WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical computers

  1. Optical Quantum Computing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeremy L. O'Brien

    2007-01-01

    In 2001, all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single-photon sources, linear optical elements, and single-photon detectors...

  2. Ternary optical computer principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金翊; 何华灿; 吕养天

    2003-01-01

    The fundamental principle and the characteristics of ternary optical computer, using horizontal polarized light, vertical polarized light and no-intensity to express information, are propounded in thispaper. The practicability to make key parts of the ternary optical computer from modern micro or integrated optical devices, opto-electronic and electro-photonic elements is discussed. The principle can be applied in three-state optical fiber communication via horizontal and vertical polarized light.

  3. Optical computer motherboards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannson, Tomasz P.; Xu, Guoda; Bartha, John M.; Gruntman, Michael A.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the application of precision plastic optics into a communication/computer sub-system, such as a hybrid computer motherboard. We believe that using optical waveguides for next-generation computer motherboards can provide a high performance alternative for present multi-layer printed circuit motherboards. In response to this demand, we suggest our novel concept of a hybrid motherboard based on an internal-fiber-coupling (IFC) wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) optical backplane. The IFC/WDM backplane provides dedicated Tx/Rx connections, and applies low-cost, high-performance components, including CD LDs, GRIN plastic fibers, molding housing, and nonimaging optics connectors. Preliminary motherboard parameters are: speed 100 MHz/100 m, or 1 GHz/10 m; fiber loss approximately 0.01 dB/m; almost zero fan-out/fan-in optical power loss, and eight standard wavelength channels. The proposed hybrid computer motherboard, based on innovative optical backplane technology, should solve low-speed, low-parallelism bottlenecks in present electric computer motherboards.

  4. Optical quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2007-12-07

    In 2001, all-optical quantum computing became feasible with the discovery that scalable quantum computing is possible using only single-photon sources, linear optical elements, and single-photon detectors. Although it was in principle scalable, the massive resource overhead made the scheme practically daunting. However, several simplifications were followed by proof-of-principle demonstrations, and recent approaches based on cluster states or error encoding have dramatically reduced this worrying resource overhead, making an all-optical architecture a serious contender for the ultimate goal of a large-scale quantum computer. Key challenges will be the realization of high-efficiency sources of indistinguishable single photons, low-loss, scalable optical circuits, high-efficiency single-photon detectors, and low-loss interfacing of these components.

  5. Computational optical biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Ming

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Optical molecular imaging is based on fluorescence or bioluminescence, and hindered by photon scattering in the tissue, especially in patient studies. Here we propose a computational optical biopsy (COB approach to localize and quantify a light source deep inside a subject. In contrast to existing optical biopsy techniques, our scheme is to collect optical signals directly from a region of interest along one or multiple biopsy paths in a subject, and then compute features of an underlying light source distribution. In this paper, we formulate this inverse problem in the framework of diffusion approximation, demonstrate the solution uniqueness properties in two representative configurations, and obtain analytic solutions for reconstruction of both optical properties and source parameters.

  6. Models of optical quantum computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krovi Hari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  7. All-optical reservoir computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duport, François; Schneider, Bendix; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-09-24

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm that uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  8. Optics and Symbolic Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-31

    28, No. 10, 795 "- 979v 5. 6. A. Huang and S. Knauer, Starlite : A Wideband Digital Switch, Proc. IEEE Global Telecommunications Conference, Atlanta...4 31 : .-. I ?4 2A 8. A. Huang, The Relationship Between STARLITE , a Wideband Digital Switch and Optics, Proc. International Conference on...34 Applied Optics, voL 27, No. 2, pp. 202-203 (1988). [10] A. Huang. "The relationship between STARLITE . a wideband digital switch and optics". Proceedings of

  9. Accuracy Enhancement in Optical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-25

    optical matrix-vector multiplier (OMVM). Redundant information can be introduced into the matriz : by increasinq the row dimcnsion of tlie matrix. The...Analog Devices for Optical Computing", LEOS, Boston , MA., November 1992. Papers Submitted to Major Professional Meetings 1. S. A. Ellett, J. F. Walkup

  10. Optical technologies for computational intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander V.

    2001-11-01

    Optics has a number of deep analogies with main principles of Computational Intelligence. We can see strong analogies between basic optical phenomena, used in Fourier-holography, and mathematical foundations of Fuzzy Set Theory. Also, analogies between optical holography technique and principles of Neural Networks Paradigm can be seen. Progress in new holographic recording media with self-developing property leads to Evolutionary Computations holographic realization. Based on these analogies we review holographic techniques from two points of view: Fuzzy Logic and Fuzzy relations.

  11. Pacifist's guide to optical computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    1991-11-01

    Optical algebraic processors can perform complex calculations in parallel and at high speeds. However, they commonly suffer from a low analog accuracy which hinders their widespread application. Error detection and correction codes provide one technique for improving the accuracy of optical algebraic processors. The use of these codes would allow some of the errors that may occur during a computation to be detected and possibly corrected. This paper describes the results of various computer simulations of optical matrix-vector multipliers employing error-correction codes. It discusses the application of convolutional codes to optical matrix-vector multipliers along with several block codes. Both binary and nonbinary codes are not employing error-correction codes. Also, the type of noise, whether signal-independent or signal-dependent, has a significant effect on the performance of a matrix-vector multiplier employing an error code. The encoding and decoding operations required for the error codes can be performed optically.

  12. Optics and Symbolic Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    computation. The well-structured data formats of vectors, matrices , etc. used in numeric computing give way to data structures that can change their shapes...complex circuitry, especially to emiIate and achieve capabilities typically if operacion requires uniformity over the complete associated with...function (PSF) P as a MxN matrix of rank R, then it is possible to decompose matrix P into a product of two unitary matrices and a diagonal matrix, ’ A

  13. Quantum Computation with Nonlinear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wen-Hong; Zhang, Cun-Lin; Long, Gui-Lu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme of quantum computation with nonlinear quantum optics. Polarization states of photons are used for qubits. Photons with different frequencies represent different qubits. Single qubit rotation operation is implemented through optical elements like the Faraday polarization rotator. Photons are separated into different optical paths, or merged into a single optical path using dichromatic mirrors. The controlled-NOT gate between two qubits is implemented by the proper combination of parametric up and down conversions. This scheme has the following features: (1) No auxiliary qubits are required in the controlled-NOT gate operation; (2) No measurement is required in the course of the computation; (3) It is resource efficient and conceptually simple.

  14. Quantum Computation with Nonlinear Optics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ke; LIU Yang; LIN Zhen-Quan; ZHANG Wen-Hong; SUN Yun-Fei; ZHANG Cun-Lin; LONG Gui-Lu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a scheme of quantum computation with nonlinear quantum optics. Polarization states of photons are used for qubits. Photons with different frequencies represent different qubits. Single qubit rotation operation is implemented through optical elements like the Faraday polarization rotator. Photons are separated into different optical paths, or merged into a single optical path using dichromatic mirrors. The controlled-NOT gate between two qubits is implemented by the proper combination of parametric up and down conversions. This scheme has the following features: (1) No auxiliary qubits are required in the controlled-NOT gate operation; (2) No measurement is required in the courseof the computation; (3) It is resource efficient and conceptually simple.

  15. Optical printing in computer animation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, N.L.; Blunden, J.A.

    1980-05-01

    The optical printer can be considered as an optical analog computer, which can perform geometric transformations and simple arithmetic operations on pictures very efficiently. The principles of operation of the printer are explained, and many of its applications to computer animation are listed and discussed briefly. Two techniques are discussed in detail: the use of high contrast masks to suppress the bright spots where two lines of different colors cross, and the use of continuous tone masks and multiple exposures to create realistic transparency at low cost.

  16. A ROBUST OPTICAL FLOW COMPUTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for robust and accurate optical flow estimation. The significance of this work is twofold. Firstly, the idea of bi-directional scheme is adopted to reduce the model error of optical flow equation, which allows the second order Taylor's expansion of optical flow equation for accurate solution without much extra computational burden; Secondly, this paper establishs a new optical flow equation based on LSCM (Local Structure Constancy Model) instead of BCM (Brightness Constancy Model), namely the optical flow equation does not act on scalar but on tensor-valued (matrix-valued) field, due to the two reason: (1) structure tensor-value contains local spatial structure information, which provides us more useable cues for computation than scalar; (2) local image structure is less sensitive to illumination variation than intensity, which weakens the disturbance of non-uniform illumination in real sequences. Qualitative and quantitative results for synthetic and real-world scenes show that the new method can produce an accurate and robust results.

  17. Quantum Computing: Linear Optics Implementations

    CERN Document Server

    Sundsøy, Pål

    2016-01-01

    One of the main problems that optical quantum computing has to overcome is the efficient construction of two-photon gates. Theoretically these gates can be realized using Kerr-nonlinearities, but the techniques involved are experimentally very difficult. We therefore employ linear optics with projective measurements to generate these non-linearities. The downside is that the measurement-induced nonlinearities achieved with linear optics are less versatile and the success rate can be quite low. This project is mainly the result of a literature study but also a theoretical work on the physics behind quantum optical multiports which is essential for realizing two-photon gates. By applying different postcorrection techniques we increase the probability of success in a modifed non-linear sign shift gate which is foundational for the two photon controlled-NOT gate. We prove that it's not possible to correct the states by only using a single beam splitter. We show that it might be possible to increase the probabilit...

  18. Optically simulated universal quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, D.; Ledesma, S.

    2008-04-01

    Recently, classical optics based systems to emulate quantum information processing have been proposed. The analogy is based on the possibility of encoding a quantum state of a system with a 2N-dimensional Hilbert space as an image in the input of an optical system. The probability amplitude of each state of a certain basis is associated with the complex amplitude of the electromagnetic field in a given slice of the laser wavefront. Temporal evolution is represented as the change of the complex amplitude of the field when the wavefront pass through a certain optical arrangement. Different modules that represent universal gates for quantum computation have been implemented. For instance, unitary operations acting on the qbits space (or U(2) gates) are represented by means of two phase plates, two spherical lenses and a phase grating in a typical image processing set up. In this work, we present CNOT gates which are emulated by means of a cube prism that splits a pair of adjacent rays incoming from the input image. As an example of application, we present an optical module that can be used to simulate the quantum teleportation process. We also show experimental results that illustrate the validity of the analogy. Although the experimental results obtained are promising and show the capability of the system for simulate the real quantum process, we must take into account that any classical simulation of quantum phenomena, has as fundamental limitation the impossibility of representing non local entanglement. In this classical context, quantum teleportation has only an illustrative interpretation.

  19. Digital optical computers at the optoelectronic computing systems center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Harry F.

    1991-01-01

    The Digital Optical Computing Program within the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Opto-electronic Computing Systems has as its specific goal research on optical computing architectures suitable for use at the highest possible speeds. The program can be targeted toward exploiting the time domain because other programs in the Center are pursuing research on parallel optical systems, exploiting optical interconnection and optical devices and materials. Using a general purpose computing architecture as the focus, we are developing design techniques, tools and architecture for operation at the speed of light limit. Experimental work is being done with the somewhat low speed components currently available but with architectures which will scale up in speed as faster devices are developed. The design algorithms and tools developed for a general purpose, stored program computer are being applied to other systems such as optimally controlled optical communication networks.

  20. An Optical Tri-valued Computing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Peng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A new optical computing experimental system is presented. Designed based on tri-valued logic, the system is built as a photoelectric hybrid computer system which is much advantageous over its electronic counterparts. Say, the tri-valued logic of the system guarantees that it is more powerful in information processing than that of systems with binary logic. And the optical characteristic of the system makes it be much capable in huge data processing than that of the electronic computers. The optical computing system includes two parts, electronic part and optical part. The electronic part consists of a PC and two embedded systems which are used for data input/output, monitor, synchronous control, user data combination and separation and so on. The optical part includes three components. They are optical encoder, logic calculator and decoder. It mainly answers for encoding the users' requests into tri-valued optical information, computing and processing the requests, decoding the tri-valued optical information to binary electronic information and so forth. Experiment results show that the system is quite right in optical information processing which demonstrates the feasibility and correctness of the optical computing system.

  1. Quantum computation architecture using optical tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitenberg, Christof; Kuhr, Stefan; Mølmer, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete architecture for scalable quantum computation with ultracold atoms in optical lattices using optical tweezers focused to the size of a lattice spacing. We discuss three different two-qubit gates based on local collisional interactions. The gates between arbitrary qubits...... quantum computing....

  2. Model of computation for Fourier optical processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Thomas J.

    2000-05-01

    We present a novel and simple theoretical model of computation that captures what we believe are the most important characteristics of an optical Fourier transform processor. We use this abstract model to reason about the computational properties of the physical systems it describes. We define a grammar for our model's instruction language, and use it to write algorithms for well-known filtering and correlation techniques. We also suggest suitable computational complexity measures that could be used to analyze any coherent optical information processing technique, described with the language, for efficiency. Our choice of instruction language allows us to argue that algorithms describable with this model should have optical implementations that do not require a digital electronic computer to act as a master unit. Through simulation of a well known model of computation from computer theory we investigate the general-purpose capabilities of analog optical processors.

  3. New computation methods for geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2014-01-01

    This book employs homogeneous coordinate notation to compute the first- and second-order derivative matrices of various optical quantities. It will be one of the important mathematical tools for automatic optical design. The traditional geometrical optics is based on raytracing only. It is very difficult, if possible, to compute the first- and second-order derivatives of a ray and optical path length with respect to system variables, since they are recursive functions. Consequently, current commercial software packages use a finite difference approximation methodology to estimate these derivatives for use in optical design and analysis. Furthermore, previous publications of geometrical optics use vector notation, which is comparatively awkward for computations for non-axially symmetrical systems.

  4. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  5. Exploiting data redundancy in computational optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Peter R T

    2015-11-30

    We present an algorithm which exploits data redundancy to make computational, coherent, optical imaging more computationally efficient. This algorithm specifically addresses the computation of how light scattered by a sample is collected and coherently detected. It is of greatest benefit in the simulation of broadband optical systems employing coherent detection, such as optical coherence tomography. Although also amenable to time-harmonic data, the algorithm is designed to be embedded within time-domain electromagnetic scattering simulators such as the psuedo-spectral and finite-difference time domain methods. We derive the algorithm in detail as well as criteria which ensure accurate execution of the algorithm. We present simulations that verify the developed algorithm and demonstrate its utility. We expect this algorithm to be important to future developments in computational imaging.

  6. Optics in computing: introduction to the feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabik, T; Thienpont, H; Ishikawa, M

    2000-02-10

    This issue of Applied Optics features 21 papers that describe the implementation of optics in computer systems and applications. This feature is the eighth in a series on the application of optics in the field of computing.

  7. Computational cameras: convergence of optics and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changyin; Nayar, Shree K

    2011-12-01

    A computational camera uses a combination of optics and processing to produce images that cannot be captured with traditional cameras. In the last decade, computational imaging has emerged as a vibrant field of research. A wide variety of computational cameras has been demonstrated to encode more useful visual information in the captured images, as compared with conventional cameras. In this paper, we survey computational cameras from two perspectives. First, we present a taxonomy of computational camera designs according to the coding approaches, including object side coding, pupil plane coding, sensor side coding, illumination coding, camera arrays and clusters, and unconventional imaging systems. Second, we use the abstract notion of light field representation as a general tool to describe computational camera designs, where each camera can be formulated as a projection of a high-dimensional light field to a 2-D image sensor. We show how individual optical devices transform light fields and use these transforms to illustrate how different computational camera designs (collections of optical devices) capture and encode useful visual information.

  8. Resource-efficient linear optical quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Daniel E; Rudolph, Terry

    2005-07-01

    We introduce a scheme for linear optics quantum computation, that makes no use of teleported gates, and requires stable interferometry over only the coherence length of the photons. We achieve a much greater degree of efficiency and a simpler implementation than previous proposals. We follow the "cluster state" measurement based quantum computational approach, and show how cluster states may be efficiently generated from pairs of maximally polarization entangled photons using linear optical elements. We demonstrate the universality and usefulness of generic parity measurements, as well as introducing the use of redundant encoding of qubits to enable utilization of destructive measurements--both features of use in a more general context.

  9. Computational Techniques for LED Optical Microcavities

    OpenAIRE

    García Santiago, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The project consist on the development of numerical methods and computational techniques to model the processes of light extraction in power LED (Light-Emitting Diodes) devices. We aim at the use of complex corrugated microstructures to boost the efficiency of our current LUXEON LED products. In order to study extraction efficiency in these devices a 3D optics model of thin film micro-structures must be developed and tested. In this project we develop a numerical model for computing and st...

  10. Optical encryption with selective computational ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Mohammad; kheradmand, Reza; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab

    2014-10-01

    Selective computational ghost imaging (SCGI) is a technique which enables the reconstruction of an N-pixel image from N measurements or less. In this paper we propose an optical encryption method based on SCGI and experimentally demonstrate that this method has much higher security under eavesdropping and unauthorized accesses compared with previous reported methods.

  11. Topics in linear optical quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glancy, Scott Charles

    This thesis covers several topics in optical quantum computation. A quantum computer is a computational device which is able to manipulate information by performing unitary operations on some physical system whose state can be described as a vector (or mixture of vectors) in a Hilbert space. The basic unit of information, called the qubit, is considered to be a system with two orthogonal states, which are assigned logical values of 0 and 1. Photons make excellent candidates to serve as qubits. They have little interactions with the environment. Many operations can be performed using very simple linear optical devices such as beam splitters and phase shifters. Photons can easily be processed through circuit-like networks. Operations can be performed in very short times. Photons are ideally suited for the long-distance communication of quantum information. The great difficulty in constructing an optical quantum computer is that photons naturally interact weakly with one another. This thesis first gives a brief review of two early approaches to optical quantum computation. It will describe how any discrete unitary operation can be performed using a single photon and a network of beam splitters, and how the Kerr effect can be used to construct a two photon logic gate. Second, this work provides a thorough introduction to the linear optical quantum computer developed by Knill, Laflamme, and Milburn. It then presents this author's results on the reliability of this scheme when implemented using imperfect photon detectors. This author finds that quantum computers of this sort cannot be built using current technology. Third, this dissertation describes a method for constructing a linear optical quantum computer using nearly orthogonal coherent states of light as the qubits. It shows how a universal set of logic operations can be performed, including calculations of the fidelity with which these operations may be accomplished. It discusses methods for reducing and

  12. Optical neural computing for associative memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Ken Yuh.

    1990-01-01

    Optical techniques for implementing neural computers are presented. In particular, holographic associative memories with feedback are investigated. Characteristics of optical neurons and optical interconnections are discussed. An LCLV is used for simulating a 2-D array of approximately 160,000 optical neurons. Thermoplastic plates are used for providing holographic interconnections among these neurons. The problem of degenerate readout in holographic interconnections and the method of sampling grids to solve this problem are presented. Two optical neural networks for associative memories are implemented and demonstrated. The first one is an optical implementation of the Hopfield network. It performs the function of auto-association that recognizes 2-D images from a distorted or partially blocked input. The trade-off between distortion tolerance and discrimination capability against new images is discussed. The second optical loop is a 2-layer network with feedback. It performs the function of hetero-association, which locks the recognized input and its associated image as a stable state in the loop. In both optical loops, it is shown that the neural gain and the similarity between the input and the stored images are the main factors that determine the dynamics of the network. Neural network models for the optical loops are presented. Equations of motion for describing the dynamical behavior of the systems are derived. The reciprocal vector basis corresponding to stored images is derived. A geometrical method is then introduced which allows us to inspect the convergence property of the system. It is also shown that the main factors that determine the system dynamics are the neural gain and the initial conditions. Photorefractive holography for optical interconnections and sampling grids for volume holographic interconnections are presented.

  13. Multivariate optical computation for predictive spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M P; Aust, J F; Dobrowolski, J A; Verly, P G; Myrick, M L

    1998-01-01

    A novel optical approach to predicting chemical and physical properties based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed and evaluated using a data set from earlier work. In our approach, a regression vector produced by PCA is designed into the structure of a set of paired optical filters. Light passing through the paired filters produces an analog detector signal that is directly proportional to the chemical/physical property for which the regression vector was designed. This simple optical computational method for predictive spectroscopy is evaluated in several ways, using the example data for numeric simulation. First, we evaluate the sensitivity of the method to various types of spectroscopic errors commonly encountered and find the method to have the same susceptibilities toward error as standard methods. Second, we use propagation of errors to determine the effects of detector noise on the predictive power of the method, finding the optical computation approach to have a large multiplex advantage over conventional methods. Third, we use two different design approaches to the construction of the paired filter set for the example measurement to evaluate manufacturability, finding that adequate methods exist to design appropriate optical devices. Fourth, we numerically simulate the predictive errors introduced by design errors in the paired filters, finding that predictive errors are not increased over conventional methods. Fifth, we consider how the performance of the method is affected by light intensities that are not linearly related to chemical composition (as in transmission spectroscopy) and find that the method is only marginally affected. In summary, we conclude that many types of predictive measurements based on use of regression (or other) vectors and linear mathematics can be performed more rapidly, more effectly, and at considerably lower cost by the proposed optical computation method than by traditional dispersive or interferometric

  14. Radiative transfer computations for optical beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, A D

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for computing direct numerical simulations of narrow optical beam waves propagating and scattering in a plane-parallel medium. For these computations, we use Fourier and Chebyshev spectral methods for three-dimensional radiative transfer that also includes polar and azimuthal angle dependences. We treat anisotropic scattering with peaked forward scattering by using a Clenshaw-Curtis quadrature rule for the polar angle and an extended trapezoid rule for the azimuthal angle. To verify our results, we compare this spectral method to Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Computer Modeling for Optical Waveguide Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-15

    COSATI CODES 18 SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessary and cleritify by DIock numnerl FIEL GRUP SB-GOUP Optical waveguide sensors Computer...reflection. The resultant probe beam transmission may be plotted as a function of changes in the refractive index of the surrounding fluid medium. BASIC...all angles of incidence about the critical angle ecr. It should be noted that N in equation (3) is a function of e, since = sin - l sin 8 , see

  16. Optical Linear Algebra for Computational Light Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Matthew

    Active illumination refers to optical techniques that use controllable lights and cameras to analyze the way light propagates through the world. These techniques confer many unique imaging capabilities (e.g. high-precision 3D scanning, image-based relighting, imaging through scattering media), but at a significant cost; they often require long acquisition and processing times, rely on predictive models for light transport, and cease to function when exposed to bright ambient sunlight. We develop a mathematical framework for describing and analyzing such imaging techniques. This framework is deeply rooted in numerical linear algebra, and models the transfer of radiant energy through an unknown environment with the so-called light transport matrix. Performing active illumination on a scene equates to applying a numerical operator on this unknown matrix. The brute-force approach to active illumination follows a two-step procedure: (1) optically measure the light transport matrix and (2) evaluate the matrix operator numerically. This approach is infeasible in general, because the light transport matrix is often much too large to measure, store, and analyze directly. Using principles from optical linear algebra, we evaluate these matrix operators in the optical domain, without ever measuring the light transport matrix in the first place. Specifically, we explore numerical algorithms that can be implemented partially or fully with programmable optics. These optical algorithms provide solutions to many longstanding problems in computer vision and graphics, including the ability to (1) photo-realistically change the illumination conditions of a given photo with only a handful of measurements, (2) accurately capture the 3D shape of objects in the presence of complex transport properties and strong ambient illumination, and (3) overcome the multipath interference problem associated with time-of-flight cameras. Most importantly, we introduce an all-new imaging regime---optical

  17. Computational algorithms for simulations in atmospheric optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, P A; Lukin, V P

    2016-04-20

    A computer simulation technique for atmospheric and adaptive optics based on parallel programing is discussed. A parallel propagation algorithm is designed and a modified spectral-phase method for computer generation of 2D time-variant random fields is developed. Temporal power spectra of Laguerre-Gaussian beam fluctuations are considered as an example to illustrate the applications discussed. Implementation of the proposed algorithms using Intel MKL and IPP libraries and NVIDIA CUDA technology is shown to be very fast and accurate. The hardware system for the computer simulation is an off-the-shelf desktop with an Intel Core i7-4790K CPU operating at a turbo-speed frequency up to 5 GHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX-960 graphics accelerator with 1024 1.5 GHz processors.

