range of 8-15 kHz. It is shown that in this case, increasing the absorption coefficient of laser radiation in water leads to an increase in the power of an acoustic emission signal. The results can be used to explain the high therapeutic efficiency of moderate-power laser-fiber apparatus.

  6. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  7. The magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere for atomic clock and optical magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Jinyin; Meng, Yanling; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere both experimentally and theoretically. The dependence of magneto-optical rotation angle on the biased magnetic field, the probe light intensity, and the probe light detuning are investigated. The probe light background is blocked and the shot noise is strongly suppressed. This detection scheme may provide a new approach for high contrast cold atom clock and cold atom optical magnetometer.

  8. Optical investigation of electromagnetic fuel atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Cornel; Beniuga, Marius

    2016-12-01

    The devices that ensure atomization of fluids (injectors and atomizers) are largely employed in contemporary technology. Injectors play a very important part in the functioning of various systems based on combustion of liquid fuels, such as internal combustion engines and turbines, jet engines, furnaces etc. During operation, these devices are subjected to important pressures and need to work within very strict parameters. It is therefore important to have very precise active surfaces. The present work aimed to investigate such devices after certain degrees of usage in order to verify the evolution of surface micro-characteristics and their influence upon operating parameters. In order to achieve the abovementioned purpose, an optical evaluation of the surface was conducted using laser profilometry. Surface measurements were conducted on several injectors, after various degrees of usage, by aid of a laser profilometer equipped with a confocal sensor that has a vertical working range of 13mm and a resolution of 1μm1. After the surface micro-topography was measured, 3D and 2D representations, as well as individual profiles of the active surfaces, were analyzed and the significant parameters were determined. Surface wear and presence of combustion residues was analyzed in terms of its influence upon operating conditions.

  9. Entanglement properties between two atoms in the binomial optical field interacting with two entangled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘堂昆; 张康隆; 陶宇; 单传家; 刘继兵

    2016-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the degree of entanglement between two atoms in a system of the binomial optical field interacting with two arbitrary entangled atoms is investigated. The influence of the strength of the dipole–dipole interaction between two atoms, probabilities of the Bernoulli trial, and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the atomic entanglement are discussed. The result shows that the two atoms are always in the entanglement state. Moreover, if and only if the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the entanglement evolution is not affected by the parameters, and the degree of entanglement is always kept as 1.

  10. Stochastic electrodynamics simulations for collective atom response in optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Jenkins, Stewart D.; Bronstein, Yael; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2017-08-01

    We study the collective optical response of an atomic ensemble confined within a single-mode optical cavity by stochastic electrodynamics simulations that include the effects of atomic position correlations, internal level structure, and spatial variations in cavity coupling strength and atom density. In the limit of low light intensity, the simulations exactly reproduce the full quantum field-theoretical description for cold stationary atoms and at higher light intensities we introduce semiclassical approximations to atomic saturation that we compare with the exact solution in the case of two atoms. We find that collective subradiant modes of the atoms, with very narrow linewidths, can be coupled to the cavity field by spatial variation of the atomic transition frequency and resolved at low intensities, and show that they can be specifically driven by tailored transverse pumping beams. We show that the cavity optical response, in particular both the subradiant mode profile and the resonance shift of the cavity mode, can be used as a diagnostic tool for the position correlations of the atoms and hence the atomic quantum many-body phase. The quantum effects are found to be most prominent close to the narrow subradiant mode resonances at high light intensities. Although an optical cavity can generally strongly enhance quantum fluctuations via light confinement, we show that the semiclassical approximation to the stochastic electrodynamics model provides at least a qualitative agreement with the exact optical response outside the subradiant mode resonances even in the presence of significant saturation of the atoms.

  11. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  12. Momentum Transfer of an Atom Moving in an Optical Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬涛; 徐至展

    2001-01-01

    When an atom moves in an optical cavity, the total momentum of the atom does not remain constant. We study a two-level atom moving slowly in an optical cavity, and give the time dependence of its mean momentum. It is found that when the initial momentum of the atom is larger than that of the photon, the mean momentum oscillates around a value less than the initial value. But, if the initial momentum is less than the momentum of the photon, the mean momentum of the atom is greater than its initial value in most cases.

  13. Eliminating light shifts in single-atom optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hutzler, Nicholas R; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We present a general solution to these limitations by loading, cooling, and imaging single atoms with temporally alternating beams. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, we expect it to enable the optical tweezer method to control nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single ato...

  14. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  15. Nonlinear interactions between the pumping kinetics, fluid dynamics and optical resonator of cw fluid flow lasers. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentman, L.H.; Nayfeh, M.H.

    1983-12-01

    This research is an integrated theoretical and experimental investigation of the nonlinear interactions which may occur between the chemical kinetics, the fluid dynamics and the unstable resonator of a continuous wave fluid flow laser. The objectives of this grant were to measure the frequency and amplitude of the time dependent pulsations in the power spectral output which have been predicted to occur in cw chemical lasers employing unstable resonators to extract power.

  16. Suspension of atoms using optical pulses, and application to gravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K J; Burke, J H T; Sackett, C A

    2009-04-17

    Atoms from a (87)Rb condensate are suspended against gravity using repeated reflections from a pulsed optical standing wave. Up to 100 reflections are observed, yielding suspension times of over 100 ms. The local gravitational acceleration can be determined from the pulse rate required to achieve suspension. Further, a gravitationally sensitive atom interferometer was implemented using the suspended atoms. This technique could potentially provide a precision measurement of gravity without requiring the atoms to fall a large distance.

  17. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Félix Riou, Aaron Reinhard, Laura A. Zundel, David S. Weiss. Spontaneous-emission- induced transition rates between atomic states in optical lattices...complementary technique to measure the hyperfine states at each lattice site. We developed a technique to cool atoms so that they are mostly in the vibrational ...28-Feb-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice

  18. Magnetoencephalography with Optically Pumped Atomic Magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter; Colombo, Anthony; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Carter, Tony; Berry, Christopher; Young, Amber; McKay, Jim; Weisend, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We are working to develop a 36-channel array of optically pumped atomic magnetometers (AMs) to perform magnetoencephalography (MEG) with the goal of localizing magnetic sources within the human brain. The 36-channel array will consist of nine 4-channel sensor modules where the channels within each sensor will be spaced by 18 mm and each sensor will cover a 40 mm by 40 mm area of the head. In a previous 4-channel AM prototype, we demonstrated the measurement of evoked responses in both the auditory and somatosensory cortexes. This prototype had a 5 fT/Hz1/2 sensitivity. In the current version of the AM under development we are maintaining the previous sensitivity while implementing several improvements, including increasing the bandwidth from 20 Hz to more than 100 Hz, reducing the separation of the active volume of the AM from exterior of the sensor from 25 mm to 10 mm or less, and reducing the active sensor volume by a factor >10 to ~15 mm3. We will present results on the performance of our most recent AM prototype and progress toward developing a complete MEG system including a person-sized magnetic shield to provide a low-noise magnetic environment for MEG measurements.

  19. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents a program of research initiatives in atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The current state of atomic, molecular, and optical physics in the US is examined with respect to demographics, education patterns, applications, and the US economy. Recommendations are made for each field, with discussions of their histories and the relevance of the research to government agencies. The section on atomic physics includes atomic theory, structure, and dynamics; accelerator-based atomic physics; and large facilities. The section on molecular physics includes spectroscopy, scattering theory and experiment, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The section on optical physics discusses lasers, laser spectroscopy, and quantum optics and coherence. A section elucidates interfaces between the three fields and astrophysics, condensed matter physics, surface science, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, and nuclear physics. Another section shows applications of the three fields in ultra-precise measurements, fusion, national security, materials, medicine, and other topics.

  20. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This is especially relevant for closely packed ensembles of atoms where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a m...

  1. Atom optical shop testing of electrostatic lenses using an atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Hromada, Ivan; Holmgren, William F; Gregoire, Maxwell D; Cronin, Alexander D

    2013-01-01

    We used an atom interferometer for atom optical shop testing of lenses for atomic de Broglie waves. We measured focal lengths and spherical aberrations of electrostatic lenses in three independent ways based on contrast data, phase data, or calculations of de Broglie wavefront curvature. We report focal lengths of -2.5 km and -21.7 km with 5% uncertainty for different lenses. All three methods give consistent results. Understanding how lenses magnify and distort atom interference fringes helps improve atom beam velocity measurements made with phase choppers [New J. Phys. 13, 115007 (2011)], which in turn will improve the accuracy of atomic polarizability measurements.

  2. Manipulating atomic states via optical orbital angular-momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Optical orbital angular-momentum(OAM)has more complex mechanics than the spin degree of photons,and may have a broad range of application.Manipulating atomic states via OAM has become an interesting topic.In this paper,we first review the general theory of generating adiabatic gauge field in ultracold atomic systems by coupling atoms to external optical fields with OAM,and point out the applications of the generated adiabatic gauge field.Then,we review our work in this field,including the generation of macroscopic superposition of vortex-antivortex states and spin Hall effect(SHE)in cold atoms.

  3. Dispersive Optical Interface Based on Nanofiber-Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dawkins, S T; Reitz, D; Vetsch, E; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We dispersively interface an ensemble of one thousand atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding a tapered optical nanofiber. This method relies on the azimuthally-asymmetric coupling of the ensemble with the evanescent field of an off-resonant probe beam, transmitted through the nanofiber. The resulting birefringence and dispersion are significant; we observe a phase shift per atom of $\\sim$\\,1\\,mrad at a detuning of six times the natural linewidth, corresponding to an effective resonant optical density per atom of 2.7\\,%. Moreover, we utilize this strong dispersion to non-destructively determine the number of atoms.

  4. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  5. Detecting magnetically guided atoms with an optical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Albrecht; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2006-01-15

    We show that a low-finesse cavity can be efficient for detecting neutral atoms. The low finesse can be compensated for by decreasing the mode waist of the cavity. We have used a near-concentric resonator with a beam waist of 12 microm and a finesse of only 1100 to detect magnetically guided Rb atoms with a detection sensitivity of 0.1 atom in the mode volume. For future experiments on single-atom detection and cavity QED applications, it should be beneficial to use miniaturized optical resonators integrated on atom chips.

  6. Atomic-Scale Confinement of Resonant Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes; Großmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C.; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-01

    In the presence of matter there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically-defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically-confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and anti-symmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically-resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultra-sensing, cavity optomechanics as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices.

  7. A Nanofiber-Based Optical Conveyor Belt for Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Vetsch, Eugen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate optical transport of cold cesium atoms over millimeter-scale distances along an optical nanofiber. The atoms are trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a two-color evanescent field surrounding the nanofiber, far red- and blue-detuned with respect to the atomic transition. The blue-detuned field is a propagating nanofiber-guided mode while the red-detuned field is a standing-wave mode which leads to the periodic axial confinement of the atoms. Here, this standing wave is used for transporting the atoms along the nanofiber by mutually detuning the two counter-propagating fields which form the standing wave. The performance and limitations of the nanofiber-based transport are evaluated and possible applications are discussed.

  8. Extremely nonlocal optical nonlinearities in atoms trapped near a waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Stimming, Hans Peter; Mazets, Igor; Kurizki, Gershon

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear optical phenomena are typically local. Here we predict the possibility of highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities for light propagating in atomic media trapped near a nano-waveguide, where long-range interactions between the atoms can be tailored. When the atoms are in an electromagnetically-induced transparency configuration, the atomic interactions are translated to long-range interactions between photons and thus to highly nonlocal optical nonlinearities. We derive and analyze the governing nonlinear propagation equation, finding a roton-like excitation spectrum for light and the emergence of long-range order in its output intensity. These predictions open the door to studies of unexplored wave dynamics and many-body physics with highly-nonlocal interactions of optical fields in one dimension.

  9. Miniature Optical Atomic Clock: Stabilization of a Kerr Comb Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenkov, A A; Liang, W; Ilchenko, V S; Byrd, J; Matsko, A B; Seidel, D; Maleki, L

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical clocks consist of a pendulum and a clockwork that translates the pendulum period to displayed time. The most advanced clocks utilize optical transitions in atoms in place of the pendulum and an optical frequency comb generated by a femtosecond laser as the clockwork. The comb must be stabilized at two points along its frequency spectrum: one with a laser to lock a comb line to a transition in the atom, and another through self referencing to stabilize the frequency interval between the comb lines. This approach requires advanced techniques, so optical atomic clocks are currently laboratory devices in specialized labs. In this paper we leverage unique properties of Kerr comb oscillators for realization of optical atomic clocks in miniature form factors. In particular, we describe a clock based on D1 transition of 87Rb that fits in the palm of the hand, and can be further miniaturized to chip scale.

  10. Dynamics of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Yuan, Heng

    2013-10-20

    We present the transfer function of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope through a series of differential equations and validate the transfer function by experimental test. A transfer function is the basis for further control system design. We build the differential equations based on a complete set of Bloch equations describing the all-optical atomic spin gyroscope, and obtain the transfer function through application of the Laplace transformation to these differential equations. Moreover, we experimentally validate the transfer function in an all-optical Cs-Xe129 atomic spin gyroscope through a series of step responses. This transfer function is convenient for analysis of the form of control system required. Furthermore, it is available for the design of the control system specifically to improve the performance of all-optical atomic spin gyroscopes.

  11. Rotating optical tubes for vertical transport of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rsheed, Anwar; Lyras, Andreas; Aldossary, Omar M.; Lembessis, Vassilis E.

    2016-12-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation of the HOT induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely, the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an optical Archimedes' screw for atoms.

  12. Rotating Optical Tubes: An Archimedes' Screw for Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rsheed, Anwar Al; Aldossary, Omar M; Lembessis, Vassilis E

    2016-01-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an Optical Archimedes' Screw (OAS) for atoms.

  13. Monitoring Tumor Targeting and Treatment Effects of IRDye 800CW and GX1-Conjugated Polylactic Acid Nanoparticles Encapsulating Endostar on Glioma by Optical Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqian; Du, Yang; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Qian; Jing, Lijia; Liang, Xiaolong; Chi, Chongwei; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging used in cancer diagnosis and therapeutic response monitoring is important for glioblastoma (GBM) research. Antiangiogenic therapy currently is one of the emerging approaches for GBM treatment. In this study, a multifunctional nanoparticle was fabricated that can facilitate the fluorescence imaging of tumor and deliver a therapeutic agent to the tumor region in vivo and therefore possesses broad application in cancer diagnosis and treatment. This particle was polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles encapsulating Endostar, which was further conjugated with GX1 peptide and the near-infrared (NIR) dye IRDye 800CW (IGPNE). We demonstrated noninvasive angiogenesis targeting and therapy of IGPNE on U87MG xenografts in vivo using dual-modality optical molecular imaging including NIR fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The NIR FMI results demonstrated that IGPNE had more accumulation to the tumor site compared to free IRDye 800CW. To further evaluate the antitumor treatment efficacy of IGPNE, BLI and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed on tumor-bearing mice. With the aid of molecular imaging, the results confirmed that IGPNE enhanced antitumor treatment efficacy compared to free Endostar. In conclusion, IGPNE realizes real-time imaging of U87MG tumors and improves the antiangiogenic therapeutic efficacy in vivo.

  14. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  15. Fold optics path: an improvement for an atomic fountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Rong; Zhou Zi-Chao; Shi Chun-Yan; Zhao Jian-Bo; Li Tang; Wang Yu-zhu

    2011-01-01

    A fold optical path is utilized to capture and launch atoms in the atomic fountain.This improved technique reduces the laser power needed by 60 percent,facilitates suppression of the laser power fluctuations,and leads to a more simple and stable system.

  16. Atomic quantum superposition state generation via optical probing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ersbak Bang; Poulsen, Uffe Vestergaard; Negretti, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the performance of a protocol to prepare an atomic ensemble in a superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable states. The protocol relies on conditional measurements performed on a light field, which interacts with the atoms inside an optical cavity prior to detection, and we...

  17. Atomic fountains and optical clocks at SYRTE: status and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Abgrall, M; De Sarlo, L; Guéna, J; Laurent, Ph; Coq, Y Le; Targat, R Le; Lodewyck, J; Lours, M; Rosenbusch, P; Rovera, D; Bize, S

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report on the work done with the LNE-SYRTE atomic clock ensemble during the last 10 years. We cover progress made in atomic fountains and in their application to timekeeping. We also cover the development of optical lattice clocks based on strontium and on mercury. We report on tests of fundamental physical laws made with these highly accurate atomic clocks. We also report on work relevant to a future possible redefinition of the SI second.

  18. Transmission Spectrum of an Optical Cavity Containing N Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Leslie, S; Brown, K R; Stamper-Kurn, D M; Whaley, K B; Leslie, Sabrina; Shenvi, Neil; Brown, Kenneth R.; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2003-01-01

    The transmission spectrum of a high-finesse optical cavity containing an arbitrary number of trapped atoms is presented. We take spatial and motional effects into account and show that in the limit of strong coupling, the important spectral features can be determined for an arbitrary number of atoms, N. We also show that these results have important ramifications in limiting our ability to determine the number of atoms in the cavity.

  19. Optical resonance and two-level atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, L

    1987-01-01

    ""Coherent and lucid…a valuable summary of a subject to which [the authors] have made significant contributions by their own research."" - Contemporary PhysicsOffering an admirably clear account of the basic principles behind all quantum optical resonance phenomena, and hailed as a valuable contribution to the literature of nonlinear optics, this distinguished work provides graduate students and research physicists probing fields such as laser physics, quantum optics, nonlinear optics, quantum electronics, and resonance optics an ideal introduction to the study of the interaction of electroma

  20. Anti-Parity-Time Symmetric Optics via Flying Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Peng; Shen, Ce; Qu, Weizhi; Wen, Jianming; Jiang, Liang; Xiao, Yanhong

    2015-01-01

    The recently-developed notion of 'parity-time (PT) symmetry' in optical systems with a controlled gain-loss interplay has spawned an intriguing way of achieving optical behaviors that are presently unattainable with standard arrangements. In most experimental studies so far, however, the implementations rely highly on the advances of nanotechnologies and sophisticated fabrication techniques to synthesize solid-state materials. Here, we report the first experimental demonstration of optical anti-PT symmetry, a counterpart of conventional PT symmetry, in a warm atomic-vapor cell. By exploiting rapid coherence transport via flying atoms, our scheme illustrates essential features of anti-PT symmetry with an unprecedented precision on phase-transition threshold, and substantially reduces experimental complexity and cost. This result represents a significant advance in non-Hermitian optics by bridging a firm connection with the field of atomic, molecular and optical physics, where novel phenomena and applications i...

  1. R-matrix theory of atomic collisions. Application to atomic, molecular and optical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Philip G. [Queen' s Univ., Belfast (United Kingdom). School of Mathematics and Physics

    2011-07-01

    Commencing with a self-contained overview of atomic collision theory, this monograph presents recent developments of R-matrix theory and its applications to a wide-range of atomic molecular and optical processes. These developments include electron and photon collisions with atoms, ions and molecules required in the analysis of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, multiphoton processes required in the analysis of superintense laser interactions with atoms and molecules and positron collisions with atoms and molecules required in antimatter studies of scientific and technological importance. Basic mathematical results and general and widely used R-matrix computer programs are summarized in the appendices. (orig.)

  2. R-Matrix Theory of Atomic Collisions Application to Atomic, Molecular and Optical Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Philip George

    2011-01-01

    Commencing with a self-contained overview of atomic collision theory, this monograph presents recent developments of R-matrix theory and its applications to a wide-range of atomic molecular and optical processes. These developments include electron and photon collisions with atoms, ions and molecules required in the analysis of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, multiphoton processes required in the analysis of superintense laser interactions with atoms and molecules and positron collisions with atoms and molecules required in antimatter studies of scientific and technologial importance. Basic mathematical results and general and widely used R-matrix computer programs are summarized in the appendices.

  3. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  4. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  5. Nonlinear coherent dynamics of an atom in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Y

    2006-01-01

    We consider a simple model of lossless interaction between a two-level single atom and a standing-wave single-mode laser field which creates a one-dimensional optical lattice. Internal dynamics of the atom is governed by the laser field which is treated to be classical with a large number of photons. Center-of-mass classical atomic motion is governed by the optical potential and the internal atomic degree of freedom. The resulting Hamilton-Schr\\"odinger equations of motion are a five-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system with two integrals of motion. The main focus of the paper is chaotic atomic motion that may be quantified strictly by positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. It is shown that atom, depending on the value of its total energy, can either oscillate chaotically in a well of the optical potential or fly ballistically with weak chaotic oscillations of its momentum or wander in the optical lattice changing the direction of motion in a chaotic way. In the regime of chaotic wandering atomic...

  6. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  7. Optical pumping of rubidium atoms in a parahydrogen matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Jonathan; Arnott, W. Patrick; Christy, Tim; Hartzell, Chase; Kanagin, Andrew; Momose, Takamasa; Patterson, David; Upadhyay, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    Building on prior work with rubidium atoms in a cryogenic argon matrix, we have grown solid parahydrogen crystals doped with rubidium atoms. Typical rubidium densities are on the order of 1017 cm-3. We have demonstrated optical pumping of the atomic spin of the implanted rubidium atoms; the measured spin polarization signals are roughly one order of magnitude larger than what was achieved in argon matrices. The combination of high atomic densities and optical addressability make this a promising experimental platform for applications such as magnetometry and fundamental physics measurements. Spin lifetimes (T1) on the order of 1 second have been observed. Progress towards measuring coherence times (T2) will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY 1265905.

  8. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  9. Spontaneous emergence of free-space optical and atomic patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous formation of patterns in dynamical systems is a rich non-equilibrium phenomenon that is studied in fields ranging from atomic physics to cosmology. Here, we report our observation of coupled optical-atomic pattern formation, which results in the creation of self-organized, multimode structures in free-space laser-driven cold atoms. We show that this process gives rise to spontaneous three-dimensional Sisyphus cooling even at very low light intensities and the emergence of self-organized atomic structures on multiple spatial scales.

  10. Detecting magnetically guided atoms with an optical cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Haase, Albrecht; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    We show that a low finesse cavity can be efficient for detecting neutral atoms. The low finesse can be compensated for by decreasing the mode waist of the cavity. We have used a near concentric resonator with a beam waist of 12$\\mu$m and a finesse of only 1100 to detect magnetically guided Rb atoms with a detection sensitivity of 0.1 atom in the mode volume. For future experiments on single atom detection and cavity QED applications, it should be very beneficial to use miniaturized optical re...

  11. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Leder, Martin; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic wave theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena would be reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, i.e. photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. We rely on a Raman $\\pi$-pulse technique to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, resulting in a focusing completely analogous to the effect described by Veselago for light waves. Future prospects of the demonstrated effects include novel sub-de Broglie wave imaging applications.

  12. Spin-velocity correlations of optically pumped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, R., III; McGuyer, B. H.; Olsen, B. A.; Happer, W.

    2012-08-01

    We present efficient theoretical tools for describing the optical pumping of atoms by light propagating at arbitrary directions with respect to an external magnetic field, at buffer-gas pressures that are small enough for velocity-selective optical pumping (VSOP) but large enough to cause substantial collisional relaxation of the velocities and the spin. These are the conditions for the sodium atoms at an altitude of about 100 km that are used as guidestars for adaptive optics in modern ground-based telescopes to correct for aberrations due to atmospheric turbulence. We use spin and velocity relaxation modes to describe the distribution of atoms in spin space (including both populations and coherences) and velocity space. Cusp kernels are used to describe velocity-changing collisions. Optical pumping operators are represented as a sum of poles in the complex velocity plane. Signals simulated with these methods are in excellent agreement with previous experiments and with preliminary experiments in our laboratory.

  13. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  14. Ultrastable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schioppo, M.; Brown, R. C.; McGrew, W. F.; Hinkley, N.; Fasano, R. J.; Beloy, K.; Yoon, T. H.; Milani, G.; Nicolodi, D.; Sherman, J. A.; Phillips, N. B.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with the 'dead' time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise from the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability that have been achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited the performance of optical clocks. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock that is based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability assessed to be for an averaging time τ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the standard quantum limit of clock stability, achieving a spectroscopy line quality factor of Q > 4 × 1015.

  15. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Rushton, Jo; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This "switching-MOT" relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap's beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for $^{85}$Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  16. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Jo; Roy, Ritayan; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This ‘switching-MOT’ relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap’s beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for 85Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  17. Hamiltonian chaos with a cold atom in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    We consider a basic model of the lossless interaction between a moving two-level atom and a standing-wave single-mode laser field. Classical treatment of the translational atomic motion provides the semiclassical Hamilton-Schrodinger equations which are a 5D nonlinear dynamical system with two integrals of motion. The atomic dynamics can be regular or chaotic in dependence on values of the control parameters, the atom-field detuning and recoil frequency. We develop a semiclassical theory of the chaotic atomic transport in terms of a random walk of the atomic electric dipole moment $u$. Based on a jump-like behavior of this variable for atoms crossing nodes of the standing wave, we construct a stochastic map that specifies the center-of-mass motion. We find the relations between the detuning, recoil frequency and the atomic energy, under which atoms may move in a optical lattice in a chaotic way. We obtain the analytical conditions under which deterministic atomic transport has fractal properties and explain a...

  18. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-04

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  19. Ultra-cold atoms in far-detuned optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P H

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and construction of a laser cooling experiment for the study of optical lattices, and reports on the results of experiments aimed at 'quantum state preparation' by means of resolved-sideband Raman cooling in a far-detuned optical lattice. Preliminary experiments were performed on cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap, in an optical molasses and in an optical lattice to determine their properties and optimise the conditions for the loading of a far-detuned optical lattice. Temperature measurement techniques such as ballistic expansion and recoil-induced resonances were used. The vibrational levels and coherences of the optical lattice were investigated with conventional probe absorption spectroscopy and a novel method based on coherent transients, which revealed evidence that the anharmonicity of the potential wells is the dominant factor in determining the widths of Raman transitions between levels. A two-dimensional far-detuned (non-dissipative) lattice was loaded from a spati...

  20. Anisotropic optical trapping of ultracold erbium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Lepers, Maxence; Dulieu, Olivier; --,

    2013-01-01

    Ultracold atoms confined in a dipole trap are submitted to a potential whose depth is proportional to the real part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. The atoms also experience photon scattering whose rate is proportional to the imaginary part of their dynamic dipole polarizability. In this article we calculate the complex dynamic dipole polarizability of ground-state erbium, a rare-earth atom that was recently Bose-condensed. The polarizability is calculated with the sum-over-state formula inherent to second-order perturbation theory. The summation is performed on transition energies and transition dipole moments from ground-state erbium, which are computed using the Racah-Slater least-square fitting procedure provided by the Cowan codes. This allows us to predict 9 unobserved odd-parity energy levels of total angular momentum J=5, 6 and 7, in the range 25000-31000 cm-1 above the ground state. Regarding the trapping potential, we find that ground-state erbium essentially behaves like a spherically-symme...

  1. Quantum optical circulator controlled by a single chirally coupled atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheucher, Michael; Hilico, Adèle; Will, Elisa; Volz, Jürgen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-12-01

    Integrated nonreciprocal optical components, which have an inherent asymmetry between their forward and backward propagation direction, are key for routing signals in photonic circuits. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-integrated quantum optical circulator operated by a single atom. Its nonreciprocal behavior arises from the chiral interaction between the atom and the transversally confined light. We demonstrate that the internal quantum state of the atom controls the operation direction of the circulator and that it features a strongly nonlinear response at the single-photon level. This enables, for example, photon number–dependent routing and novel quantum simulation protocols. Furthermore, such a circulator can in principle be prepared in a coherent superposition of its operational states and may become a key element for quantum information processing in scalable integrated optical circuits.

  2. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  3. Evaluation of atomic constants for optical radiation, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylstra, C. D.; Schneider, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic constants for optical radiation are discussed which include transition probabilities, line strengths, and oscillator strengths for both dipole and quadrupole transitions, as well as the associated matrix elements needed for line broadening calculations. Atomic constants were computed for a wide selection of elements and lines. An existing computer program was used, with modifications to include, in an approximate manner, the effect of equivalent electrons, and to enable reordering and restructuring of the output for publication. This program is suitable for fast, low cost computation of the optical constants, using the Coulomb approximation formalism for LS coupling.

  4. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  5. Atom-loss-induced quantum optical bi-stability switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Bao-Jun; Cui Fu-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics of a system composed of a cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate and an optical cavity with the two sides coupled dispersively.By adopting discrete-mode approximation for the condensate,taking atom loss as a necessary part of the model to analyze the evolution of the system,while using trial and errormethod to find out steady states of the system as a reference,numerical simulation demonstrates that with a constant pump,atom loss will trigger a quantum optical bi-stability switch,which predicts a new interesting phenomenon for experiments to verify.

  6. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    CERN Document Server

    Deans, Cameron; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  7. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  8. Quasi-Magic optical traps for Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, S; Saffman, M

    2011-01-01

    We propose blue-detuned optical traps that are suitable for trapping of both ground state and Rydberg excited atoms. Addition of a background compensation field or suitable choice of the trap geometry provides a magic trapping condition for ground and Rydberg atoms at the trap center. Deviations from the magic condition at finite temperature are calculated. Designs that achieve less than 200 kHz differential trap shift between Cs ground and 125s Rydberg states for 10 {\\mu}K Cs atoms are presented. Consideration of the trapping potential and photoionization rates

  9. Triangular and honeycomb lattices of cold atoms in optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Shabnam; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît.

    2015-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional homogeneous ensemble of cold bosonic atoms loaded inside two optical cavities and pumped by a far-detuned external laser field. We examine the conditions for these atoms to self-organize into triangular and honeycomb lattices as a result of superradiance. By collectively scattering the pump photons, the atoms feed the initially empty cavity modes. As a result, the superposition of the pump and cavity fields creates a space-periodic light-shift external potential and atoms self-organize into the potential wells of this optical lattice. Depending on the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser, these minima can either form a triangular or a hexagonal lattice. By numerically solving the dynamical equations of the coupled atom-cavity system, we have shown that the two stable atomic structures at long times are the triangular lattice and the honeycomb lattice with equally populated sites. We have also studied how to drive atoms from one lattice structure to another by dynamically changing the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser.

  10. Edge Transport in 2D Cold Atom Optical Lattices

    OpenAIRE

    V. W. Scarola; Sarma, S. Das

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically study the observable response of edge currents in two dimensional cold atom optical lattices. As an example we use Gutzwiller mean-field theory to relate persistent edge currents surrounding a Mott insulator in a slowly rotating trapped Bose-Hubbard system to time of flight measurements. We briefly discuss an application, the detection of Chern number using edge currents of a topologically ordered optical lattice insulator.

  11. Optical bistability and multistability via atomic coherence in the quasi-Λ-type atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The steady-state optical bistability(OB) and optical multistability(OM) behavior in the quasi——type atomic system driven by a probe field and a coherent coupling field inside a unidirectional ring cavity are shown,and the effects of coupling-field detuning and coupling-field intensity on the OB and OM behavior are investigated. The transition from OB to OM or vice versa is found by varying the detuning of the coherent coupling field or by adjusting the intensity of the coupling field. The influence of the atomic cooperation parameter on the OM behavior is also discussed.

  12. Atomic processes in optically thin plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaastra, Jelle S.; Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Mehdipour, Missagh; Raassen, Ton; Urdampilleta, Igone

    2016-10-01

    The Universe contains a broad range of plasmas with quite different properties depending on distinct physical processes. In this contribution we give an overview of recent developments in modeling such plasmas with a focus on X-ray emission and absorption. Despite the fact that such plasmas have been investigated already for decades, and that overall there is a good understanding of the basic processes, there are still areas, where improvements have to be made that are important for the analysis of astrophysical plasmas. We present recent work on the update of atomic parameters in the codes that describe the emission from collisional plasmas, where older approximations are being replaced now by more accurate data. Further we discuss the development of models for photo-ionised plasmas in the context of outflows around supermassive black holes and models for charge transfer that are needed for analyzing the data from the upcoming ASTRO-H satellite.

  13. CW-THz vector spectroscopy and imaging system based on 1.55-µm fiber-optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Song, Ho-Jin; Yaita, Makoto; Hirata, Akihiko; Ajito, Katsuhiro

    2014-01-27

    We present a continuous-wave terahertz (THz) vector spectroscopy and imaging system based on a 1.5-µm fiber optic uni-traveling-carrier photodiode and InGaAs photo-conductive receiver. Using electro-optic (EO) phase modulators for THz phase control with shortened optical paths, the system achieves fast vector measurement with effective phase stabilization. Dynamic ranges of 100 dB · Hz and 75 dB · Hz at 300 GHz and 1 THz, and phase stability of 1.5° per minute are obtained. With the simultaneous measurement of absorbance and relative permittivity, we demonstrate non-destructive analyses of pharmaceutical cocrystals inside tablets within a few minutes.

  14. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  15. Quantum state preparation using multi-level-atom optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Th [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Deasy, K [Photonics Centre, Tyndall National Institute, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Chormaic, S Nic [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2007-10-15

    One of the most important characteristics for controlling processes on the quantum scale is the fidelity or robustness of the techniques being used. In the case of single atoms localized in micro-traps, it was recently shown that the use of time-dependent tunnelling interactions in a multi-trap setup can be viewed as analogous to the area of multi-level optics. The atom's centre-of-mass can then be controlled with a high fidelity, using a STIRAP-type process. Here, we review previous work that led to the development of multi-level atom optics and present two examples of our most recent work on quantum state preparation.

  16. Quantum state preparation using multi-level-atom optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Th; Deasy, K.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2007-10-01

    One of the most important characteristics for controlling processes on the quantum scale is the fidelity or robustness of the techniques being used. In the case of single atoms localized in micro-traps, it was recently shown that the use of time-dependent tunnelling interactions in a multi-trap setup can be viewed as analogous to the area of multi-level optics. The atom's centre-of-mass can then be controlled with a high fidelity, using a STIRAP-type process. Here, we review previous work that led to the development of multi-level atom optics and present two examples of our most recent work on quantum state preparation.