  18. Variational optical flow computation in real time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, Andrés; Weickert, Joachim; Feddern, Christian; Kohlberger, Timo; Schnörr, Christoph

    2005-05-01

    This paper investigates the usefulness of bidirectional multigrid methods for variational optical flow computations. Although these numerical schemes are among the fastest methods for solving equation systems, they are rarely applied in the field of computer vision. We demonstrate how to employ those numerical methods for the treatment of variational optical flow formulations and show that the efficiency of this approach even allows for real-time performance on standard PCs. As a representative for variational optic flow methods, we consider the recently introduced combined local-global method. It can be considered as a noise-robust generalization of the Horn and Schunck technique. We present a decoupled, as well as a coupled, version of the classical Gauss-Seidel solver, and we develop several multgrid implementations based on a discretization coarse grid approximation. In contrast, with standard bidirectional multigrid algorithms, we take advantage of intergrid transfer operators that allow for nondyadic grid hierarchies. As a consequence, no restrictions concerning the image size or the number of traversed levels have to be imposed. In the experimental section, we juxtapose the developed multigrid schemes and demonstrate their superior performance when compared to unidirectional multgrid methods and nonhierachical solvers. For the well-known 316 x 252 Yosemite sequence, we succeeded in computing the complete set of dense flow fields in three quarters of a second on a 3.06-GHz Pentium4 PC. This corresponds to a frame rate of 18 flow fields per second which outperforms the widely-used Gauss-Seidel method by almost three orders of magnitude.

  19. Optical high-performance computing: introduction to the JOSA A and Applied Optics feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H John; Dolev, Shlomi; Green, William M J

    2009-08-01

    The feature issues in both Applied Optics and the Journal of the Optical Society of America A focus on topics of immediate relevance to the community working in the area of optical high-performance computing.

  20. Parallel reservoir computing using optical amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoorne, Kristof; Dambre, Joni; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Bienstman, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Reservoir computing (RC), a computational paradigm inspired on neural systems, has become increasingly popular in recent years for solving a variety of complex recognition and classification problems. Thus far, most implementations have been software-based, limiting their speed and power efficiency. Integrated photonics offers the potential for a fast, power efficient and massively parallel hardware implementation. We have previously proposed a network of coupled semiconductor optical amplifiers as an interesting test case for such a hardware implementation. In this paper, we investigate the important design parameters and the consequences of process variations through simulations. We use an isolated word recognition task with babble noise to evaluate the performance of the photonic reservoirs with respect to traditional software reservoir implementations, which are based on leaky hyperbolic tangent functions. Our results show that the use of coherent light in a well-tuned reservoir architecture offers significant performance benefits. The most important design parameters are the delay and the phase shift in the system's physical connections. With optimized values for these parameters, coherent semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) reservoirs can achieve better results than traditional simulated reservoirs. We also show that process variations hardly degrade the performance, but amplifier noise can be detrimental. This effect must therefore be taken into account when designing SOA-based RC implementations.

  1. Computing Temperatures in Optically Thick Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuder, Lawrence F.. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    We worked with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simulate the transfer of energy through protoplanetary disks, where planet formation occurs. The code tracks photons from the star into the disk, through scattering, absorption and re-emission, until they escape to infinity. High optical depths in the disk interior dominate the computation time because it takes the photon packet many interactions to get out of the region. High optical depths also receive few photons and therefore do not have well-estimated temperatures. We applied a modified random walk (MRW) approximation for treating high optical depths and to speed up the Monte Carlo calculations. The MRW is implemented by calculating the average number of interactions the photon packet will undergo in diffusing within a single cell of the spatial grid and then updating the packet position, packet frequencies, and local radiation absorption rate appropriately. The MRW approximation was then tested for accuracy and speed compared to the original code. We determined that MRW provides accurate answers to Monte Carlo Radiative transfer simulations. The speed gained from using MRW is shown to be proportional to the disk mass.

  2. Computational toolbox for optical tweezers in geometrical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Callegari, Agnese; Gököz, A Burak; Volpe, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers have found widespread application in many fields, from physics to biology. Here, we explain in detail how optical forces and torques can be described within the geometrical optics approximation and we show that this approximation provides reliable results in agreement with experiments for particles whose characteristic dimensions are larger than the wavelength of the trapping light. Furthermore, we provide an object-oriented software package implemented in MatLab for the calculation of optical forces and torques in the geometrical optics regime: \\texttt{OTGO - Optical Tweezers in Geometrical Optics}. We provide all source codes for \\texttt{OTGO} as well as the documentation and code examples -- e.g., standard optical tweezers, optical tweezers with elongated particle, windmill effect, Kramers transitions between two optical traps -- necessary to enable users to effectively employ it in their research and teaching.

  3. Computational optical sensing and imaging: introduction to feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerwe, David R; Harvey, Andrew; Gehm, Michael E

    2013-04-01

    The 2012 Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging (COSI) conference of the Optical Society of America was one of six colocated meetings composing the Imaging and Applied Optics Congress held in Monterey, California, 24-28 June. COSI, together with the Imaging Systems and Applications, Optical Sensors, Applied Industrial Optics, and Optical Remote Sensing of the Environment conferences, brought together a diverse group of scientists and engineers sharing a common interest in measuring and processing of information carried by optical fields. This special feature includes several papers based on presentations given at the 2012 COSI conference as well as independent contributions, which together highlight several important trends.

  4. Optical computation based on nonlinear total reflectional optical switch at the interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianqi Zhang; Huan Xu

    2009-03-01

    A new scheme of binary half adder and full adder is proposed. It realizes a kind of all-optical computation which is based on the polarization coding technique and the nonlinear total reflectional optical switches.

  5. Computer assisted optical biopsy for colorectal polyps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Avila, Fernando J.; Saint-Hill-Febles, Yadira; Renner, Janis; Klare, Peter; von Delius, Stefan; Navab, Nassir; Mateus, Diana

    2017-03-01

    We propose a method for computer-assisted optical biopsy for colorectal polyps, with the final goal of assisting the medical expert during the colonoscopy. In particular, we target the problem of automatic classification of polyp images in two classes: adenomatous vs non-adenoma. Our approach is based on recent advancements in convolutional neural networks (CNN) for image representation. In the paper, we describe and compare four different methodologies to address the binary classification task: a baseline with classical features and a Random Forest classifier, two methods based on features obtained from a pre-trained network, and finally, the end-to-end training of a CNN. With the pre-trained network, we show the feasibility of transferring a feature extraction mechanism trained on millions of natural images, to the task of classifying adenomatous polyps. We then demonstrate further performance improvements when training the CNN for our specific classification task. In our study, 776 polyp images were acquired and histologically analyzed after polyp resection. We report a performance increase of the CNN-based approaches with respect to both, the conventional engineered features and to a state-of-the-art method based on videos and 3D shape features.

  6. Physical Optics Based Computational Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivas, Stephen Joseph

    There is an ongoing demand on behalf of the consumer, medical and military industries to make lighter weight, higher resolution, wider field-of-view and extended depth-of-focus cameras. This leads to design trade-offs between performance and cost, be it size, weight, power, or expense. This has brought attention to finding new ways to extend the design space while adhering to cost constraints. Extending the functionality of an imager in order to achieve extraordinary performance is a common theme of computational imaging, a field of study which uses additional hardware along with tailored algorithms to formulate and solve inverse problems in imaging. This dissertation details four specific systems within this emerging field: a Fiber Bundle Relayed Imaging System, an Extended Depth-of-Focus Imaging System, a Platform Motion Blur Image Restoration System, and a Compressive Imaging System. The Fiber Bundle Relayed Imaging System is part of a larger project, where the work presented in this thesis was to use image processing techniques to mitigate problems inherent to fiber bundle image relay and then, form high-resolution wide field-of-view panoramas captured from multiple sensors within a custom state-of-the-art imager. The Extended Depth-of-Focus System goals were to characterize the angular and depth dependence of the PSF of a focal swept imager in order to increase the acceptably focused imaged scene depth. The goal of the Platform Motion Blur Image Restoration System was to build a system that can capture a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-exposure image which is inherently blurred while at the same time capturing motion data using additional optical sensors in order to deblur the degraded images. Lastly, the objective of the Compressive Imager was to design and build a system functionally similar to the Single Pixel Camera and use it to test new sampling methods for image generation and to characterize it against a traditional camera. These computational

  7. Computer optics and photonics for students of laser engineering disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. P.

    2005-10-01

    The concept of teaching in optics and photonics for undergraduate and post-graduate students of laser engineering disciplines are discussed. The designed curriculum include as fundamental knowledge on modern mathematics, physics and computer methods as up-to-date industrial optical engineering software training. Distributed Web-server technology with Alpha cluster station background allow to support real-time training and teaching with a set of computer optical laboratories, which are used as a framework for most university special courses. Remote access to facilities of Russian Academy of Science make it possible to accumulate modern science achievements in optical education.

  8. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  9. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2016-09-16

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  10. One-way quantum computing in the optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Nicolas C; Flammia, Steven T; Pfister, Olivier

    2008-09-26

    One-way quantum computing allows any quantum algorithm to be implemented easily using just measurements. The difficult part is creating the universal resource, a cluster state, on which the measurements are made. We propose a scalable method that uses a single, multimode optical parametric oscillator (OPO). The method is very efficient and generates a continuous-variable cluster state, universal for quantum computation, with quantum information encoded in the quadratures of the optical frequency comb of the OPO.

  11. Engineering multiphoton states for linear optics computation

    CERN Document Server

    Aniello, P; Napolitano, M; Paris, M G A; Aniello, Paolo; Lupo, Cosmo; Napolitano, Mario; Paris, Matteo G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Transformations achievable by linear optical components allow to generate the whole unitary group only when restricted to the one-photon subspace of a multimode Fock space. In this paper, we address the more general problem of encoding quantum information by multiphoton states, and elaborating it via ancillary extensions, linear optical passive devices and photodetection. Our scheme stems in a natural way from the mathematical structures underlying the physics of linear optical passive devices. In particular, we analyze an economical procedure for mapping a fiducial 2-photon 2-mode state into an arbitrary 2-photon 2-mode state using ancillary resources and linear optical passive N-ports assisted by post-selection. We found that adding a single ancilla mode is enough to generate any desired target state. The effect of imperfect photodetection in post-selection is considered and a simple trade-off between success probability and fidelity is derived.

  12. New Methods for Design and Computation of Freeform Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-09

    strategy for constructing weak solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations arising in design problems involving freeform optical surfaces[10...working in related areas of fully nonlinear partial differential equations , optics, and computational methods for optimization under extremely large...as a partial differential equation (PDE) of second order with nonstandard boundary conditions. The solution to this PDE problem is a scalar function

  13. Distributed quantum computation via optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, A; Bose, S; Serafini, Alessio; Mancini, Stefano; Bose, Sougato

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of realising effective quantum gates between two atoms in distant cavities coupled by an optical fibre. We show that highly reliable swap and entangling gates are achievable. We exactly study the stability of these gates in presence of imperfections in coupling strengths and interaction times and prove them to be robust. Moreover, we analyse the effect of spontaneous emission and losses and show that such gates are very promising in view of the high level of coherent control currently achievable in optical cavities.

  14. Demonstration of optical computing logics based on binary decision diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shiyun; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi

    2012-01-16

    Optical circuits are low power consumption and fast speed alternatives for the current information processing based on transistor circuits. However, because of no transistor function available in optics, the architecture for optical computing should be chosen that optics prefers. One of which is Binary Decision Diagram (BDD), where signal is processed by sending an optical signal from the root through a serial of switching nodes to the leaf (terminal). Speed of optical computing is limited by either transmission time of optical signals from the root to the leaf or switching time of a node. We have designed and experimentally demonstrated 1-bit and 2-bit adders based on the BDD architecture. The switching nodes are silicon ring resonators with a modulation depth of 10 dB and the states are changed by the plasma dispersion effect. The quality, Q of the rings designed is 1500, which allows fast transmission of signal, e.g., 1.3 ps calculated by a photon escaping time. A total processing time is thus analyzed to be ~9 ps for a 2-bit adder and would scales linearly with the number of bit. It is two orders of magnitude faster than the conventional CMOS circuitry, ~ns scale of delay. The presented results show the potential of fast speed optical computing circuits.

  15. All-optical reservoir computer based on saturation of absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckheere, Antoine; Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Fang, Li; Oudar, Jean-Louis; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2014-05-05

    Reservoir computing is a new bio-inspired computation paradigm. It exploits a dynamical system driven by a time-dependent input to carry out computation. For efficient information processing, only a few parameters of the reservoir needs to be tuned, which makes it a promising framework for hardware implementation. Recently, electronic, opto-electronic and all-optical experimental reservoir computers were reported. In those implementations, the nonlinear response of the reservoir is provided by active devices such as optoelectronic modulators or optical amplifiers. By contrast, we propose here the first reservoir computer based on a fully passive nonlinearity, namely the saturable absorption of a semiconductor mirror. Our experimental setup constitutes an important step towards the development of ultrafast low-consumption analog computers.

  16. Optical character recognition systems for different languages with soft computing

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Arindam; Badelia, Pratixa; K Ghosh, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    The book offers a comprehensive survey of soft-computing models for optical character recognition systems. The various techniques, including fuzzy and rough sets, artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms, are tested using real texts written in different languages, such as English, French, German, Latin, Hindi and Gujrati, which have been extracted by publicly available datasets. The simulation studies, which are reported in details here, show that soft-computing based modeling of OCR systems performs consistently better than traditional models. Mainly intended as state-of-the-art survey for postgraduates and researchers in pattern recognition, optical character recognition and soft computing, this book will be useful for professionals in computer vision and image processing alike, dealing with different issues related to optical character recognition.

  17. Computation of surface roughness using optical correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A M hamed; M Saudy

    2007-05-01

    The laser speckle photography is used to calculate the average surface roughness from the autocorrelation function of the aluminum diffuse objects. The computed results of surface roughness obtained from the profile shapes of the autocorrelation function of the diffuser show good agreement with the results obtained by the stylus profile meter.

  18. Computational wave optics library for C++: CWO++ library

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Okada, Naohisa; Nishitsuji, Takashi; Takada, Naoki; Shiraki, Atsushi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction calculations, such as the angular spectrum method, and Fresnel diffractions, are used for calculating scalar light propagation. The calculations are used in wide-ranging optics fields: for example, computer generated holograms (CGHs), digital holography, diffractive optical elements, microscopy, image encryption and decryption, three-dimensional analysis for optical devices and so on. However, increasing demands made by large-scale diffraction calculations have rendered the computational power of recent computers insufficient. We have already developed a numerical library for diffraction calculations using a graphic processing unit (GPU), which was named the GWO library. However, this GWO library is not user-friendly, since it is based on C language and was also run only on a GPU. In this paper, we develop a new C++ class library for diffraction and CGH calculations, which is referred as to a CWO++ library, running on a CPU and GPU. We also describe the structure, performance, and usage examples o...

  19. Photodeposited diffractive optical elements of computer generated masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirchin, N. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel)]. E-mail: mirchin@hait.ac.il; Peled, A. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Baal-Zedaka, I. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Margolin, R. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Zagon, M. [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Lapsker, I. [Physics Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Verdyan, A. [Physics Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel); Azoulay, J. [Physics Department, Holon Academic Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Street, Holon 58102 (Israel)

    2005-07-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) were synthesized on plastic substrates using the photodeposition (PD) technique by depositing amorphous selenium (a-Se) films with argon lasers and UV spectra light. The thin films were deposited typically onto polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates at room temperature. Scanned beam and contact mask modes were employed using computer-designed DOE lenses. Optical and electron micrographs characterize the surface details. The films were typically 200 nm thick.

  20. Photodeposited diffractive optical elements of computer generated masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirchin, N.; Peled, A.; Baal-Zedaka, I.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Verdyan, A.; Azoulay, J.

    2005-07-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) were synthesized on plastic substrates using the photodeposition (PD) technique by depositing amorphous selenium (a-Se) films with argon lasers and UV spectra light. The thin films were deposited typically onto polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates at room temperature. Scanned beam and contact mask modes were employed using computer-designed DOE lenses. Optical and electron micrographs characterize the surface details. The films were typically 200 nm thick.

  1. Computed Optical Interferometric Imaging: Methods, Achievements, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Fredrick A; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Carney, P Scott; Boppart, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional high-resolution optical imaging systems are generally restricted by the trade-off between resolution and depth-of-field as well as imperfections in the imaging system or sample. Computed optical interferometric imaging is able to overcome these longstanding limitations using methods such as interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) and computational adaptive optics (CAO) which manipulate the complex interferometric data. These techniques correct for limited depth-of-field and optical aberrations without the need for additional hardware. This paper aims to outline these computational methods, making them readily available to the research community. Achievements of the techniques will be highlighted, along with past and present challenges in implementing the techniques. Challenges such as phase instability and determination of the appropriate aberration correction have been largely overcome so that imaging of living tissues using ISAM and CAO is now possible. Computed imaging in optics is becoming a mature technology poised to make a significant impact in medicine and biology.

  2. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2015-11-23

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  3. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  4. Computational methods to compute wavefront error due to aero-optic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genberg, Victor; Michels, Gregory; Doyle, Keith; Bury, Mark; Sebastian, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Aero-optic effects can have deleterious effects on high performance airborne optical sensors that must view through turbulent flow fields created by the aerodynamic effects of windows and domes. Evaluating aero-optic effects early in the program during the design stages allows mitigation strategies and optical system design trades to be performed to optimize system performance. This necessitates a computationally efficient means to evaluate the impact of aero-optic effects such that the resulting dynamic pointing errors and wavefront distortions due to the spatially and temporally varying flow field can be minimized or corrected. To this end, an aero-optic analysis capability was developed within the commercial software SigFit that couples CFD results with optical design tools. SigFit reads the CFD generated density profile using the CGNS file format. OPD maps are then created by converting the three-dimensional density field into an index of refraction field and then integrating along specified paths to compute OPD errors across the optical field. The OPD maps may be evaluated directly against system requirements or imported into commercial optical design software including Zemax® and Code V® for a more detailed assessment of the impact on optical performance from which design trades may be performed.

  5. Computers and the design of ion beam optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nicholas R.

    Advances in microcomputers have made it possible to maintain a library of advanced ion optical programs which can be used on inexpensive computer hardware, which are suitable for the design of a variety of ion beam systems including ion implanters, giving excellent results. This paper describes in outline the steps typically involved in designing a complete ion beam system for materials modification applications. Two computer programs are described which, although based largely on algorithms which have been in use for many years, make possible detailed beam optical calculations using microcomputers, specifically the IBM PC. OPTICIAN is an interactive first-order program for tracing beam envelopes through complex optical systems. SORCERY is a versatile program for solving Laplace's and Poisson's equations by finite difference methods using successive over-relaxation. Ion and electron trajectories can be traced through these potential fields, and plots of beam emittance obtained.

  6. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  7. Computational wave optics library for C++: CWO++ library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Weng, Jiantong; Sakurai, Takahiro; Okada, Naohisa; Nishitsuji, Takashi; Takada, Naoki; Shiraki, Atsushi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction calculations, such as the angular spectrum method and Fresnel diffractions, are used for calculating scalar light propagation. The calculations are used in wide-ranging optics fields: for example, Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs), digital holography, diffractive optical elements, microscopy, image encryption and decryption, three-dimensional analysis for optical devices and so on. However, increasing demands made by large-scale diffraction calculations have rendered the computational power of recent computers insufficient. We have already developed a numerical library for diffraction calculations using a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU), which was named the GWO library. However, this GWO library is not user-friendly, since it is based on C language and was also run only on a GPU. In this paper, we develop a new C++ class library for diffraction and CGH calculations, which is referred to as a CWO++ library, running on a CPU and GPU. We also describe the structure, performance, and usage examples of the CWO++ library. Program summaryProgram title: CWO++ Catalogue identifier: AELL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 109 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 181 911 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: General computers and general computers with NVIDIA GPUs Operating system: Windows XP, Vista, 7 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. 1 core processor used in CPU and many cores in GPU. RAM: 256 M bytes Classification: 18 External routines: CImg, FFTW Nature of problem: The CWO++ library provides diffraction calculations which are useful for Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs), digital holography, diffractive

  8. Control mechanism of double-rotator-structure ternary optical computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, SONG; Liping, YAN

    2017-03-01

    Double-rotator-structure ternary optical processor (DRSTOP) has two characteristics, namely, giant data-bits parallel computing and reconfigurable processor, which can handle thousands of data bits in parallel, and can run much faster than computers and other optical computer systems so far. In order to put DRSTOP into practical application, this paper established a series of methods, namely, task classification method, data-bits allocation method, control information generation method, control information formatting and sending method, and decoded results obtaining method and so on. These methods form the control mechanism of DRSTOP. This control mechanism makes DRSTOP become an automated computing platform. Compared with the traditional calculation tools, DRSTOP computing platform can ease the contradiction between high energy consumption and big data computing due to greatly reducing the cost of communications and I/O. Finally, the paper designed a set of experiments for DRSTOP control mechanism to verify its feasibility and correctness. Experimental results showed that the control mechanism is correct, feasible and efficient.

  9. Research of the grid computing system applied in optical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei-wei; Wang, Yu-dong; Liu, Qiangsheng; Cen, Zhao-feng; Li, Xiao-tong; Lin, Yi-qun

    2008-03-01

    A grid computing in the field of optics is presented in this paper. Firstly, the basic principles and research background of grid computing are outlined in this paper, along with the overview of its applications and the development status quo. The paper also discusses several typical tasks scheduling algorithms. Secondly, it focuses on describing a task scheduling of grid computing applied in optical computation. The paper gives details about the task scheduling system, including the task partition, granularity selection and tasks allocation, especially the structure of the system. In addition, some details of communication on grid computing are also illustrated. In this system, the "makespan" and "load balancing" are comprehensively considered. Finally, we build a grid model to test the task scheduling strategy, and the results are analyzed in detail. Compared to one isolated computer, a grid comprised of one server and four processors can shorten the "makespan" to 1/4. At the same time, the experimental results of the simulation also illustrate that the proposed scheduling system is able to balance loads of all processors. In short, the system performs scheduling well in the grid environment.

  10. Repeat-until-success linear optics distributed quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yuan Liang; Beige, Almut; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2005-07-15

    We demonstrate the possibility to perform distributed quantum computing using only single-photon sources (atom-cavity-like systems), linear optics, and photon detectors. The qubits are encoded in stable ground states of the sources. To implement a universal two-qubit gate, two photons should be generated simultaneously and pass through a linear optics network, where a measurement is performed on them. Gate operations can be repeated until a success is heralded without destroying the qubits at any stage of the operation. In contrast with other schemes, this does not require explicit qubit-qubit interactions, a priori entangled ancillas, nor the feeding of photons into photon sources.

  11. Note: Computer controlled rotation mount for large diameter optics

    CERN Document Server

    Rakonjac, Ana; Deb, Amita B; Kjærgaard, Niels

    2012-01-01

    We describe the construction of a motorized optical rotation mount with a 40 mm clear aperture. The device is used to remotely control the power of large diameter laser beams for a magneto-optical trap (MOT). A piezo-electric ultrasonic motor on a printed circuit board (PCB) provides rotation with a precision better than 0.03 deg and allows for a very compact design. The rotation unit is controlled from a computer via serial communication, making integration into most software control platforms straightforward.

  12. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  13. ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF OPTIC NERVE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Saakyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive examination was made in 93 patients, including 18 children, with tumors of the optic nerve (ON. Duplex ultrasound scanning was performed in 39 patients, of them there were 11 patients with ON gliomas and 28 with ON meningiomas. The specific computed tomographic and echographic signs of ON glioma and meningiomas were detected. The studies have shown that duplex ultrasound scanning and structural computed tomography of orbital sockets are highly informative complementary imaging procedures for ON tumors, which permits one to make their correct diagnosis, to specify surgical volume, and to plan adequate treatment.

  14. The 2004 Latsis Symposium: Quantum optics for Communication and Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    1-3 March 2004 Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Auditoire SG1 The field of Quantum Optics covers topics that extend from basic physical concepts, regarding the quantum description of light, matter, and light-matter interaction, to the applications of these concepts in future information and communication technologies. This field is of primary importance for science and society for two reasons. Firstly, it brings a deeper physical understanding of the fundamental aspects of modern quantum physics. Secondly, it offers perspectives for the invention and implementation of new devices and systems in the fields of communications, information management and computing. The themes that will be addressed in the Latsis Symposium on Quantum Optics are quantum communications, quantum computation, and quantum photonic devices. The objective of the symposium is to give an overview of this fascinating and rapidly evolving field. The different talks will establish links between new fundamental c...

  15. The 2004 Latsis Symposium: Quantum optics for Communication and Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    1-3 March 2004 Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Auditoire SG1 The field of Quantum Optics covers topics that extend from basic physical concepts, regarding the quantum description of light, matter, and light-matter interaction, to the applications of these concepts in future information and communication technologies. This field is of primary importance for science and society for two reasons. Firstly, it brings a deeper physical understanding of the fundamental aspects of modern quantum physics. Secondly, it offers perspectives for the invention and implementation of new devices and systems in the fields of communications, information management and computing. The themes that will be addressed in the Latsis Symposium on Quantum Optics are quantum communications, quantum computation, and quantum photonic devices. The objective of the symposium is to give an overview of this fascinating and rapidly evolving field. The different talks will establish links between new fundamental ...

  16. The 2004 Latsis Symposium: Quantum optics for Communication and Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    1-3 March 2004 Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Auditoire SG1 The field of Quantum Optics covers topics that extend from basic physical concepts, regarding the quantum description of light, matter, and light-matter interaction, to the applications of these concepts in future information and communication technologies. This field is of primary importance for science and society for two reasons. Firstly, it brings a deeper physical understanding of the fundamental aspects of modern quantum physics. Secondly, it offers perspectives for the invention and implementation of new devices and systems in the fields of communications, information management and computing. The themes that will be addressed in the Latsis Symposium on Quantum Optics are quantum communications, quantum computation, and quantum photonic devices. The objective of the symposium is to give an overview of this fascinating and rapidly evolving field. The different talks will establish links between new fundamental...

  17. Fourier optics through the looking glass of digital computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Leonid P.

    2011-10-01

    Optical transforms are represented in computers by their discrete versions. In particular, Fourier optics is represented through Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) and Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT). Being discrete representation of the optical Fourier transform, these transforms feature a number of peculiarities that cast a new light on such fundamental properties of the Fourier Transform as sampling theorem and the uncertainty principle. In this paper, we formulate the Discrete Sampling Theorem and the discrete uncertainty principle, demonstrate that discrete signals can be both bandlimited in DFT or DCT domains and have strictly limited support in signal domain and present examples of such "bandlimited/ space-limited" signals that remain to be so for whatever large of their samples.

  18. Realization of Shor's algorithm on an optical quantum computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ A research team led by Prof. PAN Jianwei with the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), CAS has been successful in performing Shor's algorithm, a quantum algorithm for factorization, in an optical quantum computer. The feat is also independently made by another team led by Andrew White from the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. Both results were published in the 19 December, 2007 issue of Physics Review Newsletters.

  19. Determination of Horizontal Motion through Optical Flow Computations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞志和; FrankM.Caimi

    1997-01-01

    For intelligent/autonomous subsea vehicles,reliable short-range horizontal positioning is difficult to achieve,particularly over flat bottom topography.A potential solution proposed in this paper utilized a passive optical sensing method to estimate the vehicle displacement using the bottom surface texture.The suggested optical flow method does not require any feature correspondences in images and it is robust in allowing brightness changes between image frames.Fundamentally,this method is similar to correlation methods attempting to match images and compute the motion disparity.However,in correlation methods,searching a neighbor region blindly for best match is lengthy.Main contributions of this paper come from the analysis showing that optical flow computation based on the general model cannot avoid errors except for null motion although the sign of optical flow keeps correct,and from the development of an iterative shifting method based on the error characteristics to accurately determine motions.Advantages of the proposed method are verified by real image experiments.

  20. Optical design and characterization of an advanced computational imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, R. Hamilton; Fernandez-Cull, Christy; Raskar, Ramesh; Shi, Boxin; Barsi, Christopher; Zhao, Hang

    2014-09-01

    We describe an advanced computational imaging system with an optical architecture that enables simultaneous and dynamic pupil-plane and image-plane coding accommodating several task-specific applications. We assess the optical requirement trades associated with custom and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) optics and converge on the development of two low-cost and robust COTS testbeds. The first is a coded-aperture programmable pixel imager employing a digital micromirror device (DMD) for image plane per-pixel oversampling and spatial super-resolution experiments. The second is a simultaneous pupil-encoded and time-encoded imager employing a DMD for pupil apodization or a deformable mirror for wavefront coding experiments. These two testbeds are built to leverage two MIT Lincoln Laboratory focal plane arrays - an orthogonal transfer CCD with non-uniform pixel sampling and on-chip dithering and a digital readout integrated circuit (DROIC) with advanced on-chip per-pixel processing capabilities. This paper discusses the derivation of optical component requirements, optical design metrics, and performance analyses for the two testbeds built.

  1. Quantum information processing in nanostructures Quantum optics; Quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Reina-Estupinan, J H

    2002-01-01

    Since information has been regarded os a physical entity, the field of quantum information theory has blossomed. This brings novel applications, such as quantum computation. This field has attracted the attention of numerous researchers with backgrounds ranging from computer science, mathematics and engineering, to the physical sciences. Thus, we now have an interdisciplinary field where great efforts are being made in order to build devices that should allow for the processing of information at a quantum level, and also in the understanding of the complex structure of some physical processes at a more basic level. This thesis is devoted to the theoretical study of structures at the nanometer-scale, 'nanostructures', through physical processes that mainly involve the solid-state and quantum optics, in order to propose reliable schemes for the processing of quantum information. Initially, the main results of quantum information theory and quantum computation are briefly reviewed. Next, the state-of-the-art of ...

  2. Parallel processing using an optical delay-based reservoir computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Delay systems subject to delayed optical feedback have recently shown great potential in solving computationally hard tasks. By implementing a neuro-inspired computational scheme relying on the transient response to optical data injection, high processing speeds have been demonstrated. However, reservoir computing systems based on delay dynamics discussed in the literature are designed by coupling many different stand-alone components which lead to bulky, lack of long-term stability, non-monolithic systems. Here we numerically investigate the possibility of implementing reservoir computing schemes based on semiconductor ring lasers. Semiconductor ring lasers are semiconductor lasers where the laser cavity consists of a ring-shaped waveguide. SRLs are highly integrable and scalable, making them ideal candidates for key components in photonic integrated circuits. SRLs can generate light in two counterpropagating directions between which bistability has been demonstrated. We demonstrate that two independent machine learning tasks , even with different nature of inputs with different input data signals can be simultaneously computed using a single photonic nonlinear node relying on the parallelism offered by photonics. We illustrate the performance on simultaneous chaotic time series prediction and a classification of the Nonlinear Channel Equalization. We take advantage of different directional modes to process individual tasks. Each directional mode processes one individual task to mitigate possible crosstalk between the tasks. Our results indicate that prediction/classification with errors comparable to the state-of-the-art performance can be obtained even with noise despite the two tasks being computed simultaneously. We also find that a good performance is obtained for both tasks for a broad range of the parameters. The results are discussed in detail in [Nguimdo et al., IEEE Trans. Neural Netw. Learn. Syst. 26, pp. 3301-3307, 2015

  3. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  4. Optical interconnection networks for high-performance computing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Bergman, Keren

    2012-04-01

    Enabled by silicon photonic technology, optical interconnection networks have the potential to be a key disruptive technology in computing and communication industries. The enduring pursuit of performance gains in computing, combined with stringent power constraints, has fostered the ever-growing computational parallelism associated with chip multiprocessors, memory systems, high-performance computing systems and data centers. Sustaining these parallelism growths introduces unique challenges for on- and off-chip communications, shifting the focus toward novel and fundamentally different communication approaches. Chip-scale photonic interconnection networks, enabled by high-performance silicon photonic devices, offer unprecedented bandwidth scalability with reduced power consumption. We demonstrate that the silicon photonic platforms have already produced all the high-performance photonic devices required to realize these types of networks. Through extensive empirical characterization in much of our work, we demonstrate such feasibility of waveguides, modulators, switches and photodetectors. We also demonstrate systems that simultaneously combine many functionalities to achieve more complex building blocks. We propose novel silicon photonic devices, subsystems, network topologies and architectures to enable unprecedented performance of these photonic interconnection networks. Furthermore, the advantages of photonic interconnection networks extend far beyond the chip, offering advanced communication environments for memory systems, high-performance computing systems, and data centers.

  5. Computer Aided Interpretation Approach for Optical Tomographic Images

    CERN Document Server

    Klose, Christian D; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Juergen; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2010-01-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) of human finger joints in optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a multi-variate signal detection analysis aided by a machine learning classification algorithm, called Self-Organizing Mapping (SOM). Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple physical image parameters, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used as "ground truth"-benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities while...

  6. Non-diffusing photochromic gel for optical computed tomography phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study examines photochromic response in radiation sensitive hydrogels. Genipin, crosslinked, gelatin gel can support high resolution images because the chromophores do not diffuse. A low power, 633 nm He-Ne laser was used to write lines into the gels by a photobleaching reaction. Optical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans mapped the high resolution images in 3D with 0.25 mm voxel resolution. A straight line was written into a deformed gel and then readout in its relaxed, initial shape. The curved, photo-bleached line demonstrated deformable 3D dosimetry is possible with this system to the balloon edge. High resolution, photochromic images provide key information for characterizing optical CT scanners and 3D dosimeters. Many, ionizing radiation, dosimeter materials demonstrate either a photochromic or photothermal response, allowing this approach to be widely used in quantitative 3D scanning.

  7. Dynamic computer-generated nonlinear-optical holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haigang; Li, Jun; Fang, Xiangling; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zheng, Yuanlin; Chen, Xianfeng

    2017-08-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate dynamic nonlinear optical holograms by introducing the concept of computer-generated holograms for second-harmonic generation of a structured fundamental wave with a specially designed wave front. The generation of Laguerre-Gaussian second-harmonic beams is investigated in our experiment. Such a method, which only dynamically controls the wave front of the fundamental wave by a spatial light modulator, does not need domain inversion in nonlinear crystals and hence is a more flexible way to achieve the off-axis nonlinear second-harmonic beams. It can also be adopted in other schemes and has potential applications in nonlinear frequency conversion, optical signal processing, and real-time hologram, etc.

  8. Linear optical quantum computing in a single spatial mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-10-11

    We present a scheme for linear optical quantum computing using time-bin-encoded qubits in a single spatial mode. We show methods for single-qubit operations and heralded controlled-phase (cphase) gates, providing a sufficient set of operations for universal quantum computing with the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn [Nature (London) 409, 46 (2001)] scheme. Our protocol is suited to currently available photonic devices and ideally allows arbitrary numbers of qubits to be encoded in the same spatial mode, demonstrating the potential for time-frequency modes to dramatically increase the quantum information capacity of fixed spatial resources. As a test of our scheme, we demonstrate the first entirely single spatial mode implementation of a two-qubit quantum gate and show its operation with an average fidelity of 0.84±0.07.

  9. GPU-based computational adaptive optics for volumetric optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Han; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Untracht, Gavrielle R.; Zhang, Xihao; Adie, Steven G.

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that measures reflectance from within biological tissues. Current higher-NA optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technologies with near cellular resolution have limitations on volumetric imaging capabilities due to the trade-offs between resolution vs. depth-of-field and sensitivity to aberrations. Such trade-offs can be addressed using computational adaptive optics (CAO), which corrects aberration computationally for all depths based on the complex optical field measured by OCT. However, due to the large size of datasets plus the computational complexity of CAO and OCT algorithms, it is a challenge to achieve high-resolution 3D-OCM reconstructions at speeds suitable for clinical and research OCM imaging. In recent years, real-time OCT reconstruction incorporating both dispersion and defocus correction has been achieved through parallel computing on graphics processing units (GPUs). We add to these methods by implementing depth-dependent aberration correction for volumetric OCM using plane-by-plane phase deconvolution. Following both defocus and aberration correction, our reconstruction algorithm achieved depth-independent transverse resolution of 2.8 um, equal to the diffraction-limited focal plane resolution. We have translated the CAO algorithm to a CUDA code implementation and tested the speed of the software in real-time using two GPUs - NVIDIA Quadro K600 and Geforce TITAN Z. For a data volume containing 4096×256×256 voxels, our system's processing speed can keep up with the 60 kHz acquisition rate of the line-scan camera, and takes 1.09 seconds to simultaneously update the CAO correction for 3 en face planes at user-selectable depths.

  10. Multiscale modeling and computation of optically manipulated nano devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Gang; Liu, Di; Luo, Songting

    2016-07-01

    We present a multiscale modeling and computational scheme for optical-mechanical responses of nanostructures. The multi-physical nature of the problem is a result of the interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) field, the molecular motion, and the electronic excitation. To balance accuracy and complexity, we adopt the semi-classical approach that the EM field is described classically by the Maxwell equations, and the charged particles follow the Schrödinger equations quantum mechanically. To overcome the numerical challenge of solving the high dimensional multi-component many-body Schrödinger equations, we further simplify the model with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics to determine the motion of the nuclei, and use the Time-Dependent Current Density Functional Theory (TD-CDFT) to calculate the excitation of the electrons. This leads to a system of coupled equations that computes the electromagnetic field, the nuclear positions, and the electronic current and charge densities simultaneously. In the regime of linear responses, the resonant frequencies initiating the out-of-equilibrium optical-mechanical responses can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem. A self-consistent multiscale method is designed to deal with the well separated space scales. The isomerization of azobenzene is presented as a numerical example.

  11. Computationally Efficient Nonlinearity Compensation for Coherent Fiber-Optic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Likai Zhu; Guifang Li

    2012-01-01

    Split-step digital backward propagation (DBP) can be combined with coherent detection to compensate for fiber nonlinear impairments. A large number of DBP steps is usually needed for a long-haul fiber system, and this creates a heavy computational load. In a trade-off between complexity and performance, interchannel nonlinearity can be disregarded in order to simplify the DBP algorithm. The number of steps can also be reduced at the expense of performance. In periodic dispersion-managed long-haul transmission systems, optical waveform distortion is dominated by chromatic dispersion. As a result, the nonlinearity of the optical signal repeats in every dispersion period. Because of this periodic behavior, DBP of many fiber spans can be folded into one span. Using this distance-folded DBP method, the required computation for a transoceanic transmission system with full inline dispersion compensation can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude with negligible penalty. The folded DBP method can be modified to compensate for nonlinearity in fiber links with non-zero residua dispersion per span.

  12. Quantum computing by optical control of electron spins

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ren-Bao; Sham, L J

    2010-01-01

    We review the progress and main challenges in implementing large-scale quantum computing by optical control of electron spins in quantum dots (QDs). Relevant systems include self-assembled QDs of III-V or II-VI compound semiconductors (such as InGaAs and CdSe), monolayer fluctuation QDs in compound semiconductor quantum wells, and impurity centers in solids such as P-donors in silicon and nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. The decoherence of the electron spin qubits is discussed and various schemes for countering the decoherence problem are reviewed. We put forward designs of local nodes consisting of a few qubits which can be individually addressed and controlled. Remotely separated local nodes are connected by photonic structures (microcavities and waveguides) to form a large-scale distributed quantum system or a quantum network. The operation of the quantum network consists of optical control of a single electron spin, coupling of two spins in a local nodes, optically controlled quantum interfacing betwe...

  13. Computer-assisted optics teaching at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, Natalia N.; Kozel, Stanislav M.; Lockshin, Gennady R.; Entin, M. A.; Galichsky, K. V.; Lebedinsky, P. L.; Zhdanovich, P. M.

    1995-10-01

    Traditional methods used in optics teaching lack clarity and vividness when illustrating abstract notions such as polarization or interference. Here's where computer models may help, but they usually show only a single phenomenon or process and don't let the student see the entire picture. For this reason at Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology was developed the courseware 'Wave Optics on the Computer' consisting of a number of related simulations. It is intended for students studying optics at the Universities. Recently we have developed different simulations in optics for secondary school level. They are included as part of large computer courseware 'Physics by Pictures'. The courseware 'Wave Optics on the Computer' consists of nine large simulation programs and the textbook. The programs are simulating basic phenomena of wave optics. parameters of optical systems can be varied by the user. The textbook contains theoretical considerations on studied optical phenomena, recommendations concerning work with computer programs, and, especially for those wishing to deeper understand wave optics, original problems for individual solution. At the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology the course 'Wave Optics on the Computer' is used for teaching optics in the course of general physics. The course provides both the computer assisted teaching for lectures support and computer assisted learning for students during seminars in the computer classroom.

  14. Linear Optical Quantum Computing in a Single Spatial Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Ian

    2014-05-01

    We present a scheme for linear optical quantum computing using time-bin encoded qubits in a single spatial mode. This scheme allows arbitrary numbers of qubits to be encoded in the same mode, circumventing the requirement for many spatial modes that challenges the scalability of other schemes, and exploiting the inherent stability and robustness of time-frequency optical modes. This approach leverages the architecture of modern telecommunications systems, and opens a door to very high dimensional Hilbert spaces while maintaining compact device designs. Further, temporal encodings benefit from intrinsic robustness to inhomogeneities in transmission mediums. These advantages have been recognized in works exploring the preparation of time-frequency entangled states both for tests of fundamental quantum phenomena, and for quantum communications technologies including key distribution and teleportation. Here we extend this idea to computation. In particular, we present methods for single-qubit operations and heralded controlled phase (CPhase) gates, providing a sufficient set of operations for universal quantum computing with the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn scheme. As a test of our scheme, we demonstrate the first entirely single spatial mode implementation of a two-qubit quantum gate and show its operation with an average fidelity of 0.84 /pm 0.07. An analysis of the performance of current technologies suggests that our scheme offers a promising route for the construction of quantum circuits beyond the few-qubit level. In addition, we foresee that our investigation may motivate further development of the approaches presented into a regime in which time bins are temporally overlapped and frequency based manipulations become necessary, opening up encodings of even higher densities. This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/H03031X/1), the European Commission project Q-ESSENCE (248095) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  15. Computational Nanophotonics: Model Optical Interactions and Transport in Tailored Nanosystem Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, Mark [Georgia State University Research Foundation; Gray, Steven [Argon National Laboratory

    2014-02-21

    The program is directed toward development of new computational approaches to photoprocesses in nanostructures whose geometry and composition are tailored to obtain desirable optical responses. The emphasis of this specific program is on the development of computational methods and prediction and computational theory of new phenomena of optical energy transfer and transformation on the extreme nanoscale (down to a few nanometers).

  16. Universal quantum computation using all-optical hybrid encoding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭奇; 程留永; 王洪福; 张寿

    2015-01-01

    By employing displacement operations, single-photon subtractions, and weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we propose an alternative way of implementing several universal quantum logical gates for all-optical hybrid qubits encoded in both single-photon polarization state and coherent state. Since these schemes can be straightforwardly implemented only using local operations without teleportation procedure, therefore, less physical resources and simpler operations are required than the existing schemes. With the help of displacement operations, a large phase shift of the coherent state can be obtained via currently available tiny cross-Kerr nonlinearity. Thus, all of these schemes are nearly deterministic and feasible under current technology conditions, which makes them suitable for large-scale quantum computing.

  17. Optical computing with soliton trains in Bose–Einstein condensates

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 World Scientific Publishing Company. Optical computing devices can be implemented based on controlled generation of soliton trains in single and multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). Our concepts utilize the phenomenon that the frequency of soliton trains in BEC can be governed by changing interactions within the atom cloud [F. Pinsker, N. G. Berloff and V. M. Pérez-García, Phys. Rev. A87, 053624 (2013), arXiv:1305.4097]. We use this property to store numbers in terms of those frequencies for a short time until observation. The properties of soliton trains can be changed in an intended way by other components of BEC occupying comparable states or via phase engineering. We elucidate, in which sense, such an additional degree of freedom can be regarded as a tool for controlled manipulation of data. Finally, the outcome of any manipulation made is read out by observing the signature within the density profile.

  18. Computer-aided interpretation approach for optical tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe J.; Scheel, Alexander K.; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2010-11-01

    A computer-aided interpretation approach is proposed to detect rheumatic arthritis (RA) in human finger joints using optical tomographic images. The image interpretation method employs a classification algorithm that makes use of a so-called self-organizing mapping scheme to classify fingers as either affected or unaffected by RA. Unlike in previous studies, this allows for combining multiple image features, such as minimum and maximum values of the absorption coefficient for identifying affected and not affected joints. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, and mutual information. Different methods (i.e., clinical diagnostics, ultrasound imaging, magnet resonance imaging, and inspection of optical tomographic images), were used to produce ground truth benchmarks to determine the performance of image interpretations. Using data from 100 finger joints, findings suggest that some parameter combinations lead to higher sensitivities, while others to higher specificities when compared to single parameter classifications employed in previous studies. Maximum performances are reached when combining the minimum/maximum ratio of the absorption coefficient and image variance. In this case, sensitivities and specificities over 0.9 can be achieved. These values are much higher than values obtained when only single parameter classifications were used, where sensitivities and specificities remained well below 0.8.

  19. Computational Study of Stratified Combustion in an Optical Diesel Engine

    KAUST Repository

    Jaasim, Mohammed

    2017-03-28

    Full cycle simulations of KAUST optical diesel engine were conducted in order to provide insights into the details of fuel spray, mixing, and combustion characteristics at different start of injection (SOI) conditions. Although optical diagnostics provide valuable information, the high fidelity simulations with matched parametric conditions improve fundamental understanding of relevant physical and chemical processes by accessing additional observables such as the local mixture distribution, intermediate species concentrations, and detailed chemical reaction rates. Commercial software, CONVERGE™, was used as the main simulation tool, with the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence model and the multi-zone (SAGE) combustion model to compute the chemical reaction terms. SOI is varied from late compression ignition (CI) to early partially premixed combustion (PPC) conditions. The simulation results revealed a stronger correlation between fuel injection timing and combustion phasing for late SOI conditions, whereas the combustion phasing starts to decouple from SOI for early SOI cases. The predictions are consistent with the experimental observations, in terms of the overall trends in combustion and emission characteristics, while the high fidelity simulations provided further insights into the effects of mixture stratifications resulting from different SOI conditions.

  20. Hyperparallel optical quantum computation assisted by atomic ensembles embedded in double-sided optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective, scalable, hyperparallel photonic quantum computation scheme in which photonic qubits are hyperencoded both in the spatial degrees of freedom (DOF) and the polarization DOF of each photon. The deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-cnot) gate on a two-photon system is attainable with our interesting interface between the polarized photon and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble embedded in a double-sided optical cavity, and it doubles the operations in the conventional quantum cnot gate. Moreover, we present a compact hyper-cnotN gate on N +1 hyperencoded photons with only two auxiliary cavity-magnon systems, not more, and it can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques. Our proposal enables various applications with the hyperencoded photons in quantum computing and quantum networks.

  1. Computational Model Of Fiber Optic, Arc Fusion Splicing; Experimental Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Paul; Frost, Walter; Long, Wayne

    1989-02-01

    Acknowledgement: The assistance and support of the MICOM Army Missile Command is gratefully appreciated. An analytical tool to investigate the arc fusion splicing of optical fibers is developed. The physical model incorporates heat transfer and thermal, visco elastic strain. The heat transfer equations governing radiation, conduction and convection during arc heating are formulated. The radiation heat flux impinging on the fiber optics is modeled based on reported experimental analysis of a generic type arc discharge. The fusion process considers deformation of the fiber due to thermal, viscous and elastic strain. A Maxwell stress-strain relationship is assumed. The model assumes an initial gap at the beginning of the arc which is closed by a press-stroke during the heating cycle. All physical properties of the fused silica glass fibers are considered as functions of temperature based on available experimental data. A computer algorithm has been developed to solve the system of governing equations and parametric studies carried out. An experiment using a FSM-20 arc fusion splicer manufactured by Fujikura Ltd. was carried out to provide experimental verification of the analytical model. In the experiment a continuous fiber was positioned in the arc and cyclic heating and cooling was carried out. One end of the fiber was clamped and the other was free to move. The fiber was heated for 6 seconds and cooled for 3 minutes for several cycles. At the end of each cooling process, photographs of the deformation of the fiber were taken. The results showed that the fiber necked down on the free end and buldged up on the fixed end. With repeated heating and cooling cycles, the optical fiber eventually necked down to the point that it melted in two. The analytical model was run for the conditions of the experiment. Comparisons of the predicted deformation of the optical fiber with those measured is given. The analytical model displays all of the physical phenomenon of fiber

  2. Optical imaging of oral pathological tissue using optical coherence tomography and synchrotron radiation computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cânjǎu, Silvana; Todea, Carmen; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Duma, Virgil; Mǎnescu, Adrian; Topalǎ, Florin I.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2013-06-01

    The efforts aimed at early diagnosis of oral cancer should be prioritized towards developing a new screening instrument, based on optical coherence tomography (OCT), to be used directly intraorally, able to perform a fast, real time, 3D and non-invasive diagnosis of oral malignancies. The first step in this direction would be to optimize the OCT image interpretation of oral tissues. Therefore we propose plastination as a tissue preparation method that better preserves three-dimensional structure for study by new optical imaging techniques. The OCT and the synchrotron radiation computed microtomography (micro-CT) were employed for tissue sample analyze. For validating the OCT results we used the gold standard diagnostic procedure for any suspicious lesion - histopathology. This is a preliminary study of comparing features provided by OCT and Micro-CT. In the conditions of the present study, OCT proves to be a highly promising imaging modality. The use of x-ray based topographic imaging of small biological samples has been limited by the low intrinsic x-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissue and the lack of established contrast agents. Plastination can be used to enhance optical imagies of oral soft tissue samples.