  17. Electrical and optical characterization of atomically thin WS₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Thanasis; Yang, Huafeng; Jalil, Rashid; Chapman, James; Novoselov, Kostya S; Mishchenko, Artem

    2014-07-21

    Atomically thin layers of materials, which are just a few atoms in thickness, present an attractive option for future electronic devices. Herein we characterize, optically and electronically, atomically thin tungsten disulphide (WS2), a layered semiconductor. We provide the distinctive Raman and photoluminescence signatures for single layers, and prepare field-effect transistors where atomically thin WS2 serves as the conductive channel. The transistors present mobilities μ = 10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and exhibit ON/OFF ratios exceeding 100,000. Our results show that WS2 is an attractive option for applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and pave the way for further studies in this two-dimensional material.

  18. State-selective all-optical detection of Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Karlewski, Florian; Grimmel, Jens; Sándor, Nóra; Fortágh, and József

    2015-01-01

    We present an all-optical protocol for detecting population in a selected Rydberg state of alkali atoms. The detection scheme is based on the interaction of an ensemble of ultracold atoms with two laser pulses: one weak probe pulse which is resonant with the transition between the ground state and the first excited state, and a pulse with high intensity which couples the first excited state to the selected Rydberg state. We show that by monitoring the absorption signal of the probe laser over time, one can deduce the initial population of the Rydberg state. Furthermore, it is shown that - for suitable experimental conditions - the dynamical absorption curve contains information on the initial coherence between the ground state and the selected Rydberg state. We present the results of a proof-of-principle measurement performed on a cold gas of $^{87}$Rb atoms. The method is expected to find application in quantum computing protocols based on Rydberg atoms.

  19. Counting atoms using interaction blockade in an optical superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheinet, P; Trotzky, S; Feld, M; Schnorrberger, U; Moreno-Cardoner, M; Fölling, S; Bloch, I

    2008-08-29

    We report on the observation of an interaction blockade effect for ultracold atoms in optical lattices, analogous to the Coulomb blockade observed in mesoscopic solid state systems. When the lattice sites are converted into biased double wells, we detect a discrete set of steps in the well population for increasing bias potentials. These correspond to tunneling resonances where the atom number on each side of the barrier changes one by one. This allows us to count and control the number of atoms within a given well. By evaluating the amplitude of the different plateaus, we can fully determine the number distribution of the atoms in the lattice, which we demonstrate for the case of a superfluid and Mott insulating regime of 87Rb.

  20. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X

    2008-01-15

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr{sup 87} using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 0} transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr{sup 87} atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10{sup -15} and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10{sup -15} level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr{sup 88} by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10{sup -14}. (author)

  1. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  2. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  3. Synchronous Optical Pumping of Quantum Revival Beats for Atomic Magnetometery

    CERN Document Server

    Seltzer, S J; Romalis, M V

    2006-01-01

    We observe quantum beats with periodic revivals due to non-linear spacing of Zeeman levels in the ground state of potassium atoms and demonstrate their synchronous optical pumping by double modulation of the pumping light at the Larmor frequency and the revival frequency. We show that synchronous pumping increases the degree of spin polarization by a factor of 4. As a practical example, we explore the application of this double-modulation technique to atomic magnetometers operating in the geomagnetic field range and find that it can increase the sensitivity and reduce magnetic field orientation-dependent measurement errors endemic to alkali-metal magnetometers.

  4. Cold atoms in optical lattices a Hamiltonian ratchet

    CERN Document Server

    Monteiro, T S; Hutchings, N A C; Isherwood, M R

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a new type of quantum ratchet which may be realised by cold atoms in a double-well optical lattice which is pulsed with unequal periods. The classical dynamics is chaotic and we find the classical diffusion rate $D$ is asymmetric in momentum up to a finite time $t_r$. The quantum behaviour produces a corresponding asymmetry in the momentum distribution which is 'frozen-in' by Dynamical Localisation provided the break-time $t^* > t_r$. We conclude that the cold atom ratchets require $Db/ \\hbar \\sim 1$ where b is a small deviation from period-one pulses.

  5. Stability comparison of two absolute gravimeters: optical versus atomic interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Gillot, Pierre; Landragin, Arnaud; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Merlet, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    We report the direct comparison between the stabilities of two mobile absolute gravimeters of different technology: the LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter and FG5X\\#216 of the Universit\\'e du Luxembourg. These instruments rely on two different principles of operation: atomic and optical interferometry. The comparison took place in the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics in Luxembourg, at the beginning of the last International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2013. We analyse a 2h10 duration common measurement, and find that the CAG shows better immunity with respect to changes in the level of vibration noise, as well as a slightly better short term stability.

  6. Energy spectrum of fermionized bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiurong Han; Haichao Zhang; Yuzhu Wang

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum of fermionized bosonic atoms, which behave very much like spinless noninteracting fermions, in optical lattices by means of the perturbation expansion and the retarded Green's function method. The results show that the energy spectrum splits into two energy bands with single-occupation; the fermionized bosonic atom occupies nonvanishing energy state and left hole has a vanishing energy at any given momentum, and the system is in Mott-insulating state with a energy gap.Using the characteristic of energy spectra we obtained a criterion with which one can judge whether the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas is achieved or not.

  7. Simulating quantum-optical phenomena with cold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos [Departament d' Optica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot (Spain); Vega, Ines de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Porras, Diego [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ignacio Cirac, J, E-mail: carlos.navarrete@uv.es, E-mail: ines.devega@uni-ulm.de, E-mail: diego.porras@fis.ucm.es, E-mail: ignacio.cirac@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    We propose a scheme involving cold atoms trapped in optical lattices to observe different phenomena traditionally linked to quantum-optical systems. The basic idea consists of connecting the trapped atomic state to a non-trapped state through a Raman scheme. The coupling between these two types of atoms (trapped and free) turns out to be similar to that describing light-matter interaction within the rotating-wave approximation, the role of matter and photons being played by the trapped and free atoms, respectively. We explain in particular how to observe phenomena arising from the collective spontaneous emission of atomic and harmonic oscillator samples, such as superradiance and directional emission. We also show how the same setup can simulate Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonians with extended hopping as well as Ising models with long-range interactions. We believe that this system can be realized with state of the art technology.

  8. High performance of semiconductor optical amplifier available for cold atom physics research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianli Ma; Lin Xia; Bo Lu; Wei Xiong; Yin Zhang; Xiaoji Zhou; Xuzong Chen

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel design of a compact, stable, and easy-adjustable semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) system. This SOA system is capable of providing up to 560-mW laser power at the wavelength of 852 nm. For the continuous-wave (CW) seeding laser, the amplification gain can reach 18 dB. We add amplitude modulation onto the CW laser and measure the modulation amplification between seeding and output laser. The amplification gain remains constant within the frequency range from 10 Hz to 1 MHz. The whole system could work in ultra-stable condition: for CW seeding laser, the fluctuation of output power is less than 0.33% in several hours.

  9. Topological Quantum Optics in Two-Dimensional Atomic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perczel, J.; Borregaard, J.; Chang, D. E.; Pichler, H.; Yelin, S. F.; Zoller, P.; Lukin, M. D.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate that two-dimensional atomic emitter arrays with subwavelength spacing constitute topologically protected quantum optical systems where the photon propagation is robust against large imperfections while losses associated with free space emission are strongly suppressed. Breaking time-reversal symmetry with a magnetic field results in gapped photonic bands with nontrivial Chern numbers and topologically protected, long-lived edge states. Due to the inherent nonlinearity of constituent emitters, such systems provide a platform for exploring quantum optical analogs of interacting topological systems.

  10. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Anthony P; Carter, Tony R; Borna, Amir; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Johnson, Cort N; Dagel, Amber L; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2016-07-11

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are 1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. This module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization.

  11. Hanbury Brown and Twiss and other atom-atom correlations: advances in quantum atom optics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Fifty years ago, two astronomers, R. Hanbury Brown and R. Q. Twiss, invented a new method to measure the angular diameter of stars, in spite of the atmospheric fluctuations. Their proposal prompted a hot debate among physicists : how might two particles (photons), emitted independently (at opposite extremities of a star) , behave in a correlated way when detected ? It was only after the development of R Glauber's full quantum analysis that the effect was understood as a two particle quantum interference effect. From a modern perspective, it can be viewed as an early example of the amazing properties of pairs of entangled particles. The effect has now been observed with bosonic and fermionic atoms, stressing its fully quantum character. After putting these experiments in a historical perspective, I will present recent results, and comment on their significance. I will also show how our single atom detection scheme has allowed us to demonstrate the creation of atom pairs by non linear mixing of matter wa...

  12. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Kolkowitz, Shimon; Langellier, Nicholas; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L; Ye, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultra-stable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident gravitational waves (GWs) at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, rather than a phase shift arising from the relative satellite positions, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, ...

  13. Spectrally selective optical pumping in Doppler-broadened cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Hai; Zeng, Xian-Jin; Li, Qing-Meng; Huang, Qiang; Sun, Wei-Min

    2013-05-01

    The D1 line spectrally selective pumping process in Doppler-broadened cesium is analyzed by solving the optical Bloch equations. The process, described by a three-level model with the Λ scheme, shows that the saturation intensity of broadened atoms is three orders of magnitude larger than that of resting atoms. The |Fg = 3> → |Fe = 4> resonance pumping can result in the ground state |Fg = 4, mF = 4> sublevel having a maximum population of 0.157 and the population difference would be about 0.01 in two adjacent magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine (HF) state Fg = 4. To enhance the anisotropy in the ground state, we suggest employing dichromatic optical HF pumping by adding a laser to excite D1 line |Fg = 4> → |Fe = 3> transition, in which the cesium magnetometer sensitivity increases by half a magnitude and is unaffected by the nonlinear Zeeman effect even in Earth's average magnetic field.

  14. Searching for dark matter with optical atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Wcislo, Piotr; Bober, Marcin; Cygan, Agata; Lisak, Daniel; Ciurylo, Roman; Zawada, Michal

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental questions of modern physics is the existence of yet unknown forms of matter and interactions. The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by some hypothetical dark matter (DM). However, beyond its gravitational interaction at galactic scale, little is known about the DM nature and properties. One possibility is that it has a form of stable topological defects built from light scalar fields which, for nonzero DM-SM coupling, would result in transient variations of fundamental constants. Optical atomic clocks, highly sensitive to variations of the fine-structure constant, seem to be natural candidates for such searches. Here we demonstrate the first experimental constraint on the strength of transient DM-SM coupling determined with optical atomic clocks. Instead of measuring the phase difference between two distant clocks we determine a common component of their readouts. We show that our constraint, even for one-day measurement, greatly exceeds previous laboratory...

  15. Optical detection of the quantization of collective atomic motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahms, Nathan; Botter, Thierry; Schreppler, Sydney; Brooks, Daniel W C; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2012-03-30

    We directly measure the quantized collective motion of a gas of thousands of ultracold atoms, coupled to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. We detect strong asymmetries, as high as 3:1, in the intensity of light scattered into low- and high-energy motional sidebands. Owing to high cavity-atom cooperativity, the optical output of the cavity contains a spectroscopic record of the energy exchanged between light and motion, directly quantifying the heat deposited by a quantum position measurement's backaction. Such backaction selectively causes the phonon occupation of the observed collective modes to increase with the measurement rate. These results, in addition to providing a method for calibrating the motion of low-occupation mechanical systems, offer new possibilities for investigating collective modes of degenerate gases and for diagnosing optomechanical measurement backaction.

  16. Magneto-optical trap for neutral mercury atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Li; Yin Shi-Qi; Liu Kang-Kang; Qian Jun; Xu Zhen; Hong Tao; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Due to its low sensitivity to blackbody radiation,neutral mercury is a good candidate for the most accurate optical lattice clock.Here we report the observation of cold mercury atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT).Because of the high vapor pressure at room temperature,the mercury source and the cold pump were cooled down to-40 ℃ and-70 ℃,respectively,to keep the science chamber in an ultra-high vacuum of 6× 10-9 Pa.Limited by the power of the UV cooling laser,the one beam folded MOT configuration was adopted,and 1.5× 105 Hg-202 atoms were observed by fluorescence detection.

  17. Bottle atom trapping configuration by optical dipole forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Aldossary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bottle beam configuration is a light field created by the interference of a pair of Laguerre–Gauss light beams with zero orbital angular momentum. In this work we show the theoretical study of the bottle beam as well as the use of this beam for the creation of a novel atom optical dipole trap namely the bottle atom trap. In such a trap the resulting dark trapping region is three-dimensional and has a cylindrical symmetry. These promising results show that this trap is a nice candidate for trapping Bose–Einstein condensates and may serve as an optical tweezer mechanism potentially useful for trapping micron-sized dielectric particles.

  18. An atom interferometer with a shaken optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Weidner, C A; Kosloff, Ronnie; Anderson, and Dana Z

    2016-01-01

    We introduce shaken lattice interferometry with atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. The atoms undergo an interferometer sequence of splitting, propagation, reflection, and recombination by phase modulation of the lattice through a sequence of shaking functions. Each function in the sequence is determined by a learning procedure that is implemented with a genetic algorithm. Numerical simulations determine the momentum state of the atoms, which is experimentally accessible with time-of-flight imaging. The shaking function is then optimized to achieve the desired state transitions. The sensitivity of the interferometer to perturbations such as those introduced by inertial forces scales the same way as for conventional matter wave interferometers. The shaken lattice interferometer may be optimized to sense signals of interest while rejecting others, such as the measurement of an AC signal while rejecting a DC bias.

  19. Remote atomic clock synchronization via satellites and optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Piester, D; Fujieda, M; Feldmann, T; Bauch, A

    2011-01-01

    In the global network of institutions engaged with the realization of International Atomic Time (TAI), atomic clocks and time scales are compared by means of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and by employing telecommunication satellites for two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). The frequencies of the state-of-the-art primary caesium fountain clocks can be compared at the level of 10e-15 (relative, 1 day averaging) and time scales can be synchronized with an uncertainty of one nanosecond. Future improvements of worldwide clock comparisons will require also an improvement of the local signal distribution systems. For example, the future ACES (atomic clock ensemble in space) mission shall demonstrate remote time scale comparisons at the uncertainty level of 100 ps. To ensure that the ACES ground instrument will be synchronized to the local time scale at PTB without a significant uncertainty contribution, we have developed a means for calibrated clock comparisons through optical fibers. An un...

  20. An elementary quantum network of single atoms in optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stephan; Nölleke, Christian; Hahn, Carolin; Reiserer, Andreas; Neuzner, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Mücke, Martin; Figueroa, Eden; Bochmann, Joerg; Rempe, Gerhard

    2012-04-11

    Quantum networks are distributed quantum many-body systems with tailored topology and controlled information exchange. They are the backbone of distributed quantum computing architectures and quantum communication. Here we present a prototype of such a quantum network based on single atoms embedded in optical cavities. We show that atom-cavity systems form universal nodes capable of sending, receiving, storing and releasing photonic quantum information. Quantum connectivity between nodes is achieved in the conceptually most fundamental way-by the coherent exchange of a single photon. We demonstrate the faithful transfer of an atomic quantum state and the creation of entanglement between two identical nodes in separate laboratories. The non-local state that is created is manipulated by local quantum bit (qubit) rotation. This efficient cavity-based approach to quantum networking is particularly promising because it offers a clear perspective for scalability, thus paving the way towards large-scale quantum networks and their applications.

  1. An Elementary Quantum Network of Single Atoms in Optical Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Stephan; Hahn, Carolin; Reiserer, Andreas; Neuzner, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Mücke, Martin; Figueroa, Eden; Bochmann, Jörg; Rempe, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Quantum networks are distributed quantum many-body systems with tailored topology and controlled information exchange. They are the backbone of distributed quantum computing architectures and quantum communication. Here we present a prototype of such a quantum network based on single atoms embedded in optical cavities. We show that atom-cavity systems form universal nodes capable of sending, receiving, storing and releasing photonic quantum information. Quantum connectivity between nodes is achieved in the conceptually most fundamental way: by the coherent exchange of a single photon. We demonstrate the faithful transfer of an atomic quantum state and the creation of entanglement between two identical nodes in independent laboratories. The created nonlocal state is manipulated by local qubit rotation. This efficient cavity-based approach to quantum networking is particularly promising as it offers a clear perspective for scalability, thus paving the way towards large-scale quantum networks and their applicati...

  2. Optical dipole trapping of radium atoms for EDM search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, W. L.; Sulai, I. A.; Parker, R. H.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Korsch, W.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Singh, J.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing an EDM search based on laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (half-life = 15 d) atoms. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. Recently, we have succeeded in transferring Ra-226 atoms from a MOT into an optical dipole trap formed by a fiber laser beam at 1550 nm. For the EDM measurement, the cold atoms will be moved into the neighboring vacuum chamber inside magnetic shields where a pair of electrodes apply a 10 kV cm-1electric field. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Quantum simulations with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel

    2017-09-08

    Quantum simulation, a subdiscipline of quantum computation, can provide valuable insight into difficult quantum problems in physics or chemistry. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices represent an ideal platform for simulations of quantum many-body problems. Within this setting, quantum gas microscopes enable single atom observation and manipulation in large samples. Ultracold atom-based quantum simulators have already been used to probe quantum magnetism, to realize and detect topological quantum matter, and to study quantum systems with controlled long-range interactions. Experiments on many-body systems out of equilibrium have also provided results in regimes unavailable to the most advanced supercomputers. We review recent experimental progress in this field and comment on future directions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Unconditional preparation of entanglement between atoms in cascaded optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S; Gu, M; Parkins, S; Clark, Stephen; Peng, Amy; Gu, Mile; Parkins, Scott

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to unconditionally entangle the internal states of atoms trapped in separate high finesse optical cavities. The scheme uses the technique of quantum reservoir engineering in a cascaded cavity QED setting, and for ideal (lossless) coupling between the cavities generates an entangled pure state. Highly entangled states are also shown to be possible for realizable cavity QED parameters and with nonideal coupling.

  5. Multichannel optical atomic magnetometer operating in unshielded environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bevilacqua, Giuseppe; Chessa, Piero; Dancheva, Yordanka

    2016-01-01

    A multi-channel atomic magnetometer operating in an unshielded environment is described and characterised. The magnetometer is based on D1 optical pumping and D2 polarimetry of Cs vapour contained in gas-buffered cells. Several technical implementations are described and discussed in detail. The demonstrated sensitivity of the setup is 100fT/Hz^1/2 when operating in the difference mode.

  6. Unconditional preparation of entanglement between atoms in cascaded optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen; Peng, Amy; Gu, Mile; Parkins, Scott

    2003-10-24

    We propose a scheme to unconditionally entangle the internal states of atoms trapped in separate high-finesse optical cavities. The scheme uses the technique of quantum reservoir engineering in a cascaded cavity-QED setting, and for ideal (lossless) coupling between the cavities generates an entangled pure state. Highly entangled states are also shown to be possible for realizable cavity-QED parameters and with nonideal coupling.

  7. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yu Su

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments, microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  8. Optical microcavity: sensing down to single molecules and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  9. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  10. Arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold atoms and their applications in atom optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 胡建军

    2002-01-01

    A single microscopic magnetic trap for neutral atoms using planar current-carrying wires was proposed and studiedtheoretically by Weinstein et al. In this paper, we propose three structures of composite current-carrying wires to provide1D, 2D and 3D arrays of microscopic magnetic traps for cold alkali atoms. The spatial distributions of magnetic fieldsgenerated by these structures are calculated and the field gradient and curvature in each single microtrap are analysed.Our study shows that arrays of microscopic magnetic traps can be used to provide 1D, 2D or 3D atomic magneticlattices, and even to realize 1D, 2D and 3D arrays of magneto-optical traps, and so on.

  11. Extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Ole

    2015-06-05

    In this thesis, the phase diagrams and dynamics of various extended Hubbard models for ultracold atoms in optical lattices are studied. Hubbard models are the primary description for many interacting particles in periodic potentials with the paramount example of the electrons in solids. The very same models describe the behavior of ultracold quantum gases trapped in the periodic potentials generated by interfering beams of laser light. These optical lattices provide an unprecedented access to the fundamentals of the many-particle physics that govern the properties of solid-state materials. They can be used to simulate solid-state systems and validate the approximations and simplifications made in theoretical models. This thesis revisits the numerous approximations underlying the standard Hubbard models with special regard to optical lattice experiments. The incorporation of the interaction between particles on adjacent lattice sites leads to extended Hubbard models. Offsite interactions have a strong influence on the phase boundaries and can give rise to novel correlated quantum phases. The extended models are studied with the numerical methods of exact diagonalization and time evolution, a cluster Gutzwiller approximation, as well as with the strong-coupling expansion approach. In total, this thesis demonstrates the high relevance of beyond-Hubbard processes for ultracold atoms in optical lattices. Extended Hubbard models can be employed to tackle unexplained problems of solid-state physics as well as enter previously inaccessible regimes.

  12. Fluorescence spectra of atomic ensembles in a magneto-optical trap as an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Seokchan; Kang, Sungsam; Kim, Wook-Rae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    We present a study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) as an optical lattice. Fluorescence spectra of atoms trapped in a MOT with a passively phase-stabilized beam configuration have been measured by means of the photon-counting heterodyne spectroscopy. We observe a narrow Rayleigh peak and well-resolved Raman sidebands in the fluorescence spectra which clearly show that the MOT itself behaves as a three-dimensional optical lattice. Optical-lattice-like properties of the phase-stabilized MOT such as vibrational frequencies and lineshapes of Rayleigh peak and Raman sidebands are investigated systematically for various trap conditions.

  13. Inhomogeneous broadening of optical transitions of 87Rb atoms in an optical nanofiber trap

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J; Hoffman, J E; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate optical trapping of 87Rb atoms using a two-color evanescent field around an optical nanofiber. In our trapping geometry, a blue-detuned traveling wave whose polarization is nearly parallel to the polarization of a red-detuned standing wave produce significant vector light shifts that lead to broadening of the absorption profile of a near-resonant beam at the trapping site. A model that includes scalar, vector, and tensor light shifts of the probe transition $5S_{1/2}$-$5P_{3/2}$ from the trapping beams; weighted by the temperature-dependent position of the atoms in the trap qualitatively describe the observed asymmetric profile, and explained differences with previous experiments that used Cs atoms. The model provides a consistent way to extract the number of atoms in the trap.

  14. Theory of Atom Optics: Feynman's Path Integral Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Lü-bi

    2006-01-01

    The present theory of atom optics is established mainly on the Schr(o)dinger equations or the matrix mechanics equation.The authors present a new theoretical formulation of atom optics: Feynman's path integral theory.Its advantage is that one can describe the diffraction and interference of atoms passing through slits (or grating),apertures,and standing wave laser field in Earth's gravitational field by using a type of wave function and calculation is simple.For this reason,we derive the wave functions of particles in the following configurations: single slit (and slit with the van der Waals interaction),double slit,N slit,rectangular aperture,circular aperture,the Mach-Zehndertype interferometer,the interferometer with the Raman beams,the Sagnac effect,the Aharonov-Casher effect,the Kapitza-Dirac diffraction effect,and the Aharonov-Bohm effect.The authors give a wave function of the state of particles on the screen in abovementioned configurations.Our formulas show good agreement with present experimental measurements.

  15. Nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of polymeric carboxyl phthalocyanine coordinated with rare earth atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Zonghua; Chen, Jishi; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Fushi

    2017-04-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of the polymeric carboxyl phthalocyanine with lanthanum (LaPPc.COOH), holmium (HoPPc.COOH) and ytterbium (YbPPc.COOH) as centric atom, were investigated by the Z-scan method using a picosecond 532 nm laser. The synthesized phthalocyanines had steric polymeric structure and dissolved well in aqueous solution. The nonlinear optical response of them was attributed to the reverse saturable absorption and self-focus refraction. The nonlinear absorption properties decreased with the centric atoms changing from La, Ho to Yb. The largest second-order hyperpolarizability and optical limiting response threshold of LaPPc.COOH were 3.89 × 10-29 esu and 0.32 J/cm2, respectively. The reverse saturable absorption was explained by a three level mode of singlet excited state under the picosecond irradiation. The result indicates the steric structure presented additive stability of these polymeric phthalocyanines for their application as potential optical limiting materials.

  16. The atom in an intense optical field (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delone, N. B.; Krainov, V. P.

    The basic features characterizing multiphoton processes are examined, and descriptions are given of such phenomena as the multiphoton ionization of atoms, multiphoton resonance, and the perturbation of the bound-state spectrum in atoms in an optical field. The design of an experiment for measuring the interaction of laser radiation with atoms is proposed. Particular attention is given to nonlinear atomic susceptibilities, the effect of multifrequency laser radiation, and the behavior of highly excited atoms in an intense optical field.

  17. Atom in an intense optical field (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delone, N.B.; Krainov, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic features characterizing multiphoton processes are examined, and descriptions are given of such phenomena as the multiphoton ionization of atoms, multiphoton resonance, and the perturbation of the bound-state spectrum in atoms in an optical field. The design of an experiment for measuring the interaction of laser radiation with atoms is proposed. Particular attention is given to nonlinear atomic susceptibilities, the effect of multifrequency laser radiation, and the behavior of highly excited atoms in an intense optical field.

  18. Deterministic quantum nonlinear optics with single atoms and virtual photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockum, Anton Frisk; Miranowicz, Adam; Macrı, Vincenzo; Savasta, Salvatore; Nori, Franco

    2017-06-01

    We show how analogs of a large number of well-known nonlinear-optics phenomena can be realized with one or more two-level atoms coupled to one or more resonator modes. Through higher-order processes, where virtual photons are created and annihilated, an effective deterministic coupling between two states of such a system can be created. In this way, analogs of three-wave mixing, four-wave mixing, higher-harmonic and -subharmonic generation (i.e., up- and down-conversion), multiphoton absorption, parametric amplification, Raman and hyper-Raman scattering, the Kerr effect, and other nonlinear processes can be realized. In contrast to most conventional implementations of nonlinear optics, these analogs can reach unit efficiency, only use a minimal number of photons (they do not require any strong external drive), and do not require more than two atomic levels. The strength of the effective coupling in our proposed setups becomes weaker the more intermediate transition steps are needed. However, given the recent experimental progress in ultrastrong light-matter coupling and improvement of coherence times for engineered quantum systems, especially in the field of circuit quantum electrodynamics, we estimate that many of these nonlinear-optics analogs can be realized with currently available technology.

  19. Nonlinear optical properties of atomic vapor and semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Doseok [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    This thesis contains the study of highly forbidden resonant second harmonic generation (SHG) in atomic potassium vapor using tunable picosecond pulses. Various output characteristics of vapor SHG have been investigated including the input intensity dependence, potassium vapor density dependence, buffer gas pressure dependence, and spatial profile. Recently, the discovery of new nonlinear optical crystals such as barium borate (β-BaB2O4, BBO) and lithium borate (LiB3O5, LBO) has greatly improved the performance of a tunable coherent optical devices based on optical parametric generation and amplification. In the second part of this thesis, a homebuilt picosecond optical parametric generator/amplifier (OPG/OPA) system is described in detail, including its construction details and output characteristics. This laser device has found many useful applications in spectroscopic studies including surface nonlinear optical spectroscopy via sum-frequency generation (SFG). The last part of this thesis reports studies on multiphoton-excited photoluminescence from porous silicon and GaN. Multiphoton excitation and photoluminescence can give numerous complementary information about semiconductors not obtainable with one-photon, above-bandgap excitation.

  20. Comparison of ion exchange and cw CO2 laser treatment of Nd-doped phosphate laser glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Gong; Chengfu, Li

    1996-05-01

    In recent years, the effect of laser pre-irradiation and ion exchange on glasses surface were widely carried out to stabilize their damage thresholds. But comparison of ion exchange and CW CO2 laser treatment is never studied, this paper is devoted to the investigation of this question. Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses were heated with CW CO2 laser radiation and were strengthened by ion exchange. Laser damage thresholds of the surface were measured with 1064 nm 10 ns pulses focused to small spots irradiation. Both ion exchange treatment and CW CO2 laser treatment result in residual compress stress occurred at surface, peak-to- volley and microcracks decreased in surface appearance, and damage thresholds of surfaces increased by a factor of over 2. Polariscope, reflected optical microscope and atomic force microscope are used for stress, damage morphologies and surface topography analysis on glass surface. It is shown that laser condition mechanism is consistent with ion exchange treatment mechanism.

  1. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Findlay, Scott D.; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. Here, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided a cold field emission source is used. These results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.

  2. Atomic and Molecular Data for Optical Stellar Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Heiter, U; Asplund, M; Barklem, P S; Bergemann, M; Magrini, L; Masseron, T; Mikolaitis, Š; Pickering, J C; Ruffoni, M P

    2015-01-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2- to 10-m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available ...

  3. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  4. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    CERN Document Server

    Morrissey, Michael J; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining ground in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension on this work to molecules will be introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for particular applications.

  5. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síle Nic Chormaic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  6. PAMOP: Petascale Atomic, Molecular and Optical Collision Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, Brendan M; Pindzola, Michael S; Müller, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Petaflop architectures are currently being utilized efficiently to perform large scale computations in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Collisions. We solve the Schr\\"odinger or Dirac equation for the appropriate collision problem using the R-matrix or R-matrix with pseudo-states approach. We briefly outline the parallel methodology used and implemented for the current suite of Breit-Pauli and DARC codes. In this report, various examples are shown from our theoretical results compared with experimental results obtained from Synchrotron Radiation facilities where the Cray architecture at HLRS is playing an integral part in our computational projects.

  7. Laser stabilization to an atomic transition using an optically generated dispersive lineshape

    CERN Document Server

    Queiroga, Fabiano; Mestre, Valdeci; Vidal, Itamar; de Silans, Thierry Passerat; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine

    2012-01-01

    We report on a simple and robust technique to generate a dispersive signal which serves as an error signal to electronically stabilize a monomode cw laser emitting around an atomic resonance. We explore nonlinear effects in the laser beam propagation through a resonant vapor by way of spatial filtering. The performance of this technique is validated by locking semiconductor lasers to the cesium and rubidiumD2 line and observing long-term reduction of the emission frequency drifts, making the laser well adapted for many atomic physics applications.

  8. Fast transport, atom sample splitting, and single-atom qubit supply in two-dimensional arrays of optical microtraps

    CERN Document Server

    Schlosser, Malte; Gierl, Christian; Teichmann, Stephan; Tichelmann, Sascha; Birkl, Gerhard; 10.1088/1367-2630/14/12/123034

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of optical micro-traps created by microoptical elements present a versatile and scalable architecture for neutral atom quantum information processing, quantum simulation, and the manipulation of ultra-cold quantum gases. In this article, we demonstrate advanced capabilities of this approach by introducing novel techniques and functionalities as well as the combined operation of previously separately implemented functions. We introduce piezo-actuator based transport of atom ensembles over distances of more than one trap separation, examine the capabilities of rapid atom transport provided by acousto-optical beam steering, and analyze the adiabaticity limit for atom transport in these configurations. We implement a spatial light modulator with 8-bit transmission control for the per-site adjustment of the trap depth and the number of atoms loaded. We combine single-site addressing, trap depth control, and atom transport in one configuration for demonstrating the splitting of atom ensembles...

  9. Two-dimensional novel optical lattices with multi-well traps for cold atoms or molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfa Lu; Xianming Ji; Jianping Yin

    2006-01-01

    We propose some new schemes to constitute two-dimensional (2D) array of multi-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system consisting of a binary π-phase grating and a 2D array of rectangle microlens. We calculate the intensity distribution of each optical well in 2D array of multi-well traps and its geometric parameters and so on. The proposed 2D array of multi-well traps can be used to form novel 2D optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), and form various novel optical crystals with cold atoms (or molecules), or to perform quantum computing and quantum information processing on an atom chip, even to realize an array of all-optical multi-well atomic (or molecular) BoseEinstein condensates (BECs) on an all-optical integrated atom (or molecule) chip.

  10. Design and fabrication of broad angular range depth-graded C/W multilayer mirror for hard X-ray optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Zhang; Zhanshan Wang; Fengli Wang; Wenjuan Wu; Hongchang Wang; Shuji Qin; Lingyan Chen

    2005-01-01

    @@ In this paper, a depth-graded C/W multilayer mirror with broad grazing incident angular range, consisting of three multilayer stacks, each of which has different period thickness d and the layer pair number,was designed and fabricated by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering.

  11. Fourier synthesis of asymmetrical optical potentials for atoms; Fourier-Synthese von asymmetrischen optischen Potentialen fuer Atome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritt, G.

    2007-07-13

    In this work a dissipationless asymmetrical optical potential for cold atoms was produced. In a first step a new type of optical lattice was generated, whose spatial periodicity only corresponds to a quarter of the wavelength of the light used for the generation. This corresponds to the half of the periodicity of a conventional optical lattice, which is formed by the light of the same wavelength. The generation of this new type of optical lattice was reached by the use of two degenerated raman transitions. Virtual processes occur, in which four photons are involved. In conventional optical lattices however virtual two-photon processes occur. By spatially superimposing this optical lattice with a conventional optical lattice an asymmetrical optical potential could be formed. By diffraction of a Bose Einstein condensate of rubidium atoms at the transient activated asymmetrical potential the asymmetrical structure was proven. (orig.)

  12. Open-Loop Control in Quantum Optics: Two-Level Atom in Modulated Optical Field

    CERN Document Server

    Saifullah, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    The methods of mathematical control theory are widely used in the modern physics, but still they are less popular in quantum science. We will discuss the aspects of control theory, which are the most useful in applications to the real problems of quantum optics. We apply this technique to control the behavior of the two-level quantum particles (atoms) in the modulated external optical field in the frame of the so called "semi classical model", where quantum two-level atomic system (all other levels are neglected) interacts with classical electromagnetic field. In this paper we propose a simple model of feedforward (open-loop) control for the quantum particle system, which is a basement for further investigation of two-level quantum particle in the external one-dimensional optical field.

  13. Spectrally selective optical pumping in Doppler-broadened cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jun-Hai; Zeng Xian-Jin; Li Qing-Meng; Huang Qiang; Sun Wei-Min

    2013-01-01

    The D1 line spectrally selective pumping process in Doppler-broadened cesium is analyzed by solving the optical Bloch equations.The process,described by a three-level model with the A scheme,shows that the saturation intensity of broadened atoms is three orders of magnitude larger than that of resting atoms.The |Fg =3> → |Fe-4> resonance pumping can result in the ground state |Fg =4,mF =4> sublevel having a maximum population of 0.157 and the population difference would be about 0.01 in two adjacent magnetic sublevels of the hyperfine (HF) state Fg =4.To enhance the anisotropy in the ground state,we suggest employing dichromatic optical HF pumping by adding a laser to excite D1 line |Fg =4> → |Fe =3>transition,in which the cesium magnetometer sensitivity increases by half a magnitude and is unaffected by the nonlinear Zeeman effect even in Earth's average magnetic field.