  3. Computational adaptive optics for broadband interferometric tomography of tissues and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adie, Steven G.; Mulligan, Jeffrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) can shape aberrated optical wavefronts to physically restore the constructive interference needed for high-resolution imaging. With access to the complex optical field, however, many functions of optical hardware can be achieved computationally, including focusing and the compensation of optical aberrations to restore the constructive interference required for diffraction-limited imaging performance. Holography, which employs interferometric detection of the complex optical field, was developed based on this connection between hardware and computational image formation, although this link has only recently been exploited for 3D tomographic imaging in scattering biological tissues. This talk will present the underlying imaging science behind computational image formation with optical coherence tomography (OCT) -- a beam-scanned version of broadband digital holography. Analogous to hardware AO (HAO), we demonstrate computational adaptive optics (CAO) and optimization of the computed pupil correction in 'sensorless mode' (Zernike polynomial corrections with feedback from image metrics) or with the use of 'guide-stars' in the sample. We discuss the concept of an 'isotomic volume' as the volumetric extension of the 'isoplanatic patch' introduced in astronomical AO. Recent CAO results and ongoing work is highlighted to point to the potential biomedical impact of computed broadband interferometric tomography. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of HAO vs. CAO for the effective shaping of optical wavefronts, and highlight opportunities for hybrid approaches that synergistically combine the unique advantages of hardware and computational methods for rapid volumetric tomography with cellular resolution.

  4. Computer simulation of diffractive optical element (DOE) performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, Jacques F.; Venturino, Jean-Claude; Gouedard, Yannick

    2004-02-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE), also known as computer generated holograms (CGH), can transform an illuminating laser beam into a specified intensity distribution by diffraction rather than refraction or reflection. These are widely used in coherent light systems with beam shaping purposes, as an alignment tool or as a structured light generator. The diffractive surface is split into an array of sub-wavelength depth cells. Each of these locally transforms the beam by phase adaptation. Based on the work of the LSP lab from the University of Strasbourg, France, we have developed a unique industry-oriented tool. It allows the user first to optimize a DOE using the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. This part can manage sources from the simple plane wave to high order Gaussian modes or complex maps defined beams and objective patterns based on BMP images. A simulation part permits then to test the performance of the DOE with regard to system parameters, dealing with the beam, the DOE itself and the system organization. This will meet the needs of people concerned by tolerancing issues. Focusing on the industrial problem of beam shaping, we will present the whole DOE design sequence, starting from the generation of a DOE up to the study of the sensitivity of its performance according to the variation of several parameters of the system. For example, we will show the influence of the position of the beam on diffraction efficiency. This unique feature formerly neglected in industrial design process will lead the way to production quality improvement.

  5. No-go theorem for passive single-rail linear optical quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Walther, Philip; Lidar, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Photonic quantum systems are among the most promising architectures for quantum computers. It is well known that for dual-rail photons effective non-linearities and near-deterministic non-trivial two-qubit gates can be achieved via the measurement process and by introducing ancillary photons. While in principle this opens a legitimate path to scalable linear optical quantum computing, the technical requirements are still very challenging and thus other optical encodings are being actively investigated. One of the alternatives is to use single-rail encoded photons, where entangled states can be deterministically generated. Here we prove that even for such systems universal optical quantum computing using only passive optical elements such as beam splitters and phase shifters is not possible. This no-go theorem proves that photon bunching cannot be passively suppressed even when extra ancilla modes and arbitrary number of photons are used. Our result provides useful guidance for the design of optical quantum computers.

  6. Predictors of incomplete optical colonoscopy using computed tomographic colonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetika Sachdeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Optical colonoscopy (OC is the primary modality for investigation of colonic pathology. Although there is data on demographic factors for incomplete OC, paucity of data exists for anatomic variables that are associated with an incomplete OC. These anatomic variables can be visualized using computed tomographic colonography (CTC. We aim to retrospectively identify variables associated with incomplete OC using CTC and develop a scoring method to predict the outcome of OC. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, 70 cases ( with incomplete OC and 70 controls (with complete OC were identified. CTC images of cases and controls were independently reviewed by a single CTC radiologist. Demographic and anatomical parameters were recorded. Data was examined using descriptive linear statistics and multivariate logistic regression model. Results: On analysis, female gender (80% vs 58.6% P = 0.007, prior abdominal/pelvic surgeries (51.4% vs 14.3% P < 0.001, colonic length (187.6 ± 30.0 cm vs 163.8 ± 27.2 cm P < 0.001, and number of flexures (11.4 ± 3.1 vs 8.4 ± 2.9 P < 0.001 increased the risk for incomplete OC. No significant association was observed for increasing age (P = 0.881 and history of severe diverticulosis (P = 0.867 with incomplete OC. A scoring system to predict the outcome of OC is proposed based on CTC findings. Conclusion: Female gender, prior surgery, and increasing colonic length and tortuosity were associated with incomplete OC, whereas increasing age and history of severe diverticulosis were not. These factors may be used in the future to predict those patients who are at risk of incomplete OC.

  7. Advanced Modulation Techniques for High-Performance Computing Optical Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karinou, Fotini; Borkowski, Robert; Zibar, Darko

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally assess the performance of a 64 × 64 optical switch fabric used for ns-speed optical cell switching in supercomputer optical interconnects. More specifically, we study four alternative modulation formats and detection schemes, namely, 10-Gb/s nonreturn-to-zero differential phase......-shift keying with balanced direct detection, 10-Gb/s polarization division multiplexed (PDM) quadrature phase-shift keying, 40-Gb/s single-polarization 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM), and 80-Gb/s PDM-16QAM, with coherent intradyne detection, in conjunction with an optimized version...... of the optical shared memory supercomputer interconnect system switch fabric. In particular, we investigate the resilience of the aforementioned advanced modulation formats to the nonlinearities of semiconductor optical amplifiers, used as ON/OFF gates in the supercomputer optical switch fabric under study...

  8. Quantum Computations with Transverse Modes of an Optical Field Propagating in Waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符建; 唐少芳

    2003-01-01

    A fully optical method to perform quantum computation with transverse modes of the optical field propagating in waveguide is proposed by supplying the prescriptions for a universal set of quantum gates. The proposal for quantum computation is based on implementing a quantum bit with two normal modes of multi-mode waveguides. The proposed C-NOT gate has the potential of being more compact and easily realized than some optical implementations, since it is based on planar lightwave circuit technology and can be constructed by using Mach-Zehnder interferometer having semiconductor optical amplifiers with very large refractive nonlinearity in its arms.

  9. Computing the laser beam path in optical cavities: a geometric Newton's method based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cuccato, Davide; Ortolan, Antonello; Beghi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, increasing attention has been drawn to high precision optical experiments, which push resolution and accuracy of the measured quantities beyond their current limits. This challenge requires to place optical elements (e.g. mirrors, lenses, etc.) and to steer light beams with sub-nanometer precision. Existing methods for beam direction computing in resonators, e.g. iterative ray tracing or generalized ray transfer matrices, are either computationally expensive or rely on overparametrized models of optical elements. By exploiting Fermat's principle, we develop a novel method to compute the steady-state beam configurations in resonant optical cavities formed by spherical mirrors, as a function of mirror positions and curvature radii. The proposed procedure is based on the geometric Newton method on matrix manifold, a tool with second order convergence rate that relies on a second order model of the cavity optical length. As we avoid coordinates to parametrize the beam position on mirror surfac...

  10. A scheme of optical interconnection for super high speed parallel computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youju Mao(毛幼菊); Yi L(u)(吕翊); Jiang Liu(刘江); Mingrui Dang(党明瑞)

    2004-01-01

    An optical cross connection network which adopts coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM) and data packet is introduced. It can be used to realize communication between multi-CPU and multi-MEM in parallel computing system. It provides an effective way to upgrade the capability of parallel computer by combining optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and data packet switching technology. CWDM used in network construction, optical cross connection (OXC) based on optical switch arrays, and data packet format used in network construction were analyzed. We have also done the optimizing analysis of the number of optical switches needed in different scales of network in this paper. The architecture of the optical interconnection for 8 wavelength channels and 128 bits parallel transmission has been researched. Finally, a parallel transmission system with 4 nodes, 8 channels per node, has been designed.

  11. Computation and validation of two-dimensional PSF simulation based on physical optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tayabaly, K; Sironi, G; Canestrari, R; Lavagna, M; Pareschi, G

    2016-01-01

    The Point Spread Function (PSF) is a key figure of merit for specifying the angular resolution of optical systems and, as the demand for higher and higher angular resolution increases, the problem of surface finishing must be taken seriously even in optical telescopes. From the optical design of the instrument, reliable ray-tracing routines allow computing and display of the PSF based on geometrical optics. However, such an approach does not directly account for the scattering caused by surface microroughness, which is interferential in nature. Although the scattering effect can be separately modeled, its inclusion in the ray-tracing routine requires assumptions that are difficult to verify. In that context, a purely physical optics approach is more appropriate as it remains valid regardless of the shape and size of the defects appearing on the optical surface. Such a computation, when performed in two-dimensional consideration, is memory and time consuming because it requires one to process a surface map wit...

  12. A computer code for beam optics calculation--third order approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Jianqin; LI Jinhai

    2006-01-01

    To calculate the beam transport in the ion optical systems accurately, a beam dynamics computer program of third order approximation is developed. Many conventional optical elements are incorporated in the program. Particle distributions of uniform type or Gaussian type in the ( x, y, z ) 3D ellipses can be selected by the users. The optimization procedures are provided to make the calculations reasonable and fast. The calculated results can be graphically displayed on the computer monitor.

  13. Computational imaging through a fiber-optic bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Muhammad A.; Dumas, John Paul; Pierce, Mark C.; Bajwa, Waheed U.

    2017-05-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) has proven to be a viable method for reconstructing high-resolution signals using low-resolution measurements. Integrating CS principles into an optical system allows for higher-resolution imaging using lower-resolution sensor arrays. In contrast to prior works on CS-based imaging, our focus in this paper is on imaging through fiber-optic bundles, in which manufacturing constraints limit individual fiber spacing to around 2 μm. This limitation essentially renders fiber-optic bundles as low-resolution sensors with relatively few resolvable points per unit area. These fiber bundles are often used in minimally invasive medical instruments for viewing tissue at macro and microscopic levels. While the compact nature and flexibility of fiber bundles allow for excellent tissue access in-vivo, imaging through fiber bundles does not provide the fine details of tissue features that is demanded in some medical situations. Our hypothesis is that adapting existing CS principles to fiber bundle-based optical systems will overcome the resolution limitation inherent in fiber-bundle imaging. In a previous paper we examined the practical challenges involved in implementing a highly parallel version of the single-pixel camera while focusing on synthetic objects. This paper extends the same architecture for fiber-bundle imaging under incoherent illumination and addresses some practical issues associated with imaging physical objects. Additionally, we model the optical non-idealities in the system to get lower modelling errors.

  14. A Line Search Multilevel Truncated Newton Algorithm for Computing the Optical Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Garrido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the implementation details and give the experimental results of three optimization algorithms for dense optical flow computation. In particular, using a line search strategy, we evaluate the performance of the unilevel truncated Newton method (LSTN, a multiresolution truncated Newton (MR/LSTN and a full multigrid truncated Newton (FMG/LSTN. We use three image sequences and four models of optical flow for performance evaluation. The FMG/LSTN algorithm is shown to lead to better optical flow estimation with less computational work than both the LSTN and MR/LSTN algorithms.

  15. Reducing the phase sensitivity of laser-based optical reservoir computing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy; Danckaert, Jan; Van der Sande, Guy

    2016-01-25

    Optical implementations of reservoir computing systems are very promising because of their high processing speeds and the possibility to process several tasks in parallel. These systems can be implemented using semiconductor lasers subject to optical delayed feedback and optical injection. While the amount of the feedback/injection can be easily controlled, it is much more difficult to control the optical feedback/injection phase. We present extensive numerical investigations of the influence of the feedback/injection phases on laser-based reservoir computing systems with feedback. We show that a change in the phase can lead to a strong reduction in the reservoir computing system performance. We introduce a new readout layer design that -at least for some tasks- reduces this sensitivity to changes in the phase. It consists in optimizing the readout weights from a coherent combination of the reservoir's readout signal and its delayed version rather than only from the reservoir's readout signal as is usually done.

  16. Myocardial Motion Estimation: An Evaluation of Optical Flow Computation Techniques on Echocardiographic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slamet Riyadi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of image processing technique for cardiac motion analysis has been an active research in the past decade. The estimation of myocardial motion eases the cardiologist in diagnosing cardiac abnormalities. In term of movement analysis, optical flow is the most popular technique that has been used by researchers. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of three optical flow computation techniques to estimate the myocardial motion using echocardiographic images. The three techniquesare the global smoothness method (GSM, the local smoothness method (LSM and warping technique (WT. Optical flow field is computed based on healthy cardiac video on parasternal short axes view. These techniques look promising since the optical flow fields can be utilized to estimate the myocardial movement and comply with its true movement. The performances of each technique in terms of the direction, homogeneity and computing time, are also discussed.

  17. Computational Study of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Single Molecules and Clusters of Organic Electro-Optic Chromophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Kerry

    Organic electro-optic (OEO) materials integrated into silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) devices afford significant improvements in size, weight, power, and bandwidth (SWAP) performance of integrated electronic/photonic systems critical for current and next generation telecommunication, computer, sensor, transportation, and defense technologies. Improvement in molecular first hyperpolarizability, and in turn electro-optic activity, is crucial to further improvement in the performance of SOH devices. The timely preparation of new chromophores with improved molecular first hyperpolarizability requires theoretical guidance; however, common density functional theory (DFT) methods often perform poorly for optical properties in systems with substantial intramolecular charge transfer character. The first part of this dissertation describes the careful evaluation of popular long-range correction (LC) and range-separated hybrid (RSH) density functional theory (DFT) for definition of structure/function relationships crucial for the optimization of molecular first hyperpolarizability, beta. In particular, a benchmark set of well-characterized OEO chromophores is used to compare calculated results with the corresponding experimentally measured linear and nonlinear optical properties; respectively, the wavelength of the peak one-photon absorption energy, lambdamax, and beta. A goal of this work is to systematically determine the amount of exact exchange in LC/RSH-DFT methods required for accurately computing these properties for a variety OEO chromophores. High-level electron correlation (post-Hartree-Fock) methods are also investigated and compared with DFT. Included are results for the computation of beta using second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and the double-hybrid method, B2PLYP. The second part of this work transitions from single-molecule studies to computing bulk electronic and nonlinear optical properties of molecular crystals and isotropic ensembles of a

  18. Optics learning by computing, with examples using Maple, MathCad, Mathematica, and MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Moeller, Karl Dieter

    2007-01-01

    This new edition is intended for a one semester course in optics for juniors and seniors in science and engineering; it uses scripts from Maple, MathCad, Mathematica, and MATLAB provide a simulated laboratory where students can learn by exploration and discovery instead of passive absorption. The text covers all the standard topics of a traditional optics course, including: geometrical optics and aberration, interference and diffraction, coherence, Maxwell's equations, wave guides and propagating modes, blackbody radiation, atomic emission and lasers, optical properties of materials, Fourier transforms and FT spectroscopy, image formation, and holography. It contains step by step derivations of all basic formulas in geometrical, wave and Fourier optics. The basic text is supplemented by over 170 files in Maple, MathCad, Mathematica, and MATLAB (many of which are in the text, each suggesting programs to solve a particular problem, and each linked to a topic in or application of optics. The computer files are d...

  19. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    a), no deco - herence or inhomogeneous broadening is present (T−12 = σ = 0); In (b), T2 = 200 ns but σ = 0; In (c), T2 = 200 ns and σ−1 = 10 ns. (d...processes involves at least two orders of optical field and hole-burning two more. The state-of-the- art spec- troscopy already has the ultrahigh resolution

  20. Comparison of computer-based and optical face recognition paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alorf, Abdulaziz A.

    The main objectives of this thesis are to validate an improved principal components analysis (IPCA) algorithm on images; designing and simulating a digital model for image compression, face recognition and image detection by using a principal components analysis (PCA) algorithm and the IPCA algorithm; designing and simulating an optical model for face recognition and object detection by using the joint transform correlator (JTC); establishing detection and recognition thresholds for each model; comparing between the performance of the PCA algorithm and the performance of the IPCA algorithm in compression, recognition and, detection; and comparing between the performance of the digital model and the performance of the optical model in recognition and detection. The MATLAB(c) software was used for simulating the models. PCA is a technique used for identifying patterns in data and representing the data in order to highlight any similarities or differences. The identification of patterns in data of high dimensions (more than three dimensions) is too difficult because the graphical representation of data is impossible. Therefore, PCA is a powerful method for analyzing data. IPCA is another statistical tool for identifying patterns in data. It uses information theory for improving PCA. The joint transform correlator (JTC) is an optical correlator used for synthesizing a frequency plane filter for coherent optical systems. The IPCA algorithm, in general, behaves better than the PCA algorithm in the most of the applications. It is better than the PCA algorithm in image compression because it obtains higher compression, more accurate reconstruction, and faster processing speed with acceptable errors; in addition, it is better than the PCA algorithm in real-time image detection due to the fact that it achieves the smallest error rate as well as remarkable speed. On the other hand, the PCA algorithm performs better than the IPCA algorithm in face recognition because it offers

  1. Computer Generated Optical Illusions: A Teaching and Research Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Bruce; Harman, Wade

    Interactive computer-generated simulations that highlight psychological principles were investigated in this study in which 33 female and 19 male undergraduate college student volunteers of median age 21 matched line and circle sizes in six variations of Ponzo's illusion. Prior to working with the illusions, data were collected based on subjects'…

  2. Optimization of computer-generated holograms for dynamic optical manipulation with uniform structured light spots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Bu; Guanghui Yuan; Yuyang Sun; Siwei Zhu; Xiaocong Yuan

    2011-01-01

    An optimized iterative technique combining the merits of conventional Gerchber-Saxton (G-S) and adaptive-additive (A-A) algorithms to design multilevel computer-generated holograms for the creation of a desirable structured intensity pattern for multiple optical manipulation is theoretically adopted. Optical trap arrays are demonstrated with the help of liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a microscopic optical tweezer system. Additionally, continuous locked-in transport and deflection of microparticles with the generated optical lattice is proven experimentally. The proposed method possesses apparent high efficiency, high uniformity, and dynamic and reconfigurable advantages.%@@ An optimized iterative technique combining the merits of conventional Gerchber-Saxton (G-S) and adaptive-additive (A-A) algorithms to design multilevel computer-generated holograms for the creation of a desirable structured intensity pattern for multiple optical manipulation is theoretically adopted.Optical trap arrays are demonstrated with the help of liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a microscopic optical tweezer system.Additionally, continuous locked-in transport and deflection of microparticles with the generated optical lattice is proven experimentally.The proposed method possesses apparent high efficiency, high uniformity, and dynamic and reconfigurable advantages.

  3. Synthesis of Photochromic Oligophenylenimines: Optical and Computational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando I. Martínez Pérez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenyleneimine oligomers 4,4'-(((1E,1'E-(((1E,1'E-(1,4-phenylenebis-(azanylylidenebis(methanylylidenebis(2,5-bis(octyloxy-4,1-phenylenebis(methanylyl-idene-bis(azanylylidenedianiline (OIC1MS and 7,7'-(((1E,1'E-(((1E,1'E-((9H-fluorene-2,7-diylbis(azanylylidenebis(methanylylidenebis(2,5-bis(octyloxy-4,1phenylenebis- (methanylylidenebis(azanylylidenebis(9H-fluoren-2-amine (OIC2MS were prepared by means of conventional and mechanochemical synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR techniques. The optical properties of the compounds were studied in solution by using UV-visible spectroscopy, and the optical effects were analyzed as a function of solvent. The results show that OIC2MS exhibits interesting photochromic properties. Furthermore, the structural and electronic properties of the compounds were analyzed by TD-DFT. It was found that the mechanosynthesis is an efficient method for the synthesis of both tetraimines.

  4. Synthesis of photochromic oligophenylenimines: optical and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Armando I Martínez; Alonso, Oscar Coreño; Borbolla, Julián Cruz; Vásquez-Pérez, José M; Alonso, Juan Coreño; Ayala, Karina Alemán; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Pandiyan, Thangarasu; García, Rosa A Vázquez

    2015-03-27

    Phenyleneimine oligomers 4,4'-(((1E,1'E)-(((1E,1'E)-(1,4-phenylenebis-(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-4,1-phenylene))bis(methanylyl-idene))-bis(azanylylidene))dianiline (OIC1MS) and 7,7'-(((1E,1'E)-(((1E,1'E)-((9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-4,1phenylene))bis- (methanylylidene))bis(azanylylidene))bis(9H-fluoren-2-amine) (OIC2MS) were prepared by means of conventional and mechanochemical synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR techniques. The optical properties of the compounds were studied in solution by using UV-visible spectroscopy, and the optical effects were analyzed as a function of solvent. The results show that OIC2MS exhibits interesting photochromic properties. Furthermore, the structural and electronic properties of the compounds were analyzed by TD-DFT. It was found that the mechanosynthesis is an efficient method for the synthesis of both tetraimines.

  5. Simultaneous Computation of Two Independent Tasks Using Reservoir Computing Based on a Single Photonic Nonlinear Node With Optical Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy; Danckaert, Jan; Van der Sande, Guy

    2015-12-01

    In this brief, we numerically demonstrate a photonic delay-based reservoir computing system, which processes, in parallel, two independent computational tasks even when the two tasks have unrelated input streams. Our approach is based on a single-longitudinal mode semiconductor ring laser (SRL) with optical feedback. The SRL emits in two directional optical modes. Each directional mode processes one individual task to mitigate possible crosstalk. We illustrate the feasibility of our scheme by analyzing the performance on two benchmark tasks: 1) chaotic time series prediction and 2) nonlinear channel equalization. We identify some feedback configurations for which the results for simultaneous prediction/classification indicate a good performance, but with slight degradation (as compared with the performance obtained for single task processing) due to nonlinear and linear interactions between the two directional modes of the laser. In these configurations, the system performs well on both tasks for a broad range of the parameters.

  6. Analog Optical Computing Based on Dielectric Meta-reflect-array

    CERN Document Server

    Chizari, Ata; Jamali, Mohammad Vahid; Salehi, Jawad A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we realize the concept of analog computing using an array of engineered gradient dielectric meta-reflect-array. The proposed configuration consists of individual subwavelength silicon nanobricks in combination with fused silica spacer and silver ground plane realizing a reflection beam with full phase coverage $2\\pi$ degrees as well as amplitude range $0$ to $1$. Spectrally overlapping electric and magnetic dipole resonances, such high-index dielectric metasurfaces can locally and independently manipulate the amplitude and phase of the incident electromagnetic wave. This practically feasible structure overcomes substantial limitations imposed by plasmonic metasurfaces such as absorption losses and low polarization conversion efficiency in the visible range. Using such CMOS-compatible and easily integrable platforms promises highly efficient ultrathin planar wave-based computing systems which circumvent the drawbacks of conventional bulky lens-based signal processors. Based on these key properti...

  7. Optical image hiding based on computational ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Shengmei; Cheng, Weiwen; Gong, Longyan; Chen, Hanwu

    2016-05-01

    Imaging hiding schemes play important roles in now big data times. They provide copyright protections of digital images. In the paper, we propose a novel image hiding scheme based on computational ghost imaging to have strong robustness and high security. The watermark is encrypted with the configuration of a computational ghost imaging system, and the random speckle patterns compose a secret key. Least significant bit algorithm is adopted to embed the watermark and both the second-order correlation algorithm and the compressed sensing (CS) algorithm are used to extract the watermark. The experimental and simulation results show that the authorized users can get the watermark with the secret key. The watermark image could not be retrieved when the eavesdropping ratio is less than 45% with the second-order correlation algorithm, whereas it is less than 20% with the TVAL3 CS reconstructed algorithm. In addition, the proposed scheme is robust against the 'salt and pepper' noise and image cropping degradations.

  8. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-13

    Félix Riou, Aaron Reinhard, Laura A. Zundel, David S. Weiss. Spontaneous-emission- induced transition rates between atomic states in optical lattices...complementary technique to measure the hyperfine states at each lattice site. We developed a technique to cool atoms so that they are mostly in the vibrational ...28-Feb-2013 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice

  9. Bragg optics computer codes for neutron scattering instrument design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovici, M.; Yelon, W.B.; Berliner, R.R. [Missouri Univ. Research Reactor, Columbia, MO (United States); Stoica, A.D. [Institute of Physics and Technology of Materials, Bucharest (Romania)

    1997-09-01

    Computer codes for neutron crystal spectrometer design, optimization and experiment planning are described. Phase space distributions, linewidths and absolute intensities are calculated by matrix methods in an extension of the Cooper-Nathans resolution function formalism. For modeling the Bragg reflection on bent crystals the lamellar approximation is used. Optimization is done by satisfying conditions of focusing in scattering and in real space, and by numerically maximizing figures of merit. Examples for three-axis and two-axis spectrometers are given.

  10. Single Photon Holographic Qudit Elements for Linear Optical Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    volume hologram (VH) qubit logic gate. Our simulations were done both at Florida Atlantic University ( FAU ), and at AFRL during the summer by an FAU ...UG student (Chris Tison). We leveraged this AFRL grant and received approval from FAU to purchase a 7 teraflop GPU computer for student training...internship at AFRL. In order to continue this research the FAU Principal Investigator (PI) and United States (US) student were given H-token access to AFRL

  11. Computer Modeling and Simulation Evaluation of High Power LED Sources for Secondary Optical Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Hong-dong; WANG Ya-jun; DONG Ji-yang; CHEN Zhong

    2007-01-01

    Proposed and demonstrated is a novel computer modeling method for high power light emitting diodes(LEDs). It contains geometrical structure and optical property of high power LED as well as LED dies definition with its spatial and angular distribution. Merits and non-merits of traditional modeling methods when applied to high power LEDs based on secondary optical design are discussed. Two commercial high power LEDs are simulated using the proposed computer modeling method. Correlation coefficient is proposed to compare and analyze the simulation results and manufacturing specifications. The source model is precisely demonstrated by obtaining above 99% in correlation coefficient with different surface incident angle intervals.

  12. Experimental study on optical image encryption with asymmetric double random phase and computer-generated hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Sixing; Wang, Xiaolei; Song, Lipei; Zhu, Zhuqing; Zhu, Bowen; Huang, Shuai; Yu, Nana; Wang, Huaying

    2017-04-03

    Optical image encryption, especially double-random-phase-based, is of great interest in information security. In this work, we experimentally demonstrate the security and feasibility of optical image encryption with asymmetric double random phase and computer-generated hologram (CGH) by using spatial light modulator. First of all, the encrypted image modulated by asymmetric double random phase is numerically encoded into real-value CGH. Then, the encoded real-value CGH is loaded on the spatial light modulator and optically decrypted in self-designed experimental system. Experimental decryption results are in agreement with numerical calculations under the prober/mistaken phase keys condition. This optical decryption technology opens a window of optical encryption practical application and shows great potential for digital multimedia product copyright protection and holographic false trademark.

  13. Using Two Types of Computer Algebra Systems to Solve Maxwell Optics Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Kulyabov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize Maxwell optics systems, the mathematical apparatus of tensor and vector analysis is generally employed. This mathematical apparatus implies executing a great number of simple stereotyped operations, which are adequately supported by computer algebra systems. In this paper, we distinguish between two stages of working with a mathematical model: model development and model usage. Each of these stages implies its own computer algebra system. As a model problem, we consider the prob...

  14. Computational challenges in atomic, molecular and optical physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kenneth T

    2002-06-15

    Six challenges are discussed. These are the laser-driven helium atom; the laser-driven hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion; electron scattering (with ionization) from one-electron atoms; the vibrational and rotational structure of molecules such as H(3)(+) and water at their dissociation limits; laser-heated clusters; and quantum degeneracy and Bose-Einstein condensation. The first four concern fundamental few-body systems where use of high-performance computing (HPC) is currently making possible accurate modelling from first principles. This leads to reliable predictions and support for laboratory experiment as well as true understanding of the dynamics. Important aspects of these challenges addressable only via a terascale facility are set out. Such a facility makes the last two challenges in the above list meaningfully accessible for the first time, and the scientific interest together with the prospective role for HPC in these is emphasized.

  15. Computer Vision Aided Measurement of Morphological Features in Medical Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdana Bologa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computer vision aided method for non invasive interupupillary (IPD distance measurement. IPD is a morphological feature requirement in any oftalmological frame prescription. A good frame prescription is highly dependent nowadays on accurate IPD estimation in order for the lenses to be eye strain free. The idea is to replace the ruler or the pupilometer with a more accurate method while keeping the patient eye free from any moving or gaze restrictions. The method proposed in this paper uses a video camera and a punctual light source in order to determine the IPD with under millimeter error. The results are compared against standard eye and object detection routines from literature.

  16. Considerations for the extension of coherent optical processors into the quantum computing regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rupert C. D.; Birch, Philip M.; Chatwin, Chris R.

    2016-04-01

    Previously we have examined the similarities of the quantum Fourier transform to the classical coherent optical implementation of the Fourier transform (R. Young et al, Proc SPIE Vol 87480, 874806-1, -11). In this paper, we further consider how superposition states can be generated on coherent optical wave fronts, potentially allowing coherent optical processing hardware architectures to be extended into the quantum computing regime. In particular, we propose placing the pixels of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) individually in a binary superposition state and illuminating them with a coherent wave front from a conventional (but low intensity) laser source in order to make a so-called `interaction free' measurement. In this way, the quantum object, i.e. the individual pixels of the SLM in their superposition states, and the illuminating wavefront would become entangled. We show that if this were possible, it would allow the extension of coherent processing architectures into the quantum computing regime and we give an example of such a processor configured to recover one of a known set of images encrypted using the well-known coherent optical processing technique of employing a random Fourier plane phase encryption mask which classically requires knowledge of the corresponding phase conjugate key to decrypt the image. A quantum optical computer would allow interrogation of all possible phase masks in parallel and so immediate decryption.

  17. Dimensional quality control of Ti-Ni dental file by optical coordinate metrology and computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe-Fabra, J.A.; Tosello, Guido; Ontiveros, S.

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic dental files usually present complex 3D geometries, which make the complete measurement of the component very challenging with conventional micro metrology tools. Computed Tomography (CT) can represent a suitable alternative solution to micro metrology tools based on optical and tactil...

  18. Gray-scale and color optical encryption based on computational ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanha, Mehrdad; Kheradmand, Reza; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab

    2012-09-01

    We propose two approaches for optical encryption based on computational ghost imaging. These methods have the capability of encoding ghost images reconstructed from gray-scale images and colored objects. We experimentally demonstrate our approaches under eavesdropping in two different setups, thereby proving the robustness and simplicity thereof for encryption compared with previous algorithms.

  19. Computational Modeling of the Optical Rotation of Amino Acids: An "in Silico" Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Autschbach, Jochen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates the optical activity of the amino acid valine has been developed for an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Hybrid density functional theory calculations were carried out for valine to confirm the rule that adding a strong acid to a solution of an amino acid in the l…

  20. Computational Modeling of the Optical Rotation of Amino Acids: An "in Silico" Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Autschbach, Jochen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates the optical activity of the amino acid valine has been developed for an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Hybrid density functional theory calculations were carried out for valine to confirm the rule that adding a strong acid to a solution of an amino acid in the l…

  1. Computational high-resolution optical imaging of the living human retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Adie, Steven G.; Scott Carney, P.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-07-01

    High-resolution in vivo imaging is of great importance for the fields of biology and medicine. The introduction of hardware-based adaptive optics (HAO) has pushed the limits of optical imaging, enabling high-resolution near diffraction-limited imaging of previously unresolvable structures. In ophthalmology, when combined with optical coherence tomography, HAO has enabled a detailed three-dimensional visualization of photoreceptor distributions and individual nerve fibre bundles in the living human retina. However, the introduction of HAO hardware and supporting software adds considerable complexity and cost to an imaging system, limiting the number of researchers and medical professionals who could benefit from the technology. Here we demonstrate a fully automated computational approach that enables high-resolution in vivo ophthalmic imaging without the need for HAO. The results demonstrate that computational methods in coherent microscopy are applicable in highly dynamic living systems.

  2. Computational chemistry modeling and design of photoswitchable alignment materials for optically addressable liquid crystal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, K. L.; Sekera, E. R.; Xiao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Photoalignment technology based on optically switchable "command surfaces" has been receiving increasing interest for liquid crystal optics and photonics device applications. Azobenzene compounds in the form of low-molar-mass, watersoluble salts deposited either directly on the substrate surface or after dispersion in a polymer binder have been almost exclusively employed for these applications, and ongoing research in the area follows a largely empirical materials design and development approach. Recent computational chemistry advances now afford unprecedented opportunities to develop predictive capabilities that will lead to new photoswitchable alignment layer materials with low switching energies, enhanced bistability, write/erase fatigue resistance, and high laser-damage thresholds. In the work described here, computational methods based on the density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory were employed to study the impact of molecular structure on optical switching properties in photoswitchable methacrylate and acrylamide polymers functionalized with azobenzene and spiropyran pendants.

  3. All-optical quantum computing with a hybrid solid-state processing unit

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, Pei; Li, Chong

    2011-01-01

    We develop an architecture of hybrid quantum solid-state processing unit for universal quantum computing. The architecture allows distant and nonidentical solid-state qubits in distinct physical systems to interact and work collaboratively. All the quantum computing procedures are controlled by optical methods using classical fields and cavity QED. Our methods have prominent advantage of the insensitivity to dissipation process due to the virtual excitation of subsystems. Moreover, the QND measurements and state transfer for the solid-state qubits are proposed. The architecture opens promising perspectives for implementing scalable quantum computation in a broader sense that different solid systems can merge and be integrated into one quantum processor afterwards.

  4. Computer Generated Hologram and Magneto-Optic Spatial Light Modulator for Optical Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    must become familiar with the C programming language, a C compiler (Computer Innovations C86 is installed on the Zenith 248 which is interfaced with...a library. The - libraries C86S2S and TARGA must also be included since C86S2S contains all the C programming functions and the TARGA library

  5. Diagnostic ability of barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário L. R. Monteiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index, calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. RESULTS: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values (± SD were 64.47% ± 6.06% and 49.44% ± 10.94%in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  6. A Stochastic Approach for Blurred Image Restoration and Optical Flow Computation on Field Image Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文; 陈熙霖

    1997-01-01

    The blur in target images caused by camera vibration due to robot motion or hand shaking and by object(s) moving in the background scene is different to deal with in the computer vision system.In this paper,the authors study the relation model between motion and blur in the case of object motion existing in video image sequence,and work on a practical computation algorithm for both motion analysis and blut image restoration.Combining the general optical flow and stochastic process,the paper presents and approach by which the motion velocity can be calculated from blurred images.On the other hand,the blurred image can also be restored using the obtained motion information.For solving a problem with small motion limitation on the general optical flow computation,a multiresolution optical flow algoritm based on MAP estimation is proposed. For restoring the blurred image ,an iteration algorithm and the obtained motion velocity are used.The experiment shows that the proposed approach for both motion velocity computation and blurred image restoration works well.

  7. Quantum computers based on electron spins controlled by ultrafast off-resonant single optical pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan M; Fu, Kai-Mei C; Ladd, Thaddeus D; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2007-07-27

    We describe a fast quantum computer based on optically controlled electron spins in charged quantum dots that are coupled to microcavities. This scheme uses broadband optical pulses to rotate electron spins and provide the clock signal to the system. Nonlocal two-qubit gates are performed by phase shifts induced by electron spins on laser pulses propagating along a shared waveguide. Numerical simulations of this scheme demonstrate high-fidelity single-qubit and two-qubit gates with operation times comparable to the inverse Zeeman frequency.

  8. The symmetric MSD encoder for one-step adder of ternary optical computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Song; LiPing, Yan

    2016-08-01

    The symmetric Modified Signed-Digit (MSD) encoding is important for achieving the one-step MSD adder of Ternary Optical Computer (TOC). The paper described the symmetric MSD encoding algorithm in detail, and developed its truth table which has nine rows and nine columns. According to the truth table, the state table was developed, and the optical-path structure and circuit-implementation scheme of the symmetric MSD encoder (SME) for one-step adder of TOC were proposed. Finally, a series of experiments were designed and performed. The observed results of the experiments showed that the scheme to implement SME was correct, feasible and efficient.

  9. Comments on: Optical computation based on nonlinear total reflectional optical switch at the interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y A Zaghloul

    2015-12-01

    As we read the paper by Jianqi Zhang and Huan Xu, Pramana – J. Phys. 72, 547 (2009), two issues became clear, that warranted writing this comment. First, the switch, which is the main building block of the devices, and which is used to route the signal, does not work as explained in Section 4.1. Accordingly, the optical router does not work as explained, either. In addition, the half adder does not work as explained and a completely different Truth Table is obtained. The full adder is left to the reader as an exercise. Secondly, the previously published work, which is closely related to the work reported, was not referenced or discussed. In the following paragraphs we discuss each issue in some detail to give the authors the opportunity to better explain their work and clear such issues.

  10. High-speed linear optics quantum computing using active feed-forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedel, Robert; Walther, Philip; Tiefenbacher, Felix; Böhi, Pascal; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-01-04

    As information carriers in quantum computing, photonic qubits have the advantage of undergoing negligible decoherence. However, the absence of any significant photon-photon interaction is problematic for the realization of non-trivial two-qubit gates. One solution is to introduce an effective nonlinearity by measurements resulting in probabilistic gate operations. In one-way quantum computation, the random quantum measurement error can be overcome by applying a feed-forward technique, such that the future measurement basis depends on earlier measurement results. This technique is crucial for achieving deterministic quantum computation once a cluster state (the highly entangled multiparticle state on which one-way quantum computation is based) is prepared. Here we realize a concatenated scheme of measurement and active feed-forward in a one-way quantum computing experiment. We demonstrate that, for a perfect cluster state and no photon loss, our quantum computation scheme would operate with good fidelity and that our feed-forward components function with very high speed and low error for detected photons. With present technology, the individual computational step (in our case the individual feed-forward cycle) can be operated in less than 150 ns using electro-optical modulators. This is an important result for the future development of one-way quantum computers, whose large-scale implementation will depend on advances in the production and detection of the required highly entangled cluster states.

  11. Simulation and Noise Analysis of Multimedia Transmission in Optical CDMA Computer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasaruddin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates and analyzes noise of multimedia transmission in a flexible optical code division multiple access (OCDMA computer network with different quality of service (QoS requirements. To achieve multimedia transmission in OCDMA, we have proposed strict variable-weight optical orthogonal codes (VW-OOCs, which can guarantee the smallest correlation value of one by the optimal design. In developing multimedia transmission for computer network, a simulation tool is essential in analyzing the effectiveness of various transmissions of services. In this paper, implementation models are proposed to analyze the multimedia transmission in the representative of OCDMA computer networks by using MATLAB simulink tools. Simulation results of the models are discussed including spectrums outputs of transmitted signals, superimposed signals, received signals, and eye diagrams with and without noise. Using the proposed models, multimedia OCDMA computer network using the strict VW-OOC is practically evaluated. Furthermore, system performance is also evaluated by considering avalanche photodiode (APD noise and thermal noise. The results show that the system performance depends on code weight, received laser power, APD noise, and thermal noise which should be considered as important parameters to design and implement multimedia transmission in OCDMA computer networks.

  12. Simulation and Noise Analysis of Multimedia Transmission in Optical CDMA Computer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasaruddin Nasaruddin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper simulates and analyzes noise of multimedia transmission in a flexible optical code division multiple access (OCDMA computer network with different quality of service (QoS requirements. To achieve multimedia transmission in OCDMA, we have proposed strict variable-weight optical orthogonal codes (VW-OOCs, which can guarantee the smallest correlation value of one by the optimal design. In developing multimedia transmission for computer network, a simulation tool is essential in analyzing the effectiveness of various transmissions of services. In this paper, implementation models are proposed to analyze the multimedia transmission in the representative of OCDMA computer networks by using MATLAB simulink tools. Simulation results of the models are discussed including spectrums outputs of transmitted signals, superimposed signals, received signals, and eye diagrams with and without noise. Using the proposed models, multimedia OCDMA computer network using the strict VW-OOC is practically evaluated. Furthermore, system performance is also evaluated by considering avalanche photodiode (APD noise and thermal noise. The results show that the system performance depends on code weight, received laser power, APD noise, and thermal noise which should be considered as important parameters to design and implement multimedia transmission in OCDMA computer networks.

  13. Optical image encryption based on binary Fourier transform computer-generated hologram and pixel scrambling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Ying; Wang, Yu-Rong; Wang, Yong; Li, Hui-Juan; Sun, Wen-Jia

    2007-07-01

    A new method of optical image encryption with binary Fourier transform computer-generated hologram (CGH) and pixel-scrambling technology is presented. In this method, the orders of the pixel scrambling, as well as the encrypted image, are used as the keys to decrypt the original image. Therefore, higher security is achieved. Furthermore, the encrypted image is binary, so it is easy to be fabricated and robust against noise and distortion. Computer simulation results are given to verify the feasibility of this method and its robustness against occlusion and additional noise.

  14. Computational Approach for Studying Optical Properties of DNA Systems in Solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørby, Morten Steen; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a study of the methodological aspects regarding calculations of optical properties for DNA systems in solution. Our computational approach will be built upon a fully polarizable QM/MM/Continuum model within a damped linear response theory framework. In this approach...... the environment is given a highly advanced description in terms of the electrostatic potential through the polarizable embedding model. Furthermore, bulk solvent effects are included in an efficient manner through a conductor-like screening model. With the aim of reducing the computational cost we develop a set...... of averaged partial charges and distributed isotropic dipole-dipole polarizabilities for DNA suitable for describing the classical region in ground-state and excited-state calculations. Calculations of the UV-spectrum of the 2-aminopurine optical probe embedded in a DNA double helical structure are presented...

  15. Integration of highly probabilistic sources into optical quantum architectures: perpetual quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Devitt, Simon J; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a design for an optical topological cluster state computer constructed exclusively from a single quantum component. Unlike previous efforts we eliminate the need for on demand, high fidelity photon sources and detectors and replace them with the same device utilised to create photon/photon entanglement. This introduces highly probabilistic elements into the optical architecture while maintaining complete specificity of the structure and operation for a large scale computer. Photons in this system are continually recycled back into the preparation network, allowing for a arbitrarily deep 3D cluster to be prepared using a comparatively small number of photonic qubits and consequently the elimination of high frequency, deterministic photon sources.

  16. Physics education through computational tools: the case of geometrical and physical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Y.; Santana, A.; Mendoza, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    Recently, with the development of more powerful and accurate computational tools, the inclusion of new didactic materials in the classroom is known to have increased. However, the form in which these materials can be used to enhance the learning process is still under debate. Many different methodologies have been suggested for constructing new relevant curricular material and, among them, just-in-time teaching (JiTT) has arisen as an effective and successful way to improve the content of classes. In this paper, we will show the implemented pedagogic strategies for the courses of geometrical and optical physics for students of optometry. Thus, the use of the GeoGebra software for the geometrical optics class and the employment of new in-house software for the physical optics class created using the high-level programming language Python is shown with the corresponding activities developed for each of these applets.

  17. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes.

  18. Time-Of-Flight Camera, Optical Tracker and Computed Tomography in Pairwise Data Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlomiej Pycinski

    Full Text Available A growing number of medical applications, including minimal invasive surgery, depends on multi-modal or multi-sensors data processing. Fast and accurate 3D scene analysis, comprising data registration, seems to be crucial for the development of computer aided diagnosis and therapy. The advancement of surface tracking system based on optical trackers already plays an important role in surgical procedures planning. However, new modalities, like the time-of-flight (ToF sensors, widely explored in non-medical fields are powerful and have the potential to become a part of computer aided surgery set-up. Connection of different acquisition systems promises to provide a valuable support for operating room procedures. Therefore, the detailed analysis of the accuracy of such multi-sensors positioning systems is needed.We present the system combining pre-operative CT series with intra-operative ToF-sensor and optical tracker point clouds. The methodology contains: optical sensor set-up and the ToF-camera calibration procedures, data pre-processing algorithms, and registration technique. The data pre-processing yields a surface, in case of CT, and point clouds for ToF-sensor and marker-driven optical tracker representation of an object of interest. An applied registration technique is based on Iterative Closest Point algorithm.The experiments validate the registration of each pair of modalities/sensors involving phantoms of four various human organs in terms of Hausdorff distance and mean absolute distance metrics. The best surface alignment was obtained for CT and optical tracker combination, whereas the worst for experiments involving ToF-camera.The obtained accuracies encourage to further develop the multi-sensors systems. The presented substantive discussion concerning the system limitations and possible improvements mainly related to the depth information produced by the ToF-sensor is useful for computer aided surgery developers.

  19. A lower bound for routing on a completely connected optical communication parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jerrum, M. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computer Science; MacKenzie, P.D. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences

    1993-08-03

    The task of routing a 2-relation on an n-processor completely connected optical communication parallel computer (OCPC) is considered. A lower bound is presented that applies to any randomized distributed algorithm for this task: specifically, it is shown that the expected number of steps required to route a 2-relation is {Omega}({radical} log log n) in the worst case. For comparison, the best upper bound known is O(log log n).

  20. Computational Principle and Performance Evaluation of Coherent Ising Machine Based on Degenerate Optical Parametric Oscillator Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Haribara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the operational principle of a coherent Ising machine (CIM based on a degenerate optical parametric oscillator (DOPO network. A quantum theory of CIM is formulated, and the computational ability of CIM is evaluated by numerical simulation based on c-number stochastic differential equations. We also discuss the advanced CIM with quantum measurement-feedback control and various problems which can be solved by CIM.

  1. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques....... Here, a new method for optimising cardiac coronary CT with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histopathology is presented. Materials and methods: Twenty human hearts obtained from autopsies were used. A contrast agent that solidifies after cooling was injected into the coronary arteries. CT...

  2. INVERSE COMPUTATION OF OPTICAL-ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT IN INHOMOGENEOUS MATERIAL WITH VARIED THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuJianxin

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,for an inhomogeneous material in which the thermal conductivity varies as a function of depth,an efficient treatment is proposed to inversely calculate the depth distribution of optical-absorption coefficient by the surface temperature of the material. It is demonstrated that the results of inverse computation by that method are more similar to the experimental ones measured by some destructive method. Thus ,the treatment is more feasible to nondestructively estimate the distribution.

  3. Scanning laser optical computed tomography system for large volume 3D dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2017-04-01

    Stray light causes artifacts in optical computed tomography (CT) that negatively affect the accuracy of radiation dosimetry in gels or solids. Scatter effects are exacerbated by a large dosimeter volume, which is desirable for direct verification of modern radiotherapy treatment plans such as multiple-isocenter radiosurgery. The goal in this study was to design and characterize an optical CT system that achieves high accuracy primary transmission measurements through effective stray light rejection, while maintaining sufficient scan speed for practical application. We present an optical imaging platform that uses a galvanometer mirror for horizontal scanning, and a translation stage for vertical movement of a laser beam and small area detector for minimal stray light production and acceptance. This is coupled with a custom lens-shaped optical CT aquarium for parallel ray sampling of projections. The scanner images 15 cm diameter, 12 cm height cylindrical volumes at 0.33 mm resolution in approximately 30 min. Attenuation coefficients reconstructed from CT scans agreed with independent cuvette measurements within 2% for both absorbing and scattering solutions as well as small 1.25 cm diameter absorbing phantoms placed within a large, scattering medium that mimics gel. Excellent linearity between the optical CT scanner and the independent measurement was observed for solutions with between 90% and 2% transmission. These results indicate that the scanner should achieve highly accurate dosimetry of large volume dosimeters in a reasonable timeframe for clinical application to radiotherapy dose verification procedures.