  14. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd [University of Southern California

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  15. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  16. Quantum atomic lithography via cross-cavity optical Stern-Gerlach setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C. E.; Batalhão, T. B.; Bachelard, R.; de Moraes Neto, G. D.; de Ponte, M. A.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2014-10-01

    We present a fully quantum scheme to perform 2D atomic lithography based on a cross-cavity optical Stern-Gerlach setup: an array of two mutually orthogonal cavities crossed by an atomic beam perpendicular to their optical axes, which is made to interact with two identical modes. After deriving an analytical solution for the atomic momentum distribution, we introduce a protocol allowing us to control the atomic deflection by manipulating the amplitudes and phases of the cavity field states.

  17. Optical precursor with four-wave mixing and storage based on a cold-atom ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Jiang, Yun Kun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-03-06

    We observed optical precursors in four-wave mixing based on a cold-atom gas. Optical precursors appear at the edges of pulses of the generated optical field, and propagate through the atomic medium without absorption. Theoretical analysis suggests that these precursors correspond to high-frequency components of the signal pulse, which means the atoms cannot respond quickly to rapid changes in the electromagnetic field. In contrast, the low-frequency signal components are absorbed by the atoms during transmission. We also showed experimentally that the backward precursor can be stored using a Raman transition of the atomic ensemble and retrieved later.

  18. Simultaneous magneto-optical trapping of lithium and ytterbium atoms towards production of ultracold polar molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Okano, M; Muramatsu, M; Doi, K; Uetake, S; Takasu, Y; Takahashi, Y

    2009-01-01

    We have successfully implemented the first simultaneous magneto-optical trapping (MOT) of lithium ($^6$Li) and ytterbium ($^{174}$Yb) atoms, towards production of ultracold polar molecules of LiYb. For this purpose, we developed the dual atomic oven which contains both atomic species as an atom source and successfully observed the spectra of the Li and Yb atoms in the atomic beams from the dual atomic oven. We constructed the vacuum chamber including the glass cell with the windows made of zinc selenium (ZnSe) for the CO$_2$ lasers, which are the useful light sources of optical trapping for evaporative and sympathetic cooling. Typical atom numbers and temperatures in the compressed MOT are 7$\\times10^3$ atoms, 640 $\\mu$K for $^6$Li, 7$\\times10^4$ atoms and 60 $\\mu$K for $^{174}$Yb, respectively.

  19. Quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangouard, Nicolas; Simon, Christoph; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of quantum states over long distances is limited by photon loss. Straightforward amplification as in classical telecommunications is not an option in quantum communication because of the no-cloning theorem. This problem could be overcome by implementing quantum repeater protocols, which create long-distance entanglement from shorter-distance entanglement via entanglement swapping. Such protocols require the capacity to create entanglement in a heralded fashion, to store it in quantum memories, and to swap it. One attractive general strategy for realizing quantum repeaters is based on the use of atomic ensembles as quantum memories, in combination with linear optical techniques and photon counting to perform all required operations. Here the theoretical and experimental status quo of this very active field are reviewed. The potentials of different approaches are compared quantitatively, with a focus on the most immediate goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons.

  20. Quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Sangouard, Nicolas; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of quantum states over long distances is limited by photon loss. Straightforward amplification as in classical telecommunications is not an option in quantum communication because of the no-cloning theorem. This problem could be overcome by implementing quantum repeater protocols, which create long-distance entanglement from shorter-distance entanglement via entanglement swapping. Such protocols require the capacity to create entanglement in a heralded fashion, to store it in quantum memories, and to swap it. One attractive general strategy for realizing quantum repeaters is based on the use of atomic ensembles as quantum memories, in combination with linear optical techniques and photon counting to perform all required operations. Here we review the theoretical and experimental status quo of this very active field. We compare the potential of different approaches quantitatively, with a focus on the most immediate goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons.

  1. Nonlinear control of chaotic walking of atoms in an optical lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Argonov V.; Prants, S.V.

    2007-01-01

    Centre-of-mass atomic motion in an optical lattice near the resonance is shown to be a chaotic walking due to the interplay between coherent internal atomic dynamics and spontaneous emission. Statistical properties of chaotic atomic motion can be controlled by the single parameter, the detuning between the atomic transition frequency and the laser frequency. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation in the energetic space to describe the atomic transport near the resonance and demonstrate numericall...

  2. Ultraslow Helical Optical Bullets and Their Acceleration in Magneto-Optically Controlled Coherent Atomic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme to produce ultraslow (3+1)-dimensional helical optical solitons, alias helical optical bullets, in a resonant three-level $\\Lambda$-type atomic system via quantum coherence. We show that, due to the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency, the helical optical bullets can propagate with an ultraslow velocity up to $10^{-5}$ $c$ ($c$ is the light speed in vacuum) in longitudinal direction and a slow rotational motion (with velocity $10^{-7}$ $c$) in transverse directions. The generation power of such optical bullets can be lowered to microwatt, and their stability can be achieved by using a Bessel optical lattice potential formed by a far-detuned laser field. We also show that the transverse rotational motion of the optical bullets can be accelerated by applying a time-dependent Stern-Gerlach magnetic field. Because of the untraslow velocity in the longitudinal direction, a significant acceleration of the rotational motion of optical bullets may be observed for a very short medium...

  3. Optical phase conjugation in atomic beams and vapors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, John James

    1997-07-01

    Optical phase conjugation in atomic beams and vapors using alkali metal atoms as the nonlinear medium is examined. The significance of the sodium system is that the nonlinear gain is high due to the hyperfine system, which behaves as a Raman system. The gains observed were larger than 100 in cases involving two separate pump lasers. The gain is also seen to be more complicated than a Raman system. The frequency of the beams is examined for three separate configurations. We examine a self pumped configuration, an externally pumped configuration consisting of two pump lasers and a probe, and a ring configuration. The observed gain in a self pumped configuration is a result of a mixture of a three level Mollow type gain and a Raman gain. The initial cavity laser is a result of the Mollow gain, and the conjugate produced is seen to arise from the interaction of the cavity beams with the initial pump beam to produce the conjugate. In the externally pumped scheme, the gain is due to Coherent Population Trapping (CPT) in a double-Λ Raman system. There is an equilibrium that is obtained that is responsible for the high gains observed in this particular setup. The bandwidth of the ground state two photon induced coherence is less than the natural lifetime, indicating CPT as the gain mechanism. In the ring configuration, we observed two separate gains. There is a forward and a backward gain. These two oscillations occur together for a 430 MHZ bandwidth which coincides with the observed width of the phase conjugate oscillation. The design of our vapor cells is discussed in depth. The heat pipe configuration, necessary to successfully conduct these experiments is shown in detail. The design of our atomic beams is also discussed.

  4. Multi-level cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency in cold atoms using an optical nanofibre interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin optical fibres integrated into cold atom setups are proving to be ideal building blocks for atom-photon hybrid quantum networks. Such optical nanofibres (ONF) can be used for the demonstration of nonlinear optics and quantum interference phenomena in atomic media. Here, we report on the observation of multilevel cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofibre to interface cold $^{87}$Rb atoms through the intense evanescent fields that can be achieved at ultralow probe and coupling powers. Both the probe (at 780 nm) and the coupling (at 776 nm) beams propagate through the nanofibre. The observed multipeak transparency spectra of the probe beam could offer a method for simultaneously slowing down multiple wavelengths in an optical nanofibre or for generating ONF-guided entangled beams, showing the potential of such an atom-nanofibre system for quantum information. We also demonstrate all-optical-switching in the all fibred system using the obtained EIT effect.

  5. Cavity-aided magnetic-resonance microscopy of atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, Tom P; Brooks, Daniel W C; Botter, Thierry; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for investigating the microscopic properties and dynamics of physical systems. In this work we demonstrate state-sensitive MRI of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. Single-shot spatial resolution is 120 nm, well below the lattice spacing, and number sensitivity is +/-2.4 for 150 atoms on a single site, well below Poissonian atom-number fluctuations. We achieve this by combining high-spatial-resolution control over the atomic spin using an atom chip, together with nearly quantum-limited spin measurement, obtained by dispersively coupling the atoms to light in a high-finesse optical cavity. The MRI is minimally disruptive of the atoms' internal state, preserving the magnetisation of the gas for subsequent experiments. Using this technique, we observe the nonequilibrium transport dynamics of the atoms among individual lattice sites. We see the atom cloud initially expand ballistically, followed by the onset of interaction-inhibited transport.

  6. The dynamic properties of the two-level entangled atom in an optical field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of an optical field and one of the entangled atoms is analyzed in detail in this paper. Furthermore, the dynamic properties of the two-level entangled atom are manifested. The properties of the action are dependent on the initial state of the atom. After detecting the atom out of the field, we can obtain the state of the other atom moving in the field. It is shown that the state of the atom out of the field influences the dynamic properties of the atom in the field.

  7. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jöllenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.

    2011-01-01

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized...... distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4×1010 atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7×109 captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all...

  8. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  9. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  10. Ultra-stable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppo, M; McGrew, W F; Hinkley, N; Fasano, R J; Beloy, K; Yoon, T H; Milani, G; Nicolodi, D; Sherman, J A; Phillips, N B; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2016-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with dead time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise of the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited optical clock performance. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability of $6 \\times 10^{-17} / \\sqrt{\\tau}$ for an averaging time $\\tau$ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the stan...

  11. Fiber-optic based in situ atomic spectroscopy for manufacturing of x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasoff, George; Metting, Christopher J.; von Bredow, Hasso

    2016-09-01

    The manufacturing of multilayer Laue (MLL) components for X-ray optics by physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires high precision and accuracy that presents a significant process control challenge. Currently, no process control system provides the accuracy, long-term stability and broad capability for adoption in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. In situ atomic absorption spectroscopy is a promising process control solution, capable of monitoring the deposition rate and chemical composition of extremely thin metal silicide films during deposition and overcoming many limitations of the traditional methods. A novel in situ PVD process control system for the manufacturing of high-precision thin films, based on combined atomic absorption/emission spectrometry in the vicinity of the deposited substrate, is described. By monitoring the atomic concentration in the plasma region independently from the film growth on the deposited substrate, the method allows deposition control of extremely thin films, compound thin films and complex multilayer structures. It provides deposition rate and film composition measurements that can be further utilized for dynamic feedback process control. The system comprises a reconfigurable hardware module located outside the deposition chamber with hollow cathode light sources and a fiber-optic-based frame installed inside the deposition chamber. Recent experimental results from in situ monitoring of Al and Si thin films deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering at a variety of plasma conditions and monitoring configurations are presented. The results validate the operation of the system in the deposition of compound thin films and provide a path forward for use in manufacturing of X-Ray optics.

  12. Optical dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic diffraction grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobroslawa; Panas, Roman

    2014-01-01

    and numerically determined mirror efficiencies are close to 100%. The intensity of SPPs above a real grating coupler and the atomic trajectories, as well as the momentum dispersion of the atom cloud being reflected, are computed. A suggestion is given as to how the plasmonic mirror might serve as an optical atom...

  13. Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optical switch that operates with a few hundred photons per switching pulse. The light-light interaction is mediated by laser-cooled atoms. The required strong interaction between atoms and light is achieved by simultaneously confining photons and atoms inside the microscopic...

  14. Quantum logic operations on two distant atoms trapped in two optical-fibre-connected cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ying-Qiao; Zhang Shou; Yeon Kyu-Hwang; Yu Seong-Cho

    2011-01-01

    Based on the coupling of two distant three-level atoms in two separate optical cavities connected with two optical fibres,schemes on the generation of several two-qubit logic gates are discussed under the conditions of △ =δ -2v cos πk/2 (》) g/2 and (v~ g).Discussion and analysis of the fidelity,gate time and experimental setups show that our schemes are feasible with current optical cavity,atomic trap and optical fibre techniques.Moreover,the atom-cavityfibre coupling can be used to generate an N-qubit nonlocal entanglement and transfer quantum information among N distant atoms by arranging N atom-cavity assemblages in a line and connecting each two adjacent cavities with two optical fibres.

  15. Efficient Scheme for the Generation of Atomic Schroedinger Cat States in an Optical Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGShi-Biao; LINLi-Hua; JIANGYun-Kun

    2003-01-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed for the generation of atomic Schroedinger cat states in an optical cavity. In the scheme N three-level atoms are loaded in the optical cavity. Raman coupling of two ground states is achieved via a laser tield and the cavity mode. The cavity mode is always in the vacuum state and the atoms have no probability of being populated in the excited state. Thus, the scheme is insensitive to both the cavity decay and spontaneous emission.

  16. Efficient Scheme for the Generation of Atomic Schrodinger Cat States in an Optical Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao; LIN Li-Hua; JIANG Yun-Kun

    2003-01-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed for the generation of atomic Schrodinger cat states in an optical cavity. Inthe scheme N three-level atoms are loaded in the optical cavity. Raman coupling of two ground states is achieved via alaser field and the cavity mode. The cavity mode is always in the vacuum state and the atoms have no probability ofbeing populated in the excited state. Thus, the scheme is insensitive to both the cavity decay and spontaneous emission.

  17. Observation of cooperatively enhanced atomic dipole forces from NV centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Juan, M L; Besga, B; Brennen, G; Molina-Terriza, G; Volz, T

    2015-01-01

    Since the early work by Ashkin in 1970, optical trapping has become one of the most powerful tools for manipulating small particles, such as micron sized beads or single atoms. The optical trapping mechanism is based on the interaction energy of a dipole and the electric field of the laser light. In atom trapping, the dominant contribution typically comes from the allowed optical transition closest to the laser wavelength, whereas for mesoscopic particles it is given by the bulk polarizability of the material. These two different regimes of optical trapping have coexisted for decades without any direct link, resulting in two very different contexts of applications: one being the trapping of small objects mainly in biological settings, the other one being dipole traps for individual neutral atoms in the field of quantum optics. Here we show that for nanoscale diamond crystals containing artificial atoms, so-called nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers, both regimes of optical trapping can be observed at the same...

  18. Atomic population distribution in the output ports of cold-atom interferometers with optical splitting and recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2010-01-01

    Cold-atom interferometers with optical splitting and recombination use off-resonant laser beams to split a cloud of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) into two clouds that travel along different paths and are then recombined again using optical beams. After the recombination, the BEC in general populates both the cloud at rest and the moving clouds. Measuring relative number of atoms in each of these clouds yields information about the relative phase shift accumulated by the atoms in the two moving clouds during the interferometric cycle. We derive the expression for the probability of finding any given number of atoms in each of the clouds, discuss features of the probability density distribution, analyze its dependence on the relative accumulated phase shift as a function of the strength of the interatomic interactions, and compare our results with experiment.

  19. Experimental demonstration of CW light injection effect in upstream traffic TDM-PON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Wu, Yu-Fu; Shih, Fu-Yuan; Chi, Sien

    2010-06-01

    High capacity time-division-multiplexed passive optical network (TDM-PON) is an emerging fiber access network that deploys optical access lines between a carrier's central office (CO) and a customer sites. In this investigation, we demonstrate and analyze the continuous wave (CW) upstream effect in TDM-PONs. Besides, we also propose and design a protection apparatus in each optical network unit (ONU) to avoid a CW upstream traffic in TDM-PONs due to sudden external environment change or ONU failure. When an upstream CW injection occurs in TDM access network, the protection scheme can stop the CW effect within a few ms to maintain the entire data traffic.

  20. The Level-split of the Two-level Entangled Atom in an Optical Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhuoliang; HUANG Ting; GUO Guangcan; YI Youming

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a two-level entangled atom in an optical field with circular polarization is studied in this paper. The interaction of an optical field and one of the entangled atoms is analyzed in detail. A general solution of the SchrAo¨Gdinger equation about the motion of the entangled atom is obtained. The properties of the action are dependent on the initial state of the atom. By detecting the entangled atom out of the field, we can obtain the state of the other atom moving in the field. It is shown that the state of the atom out of the field will influence the energies of the split-levels of the atom in the field.

  1. High accuracy measure of atomic polarizability in an optical lattice clock

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, J. A.; Lemke, N. D.; Hinkley, N.; Pizzocaro, M.; Fox, R. W.; Ludlow, A. D.; Oates, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Despite being a canonical example of quantum mechanical perturbation theory, as well as one of the earliest observed spectroscopic shifts, the Stark effect contributes the largest source of uncertainty in a modern optical atomic clock through blackbody radiation. By employing an ultracold, trapped atomic ensemble and high stability optical clock, we characterize the quadratic Stark effect with unprecedented precision. We report the ytterbium optical clock's sensitivity to electric fields (suc...

  2. Optical interface created by laser-cooled atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, E; Sagué, G; Schmidt, R; Dawkins, S T; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-01-01

    Trapping and optically interfacing laser-cooled neutral atoms is an essential requirement for their use in advanced quantum technologies. Here we simultaneously realize both of these tasks with cesium atoms interacting with a multi-color evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber. The atoms are localized in a one-dimensional optical lattice about 200 nm above the nanofiber surface and can be efficiently interrogated with a resonant light field sent through the nanofiber. Our technique opens the route towards the direct integration of laser-cooled atomic ensembles within fiber networks, an important prerequisite for large scale quantum communication schemes. Moreover, it is ideally suited to the realization of hybrid quantum systems that combine atoms with, e.g., solid state quantum devices.

  3. All-optical production and trapping of metastable noble gas atoms down to the single atom regime

    CERN Document Server

    Kohler, M; Sahling, P; Sieveke, C; Jerschabek, N; Kalinowski, M B; Becker, C; Sengstock, K

    2014-01-01

    The determination of isotope ratios of noble gas atoms has many applications e.g. in physics, nuclear arms control, and earth sciences. For several applications, the concentration of specific noble gas isotopes (e.g. Kr and Ar) is so low that single atom detection is highly desirable for a precise determination of the concentration. As an important step in this direction, we demonstrate operation of a krypton Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) setup based on a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable Kr atoms excited by all-optical means. Compared to other state-of-the-art techniques for preparing metastable noble gas atoms, all-optical production is capable of overcoming limitations regarding minimal probe volume and avoiding cross-contamination of the samples. In addition, it allows for a compact and reliable setup. We identify optimal parameters of our experimental setup by employing the most abundant isotope Kr-84, and demonstrate single atom detection within a 3D MOT.

  4. Influence of Atomic Motion on a Microlaser in an Optical Standing-Wave Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬涛; 冯勋立; 张文琦; 徐至展

    2002-01-01

    We study the microlaser in an optical standing-wave cavity injected with two-level atoms. The results have shown the obvious infIuence of atomic centre-of-mass motion on the microlaser, such as the photon distribution, the linewidth and the frequency shift. It was found that when the momentum of atoms is comparable to that of photons, the influence of atomic motion is dominated and the number of photons in the microlaser can be greatly enhanced, owing to part of the atomic kinetic energy being transferred to the resonator. This work provides a comparison of the related studies on the atomic motion under special assumptions.

  5. Interference and dynamics of light from a distance-controlled atom pair in an optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Neuzner, Andreas; Morin, Olivier; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Interference is central to quantum physics and occurs when indistinguishable paths exist, like in a double-slit experiment. Replacing the two slits with two single atoms introduces optical non-linearities for which nontrivial interference phenomena are predicted. Their observation, however, has been hampered by difficulties in preparing the required atomic distribution, controlling the optical phases and detecting the faint light. Here we overcome all of these experimental challenges by combining an optical lattice for atom localisation, an imaging system with single-site resolution, and an optical resonator for light steering. We observe resonator-induced saturation of resonance fluorescence for constructive interference of the scattered light and nonzero emission with huge photon bunching for destructive interference. The latter is explained by atomic saturation and photon pair generation. Our experimental setting is scalable and allows one to realize the Tavis-Cummings model for any number of atoms and pho...

  6. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  7. Negative refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices with nonuniform artificial gauge fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ai-Xia, E-mail: zhangax@nwnu.edu.cn; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically study the reflection and refraction of ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices exposed to a nonuniform artificial magnetic field. The introduction of the nonuniform artificial magnetic field to the optical lattice for suitable designer magnetic potential barrier can lead to a series of intriguing reflection and refraction phenomena of atoms, including reflection, positive refraction, negative refraction and atomic matter wave splitting. Both the occurrence and the distribution of these reflection and refraction scenarios can be coherently controlled by the nonuniform artificial magnetic field. In particular, the regions close to the boundary of reflection demonstrate two more interesting propagation modes, i.e., a reflected branch of atoms comprising a positive or negative refracted branch of atoms with almost same atom population will be excited simultaneously at the magnetic potential barrier. The results can be a guide for the coherent control of the matter waves in optical lattices and the design of new atom optics devices. - Highlights: • Ultra-cold atoms in OL with nonuniform magnetic field are studied. • Matter wave reflection, refraction and splitting are coherently controlled. • Results provide a guide for the design of new atomic optics devices.

  8. High-repetition-rate quasi-CW side-pumped mJ eye-safe laser with a monolithic KTP crystal for intracavity optical parametric oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C Y; Chen, Y C; Huang, Y P; Huang, Y J; Su, K W; Chen, Y F

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a high-repetition-rate millijoule passively Q-switched eye-safe Nd:YVO(4) laser pumped by a quasi-CW diode stack. A theoretical analysis has been explored for the design criteria of generating TEM(n,0) mode in the diode-stack directly side-pumping configuration. We successfully generate TEM(n,0) modes at 1064 nm by adjusting the gain medium with respected to the laser axis. We further observe the spatial cleaning ability for generating an nearly TEM(0,0) mode output at 1573 nm with a monolithic OPO cavity. At the repetition rate up to 200 Hz, the output pulse energy reaches 1.21 mJ with the threshold pump energy of 17.9 mJ.

  9. Evolution of nonlinear optical properties: from gold atomic clusters to plasmonic nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Reji; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Thomas, Jayan

    2012-09-12

    Atomic clusters of metals are an emerging class of extremely interesting materials occupying the intermediate size regime between atoms and nanoparticles. Here we report the nonlinear optical (NLO) characteristics of ultrasmall, atomically precise clusters of gold, which are smaller than the critical size for electronic energy quantization (∼2 nm). Our studies reveal remarkable features of the distinct evolution of the optical nonlinearity as the clusters progress in size from the nonplasmonic regime to the plasmonic regime. We ascertain that the smallest atomic clusters do not show saturable absorption at the surface plasmon wavelength of larger gold nanocrystals (>2 nm). Consequently, the third-order optical nonlinearity in these ultrasmall gold clusters exhibits a significantly lower threshold for optical power limiting. This limiting efficiency, which is superior to that of plasmonic nanocrystals, is highly beneficial for optical limiting applications.

  10. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigi, Valentina; Bimbard, Erwan; Stanojevic, Jovica; Hilliard, Andrew J; Nogrette, Florence; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Grangier, Philippe

    2012-12-07

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within the medium. The measurements allow a direct estimation of the "blockaded fraction" of atoms within the atomic ensemble.

  11. Rectified optical force on dark-state atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, E. A.; Kosachiov, D. V.

    1997-12-01

    We show that an imperfection of velocity-selective coherent population trapping (VSCPT) in three-level atoms excited by standing light waves causes a rectified force on cooled atoms. The rectified force as well as the cooling force are calculated both analytically and numerically for 0953-4075/30/24/010/img5 and cascade three-level systems. Combination of these forces with the VSCPT mechanism can lead to localization of very cold atoms in potential wells created by the rectified force. This effect should be taken into account in experiments with VSCPT in standing waves, and can be used for realizing superlattices of cold atoms, in particular, cold Rydberg atoms.

  12. An atomic spin precession detection method based on electro-optic modulation in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Xuejing; Li, Yang; Yao, Han; Dai, Lingling; Yang, Biyao; Ding, Ming

    2017-07-01

    We present an ultrahigh-sensitivity electro-optic modulator (EOM) detection method for detecting the atomic Larmor precession in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime. A magnetic field sensitivity of ~10 f T Hz-1/2 has been achieved by optimizing the probe laser parameters and the EOM modulation conditions, which is comparable to that with the Faraday modulation method and has a better performance than the balanced polarimetry method in the low frequency range. The EOM detection method in the atomic magnetometer presents several advantages, such as simple structure, no extra magnetic noise, moderate thermal effect, high measurement sensitivity and reliable stability. It is demonstrated to be feasible for the improved compactness and simplicity of atomic magnetic field measurement devices in the future.

  13. Optical Signatures of Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Fermionic Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Cordobes Aguilar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We show how off-resonant light scattering can provide quantitative information on antiferromagnetic ordering of a two-species fermionic atomic gas in a tightly-confined two-dimensional optical lattice. We analyze the emerging magnetic ordering of atoms in the mean-field and in random phase approximations and show how the many-body static and dynamic correlations, evaluated in the standard Feynman-Dyson perturbation series, can be detected in the scattered light signal. The staggered magnetization reveals itself in the magnetic Bragg peaks of the individual spin components. These magnetic peaks, however, can be considerably suppressed in the absence of a true long-range antiferromagnetic order. The light scattered outside the diffraction orders can be collected by a lens with highly improved signal-to-shot-noise ratio when the diffraction maxima are blocked. The collective and single-particle excitations are identified in the spectrum of the scattered light. We find that the spin-conserving and spin-exchanging atomic transitions convey information on density, longitudinal spin, and transverse spin correlations. The different correlations and scattering processes exhibit characteristic angular distribution profiles for the scattered light, and e.g., the diagnostic signal of transverse spin correlations could be separated from the optical response by the scattering direction, frequency, or polarization. We also analyze the detection accuracy by estimating the number of required measurements, constrained by the heating rate that is determined by inelastic light-scattering events. The imaging technique could be extended to the two-species fermionic states in other regions of the phase diagram where the ground-state properties are still not fully understood.

  14. Towards a Re-definition of the Second Based on Optical Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The rapid increase in accuracy and stability of optical atomic clocks compared to the caesium atomic clock as primary standard of time and frequency asks for a future re-definition of the second in the International System of Units (SI). The status of the optical clocks based on either single ions in radio-frequency traps or on neutral atoms stored in an optical lattice is described with special emphasis of the current work at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Besides the development and operation of different optical clocks with estimated fractional uncertainties in the 10^-18 range, the supporting work on ultra-stable lasers as core elements and the means to compare remote optical clocks via transportable standards, optical fibers, or transportable clocks is reported. Finally, the conditions, methods and next steps are discussed that are the prerequisites for a future re-definition of the second.

  15. Optical control of the spin of a magnetic atom in a semiconductor quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besombes L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The control of single spins in solids is a key but challenging step for any spin-based solid-state quantumcomputing device. Thanks to their expected long coherence time, localized spins on magnetic atoms in a semiconductor host could be an interesting media to store quantum information in the solid state. Optical probing and control of the spin of individual or pairs of Manganese (Mn atoms (S = 5/2 have been obtained in II-VI and IIIV semiconductor quantum dots during the last years. In this paper, we review recently developed optical control experiments of the spin of an individual Mn atoms in II-VI semiconductor self-assembled or strain-free quantum dots (QDs.We first show that the fine structure of the Mn atom and especially a strained induced magnetic anisotropy is the main parameter controlling the spin memory of the magnetic atom at zero magnetic field. We then demonstrate that the energy of any spin state of a Mn atom or pairs of Mn atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect induced by a resonant laser field. The strong coupling with the resonant laser field modifies the Mn fine structure and consequently its dynamics.We then describe the spin dynamics of a Mn atom under this strong resonant optical excitation. In addition to standard optical pumping expected for a resonant excitation, we show that the Mn spin population can be trapped in the state which is resonantly excited. This effect is modeled considering the coherent spin dynamics of the coupled electronic and nuclear spin of the Mn atom optically dressed by a resonant laser field. Finally, we discuss the spin dynamics of a Mn atom in strain-free QDs and show that these structures should permit a fast optical coherent control of an individual Mn spin.

  16. A compact microchip atomic clock based on all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold trapped Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D. M.; Zozulya, A.; Anderson, D. Z.

    2010-12-01

    We propose a compact atomic clock that uses all-optical interrogation of ultra-cold Rb atoms that are magnetically trapped near the surface of an atom microchip. The interrogation scheme, which combines electromagnetically induced transparency with Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields, can achieve an atomic shot-noise-level performance better than 10^{-13}/sqrt{tau} for 106 atoms. A two-color Mach-Zehnder interferometer can detect a 100-pW probe beam at the optical shot-noise level using conventional photodetectors. This measurement scheme is nondestructive and therefore can be used to increase the operational duty cycle by reusing the trapped atoms for multiple clock cycles. Numerical calculations of the density matrix equations are used to identify realistic operating parameters at which AC Stark shifts are eliminated. By considering fluctuations in these parameters, we estimate that AC Stark shifts can be canceled to a level better than 2×10-14. An overview of the apparatus is presented with estimates of cycle time and power consumption.

  17. Spatial distribution of optically induced atomic excitation in a dense and cold atomic ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Fofanov, Ya A; Sokolov, I M; Havey, M D

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of our general theoretical results developed previously in JETP 112, 246 (2011), we calculate the spatial distribution of atoms excited in a dense and cold atomic cloud by weak monochromatic light. We also study the atomic distribution over different Zeeman sublevels of the excited state in different parts of the cloud. The dependence of this distribution of atomic excitation on the density of the atomic ensemble and the frequency of external emission is investigated. We show that in the boundary regions of the cloud the orientation and alignment of atomic angular momentum takes place. Analysis of the spatial distribution of atomic excitation shows no noticeable signs of light localization effects even in those parameter regimes where the Ioffe-Regel criterium of strong localization is satisfied. However, comparative calculations performed in the framework of the scalar approximation to the dipole-dipole interaction reveals explicit manifestation of strong localization under some conditions.

  18. Coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 3D optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yang; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a $5\\times 5\\times 5$ array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in non-targeted atoms is smaller than $3\\times 10^{-3}$ in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  19. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  20. Enhanced optical cross section via collective coupling of atomic dipoles in a 2D array

    CERN Document Server

    Bettles, Robert J; Adams, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the optical cross section is an enticing goal in light-matter interactions, due to its fundamental role in quantum and non-linear optics. Here, we show how dipolar interactions can suppress off-axis scattering in a two-dimensional atomic array, leading to a subradiant collective mode where the optical cross section is enhanced by an order of magnitude. As a consequence, it is possible to attain an optical depth which implies high fidelity extinction, from a monolayer. Using realistic experimental parameters, we also model how lattice vacancies and the atomic trapping depth affect the transmission, concluding that such high extinction should be possible, using current experimental techniques.

  1. Controlling steady-state and dynamical properties of atomic optical bistability

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the theoretical and experimental studies of atomic optical bistability and multistability, and their dynamical properties in systems with two- and three-level inhomogeneously-broadened atoms inside an optical cavity. By making use of the modified linear absorption and dispersion, as well as the greatly enhanced nonlinearity in the three-level electromagnetically induced transparency system, the optical bistablity and efficient all-optical switching can be achieved at relatively low laser powers, which can be well controlled and manipulated. Un

  2. Hong-Ou-Mandel atom interferometry in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Brian; Kaufman, Adam; Reynolds, Collin; Wall, Michael; Foss-Feig, Michael; Hazzard, Kaden; Rey, Ana Maria; Regal, Cindy

    2014-05-01

    We present recent work in which we demonstrate near-complete control over all the internal and external degrees of freedom of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms trapped in sub-micron optical tweezers. Utilizing this control for two atoms in two optical tweezers, we implement a massive-particle analog of the Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer where atom tunneling plays the role of the photon beamsplitter. The interferometer is used to probe the effect of atomic indistinguishability on the two-atom dynamics for a variety of initial conditions. These experiments demonstrate the viability of the optical tweezer platform for bottom-up generation of low-entropy quantum systems and pave the way toward the direct observation of quantum dynamics in more complex finite-sized systems.

  3. Sub-Doppler temperature measurements of laser-cooled atoms using optical nanofibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Laura; Deasy, Kieran; Daly, Mark J.; Morrissey, Michael J.; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the average temperature of a cloud of cold 85Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap using an optical nanofibre. A periodic spatial variation is applied to the magnetic fields generated by the trapping coils and this causes the trap centre to oscillate, which, in turn, causes the cloud of cold atoms to oscillate. The optical nanofibre is used to collect the fluorescence emitted by the cold atoms, and the frequency response between the motion of the centre of the oscillating trap and the cloud of atoms is determined. This allows us to make measurements of cloud temperature both above and below the Doppler limit, thereby paving the way for nanofibres to be integrated with ultracold atoms for hybrid quantum devices.

  4. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  5. CW THz standoff imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Zhang, Yalin; Mu, Junkai; Zhao, Yuejin; Zhang, Cunlin

    2009-11-01

    We present a continuous-wave (CW) terahertz (THz) standoff scanning imaging system at 0.2 THz. This system works at reflection geometry and the imaging distance is 30 m. A Gunn oscillator is utilized as emitter and an unbiased Schottky diode operated at room temperature is employed as detector. A polyethylene Fresnel lens is used to collimation terahertz wave for standoff propagation. five aluminum mirrors are employed to increase distance. The sample is placed on an X-Y two-dimensional stage which is controlled by a computer. The collimated THz wave propagates in air and is focused to the sample by another polyethylene Fresnel lens. The back scatted THz wave from the sample surface is collected by the detector alone the same path. The two-dimensional image of sample is obtained by a raster scanning fashion. An aluminum plate with holes, an airplane model and a toy gun contained in a box are imaged at 30 m from the imaging unit. The results show that this standoff imaging system has a wide potential to be applied in the area of security inspection and screening.

  6. Quantum Correlation of Two Entangled Atoms Interacting with the Binomial Optical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2016-10-01

    Quantum correlations of two atoms in a system of two entangled atoms interacting with the binomial optical field are investigated. In eight different initial states of the two atoms, the influence of the strength of the dipole-dipole interaction, probabilities of a the Bernoulli trial and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the geometrical quantum discord between two atoms are discussed. The result shows that two atoms always exist the correlation for different parameters. In addition, when and only when the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the temporal evolution of geometrical quantum discord is not affected by the parameters, and always keep in the degree of geometrical quantum discord that is a fixed value.