  4. Scanning laser optical computed tomography system for large volume 3D dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2017-04-07

    Stray light causes artifacts in optical computed tomography (CT) that negatively affect the accuracy of radiation dosimetry in gels or solids. Scatter effects are exacerbated by a large dosimeter volume, which is desirable for direct verification of modern radiotherapy treatment plans such as multiple-isocenter radiosurgery. The goal in this study was to design and characterize an optical CT system that achieves high accuracy primary transmission measurements through effective stray light rejection, while maintaining sufficient scan speed for practical application. We present an optical imaging platform that uses a galvanometer mirror for horizontal scanning, and a translation stage for vertical movement of a laser beam and small area detector for minimal stray light production and acceptance. This is coupled with a custom lens-shaped optical CT aquarium for parallel ray sampling of projections. The scanner images 15 cm diameter, 12 cm height cylindrical volumes at 0.33 mm resolution in approximately 30 min. Attenuation coefficients reconstructed from CT scans agreed with independent cuvette measurements within 2% for both absorbing and scattering solutions as well as small 1.25 cm diameter absorbing phantoms placed within a large, scattering medium that mimics gel. Excellent linearity between the optical CT scanner and the independent measurement was observed for solutions with between 90% and 2% transmission. These results indicate that the scanner should achieve highly accurate dosimetry of large volume dosimeters in a reasonable timeframe for clinical application to radiotherapy dose verification procedures.

  5. Prehistological evaluation of benign and malignant pigmented skin lesions with optical computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokolakis, Athanasios; Zacharakis, Giannis; Krasagakis, Konstantin; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Favicchio, Rosy; Spiliopoulos, George; Giannikaki, Elpida; Ripoll, Jorge; Tosca, Androniki

    2012-06-01

    Discrimination of benign and malignant melanocytic lesions is a major issue in clinical dermatology. Assessment of the thickness of melanoma is critical for prognosis and treatment selection. We aimed to evaluate a novel optical computed tomography (optical-CT) system as a tool for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of melanocytic lesions and its ability to discriminate benign from malignant melanocytic lesions while simultaneously determining the thickness of invasive melanoma. Seventeen melanocytic lesions, one hemangioma, and normal skin were assessed immediately after their excision by optical-CT and subsequently underwent histopathological examination. Tomographic reconstructions were performed with a back-propagation algorithm calculating a 3-D map of the total attenuation coefficient (AC). There was a statistically significant difference between melanomas, dysplastic nevi, and non-dysplastic nevi, as indicated by Kruskal-Wallis test. Median AC values were higher for melanomas compared with dysplastic and non-dysplastic nevi. No statistically significant difference was observed when thickness values obtained by optical-CT were compared with histological thickness using a Wilcoxon sighed rank test. Our results suggest that optical-CT can be important for the immediate prehistological evaluation of biopsies, assisting the physician for a rapid assessment of malignancy and of the thickness of a melanocytic lesion.

  6. Requirements for fault-tolerant factoring on an atom-optics quantum computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J; Stephens, Ashley M; Munro, William J; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-01-01

    Quantum information processing and its associated technologies have reached a pivotal stage in their development, with many experiments having established the basic building blocks. Moving forward, the challenge is to scale up to larger machines capable of performing computational tasks not possible today. This raises questions that need to be urgently addressed, such as what resources these machines will consume and how large will they be. Here we estimate the resources required to execute Shor's factoring algorithm on an atom-optics quantum computer architecture. We determine the runtime and size of the computer as a function of the problem size and physical error rate. Our results suggest that once the physical error rate is low enough to allow quantum error correction, optimization to reduce resources and increase performance will come mostly from integrating algorithms and circuits within the error correction environment, rather than from improving the physical hardware.

  7. Computer-aided design provisionalization and implant insertion combined with optical scanning of plaster casts and computed tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Shingo; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Kanno, Takahiro; Tatemoto, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    The conventional implant prosthesis planning process currently involves confirmation of two-dimensional anatomical findings or the quantity and quality of bones using panoramic X-ray images. The introduction of computed tomography (CT) into the field has enabled the previously impossible confirmation of three-dimensional findings, making implant planning in precise locations possible. However, artifacts caused by the presence of metal prostheses can become problematic and can result in obstacles to diagnosis and implant planning. The most updated version of SimPlant® Pro has made it possible to integrate plaster cast images with CT data using optical scanning. Using this function, the obstacles created by metal prostheses are eliminated, facilitating implant planning at the actual intraoral location. Furthermore, a SurgiGuide® based on individual patient information can be created on plaster casts, resulting in easier and more precise implant insertion. PMID:24987602

  8. Computational optical palpation: micro-scale force mapping using finite-element methods (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate quantification of forces, applied to, or generated by, tissue, is key to understanding many biomechanical processes, fabricating engineered tissues, and diagnosing diseases. Many techniques have been employed to measure forces; in particular, tactile imaging - developed to spatially map palpation-mimicking forces - has shown potential in improving the diagnosis of cancer on the macro-scale. However, tactile imaging often involves the use of discrete force sensors, such as capacitive or piezoelectric sensors, whose spatial resolution is often limited to 1-2 mm. Our group has previously presented a type of tactile imaging, termed optical palpation, in which the change in thickness of a compliant layer in contact with tissue is measured using optical coherence tomography, and surface forces are extracted, with a micro-scale spatial resolution, using a one-dimensional spring model. We have also recently combined optical palpation with compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify stiffness. A main limitation of this work, however, is that a one-dimensional spring model is insufficient in describing the deformation of mechanically heterogeneous tissue with uneven boundaries, generating significant inaccuracies in measured forces. Here, we present a computational, finite-element method, which we term computational optical palpation. In this technique, by knowing the non-linear mechanical properties of the layer, and from only the axial component of displacement measured by phase-sensitive OCE, we can estimate, not only the axial forces, but the three-dimensional traction forces at the layer-tissue interface. We use a non-linear, three-dimensional model of deformation, which greatly increases the ability to accurately measure force and stiffness in complex tissues.

  9. High performance optical encryption based on computational ghost imaging with QR code and compressive sensing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shengmei; Wang, Le; Liang, Wenqiang; Cheng, Weiwen; Gong, Longyan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a high performance optical encryption (OE) scheme based on computational ghost imaging (GI) with QR code and compressive sensing (CS) technique, named QR-CGI-OE scheme. N random phase screens, generated by Alice, is a secret key and be shared with its authorized user, Bob. The information is first encoded by Alice with QR code, and the QR-coded image is then encrypted with the aid of computational ghost imaging optical system. Here, measurement results from the GI optical system's bucket detector are the encrypted information and be transmitted to Bob. With the key, Bob decrypts the encrypted information to obtain the QR-coded image with GI and CS techniques, and further recovers the information by QR decoding. The experimental and numerical simulated results show that the authorized users can recover completely the original image, whereas the eavesdroppers can not acquire any information about the image even the eavesdropping ratio (ER) is up to 60% at the given measurement times. For the proposed scheme, the number of bits sent from Alice to Bob are reduced considerably and the robustness is enhanced significantly. Meantime, the measurement times in GI system is reduced and the quality of the reconstructed QR-coded image is improved.

  10. Intrinsic parameterization of a computational optical system for long-distance displacement structural monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luís F. Lages; Rebordão, José Manuel N. V.; Ribeiro, Álvaro Silva

    2015-01-01

    We aim at the intrinsic parameterization of a computational optical system applied in long-distance displacement measurement of large-scale structures. In this structural-monitoring scenario, the observation distance established between the digital camera and reference targets, which is composed of the computational optical system, can range from 100 up to 1000 m, requiring the use of long-focal length lenses in order to obtain a suitable sensitivity for the three-dimensional displacement measurement of the observed structure which can be of reduced magnitude. Intrinsic parameterization of long-focal length cameras is an emergent issue since conventional approaches applied for reduced focal length cameras are not suitable mainly due to ill-conditioned matrices in least squares estimation procedures. We describe the intrinsic parameterization of a long-focal length camera (600 mm) by the diffractive optical element method and present the obtained estimates and measurement uncertainties, discussing their contribution for the system's validation by calibration field test and displacement measurement campaigns in a long-span suspension bridge.

  11. AZTECA, a y-y diagram oriented interactive computer program for optical system design and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Hernandez, Ricardo

    1995-09-01

    The Centro de Investigaciones en Optica is developing the AZTECA optical design program to exploit the full synthesis capabilities intrinsic to Delano's y-y method. Both the y- y diagram and its dual the (omega) -(omega) diagram, are manipulated in real time to introduce changes at any point or line in those diagrams. These changes result in altered new versions of the optical system by means of a specialized subroutine that incorporates the fundamental synthesis equations for those diagrams. To display results on the computer's screen as the optimization process progress, AZTECA makes wide use of the fact that the y-y and the (omega) -(omega) diagrams display graphically all the first order attributes of an optical system. This program adjoins to these features the calculation of Buchdahl's 3rd, 5th, and 7th order aberration coefficients to the output. This results in a real time display of the system's paraxial and aberrational behavior. Efficient graphic displays, the program's modular structure and an interactive mode of operation, also contribute to make the AZTECA a versatile platform. It will be further developed as a new tool for efficient optical system design.

  12. A computer graphics reconstruction and optical analysis of scale anomalies in Caravaggio's Supper at Emmaus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, David G.; Furuichi, Yasuo

    2011-03-01

    David Hockney has argued that the right hand of the disciple, thrust to the rear in Caravaggio's Supper at Emmaus (1606), is anomalously large as a result of the artist refocusing a putative secret lens-based optical projector and tracing the image it projected onto his canvas. We show through rigorous optical analysis that to achieve such an anomalously large hand image, Caravaggio would have needed to make extremely large, conspicuous and implausible alterations to his studio setup, moving both his purported lens and his canvas nearly two meters between "exposing" the disciple's left hand and then his right hand. Such major disruptions to his studio would have impeded -not aided- Caravaggio in his work. Our optical analysis quantifies these problems and our computer graphics reconstruction of Caravaggio's studio illustrates these problems. In this way we conclude that Caravaggio did not use optical projections in the way claimed by Hockney, but instead most likely set the sizes of these hands "by eye" for artistic reasons.

  13. Dense all-optical WDM-SCM technology for high-speed computer interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ih, Charles S.; Tian, Rongsheng; Zhou, H. X.; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    1993-07-01

    We describe a dense and flexible all optical multi-channel communication system for high speed computer interconnects. The system can provide 10 Gb/s for each individual node with a total system capacity to 250 Gb/s using currently available technologies. The system capacity can be scaled to 1 Tb/s using optical amplifiers with a broader bandwidth and higher modulations. The system is based on the multi-beam (heterodyne) modulator (MBM) recently demonstrated in our laboratory and other current technologies in tunable laser arrays and acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). Each MBM automatically forms a high frequency microwave sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) with sub-carrier frequency to tens of GHz. A MBM with sub-carriers at 17 and 21 GHz has already been demonstrated and can be scaled to higher frequencies by using a higher frequency detector. Each SCM group may consist of up to 10 one-Gb/s channels and occupies only 1 nm spectral width. Therefore we can form a conventional WDM with 25 divisions within the bandwidth of commercially available optical amplifiers.

  14. MODA: a new algorithm to compute optical depths in multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, Albino; Gafton, Emanuel; Cabezón, Rubén; Rosswog, Stephan; Liebendörfer, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We introduce the multidimensional optical depth algorithm (MODA) for the calculation of optical depths in approximate multidimensional radiative transport schemes, equally applicable to neutrinos and photons. Motivated by (but not limited to) neutrino transport in three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers, our method makes no assumptions about the geometry of the matter distribution, apart from expecting optically transparent boundaries. Methods: Based on local information about opacities, the algorithm figures out an escape route that tends to minimize the optical depth without assuming any predefined paths for radiation. Its adaptivity makes it suitable for a variety of astrophysical settings with complicated geometry (e.g., core-collapse supernovae, compact binary mergers, tidal disruptions, star formation, etc.). We implement the MODA algorithm into both a Eulerian hydrodynamics code with a fixed, uniform grid and into an SPH code where we use a tree structure that is otherwise used for searching neighbors and calculating gravity. Results: In a series of numerical experiments, we compare the MODA results with analytically known solutions. We also use snapshots from actual 3D simulations and compare the results of MODA with those obtained with other methods, such as the global and local ray-by-ray method. It turns out that MODA achieves excellent accuracy at a moderate computational cost. In appendix we also discuss implementation details and parallelization strategies.

  15. The position of a standard optical computer mouse affects cardiorespiratory responses during the operation of a computer under time constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Sako

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated the association between task-induced stress and fatigue by examining the cardiovascular responses of subjects using different mouse positions while operating a computer under time constraints. Material and Methods: The study was participated by 16 young, healthy men and examined the use of optical mouse devices affixed to laptop computers. Two mouse positions were investigated: (1 the distal position (DP, in which the subjects place their forearms on the desk accompanied by the abduction and flexion of their shoulder joints, and (2 the proximal position (PP, in which the subjects place only their wrists on the desk without using an armrest. The subjects continued each task for 16 min. We assessed differences in several characteristics according to mouse position, including expired gas values, autonomic nerve activities (based on cardiorespiratory responses, operating efficiencies (based on word counts, and fatigue levels (based on the visual analog scale – VAS. Results: Oxygen consumption (VO2, the ratio of inspiration time to respiration time (Ti/Ttotal, respiratory rate (RR, minute ventilation (VE, and the ratio of expiration to inspiration (Te/Ti were significantly lower when the participants were performing the task in the DP than those obtained in the PP. Tidal volume (VT, carbon dioxide output rates (VCO2/VE, and oxygen extraction fractions (VO2/VE were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. No significant difference in VAS was observed between the positions; however, as the task progressed, autonomic nerve activities were lower and operating efficiencies were significantly higher for the DP than they were for the PP. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the DP has fewer effects on cardiorespiratory functions, causes lower levels of sympathetic nerve activity and mental stress, and produces a higher total workload than the PP. This suggests that the DP is preferable to the PP when

  16. Micrometric precision of prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, Flávio Domingues; de Almeida Prado Naves Carneiro, Thiago; do Prado, Célio Jesus; Prudente, Marcel Santana; Zancopé, Karla; Davi, Letícia Resende; Mendonça, Gustavo; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-08-01

    The current study evaluated prosthetic dental crowns obtained by optical scanning and a computer-aided designing/computer-aided manufacturing system using micro-computed tomography to compare the marginal fit. The virtual models were obtained with four different scanning surfaces: typodont (T), regular impressions (RI), master casts (MC), and powdered master casts (PMC). Five virtual models were obtained for each group. For each model, a crown was designed on the software and milled from feldspathic ceramic blocks. Micro-CT images were obtained for marginal gap measurements and the data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. The mean vertical misfit was T=62.6±65.2 μm; MC=60.4±38.4 μm; PMC=58.1±38.0 μm, and RI=89.8±62.8 μm. Considering a percentage of vertical marginal gap of up to 75 μm, the results were T=71.5%, RI=49.2%, MC=69.6%, and PMC=71.2%. The percentages of horizontal overextension were T=8.5%, RI=0%, MC=0.8%, and PMC=3.8%. Based on the results, virtual model acquisition by scanning the typodont (simulated mouth) or MC, with or without powder, showed acceptable values for the marginal gap. The higher result of marginal gap of the RI group suggests that it is preferable to scan this directly from the mouth or from MC.

  17. Optical tomographic detection of rheumatoid arthritis with computer-aided classification schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Christian D.; Klose, Alexander D.; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2009-02-01

    A recent research study has shown that combining multiple parameters, drawn from optical tomographic images, leads to better classification results to identifying human finger joints that are affected or not affected by rheumatic arthritis RA. Building up on the research findings of the previous study, this article presents an advanced computer-aided classification approach for interpreting optical image data to detect RA in finger joints. Additional data are used including, for example, maximum and minimum values of the absorption coefficient as well as their ratios and image variances. Classification performances obtained by the proposed method were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, Youden index and area under the curve AUC. Results were compared to different benchmarks ("gold standard"): magnet resonance, ultrasound and clinical evaluation. Maximum accuracies (AUC=0.88) were reached when combining minimum/maximum-ratios and image variances and using ultrasound as gold standard.

  18. A scalable silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for high performance computing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Runxiang; Cheung, Stanley; Li, Yuliang; Okamoto, Katsunari; Proietti, Roberto; Yin, Yawei; Yoo, S J B

    2013-12-30

    This paper discusses the architecture and provides performance studies of a silicon photonic chip-scale optical switch for scalable interconnect network in high performance computing systems. The proposed switch exploits optical wavelength parallelism and wavelength routing characteristics of an Arrayed Waveguide Grating Router (AWGR) to allow contention resolution in the wavelength domain. Simulation results from a cycle-accurate network simulator indicate that, even with only two transmitter/receiver pairs per node, the switch exhibits lower end-to-end latency and higher throughput at high (>90%) input loads compared with electronic switches. On the device integration level, we propose to integrate all the components (ring modulators, photodetectors and AWGR) on a CMOS-compatible silicon photonic platform to ensure a compact, energy efficient and cost-effective device. We successfully demonstrate proof-of-concept routing functions on an 8 × 8 prototype fabricated using foundry services provided by OpSIS-IME.

  19. Computer modelling of the optical properties of transition-metal ions in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartram, R.H. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Computational methods for modeling the optical properties of substitutional transition-metal impurities in insulating solids, potentially applicable to some scintillator and phosphor materials, are reviewed. Methods considered include crystal-field and semiempirical ligand-field models; SCF-X{alpha}-SW, SCF-RHF-LCAO, SCF-UHF-LCAO and CI ab initio methods; and ICECAP and HADESR embedded-cluster methods with lattice relaxation. A detailed example of the application of the HADESR method to crystal-field spectra of Cr{sup 3+} in halide elpasolites is described. In this method, ab initio molecular-orbital calculations with effective core potentials are performed for selected ionic configurations. Simultaneous relaxation of the cluster and surrounding lattice, with mutual pair-potential interactions, is accomplished by a modified lattice statics program. properties include pressure-dependent optical transition energies, vibration frequencies and radiationless transition rates.

  20. Visual analysis of the computer simulation for both imaging and non-imaging optical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barladian, B. K.; Potemin, I. S.; Zhdanov, D. D.; Voloboy, A. G.; Shapiro, L. S.; Valiev, I. V.; Birukov, E. D.

    2016-10-01

    Typical results of the optic simulation are images generated on the virtual sensors of various kinds. As a rule, these images represent two-dimensional distribution of the light values in Cartesian coordinates (luminance, illuminance) or in polar coordinates (luminous intensity). Using the virtual sensors allows making the calculation and design of different kinds of illumination devices, providing stray light analysis, synthesizing of photorealistic images of three-dimensional scenes under the complex illumination generated with optical systems, etc. Based on rich experience in the development and practical using of computer systems of virtual prototyping and photorealistic visualization the authors formulated a number of basic requirements for the visualization and analysis of the results of light simulations represented as two-dimensional distribution of luminance, illuminance and luminous intensity values. The requirements include the tone mapping operators, pseudo color imaging, visualization of the spherical panorama, regression analysis, the analysis of the image sections and regions, analysis of pixel values, the image data export, etc. All those requirements were successfully satisfied in designed software component for visual analysis of the light simulation results. The module "LumiVue" is an integral part of "Lumicept" modeling system and the corresponding plug-in of computer-aided design and support for CATIA product. A number of visual examples of analysis of calculated two-dimensional distribution of luminous intensity, illuminance and luminance illustrate the article. The examples are results of simulation and design of lighting optical systems, secondary optics for LEDs, stray light analysis, virtual prototyping and photorealistic rendering.

  1. Approximate Bayesian computation for estimating number concentrations of monodisperse nanoparticles in suspension by optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röding, Magnus; Zagato, Elisa; Remaut, Katrien; Braeckmans, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    We present an approximate Bayesian computation scheme for estimating number concentrations of monodisperse diffusing nanoparticles in suspension by optical particle tracking microscopy. The method is based on the probability distribution of the time spent by a particle inside a detection region. We validate the method on suspensions of well-controlled reference particles. We illustrate its usefulness with an application in gene therapy, applying the method to estimate number concentrations of plasmid DNA molecules and the average number of DNA molecules complexed with liposomal drug delivery particles.

  2. Development of a Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Arnold, William; Ramsey, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The future X-ray observatory missions require grazing-incidence x-ray optics with angular resolution of polished mandrels from which the shells are replicated. With an aim to fabricate better shells, and reduce the cost/time of mandrel production, a computer-controlled polishing machine is developed for deterministic and localized polishing of mandrels. Cylindrical polishing software is also developed that predicts the surface residual errors under a given set of operating parameters and lap configuration. Design considerations of the polishing lap are discussed and the effects of nonconformance of the lap and the mandrel are presented.

  3. Unicursal random maze tool path for computer-controlled optical surfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunjin; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Qiao

    2015-12-01

    A novel unicursal random maze tool path is proposed in this paper, which can not only implement uniform coverage of the polishing surfaces, but also possesses randomness and multidirectionality. The simulation experiments along with the practical polishing experiments are conducted to make the comparison of three kinds of paths, including maze path, raster path, and Hilbert path. The experimental results validate that the maze path can warrant uniform polishing and avoid the appearance of the periodical structures in the polished surface. It is also more effective than the Hilbert path in restraining the mid-spatial frequency error in computer-controlled optical surfacing process.

  4. Monitoring foam coarsening using a computer optical mouse as a dynamic laser speckle measurement sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jáder Guerrero; Enrique Mejia-Ospino; Rafael Cabanzo

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an experimental approach to track coarsening process of foam using a computer optical mouse as a dynamic laser speckle measurement sensor. The dynamics of foam coarsening and rearrangement events cause changes in the intensity of laser speckle backscattered from the foam. A strong negative correlation between the average speed of the cursor and the evolution of bubble diameter was found. We used microscopic images to demonstrate that decrease in speed is related to increase in bubble size. The proposed set-up is not very expensive, is highly portable and can be used in laboratory measurements of dynamics in other kinds of opaque materials.

  5. Application of bilateral filtration with weight coefficients for similarity metric calculation in optical flow computation algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Titkov, V. V.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Chemezov, V. O.; Eremin, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Application of weight coefficients of the bilateral filter used to determine weighted similarity metrics of image ranges in optical flow computation algorithm that employs 3-dimension recursive search (3DRS) was investigated. By testing the algorithm applying images taken from the public test database Middlebury benchmark, the effectiveness of this weighted similarity metrics for solving the image processing problem was demonstrated. The necessity of matching the equation parameter values when calculating the weight coefficients aimed at taking into account image texture features was proved for reaching the higher noise resistance under the vector field construction. The adaptation technique which allows excluding manual determination of parameter values was proposed and its efficiency was demonstrated.

  6. Superconducting resonators as beam splitters for linear-optics quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirolli, Luca; Burkard, Guido; Kumar, Shwetank; Divincenzo, David P

    2010-06-11

    We propose and analyze a technique for producing a beam-splitting quantum gate between two modes of a ring-resonator superconducting cavity. The cavity has two integrated superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that are modulated by applying an external magnetic field. The gate is accomplished by applying a radio frequency pulse to one of the SQUIDs at the difference of the two mode frequencies. Departures from perfect beam splitting only arise from corrections to the rotating wave approximation; an exact calculation gives a fidelity of >0.9992. Our construction completes the toolkit for linear-optics quantum computing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  7. Small field dose delivery evaluations using cone beam optical computed tomography-based polymer gel dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Olding

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the combination of cone beam optical computed tomography with an N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM-based polymer gel dosimeter for three-dimensional dose imaging of small field deliveries. Initial investigations indicate that cone beam optical imaging of polymer gels is complicated by scattered stray light perturbation. This can lead to significant dosimetry failures in comparison to dose readout by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For example, only 60% of the voxels from an optical CT dose readout of a 1 l dosimeter passed a two-dimensional Low′s gamma test (at a 3%, 3 mm criteria, relative to a treatment plan for a well-characterized pencil beam delivery. When the same dosimeter was probed by MRI, a 93% pass rate was observed. The optical dose measurement was improved after modifications to the dosimeter preparation, matching its performance with the imaging capabilities of the scanner. With the new dosimeter preparation, 99.7% of the optical CT voxels passed a Low′s gamma test at the 3%, 3 mm criteria and 92.7% at a 2%, 2 mm criteria. The fitted interjar dose responses of a small sample set of modified dosimeters prepared (a from the same gel batch and (b from different gel batches prepared on the same day were found to be in agreement to within 3.6% and 3.8%, respectively, over the full dose range. Without drawing any statistical conclusions, this experiment gives a preliminary indication that intrabatch or interbatch NIPAM dosimeters prepared on the same day should be suitable for dose sensitivity calibration.