  7. Deceleration of a continuous-wave(CW)molecular beam with a single quasi-CW semi-Gaussian laser beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Ya-Ling; Xia Yong; Yin Jian-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We propose a promising scheme to decelerate a CW molecular beam by using a red-detuned quasi-cw semi-Gaussian laser beam(SGB).We study the dynamical process of the deceleration for a CW deuterated ammonia(ND3)molecular beam by Monte-Carlo simulation method.Our study shows that we can obtain a ND3 molecular beam with a relative average kinetic energy loss of about 10% and a relative output molecular number of more than 90% by using a single quasi-cw SGB with a power of 1.5kW and a maximum optical well depth of 7.33mK.

  8. Magnetic induction tomography using an all-optical ⁸⁷Rb atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Jurgilas, Sarunas; Dow, Albert; Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate magnetic induction tomography (MIT) with an all-optical atomic magnetometer. Our instrument creates a conductivity map of conductive objects. Both the shape and size of the imaged samples compare very well with the actual shape and size. Given the potential of all-optical atomic magnetometers for miniaturization and extreme sensitivity, the proof-of-principle presented in this Letter opens up promising avenues in the development of instrumentation for MIT.

  9. Optically induced conical intersections in traps for ultracold atoms and molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallis, A.O.G.; Hutson, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    We show that conical intersections can be created in laboratory coordinates by dressing a parabolic trap for ultracold atoms or molecules with a combination of optical and static magnetic fields. The resulting ring trap can support single-particle states with half-integer rotational quantization and many-particle states with persistent flow. Two well-separated atomic or molecular states are brought into near-resonance by an optical field and tuned across each other with an inhomogeneous magne...

  10. A Subfemtotesla Atomic Magnetometer Based on Hybrid Optical Pumping of Potassium and Rubidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Cai, Hongwei; Ding, Ming; Quan, Wei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-05-01

    Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have been researched and applied extensively. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with no cryogenic cooling of atomic magnetometers would enable many applications with low cost, including the magnetoencephalography (MEG). Ultrahigh sensitivity atomic magnetometer is considered to be the main development direction for the future. Hybrid optical pumping has been proposed to improve the efficiency of nuclear polarization. But it can also be used for magnetic field measurement. This method can control absorption of optical pumping light, which is benefit for improving the uniformity of alkali metal atoms polarization and the sensitivity of atomic magnetometer. In addition, it allows optical pumping in the absence of quenching gas. We conduct experiments with a hybrid optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a cell containing potassium and rubidium. By adjusting the density ratio of alkali metal and the pumping laser conditions, we measured the magnetic field sensitivity better than 0.7 fT/sqrt(Hz).

  11. An atomic beam source for fast loading of a magneto-optical trap under high vacuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDowall, P.D.; Hilliard, Andrew; Grünzweig, T.

    2012-01-01

    is capable of loading 90 of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) in less than 7 s while maintaining a low vacuum pressure of 10 -11 Torr. The transverse velocity components of the atomic beam are measured to be within typical capture velocities of a rubidium MOT. Finally, we show that the atomic beam can be turned...

  12. High-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical-trap source for cold lithium atoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiecke, T.G.; Gensemer, S.D.; Ludewig, A.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT) as a beam source for cold Li-6 atoms. The source is side loaded from an oven operated at temperatures in the range 600 less than or similar to T less than or similar to 700 K. The performance is analyzed by loading the atoms into a

  13. Analyzing quantum jumps of one and two atoms strongly coupled to an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reick, Sebastian; Mølmer, Klaus; Alt, Wolfgang;

    2010-01-01

    We induce quantum jumps between the hyperfine ground states of one and two cesium atoms, strongly coupled to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator, and analyze the resulting random telegraph signals. We identify experimental parameters to deduce the atomic spin state nondestructively from ...

  14. Photon-correlation measurements of atomic-cloud temperature using an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Grover, J A; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2015-01-01

    We develop a temperature measurement of an atomic cloud based on the temporal correlations of fluorescence photons evanescently coupled into an optical nanofiber. We measure the temporal width of the intensity-intensity correlation function due to atomic transit time and use it to determine the most probable atomic velocity, hence the temperature. This technique agrees well with standard time-of-flight temperature measurements. We confirm our results with trajectory simulations.

  15. A Realization of a Quasi-Random Walk for Atoms in Time-Dependent Optical Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hinkel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the time dependent dynamics of an atom in a two-color pumped cavity, longitudinally through a side mirror and transversally via direct driving of the atomic dipole. The beating of the two driving frequencies leads to a time dependent effective optical potential that forces the atom into a non-trivial motion, strongly resembling a discrete random walk behavior between lattice sites. We provide both numerical and analytical analysis of such a quasi-random walk behavior.

  16. Making optical atomic clocks more stable with $10^{-16}$ level laser stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Y Y; Lemke, N D; Fox, R W; Sherman, J A; Ma, L -S; Oates, C W

    2011-01-01

    The superb precision of an atomic clock is derived from its stability. Atomic clocks based on optical (rather than microwave) frequencies are attractive because of their potential for high stability, which scales with operational frequency. Nevertheless, optical clocks have not yet realized this vast potential, due in large part to limitations of the laser used to excite the atomic resonance. To address this problem, we demonstrate a cavity-stabilized laser system with a reduced thermal noise floor, exhibiting a fractional frequency instability of $2 \\times 10^{-16}$. We use this laser as a stable optical source in a Yb optical lattice clock to resolve an ultranarrow 1 Hz transition linewidth. With the stable laser source and the signal to noise ratio (S/N) afforded by the Yb optical clock, we dramatically reduce key stability limitations of the clock, and make measurements consistent with a clock instability of $5 \\times 10^{-16} / \\sqrt{\\tau}$.

  17. Hybrid Quantum System of a Nanofiber Mode Coupled to Two Chains of Optically Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zoubi, Hashem

    2010-01-01

    A tapered optical nanofiber simultaneously used to trap and optically interface of cold atoms through evanescent fields constitutes a new and well controllable hybrid quantum system. The atoms are trapped in two parallel 1D optical lattices generated by suitable far blue and red detuned evanescent field modes very close to opposite sides of the nanofiber surface. Collective electronic excitations (excitons) of each of the optical lattices are resonantly coupled to the second lattice forming symmetric and antisymmetric common excitons. In contrast to the inverse cube dependence of the individual atomic dipole-dipole interaction, we analytically find an exponentially decaying coupling strength with distance between the lattices. The resulting symmetric (bright) excitons strongly interact with the resonant nanofiber photons to form fiber polaritons, which can be observed through linear optical spectra. For large enough wave vectors the polariton decay rate to free space is strongly reduced, which should render t...

  18. Hyperparallel optical quantum computation assisted by atomic ensembles embedded in double-sided optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective, scalable, hyperparallel photonic quantum computation scheme in which photonic qubits are hyperencoded both in the spatial degrees of freedom (DOF) and the polarization DOF of each photon. The deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-cnot) gate on a two-photon system is attainable with our interesting interface between the polarized photon and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble embedded in a double-sided optical cavity, and it doubles the operations in the conventional quantum cnot gate. Moreover, we present a compact hyper-cnotN gate on N +1 hyperencoded photons with only two auxiliary cavity-magnon systems, not more, and it can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques. Our proposal enables various applications with the hyperencoded photons in quantum computing and quantum networks.

  19. Precision control of magneto-optically cooled rubidium atoms (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nic Chormaic, S.; Yarovitskiy, A.; Shortt, B.; Deasy, K.; Morrissey, M.

    2005-06-01

    Research interest in designing sources of cold atoms has significantly increased during the past ten years with the development of suitable laser sources for magneto-optical trapping and the further mastering of evaporative cooling in order to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation. The magneto-optical trap is now viewed as a standard research facility worldwide and has opened up many new exciting research directions in atomic physics. One area of interest is that of combining spherical microcavities with cold atomic sources in order to achieve efficient photon exchange between the cavity and atom for further understandings of cavity quantum electrodynamics. This could eventually lead to atom entanglement via photon exchange which would have implications for quantum logic design. However, initial attempts to achieve such interactions have been hindered by inadequate control and manipulation of the cold atom source. Here, we present work on designing and building an ultra-stable source of magneto-optically cooled rubidium atoms with a temperature in the tens of microKelvin range. We discuss the different cooling mechanisms involved in the process and present a suitable experimental arrangement including details on the ultra-high vacuum chamber, the laser systems being used and the source of rubidium vapour. Finally, we discuss some future direction for the research including the diffraction of atoms from gratings and micron-sized objects and the parameter control of the cloud of atoms.

  20. Correlated hopping of bosonic atoms induced by optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckholt, Maria [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, Garching, D-85478 (Germany); Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, c/Serrano 113b, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)], E-mail: maria.eckholt@mpq.mpg.de

    2009-09-15

    In this work, we analyze a particular setup with ultracold atoms trapped in state-dependent lattices. We show that any asymmetry in the contact interaction translates into one of two classes of correlated hopping. After deriving the effective lattice Hamiltonian for the atoms, we obtain analytically and numerically the different phases and quantum phase transitions. We find for weak correlated hopping both Mott insulators and charge density waves, while for stronger correlated hopping the system transitions into a pair superfluid. We demonstrate that this phase exists for a wide range of interaction asymmetries and has interesting correlation properties that differentiate it from an ordinary atomic Bose-Einstein condensate.

  1. On-site monitoring of atomic density number for an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on atomic spin exchange relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng; Chen, Xiyuan; Ding, Ming; Shan, Guangcun; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei

    2016-07-25

    We present a method for monitoring the atomic density number on site based on atomic spin exchange relaxation. When the spin polarization P ≪ 1, the atomic density numbers could be estimated by measuring magnetic resonance linewidth in an applied DC magnetic field by using an all-optical atomic magnetometer. The density measurement results showed that the experimental results the theoretical predictions had a good consistency in the investigated temperature range from 413 K to 463 K, while, the experimental results were approximately 1.5 ∼ 2 times less than the theoretical predictions estimated from the saturated vapor pressure curve. These deviations were mainly induced by the radiative heat transfer efficiency, which inevitably leaded to a lower temperature in cell than the setting temperature.

  2. Controllable Persistent Atom Current of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Optical Lattice Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Gong-Ping; LIANG Jiu-Qing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the macroscopic quantum state of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices is studied by solving the periodic Gross-Pitaevskii equation in one-dimensional geometry. It is shown that an exact solution seen to be a travelling wave of excited macroscopic quantum states resultes in a persistent atom current, which can be controlled by adjusting of the barrier height of the optical periodic potential. A critical condition to generate the travelling wave is demonstrated and we moreover propose a practical experiment to realize the persistent atom current in a toroidal atom waveguide.

  3. Excitation Spectrum of Spin-1 Bosonic Atoms in an Optical Lattice with High Filling Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing-Min

    2007-01-01

    The Green's function and the higher-order correlation functions of spin-1 cold atoms in an optical lattice are defined.Because we consider the problem of spin-1 Bose condensed atoms in an optical lattice with high filling factors,I.e.,the number density of Bose condensed atoms no is large,the fluctuation of them can be neglected and we take mean-field approximation for the higher-order terms.The excitation spectra for both the polar case and the ferromagnetic case are obtained and analyzed.

  4. Nonlinear optical response of a two-dimensional atomic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The theory of Bloembergen and Pershan for the light waves at the boundary of nonlinear media is extended to a nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal, i.e., a single planar atomic lattice, placed between linear bulk media. The crystal is treated as a zero-thickness interface, a real 2D system. Harmonic waves emanate from it. Generalization of the laws of reflection and refraction give the direction and the intensity of the harmonic waves. As a particular case that contains all the essential physical features, second-order harmonic generation is considered. The theory, due to its simplicity that stems from the special character of a single planar atomic lattice, is able to elucidate and explain the rich experimental details of harmonic generation from a 2D atomic crystal.

  5. Nonlinear magneto-optical effects in cold atoms of 87Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ling-Xiang; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2004-01-01

    With laser-cooled cold 87Rb atoms as a magneto-optical medium, a weak right circularly polarized probe field and frequency modulation technique are used to detect the magnetic distribution of the quadrupole field. A two-peak dispersion-like signal other than that of the usual nonlinear magneto-optical effect mentioned in other papers is obtained.

  6. Coherent matter wave optics on an atom chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Schumm, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip.......Coherent manipulation of matter waves in microscopic trapping potentials facilitates both fundamental and technological applications. Here we focus on experiments with a microscopic integrated interferometer that demonstrate coherent operation on an atom chip....

  7. Spin Accumulation of Spinor Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; JIANG Zhan-Feng

    2007-01-01

    We obtain an effective spin correlation Hamiltonian describing the interaction of light with a two-level atom, then we investigate the classical trajectory of the two-level atom system by numerical integration of the Heisenberg equation of motion. Our results show that the spin accumulation is a very popular phenomenon as long as the spin character cannot be ignored in the Hamiltonian. We propose experimental protocol to observe this new phenomenon in further experiments.

  8. Interaction of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms with higher order modes of an optical nanofibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Gokhroo, Vandna; Deasy, Kieran; Maimaiti, Aili; Frawley, Mary C.; Phelan, Ciarán; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are used to confine light to sub-wavelength regions and are very promising tools for the development of optical fibre-based quantum networks using cold, neutral atoms. To date, experimental studies on atoms near nanofibres have focussed on fundamental fibre mode interactions. In this work, we demonstrate the integration of a few-mode optical nanofibre into a magneto-optical trap for 87Rb atoms. The nanofibre, with a waist diameter of ∼700 nm, supports both the fundamental and first group of higher order modes (HOMs) and is used for atomic fluorescence and absorption studies. In general, light propagating in higher order fibre modes has a greater evanescent field extension around the waist in comparison with the fundamental mode. By exploiting this behaviour, we demonstrate that the detected signal of fluorescent photons emitted from a cloud of cold atoms centred at the nanofibre waist is larger if HOMs are also included. In particular, the signal from HOMs appears to be about six times larger than that obtained for the fundamental mode. Absorption of on-resonance, HOM probe light by the laser-cooled atoms is also observed. These advances should facilitate the realization of atom trapping schemes based on HOM interference.

  9. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-01

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  10. Ultrafast All-optical Modulation Exploiting the Vibrational Dynamic of Metallic Meta-atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Hao F; Sun, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Optical control over elementary molecular vibration establishes fundamental capabilities for exploiting the broad range of optical linear and nonlinear phenomena. However, experimental demonstration of the coherently driven molecular vibration remains a challenge task due to the weak optical force imposed on natural materials. Here we report the design of "meta-atom" that exhibits giant artificial optical nonlinearity. These "meta-atoms" support co-localized magnetic resonance at optical frequency and vibration resonance at GHz frequency with a deep-sub-diffraction-limit spatial confinement (${\\lambda}^2/100$). The coherent coupling of those two distinct resonances manifests a strong optical force, which is fundamentally different from the commonly studied form of radiation forces, the gradient forces, or photo-thermal induced deformation. It results in a giant third-order susceptibility $\\chi^{(3)}$ of $10^{-13}$ $m^2$/$V^2$, which is more than six orders of magnitude larger than that found in natural materi...

  11. Feasibility of a feedback control of atomic self-organization in an optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, D. A., E-mail: ivanov-den@yandex.ru; Ivanova, T. Yu. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Many interesting nonlinear effects are based on the strong interaction of motional degrees of freedom of atoms with an optical cavity field. Among them is the spatial self-organization of atoms in a pattern where the atoms group in either odd or even sites of the cavity-induced optical potential. An experimental observation of this effect can be simplified by using, along with the original cavity-induced feedback, an additional electronic feedback based on the detection of light leaking the cavity and the control of the optical potential for the atoms. Following our previous study, we show that this approach is more efficient from the laser power perspective than the original scheme without the electronic feedback.

  12. Observation of Parity-Time Symmetry in Optically Induced Atomic Lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Sheng, Jiteng; Yang, Liu; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; He, Bing; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    A wide class of non-Hermitian Hamiltonians can possess entirely real eigenvalues when they have parity-time (PT) symmetric potentials. Due to their unusual properties, this family of non-Hermitian systems has recently attracted considerable attention in diverse areas of physics, especially in coupled gain-loss waveguides and optical lattices. Given that multi-level atoms can be quite efficient in judiciously synthesizing refractive index profiles, schemes based on atomic coherence have been recently proposed to realize optical potentials with PT-symmetric properties. Here, we experimentally demonstrate for the first time PT-symmetric optical lattices in a coherently-prepared four-level N-type atomic system. By appropriately tuning the pertinent atomic parameters, the onset of PT symmetry breaking is observed through measuring an abrupt phase-shift jump. The experimental realization of such readily reconfigurable and effectively controllable PT-symmetric periodic lattice structures sets a new stage for further...

  13. Coherence and Raman sideband cooling of a single atom in an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, J D; Zibrov, A S; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate quantum control of a single atom in an optical tweezer trap created by a tightly focused optical beam. We show that longitudinal polarization components in the dipole trap arising from the breakdown of the paraxial approximation give rise to significant internal-state decoherence. We show that this effect can be mitigated by appropriate choice of magnetic bias field, enabling Raman sideband cooling of a single atom close to its three-dimensional ground state in an optical trap with a beam waist as small as $w=900$ nm. We achieve vibrational occupation numbers of $\\bar{n}_r = 0.01$ and $\\bar{n}_a = 8$ in the radial and axial directions of the trap, corresponding to an rms size of the atomic wavepacket of 24 nm and 270 nm, respectively. This represents a promising starting point for future hybrid quantum systems where atoms are placed in close proximity to surfaces.

  14. Influence of electron beam irradiation on nonlinear optical properties of Al doped ZnO thin films for optoelectronic device applications in the cw laser regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Albin; Pramodini, S.; Poornesh, P.; Kityk, I. V.; Fedorchuk, A. O.; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    We present the studies on third-order nonlinear optical properties of Al doped ZnO thin films irradiated with electron beam at different dose rate. Al doped ZnO thin films were deposited on a glass substrate by spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The thin films were irradiated using the 8 MeV electron beam from microtron ranging from 1 kG y to 5 kG y. Nonlinear optical studies were carried out by employing the single beam Z-scan technique to determine the sign and magnitude of absorptive and refractive nonlinearities of the irradiated thin films. Continuous wave He-Ne laser operating at 633 nm was used as source of excitation. The open aperture Z-scan measurements indicated the sample displays reverse saturable absorption (RSA) process. The negative sign of the nonlinear refractive index n2 was noted from the closed aperture Z-scan measurements indicates, the films exhibit self-defocusing property due to thermal nonlinearity. The third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ(3) varies from 8.17 × 10-5 esu to 1.39 × 10-3 esu with increase in electron beam irradiation. The present study reveals that the irradiation of electron beam leads to significant changes in the third-order optical nonlinearity. Al doped ZnO displays good optical power handling capability with optical clamping of about ∼5 mW. The irradiation study endorses that the Al doped ZnO under investigation is a promising candidate photonic device applications such as all-optical power limiting.

  15. One-Atom-Thick IR Metamaterials and Transformation Optics Using Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Vakil, Ashkan

    2011-01-01

    Here we theoretically show, by designing and manipulating spatially inhomogeneous, non-uniform conductivity patterns across a single flake of graphene, that this single-atom-layered material can serve as a "one-atom-thick" platform for infrared metamaterials and transformation optical devices. It is known that by varying the chemical potential using gate electric and/or magnetic fields, the graphene conductivity in the THz and IR frequencies can be changed. This versatility provides the possibility that different "patches" on a single flake of graphene possess different conductivities, suggesting a mechanism to construct "single-atom-thick" IR metamaterials and transformation optical structures. Our computer simulation results pave the way for envisioning numerous IR photonic functions and metamaterial concepts-all on a "one-atom-thick" platform-of such we list a few here: edge waveguides, bent ribbon-like paths guiding light, photonic splitters and combiners, "one-atom-thick" IR scattering elements as buildi...

  16. Ultra-cold mechanical resonators coupled to atoms in an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Geraci, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    We propose an experiment utilizing an array of cooled micro-cantilevers coupled to a sample of ultra-cold atoms trapped near a micro-fabricated surface. The cantilevers allow individual lattice site addressing for atomic state control and readout, and potentially may be useful in optical lattice quantum computation schemes. Assuming resonators can be cooled to their vibrational ground state, the implementation of a two-qubit controlled-NOT gate with atomic internal states and the motional states of the resonator is described. We also consider a protocol for entangling two or more cantilevers on the atom chip with different resonance frequencies, using the trapped atoms as an intermediary. Although similar experiments could be carried out with magnetic microchip traps, the optical confinement scheme we consider may exhibit reduced near-field magnetic noise and decoherence. Prospects for using this novel system for tests of quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales or quantum information processing are discussed.

  17. Observation of single neutral atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; He Jun; Qiu Ying; Yang Bao-Dong; Zhao Jiang-Yan; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2008-01-01

    Single caesium atoms in a large-magnetic-gradient vapour-cell magneto-optical trap have been identified. The trapping of individual atoms is marked by the steps in fluorescence signal corresponding to the capture or loss of single atoms. The typical magnetic gradient is about 29 mT/cm, which evidently reduces the capture rate of magneto-optical trap.

  18. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, K. D.; Singh, P. K.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate generation of an isotopically pure beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first slowed using a Zeeman Slower. They are then subjected to a pair of molasses beams inclined at $45^\\circ$ with respect to the slowed atomic beam. The slowed atoms are deflected and probed at a distance of 160 mm. We demonstrate selective deflection of the bosonic isotope $^{174}$Yb, and the fermionic isotope $^{171}$Yb. Using a transient measurement after the molasses beams are turned on, we find a longitudinal temperature of 41 mK.

  19. Cold beam of isotopically pure Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Rathod; P K Singh; Vasant Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the generation of an isotopically pure beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms by deflection using 1D-optical molasses. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first slowed using a Zeeman slower. They are then subjected to a pair of molasses beams inclined at 45° with respect to the slowed atomic beam. The slowed atoms are deflected and probed at a distance of 160 mm. We demonstrate the selective deflection of the bosonic isotope 174Yb and the fermionic isotope 171Yb. Using a transient measurement after the molasses beams are turned on, we find a longitudinal temperature of 41 mK.

  20. Investigation of ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Li-Rong; Ji Zhong-Hua; Yuan Jin-Peng; Yang Yan; Zhao Yan-Ting; Ma Jie; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,ultracold atoms and molecules in a dark magneto-optical trap (MOT) are studied via depumping the cesium cold atoms into the dark hyperfine ground state.The collision rate is reduced to 0.45 s-1 and the density of the atoms is increased to 5.6 × 1011 cm-3 when the fractional population of the atoms in the bright hyperfine ground state is as low as 0.15.The vibrational spectra of the ultracold cesium molecules are also studied in a standard MOT and in a dark MOT separately.The experimental results are analyzed by using the perturbative quantum approach.

  1. Magneto-optical Trapping through a Transparent Silicon Carbide Atom Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Huet, Landry; Morvan, Erwan; Sarazin, Nicolas; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Reichel, Jakob; Guerlin, Christine; Schwartz, Sylvain

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of trapping about one hundred million rubidium atoms in a magneto-optical trap with several of the beams passing through a transparent atom chip mounted on a vacuum cell wall. The chip is made of a gold microcircuit deposited on a silicon carbide substrate, with favorable thermal conductivity. We show how a retro-reflected configuration can efficiently address the chip birefringence issues, allowing atom trapping at arbitrary distances from the chip. We also demonstrate detection through the chip, granting a large numerical aperture. This configuration is compared to other atom chip devices, and some possible applications are discussed.

  2. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  3. Divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices: intensity landscape and magic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Topcu, Turker

    2013-01-01

    We develop a theoretical understanding of trapping divalent Rydberg atoms in optical lattices. Because the size of the Rydberg electron cloud can be comparable to the scale of spatial variations of laser intensity, we pay special attention to averaging optical fields over the atomic wavefunctions. Optical potential is proportional to the ac Stark polarizability. We find that in the independent particle approximation for the valence electrons, this polarizability breaks into two contributions: the singly ionized core polarizability and the contribution from the Rydberg electron. Unlike the usually employed free electron polarizability, the Rydberg contribution depends both on laser intensity profile and the rotational symmetry of the total electronic wavefunction. We focus on the $J=0$ Rydberg states of Sr and evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s$n$s($^1S_0$) and 5s$n$p($^3P_0$) Rydberg states. We specifically choose Sr atom for its optical lattice clock applications. We find that there are several ...

  4. Resonant optical control of the spin of a single Cr atom in a quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2017-01-01

    A Cr atom in a semiconductor host carries a localized spin with an intrinsic large spin to strain coupling, which is particularly promising for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical systems and coherent mechanical spin driving. We demonstrate here that the spin of an individual Cr atom inserted in a semiconductor quantum dot can be controlled optically. We first show that a Cr spin can be prepared by resonant optical pumping. Monitoring the time dependence of the intensity of the resonant fluorescence of the quantum dot during this process permits us to probe the dynamics of the optical initialization of the Cr spin. Using this initialization and readout technique we measured a Cr spin relaxation time at T =5 K in the microsecond range. We finally demonstrate that, under a resonant single-mode laser field, the energy of any spin state of an individual Cr atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect.

  5. Dynamical properties of moving atom–atom entanglement and entanglement between two atoms with optical field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Abdel-Khalek; S H A Halawani

    2015-12-01

    Quantum information technology largely relies on a sophisticated and fragile resource, called quantum entanglement, which exhibits a highly nontrivial manifestation of the coherent superposition of the states of composite quantum systems. In this paper, we study the interaction between the general and even coherent fields with moving and stationary two two-level atoms. In this regard, this paper investigates the von Neumann entropy and the atoms–field tangle as a measure of entanglement between the general and even coherent fields with the two atoms. Also, the entanglement between the two atoms using concurrence and negativity during time evolution is discussed. This paper examines the effects of multiphoton transitions and initial state setting on the entanglement for the system under consideration. Finally, the results demonstrate an important phenomenon such as the sudden death and birth of entanglement when the two atoms are initially in entangled states.

  6. Polarization-selective optical nonlinearities in cold Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Hui; Artoni, M.; La Rocca, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    We study the interaction between a probe and a trigger weak fields in a sample of cold rubidium atoms in the presence of a coupling and a dressing strong fields. Dipole Rydberg blockade may occur and can be set to depend on the probe and trigger polarizations giving rise to diverse regimes of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with a concomitant small probe and trigger absorption and dispersion. This is shown to be relevant to the implementation of polarization conditional probe and trigger cross nonlinearities in cold Rydberg atoms.

  7. Tunable All-Optical Wavelength Conversion Based on Cascaded SHG/DFG in a Ti:PPLN Waveguide Using a Single CW Control Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Nouroozi, Rahman; Wang, Wenrui

    2012-01-01

    Tunable all-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) of a 40-Gb/s RZ-OOK data signal based on cascaded second-harmonic generation (SHG) and difference-frequency generation (DFG) in a Ti:PPLN waveguide is demonstrated. Error-free performances with negligible power penalty are achieved for the waveleng...

  8. A dark-line two-dimensional magneto-optical trap of 85Rb atoms with high optical depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanchao; Chen, J F; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Shuyu; Loy, M M T; Wong, G K L; Du, Shengwang

    2012-07-01

    We describe the apparatus of a dark-line two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) of (85)Rb cold atoms with high optical depth (OD). Different from the conventional configuration, two (of three) pairs of trapping laser beams in our 2D MOT setup do not follow the symmetry axes of the quadrupole magnetic field: they are aligned with 45° angles to the longitudinal axis. Two orthogonal repumping laser beams have a dark-line volume in the longitudinal axis at their cross over. With a total trapping laser power of 40 mW and repumping laser power of 18 mW, we obtain an atomic OD up to 160 in an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) scheme, which corresponds to an atomic-density-length product NL = 2.05 × 10(15) m(-2). In a closed two-state system, the OD can become as large as more than 600. Our 2D MOT configuration allows full optical access of the atoms in its longitudinal direction without interfering with the trapping and repumping laser beams spatially. Moreover, the zero magnetic field along the longitudinal axis allows the cold atoms maintain a long ground-state coherence time without switching off the MOT magnetic field, which makes it possible to operate the MOT at a high repetition rate and a high duty cycle. Our 2D MOT is ideal for atomic-ensemble-based quantum optics applications, such as EIT, entangled photon pair generation, optical quantum memory, and quantum information processing.

  9. Graphene-like optical light field and its interaction with two-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Courtial, Johannes; Radwell, N.; Selyem, A.; Franke-Arnold, S.; Aldossary, O. M.; Babiker, M.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical basis leading to the creation of a light field with a hexagonal honeycomb structure resembling graphene is considered along with its experimental realization and its interaction with atoms. It is argued that associated with such a light field is an optical dipole potential which leads to the diffraction of the atoms, but the details depend on whether the transverse spread of the atomic wave packet is larger than the transverse dimensions of the optical lattice (resonant Kapitza-Dirac effect) or smaller (optical Stern-Gerlach effect). Another effect in this context involves the creation of gauge fields due to the Berry phase acquired by the atom moving in the light field. The experimental realization of the light field with a honeycomb hexagonal structure is described using holographic methods and we proceed to explore the atom diffraction in the Kapitza-Dirac regime as well as the optical Stern-Gerlach regime, leading to momentum distributions with characteristic but different hexagonal structures. The artificial gauge fields too are shown to have the same hexagonal spatial structure and their magnitude can be significantly large. The effects are discussed with reference to typical parameters for the atoms and the fields.

  10. Continuously transferring cold atoms in caesium double magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2006-01-01

    We have established a caesium double magneto-optical trap (MOT) system for cavity-QED experiment, and demonstrated the continuous transfer of cold caesium atoms from the vapour-cell MOT with a pressure of ~ 1 × 10-6 Pa to the ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) MOT with a pressure of ~ 8 × 10-8 Pa via a focused continuous-wave transfer laser beam. The effect of frequency detuning as well as the intensity of the transfer beam is systematically investigated, which makes the transverse cooling adequate before the atoms leak out of the vapour-cell MOT to reduce divergence of the cold atomic beam. The typical cold atomic flux got from vapour-cell MOT is ~ 2 × 107 atoms/s. About 5 × 106 caesium atoms are recaptured in the UHV MOT.

  11. Atomic force microscope with integrated optical microscope for biological applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, Constant A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; van der Werf, Kees; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Segerink, Franciscus B.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    Since atomic force microscopy (AFM) is capable of imaging nonconducting surfaces, the technique holds great promises for high‐resolution imaging of biological specimens. A disadvantage of most AFMs is the fact that the relatively large sample surface has to be scanned multiple times to pinpoint a

  12. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  13. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumb, D.H.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Krumrey, M.

    2008-01-01

    of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare...

  14. Measurement of "optical" transition probabilities in the silver atom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, J.; Smit, J.A.

    1958-01-01

    For 22 spectral lines of the silver atom the probability of spontaneous transition has been derived from measurements of the emission intensity of the line and the population of the corresponding upper level. The medium of excitation was the column of a vertical arc discharge in air of atmospheric

  15. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks-Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  16. Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    interrogated by a linearly polarized laser with bare Rabi frequency B and detuning from the atomic resonance . The Pauli exclusion principle forces...are populated. The population of transverse modes is accounted for as a renormalization of the interaction parameter. The interaction part of the

  17. Research on Doppler frequency in incoherent FM/CW laser detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Cui, Zhanzhong

    2010-10-01

    The principle of transmitted and received laser in incoherent FM/CW laser detection is different from the one in coherent FM/CW laser detection. The methods for distance solution in both detections are similar. Incoherent FM/CW laser detection uses subcarrier to modulate the intensity of laser, and the photodetector detects the intensity of received signal. The amplified photocurrent is mixed with local oscillator signal, and the intermediate frequency (IF) signal contains the information of distance from sensor to target. The Doppler frequency for this detection is related with the relative radial velocity between sensor and target. The optical frequency is directly modulated with electro-optic device in coherent FM/CW laser detection and the received laser signal is photomixed with transmitted laser signal. The Doppler frequency in the detection relates to the optical frequency. In distance-measuring lidar, the Doppler frequency affects the solution. The Doppler frequency in incoherent FM/CW laser detection is unrelated with optical frequency, and it is much less than the one in coherent FM/CW laser detection, correspondingly. The error in incoherent FM/CW laser detection is smaller. As a result, the incoherent FM/CW laser detection is more suitable for the use of distance-measuring lidar.

  18. Magnetic microtraps for cavity QED, Bose-Einstein condensates, and atom optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    The system comprised of an atom strongly coupled to photons, known as cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), provides a rich experimental setting for quantum information processing, both in the implementation of quantum logic gates and in the development of quantum networks. Moreover, studies of cavity QED will help elucidate the dynamics of continuously observed open quantum systems with quantum-limited feedback. To achieve these goals in cavity QED, a neutral atom must be tightly confined inside a high-finesse cavity with small mode volume for long periods of time. Microfabricated wires on a substrate---known as an atom chip---can create a sufficiently high-curvature magnetic potential to trap atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime. We have recently integrated an optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity with such a device. The microwires allow the on-chip collection and laser cooling of neutral atoms, and allow the magnetic waveguiding of these atoms to an Ioffe trap inside the cavity mode. Magnetically trapped intracavity atoms have been detected with this cavity QED system. A similar experiment employing microdisks and photonic bandgap cavities is nearing completion. With these more exotic cavities, a robust and scalable atom-cavity chip system will deeply probe the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with magnetically trapped atoms. Atom chips have found great success in producing and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates and in creating novel atom optical elements. An on-chip BEC has been attained in a miniaturized system incorporating an atom chip designed for atom interferometry and for studies of Josephson effects of a BEC in a double-well potential. Using similar microfabrication techniques, we created and demonstrated a specular magnetic atom mirror formed from a standard computer hard drive. This device, in conjunction with micron-sized charged circular pads, can produce a 1-D ring trap which may prove useful for studying Tonks gases in a ring geometry and for

  19. Thermally stimulated third-order optical nonlinearity in Cd-doped CuO-PVA thin films under cw laser illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgadge, Y. S.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Muley, G. G.