  8. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-04-07

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm(-1). For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm(-1). With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  9. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: II. Reduction using a convergent light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) using a broad beam and CCD camera is a fast method for densitometry of 3D optical gel dosimeters. However, diffuse light sources introduce considerable stray light into the imaging system, leading to underestimation of attenuation coefficients and non-uniformities in CT images unless corrections are applied to each projection image. In this study, the light source of a commercial optical CT scanner is replaced with a convergent cone beam source consisting of almost exclusively image forming primary rays. The convergent source is achieved using a small isotropic source and a Fresnel lens. To characterize stray light effects, full-field cone beam CT imaging is compared to fan beam CT (FBCT) using a 1 cm high fan beam aperture centered on the optic axis of the system. Attenuating liquids are scanned within a large 96 mm diameter uniform phantom and in a small 13.5 mm diameter finger phantom. For the uniform phantom, cone and fan beam CT attenuation coefficients agree within a maximum deviation of (1  ±  2)% between mean values over a wide range from 0.036 to 0.43 cm-1. For the finger phantom, agreement is found with a maximum deviation of (4  ±  2)% between mean values over a range of 0.1-0.47 cm-1. With the convergent source, artifacts associated with refractive index mismatch and vessel optical features are more pronounced. Further optimization of the source size to achieve a balance between quantitative accuracy and artifact reduction should enable practical, accurate 3D dosimetry, avoiding time consuming 3D scatter measurements.

  10. Computer-aided diagnosis of breast MRI with high accuracy optical flow estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Baese, Anke; Barbu, Adrian; Lobbes, Marc; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Burgeth, Bernhard; Kleefeld, Andreas; Meyer-Bäse, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    Non-mass enhancing lesions represent a challenge for the radiological reading. They are not well-defined in both morphology (geometric shape) and kinetics (temporal enhancement) and pose a problem to lesion detection and classification. To enhance the discriminative properties of an automated radiological workflow, the correct preprocessing steps need to be taken. In an usual computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system, motion compensation plays an important role. To this end, we employ a new high accuracy optical flow based motion compensation algorithm with robustification variants. An automated computer-aided diagnosis system evaluates the atypical behavior of these lesions, and additionally considers the impact of non-rigid motion compensation on a correct diagnosis.

  11. Application of optical tweezers using DOE and SLM to control of beads with information-DNA for photonic DNA computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, M. J.; Ogura, Y.; Tanida, J.

    2008-03-01

    We have proposed photonic DNA computing as a new parallel computing paradigm, in which optical techniques are used to manipulate information-coded DNA. In this paper, we present a parallel transportation of multiple beads bound with hairpin-structure DNA using a dynamic optical tweezers system which combines a spatial light modulator (SLM) with a diffractive optical element (DOE). This system provides and effective method for parallel manipulations of DNA-bound beads at multiple positions. In the experiments, three 2.8-μm-diameter beads bound with hairpin DNA were trapped and transported in 1 μm of step by switching of the SLM patterns. The results demonstrate that the dynamic holographic optical tweezers system with combination of the DOE and the SLM is useful in spatially parallel processing required for photonic DNA computing.

  12. Effective method to compute Franck-Condon integrals for optical spectra of large molecules in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Fabrizio; Improta, Roberto; Lami, Alessandro; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2007-02-28

    The authors present a new method for the computation of vibrationally resolved optical spectra of large molecules, including the Duschinsky [Acta Physicochim. URSS 7, 551 (1937)] rotation of the normal modes. The method automatically selects the relevant vibronic contributions to the spectrum, independent of their frequency, and it is able to provide fully converged spectra with a quite modest computational time, both in vacuo and in condensed phase. Starting from the rigorous time-dependent expression they discuss indeed in which limits the spectrum of a molecule embedded in a solvent, described as a polarizable continuum, can be computed in a time-independent formalism, defining both nonequilibrium and equilibrium limits. In these cases the polarizable continuum model provides a suitable description of the solvent field. By computing the absorption spectra of anthracene in gas phase and of coumarin C153 in gas phase and cyclohexane, and the phosphorescence spectrum of the unsubstituted coumarin in ethanol they show that the method is fast and efficient.

  13. Computational Combination of the Optical Properties of Fenestration Layers at High Directional Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Oliver Grobe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex fenestration systems typically comprise co-planar, clear and scattering layers. As there are many ways to combine layers in fenestration systems, a common approach in building simulation is to store optical properties separate for each layer. System properties are then computed employing a fast matrix formalism, often based on a directional basis devised by JHKlems comprising 145 incident and 145 outgoing directions. While this low directional resolution is found sufficient to predict illuminance and solar gains, it is too coarse to replicate the effects of directionality in the generation of imagery. For increased accuracy, a modification of the matrix formalism is proposed. The tensor-tree format of RADIANCE, employing an algorithm subdividing the hemisphere at variable resolutions, replaces the directional basis. The utilization of the tensor-tree with interfaces to simulation software allows sharing and re-use of data. The light scattering properties of two exemplary fenestration systems as computed employing the matrix formalism at variable resolution show good accordance with the results of ray-tracing. Computation times are reduced to 0.4% to 2.5% compared to ray-tracing through co-planar layers. Imagery computed employing the method illustrates the effect of directional resolution. The method is supposed to foster research in the field of daylighting, as well as applications in planning and design.

  14. Design and construction of an optical computed tomography scanner for polymer gel dosimetry application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Mesbahi, Asghar; Keshtkar, Ahmad; Azimirad, Vahid

    2014-04-01

    Polymer gel dosimeter is the only accurate three dimensional (3D) dosimeter that can measure the absorbed dose distribution in a perfect 3D setting. Gel dosimetry by using optical computed tomography (OCT) has been promoted by several researches. In the current study, we designed and constructed a prototype OCT system for gel dosimetry. First, the electrical system for optical scanning of the gel container using a Helium-Neon laser and a photocell was designed and constructed. Then, the mechanical part for two rotational and translational motions was designed and step motors were assembled to it. The data coming from photocell was grabbed by the home-built interface and sent to a personal computer. Data processing was carried out using MATLAB software. To calibrate the system and tune up the functionality of it, different objects was designed and scanned. Furthermore, the spatial and contrast resolution of the system was determined. The system was able to scan the gel dosimeter container with a diameter up to 11 cm inside the water phantom. The standard deviation of the pixels within water flask image was considered as the criteria for image uniformity. The uniformity of the system was about ±0.05%. The spatial resolution of the system was approximately 1 mm and contrast resolution was about 0.2%. Our primary results showed that this system is able to obtain two-dimensional, cross-sectional images from polymer gel samples.

  15. VELOCITY FIELD COMPUTATION IN VIBRATED GRANULAR MEDIA USING AN OPTICAL FLOW BASED MULTISCALE IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Debayle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An image analysis method has been developed in order to compute the velocity field of a granular medium (sand grains, mean diameter 600 μm submitted to different kinds of mechanical stresses. The differential method based on optical flow conservation consists in describing a dense motion field with vectors associated to each pixel. A multiscale, coarse-to-fine, analytical approach through tailor sized windows yields the best compromise between accuracy and robustness of the results, while enabling an acceptable computation time. The corresponding algorithmis presented and its validation discussed through different tests. The results of the validation tests of the proposed approach show that the method is satisfactory when attributing specific values to parameters in association with the size of the image analysis window. An application in the case of vibrated sand has been studied. An instrumented laboratory device provides sinusoidal vibrations and enables external optical observations of sand motion in 3D transparent boxes. At 50 Hz, by increasing the relative acceleration G, the onset and development of two convective rolls can be observed. An ultra fast camera records the grain avalanches, and several pairs of images are analysed by the proposed method. The vertical velocity profiles are deduced and allow to precisely quantify the dimensions of the fluidized region as a function of G.

  16. Computational modeling of optical projection tomographic microscopy using the finite difference time domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Ryan L; Seibel, Eric J

    2012-12-01

    We present a method for modeling image formation in optical projection tomographic microscopy (OPTM) using high numerical aperture (NA) condensers and objectives. Similar to techniques used in computed tomography, OPTM produces three-dimensional, reconstructed images of single cells from two-dimensional projections. The model is capable of simulating axial scanning of a microscope objective to produce projections, which are reconstructed using filtered backprojection. Simulation of optical scattering in transmission optical microscopy is designed to analyze all aspects of OPTM image formation, such as degree of specimen staining, refractive-index matching, and objective scanning. In this preliminary work, a set of simulations is performed to examine the effect of changing the condenser NA, objective scan range, and complex refractive index on the final reconstruction of a microshell with an outer radius of 1.5 μm and an inner radius of 0.9 μm. The model lays the groundwork for optimizing OPTM imaging parameters and triaging efforts to further improve the overall system design. As the model is expanded in the future, it will be used to simulate a more realistic cell, which could lead to even greater impact.

  17. Frequency-domain analysis of computer-controlled optical surfacing processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Mid-high spatial frequency errors are often induced on optical surfaces polished by computer-controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) processes. In order to efficiently remove these errors, which would degrade the performances of optical systems, the ability of a CCOS process to correct the errors have been investigated based on the convolution integral model in view of the availability of material removal. To quantify the ability, some conceptions, such as figure correcting ability and material removal availability (MRA), have been proposed. The research result reveals that the MRA of the CCOS process to correct a single spatial frequency error is determined by its tool removal function (TRF), and it equals the normalized amplitude spectrum of the Fourier transform of its TRF. Finally, three sine surfaces were etched using ion beam figuring (IBF), which is a typical CCOS process. The experimental results have verified the theoretical analysis. The employed method and the conclusions of this work provide a useful mathematical basis to analyze and optimize CCOS processes.

  18. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J., E-mail: jurzay@stanford.edu; Mani, A. [Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-3024 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers and induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after introduction of

  19. Rapid Classification of Imaged Objects Using Molecular Factor and Multivariate Optical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Megan Renee

    Unique algorithm development is vital for the success of novel instrumentation. Our lab has focused on the design of imaging systems based on molecular factor and multivariate optical computing. A simulation-driven design approach was utilized to develop a multimode infrared imaging system for chemical contrast enhancement. This infrared thermal imaging system is based on molecular factor (MFC) and lockin computing methods. MFC was accomplished with filter elements made of thin organic films deposited on IR-transparent substrates and allows a system response to be tuned to a specific analyte. Unique algorithms were written in-house using MatLabRTM (The Mathworks, Natick, MA). The algorithms used a lock-in computing technique to amplify the diffuse re ectance signal, which is only a few percent of the total signal. Intensive thin film studies were conducted to understand the effects of films on fabric to improve our simulation-driven design approach. A prototype instrument has been validated through the production of a real setup. We have shown that it is able to detect trace amounts of blood diluted in water (as small as 1:100) on fabric as well as differentiate blood from common false positives of other blood detection methods (i.e., luminol). The second imaging system was designed for the differentiation of phytoplankton species in the ocean. Multivariate optical computing (MOC) was applied to the uorescence excitation spectra of individual phytoplankton cells to design multivariate optical elements (MOEs). MOEs are filters fabricated to mimic linear discriminants analysis (LDA) results based on plankton spectroscopy. The imaging system uses these MOEs housed in a filter wheel to produce "streak" images of phytoplankton as they flow past a CCD camera, with each streak having the appearance of a barcode whose intensities are related to scores of the plankton spectra on linear discriminant functions. Algorithms for this system have been designed to automatically

  20. Characterization of ion-assisted induced absorption in A-Si thin-films used for multivariate optical computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Aditya B.; Price, James M.; Dai, Bin; Perkins, David; Chen, Ding Ding; Jones, Christopher M.

    2015-06-01

    Multivariate optical computing (MOC), an optical sensing technique for analog calculation, allows direct and robust measurement of chemical and physical properties of complex fluid samples in high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) downhole environments. The core of this MOC technology is the integrated computational element (ICE), an optical element with a wavelength-dependent transmission spectrum designed to allow the detector to respond sensitively and specifically to the analytes of interest. A key differentiator of this technology is it uses all of the information present in the broadband optical spectrum to determine the proportion of the analyte present in a complex fluid mixture. The detection methodology is photometric in nature; therefore, this technology does not require a spectrometer to measure and record a spectrum or a computer to perform calculations on the recorded optical spectrum. The integrated computational element is a thin-film optical element with a specific optical response function designed for each analyte. The optical response function is achieved by fabricating alternating layers of high-index (a-Si) and low-index (SiO2) thin films onto a transparent substrate (BK7 glass) using traditional thin-film manufacturing processes (e.g., ion-assisted e-beam vacuum deposition). A proprietary software and process are used to control the thickness and material properties, including the optical constants of the materials during deposition to achieve the desired optical response function. The ion-assisted deposition is useful for controlling the densification of the film, stoichiometry, and material optical constants as well as to achieve high deposition growth rates and moisture-stable films. However, the ion-source can induce undesirable absorption in the film; and subsequently, modify the optical constants of the material during the ramp-up and stabilization period of the e-gun and ion-source, respectively. This paper characterizes the unwanted

  1. Computer generated hologram null test of a freeform optical surface with rectangular aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Ma, Jianshe; Tan, Qiaofeng; Kang, Guoguo; Liu, Yi; Jin, Guofan

    2012-02-01

    In null computed generated hologram (CGH) test of optical elements, fitting method is needed in null CGH design to generate continuous phase function from the ray-traced discrete phase data. The null CGH for freeform testing usually has a deformed aperture and a high order phase function, because of the aberrations introduced by freeform wavefront propagation. With traditional Zernike polynomial fitting method, selection of an orthogonal basis set and choosing number of terms are needed before fitting. Zernike polynomial fitting method is not suitable in null CGH design for freeform testing; a novel CGH design method with cubic B-spline interpolation is developed. For a freeform surface with 18×18 mm2 rectangular aperture and 630 μm peak-to-valley undulation, the null CGH with a curved rectangular aperture is designed by using the method proposed. Simulation and experimental results proved the feasibility of the novel CGH design method.

  2. Computational optical distortion correction using a radial basis function-based mapping method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Aaron; Vo, Sophie; Parkins, Keith; Rodriguez, Francisco; Cakmakci, Ozan; Rolland, Jannick P

    2012-07-01

    A distortion mapping and computational image unwarping method based on a network interpolation that uses radial basis functions is presented. The method is applied to correct distortion in an off-axis head-worn display (HWD) presenting up to 23% highly asymmetric distortion over a 27°x21° field of view. A 10(-5) mm absolute error of the mapping function over the field of view was achieved. The unwarping efficacy was assessed using the image-rendering feature of optical design software. Correlation coefficients between unwarped images seen through the HWD and the original images, as well as edge superimposition results, are presented. In an experiment, images are prewarped using radial basis functions for a recently built, off-axis HWD with a 20° diagonal field of view in a 4:3 ratio. Real-time video is generated by a custom application with 2 ms added latency and is demonstrated.

  3. Computed anatomical modelling of the optic pathway and oculomotor system using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanes, J A; Ruisoto, P; Prats-Galino, A; Framiñán, A; Riesco, J M

    2014-07-01

    This study presents a computer-based tool for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of the optic pathway and oculomotor system using 3D high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets from a healthy subject. The 3D models were built as wireframe grids co-registered with MRI sections. First, 3D anatomical models were generated of the visual pathway from the eyeball to the primary visual cortex and of the cranial oculomotor nerves from the brain stem to the extrinsic eye muscles. Second, a graphical user interface allowed individual and group visualization, translation, rotation and zooming of the 3D models in different spatial positions simultaneously with MRI orthogonal cut planes. Educational and clinical applications are also discussed.

  4. Cryptanalysis and security enhancement of optical cryptography based on computational ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Yao, Jianbin; Liu, Xuemei; Zhou, Xin; Li, Zhongyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical cryptography based on computational ghost imaging (CGI) has attracted much attention of researchers because it encrypts plaintext into a random intensity vector rather than complexed-valued function. This promising feature of the CGI-based cryptography reduces the amount of data to be transmitted and stored and therefore brings convenience in practice. However, we find that this cryptography is vulnerable to chosen-plaintext attack because of the linear relationship between the input and output of the encryption system, and three feasible strategies are proposed to break it in this paper. Even though a large number of plaintexts need to be chosen in these attack methods, it means that this cryptography still exists security risks. To avoid these attacks, a security enhancement method utilizing an invertible matrix modulation is further discussed and the feasibility is verified by numerical simulations.

  5. Simulation of radiation effects on three-dimensional computer optical memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovitch, M.; Emfietzoglou, D.

    1997-01-01

    A model was developed to simulate the effects of heavy charged-particle (HCP) radiation on the information stored in three-dimensional computer optical memories. The model is based on (i) the HCP track radial dose distribution, (ii) the spatial and temporal distribution of temperature in the track, (iii) the matrix-specific radiation-induced changes that will affect the response, and (iv) the kinetics of transition of photochromic molecules from the colored to the colorless isomeric form (bit flip). It is shown that information stored in a volume of several nanometers radius around the particle's track axis may be lost. The magnitude of the effect is dependent on the particle's track structure.

  6. A lensless optical security system based on computer-generated phase only masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Guohai; Zhang, Jingjuan

    2004-03-01

    A lensless optical security system based on computer generated phase only masks is proposed in the present paper. These masks are located at determined positions along the direction of propagation so as to decrypt the target image. These positions coordinates are used as encoding parameters as well as the wavelength in the encryption process. Compared with previous studies, the proposed system has three significant advantages: first, it is lensless and therefore can minimize the hardware requirement and is much easier to implement. Second, the proposed system uses the wavelength and the position parameters besides the phase codes as additional keys and consequently achieves much higher security. Finally, the encrypted data can be directly transmitted via communication lines and then decrypted with the correct wavelength and the position parameters at the receiver. Applications and implementation considerations of the proposed system are also discussed.

  7. Modeling of edge effect in subaperture tool influence functions of computer controlled optical surfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Songlin; Zhang, Xiangchao; He, Xiaoying; Xu, Min

    2016-12-20

    Computer controlled optical surfacing requires an accurate tool influence function (TIF) for reliable path planning and deterministic fabrication. Near the edge of the workpieces, the TIF has a nonlinear removal behavior, which will cause a severe edge-roll phenomenon. In the present paper, a new edge pressure model is developed based on the finite element analysis results. The model is represented as the product of a basic pressure function and a correcting function. The basic pressure distribution is calculated according to the surface shape of the polishing pad, and the correcting function is used to compensate the errors caused by the edge effect. Practical experimental results demonstrate that the new model can accurately predict the edge TIFs with different overhang ratios. The relative error of the new edge model can be reduced to 15%.

  8. Edge control in a computer controlled optical surfacing process using a heterocercal tool influence function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haixiang; Zhang, Xin; Ford, Virginia; Luo, Xiao; Qi, Erhui; Zeng, Xuefeng; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-11-14

    Edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues in a computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) process. Traditional opticians have to even up the consequences of the two following cases. Operating CCOS in a large overhang condition affects the accuracy of material removal, while in a small overhang condition, it achieves a more accurate performance, but leaves a narrow rolled-up edge, which takes time and effort to remove. In order to control the edge residuals in the latter case, we present a new concept of the 'heterocercal' tool influence function (TIF). Generated from compound motion equipment, this type of TIF can 'transfer' the material removal from the inner place to the edge, meanwhile maintaining the high accuracy and efficiency of CCOS. We call it the 'heterocercal' TIF, because of the inspiration from the heterocercal tails of sharks, whose upper lobe provides most of the explosive power. The heterocercal TIF was theoretically analyzed, and physically realized in CCOS facilities. Experimental and simulation results showed good agreement. It enables significant control of the edge effect and convergence of entire surface errors in large tool-to-mirror size-ratio conditions. This improvement will largely help manufacturing efficiency in some extremely large optical system projects, like the tertiary mirror of the Thirty Meter Telescope.

  9. Study of weighted space deconvolution algorithm in computer controlled optical surfacing formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Li; Wei Zhang; Guoyu Yu

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental research on the deconvolution algorithm of dwell time in the technology of computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) formation is made to get an ultra-smooth surface of space optical element. Based on the Preston equation, the convolution model of CCOS is deduced. Considering the morbidity problem of deconvolution algorithm and the actual situation of CCOS technology, the weighting spatial deconvolution algorithm is presented based on the non-periodic matrix model, which avoids solving morbidity resulting from the noise induced by measurement error. The discrete convolution equation is solved using conjugate gradient iterative method and the workload of iterative calculation in spatial domain is reduced effectively. Considering the edge effect of convolution algorithm, the method adopts a marginal factor to control the edge precision and attains a good effect. The simulated processing test shows that the convergence ratio of processed surface shape error reaches 80%. This algorithm is further verified through an experiment on a numerical control bonnet polishing machine, and an ultra-smooth glass surface with the root-mean-square (RMS) error of 0.0088 μm is achieved. The simulation and experimental results indicate that this algorithm is steady, convergent, and precise, and it can satisfy the solving requirement of actual dwell time.

  10. VPIsystems industry training program on computer-aided design of fiber optic communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andre; Chan, David K. C.

    2002-05-01

    In industry today, professional Photonic Design Automation (PDA) tools are a necessity to enable fast development cycles for the design of optical components, systems and networks. The training of industrial personnel is of great importance in facilitating the full usability of PDA tools tailored to meet these demands. As the market leader of design and planning tools for system integrators and manufacturers of optical transmission systems and components, VPIsystems offers a set of two-day training courses. Attendees are taught on the design of metro WDM networks, high speed DWDM and ultra long-haul WDM systems, analogue and digital cable access systems, EDFA and Raman amplifiers, as well as active devices and circuits. The course work compromises of: (1) lectures on physical and modeling background topics; (2) creation of typical simulation scenarios and; (3) the analysis of results. This course work is facilitated by guided, hands-on lab exercises using VPIsystems software for a variety of practical design situations. In classes of up to 15, each attendee is allocated a computer, thereby allowing for a thorough and speedy training for the individual in all of the covered topics as well as for any extra-curriculum topics to be covered. Since 1999, more than 750 people have graduated from over 60 training courses. In this paper, details of VPIsystems Industry training program will be presented.

  11. A fast inverse consistent deformable image registration method based on symmetric optical flow computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deshan; Li, Hua; Low, Daniel A.; Deasy, Joseph O.; El Naqa, Issam

    2008-11-01

    Deformable image registration is widely used in various radiation therapy applications including daily treatment planning adaptation to map planned tissue or dose to changing anatomy. In this work, a simple and efficient inverse consistency deformable registration method is proposed with aims of higher registration accuracy and faster convergence speed. Instead of registering image I to a second image J, the two images are symmetrically deformed toward one another in multiple passes, until both deformed images are matched and correct registration is therefore achieved. In each pass, a delta motion field is computed by minimizing a symmetric optical flow system cost function using modified optical flow algorithms. The images are then further deformed with the delta motion field in the positive and negative directions respectively, and then used for the next pass. The magnitude of the delta motion field is forced to be less than 0.4 voxel for every pass in order to guarantee smoothness and invertibility for the two overall motion fields that are accumulating the delta motion fields in both positive and negative directions, respectively. The final motion fields to register the original images I and J, in either direction, are calculated by inverting one overall motion field and combining the inversion result with the other overall motion field. The final motion fields are inversely consistent and this is ensured by the symmetric way that registration is carried out. The proposed method is demonstrated with phantom images, artificially deformed patient images and 4D-CT images. Our results suggest that the proposed method is able to improve the overall accuracy (reducing registration error by 30% or more, compared to the original and inversely inconsistent optical flow algorithms), reduce the inverse consistency error (by 95% or more) and increase the convergence rate (by 100% or more). The overall computation speed may slightly decrease, or increase in most cases

  12. A fast inverse consistent deformable image registration method based on symmetric optical flow computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Deshan; Li Hua; Low, Daniel A; Deasy, Joseph O; Naqa, Issam El [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, 4921 Parkview Place, LL, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2008-11-07

    Deformable image registration is widely used in various radiation therapy applications including daily treatment planning adaptation to map planned tissue or dose to changing anatomy. In this work, a simple and efficient inverse consistency deformable registration method is proposed with aims of higher registration accuracy and faster convergence speed. Instead of registering image I to a second image J, the two images are symmetrically deformed toward one another in multiple passes, until both deformed images are matched and correct registration is therefore achieved. In each pass, a delta motion field is computed by minimizing a symmetric optical flow system cost function using modified optical flow algorithms. The images are then further deformed with the delta motion field in the positive and negative directions respectively, and then used for the next pass. The magnitude of the delta motion field is forced to be less than 0.4 voxel for every pass in order to guarantee smoothness and invertibility for the two overall motion fields that are accumulating the delta motion fields in both positive and negative directions, respectively. The final motion fields to register the original images I and J, in either direction, are calculated by inverting one overall motion field and combining the inversion result with the other overall motion field. The final motion fields are inversely consistent and this is ensured by the symmetric way that registration is carried out. The proposed method is demonstrated with phantom images, artificially deformed patient images and 4D-CT images. Our results suggest that the proposed method is able to improve the overall accuracy (reducing registration error by 30% or more, compared to the original and inversely inconsistent optical flow algorithms), reduce the inverse consistency error (by 95% or more) and increase the convergence rate (by 100% or more). The overall computation speed may slightly decrease, or increase in most cases

  13. Optical diagnostics of a single evaporating droplet using fast parallel computing on graphics processing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubczyk, D.; Migacz, S.; Derkachov, G.; Woźniak, M.; Archer, J.; Kolwas, K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the first application of the graphics processing units (GPUs) accelerated computing technology to improve performance of numerical methods used for the optical characterization of evaporating microdroplets. Single microdroplets of various liquids with different volatility and molecular weight (glycerine, glycols, water, etc.), as well as mixtures of liquids and diverse suspensions evaporate inside the electrodynamic trap under the chosen temperature and composition of atmosphere. The series of scattering patterns recorded from the evaporating microdroplets are processed by fitting complete Mie theory predictions with gradientless lookup table method. We showed that computations on GPUs can be effectively applied to inverse scattering problems. In particular, our technique accelerated calculations of the Mie scattering theory on a single-core processor in a Matlab environment over 800 times and almost 100 times comparing to the corresponding code in C language. Additionally, we overcame problems of the time-consuming data post-processing when some of the parameters (particularly the refractive index) of an investigated liquid are uncertain. Our program allows us to track the parameters characterizing the evaporating droplet nearly simultaneously with the progress of evaporation.