    2015-08-01

    We report synthesis, linear and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Cd-doped CuO-PVA nanocomposite thin films. Cd-doped CuO nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained by chemical synthesis method, and spin coating technique was used to obtain thin films in polyvinyl alcohol matrix. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows formation of crystalline CuO having monoclinic phase with average particle size of 10 nm. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy attests formation of NPs by witnessing strong blue shift in the excitonic absorption. Absorption wavelength of CuO NPs shifts from 365 to 342 nm for Cd doping of 1-5 wt%. Both XRD and UV-Vis data confirm decrease in particle size with increase in Cd-doping concentration. Thin films have been characterized by Z-scan technique under continuous-wave He-Ne laser, and enhanced values of nonlinear refractive index n 2 and nonlinear absorption coefficient β have been obtained. Enhancements in the nonlinear optical properties have been attributed to the thermal effect due to strong linear absorption coefficient combined with increased thermo-optic coefficient. Contributing mechanisms such as photoacoustic effect, surface states effect and dielectric effect due to dopant and thin film structure have been discussed.

  20. Optical bistability enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sawant, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The control of light transmission through a Fabry-Perot cavity containing atoms is theoretically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the time dependent cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained in steady state limit. For an ensemble of atoms in the cavity mode, the response of the intra-cavity light intensity to the intersecting resonant beam is understood for stationary atoms (closed system) and non-static atoms (open system). The open system is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, with the thermal environment. The solutions to the model are used to qualitatively explain the observed steady state and transient behaviour of the light in the cavity mode, in Sharma et. al. [1]. ...

  1. Observation and measurement of "giant" dispersive optical non-linearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Parigi, Valentina; Stanojevic, Jovica; Hilliard, Andrew J; Nogrette, Florence; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Grangier, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We observe and measure dispersive optical non-linearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical non-linearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within the medium. The measurements allow a direct estimation of the "blockaded fraction" of atoms within the atomic ensemble.

  2. Evaluation of atomic constants for optical radiation, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylstra, C. D.; Schneider, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Various atomic constant for 23 elements from helium to mercury were computed and are presented in tables. The data given for each element start with the element name, its atomic number, its ionic state, and the designation and series limit for each parent configuration. This is followed by information on the energy level, parent configuration, and designation for each term available to the program. The matrix elements subtables are ordered by the sequence numbers, which represent the initial and final levels of the transitions. Each subtable gives the following: configuration of the core or parent, designation and energy level for the reference state, effective principal quantum number, energy of the series limit, value of the matrix element for the reference state interacting with itself, and sum of all of the dipole matrix elements listed in the subtable. Dipole and quadrupole interaction data are also given.

  3. Computational challenges in atomic, molecular and optical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kenneth T

    2002-06-15

    Six challenges are discussed. These are the laser-driven helium atom; the laser-driven hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion; electron scattering (with ionization) from one-electron atoms; the vibrational and rotational structure of molecules such as H(3)(+) and water at their dissociation limits; laser-heated clusters; and quantum degeneracy and Bose-Einstein condensation. The first four concern fundamental few-body systems where use of high-performance computing (HPC) is currently making possible accurate modelling from first principles. This leads to reliable predictions and support for laboratory experiment as well as true understanding of the dynamics. Important aspects of these challenges addressable only via a terascale facility are set out. Such a facility makes the last two challenges in the above list meaningfully accessible for the first time, and the scientific interest together with the prospective role for HPC in these is emphasized.

  4. Optically Controlled Distributed Quantum Computing Using Atomic Ensembles As Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-23

    Distribution approved for public release. 8 Figure 7: Schematic Illustration of a network of small-scale quantum...quantum bits in different systems, for example, Rb atoms and NV diamond, preferably using telecom fibres. In this paper, we describe a quantum frequency...converter (QFC) that will perform this telecom band qubit conversion. The QFC is based on periodically poled lithium niobate waveguides. For

  5. Many-Body Quantum Optics with Decaying Atomic Spin States: ($\\gamma$, $\\kappa$) Dicke model

    CERN Document Server

    Gelhausen, Jan; Strack, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We provide a theory for quantum-optical realizations of the open Dicke model with internal, atomic spin states subject to uncorrelated, single-site spontaneous emission with rate $\\gamma$. This introduces a second decay channel for excitations to irreversibly dissipate into the environment, in addition to the photon loss with rate $\\kappa$. We compute the mean-field non-equilibrium steady states for spin and photon observables in the long-time limit, $t\\rightarrow \\infty$. Although $\\gamma$ does not conserve the total angular momentum of the spin array, we argue that our solution is exact in the thermodynamic limit, for the number of atoms $N\\rightarrow \\infty$. In light of recent and upcoming experiments realizing superradiant phase transitions using internal atomic states with pinned atoms in optical lattices, our work lays the foundation for the pursuit of a new class of open quantum magnets coupled to quantum light.

  6. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何军; 刘贝; 刁文婷; 王杰英; 靳刚; 王军民

    2015-01-01

    A single atom in a magneto–optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of∼100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters.

  7. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of impurity atom in semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M; Tanaka, Y; Komuro, S; Morikawa, T; Aoyagi, Y; Ishikawa, T

    2001-03-01

    We observed the x-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL) of erbium-doped silicon (Si:Er) thin films to make a site-selective x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurement of an optically active Er atom. The undulator beam was used for the increment of the electron population in the excited state, and following XEOL at an infrared wavelength of 1.54 microm with minimum absorption loss in the host Si was detected. The edge-jump and XAFS oscillation were successfully obtained at the Er L(III)-edge. This spectrum originated from inner-shell excitation and relaxation of only the optically active Er atom, indicating that site-selectivity at an atomic level was achieved.

  8. Nonlinear effects in optical pumping of a cold and slow atomic beam

    KAUST Repository

    Porfido, N.

    2015-10-12

    By photoionizing hyperfine (HF) levels of the Cs state 62P3/2 in a slow and cold atom beam, we find how their population depends on the excitation laser power. The long time (around 180μs) spent by the slow atoms inside the resonant laser beam is large enough to enable exploration of a unique atom-light interaction regime heavily affected by time-dependent optical pumping. We demonstrate that, under such conditions, the onset of nonlinear effects in the population dynamics and optical pumping occurs at excitation laser intensities much smaller than the conventional respective saturation values. The evolution of population within the HF structure is calculated by numerical integration of the multilevel optical Bloch equations. The agreement between numerical results and experiment outcomes is excellent. All main features in the experimental findings are explained by the occurrence of “dark” and “bright” resonances leading to power-dependent branching coefficients.

  9. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    A single atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of ~ 100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61205215, 11274213, and 61475091).

  10. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  11. Emergence of correlated optics in one-dimensional waveguides for classical and quantum atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruostekoski, Janne; Javanainen, Juha

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the emergence of correlated optical phenomena in the transmission of light through a waveguide that confines classical or ultracold quantum degenerate atomic ensembles. The conditions of the correlated collective response are identified in terms of atom density, thermal broadening, and photon losses by using stochastic Monte Carlo simulations and transfer matrix methods of transport theory. We also calculate the "cooperative Lamb shift" for the waveguide transmission resonance, and discuss line shifts that are specific to effectively one-dimensional waveguide systems.

  12. Nonlinear interaction of meta-atoms through optical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slobozhanyuk, A. P.; Kapitanova, P. V.; Filonov, D. S.; Belov, P. A. [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Powell, D. A. [Nonlinear Physics Centre and Centre for Ultrahigh-bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Shadrivov, I. V.; Kivshar, Yu. S. [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Nonlinear Physics Centre and Centre for Ultrahigh-bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Lapine, M., E-mail: mlapine@physics.usyd.edu.au [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO), St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Centre for Ultrahigh-bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); McPhedran, R. C. [Centre for Ultrahigh-bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-01-06

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a multi-frequency nonlinear coupling mechanism between split-ring resonators. We engineer the coupling between two microwave resonators through optical interaction, whilst suppressing the direct electromagnetic coupling. This allows for a power-dependent interaction between the otherwise independent resonators, opening interesting opportunities to address applications in signal processing, filtering, directional coupling, and electromagnetic compatibility.

  13. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  14. A quantum gas microscope for detecting single atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, Waseem S; Gillen, Jonathon I; Peng, Amy; Fölling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2009-11-05

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in creating complex atomic many-body quantum systems. One approach is to use macroscopic, effectively thermodynamic ensembles of ultracold atoms to create quantum gases and strongly correlated states of matter, and to analyse the bulk properties of the ensemble. For example, bosonic and fermionic atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice can be used for quantum simulations of solid-state models. The opposite approach is to build up microscopic quantum systems atom-by-atom, with complete control over all degrees of freedom. The atoms or ions act as qubits and allow the realization of quantum gates, with the goal of creating highly controllable quantum information systems. Until now, the macroscopic and microscopic strategies have been fairly disconnected. Here we present a quantum gas 'microscope' that bridges the two approaches, realizing a system in which atoms of a macroscopic ensemble are detected individually and a complete set of degrees of freedom for each of them is determined through preparation and measurement. By implementing a high-resolution optical imaging system, single atoms are detected with near-unity fidelity on individual sites of a Hubbard-regime optical lattice. The lattice itself is generated by projecting a holographic mask through the imaging system. It has an arbitrary geometry, chosen to support both strong tunnel coupling between lattice sites and strong on-site confinement. Our approach can be used to directly detect strongly correlated states of matter; in the context of condensed matter simulation, this corresponds to the detection of individual electrons in the simulated crystal. Also, the quantum gas microscope may enable addressing and read-out of large-scale quantum information systems based on ultracold atoms.

  15. Electronic and optical properties of BxNyCz monolayers with adsorption of hydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, L.; Azevedo, S.; de Lima Bernardo, B.

    2017-03-01

    We apply first-principles calculations, using density functional theory, to analyze the electronic and optical properties of monolayers of graphene with a nanodomain of 2D hexagonal boron nitrite (h-BN). It also investigated the effects of the adsorption of hydrogen atoms in different atoms at the edge of the h-BN nanodomain. We calculate the electronic band structure, the complex dielectric function and the optical conductivity. For such systems, the calculations demonstrate that the compounds exhibit a prominent excitement in the visible and near-infrared regions. In this form, the present study provides physical basis for potential applications of the considered materials in optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale.

  16. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  17. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atoneche, F; Malik, D; Kirilyuk, A; Toonen, A J; Etteger, A F van; Rasing, Th, E-mail: f.atoneche@science.ru.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-06

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at {lambda}/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  18. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoneche, F.; Malik, D.; Kirilyuk, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Rasing, Th

    2011-07-01

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at λ/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  19. All-optical switching in an open V-type atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, H.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the optical bistability (OB) and absorption properties of a weak probe field in an open V-type three-level atomic system have been investigated. We found that the OB threshold could be reduced via spontaneously generated coherence (SGC), coherent and incoherent pump fields, atomic injection, and exit rates. We also found that the threshold intensity of OB in an open system was less than that in the closed system. The all-optical switching due to the OB has also been discussed.

  20. Concurrence Measurement for the Two-Qubit Optical and Atomic States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Concurrence provides us an effective approach to quantify entanglement, which is quite important in quantum information processing applications. In the paper, we mainly review some direct concurrence measurement protocols of the two-qubit optical or atomic system. We first introduce the concept of concurrence for a two-qubit system. Second, we explain the approaches of the concurrence measurement in both a linear and a nonlinear optical system. Third, we introduce some protocols for measuring the concurrence of the atomic entanglement system.

  1. Optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of F=1 atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sooshin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Shin, Y

    2016-01-01

    We report our study of the optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of $^{23}$Na atoms in the $F=1$ hyperfine spin states. Solving a set of rate equations for the spin populations under a probe beam, we obtain an analytic expression for the optical signal of the $F=1$ absorption imaging. Furthermore, we verify the result by measuring the absorption spectra of $^{23}$Na Bose-Einstein condensates prepared in various spin states with different probe beam pulse durations. The analytic result can be used in quantitative analysis of $F=1$ spinor condensate imaging and readily applied to other alkali atoms with $I=3/2$ nuclear spin such as $^{87}$Rb.

  2. Note: A four-pass acousto-optic modulator system for laser cooling of sodium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2017-07-01

    We present a four-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) system for providing the repumping light for laser cooling of sodium atoms. With only one 400 MHz AOM, we achieve a tunable laser frequency shift around 1.6 GHz with total efficiency up to 30%. This setup provides an alternative over conventional methods to generate a sodium repumping light using more expensive high frequency AOMs or electro-optical modulators (EOMs) in the GHz domain. This compact and reliable setup can be easily adapted to other frequencies and may find applications in laser spectroscopy, laser cooling and trapping, and coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states.

  3. Theory of atom optics: Feynman's path integral approach (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü-bi DENG

    2008-01-01

    In the preceding paper, we discussed eight configurations of particle Fraunhofer diffraction. In this pa-per, we consider nine configurations of particle Fresnel dif-fraction, and have derived the wave functions of particles in these configurations. Furthermore, the author presents a new inertial navigator principle. Its devised accuracy is not lower than that of the inertial navigator based on cold atom inter-ferometer. The new inertial navigator is named as ABSE inertial navigator. ABSE is abbreviation for Aharonov-Bohrn-Sagnac effect.

  4. Quantum Entanglement and Correlation of Two Qubit Atoms Interacting with the Coherent State Optical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2017-10-01

    Using the three criterions of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord, we investigate the quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with the coherent state optical field. We discuss the influence of different photon number of the mean square fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord between two atoms when the two atoms are initially in specific three states. The results show that different photon number of the mean square fluctuations can lead to different effects of quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics.

  5. Quantum Entanglement and Correlation of Two Qubit Atoms Interacting with the Coherent State Optical Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2017-08-01

    Using the three criterions of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord, we investigate the quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with the coherent state optical field. We discuss the influence of different photon number of the mean square fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord between two atoms when the two atoms are initially in specific three states. The results show that different photon number of the mean square fluctuations can lead to different effects of quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics.

  6. Optical readout of the quantum collective motion of an array of atomic ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Thierry; Brooks, Daniel W C; Schreppler, Sydney; Brahms, Nathan; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2013-04-12

    We create an ultracold-atom-based cavity optomechanical system in which the center-of-mass modes of motion of as many as six distinguishable atomic ensembles are prepared and optically detected near their ground states. We demonstrate that the collective motional state of one atomic ensemble can be selectively addressed while preserving neighboring ensembles near their ground states to better than 95% per excitation quantum. We also show that our system offers nanometer-scale spatial resolution of each atomic ensemble via optomechanical imaging. This technique enables the in situ parallel sensing of potential landscapes, a capability relevant to active research areas of atomic physics and force-field detection in optomechanics.

  7. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  8. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wu, J.; Feng, G.; Nute, J.; Piano, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Ma, J.; Xiao, L.; Jia, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load 1.5 × 107 atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 µK to 1.7 µK within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about 1.2 × 107. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  9. Bimodal momentum distribution of laser-cooled atoms in optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Dion, Claude M; Kastberg, Anders; Sjölund, Peder

    2016-01-01

    We study, numerically and experimentally, the momentum distribution of atoms cooled in optical lattices. Using semi-classical simulations, we show that this distribution is bimodal, made up of a central feature corresponding to "cold", trapped atoms, with tails of "hot", untrapped atoms, and that this holds true also for very shallow potentials. Careful analysis of the distribution of high-momentum untrapped atoms, both from simulations and experiments, shows that the tails of the distribution does not follow a normal law, hinting at a power-law distribution and non-ergodic behavior. We also revisit the phenomenon of d\\'ecrochage, the potential depth below which the temperature of the atoms starts increasing.

  10. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  11. All-optical switching in a continuously operated and strongly coupled atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate collective strong coupling, optical bi-stability (OB) and all-optical switching in a system consisting of ultracold 85Rb atoms, trapped in a dark magneto-optical trap (DMOT), coupled to an optical Fabry-Perot cavity. The strong coupling is established by measuring the vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) of a weak on-axis probe beam. The dependence of VRS on the probe beam power is measured and bi-stability in the cavity transmission is observed. We demonstrate control over the transmission of the probe beam through the atom-cavity system using a free-space off-axis control beam and show that the cavity transmission can be switched on and off in micro-second timescales using micro-Watt control powers. The utility of the system as a tool for sensitive, in-situ and rapid measurements is envisaged.

  12. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Saito

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ=780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ=780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  13. Zeeman effect and optical pumping in atomic rubidium: a teaching experiment in quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, R.J.; Adams, S.; Seddon, G.; Golby, J.A.; Massey, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe an experiment developed recently in an undergraduate laboratory to measure the Zeeman splitting of the ground state of atomic rubidium. An optical pumping technique is employed and the magnetic field is calibrated by using free-electron spin resonance. Multiphoton absorption and power broadening of transitions are also investigated and a number of quantum principles introduced experimentally.

  14. Observation of Motion Dependent Nonlinear Dispersion with Narrow Linewidth Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Westergaard, Philip G; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilisation using ultra-stable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the non-linear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow atomic transition to an optical cavity. Here we have constructed such a system and observed non-linear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multi-photon scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity transmission significantly while leaving the phase signature relatively unaffected. By varying the number of atoms and the intra-cavity power we systematically study this non-linear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple sys...

  15. Essay: Fifty years of atomic, molecular and optical physics in Physical Review Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroche, Serge

    2008-10-17

    The fiftieth anniversary of Physical Review Letters is a good opportunity to review the extraordinary progress of atomic, molecular, and optical physics reported in this journal during the past half-century. As both a witness and an actor of this story, I recall personal experiences and reflect about the past, present, and possible future of my field of research.

  16. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mari; Tajima, Ryoichi; Kiyosawa, Ryota; Nagata, Yugo; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ =780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ =780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  17. Interaction of laser-cooled $^{87}$Rb atoms with higher order modes of an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Maimaiti, Aili; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary C; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    Optical nanofibers can be used to confine light to submicron regions and are very promising for the realization of optical fiber-based quantum networks using cold, neutral atoms. Light propagating in the higher order modes of a nanofiber has a greater evanescent field extension around the waist in comparison with the fundamental mode, leading to a stronger interaction with the surrounding environment. In this work, we report on the integration of a few-mode, optical nanofiber, with a waist diameter of ~700 nm, into a magneto-optical trap for $^{87}$Rb atoms. The nanofiber is fabricated from 80 $\\mu$m diameter fiber using a brushed hydrogen-oxygen flame pulling rig. We show that absorption by laser-cooled atoms around the waist of the nanofiber is stronger when probe light is guided in the higher order modes than in the fundamental mode. As predicted by Masalov and Minogin*, fluorescent light from the atoms coupling in to the nanofiber through the waist has a higher pumping rate (5.8 times) for the higher-orde...

  18. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  19. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  20. Light storage in a cold atomic ensemble with a high optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2017-06-01

    A quantum memory with a high storage efficiency and a long coherence time is an essential element in quantum information applications. Here, we report our recent development of an optical quantum memory with a rubidium-87 cold atom ensemble. By increasing the optical depth of the medium, we have achieved a storage efficiency of 65% and a coherence time of 51 μs for a weak laser pulse. The result of a numerical analysis based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations agrees well with the experimental results. Our result paves the way toward an efficient optical quantum memory and may find applications in photonic quantum information processing.

  1. Atomic Bloch-Zener oscillations and Stückelberg interferometry in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Sebastian; Salger, Tobias; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2010-11-19

    We report on experiments investigating quantum transport and band interferometry of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice with a two-band miniband structure, realized with a Fourier-synthesized optical lattice potential. Bloch-Zener oscillations, the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling between the two bands, are observed. When the relative phase between paths in different bands is varied, an interference signal is observed, demonstrating the coherence of the dynamics in the miniband system. Measured fringe patterns of this Stückelberg interferometer allow us to interferometrically map out the band structure of the optical lattice over the full Brillouin zone.

  2. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  3. Optical detection of potassium chloride vapor using collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and selective optical technique to detect potassium chloride (KCl) vapor is introduced. The technique is based on the photofragmentation of KCl molecules, using a pulsed UV laser, and optical probing of the temporarily increased amount of potassium atoms with a near-infrared laser. The two laser beams are aligned to go through the sample volume along the same optical path. The performance of the technique is demonstrated by detecting KCl concentrations from 25 ppb to 30 ppm in a temperature-controlled cell.

  4. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of {87}Rb and metastable {4}He atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25~muK) mixture of rubidium ({87}Rb) and metastable triplet helium ({4}He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole magnetic trap, and transfer to a single-beam optical dipole trap. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the doubly spin-stretched spin-state mixture and measure much shorter lifetimes for other spin-state combinations. We discuss prospects for realizing quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms.

  5. Frequency-doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, Fabien; Bidel, Yannick; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    A compact and robust frequency-doubled telecom laser system at 780 nm is presented for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices. Adopting an optical switch at 1.5 μm and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is required for the laser system. Our system delivers a 900 mW laser beam with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a 650 mW laser beam with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  6. Frequency doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Theron, Fabien; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Zahzam, Nassim; Bresson, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A compact and robust laser system, based on a frequency-doubled telecom laser, providing all the lasers needed for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices is presented. Thanks to an optical switch at 1.5 \\mu m and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is needed for all the laser system. Our system delivers at 780 nm a power of 900 mW with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a power of 650 mW with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  7. Fault-tolerant quantum repeater with atomic ensembles and linear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Z B; Schmiedmayer, J; Zhao, B; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Zhao, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed remarkable experimental progresses on photon manipulation for quantum communication (QC). However, current probabilistic entangled photon sources and the difficulty of storing photons limit these experiments to moderate distances (about 10-100 km for quantum cryptography and a few photonic qubits. For long-distance (>1000 km) QC, one must realize quantum network with many communication nodes via the quantum repeater (QR) protocol. The existing implementations of QR seem to be not enough. Here we propose an efficient, fault-tolerant long-distance QC architecture with linear-optical robust entangler and atomic-ensemble-based quantum memory for photonic polarization qubits; the architecture is based on two-photon interference, which is about 10^8 times more stable than single-photon interference for atomic-ensemble-based single photons. Incorporating several significant recent advances on atomic-ensemble-based techniques and linear-optical entanglement purification, our scheme faithfu...

  8. A telecom-wavelength atomic quantum memory in optical fiber for heralded polarization qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Jeongwan; Puigibert, Marcel li Grimau; Verma, Varun B; Marsili, Francesco; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Photon-based quantum information processing promises new technologies including optical quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and distributed quantum networks. Polarization-encoded photons at telecommunication wavelengths provide a compelling platform for practical realization of these technologies. However, despite important success towards building elementary components compatible with this platform, including sources of entangled photons, efficient single photon detectors, and on-chip quantum circuits, a missing element has been atomic quantum memory that directly allows for reversible mapping of quantum states encoded in the polarization degree of a telecom-wavelength photon. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of polarization states of heralded single-photons at telecom-wavelength by implementing the atomic frequency comb protocol in an ensemble of erbium atoms doped into an optical fiber. Despite remaining limitations in our proof-of-principle demonstration such as small storage eff...

  9. Optical meta-atom for localization of light with quantized energy

    CERN Document Server

    Lannebère, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to confine light into a small region of space is of paramount importance in many areas of modern science. Here, we suggest a mechanism to store a quantized "bit" of light - with a very precise amount of energy - in an open core-shell plasmonic structure ("meta-atom") with a nonlinear optical response. Notwithstanding the trapped light state is embedded in the radiation continuum, its lifetime is not limited by the radiation loss. Interestingly, it is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear response and volume plasmons enables breaking fundamental reciprocity restrictions, and coupling very efficiently an external light source to the meta-atom. The collision of an incident optical pulse with the meta-atom may be used to release the trapped radiation "bit".

  10. Harmonic detection of magnetic resonance for sensitivity improvement of optical atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, M.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Hamidi, S. M.; Khalkhali, S. M. H.

    2017-02-01

    Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers use optically detected magnetic resonance of atomic spins to measure extremely weak magnetic field changes. The magnetometer sensitivity is directly proportional to the ratio of intensity to line-shape of the resonance signal. To obtain narrower resonance signal, we implemented harmonic detection of magnetic resonance method in Mx configuration. The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detection of the higher harmonics were employed in phenomenological Bloch equations. The measured and simulated harmonic components of the resonance signals in frequency domain yielded significantly narrower line-width accompanying much improved sensitivity. Our results confirm the sensitivity improvement by a factor of two in optical atomic magnetometer via second harmonic signal which can open a new insight in the weak magnetic field measurement system design.

  11. Magic-wavelength optical dipole trap of cesium and rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmin; Cheng, Yongjie; Guo, Shanlong; Yang, Baodong; He, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Optical dipole traps (ODT) with far-off-resonance laser are important tools in more and more present cold-atom experiments, which allow confinement of laser-cooled atoms with a long storage time. Particularly, the magic wavelength ODT can cancel the position-dependent spatially inhomogeneous light shift of desired atomic transition, which is introduced by the ODT laser beam. Now it plays an important role in the state-insensitive quantum engineering and the atomic optical clock. To verify the magic wavelength or the magic wavelength combination for D2 line transition of cesium (Cs) and rubidium (Rb) atoms, we calculated and analyzed the light shift of the 133Cs 6S1/2 - 6P3/2 transition for a monochromatic ODT, and also the 87Rb 5S1/2 - 5P3/2 transition for a dichromatic ODT with a laser frequency ratio of 2:1. Also a dichromatic magic-wavelength ODT laser system for 87Rb atoms is proposed and experimentally realized by employing the quasi-phase-matched frequency doubling technique with telecom laser and fiber amplifier.

  12. Optical cooling and trapping of highly magnetic atoms: the benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreon, Davide; Sidorenkov, Leonid A.; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern–Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically 3× {10}8 atoms at a temperature of 15 μK. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, which allows for a simple model accounting for our measurements. We also measure the rate of density-dependent atom losses, finding good agreement with a model based on light-induced Van der Waals forces. A minimal two-body loss rate β ∼ 2× {10}-11 cm3 s–1 is reached in the spin-polarized regime. Our results constitute a benchmark for the experimental study of ultracold gases of magnetic lanthanide atoms.

  13. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  14. Real-time near-field terahertz imaging with atomic optical fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, C. G.; Šibalić, N.; de Melo, N. R.; Kondo, J. M.; Adams, C. S.; Weatherill, K. J.

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) near-field imaging is a flourishing discipline, with applications from fundamental studies of beam propagation to the characterization of metamaterials and waveguides. Beating the diffraction limit typically involves rastering structures or detectors with length scale shorter than the radiation wavelength; in the THz domain this has been achieved using a number of techniques including scattering tips and apertures. Alternatively, mapping THz fields onto an optical wavelength and imaging the visible light removes the requirement for scanning a local probe, speeding up image collection times. Here, we report THz-to-optical conversion using a gas of highly excited Rydberg atoms. By collecting THz-induced optical fluorescence we demonstrate a real-time image of a THz standing wave and use well-known atomic properties to calibrate the THz field strength.

  15. Evolution of microstructure and related optical properties of ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adib Abou Chaaya

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A study of transmittance and photoluminescence spectra on the growth of oxygen-rich ultra-thin ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition is reported. The structural transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline state is observed upon increasing the thickness. The unusual behavior of the energy gap with thickness reflected by optical properties is attributed to the improvement of the crystalline structure resulting from a decreasing concentration of point defects at the growth of grains. The spectra of UV and visible photoluminescence emissions correspond to transitions near the band-edge and defect-related transitions. Additional emissions were observed from band-tail states near the edge. A high oxygen ratio and variable optical properties could be attractive for an application of atomic layer deposition (ALD deposited ultrathin ZnO films in optical sensors and biosensors.

  16. Evolution of microstructure and related optical properties of ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Chaaya, Adib; Viter, Roman; Bechelany, Mikhael; Alute, Zanda; Erts, Donats; Zalesskaya, Anastasiya; Kovalevskis, Kristaps; Rouessac, Vincent; Smyntyna, Valentyn; Miele, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A study of transmittance and photoluminescence spectra on the growth of oxygen-rich ultra-thin ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition is reported. The structural transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline state is observed upon increasing the thickness. The unusual behavior of the energy gap with thickness reflected by optical properties is attributed to the improvement of the crystalline structure resulting from a decreasing concentration of point defects at the growth of grains. The spectra of UV and visible photoluminescence emissions correspond to transitions near the band-edge and defect-related transitions. Additional emissions were observed from band-tail states near the edge. A high oxygen ratio and variable optical properties could be attractive for an application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) deposited ultrathin ZnO films in optical sensors and biosensors.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms inside a high-finesse optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Kumar, Santosh; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Chao, Yuanxi; Fan, Haoquan; Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We present experimental work on the observation of Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) inside a high-finesse optical cavity. We show that a cold atomic cloud with controllable number of atoms can be transported into the cavity by using a focus-tunable lens. Rydberg atoms are excited via a two-photon transition in a ladder-type EIT configuration. A three-peak structure in the cavity transmission can be observed when Rydberg EIT atoms are generated inside the cavity. The two side peaks are caused by ``bright state polaritons'', while the central peak corresponds to a ``dark-state polariton'' The cavity Rydberg EIT system can be useful for single photon generation using the Rydberg blockade effect, studying many-body physics, and generating novel quantum states amongst many other applications. This work is supported by AFOSR.

  18. Optical response of gas-phase atoms at less than $\\lambda/80$ from a dielectric surface

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, K A; Hughes, I G; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental observations of atom-light interactions within tens of nanometers (down to 11~nm) of a sapphire surface. Using photon counting we detect the fluorescence from of order one thousand Rb or Cs atoms, confined in a vapor with thickness much less than the optical excitation wavelength. The asymmetry in the spectral lineshape provides a direct read-out of the atom-surface potential. A numerical fit indicates a power-law $-C_{\\alpha}/r^{\\alpha}$ with $\\alpha=3.02\\pm0.06$ confirming that the van der Waals interaction dominates over other effects. The extreme sensitivity of our photon-counting technique may allow the search for atom-surface bound states.

  19. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-06-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  20. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented.

  1. Optical response of gas-phase atoms at less than λ/80 from a dielectric surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, K A; Keaveney, J; Hughes, I G; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2014-06-27

    We present experimental observations of atom-light interactions within tens of nanometers (down to 11 nm) of a sapphire surface. Using photon counting we detect the fluorescence from of order one thousand Rb or Cs atoms, confined in a vapor with thickness much less than the optical excitation wavelength. The asymmetry in the spectral line shape provides a direct readout of the atom-surface potential. A numerical fit indicates a power law -C(α)/r(α) with α = 3.02 ± 0.06 confirming that the van der Waals interaction dominates over other effects. The extreme sensitivity of our photon-counting technique may allow the search for atom-surface bound states.

  2. Laser cooling a neutral atom to the three-dimensional vibrational ground state of an optical tweezer

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, Adam M; Regal, Cindy A

    2012-01-01

    We report three-dimensional ground state cooling of a single neutral atom in an optical tweezer. After employing Raman sideband cooling for 33 ms, we measure via sideband spectroscopy a three-dimensional ground state occupation of ~90%. Ground state neutral atoms in optical tweezers will be instrumental in numerous quantum logic applications and for nanophotonic interfaces that require a versatile platform for storing, moving, and manipulating ultracold single neutral atoms.

  3. Blackbody radiation shift in the Sr optical atomic clock

    CERN Document Server

    Safronova, M S; Safronova, U I; Kozlov, M G; Clark, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the static and dynamic polarizabilities of the 5s^2 ^1S_0 and 5s5p ^3P_0^o states of Sr using the high-precision relativistic configuration interaction + all-order method. Our calculation explains the discrepancy between the recent experimental 5s^2 ^1S_0 - 5s5p ^3P_0^o dc Stark shift measurement \\Delta \\alpha = 247.374(7) a.u. [Middelmann et. al, arXiv:1208.2848 (2012)] and the earlier theoretical result of 261(4) a.u. [Porsev and Derevianko, Phys. Rev. A 74, 020502R (2006)]. Our present value of 247.5 a.u. is in excellent agreement with the experimental result. We also evaluated the dynamic correction to the BBR shift with 1 % uncertainty; -0.1492(16) Hz. The dynamic correction to the BBR shift is unusually large in the case of Sr (7 %) and it enters significantly into the uncertainty budget of the Sr optical lattice clock. We suggest future experiments that could further reduce the present uncertainties.

  4. Generating Entanglement between Atomic Spins with Low-Noise Probing of an Optical Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Kevin C; Greve, Graham P; Thompson, James K

    2015-01-01

    Atomic projection noise limits the ultimate precision of all atomic sensors, including clocks, inertial sensors, magnetometers, etc. The independent quantum collapse of $N$ atoms into a definite state (for example spin up or down) leads to an uncertainty $\\Delta \\theta_{SQL}=1/\\sqrt{N}$ in the estimate of the quantum phase accumulated during a Ramsey sequence or its many generalizations. This phase uncertainty is referred to as the standard quantum limit. Creating quantum entanglement between the $N$ atoms can allow the atoms to partially cancel each other's quantum noise, leading to reduced noise in the phase estimate below the standard quantum limit. Recent experiments have demonstrated up to $10$~dB of phase noise reduction relative to the SQL by making collective spin measurements. This is achieved by trapping laser-cooled Rb atoms in an optical cavity and precisely measuring the shift of the cavity resonance frequency by an amount that depends on the number of atoms in spin up. Detecting the probe light ...

  5. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  6. A high repetition rate experimental setup for quantum non-linear optics with cold Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busche, Hannes; Ball, Simon W.; Huillery, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Using electromagnetically induced transparency and photon storage, the strong dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms and the resulting dipole blockade can be mapped onto light fields to realise optical non-linearities and interactions at the single photon level. We report on the realisation of an experimental apparatus designed to study interactions between single photons stored as Rydberg excitations in optically trapped microscopic ensembles of ultracold 87Rb atoms. A pair of in-vacuum high numerical aperture lenses focus excitation and trapping beams down to 1 μm, well below the Rydberg blockade. Thanks to efficient magneto-optical trap (MOT) loading from an atomic beam generated by a 2D MOT and the ability to recycle the microscopic ensembles more than 20000 times without significant atom loss, we achieve effective repetition rates exceeding 110 kHz to obtain good photon counting statistics on reasonable time scales. To demonstrate the functionality of the setup, we present evidence of strong photon interactions including saturation of photon storage and the retrieval of non-classical light. Using in-vacuum antennae operating at up to 40 GHz, we perform microwave spectroscopy on photons stored as Rydberg excitations and observe an interaction induced change in lineshape depending on the number of stored photons.

  7. An integrated quantum repeater at telecom wavelength with single atoms in optical fiber cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Quantum repeaters promise to enable quantum networks over global distances by circumventing the exponential decrease in success probability inherent in direct photon transmission. We propose a realistic, functionally integrated quantum-repeater implementation based on single atoms in optical cavities. Entanglement is directly generated between the single-atom quantum memory and a photon at telecom wavelength. The latter is collected with high efficiency and adjustable temporal and spectral properties into a spatially well-defined cavity mode. It is heralded by a near-infrared photon emitted from a second, orthogonal cavity. Entanglement between two remote quantum memories can be generated via an optical Bell-state measurement, while we propose entanglement swapping based on a highly efficient, cavity-assisted atom-atom gate. Our quantum-repeater scheme eliminates any requirement for wavelength conversion such that only a single system is needed at each node. We investigate a particular implementation with rubidium and realistic parameters for Fabry-Perot cavities based on hbox {CO}_2 laser-machined optical fibers. We show that the scheme enables the implementation of a rather simple quantum repeater that outperforms direct entanglement generation over large distances and does not require any improvements in technology beyond the state of the art.

  8. Engineering exciton interactions with Zeeman excitations of highly magnetic atoms on an optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, R A Vargas

    2015-01-01

    We show that Zeeman excitations in an ensemble of highly magnetic atoms trapped in an optical lattice lead to interacting Frenkel excitons described by a tunable $t$-$V$ model. The dispersion of the excitons and the interactions between excitons can be tuned in a wide range by transferring atoms to different Zeeman states. We show that these parameters are insensitive to an external magnetic field, which leads to an interesting possibility of engineering lattice models with significant particle-non-conserving terms. We consider the coupling of the Zeeman excitations to the translational motion of atoms in the lattice and show that the resulting Hamiltonian is equivalent to a polaron Hamiltonian, where the mathematical form of the particle - phonon interaction can be tuned by transferring atoms to different Zeeman states. We calculate the model parameters for the specific system of Dy atoms on an optical lattice with the lattice site separation 266 nm and show that the exciton interaction parameters can be tun...

  9. One- and Two-Dimensional Arrays of Double-Well Optical Traps for Cold Atoms or Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xian-Ming; YIN Jian-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel scheme to form one- and two-dimensional arrays of double-well optical dipole traps for cold atoms (or molecules) by using an optical system composed of a binary π-phase grating and a lens illuminated by a plane light wave, and study the relationship between the maximum intensity Imax of each optical well (or the maximum trapping potential Umax for 85Rb atoms) and the relative apertureβ (= a/f) of the lens. We also calculate the intensity gradients of each optical well and their curvatures, and estimate the spontaneous photon-scattering rate of trapped atom in each well, including Rayleigh and Raman scattering rates. Our study shows that the proposed 1D and 2D arrays of double-well traps can be used to prepare 1D and 2D novel optical lattices with cold atoms (or molecules), or form an all-optically integrated atom optical chip, or even to realize an array of all-optical double-well atomic (or molecular) Bose-Einstein condensates by optical-potential evaporative cooling, and so on.

  10. Observation of Robust Quantum Resonance Peaks in an Atom Optics Kicked Rotor with Amplitude Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Sadgrove, M; Mullins, T; Parkins, S; Leonhardt, R; Sadgrove, Mark; Hilliard, Andrew; Mullins, Terry; Parkins, Scott; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    The effect of pulse train noise on the energy peaks at quantum resonance seen in the Atom Optics Kicked Rotor is investigated experimentally. Quantum resonance peaks in the late time energy of the atoms were found to be completely robust against noise applied to the kicking amplitude but even small levels of noise on the kicking period lead to destruction of the quantum resonance peak. The robustness of low energy levels to either side of the resonance peak to amplitude noise and their comparative susceptibility to period noise is explained in terms of a recurrence of classically stable dynamics which occurs near quantum resonance.

  11. Proposal for a Chaotic Ratchet Using Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, T. S.; Dando, P. A.; Hutchings, N. A.; Isherwood, M. R.

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a new type of quantum ratchet which may be realized by cold atoms in a double-well optical lattice, pulsed with unequal periods. The classical dynamics is chaotic and we find the classical diffusion rate D is asymmetric in momentum up to a finite time tr. The quantum behavior produces a corresponding asymmetry in the momentum distribution which is ``frozen-in'' by dynamical localization provided the break time t*>=tr. We conclude that the cold atom ratchets require Db/ℏ~1, where b is a small deviation from period-one pulses.

  12. Comparison of liposome entrapment parameters by optical and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoss, N L; Popescu, O; Pop, V I; Porutiu, D; Kummerow, F A; Benga, G

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the complete characterization of liposomes prepared by ether-injection are described in detail. The validity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry for measuring markers of trapped volume was checked by comparative determinations of markers with established optical spectrophotometrical methods. The favorable results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantitate the marker Mn2+ are of particular relevance as manganese ion is also the paramagnetic probe in n.m.r. measurements of water permeability of liposomes; our results indicate that in such measurements no other marker need be incorporated.

  13. Two-photon phase gate with linear optical elements and atom-cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Xia, Yan; Lu, Pei-Min

    2016-09-01

    We propose a protocol for implementing π phase gate of two photons with linear optical elements and an atom-cavity system. The evolution of the atom-cavity system is based on the quantum Zeno dynamics. The devices in the present protocol are simple and feasible with current experimental technology. Moreover, the method we proposed here is deterministic with a high fidelity. Numerical simulation shows that the evolution in cavity is efficient and robust. Therefore, the protocol may be helpful for quantum computation field.

  14. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, V.; Bimbard, E.; Stanojevic, J.

    2012-01-01

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within ...

  15. Optical limiting using spatial self-phase modulation in hot atomic sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Cheng, Xuemei; Zhang, Ying; Yin, Xunli; Jiang, Man; Chen, Haowei; Bai, Jintao

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we characterized the performance of optical limiting by self-phase modulation (SPM) in hot atomic vapor cell. The results indicated that the performance of the optical limiter is closely related to the position of the sample cell, which is determined by the Rayleigh lenght of beam. The lowest limiting threshold and clamp output were obtained at the sample position at -10 mm from the coordinate origin (the beam waist). The phenomenon was explained well by the theory of SPM and z-scan, which are caused by both Kerr effect and the thermal optical nonlinear effect. This useful information obtained in the meaning of this work is determining the optimal position of the sample cell in the optical limiter and other applications of SPM.

  16. Protective coating and hyperthermal atomic oxygen texturing of optical fibers used for blood glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing cones and pillars on polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) optical fibers for glucose monitoring. The method, in one embodiment, consists of using electron beam evaporation to deposit a non-contiguous thin film of aluminum on the distal ends of the PMMA fibers. The partial coverage of aluminum on the fibers is randomly, but rather uniformly distributed across the end of the optical fibers. After the aluminum deposition, the ends of the fibers are then exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, which oxidizes the areas that are not protected by aluminum. The resulting PMMA fibers have a greatly increased surface area and the cones or pillars are sufficiently close together that the cellular components in blood are excluded from passing into the valleys between the cones and pillars. The optical fibers are then coated with appropriated surface chemistry so that they can optically sense the glucose level in the blood sample than that with conventional glucose monitoring.

  17. CW SOLID-STATE OPTICAL MASER (LASER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ruby rods, (3) Ruby oscillation linewidth, (4) Investigations of rare-earth spectra in yttrium aliminum garnets, (5) Nonlinear dielectric properties of KTaO3 near its Curie point, (6) The diffraction-limited oscillator. (Author)

  18. ''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland Winston Joseph O' Gallagher

    2005-01-15

    This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in

  19. Spatially localized structures and oscillons in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charukhchyan, M. V.; Sedov, E. S.; Arakelian, S. M.; Alodjants, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of formation of small-amplitude spatially localized oscillatory structures for atomic Bose-Einstein condensates confined in two- and three-dimensional optical lattices, respectively. Our approach is based on applying the regions with different signs of atomic effective masses where an atomic system exhibits effective hyperbolic dispersion within the first Brillouin zone. By using the kp method we have demonstrated mapping of the initial Gross-Pitaevskii equation on nonlinear Klein-Gordon and/or Ginzburg-Landau-Higgs equations, which is inherent in matter fields within ϕ4-field theories. Formation of breatherlike oscillating localized states—atomic oscillons—as well as kink-shaped states have been predicted in this case. Apart from classical field theories atomic field oscillons occurring in finite lattice structures possess a critical number of particles for their formation. The obtained results pave the way to simulating some analogues of fundamental cosmological processes occurring during our Universe's evolution and to modeling nonlinear hyperbolic metamaterials with condensed matter (atomic) systems.

  20. Saturation of atomic transitions using sub-wavelength diameter tapered optical fibers in rubidium vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D E; Pittman, T B

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally investigate ultralow-power saturation of the rubidium D2 transitions using a tapered optical fiber (TOF) suspended in a warm Rb vapor. A direct comparison of nonlinear absorption measurements for the TOF system with those obtained in a standard free-space vapor cell system highlights the differences in saturation behavior for the two systems. The effects of hyperfine pumping in the TOF system are found to be minimized due to the short atomic transit times through the highly confined evanescent optical mode guided by the TOF. The TOF system data is well-fit by a relatively simple empirical absorption model that indicates nanoWatt-level saturation powers.

  1. Mesoscale cavities in hollow-core waveguides for quantum optics with atomic ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haapamaki C.M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-mode hollow-core waveguides loaded with atomic ensembles offer an excellent platform for light–matter interactions and nonlinear optics at low photon levels. We review and discuss possible approaches for incorporating mirrors, cavities, and Bragg gratings into these waveguides without obstructing their hollow cores. With these additional features controlling the light propagation in the hollow-core waveguides, one could potentially achieve optical nonlinearities controllable by single photons in systems with small footprints that can be integrated on a chip. We propose possible applications such as single-photon transistors and superradiant lasers that could be implemented in these enhanced hollow-core waveguides.

  2. Concentrating partially entangled W-class states on nonlocal atoms using low- Q optical cavity and linear optical elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong; Chen, Xi; Duan, YuWen; Fan, Ling; Zhang, Ru; Wang, TieJun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Entanglement plays an important role in quantum information science, especially in quantum communications. Here we present an efficient entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) for nonlocal atom systems in the partially entangled W-class states, using the single-photon input-output process regarding low- Q cavity and linear optical elements. Compared with previously published ECPs for the concentration of non-maximally entangled atomic states, our protocol is much simpler and more efficient as it employs the Faraday rotation in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and the parameter-splitting method. The Faraday rotation requires the cavity with low- Q factor and weak coupling to the atom, which makes the requirement for entanglement concentration much less stringent than the previous methods, and achievable with current cavity QED techniques. The parameter-splitting method resorts to linear-optical elements only. This ECP has high efficiency and fidelity in realistic experiments, and some imperfections during the experiment can be avoided efficiently with currently available techniques.

  3. In situ characterization of an optically thick atom-filled cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munns, J. H. D.; Qiu, C.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.; Saunders, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    A means for precise experimental characterization of the dielectric susceptibility of an atomic gas inside an optical cavity is important for the design and operation of quantum light-matter interfaces, particularly in the context of quantum information processing. Here we present a numerically optimized theoretical model to predict the spectral response of an atom-filled cavity, accounting for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening at high optical densities. We investigate the regime where the two broadening mechanisms are of similar magnitude, which makes the use of common approximations invalid. Our model agrees with an experimental implementation with warm caesium vapor in a ring cavity. From the cavity response, we are able to extract important experimental parameters, for instance the ground-state populations, total number density, and the magnitudes of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening.

  4. In Situ Characterisation of an Optically Thick Atom-Filled Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Munns, J H D; Ledingham, P M; Walmsley, I A; Nunn, J; Saunders, D J

    2015-01-01

    A means for precise experimental characterization of the dielectric susceptibility of an atomic gas inside and optical cavity is important for design and operation of quantum light matter interfaces, particularly in the context of quantum information processing. Here we present a numerically optimised theoretical model to predict the spectral response of an atom-filled cavity, accounting for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening at high optical densities. We investigate the regime where the two broadening mechanisms are of similar magnitude, which makes the use of common approximations invalid. Our model agrees with an experimental implementation with warm caesium vapour in a ring cavity. From the cavity response, we are able to extract important experimental parameters, for instance the ground state populations, total number density and the magnitudes of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening.

  5. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrandt, D R; Heidecker, J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of (27)Al(+) in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser.

  6. Self-consistent approach for Bose-condensed atoms in optical lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Yukalov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bose atoms in optical lattices are considered at low temperatures and weak interactions, when Bose-Einstein condensate is formed. A self-consistent approach, based on the use of a representative statistical ensemble, is employed, guaranteeing a gapless spectrum of collective excitations and the validity of conservation laws. In order to show that the approach is applicable to both weak and tight binding, the problem is treated in the Bloch as well as in the Wannier representations. Both these ways result in similar expressions that are compared for the self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov approximation. A convenient general formula for the superfluid fraction of atoms in an optical lattice is derived.

  7. Negative and positive hysteresis in double-cavity optical bistability in three-level atom

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, H Aswath

    2010-01-01

    We present novel hysteretic behaviour of a three-level ladder atomic system exhibiting double-cavity optical bistability in the mean-field limit. The two fields coupling the atomic system experience feedback via two independent, unidirectional, single mode ring cavities and exhibit cooperative phenomena, simultaneously. The system displays a range of rich dynamical features varying from normal switching to self pulsing and a period-doubling route to chaos for both the fields. We focus our attention to a new hump like feature in the bistable curve arising purely due to cavity induced inversion, which eventually leads to negative hysteresis in the bistable response. This is probably the only all-optical bistable system that exhibits positive as well as negative bistable hysteresis in different input field intensity regimes. For both the fields, the switching times, the associated critical slowing down, the self-pulsing characteristics, and the chaotic behaviour can be controlled to a fair degree, moreover, all ...

  8. Optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of F =1 atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooshin; Seo, Sang Won; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Shin, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We report our study of the optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of 23Na atoms in the F =1 hyperfine spin states. Solving a set of rate equations for the spin populations in the presence of a probe beam, we obtain an analytic expression for the optical signal of the F =1 absorption imaging. Furthermore, we verify the result by measuring the absorption spectra of 23Na Bose-Einstein condensates prepared in various spin states with different probe-beam pulse durations. The analytic result can be used in the quantitative analysis of F =1 spinor condensate imaging and readily applied to other alkali-metal atoms with I =3 /2 nuclear spin such as 87Rb.

  9. Controlling and detecting spin correlations of ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotzky, Stefan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Schnorrberger, Ute; Cheinet, Patrick; Bloch, Immanuel

    2010-12-31

    We report on the controlled creation of a valence bond state of delocalized effective-spin singlet and triplet dimers by means of a bichromatic optical superlattice. We demonstrate a coherent coupling between the singlet and triplet states and show how the superlattice can be employed to measure the singlet-fraction employing a spin-blockade effect. Our method provides a reliable way to detect and control nearest-neighbor spin correlations in many-body systems of ultracold atoms. Being able to measure these correlations is an important ingredient in studying quantum magnetism in optical lattices. We furthermore employ a SWAP operation between atoms which are part of different triplets, thus effectively increasing their bond-length. Such a SWAP operation provides an important step towards the massively parallel creation of a multiparticle entangled state in the lattice.

  10. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  11. EIT-control of single-atom motion in an optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Kampschulte, Tobias; Manz, Sebastian; Martinez-Dorantes, Miguel; Reimann, René; Yoon, Seokchan; Meschede, Dieter; Bienert, Marc; Morigi, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate cooling of the motion of a single atom confined by a dipole trap inside a high-finesse optical resonator. Cooling of the vibrational motion results from EIT-like interference in an atomic \\Lambda-type configuration, where one transition is strongly coupled to the cavity mode and the other is driven by an external control laser. Good qualitative agreement with the theoretical predictions is found for the explored parameter ranges. The role of the cavity in the cooling dynamics is confirmed by means of a direct comparison with EIT-cooling performed in the dipole trap in free space. These results set the basis to the realization of an efficient photonic interface based on single atoms.

  12. Creation of effective magnetic fields in optical lattices The Hofstadter butterfly for cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksch, D

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of neutral atoms in a 2D optical lattice which traps two distinct internal states of the atoms in different columns. Two Raman lasers are used to coherently transfer atoms from one internal state to the other, thereby causing hopping between the different columns. By adjusting the laser parameters appropriately we can induce a non vanishing phase of particles moving along a closed path on the lattice. This phase is proportional to the enclosed area and we thus simulate a magnetic flux through the lattice. This setup is described by a Hamiltonian identical to the one for electrons on a lattice subject to a magnetic field and thus allows us to study this equivalent situation under very well defined controllable conditions. We consider the limiting case of huge magnetic fields -- which is not experimentally accessible for electrons in metals -- where a fractal band structure, the Hofstadter butterfly, characterizes the system.

  13. Proposal for a telecom quantum repeater with single atoms in optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Niemietz, Dominik; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-05-01

    Quantum repeaters hold the promise to enable long-distance quantum communication via entanglement generation over arbitrary distances. Single atoms in optical cavities have been shown to be ideally suited for the experimental realization of many tasks in quantum communication. To utilize these systems for a quantum repeater, it would be desirable to operate them at telecom wavelengths. We propose to use a cascaded scheme employing transitions at telecom wavelengths between excited states of alkali atoms for entanglement generation between a single photon at telecom wavelength and a single atom at the crossing point of two cavity modes. A cavity-assisted quantum gate can be used for entanglement swapping. We estimate the performance of these systems using numerical simulations based on experimental parameters obtained for CO2 laser-machined fiber cavities in our laboratory. Finally, we show that a quantum repeater employing the aforementioned scheme and current technology could outperform corresponding schemes based on direct transmission.

  14. Quantum optics and cavity QED Quantum network with individual atoms and photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempe G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantum physics allows a new approach to information processing. A grand challenge is the realization of a quantum network for long-distance quantum communication and large-scale quantum simulation. This paper highlights a first implementation of an elementary quantum network with two fibre-linked high-finesse optical resonators, each containing a single quasi-permanently trapped atom as a stationary quantum node. Reversible quantum state transfer between the two atoms and entanglement of the two atoms are achieved by the controlled exchange of a time-symmetric single photon. This approach to quantum networking is efficient and offers a clear perspective for scalability. It allows for arbitrary topologies and features controlled connectivity as well as, in principle, infinite-range interactions. Our system constitutes the largest man-made material quantum system to date and is an ideal test bed for fundamental investigations, e.g. quantum non-locality.

  15. Narrow-line magneto-optical trap for erbium: Simple approach for a complex atom

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, A; Mark, M; Rietzler, A; Schindler, J; Zupanic, E; Grimm, R; Ferlaino, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experimental realization of a robust and efficient magneto-optical trap for erbium atoms, based on a narrow cooling transition at 583nm. We observe up to $N=2 \\times 10^{8}$ atoms at a temperature of about $T=15 \\mu K$. This simple scheme provides better starting conditions for direct loading of dipole traps as compared to approaches based on the strong cooling transition alone, or on a combination of a strong and a narrow kHz transition. Our results on Er point to a general, simple and efficient approach to laser cool samples of other lanthanide atoms (Ho, Dy, and Tm) for the production of quantum-degenerate samples.

  16. Coherence preservation of a single neutral atom qubit transferred between magic-intensity optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jiaheng; Guo, Ruijun; Xu, Peng; Wang, Kunpeng; Sheng, Cheng; Liu, Min; Wang, Jin; Derevianko, Andrei; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the coherence of a single mobile atomic qubit can be well preserved during a transfer process among different optical dipole traps (ODTs). This is a prerequisite step in realizing a large-scale neutral atom quantum information processing platform. A qubit encoded in the hyperfine manifold of $^{87}$Rb atom is dynamically extracted from the static quantum register by an auxiliary moving ODT and reinserted into the static ODT. Previous experiments were limited by decoherences induced by the differential light shifts of qubit states. Here we apply a magic-intensity trapping technique which mitigates the detrimental effects of light shifts and substantially enhances the coherence time to $225 \\pm 21\\,\\mathrm{ms}$. The experimentally demonstrated magic trapping technique relies on the previously neglected hyperpolarizability contribution to the light shifts, which makes the light shift dependence on the trapping laser intensity to be parabolic. Because of the parabolic dependence, at a certain ...

  17. Nonlinear Sensing With Collective States of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-02

    decimation algorithm , a method that takes into account quantum correlations. B.1. In collaboration with D. Blume and X.Y. Yin at Washington State...Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Nonlinear quantum sensing, quantum metrology, ultracold atoms, optical lattices REPORT...with applications to interaction-based quantum metrology, Physical Review A, (10 2014): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.041602 Khan W Mahmud, Lei Jiang

  18. Optically Pumped Atomic Rubidium Lasers: Two-Photon and Exciplex Excitation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    atomic oxygen”. Physical Review A, 34(1):185–198, 1986. 21. D. Touahri, A. Clairon J. Zondy R. Felder -L. Hilico B. de Beauvoir F. Biraben, O. Acef and F...979, 2004. 24. F. Nez, R. Felder , F. Biraben and Y. Millerioux. “Optical frequency determina- tion of the hyperfine components of the 5S1/2 − 5D3/2

  19. Excitations of optically driven atomic condensate in a cavity: theory of photodetection measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.; Öztop, Barış; Bordyuh, Mykola; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2011-01-01

    This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 212.175.32.130 This content was downloaded on 22/04/2014 at 11:58 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Excitations of optically driven atomic condensate in a cavity: theory of photodetection measurements View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPsc...

  20. 600-W lamp pumped CW Nd:YAG laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li(李强); Zhimin Wang(王志敏); Zhiyong Wang(王智勇); Zhensheng Yu(于振声); Hong Lei(雷訇); Jiang Guo(郭江); Gang Li(李港); Tiechuan Zuo(左铁钏)

    2003-01-01

    A lamp pumped CW Nd:YAG laser is presented in this paper for the requirement of industrial application.The main factors, which affect output power and beam quality of high power solid-state laser module, are theoretically analyzed. Total electro-optics efficiency of lamp pumped Nd:YAG crystal as high as 4.0% is obtained, and output power is higher than 647 W with beam parameter product 22 mm.mrad.

  1. An integrated instrumental setup for the combination of atomic force microscopy with optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R J; Heyes, C D; Knebel, D; Röcker, C; Nienhaus, G U

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, the study of single biomolecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques has resulted in a plethora of new information regarding the physics underlying these complex biological systems. It is especially advantageous to be able to measure the optical, topographical, and mechanical properties of single molecules simultaneously. Here an AFM is used that is especially designed for integration with an inverted optical microscope and that has a near-infrared light source (850 nm) to eliminate interference between the optical experiment and the AFM operation. The Tip Assisted Optics (TAO) system consists of an additional 100 x 100-microm(2) X-Y scanner for the sample, which can be independently and simultaneously used with the AFM scanner. This allows the offset to be removed between the confocal optical image obtained with the sample scanner and the simultaneously acquired AFM topography image. The tip can be positioned exactly into the optical focus while the user can still navigate within the AFM image for imaging or manipulation of the sample. Thus the tip-enhancement effect can be maximized and it becomes possible to perform single molecule manipulation experiments within the focus of a confocal optical image. Here this is applied to simultaneous measurement of single quantum dot fluorescence and topography with high spatial resolution.

  2. Coherent Excitation of Lithium to Rydberg States and Application to Rydberg Atom Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, G.; Widmer, M.; Tudorica, F.; Iu, C.-H.; Metcalf, H.

    1996-05-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of several schemes for coherently exciting lithium atoms in a thermal beam to Rydberg states in a four level/three laser system, previously discussed by Oreg et al.(J. Oreg et al.), Phys. Rev. A 45, 4888 (1992). The time evolution of the dressed states and their populations are calculated numerically, solving the optical Bloch equations by a fourth order Runge-Kutta integration. Our code closely models actual experimental conditions, including spontaneous decay, beam profiles, intensities and detunings. Large Rydberg populations (50%) around n=15 may be obtained by non-adiabatic excitation, with each laser power on the order of 1 mW. We discuss the effects of an externally controlled time dependent detuning in the Rydberg state, for example as produced by atoms traversing an inhomogeneous electric field. An understanding of this excitation mechanism is important for large angle reflection of coherently excited atoms using field gradients. Some primitive ideas of Stark-Rydberg atom optics are presented.

  3. Optical cooling and trapping highly magnetic atoms: The benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Dreon, Davide; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell Lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line Dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern-Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically $3\\times 10^8$ atoms at a temperature of 20$\\,\\mu$K. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, whi...

  4. Telecom-Wavelength Atomic Quantum Memory in Optical Fiber for Heralded Polarization Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jeongwan; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Puigibert, Marcel. lí Grimau; Verma, Varun; Marsili, Francesco; Nam, Sae Woo; Oblak, Daniel; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Polarization-encoded photons at telecommunication wavelengths provide a compelling platform for practical realizations of photonic quantum information technologies due to the ease of performing single qubit manipulations, the availability of polarization-entangled photon-pair sources, and the possibility of leveraging existing fiber-optic links for distributing qubits over long distances. An optical quantum memory compatible with this platform could serve as a building block for these technologies. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of an atomic quantum memory that directly allows for reversible mapping of quantum states encoded in the polarization degree of freedom of a telecom-wavelength photon. We show that heralded polarization qubits at a telecom wavelength are stored and retrieved with near-unity fidelity by implementing the atomic frequency comb protocol in an ensemble of erbium atoms doped into an optical fiber. Despite remaining limitations in our proof-of-principle demonstration such as small storage efficiency and storage time, our broadband light-matter interface reveals the potential for use in future quantum information processing.

  5. Real-Time Near-Field Terahertz Imaging with Atomic Optical Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Wade, Christopher G; de Melo, Natalia R; Kondo, Jorge M; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) near-field imaging is a flourishing discipline [1], with applications from fundamental studies of beam propagation [2,3] to the characterisation of metameterials [4,5] and waveguides [6,7]. Beating the diffraction limit typically involves rastering structures or detectors with length scale shorter than the radiation wavelength; in the THz domain this has been achieved using a number of techniques including scattering tips [8,9] and apertures [10]. Alternatively, mapping THz fields onto an optical wavelength and imaging the visible light removes the requirement for scanning a local probe, speeding up image collection times [11,12]. Here we report THz to optical conversion using a gas of highly excited `Rydberg' atoms. By collecting THz-induced optical fluorescence we demonstrate a real-time image of a THz standing wave and we use well-known atomic properties to calibrate the THz field strength. The mono-atomic gas does not distort the THz field and offers the potential to immerse structures wit...

  6. An ultra-low noise optical head for liquid environment atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, I; Kuchuk, K; Sivan, U

    2015-08-01

    The design considerations and eventual performance of a new, ultra-low noise optical head for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are presented. The head, designed specifically for the study of hydration layers and ion organization next to solid surfaces and biomolecules, displays an integrated tip-sample distance noise below 3 pm. The sensitivity of the optical beam deflection sensor, operating at frequencies up to 8.6 MHz (3 dB roll-off), is typically below 10 fm/√Hz, enabling utilization of high frequency cantilevers of low thermal noise for fundamental and higher mode imaging. Exceptional signal stability and low optical noise are achieved by replacing the commonly used laser diode with a helium-neon laser. An integral photothermal excitation of the cantilever produces pure harmonic oscillations, minimizing the generation of higher cantilever modes and deleterious sound waves characterizing the commonly used excitation by a piezoelectric crystal. The optical head is designed to fit on top of the widespread Multimode(®) (Bruker) piezo-tube and accommodate its commercial liquid cell. The performance of the new AFM head is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a muscovite mica surface in aqueous solution.

  7. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atom as a candidate for optical lattice clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Tolstikhina, I; Kalganova, E; Vishnyakova, G; Khabarova, K; Tregubov, D; Golovizin, A; Sorokin, V; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-01-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the $^{169}$Tm atom at the wavelength of $1.14\\,\\mu$m as a candidate for a 2D optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=7/2)$ and $[\\text{Xe}]4f^{13}6s^2 (J=5/2)$ in the spectral range from $250\\,$nm to $1200\\,$nm, we suggest the "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at $807\\,$nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at $1.14\\,\\mu$m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to $8\\times10^{-17}$ in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than $5 \\times 10^{-18}$ in fractional units. By direct excitation of the $1.14\\,\\mu$m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole ...

  8. An ultra-low noise optical head for liquid environment atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, I.; Kuchuk, K.; Sivan, U.

    2015-08-01

    The design considerations and eventual performance of a new, ultra-low noise optical head for dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) are presented. The head, designed specifically for the study of hydration layers and ion organization next to solid surfaces and biomolecules, displays an integrated tip-sample distance noise below 3 pm. The sensitivity of the optical beam deflection sensor, operating at frequencies up to 8.6 MHz (3 dB roll-off), is typically below 10 fm / √{ Hz } , enabling utilization of high frequency cantilevers of low thermal noise for fundamental and higher mode imaging. Exceptional signal stability and low optical noise are achieved by replacing the commonly used laser diode with a helium-neon laser. An integral photothermal excitation of the cantilever produces pure harmonic oscillations, minimizing the generation of higher cantilever modes and deleterious sound waves characterizing the commonly used excitation by a piezoelectric crystal. The optical head is designed to fit on top of the widespread Multimode® (Bruker) piezo-tube and accommodate its commercial liquid cell. The performance of the new AFM head is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a muscovite mica surface in aqueous solution.

  9. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddeda, R.; Usmani, I.; Bimbard, E.; Grankin, A.; Ourjoumtsev, A.; Brion, E.; Grangier, P.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an electromagnetically induced transparency configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals’ interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  10. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Boddeda, Rajiv; Bimbard, Erwan; Grankin, Andrey; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Brion, Etienne; Grangier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an EIT (electromagnetically induced transparency) configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals' interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  11. Modeling optical properties of silicon clusters by first principles: From a few atoms to large nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurbawono, Argo; Liu, Shuanglong [Department of Physics and the Centre for Advanced 2D Materials, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3 (Singapore); Zhang, Chun, E-mail: phyzc@nus.edu.sg [Department of Physics and the Centre for Advanced 2D Materials, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3 (Singapore)

    2015-04-21

    Time dependent density functional tight binding (TDDFTB) method is implemented with sparse matrix techniques and improved parallelization algorithms. The method is employed to calculate the optical properties of various Si nanocrystals (NCs). The calculated light absorption spectra of small Si NCs from TDDFTB were found to be comparable with many body perturbation methods utilizing planewave basis sets. For large Si NCs (more than a thousand atoms) that are beyond the reach of conventional approaches, the TDDFTB method is able to produce reasonable results that are consistent with prior experiments. We also employed the method to study the effects of surface chemistry on the optical properties of large Si NCs. We learned that the optical properties of Si NCs can be manipulated with small molecule passivations such as methyl, hydroxyl, amino, and fluorine. In general, the shifts and profiles in the absorption spectra can be tuned with suitably chosen passivants.

  12. Optical Emission Spectroscopic Measurement of Hydroxyl Radicals in Air Discharge with Atomized Water%Optical Emission Spectroscopic Measurement of Hydroxyl Radicals in Air Discharge with Atomized Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明; 陈维刚; 张颖

    2011-01-01

    Effects of discharge mode, voltage applied, size of the nozzle discharge electrode and flow rate of water on the generation of hydroxyl radical were investigated in air discharge with atomized water, by using optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Water was injected into the discharge region through the discharge nozzle electrode, and a large amount of fine water drops, formed and distributed in the discharge region, corona discharge was more effective to generate were observed. It was found that negative DC the hydroxyl radicals in comparison to positive DC corona discharge or negative pulsed discharge. A larger outer diameter of the nozzle electrode or a stronger electric field is beneficial for hydroxyl-radical generation. Moreover, there is a critical value in the flow rate of atomized water against the discharge voltage. Below this critical value, hydroxyl-radical generation increases with the increase in flow rate of the water, while above this value, it decreases. In addition, it is observed that OES from the discharge is mainly in the ultraviolet domain. The results are helpful in the study of the mechanism and application of plasma in pollution-control in either air or water.

  13. Ballistic and localized transport for the atom optics kicked rotor in the limit of vanishing kicking period

    CERN Document Server

    Sadgrove, M; Parkins, S; Leonhardt, R; Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Parkins, Scott; Leonhardt, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    We present mean energy measurements for the atom optics kicked rotor as the kicking period tends to zero. A narrow resonance is observed marked by quadratic energy growth, in parallel with a complete freezing of the energy absorption away from the resonance peak. Both phenomena are explained by classical means, taking proper account of the atoms' initial momentum distribution.

  14. Coherent optical transients observed in rubidium atomic line filtered Doppler velocimetry experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Mario E., E-mail: mario.fajardo@eglin.af.mil; Molek, Christopher D.; Vesely, Annamaria L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Munitions Directorate, Ordnance Division, Energetic Materials Branch, AFRL/RWME, 2306 Perimeter Road, Eglin AFB, Florida 32542-5910 (United States)

    2015-10-14

    We report the first successful results from our novel Rubidium Atomic Line Filtered (RALF) Doppler velocimetry apparatus, along with unanticipated oscillatory signals due to coherent optical transients generated within pure Rb vapor cells. RALF is a high-velocity and high-acceleration extension of the well-known Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) technique for constructing multi-dimensional flow velocity vector maps in aerodynamics experiments [H. Komine, U.S. Patent No. 4,919,536 (24 April 1990)]. RALF exploits the frequency dependence of pressure-broadened Rb atom optical absorptions in a heated Rb/N{sub 2} gas cell to encode the Doppler shift of reflected near-resonant (λ{sub 0} ≈ 780.24 nm) laser light onto the intensity transmitted by the cell. The present RALF apparatus combines fiber optic and free-space components and was built to determine suitable operating conditions and performance parameters for the Rb/N{sub 2} gas cells. It yields single-spot velocities of thin laser-driven-flyer test surfaces and incorporates a simultaneous Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) channel [Strand et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 083108 (2006)] for validation of the RALF results, which we demonstrate here over the v = 0 to 1 km/s range. Both RALF and DGV presume the vapor cells to be simple Beer's Law optical absorbers, so we were quite surprised to observe oscillatory signals in experiments employing low pressure pure Rb vapor cells. We interpret these oscillations as interference between the Doppler shifted reflected light and the Free Induction Decay (FID) coherent optical transient produced within the pure Rb cells at the original laser frequency; this is confirmed by direct comparison of the PDV and FID signals. We attribute the different behaviors of the Rb/N{sub 2} vs. Rb gas cells to efficient dephasing of the atomic/optical coherences by Rb-N{sub 2} collisions. The minimum necessary N{sub 2} buffer gas density ≈0.3 amagat translates into a

  15. The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of Sized Airborne Particulate in Dayton, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    PERIOD COVERED " AneT Appication of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy ’ and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of THESIS/DISSERTATION 4 Sized...1978 U I HEREBY REC04MEND THAT THE THESIS PREPARED ’NDER MY SUPERVISION BY Lorelei Ann Krebs ENTITLED The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and...acid and diluted with distilled water in a 25 milliliter volumetric flask. Atomic absorption . spectroscopy was used to analyze the solutions for

  16. All-optical atom trap trace analysis for rare krypton isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woelk, Pablo; Kohler, Markus; Sieveke, Carsten; Hebel, Simon; Sahling, Peter [Carl Friedrich von Weizsaecker Centre for Science and Peace Research, University of Hamburg (Germany); Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, University of Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope Krypton-85 is an excellent indicator for the detection of nuclear reprocessing activities. However, for the analysis of atmospheric air samples, sensitive measuring methods down to the single atom level are required because of the small concentrations. Furthermore, for a practical and effective detection of clandestine reprocessing, small sample sizes and a high sample throughput rate are desirable. Established methods using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) allow high sensitivity but have a limited throughput of about 200 samples per year, since the vacuum chambers have to be flushed for several hours after each measurement to avoid cross contamination due to the RF-driven excitation of metastable states. Here we present an enhanced ATTA apparatus, which in contrast to the established methods, produces metastable Kr all-optically. This avoids cross contamination, therefore allowing a much higher throughput rate. The apparatus is based on a self-made VUV-lamp and a 2D-3D magneto-optical trap setup. In the 2D trap metastable krypton is produced and a beam of atoms is formed by Doppler-cooling simultaneously.

  17. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  18. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  19. Measuring the Gouy Phase of Matter Waves using Singular Atom Optics with Spinor BECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Justin T.; Hansen, Azure; Murphree, Joseph D.; Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    The Gouy phase is a propagation-dependent geometric phase found in confined waves as they propagate through a focus. Although it has been observed and studied extensively both in scalar and vector optical beams as well as in electron vortex beams, it has not yet been directly observed in ultracold matter waves. The Schrödinger equation has the same form as the paraxial wave equation from electromagnetism; expansion of a BEC upon release from a trap has the same mathematical form as a beam propagating away from a focus. We employ and extend this analogy between coherent optical beams and coherent matter waves to include spin angular momentum (polarization), which enables us measure the matter wave Gouy phase using coreless vortex spin textures in spinor BECs. Because the Gouy phase is dependent on the orbital angular momentum of the wave, the vortex and core states acquire different Gouy phase shifts. Parameters that are sensitive to the relative phase such as two-dimensional maps of the Stokes parameters rotate during evolution due to this phase difference. Using atom-optic polarimetry we can access the evolution of the atomic Stokes parameters and observe this rotation.

  20. Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of long-distance entanglement in the ground state of quantum spin models, its use in high-fidelity and robust quantum communication, and its realization in many-body systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices and in arrays of coupled optical cavities. We investigate different patterns of site-dependent interaction couplings, singling out two general settings: Patterns that allow for perfect long-distance entanglement (LDE) in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement remains finite in the thermodynamic limit, and patterns of quasi long-distance entanglement (QLDE) in the ground state of the system, namely, such such that the end-to-end entanglement vanishes with a very slow power-law decay as the length of the spin chain is increased. We discuss physical realizations of these models in ensembles of ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices. We show how, using either suitably engineered super-lattice structures or exploiting the presence...

  1. Electromagnetically induced transparency for guided light in an atomic array outside an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kien, Fam Le

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of guided light along an array of three-level atoms in the vicinity of an optical nanofiber under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency. We examine two schemes of atomic levels and field polarizations where the guided probe field is quasilinearly polarized along the major or minor principal axis, which is parallel or perpendicular, respectively, to the radial direction of the atomic position. Our numerical calculations indicate that 200 cesium atoms in a linear array with a length of 100 $\\mu$m at a distance of 200 nm from the surface of a nanofiber with a radius of 250 nm can slow down the speed of guided probe light by a factor of about $3.5\\times 10^6$ (the corresponding group delay is about 1.17 $\\mu$s). In the neighborhood of the Bragg resonance, a significant fraction of the guided probe light can be reflected back with a negative group delay. The reflectivity and the group delay of the reflected field do not depend on the propagation direction of the probe f...

  2. Speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography images based on wave atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yongzhao; Liu, Gangjun; Feng, Guoying; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique, which is based on low-coherence interferometry. OCT images suffer from speckle noise, which reduces image contrast. A shrinkage filter based on wave atoms transform is proposed for speckle reduction in OCT images. Wave atoms transform is a new multiscale geometric analysis tool that offers sparser expansion and better representation for images containing oscillatory patterns and textures than other traditional transforms, such as wavelet and curvelet transforms. Cycle spinning-based technology is introduced to avoid visual artifacts, such as Gibbs-like phenomenon, and to develop a translation invariant wave atoms denoising scheme. The speckle suppression degree in the denoised images is controlled by an adjustable parameter that determines the threshold in the wave atoms domain. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively remove the speckle noise and improve the OCT image quality. The signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio, average equivalent number of looks, and cross-correlation (XCOR) values are obtained, and the results are also compared with the wavelet and curvelet thresholding techniques. PMID:24825507

  3. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantum technology for the 21st century’. PMID:28652493

  4. Retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression in CW-CMS of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Sota; Komatsu, Setsuko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2007-02-01

    The CW-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) line has the cytoplasm of Oryza rufipogon Griff, and mature pollen is morphologically normal under an optical microscope but lacks the ability to germinate; restorer gene Rf17 has been identified as restoring this ability. The difference between nuclear gene expression in mature anthers was compared for the CW-CMS line, [cms-CW] rf17rf17, and a maintainer line with normal cytoplasm of Oryza sativa L., [normal] rf17rf17. Using a 22-k rice oligoarray we detected 58 genes that were up-regulated more than threefold in the CW-CMS line. Expression in other organs was further investigated for 20 genes using RT-PCR. Five genes, including genes for alternative oxidase, were found to be preferentially expressed in [cms-CW] rf17rf17 but not in [normal] rf17rf17 or [cms-CW] Rf17Rf17. Such [cms-CW] rf17rf17-specific gene expression was only observed in mature anthers but not in leaves, stems, or roots, indicating the presence of anther-specific mitochondrial retrograde regulation of nuclear gene expression, and that Rf17 has a role in restoring the ectopic gene expression. We also used a proteomic approach to discover the retrograde regulated proteins and identified six proteins that were accumulated differently. These results reveal organ-specific induced mitochondrial retrograde pathways affecting nuclear gene expression possibly related to CMS.

  5. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-11

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other's phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon's polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because "no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift''. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two-photon operations

  6. A photon-photon quantum gate based on a single atom in an optical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Bastian; Welte, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    That two photons pass each other undisturbed in free space is ideal for the faithful transmission of information, but prohibits an interaction between the photons. Such an interaction is, however, required for a plethora of applications in optical quantum information processing. The long-standing challenge here is to realize a deterministic photon-photon gate, that is, a mutually controlled logic operation on the quantum states of the photons. This requires an interaction so strong that each of the two photons can shift the other’s phase by π radians. For polarization qubits, this amounts to the conditional flipping of one photon’s polarization to an orthogonal state. So far, only probabilistic gates based on linear optics and photon detectors have been realized, because “no known or foreseen material has an optical nonlinearity strong enough to implement this conditional phase shift”. Meanwhile, tremendous progress in the development of quantum-nonlinear systems has opened up new possibilities for single-photon experiments. Platforms range from Rydberg blockade in atomic ensembles to single-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics. Applications such as single-photon switches and transistors, two-photon gateways, nondestructive photon detectors, photon routers and nonlinear phase shifters have been demonstrated, but none of them with the ideal information carriers: optical qubits in discriminable modes. Here we use the strong light-matter coupling provided by a single atom in a high-finesse optical resonator to realize the Duan-Kimble protocol of a universal controlled phase flip (π phase shift) photon-photon quantum gate. We achieve an average gate fidelity of (76.2 ± 3.6) per cent and specifically demonstrate the capability of conditional polarization flipping as well as entanglement generation between independent input photons. This photon-photon quantum gate is a universal quantum logic element, and therefore could perform most existing two

  7. Quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessler, Stefan

    2014-04-15

    Ultracold atoms can be trapped in periodic intensity patterns of light created by counterpropagating laser beams, so-called optical lattices. In contrast to its natural counterpart, electrons in a solid state crystal, this man-made setup is very clean and highly isolated from environmental degrees of freedom. Moreover, to a large extent, the experimenter has dynamical control over the relevant system parameters: the interaction between atoms, the tunneling amplitude between lattice sites, and even the dimensionality of the lattice. These advantages render this system a unique platform for the simulation of quantum many-body dynamics for various lattice Hamiltonians as has been demonstrated in several experiments by now. The most significant step in recent times has arguably been the introduction of single-site detection of individual atoms in optical lattices. This technique, based on fluorescence microscopy, opens a new doorway for the study of quantum many-body states: the detection of the microscopic atom configuration. In this thesis, we theoretically explore the dynamics of ultracold atoms in optical lattices for various setups realized in present-day experiments. Our main focus lies on aspects that become experimentally accessible by (realistic extensions of) the novel single-site measurement technique. The first part deals with the expansion of initially confined atoms in a homogeneous lattice, which is one way to create atomic motion in experiments. We analyze the buildup of spatial correlations during the expansion of a finitely extended band insulating state in one dimension. The numerical simulation reveals the creation of remote spin-entangled fermions in the strongly interacting regime. We discuss the experimental observation of such spin-entangled pairs by means of a single-site measurement. Furthermore, we suggest studying the impact of observations on the expansion dynamics for the extreme case of a projective measurement in the spatial occupation

  8. Spin dynamics of an individual Cr atom in a semiconductor quantum dot under optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A. [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Utsumi, H.; Kuroda, S. [Institute of Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 305-8573 Tsukuba (Japan); Boukari, H.; Besombes, L., E-mail: lucien.besombes@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Institut Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-01

    We studied the spin dynamics of a Cr atom incorporated in a II-VI semiconductor quantum dot using photon correlation techniques. We used recently developed singly Cr-doped CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots to access the spin of an individual magnetic atom. Auto-correlation of the photons emitted by the quantum dot under continuous wave optical excitation reveals fluctuations of the localized spin with a timescale in the 10 ns range. Cross-correlation gives quantitative transfer time between Cr spin states. A calculation of the time dependence of the spin levels population in Cr-doped quantum dots shows that the observed spin dynamics is dominated by the exciton-Cr interaction. These measurements also provide a lower bound in the 20 ns range for the intrinsic Cr spin relaxation time.

  9. Quantum phases and dynamics of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Mueller, Erich

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by experiments performed by R. Landig et al. (arXiv:1511.00007), we theoretically explore the behavior of bosonic atoms trapped in a single-mode cavity in the presence of a two-dimensional optical lattice. As explained by arXiv:1511.00007, Rayleigh scattering of light from the lattice-inducing beams into the cavity produces infinite-range cavity-mediated interactions between the atoms, leading to competition between superfluid, supersolid, Mott insulating and charge density wave phases. We calculate the phase diagram for a uniform trap using a variation of the Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also calculate the spatial distribution of the different phases in the gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We explore hysteretic behavior when parameters of the system are changed.

  10. Ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic motion in multilayer Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fons P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase change random access memory devices have evolved dramatically with the recent development of superlattice structure of Ge-Sb-Te material (GST-SL in terms of its low power consumption. The phase change in GST-SL is mainly characterized by the displacement of Ge atoms. Here we examine a new phase change method, that is the manipulation of Ge-Te bonds using linearly-polarized femtosecond near-infrared optical pulses. As a result, we found that the p-polarized pump pulse is more effective in inducing the reversible and irreversible displacement of Ge atoms along [111] direction in the local structure. This structural change would be induced by the anisotropic carrier-phonon interaction along the [111] direction created by the p-polarized pulse.

  11. Atom dynamics in optical lattices: Time-dependent simulation and decoherence suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rinaldis, Sergio; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2004-03-01

    We develop a model to simulate the dynamics of atoms trapped in an optical lattice with gravity in the presence of natural decoherence. The latter, measured by quantum process tomography, is dominated by pure dephasing. The wavefunction is represented on a grid and the time dependent evolution operator is expanded in Chebychev polynomials according to the (t,t') method (*), while a fictitious environment is introduced that simulates the observed dephasing. The control field consists in raising or lowering the potential wells of the atoms and modifying the phase of the laser fields (that results in a translation of the lattice). As an example relevant for quantum information processing, we simulate the effect of bang-bang pulses designed to suppress decoherence. (*) Ref. U.Peskin, R. Kosloff, N. Moiseyev, J. Chem. Phys. 8849 (1994)

  12. Breakdown of Atomic Hyperfine Coupling in a Deep Optical-Dipole Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Neuzner, Andreas; Dürr, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the breakdown of hyperfine coupling for an atom in a deep optical-dipole trap. One-color laser spectroscopy is performed at the resonance lines of a single $^{87}$Rb atom for a trap wavelength of 1064 nm. Evidence of hyperfine breakdown comes from three observations, namely a nonlinear dependence of the transition frequencies on the trap intensity, a splitting of lines which are degenerate for small intensities, and the ability to drive transitions which would be forbidden by selection rules in the absence of hyperfine breakdown. From the data, we infer the hyperfine interval of the $5P_{1/2}$ state and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities for the $5P_{3/2}$ state.

  13. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigge, T.; Hafke, B.; Witte, T.; Krenzer, B.; Streubühr, C.; Samad Syed, A.; Mikšić Trontl, V.; Avigo, I.; Zhou, P.; Ligges, M.; von der Linde, D.; Bovensiepen, U.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.; Wippermann, S.; Lücke, A.; Sanna, S.; Gerstmann, U.; Schmidt, W. G.

    2017-03-01

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  14. Optically excited structural transition in atomic wires on surfaces at the quantum limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigge, T; Hafke, B; Witte, T; Krenzer, B; Streubühr, C; Samad Syed, A; Mikšić Trontl, V; Avigo, I; Zhou, P; Ligges, M; von der Linde, D; Bovensiepen, U; Horn-von Hoegen, M; Wippermann, S; Lücke, A; Sanna, S; Gerstmann, U; Schmidt, W G

    2017-03-29

    Transient control over the atomic potential-energy landscapes of solids could lead to new states of matter and to quantum control of nuclear motion on the timescale of lattice vibrations. Recently developed ultrafast time-resolved diffraction techniques combine ultrafast temporal manipulation with atomic-scale spatial resolution and femtosecond temporal resolution. These advances have enabled investigations of photo-induced structural changes in bulk solids that often occur on timescales as short as a few hundred femtoseconds. In contrast, experiments at surfaces and on single atomic layers such as graphene report timescales of structural changes that are orders of magnitude longer. This raises the question of whether the structural response of low-dimensional materials to femtosecond laser excitation is, in general, limited. Here we show that a photo-induced transition from the low- to high-symmetry state of a charge density wave in atomic indium (In) wires supported by a silicon (Si) surface takes place within 350 femtoseconds. The optical excitation breaks and creates In-In bonds, leading to the non-thermal excitation of soft phonon modes, and drives the structural transition in the limit of critically damped nuclear motion through coupling of these soft phonon modes to a manifold of surface and interface phonons that arise from the symmetry breaking at the silicon surface. This finding demonstrates that carefully tuned electronic excitations can create non-equilibrium potential energy surfaces that drive structural dynamics at interfaces in the quantum limit (that is, in a regime in which the nuclear motion is directed and deterministic). This technique could potentially be used to tune the dynamic response of a solid to optical excitation, and has widespread potential application, for example in ultrafast detectors.

  15. Atom waveguide and 1D optical lattice using a two-color evanescent light field around an optical micro/nano-fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Fu; Xiang Yin; Ningyuan Li; Limin Tong

    2008-01-01

    We propose a two-color scheme of atom waveguides and one-dimensional(1D)optical lattices using evanescent wave fields of different transverse modes around an optical micro/nano-fiber.The atom guide potential can be produced when the optical fiber carries a red-detuned light with TE01 mode and a blue-detuned light with HE11 mode,and the 1D optical lattice potential can be produced when the red-detuned light is transformed to the superposition of the TE01 mode and HE11 mode.The two trapping potentials can be transformed to each other for accurately controlling mode transformation for the red-detuned light.This might provide a new approach to realize flexible transition between the guiding and trapping states of atoms.

  16. Atoms in optical networks. A simple tridimensional model; Atomos en redes opticas. Un modelo tridimensional sencillo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balleza D, E

    2004-07-01

    In the first chapter of this work we will show a detailed analysis of the one cooling Doppler phenomenon that appears when a laser induces a dipolar moment to the atoms in such a way that these may interact with him to transfer moment to the field with the subsequent decrease of kinetic energy that macroscopically it is translated in cooling of the atomic cloud. When the experiments of atomic cooling were carried out it was observed that the temperature was smaller to the one than it predicted the cooling Doppler, this originates the creation of a theory but it dies in which the over simplification is eliminated that the alone atom consists of two energy levels and levels are introduced of it structures fine that are able to explain the extra cooling. To this phenomenon it is called Sisifo effect and it is studied detailedly in the chapter two. The first two chapters talk each other about the atomic cooling, but it stops that the atomic cloud can be manipulated, before being confined, problem that we will expose in the chapter three with experimental solutions that at the moment they are implemented in the laboratories around the world. In particular we will concentrate on the traps FORT (Far Off Resonance Trap, trap very outside of resonance) that confine to the atoms in optic nets. The lasers gaussianos originate a potential sinusoidal along the propagation address and gaussiano in the perpendicular plane to this. In the I surrender four he/she intends a three-dimensional model that substitutes To the variation sinusoidal for a function crenel and he/she makes an approach To first order in the radial dependence to obtain an oscillator potential Harmonic instead of the gaussiano that you taenia. The pattern is solved in a similar way To the pattern unidimensional of bands: they are the functions of wave solution For every period and they are coupled among if so that they satisfy conditions of rhythm, When making this you arrives to a womb that couples the

  17. Cold atom trap with zero residual magnetic field: the ac magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew; Murray, Andrew James

    2008-10-24

    A novel atom trap is described using alternating current to generate the magnetic B field, together with high speed polarization switching of the damping laser field. This combination produces a trap as effective as a standard magneto-optical trap (MOT), with the advantage that the average B field is zero. No net current is hence induced in surrounding conductive elements, and the B field produced by the ac MOT is found to switch off >300 times faster than a conventional MOT. New experiments can hence be performed, including charged particle probing or detection of the cold target ensemble.

  18. Testing spatial α-variation with optical atomic clocks based on highly charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berengut J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We review recent works illustrating the potential use of highly charged ions as the basis of optical atomic clocks of exceptional accuracy and very high sensitivity to variation of the fine structure constant, α. The tendency towards large transition energies in highly charged ions can be overcome using level crossings, which allow transitions between different orbitals to be within the range of usual lasers. We present simple scaling laws that demonstrate reduced systematics that could be realised in highly charged ion clocks. Such clocks could allow us to corroborate astronomical studies that suggest a spatial gradient in values of α across the Universe.

  19. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  20. Analytical Solutions of Temporal Evolution of Populations in Optically-Pumped Atoms with Circularly Polarized Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung-Ryoul Noh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an analytical calculation of temporal evolution of populations for optically pumped atoms under the influence of weak, circularly polarized light. The differential equations for the populations of magnetic sublevels in the excited state, derived from rate equations, are expressed in the form of inhomogeneous second-order differential equations with constant coefficients. We present a general method of analytically solving these differential equations, and obtain explicit analytical forms of the populations of the ground state at the lowest order in the saturation parameter. The obtained populations can be used to calculate lineshapes in various laser spectroscopies, considering transit time relaxation.

  1. Enhancing thermally induced effects on atomic force microscope cantilevers using optical microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duy Vy, Nguyen; Iida, Takuya

    2016-12-01

    A theory of enhancing thermally induced effects on atomic force microscope cantilevers with respect to the input power is proposed. An optical microcavity is used to increase the absorbed power and radiation pressure on thin films. We show that the response to the input power is enhanced up to an order of magnitude for cantilevers of ∼200 µm in length and ∼0.5 µm in thickness. A decrease in the absorbed power in the presence of cantilever deflection increases system endurability with respect to the input power. The study gives methods for amplifying and tuning vibration amplitudes in amplitude modulation modes with high sensitivity and low controlling input power.

  2. Bloch oscillations of quasispin polaritons in a magneto-optically controlled atomic ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chang; Zhou, Lan

    2012-01-01

    We consider the propagation of a quantized polarized light in a magneto-optically manipulated atomic ensemble with a tripod configuration. Polariton formalism is applied when the medium is subjected to a washboard magnetic field under electromagnetically induced transparency. The dark-state polariton with multiple components is achieved. We analyze quantum dynamics of the dark-state polariton by some experiment data from rubidium D1-line. It is found that one component propagates freely, however the wavepacket trajectory of the other component performs Bloch oscillations.

  3. Optical nonlinearities of excitonic states in atomically thin 2D transition metal dichalcogenides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Daniel Beom Soo

    2017-09-01

    We calculated the optical nonlinearities of the atomically thin monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide material (particularly MoS 2 ), particularly for those linear and nonlinear tran- sition processes that utilize the bound exciton states. We adopted the bound and the unbound exciton states as the basis for the Hilbert space, and derived all the dynamical density matri- ces that provides the induced current density, from which the nonlinear susceptibilities can be drawn order-by-order via perturbative calculations. We provide the nonlinear susceptibil- ities for the linear, the second-harmonic, the third-harmonic, and the kerr-type two-photon processes.

  4. Sympathetic cooling in an optically trapped mixture of alkali and spin-singlet atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladyslav V; Khramov, Alexander; Hansen, Anders H; Dowd, William H; Münchow, Frank; Jamison, Alan O; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2011-04-15

    We report on the realization of a stable mixture of ultracold lithium and ytterbium atoms confined in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We observe sympathetic cooling of 6Li by 174Yb and extract the s-wave scattering length magnitude |a(6Li-174Yb)|=(13±3)a0 from the rate of interspecies thermalization. Using forced evaporative cooling of 174Yb, we achieve reduction of the 6Li temperature to below the Fermi temperature, purely through interspecies sympathetic cooling.

  5. Generating topological optical flux lattices for ultracold atoms by modulated Raman and radio-frequency couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; You, Li

    2017-01-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically generate optical flux lattices with nontrivial band topology using amplitude-modulated Raman lasers and radio-frequency (rf) magnetic fields. By tuning the strength of Raman and rf fields, three distinct phases are realized at unit filling for a unit cell. Respectively, these three phases correspond to normal insulator, topological Chern insulator, and semimetal. Nearly nondispersive bands are found to appear in the topological phase, which promises opportunities for investigating strongly correlated quantum states within a simple cold-atom setup. The validity of our proposal is confirmed by comparing the Floquet quasienergies from the evolution operator with the spectrum of the effective Hamiltonian.

  6. Controlling Single-Photon Transport along an Optical Waveguide by using a Three-Level Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wei; CHEN Bin; XU Wei-Dong

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the single-photon transport properties in an optical waveguide embedded with a V-type three-level atom (VTLA) based on symmetric and asymmetric couplings between the photon and the VTLA.Our numerical results show that the transmission spectrum of the incident photon can be well controlled by virtue of both symmetric and asymmetric coupling interactions.A multifrequency photon attenuator is realized by controlling the asymmetric coupling interactions.Furthermore,the influences of dissipation of the VTLA for the realistic physical system on single-photon transport properties are also analyzed.

  7. Development of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a K-Rb hybrid cell and its application to magnetocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Ito

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an optically pumped atomic magnetometer using a hybrid cell of K and Rb. The hybrid optical pumping technique can apply dense alkali-metal vapor to the sensor head and leads to high signal intensity. We use dense Rb vapor as probed atoms, and achieve a sensitivity of approximately 100 fTrms/Hz1/2 around 10 Hz. In this case, the sensitivity is limited by the system noise, and the magnetic linewidth is narrower than that for direct Rb optical pumping. We demonstrated magnetocardiography using the magnetometer and obtained clear human magnetocardiograms.

  8. Beyond optical molasses: 3D raman sideband cooling of atomic cesium to high phase-space density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman; Vuletic; Chin; Chu

    2000-01-17

    We demonstrate a simple, general purpose method to cool neutral atoms. A sample containing 3x10(8) cesium atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap is cooled and simultaneously spin polarized in 10 ms at a density of 1.1x10(11) cm (-3) to a phase space density nlambda(3)(dB) = 1/500, which is almost 3 orders of magnitude higher than attainable in free space with optical molasses. The technique is based on 3D degenerate Raman sideband cooling in optical lattices and remains efficient even at densities where the mean lattice site occupation is close to unity.

  9. Demonstration of fold and cusp catastrophes in an atomic cloud reflected from an optical barrier in the presence of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenblum, Serge; Shomroni, Itay; Kaner, Roy; Arusi-Parpar, Talya; Raz, Oren; Dayan, Barak

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate first-order (fold) and second-order (cusp) catastrophes in the density of an atomic cloud reflected from an optical barrier in the presence of gravity, and show their corresponding universal asymptotic behavior. The cusp point enables robust, field-free refocusing of an expanding atomic cloud with a wide velocity distribution. Specifically, the density attained at the cusp point in our experiment reached 65% of the peak density of the atoms in the trap prior to their release. We thereby add caustics to the various phenomena with parallels in optics that can be harnessed for manipulation of cold atoms. The structural stability of catastrophes provides inherent robustness against variations in the system's dynamics and initial conditions, making them suitable for manipulation of atoms under imperfect conditions and limited controllability.

  10. High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Salim, Evan A; Pfeiffer, Jonathan B; Anderson, Dana Z

    2012-01-01

    A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

  11. From quantum turbulence to statistical atom optics: new perspectives in speckle matter wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, P E S; Telles, G D; Impens, F; Kaiser, R; Bagnato, V S

    2016-01-01

    Quantum Turbulence, the chaotic configuration of tangled quantized vortex lines, can be analyzed from the matter wave perspective in instead of the traditional fluid perspective. We report the observation of a remarkable similarity in between the dynamics of a freely expanding turbulent Bose-Einstein condensate and the propagation of an optical speckle pattern. Both follow very similar basic propagation characteristics. The second-order correlation is calculated and the typical correlation length of the two phenomena is used to substantiate the observations. The analogy between an expanding turbulent atomic condensate and a traveling optical speckle creates exciting prospects to investigate disordered quantum matter including the possibilities of a 3D speckle matter field.

  12. Automated cantilever exchange and optical alignment for High-throughput, parallel atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnagte, Tom; Kramer, Lukas; Dekker, Bert; Herfst, Rodolf; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), the exchange and alignment of the AFM cantilever with respect to the optical beam and position-sensitive detector (PSD) are often performed manually. This process is tedious and time-consuming and sometimes damages the cantilever or tip. To increase the throughput of AFM in industrial applications, the ability to automatically exchange and align the cantilever in a very short time with sufficient accuracy is required. In this paper, we present the development of an automated cantilever exchange and optical alignment instrument. We present an experimental proof of principle by exchanging various types of AFM cantilevers in 6 seconds with an accuracy better than 2 um. The exchange and alignment unit is miniaturized to allow for integration in a parallel AFM. The reliability of the demonstrator has also been evaluated. Ten thousand continuous exchange and alignment cycles were performed without failure. The automated exchange and alignment of the AFM cantilever overcome a large ...

  13. Magneto-Optical Trapping of 88Sr atoms with 689 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; LIN Bai-Ke; ZHAO Yang; LI Ye; WANG Shao-Kai; WANG Min-Ming; ZANG Er-Jun; LI Tian-Chu; FANG Zhan-Jun

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of strontium magneto-optical trap(MOT) operating on the intercombination transition lSo-3 P1 at 689nm, namely red MOT. A 689nm laser used for cooling and trapping is injection locked to a master laser, whose linewidth is narrowed to 150 Hz by locking to a high finesse optical reference cavity.88 Sr atoms pre-cooled and trapped by the broad 1SO-1 Pl transition at 461 nm are transferred to the red MOT with the help of a time sequence controller. The transfer ratio is about 20% and the red MOT's temperature is estimated to be less than 20 μK by the time-of-flight(TOF) image analysis.

  14. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 2. Molecules and photons - Spectroscopy and collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter [Max-Born-Institut fuer Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This is the second volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 2 introduces lasers and quantum optics, while the main focus is on the structure of molecules and their spectroscopy, as well as on collision physics as the continuum counterpart to bound molecular states. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  15. Nonlinear optical and atomic systems at the interface of physics and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Garreau, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the interface between mathematics and physics, this book offers an introduction to the physics, the mathematics, and the numerical simulation of nonlinear systems in optics and atomic physics. The text covers a wide spectrum of current research on the subject, which is  an extremely active field in physics and mathematical physics, with a very broad range of implications, both for fundamental science and technological applications: light propagation in microstructured optical fibers, Bose-Einstein condensates, disordered systems, and the newly emerging field of nonlinear quantum mechanics.   Accessible to PhD students, this book will also be of interest to post-doctoral researchers and seasoned academics.

  16. Cold Atom Physics Using Ultra-Thin Optical Fibers: Light-Induced Dipole Forces and Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sagu'e, G; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A; Vetsch, E

    2007-01-01

    The strong evanescent field around ultra-thin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold Caesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  17. Long-distance entanglement in many-body atomic and optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano, SA (Italy)], E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.it

    2010-02-15

    We discuss the phenomenon of long-distance entanglement (LDE) in the ground state of quantum spin models, its use in high-fidelity and robust quantum communication, and its realization in many-body systems of ultracold atoms in optical lattices and in arrays of coupled optical cavities. We investigate XX quantum spin models on one-dimensional lattices with open ends and different patterns of site-dependent interaction couplings, singling out two general settings: patterns that allow for perfect LDE in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement remains finite in the thermodynamic limit, and patterns of quasi-long-distance entanglement (QLDE) in the ground state of the system, namely such that the end-to-end entanglement vanishes with a very slow power-law decay as the length of the spin chain is increased. We discuss physical realizations of these models in ensembles of ultracold bosonic atoms loaded in optical lattices. We show how, using either suitably engineered super-lattice structures or exploiting the presence of edge impurities in lattices with single periodicity, it is possible to realize models endowed with nonvanishing LDE or QLDE. We then study how to realize models that optimize the robustness of QLDE at finite temperature and in the presence of imperfections using suitably engineered arrays of coupled optical cavities. For both cases the numerical estimates of the end-to-end entanglement in the actual physical systems are thoroughly compared with the analytical results obtained for the spin model systems. We finally introduce LDE-based schemes of long-distance quantum teleportation in linear arrays of coupled cavities, and show that they allow for high-fidelity and high success rates even at moderately high temperatures.

  18. Quasi-CW Diode Laser End-pumped Yb3+∶GlassMicrochip Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shixun; HU Lili; LIU Zhuping; HUANG Guosong; JIANG Zhonghong; YASUKAZU Izawa

    2002-01-01

    Quasi-CW diode-pumped Yb3+∶borate glass and Yb3+∶phosphate glass microchip lasers have been reported. From Yb3+∶phosphate glass laser, the maximum average output power was 31 mW and the optical-optical conversion efficiency was 5%.The maximum average output power was 18 mW, and optical-optical conversion efficiency was 3% for Yb3+∶borate glass laser.

  19. Selectively tunable optical Stark effect of anisotropic excitons in atomically thin ReS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Doeon; Noh, Minji; Cha, Soonyoung; Soh, Chan Ho; Sung, Ji Ho; Jo, Moon-Ho; Choi, Hyunyong

    2016-11-01

    The optical Stark effect is a coherent light-matter interaction describing the modification of quantum states by non-resonant light illumination in atoms, solids and nanostructures. Researchers have strived to utilize this effect to control exciton states, aiming to realize ultra-high-speed optical switches and modulators. However, most studies have focused on the optical Stark effect of only the lowest exciton state due to lack of energy selectivity, resulting in low degree-of-freedom devices. Here, by applying a linearly polarized laser pulse to few-layer ReS2, where reduced symmetry leads to strong in-plane anisotropy of excitons, we control the optical Stark shift of two energetically separated exciton states. Especially, we selectively tune the Stark effect of an individual state with varying light polarization. This is possible because each state has a completely distinct dependence on light polarization due to different excitonic transition dipole moments. Our finding provides a methodology for energy-selective control of exciton states.

  20. Study of the metastable helium spin polarization in an optically pumped afterglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essabaa, S.; Schearer, L. D.; Arianer, J.; Brissaud, I.; Humblot, H.; Zerhouni, O.

    1994-05-01

    A very efficient technique of optical pumping is applied in order to polarize 2 3S 1 metastable 4He atoms within an afterglow by means of a high power LNA laser. An almost complete atom polarization is achieved. This allows the production of an electron beam of appreciable intensity with high polarization well suited to perform a polarized electron source for linear cw accelerators.

  1. High-speed imaging optical techniques for shockwave and droplets atomization analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slangen, Pierre R.; Lauret, Pierre; Heymes, Frederic; Aprin, Laurent; Lecysyn, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Droplets atomization by shockwave can act as a consequence in domino effects on an industrial facility: aggression of a storage tank (projectile from previous event, for example) can cause leakage of hazardous material (toxic and flammable). As the accident goes on, a secondary event can cause blast generation, impacting the droplets and resulting in their atomization. Therefore, exchange surface increase impacts the evaporation rate. This can be an issue in case of dispersion of such a cloud. The experiments conducted in the lab generate a shockwave with an open-ended shock tube to break up liquid droplets. As the expected shockwave speed is about 400 m/s (˜Mach 1.2), the interaction with falling drops is very short. High-speed imaging is performed at about 20,000 fps. The shockwave is measured using both overpressure sensors: particle image velocimetry and pure in line shadowgraphy. The size of fragmented droplets is optically measured by direct shadowgraphy simultaneously in different directions. In these experiments, secondary breakups of a droplet into an important number of smaller droplets from the shockwave-induced flow are shown. The results of the optical characterizations are discussed in terms of shape, velocity, and size.

  2. Dynamics of atomic clusters in intense optical fields of ultrashort duration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Mathur; Firoz A Rajgara

    2012-01-01

    Intense laser pulses have been generated that last for only 10 fs, long enough to accommodate only 3 optical cycles of 800 nm light. Upon focussing such pulses, intensities in the 1015 W cm−2 range are readily generated. At such intensities, the magnitude of the optical field begins to match intra-atomic Coulombic fields. Consequently, exposure of atoms and molecules to such intense pulses inevitably leads to single and multiple ionization. We report here results of experiments that we have conducted that involve irradiation of gas-phase Ar15,000 clusters by such intense, few-cycle laser pulses. The clusters become multiply ionized and undergo Coulomb explosion, giving rise to ejection of fast Ar-ions. Results show that the strong-field dynamics in the few-cycle domain differ significantly from those that occur in the longer pulse (> 30 fs) regime. Manifestations of these differences are presented in the form of angle-dependent ion energy and ion yield functions.

  3. Photon bunching and anti-bunching with two dipole-coupled atoms in an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ya-Mei; Hu, Chang-Sheng; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Wu, Huai-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of the dipole-dipole interaction (DDI) on the photon statistics with two atoms trapped in an optical cavity driven by a laser field and subjected to cooperative emission. By means of the quantum trajectory analysis and the second-order correlation functions, we show that the photon statistics of the cavity transmission can be flexibly modulated by the DDI while the incoming coherent laser selectively excites the atom-cavity system’s nonlinear Jaynes-Cummings ladder of excited states. Finally, we find that the effect of the cooperatively atomic emission can also be revealed by the numerical simulations and can be explained with a simplified picture. The DDI induced nonlinearity gives rise to highly nonclassical photon emission from the cavity that is significant for quantum information processing and quantum communication. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305037, 11347114, and 11374054) and the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2013J01012).

  4. Classical stochastic measurement trajectories: Bosonic atomic gases in an optical cavity and quantum measurement backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2014-08-01

    We formulate computationally efficient classical stochastic measurement trajectories for a multimode quantum system under continuous observation. Specifically, we consider the nonlinear dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate contained within an optical cavity subject to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. The classical trajectories encode within a classical phase-space representation a continuous quantum measurement process conditioned on a given detection record. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the quasiprobability distribution of the combined condensate-cavity system. We unravel the dynamics into stochastic classical trajectories that are conditioned on the quantum measurement process of the continuously monitored system. Since the dynamics of a continuously measured observable in a many-atom system can be closely approximated by classical dynamics, the method provides a numerically efficient and accurate approach to calculate the measurement record of a large multimode quantum system. Numerical simulations of the continuously monitored dynamics of a large atom cloud reveal considerably fluctuating phase profiles between different measurement trajectories, while ensemble averages exhibit local spatially varying phase decoherence. Individual measurement trajectories lead to spatial pattern formation and optomechanical motion that solely result from the measurement backaction. The backaction of the continuous quantum measurement process, conditioned on the detection record of the photons, spontaneously breaks the symmetry of the spatial profile of the condensate and can be tailored to selectively excite collective modes.

  5. Non-linear Spectroscopy of Sr Atoms in an Optical Cavity for Laser Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Bjarke T R; Schäffer, Stefan A; Westergaard, Philip G; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-01-01

    We study the non-linear interaction of a cold sample of strontium-88 atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit and investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak inter-combination line $\\lvert 5s^{2} \\, ^1 \\textrm{S}_0 \\rangle \\,-\\, \\lvert 5s5p \\, ^3 \\textrm{P}_1 \\rangle$ at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures - the cavity transmitted phase and absorption - by employing FM spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free space situation where no cavity is present. Furthermore, the non-linear dynami...

  6. Stability of Magneto-optical Traps with Large Field Gradients: Limits on the Tight Confinement of Single Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems, P.; Boyd, R.; Bliss, J.; Libbrecht, K. [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, 264-33 California Institute of Physics, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    We report measurements of the stability of magneto-optical traps (MOTs) for neutral atoms in the limit of tight confinement of a single atom. For quadrupole magnetic field gradients at the trap center greater than {approximately}1kG/cm, we find that stochastic diffusion of atoms out of the trapping volume becomes the dominant particle loss mechanism, ultimately limiting the MOT size to greater than {approximately}5{mu}m. We measured and modeled the diffusive loss rate as a function of laser power, detuning, and field gradient for trapped cesium atoms. In addition, for as few as two atoms, the collisional loss rates become very high for tightly confined traps, allowing the direct observation of isolated two-body atomic collisions in a MOT. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms: a second generation of cold atom clocks; Horloge a reseau optique au strontium: une 2. generation d'horloges a atomes froids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Targat, R

    2007-07-15

    Atomic fountains, based on a microwave transition of Cesium or Rubidium, constitute the state of the art atomic clocks, with a relative accuracy close to 10{sup -16}. It nevertheless appears today that it will be difficult to go significantly beyond this level with this kind of device. The use of an optical transition, the other parameters being unchanged, gives hope for a 4 or 5 orders of magnitude improvement of the stability and of the relative uncertainty on most systematic effects. As for motional effects on the atoms, they can be controlled on a very different manner if they are trapped in an optical lattice instead of experiencing a free ballistic flight stage, characteristic of fountains. The key point of this approach lies in the fact that the trap can be operated in such a way that a well chosen, weakly allowed, J=0 {yields} J=0 clock transition can be free from light shift effects. In this respect, the strontium atom is one of the most promising candidate, the 1S{sub 0} {yields} 3P{sub 0} transition has a natural width of 1 mHz, and several other easily accessible transitions can be used to efficiently laser cool atoms down to 10 {mu}K. This thesis demonstrates the experimental feasibility of an optical lattice clock based on the strontium atom, and reports on a preliminary evaluation of the relative accuracy with the fermionic isotope {sup 87}Sr, at a level of a few 10{sup -15}. (author)

  8. Effects of doping of calcium atom(s) on structural, electronic and optical properties of binary strontium chalcogenides - A theoretical investigation using DFT based FP-LAPW methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rahul; Chattopadhyaya, Surya

    2017-09-01

    The effects of doping of Ca atom(s) on structural, electronic and optical properties of binary strontium chalcogenide semiconductor compounds have been investigated theoretically using DFT based FP-LAPW approach by modeling the rock-salt (B1) ternary alloys CaxSr1-xS, CaxSr1-xSe and CaxSr1-xTe at some specific concentrations 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 and studying their aforesaid properties. The exchange-correlation potentials for their structural properties have been computed using the Wu-Cohen generalized-gradient approximation (WC-GGA) scheme, while those for the electronic and optical properties have been computed using recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) scheme. In addition, we have computed the electronic and optical properties with the traditional BLYP and PBE-GGA schemes for comparison. The atomic and orbital origin of different electronic states in the band structure of each of the compounds have been identified from the respective density of states (DOS). Using the approach of Zunger and co-workers, the microscopic origin of band gap bowing has been discussed in term of volume deformation, charge exchange and structural relaxation. Bonding characteristics among the constituent atoms of each of the specimens have been discussed from their charge density contour plots. Optical properties of the binary compounds and ternary alloys have been investigated theoretically in terms of their respective dielectric function, refractive index, normal incidence reflectivity and optical conductivity. Several calculated results have been compared with available experimental and other theoretical data.

  9. Dispersive response of atoms trapped near the surface of an optical nanofiber with applications to QND measurement and spin squeezing

    CERN Document Server

    Qi, Xiaodong; Jessen, Poul S; Deutsch, Ivan H

    2015-01-01

    We study the strong coupling between photons and atoms that can be achieved in an optical nanofiber geometry when the interaction is dispersive. While the Purcell enhancement factor for spontaneous emission into the guided mode does not reach the strong-coupling regime for individual atoms, one can obtain high cooperativity for ensembles of a few thousand atoms due to the tight confinement of the guided modes and constructive interference over the entire chain of trapped atoms. We calculate the dyadic Green's function, which determines the scattering of light by atoms in the presence of the fiber, and thus the phase shift and polarization rotation induced on the guided light by the trapped atoms. The Green's function is related to a full Heisenberg-Langevin treatment of the dispersive response of the quantized field to tensor polarizable atoms. We apply our formalism to quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of the atoms via polarimetry. We study shot-noise-limited detection of atom number for atoms in a com...

  10. Progress in hollow core photonic crystal fiber for atomic vapour based coherent optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, T. D.; Wang, Y. Y.; Alharbi, M.; Fourcade Dutin, C.; Mangan, B. J.; Wheeler, N. V.; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on progress in different hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) design and fabrication for atomic vapor based applications. We have fabricated a Photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding HC-PCF with a record loss of 107dB/km at 785nm in this class of fiber. A double photonic bandgap (DPBG) guiding HC-PCF with guidance bands centred at 780nm and 1064nm is reported. A 7-cell 3-ring Kagome HC-PCF with hypocycloid core is reported, the optical loss at 780nm has been reduced to 70dB/km which to the best of our knowledge is the lowest optical loss reported at this wavelength using HC-PCF. Details on experimental loading of alkali metal vapours using a far off red detuned laser are reported. This optical loading has been shown to decrease the necessary loading time for Rb into the hollow core of a fiber. The quantity of Rb within the fiber core has been enhanced by a maximum of 14% through this loading procedure.

  11. Ultraviolet optical properties of aluminum fluoride thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, John, E-mail: john.j.hennessy@jpl.nasa.gov; Jewell, April D.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Nikzad, Shouleh [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Aluminum fluoride (AlF{sub 3}) is a low refractive index material with promising optical applications for ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. An atomic layer deposition process using trimethylaluminum and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride has been developed for the deposition of AlF{sub 3} at substrate temperatures between 100 and 200 °C. This low temperature process has resulted in thin films with UV-optical properties that have been characterized by ellipsometric and reflection/transmission measurements at wavelengths down to 200 nm. The optical loss for 93 nm thick films deposited at 100 °C was measured to be less than 0.2% from visible wavelengths down to 200 nm, and additional microstructural characterization demonstrates that the films are amorphous with moderate tensile stress of 42–105 MPa as deposited on silicon substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis shows no signature of residual aluminum oxide components making these films good candidates for a variety of applications at even shorter UV wavelengths.

  12. Noticeable positive Doppler effect on optical bistability in an N-type active Raman gain atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Zeng-Guang; Niu Yue-Ping; Zhang Jing-Tao; Gong Shang-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Doppler effect on optical bistability in an N type active Raman gain atomic system inside an optical ring cavity.It is shown that the Doppler effect can greatly enhance the dispersion and thus create the bistable behaviour or greatly increase the bistable region,which has been known as the positive Doppler effect on optical bistability.In addition,we find that a positive Doppler effect can change optical bistability from the hybrid dispersion-gain type to a dispersive type.

  13. Photoluminescence properties of Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fiber based on atomic layer deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jianxiang, E-mail: wenjx@shu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Specialty Fiber Optics and Optical Access Networks, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Jie; Dong, Yanhua; Chen, Na [Key Laboratory of Specialty Fiber Optics and Optical Access Networks, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-ding [Photonics & Optical Communications, School of Electrical Engineering & Telecommunications, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia); Pang, Fufei; Chen, Zhenyi [Key Laboratory of Specialty Fiber Optics and Optical Access Networks, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Wang, Tingyun, E-mail: tywang@mail.shu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Specialty Fiber Optics and Optical Access Networks, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We report on a new fabrication method of producing Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers. • There are obvious Bi-type ions absorption peaks at 520, 700 and 800 nm. • The fluorescence peaks are 1130 and 1145 nm with 489 and 705 nm excitations, respectively. • Their fluorescence lifetimes are 701 and 721 μs, respectively. • And then there are obvious fluorescence bands in 600–850 and 900–1650 nm with 532 nm pump exciting. • There is a maximum fluorescence intensity peak at 1120 nm, and its full wave at half maximum (FWHM) is approximately 180 nm. • These may mainly result from the interaction between Bi and Al ions. • The Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers would be used in high power or broadly tunable laser sources, and optical fiber amplifier in the optical communication fields. - Abstract: The Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers are fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) doping technique combing with conventional modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process. Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are induced into silica optical fiber core layer by ALD technique, with Bis (2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-3,5-heptanedionato) Bismuth(III) (Bi(thd){sub 3}) and H{sub 2}O as Bi and O precursors, and with Al(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} (TMA) as Al precursor, respectively. The structure features and optical properties of Bi/Al-codoped silica optical fibers are investigated. Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} stoichiometry is confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The valence state of Bi element is +3. Concentration distribution of Si, Ge and O elements is approximately 24–33, 9 and 66 mol%, respectively, in fiber preform core and cladding layer region. Bi and Al ions have been also slightly doped approximately 150–180 and 350–750 ppm in fiber preform core, respectively. Refractive index difference of the Bi/Al-codoped fiber is approximately 0.58% using optical fiber refractive index profiler analyzer. There are obvious Bi-type ions absorption

  14. Lars Onsager Prize Talk: A New Challenge for Cold Atom Physics: Achieving the Strongly Correlated Regimes for Cold Atoms in Optical Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tin-Lun

    2008-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices show great promise to generate a whole host of new strongly correlated states and to emulate many theoretical models for strongly interacting electronic systems. However, to reach these strongly correlated regimes, we need to reach unprecedented low temperatures within current experimental settings. To achieve this, it is necessary to remove considerable amount of entropy from the system. Here, we point out a general principle for removing entropies of quantum gases in optical lattices which will allow one to reach some extraordinarily low temperature scales.

  15. Optimal densities of alkali metal atoms in an optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer considering the spatial distribution of spin polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yosuke; Sato, Daichi; Kamada, Keigo; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2016-07-11

    An optically pumped K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer can be a useful tool for biomagnetic measurements due to the high spatial homogeneity of its sensor property inside a cell. However, because the property varies depending on the densities of potassium and rubidium atoms, optimization of the densities is essential. In this study, by using the Bloch equations of K and Rb and considering the spatial distribution of the spin polarization, we confirmed that the calculation results of spin polarization behavior are in good agreement with the experimental data. Using our model, we calculated the spatial distribution of the spin polarization and found that the optimal density of K atoms is 3 × 1019 m-3 and the optimal density ratio is nK/nRb ~ 400 to maximize the output signal and enhance spatial homogeneity of the sensor property.

  16. Optical Guiding of Trapped Atoms by a Blue-Detuned Hollow Laser Beam in the Horizontal Direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Kai-Jun; LI Ke; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical guiding of 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) by a blue-detuned horizontal hollow laser beam is demonstrated experimentally. The guiding efficiency and the velocity distribution of the guided atoms are found to have strong dependence on the detuning of the guiding laser. In particular, the optimum guiding occurs when the blue detuning of the hollow laser beam is approximately equal to the hyperfine structure splitting of the 85Rb ground states, in good agreement with the theoretical analysis based on a three-level model.

  17. Effect of atomic noise on optical squeezing via polarization self-rotation in a thermal vapor cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, M.T.L.; Hetet, G.; Peng, A.

    2006-01-01

    show results of the characterization of PSR in isotopically enhanced rubidium-87 cells, performed in two independent laboratories. We observed that, contrary to earlier work, the presence of atomic noise in the thermal vapor overwhelms the observation of squeezing. We present a theory that contains......The traversal of an elliptically polarized optical field through a thermal vapor cell can give rise to a rotation of its polarization axis. This process, known as polarization self-rotation (PSR), has been suggested as a mechanism for producing squeezed light at atomic transition wavelengths. We...... atomic noise terms and show that a null result in squeezing is consistent with this theory....

  18. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau-Zener tunneling considered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jie-Yun; Wang, Lan-Yu

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau-Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau-Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau-Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  19. Optical trapping of ultracold dysprosium atoms: transition probabilities, dynamic dipole polarizabilities and van der Waals $C_6$ coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; Dulieu, Olivier; Nascimbene, Sylvain; Lepers, Maxence

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of optical trapping of ultracold atoms depend on the atomic dynamic dipole polarizability governing the atom-field interaction. In this article, we have calculated the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic dipole polarizability of dysprosium in the ground and first excited level. Due to the high electronic angular momentum of those two states, the polarizabilities possess scalar, vector and tensor contributions that we have computed, on a wide range of trapping wavelengths, using the sum-over-state formula. Using the same formalism, we have also calculated the $C_6$ coefficients characterizing the van der Waals interaction between two dysprosium atoms in the two lowest levels. We have computed the energies of excited states and the transition probabilities appearing in the sums, using a combination of \\textit{ab initio} and least-square-fitting techniques provided by the Cowan codes and extended in our group. Regarding the real part of the polarizability, for field frequencies far from atomic...

  20. Modulation of periodic field on the atomic current in optical lattices with Landau–Zener tunneling considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jie-Yun, E-mail: jyyan@bupt.edu.cn; Wang, Lan-Yu, E-mail: lan_yu_wang@163.com

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the atomic current in optical lattices under the presence of both constant and periodic external field with Landau–Zener tunneling considered. By simplifying the system to a two-band model, the atomic current is obtained based on the Boltzmann equations. We focus on three situations to discuss the influence of the Landau–Zener tunneling and periodic field on the atomic current. Numerical calculations show the atomic transient current would finally become the stable oscillation, whose amplitude and average value can be further adjusted by the periodic external field. It is concluded that the periodic external field could provide an effective modulation on the atomic current even when the Landau–Zener tunneling probability has almostly become a constant.

  1. Requirements for fault-tolerant factoring on an atom-optics quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J; Stephens, Ashley M; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-01-01

    Quantum information processing and its associated technologies have reached a pivotal stage in their development, with many experiments having established the basic building blocks. Moving forward, the challenge is to scale up to larger machines capable of performing computational tasks not possible today. This raises questions that need to be urgently addressed, such as what resources these machines will consume and how large will they be. Here we estimate the resources required to execute Shor's factoring algorithm on an atom-optics quantum computer architecture. We determine the runtime and size of the computer as a function of the problem size and physical error rate. Our results suggest that once the physical error rate is low enough to allow quantum error correction, optimization to reduce resources and increase performance will come mostly from integrating algorithms and circuits within the error correction environment, rather than from improving the physical hardware.

  2. Quantitative measurements of electromechanical response with a combined optical beam and interferometric atomic force microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Proksch, Roger [Asylum Research an Oxford Instruments Company, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States)

    2015-06-22

    An ongoing challenge in atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments is the quantitative measurement of cantilever motion. The vast majority of AFMs use the optical beam deflection (OBD) method to infer the deflection of the cantilever. The OBD method is easy to implement, has impressive noise performance, and tends to be mechanically robust. However, it represents an indirect measurement of the cantilever displacement, since it is fundamentally an angular rather than a displacement measurement. Here, we demonstrate a metrological AFM that combines an OBD sensor with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) to enable accurate measurements of the cantilever velocity and displacement. The OBD/LDV AFM allows a host of quantitative measurements to be performed, including in-situ measurements of cantilever oscillation modes in piezoresponse force microscopy. As an example application, we demonstrate how this instrument can be used for accurate quantification of piezoelectric sensitivity—a longstanding goal in the electromechanical community.

  3. Optical processes of photonic band gap structure with dressing field in atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Zhe; Liu, Zhe; Cai, Kang-Ning; Zhong, Hua; Zhang, Wei-Tao; Liu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Peng

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally investigate probe transmission signals (PTS), the four-wave mixing photonic band gap signal (FWM BGS), and the fluorescence signal (FLS) in an inverted Y-type four level atomic system. For the first time, we compare the FLS of the two ground-state hyperfine levels of Rb 85. In particular, the second-order and the fourth-order fluorescence signals perform dramatic dressing discrepancies under the two hyperfine levels. Moreover, we find that the dressing field has some dressing effects on three such types of signals. Therefore, we demonstrate that the characteristics of PTS, FWM BGS, and FLS can be controlled by frequency detunings, the powers or phases of the dressing field. Such research could have potential applications in optical diodes, amplifiers, and quantum information processing.

  4. Optical control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Arijit; Sawant, Rahul V; Sheikholeslami, G; Budker, D; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the manipulation of transmitted light through an optical Fabry-Perot cavity, built around a spectroscopy cell containing enriched rubidium vapor. Light resonant with the $^{87}$Rb D$_{2}$ ($F=2/F=1$) $\\leftrightarrow F'$ manifold, is controlled by transverse intersection of the cavity mode by another resonant light beam. The cavity transmission can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the coupling of atomic states due to the intersecting beams. The extreme manifestation of cavity mode control is the precipitious destruction (negative logic switching) or buildup (positive logic switching) of the transmitted light intensity, on intersection of the transverse control beam with the cavity mode. Both the steady state and transient response are experimentally investigated. The mechanism behind the change in cavity transmission is discussed in brief.

  5. Flow-induced charge modulation in superfluid atomic fermions loaded into an optical kagome lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Sato, Chika; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Tsuchiya, Shunji

    2013-04-05

    We study the superfluid state of atomic fermions in a tunable optical kagome lattice motivated by recent experiments. We show that the imposed superflow induces spatial modulations in the density and order parameter of the pair condensate and leads to a charge modulated superfluid state analogous to a supersolid state. The spatial modulations in the superfluid emerge due to the geometric effect of the kagome lattice that introduces anisotropy in hopping amplitudes of fermion pairs in the presence of superflow. We also study superflow instabilities and find that the critical current limited by the dynamical instability is quite enhanced due to the large density of states associated with the flatband. The charge modulated superfluid state can sustain high temperatures close to the transition temperature that is also enhanced due to the flatband and is therefore realizable in experiments.

  6. Zitterbewegung with spin-orbit coupled ultracold atoms in a fluctuating optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonov, V. Yu; Makarov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of non-interacting ultracold atoms with artificial spin-orbit coupling is considered. Spin-orbit coupling is created using two moving optical lattices with orthogonal polarizations. Our main goal is to study influence of lattice noise on Rabi oscillations. Special attention is paid to the phenomenon of the Zitterbewegung being trembling motion caused by Rabi transitions between states with different velocities. Phase and amplitude fluctuations of lattices are modelled by means of the two-dimensional stochastic Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, also known as harmonic noise. In the the noiseless case the problem is solved analytically in terms of the momentum representation. It is shown that lattice noise significantly extends duration of the Zitterbewegung as compared to the noiseless case. This effect originates from noise-induced decoherence of Rabi oscillations.

  7. Fast, high-precision optical polarization synthesizer for ultracold-atom experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Meschede, Dieter; Zopes, Jonathan; Alberti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to precisely synthesize arbitrary polarization states of light with a high modulation bandwidth. Our approach consists in superposing two laser light fields with the same wavelength, but with opposite circular polarizations, where the phase and amplitude of each light field are individually controlled. To assess the precision of the synthesized polarization states, we characterize static spatial variations of the polarization over the wavefront, as well as the noise spectral density of temporal fluctuations. We find that static polarization distortions limit the extinction ratio to $2\\times 10^{-5}$, corresponding to a 0.01% reduction of the degree of polarization (DOP). We also obtain that temporal fluctuations give rise to a $0.2^\\circ$ uncertainty in the state of polarization (SOP). We recently demonstrated an application of the polarization synthesizer (Robens et al., arXiv:1608.02410) to create two fully independent, controllable optical lattices, which trap atoms depending on...

  8. On how the optical depth tunes the effects of ISM neutral atom flow on debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Marzari, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The flux of ISM neutral atoms surrounding stars and their environment affects the motion of dust particles in debris disks, causing a significant dynamical evolution. Large values of eccentricity and inclination can be excited and strong correlations settle in among the orbital angles. This dynamical behaviour, in particular for bound dust grains, can potentially cause significant asymmetries in dusty disks around solar type stars which might be detected by observations. However, the amount of orbital changes due to this non--gravitational perturbation is strongly limited by the collisional lifetime of dust particles. We show that for large values of the disk's optical depth the influence of ISM flow on the disk shape is almost negligible because the grains are collisionally destroyed before they can accumulate enough orbital changes due to the ISM perturbations. On the other hand, for values smaller than $10^{-3}$, peculiar asymmetric patterns appear in the density profile of the disk when we consider 1-10 m...

  9. Uniform synthetic magnetic field and effective mass for cold atoms in a shaken optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sols, Fernando; Creffield, Charles E.; Pieplow, Gregor; Goldman, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Cold atoms can be made to experience synthetic magnetic fields when placed in a suitably driven optical lattice. For coherent systems the switching protocol plays an essential role in determining the long time behavior. Relatively simple driving schemes may generate a uniform magnetic flux but an inhomogeneous effective mass. A two-stage split driving scheme can recover a uniform effective mass but at the price of rendering the magnetic field space dependent. We propose a four-stage split driving that generates uniform field and mass of arbitrary values for all driving amplitudes. Finally, we study a modified two-stage split driving approach that enables uniform field and mass for most of but not all values of the magnetic field. Work supported by MINECO (Spain) under Grant FIS2013-41716-P, by FRS-FNRS (Belgium), and by BSPO under PAI Project No. P7/18 DYGEST.

  10. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  11. Intracavity Rydberg-atom electromagnetically induced transparency using a high-finesse optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Chao, Yuanxi; Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Shaffer, James P.

    2017-09-01

    We present an experimental study of cavity-assisted Rydberg-atom electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using a high-finesse optical cavity (F ˜28 000 ). Rydberg atoms are excited via a two-photon transition in a ladder-type EIT configuration. A three-peak structure of the cavity transmission spectrum is observed when Rydberg EIT is generated inside the cavity. The two symmetrically spaced side peaks are caused by bright-state polaritons, while the central peak corresponds to a dark-state polariton. Anticrossing phenomena and the effects of mirror adsorbate electric fields are studied under different experimental conditions. We determine a lower bound on the coherence time for the system of 7.26 ±0.06 μ s , most likely limited by laser dephasing. The cavity-Rydberg EIT system can be useful for single-photon generation using the Rydberg blockade effect, studying many-body physics, and generating novel quantum states among many other applications.

  12. Quantum Yield Heterogeneity among Single Nonblinking Quantum Dots Revealed by Atomic Structure-Quantum Optics Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfield, Noah J; McBride, James R; Wang, Feng; Buck, Matthew R; Keene, Joseph D; Reid, Kemar R; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-02-23

    Physical variations in colloidal nanostructures give rise to heterogeneity in expressed optical behavior. This correlation between nanoscale structure and function demands interrogation of both atomic structure and photophysics at the level of single nanostructures to be fully understood. Herein, by conducting detailed analyses of fine atomic structure, chemical composition, and time-resolved single-photon photoluminescence data for the same individual nanocrystals, we reveal inhomogeneity in the quantum yields of single nonblinking "giant" CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (g-QDs). We find that each g-QD possesses distinctive single exciton and biexciton quantum yields that result mainly from variations in the degree of charging, rather than from volume or structure inhomogeneity. We further establish that there is a very limited nonemissive "dark" fraction (<2%) among the studied g-QDs and present direct evidence that the g-QD core must lack inorganic passivation for the g-QD to be "dark". Therefore, in contrast to conventional QDs, ensemble photoluminescence quantum yield is principally defined by charging processes rather than the existence of dark g-QDs.

  13. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A; Tyurnina, Anastasia V; Yu, Geliang L; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Geim, Andre K; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  14. A plateau in the sensitivity of a compact optically pumped atomic magnetometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuhiko Mizutani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a compact optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM, there is a plateau in the sensitivity where the dependence of the sensitivity on pumping power is small compared with that predicted by the uniform polarization model. The mechanism that generates this plateau was explained by numerical analysis. The distribution of spin polarization in the alkali metal cell of an OPAM was modeled using the Bloch equation incorporating a diffusion term and an equation for the attenuation of the pump beam. The model was well-fitted to the experimental results for a module with a cubic cell with 20 mm sides and pump and probe beams with 8 mm diameter. On the plateau, strong magnetic response was generated at the regions that were not illuminated directly by the intense pump beam, while at the same time spin polarization as large as 0.5 was maintained due to diffusion of the spin-polarized atoms. Thus, the sensitivity of the magnetometer monitored with a probe beam decreases only slightly with increasing pump beam intensity because the spin polarization under an intense pump beam is saturated. This plateau, which is characteristic of this type of magnetometer using a narrow pump and probe beams, can be used in arrays of magnetometers because it enables stable operation with little sensitivity fluctuation from changes in pump beam power.

  15. A novel HLA-Cw*01 variant allele, HLA-Cw*0130.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z-H; Wang, D-M

    2009-12-01

    The novel HLA-Cw*0130 variant allele differs from the closest allele Cw*010201 by single nucleotide change at genomic nt 959 T>C (CDS nt 583 T>C, codon 171 TAC>CAC) in exon 3, which causes an amino acid change Tyr171His.

  16. Measurement of Absolute Atomic Collision Cross Section with Helium Using 87Rb Atoms Confined in Magneto-Optic and Magnetic Traps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Cheng; ZHOU Ke-Ya; WANG Yue-Yuan; LIAO Qing-Hong; LIU Shu-Tian

    2011-01-01

    We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87 Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap. The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences. The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained. These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.%@@ We present the measurements and calculations of the absolute total collision cross sections for a room-temperature gas of helium using 87Rb atoms confined in either a magneto-optic or a magnetic quadrupole trap.The loss rates from the magneto-optic trap and the pure magnetic trap are compared and show significant differences.The collision cross sections as a function of trap depth for helium gas are obtained.These findings are significant for extracting the information about the different cross sections when the trap depth is changed.

  17. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  18. The Quantum World of Ultra-Cold Atoms and Light - Book 1: Foundations of Quantum Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Crispin; Zoller, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Abstract The Table of Contents is as follows: * I - THE PHYSICAL BACKGROUND * 1. Controlling the Quantum World * 1.1 Quantum Optics * 1.2 Quantum Information * 2. Describing the Quantum World * 2.1 Classical Stochastic Processes * 2.2. Theoretical Quantum Optics * 2.3. Quantum Stochastic Methods * 2.4. Ultra-Cold Atoms * II - CLASSICAL STOCHASTIC METHODS * 3. Physics in a Noisy World * 3.1. Brownian Motion and the Thermal Origin of Noise * 3.2. Brownian Motion, Friction, Noise and Temperature * 3.3. Measurement in a Fluctuating System * 4. Stochastic Differential Equations * 4.1. Ito Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.2. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 4.3. The Stratonovich Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.4. Systems with Many Variables * 4.5. Numerical Simulation of Stochastic Differential Equations * 5. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.1. Fokker-Planck Equation in One Dimension * 5.2. Eigenfunctions of the Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.3. Many-Variable Fokker-Planck Equations * 6. Master Equations and Jump Processes * 6.1. The Master Equation * 7. Applications of Random Processes * 7.1. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process * 7.2. Johnson Noise * 7.3. Complex Variable Oscillator Processes * 8. The Markov Limit * 8.1. The White Noise Limit * 8.2. Interpretation and Generalizations of the White Noise Limit * 8.3. Linear Non-Markovian Stochastic Differential Equations * 9. Adiabatic Elimination of Fast Variables * 9.1 Slow and Fast Variables * 9.2. Other Applications of the Adiabatic Elimination Method * III - FIELDS, QUANTA AND ATOMS * 10. Ideal Bose and Fermi Systems * 10.1. The Quantum Gas * 10.2. Thermal States * 10.3. Fluctuations in the Ideal Bose Gas * 10.4. Bosonic Quantum Gaussian Systems * 10.5. Coherent States * 10.6. Fluctuations in Systems of Fermions * 10.7. Two-Level Systems and Pauli Matrices * 11. Quantum Fields * 11.1 Kinds of Quantum Field * 11.2 Coherence and Correlation Functions * 12. Atoms, Light and their Interaction * 12.1. Interaction with the

  19. Shifting the boundaries: pulse-shape effects in the atom-optics kicked rotor

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, P H; Meacher, D R

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of experiments performed on cold caesium in a pulsed sinusoidal optical potential created by counter-propagating laser beams having a small frequency difference in the laboratory frame. Since the atoms, which have average velocity close to zero in the laboratory frame, have non-zero average velocity in the co-moving frame of the optical potential, we are able to centre the initial velocity distribution of the cloud at an arbitrary point in phase-space. In particular, we demonstrate the use of this technique to place the initial velocity distribution in a region of phase-space not accessible to previous experiments, namely beyond the momentum boundaries arising from the finite pulse duration of the potential. We further use the technique to explore the kicked rotor dynamics starting from a region of phase-space where there is a strong velocity dependence of the diffusion constant and quantum break time and demonstrate that this results in a marked asymmetry in the chaotic evolution of th...

  20. Optical and atomic force microscopy of an explanted AcrySof intraocular lens with glistenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, M; Tetsumoto, K; Tagami, Y; Kato, K; Nakamae, K

    2000-04-01

    To assess the surface morphology and cause of glistenings in an explanted AcrySof intraocular lens (IOL). Shakai Hoken Kobe Central Hospital, Kobe, Japan. A 63-year-old Japanese man had implantation of an AcrySof IOL in the capsular bag. One month postoperatively, he had a neodymium:YAG laser capsulotomy for posterior capsule opacification, which changed the IOL's position in the capsular bag. A few months later, the patient developed disabling night glare from intralenticular glistenings and progressive hyperopic refractive error. The IOL was explanted and then analyzed by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Laboratory analysis of control AcrySof IOLs kept in a balanced salt solution at steady room and body temperature for 2 months was also performed to evaluate the cause of the glistenings observed clinically. Optical microscopy showed that the explanted AcrySof IOL had several microvacuoles; no abnormalities were observed in the control AcrySof IOLs before or after folding at the room and body temperatures. The AFM analysis showed a significant change in the surface morphology of the explanted IOL, including vacuolar formations in the posterior surface as well as numerous anterior surface irregularities. No microvacuoles or surface morphology alterations were observed in the control AcrySof IOLs by AFM analysis. The glistenings in the explanted AcrySof IOL were likely caused by temperature changes and not mechanical stress from folding.