  14. The coefficient of error of optical fractionator population size estimates: a computer simulation comparing three estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, E M; Wilson, P D

    1998-11-01

    The optical fractionator is a design-based two-stage systematic sampling method that is used to estimate the number of cells in a specified region of an organ when the population is too large to count exhaustively. The fractionator counts the cells found in optical disectors that have been systematically sampled in serial sections. Heretofore, evaluations of optical fractionator performance have been made by performing tests on actual tissue sections, but it is difficult to evaluate the coefficient of error (CE), i.e. the precision of a population size estimate, by using biological tissue samples because they do not permit a comparison of an estimated CE with the true CE. However, computer simulation does permit making such comparisons while avoiding the observational biases inherent in working with biological tissue. This study is the first instance in which computer simulation has been applied to population size estimation by the optical fractionator. We used computer simulation to evaluate the performance of three CE estimators. The estimated CEs were evaluated in tests of three types of non-random cell population distribution and one random cell population distribution. The non-random population distributions varied by differences in 'intensity', i.e. the expected cell counts per disector, according to both section and disector location within the section. Two distributions were sinusoidal and one was linearly increasing; in all three there was a six-fold difference between the high and low intensities. The sinusoidal distributions produced either a peak or a depression of cell intensity at the centre of the simulated region. The linear cell intensity gradually increased from the beginning to the end of the region that contained the cells. The random population distribution had a constant intensity over the region. A 'test condition' was defined by its population distribution, the period between consecutive sampled sections and the spacing between consecutive

  15. Experimental, computational, and analytical techniques for diagnosing breast cancer using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Gregory M.

    This dissertation presents the results of an investigation into experimental, computational, and analytical methodologies for diagnosing breast cancer using fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. First, the optimal experimental methodology for tissue biopsy studies was determined using an animal study. It was found that the use of freshly excised tissue samples preserved the original spectral line shape and magnitude of the fluorescence and diffuse reflectance. Having established the optimal experimental methodology, a clinical study investigating the use of fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the diagnosis of breast cancer was undertaken. In addition, Monte Carlo-based models of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence were developed and validated to interpret these data. These models enable the extraction of physically meaningful information from the measured spectra, including absorber concentrations, and scattering and intrinsic fluorescence properties. The model was applied to the measured spectra, and using a support vector machine classification algorithm based on physical features extracted from the diffuse reflectance spectra, it was found that breast cancer could be diagnosed with a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 92%, respectively, which are substantially better than that obtained using a conventional, empirical algorithm. It was found that malignant tissues had lower hemoglobin oxygen saturation, were more scattering, and had lower beta-carotene concentration, relative to the non-malignant tissues. It was also found that the fluorescence model could successfully extract the intrinsic fluorescence line shape from tissue samples. One limitation of the previous study is that a priori knowledge of the tissue's absorbers and scatterers is required. To address this limitation, and to improve upon the method with which fiber optic probes are designed, an alternate approach was developed. This method used a

  16. Use Of The SYSCAP 2.5 Computer Analysis Program For Advanced Optical System Design And Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, C. T.

    1983-10-01

    The successful development of various electro-optical systems is highly dependent on precise electronic circuit design which must account for possible parameter drift in the various piece parts. The utilization of a comprehensive computer analysis program (SYSCAP) provides the electro-optical system designer and electro-optical management organization with a well-structured tool for a comprehensive system analysis'. As a result, the techniques described in this paper can be readily used by the electro-optical design community. An improved version of the SYSCAP computer program (version 2.5) is presented which inncludes the following new advances: (1) the introduction of a standard macro library that permits call-up of proven mathematical models for system modeling and simulation, (2) the introduction of improved semiconductor models for bipolar junction transistors and p-n junctions, (3) multifunction modeling capability to link signals with very high speed electronic circuit models, (4) high resolution computer graphics (both interactive and batch process) for display and permanent records, and (5) compatibility and interface with ad-vanced engineering work stations. This 2.5* version of the present SYSCAP 2 computer analysis program will be available for use through the Control Data Corporation world-wide Cybernet system in 1983*. This paper provides an overview of SYSCAP modeling and simulation capabilities.

  17. Diagnostic ability of Barrett's index to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy using multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Mario L.R.; Goncalves, Allan C.P.; Silva, Carla T.M.; Moura, Janete P.; Ribeiro, Carolina S.; Gebrim, Eloisa M.M.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Division of Ophthalmology; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. of Endocrinology; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Division of Radiology]. E-mail: mlrmonteiro@terra.com.br

    2008-07-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a muscular index (Barrett's Index), calculated with multidetector computed tomography, to detect dysthyroid optic neuropathy in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. Methods: Thirty-six patients with Graves' orbitopathy were prospectively studied and submitted to neuro-ophthalmic evaluation and multidetector computed tomography scans of the orbits. Orbits were divided into two groups: those with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy. Barrett's index was calculated as the percentage of the orbit occupied by muscles. Sensitivity and specificity were determined for several index values. Results: Sixty-four orbits (19 with and 45 without dysthyroid optic neuropathy) met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean Barrett's index values ({+-}SD) were 64.47% {+-} 6.06% and 49.44% {+-} 10.94% in the groups with and without dysthyroid optic neuropathy, respectively (p<0.001). Barrett's index sensitivity ranged from 32% to 100%, and Barrett's index specificity ranged from 24% to 100%. The best combination of sensitivity and specificity was 79%/72% for BI=60% (odds ratio: 9.2). Conclusions: Barrett's Index is a useful indicator of dysthyroid optic neuropathy and may contribute to early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with a Barrett's index >60% should be carefully examined and followed for the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. (author)

  18. Impairments Computation for Routing Purposes in a Transparent-Access Optical Network Based on Optical CDMA and WDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Optical access networks are becoming more widespread and the use of multiple services might require a transparent optical network (TON). Multiplexing and privacy could benefit from the combination of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and optical coding (OC) and wavelength conversion in optical switches. The routing process needs to be cognizant of different resource types and characteristics such as fiber types, fiber linear impairments such as attenuation, dispersion, etc. as well as fiber nonlinear impairments such as four-wave mixing, cross-phase modulation, etc. Other types of impairments, generated by optical nodes or photonic switches, also affect the signal quality (Q) or the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR), which is related to the bit error rate (BER). Therefore, both link and switch impairments must be addressed and somehow incorporated into the routing algorithm. However, it is not practical to fully integrate all photonic-specific attributes in the routing process. In this study, new routing parameters and constraints are defined that reflect the distinct characteristics of photonic networking. These constraints are applied to the design phase of TON and expressed as a cost or metric form that will be used in the network routing algorithm.

  19. Computing approximate blocking probability of inverse multiplexing and sub-band conversion in the flexible-grid optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yamei; You, Shanhong

    2016-07-01

    With the rapid growth of data rate, the optical network is evolving from fixed-grid to flexible-grid to provide spectrum-efficient and scalable transport of 100 Gb/s services and beyond. Also, the deployment of wavelength converter in the existing network can increase the flexibility of routing and wavelength allocation (RWA) and improve blocking performance of the optical networks. In this paper, we present a methodology for computing approximate blocking probabilities of the provision of multiclass services in the flexible-grid optical networks with sub-band spectrum conversion and inverse multiplexing respectively. Numerical calculation results based on the model are compared to the simulation results for the different cases. It is shown that the calculation results match well with the simulation results for the flexible-grid optical networks at different scenarios.

  20. Computing the total atmospheric refraction for real-time optical imaging sensor simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Richard F.

    2015-05-01

    Fast and accurate computation of light path deviation due to atmospheric refraction is an important requirement for real-time simulation of optical imaging sensor systems. A large body of existing literature covers various methods for application of Snell's Law to the light path ray tracing problem. This paper provides a discussion of the adaptation to real time simulation of atmospheric refraction ray tracing techniques used in mid-1980's LOWTRAN releases. The refraction ray trace algorithm published in a LOWTRAN-6 technical report by Kneizys (et. al.) has been coded in MATLAB for development, and in C-language for simulation use. To this published algorithm we have added tuning parameters for variable path segment lengths, and extensions for Earth grazing and exoatmospheric "near Earth" ray paths. Model atmosphere properties used to exercise the refraction algorithm were obtained from tables published in another LOWTRAN-6 related report. The LOWTRAN-6 based refraction model is applicable to atmospheric propagation at wavelengths in the IR and visible bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. It has been used during the past two years by engineers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) in support of several advanced imaging sensor simulations. Recently, a faster (but sufficiently accurate) method using Gauss-Chebyshev Quadrature integration for evaluating the refraction integral was adopted.

  1. HEADING RECOVERY FROM OPTIC FLOW: COMPARING PERFORMANCE OF HUMANS AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Foulkes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human observers can perceive their direction of heading with a precision of about a degree. Several computational models of the processes underpinning the perception of heading have been proposed. In the present study we set out to assess which of four candidate models best captured human performance; the four models we selected reflected key differences in terms of approach and methods to modelling optic flow processing to recover movement parameters. We first generated a performance profile for human observers by measuring how performance changed as we systematically manipulated both the quantity (number of dots in the stimulus per frame and quality (amount of 2D directional noise of the flow field information. We then generated comparable performance profiles for the four candidate models. Models varied markedly in terms of both their performance and similarity to human data. To formally assess the match between the models and human performance we regressed the output of each of the four models against human performance data. We were able to rule out two models that produced very different performance profiles to human observers. The remaining two shared some similarities with human performance profiles in terms of the magnitude and pattern of thresholds. However none of the models tested could capture all aspect of the human data.

  2. Error in the sampling area of an optical disdrometer: consequences in computing rain variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, R; Castro, A; Fernández-Raga, M; Palencia, C; Calvo, A I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the estimation of the characteristic uncertainties of optic disdrometers in an attempt to calculate the efficient sampling area according to the size of the drop and to study how this influences the computation of other parameters, taking into account that the real sampling area is always smaller than the nominal area. For large raindrops (a little over 6 mm), the effective sampling area may be half the area indicated by the manufacturer. The error committed in the sampling area is propagated to all the variables depending on this surface, such as the rain intensity and the reflectivity factor. Both variables tend to underestimate the real value if the sampling area is not corrected. For example, the rainfall intensity errors may be up to 50% for large drops, those slightly larger than 6 mm. The same occurs with reflectivity values, which may be up to twice the reflectivity calculated using the uncorrected constant sampling area. The Z-R relationships appear to have little dependence on the sampling area, because both variables depend on it the same way. These results were obtained by studying one particular rain event that occurred on April 16, 2006.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  4. Laser Plasmas : Lie-optic matrix algorithm for computer simulation of paraxial self-focusing in a plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Subbarao; R Uma; Kamal Goyal; Sanjeev Goyal; Karuna Batra

    2000-11-01

    Propagation algorithm for computer simulation of stationary paraxial self-focusing laser beam in a medium with saturating nonlinearity is given in Lie-optic form. Accordingly, a very natural piece-wise continuous Lie transformation that reduces to a restricted Lorentz group of the beam results. It gives rise to a matrix method for self-focusing beam propagation that is constructed and implemented. Although the results use plasma nonlinearities of saturable type, and a gaussian initial beam, these results are applicable for other media like linear optical fibers and to more general situations.

  5. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  6. Optical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, S. C.

    1985-12-01

    The technical contributions were as follows: (1) Optical parallel 2-D neighborhood processor and optical processor assessment technique; (2) High accuracy with moderately accurate components and optical fredkin gate architectures; (3) Integrated optical threshold computing, pipelined polynomial processor, and all optical analog/digital converter; (4) Adaptive optical associative memory model with attention; (5) Effectiveness of parallelism and connectivity in optical computers; (6) Optical systolic array processing using an integrated acoustooptic module; (7) Optical threshold elements and networks, holographic threshold processors, adaptive matched spatial filtering, and coherence theory in optical computing; (8) Time-varying optical processing for sub-pixel targets, optical Kalman filtering, and adaptive matched filtering; (9) Optical degrees of freedom, ultra short optical pulses, number representations, content-addressable-memory processors, and integrated optical Givens rotation devices; (10) Optical J-K flip flop analysis and interfacing for optical computers; (11) Matrix multiplication algorithms and limits of incoherent optical computers; (12) Architecture for machine vision with sensor fusion, pattern recognition functions, and neural net implementations; (13) Optical computing algorithms, architectures, and components; and (14) Dynamic optical interconnections, advantages and architectures.

  7. Optically stimulated luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz due to repeated use in single aliquot readout: Experiments and computer simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a study to examine sensitivity changes in single aliquot techniques using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) a series of experiments has been conducted with single aliquots of natural quartz, and the data compared with the results of computer simulations of the type of processes...... believed to be occurring. The computer model used includes both shallow and deep ('hard-to-bleach') traps, OSL ('easy-to-bleach') traps, and radiative and non-radiative recombination centres. The model has previously been used successfully to account for sensitivity changes in quartz due to thermal...... trap and deep trap effects....

  8. Tailorable optical scattering properties of the V-shaped plasmonic nano-antennas: a computationally efficient and fast analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rashidi, Arash; Anagnostou, Dimitris E

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an efficient computational scheme based on Macro Basis Function (MBF) method, to analyze the scattering of a plane wave by the V-shaped plasmonic optical nano-antennas. The polarization currents and the scattered fields for symmetric and anti-symmetric excitations are investigated. We investigate how the resonant frequency of the plasmonic V-shaped nanoantenna is tailored by engineering the geometrical parameters and by changing the polarization state of the incident plane wave. The computational model presented herein is faster by orders of magnitude than commercially available finite methods and is capable to characterize also other nanoantennas comprising of junctions and bends of nanorods.

  9. Real-time optical correlator using computer-generated holographic filter on a liquid crystal light valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey

    1990-01-01

    Limitations associated with the binary phase-only filter often used in optical correlators are presently circumvented in the writing of complex-valued data on a gray-scale spatial light modulator through the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH) algorithm. The CGH encodes complex-valued data into nonnegative real CGH data in such a way that it may be encoded in any of the available gray-scale spatial light modulators. A CdS liquid-crystal light valve is used for the complex-valued CGH encoding; computer simulations and experimental results are compared, and the use of such a CGH filter as the synapse hologram in a holographic optical neural net is discussed.

  10. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  11. Real-time optical correlator using computer-generated holographic filter on a liquid crystal light valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Yu, Jeffrey

    1990-01-01

    Limitations associated with the binary phase-only filter often used in optical correlators are presently circumvented in the writing of complex-valued data on a gray-scale spatial light modulator through the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH) algorithm. The CGH encodes complex-valued data into nonnegative real CGH data in such a way that it may be encoded in any of the available gray-scale spatial light modulators. A CdS liquid-crystal light valve is used for the complex-valued CGH encoding; computer simulations and experimental results are compared, and the use of such a CGH filter as the synapse hologram in a holographic optical neural net is discussed.

  12. Computer-Controlled Cylindrical Polishing Process for Development of Grazing Incidence Optics for Hard X-Ray Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gufran Sayeed; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The presentation includes grazing incidence X-ray optics, motivation and challenges, mid spatial frequency generation in cylindrical polishing, design considerations for polishing lap, simulation studies and experimental results, future scope, and summary. Topics include current status of replication optics technology, cylindrical polishing process using large size polishing lap, non-conformance of polishin lap to the optics, development of software and polishing machine, deterministic prediction of polishing, polishing experiment under optimum conditions, and polishing experiment based on known error profile. Future plans include determination of non-uniformity in the polishing lap compliance, development of a polishing sequence based on a known error profile of the specimen, software for generating a mandrel polishing sequence, design an development of a flexible polishing lap, and computer controlled localized polishing process.

  13. Computational studies of third-order nonlinear optical properties of pyridine derivative 2-aminopyridinium p-toluenesulphonate crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANUJ KUMAR; MAHESH PAL SINGH YADAV

    2017-07-01

    We have reported a theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical behaviour, electronic and optical properties and other molecular properties of the organic nonlinear optical crystal 2-aminopyridinium ptoluenesulphonate(APPTS). The computation has been done using density functional theory (DFT) methodemploying 6-31G(d) basis set and Becke’s three-parameter hybrid functional (B3LYP). Calculated values of static hyperpolarizability confirm the good nonlinear behaviour of the molecule. Electronic behaviour and global reactivity descriptor parameters are calculated and analysed using HOMO–LUMO analysis. Energy band gap and simulated UV–visible spectrum show good agreement with experimental results. Other important molecular properties like rotational constant, zero-point vibrational energy, total energy at room temperature and pressure have also beencalculated in the ground state.

  14. Computational studies of third-order nonlinear optical properties of pyridine derivative 2-aminopyridinium p-toluenesulphonate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anuj; Yadav, Mahesh Pal Singh

    2017-07-01

    We have reported a theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical behaviour, electronic and optical properties and other molecular properties of the organic nonlinear optical crystal 2-aminopyridinium p-toluenesulphonate (APPTS). The computation has been done using density functional theory (DFT) method employing 6-31G(d) basis set and Becke's three-parameter hybrid functional (B3LYP). Calculated values of static hyperpolarizability confirm the good nonlinear behaviour of the molecule. Electronic behaviour and global reactivity descriptor parameters are calculated and analysed using HOMO-LUMO analysis. Energy band gap and simulated UV-visible spectrum show good agreement with experimental results. Other important molecular properties like rotational constant, zero-point vibrational energy, total energy at room temperature and pressure have also been calculated in the ground state.

  15. Segment Orientation and Optical Birefringence of Amorphous Polymers Under Tensile Deformation: Novel Computational Method applied to Different Glassy Polycarbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Upendra; Sulatha, M. S.

    2005-03-01

    Orientation dependent optical properties of Bisphenol A polycarbonate and two aliphatic substituted polycarbonates in glassy phase have been studied by atomistic modeling using molecular mechanics simulations under tensile deformation. Probability distributions and orientation functions show that phenylene rings and carbonate groups vectors along the main chain orient towards stretching direction following deformation. Interchain packing of rings and carbonates become ordered with strain. Efficient computational approach for calculation of optical birefringence of amorphous polymers is presented and applied to the polycarbonates in detail. Polarizability anisotropy of the polymer segments and chain as a function of deformation is calculated by combining information on the conformations and group polarizabilities, and used to estimate birefringence during deformation. Simulated and experimental values for segment orientation and bulk birefringence are in very good agreement. Effect of the optical properties of atomic groups on bulk birefringence is brought forth for the first time by molecular simulation for polymers other than polyethylene.

  16. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  17. Enhancing performance of LCoS-SLM as adaptive optics by using computer-generated holograms modulation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Wei; Lyu, Bo-Han; Wang, Chen; Hung, Cheng-Chieh

    2017-05-01

    We have already developed multi-function and easy-to-use modulation software that was based on LabVIEW system. There are mainly four functions in this modulation software, such as computer generated holograms (CGH) generation, CGH reconstruction, image trimming, and special phase distribution. Based on the above development of CGH modulation software, we could enhance the performance of liquid crystal on silicon - spatial light modulator (LCoSSLM) as similar as the diffractive optical element (DOE) and use it on various adaptive optics (AO) applications. Through the development of special phase distribution, we are going to use the LCoS-SLM with CGH modulation software into AO technology, such as optical microscope system. When the LCOS-SLM panel is integrated in an optical microscope system, it could be placed on the illumination path or on the image forming path. However, LCOS-SLM provides a program-controllable liquid crystal array for optical microscope. It dynamically changes the amplitude or phase of light and gives the obvious advantage, "Flexibility", to the system

  18. 3Dtrapping and manipulation of micro-particles using holographic optical tweezers with optimized computer-generated holograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Tao; Jing Li; Qian Long; Xiaoping Wu

    2011-01-01

    A multi-plane adaptive-additive algorithm is developed for optimizing computer-generated holograms for the reconstruction of traps in three-dimensional (3D) spaces. This algorithm overcomes the converging stagnation problem of the traditional multi-plane Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and improves the diffraction efficiency of the holograms effectively. The optimized holograms are applied in a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) platform. Additionally, a computer program is developed and integrated into the HOT platform for the purpose of achieving the interactive control of traps. Experiments demonstrate that the manipulation of micro-particles into the 3D structure with optimized holograms can be carried out effectively on the HOT platform.%A multi-plane adaptive-additive algorithm is developed for optimizing computer-generated holograms for the reconstruction of traps in three-dimensional (3D) spaces.This algorithm overcomes the converging stagnation problem of the traditional multi-plane Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm and improves the diffraction efficiency of the holograms effectively.The optimized holograms are applied in a holographic optical tweezers (HOT) platform.Additionally,a computer program is developed and integrated into the HOT platform for the purpose of achieving the interactive control of traps.Experiments demonstrate that the manipulation of micro-particles into the 3D structure with optimized holograms can be carried out effectively on the HOT platform.

  19. Computer simulation of the collision frequency of two particles in optical tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Sheng-Hua; Li Yin-Mei; Lou Li-Ren; Sun Zhi-Wei

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been successfully used in the study of colloid science. In most applications people are concerned with the behaviour of a single particle held in the optical tweezers. Recently, the ability of the optical tweezers to simultaneously hold two particles has been used to determine the stability ratio of colloidal dispersion. This new development stimulates the efforts to explore the characteristics of a two-particle system in the optical tweezers.An infinite spherical potential well has been used to estimate the collision frequency for two particles in the optical trap based on a Monte Carlo simulation. In this article, a more reasonable harmonic potential, commonly accepted for the optical tweezers, is adopted in a Monte Carlo simulation of the collision frequency. The effect of hydrodynamic interaction of particles in the trap is also considered. The simulation results based on this improved model show quantitatively that the collision frequency drops down sharply at first and then decreases slowly as the distance between the two particles increases. The simulation also shows how the collision frequency is related to the stiffness of the optical tweezers.

  20. Computer program TRACK_VISION for simulating optical appearance of etched tracks in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2008-04-01

    A computer program called TRACK_VISION for determining the optical appearances of tracks in nuclear track materials resulted from light-ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching was described. A previously published software, TRACK_TEST, was the starting point for the present software TRACK_VISION, which contained TRACK_TEST as its subset. The programming steps were outlined. Descriptions of the program were given, including the built-in V functions for the commonly employed nuclear track material commercially known as CR-39 (polyallyldiglycol carbonate) irradiated by alpha particles. Program summaryProgram title: TRACK_VISION Catalogue identifier: AEAF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4084 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 117 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90 Computer: Pentium PC Operating system: Windows 95+ RAM: 256 MB Classification: 17.5, 18 External routines: The entire code must be linked with the MSFLIB library. MSFLib is a collection of C and C++ modules which provides a general framework for processing IBM's AFP datastream. MSFLIB is specific to Visual Fortran (Digital, Compaq or Intel flavors). Nature of problem: Nuclear track detectors are commonly used for radon measurements through studying the tracks generated by the incident alpha particles. Optical microscopes are often used for this purpose but the process is relatively tedious and time consuming. Several automatic and semi-automatic systems have been developed in order to facilitate determination of track densities. In all these automatic systems, the optical appearance of the tracks is important. However, not much has been done so far to obtaining the

  1. Ceramic and polymeric dental onlays evaluated by photo-elasticity, optical coherence tomography, and micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Topala, Florin; Ionita, Ciprian; Negru, Radu; Fabriky, Mihai; Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Marsavina, Liviu; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    Dental onlays are restorations used to repair rear teeth that have a mild to moderate amount of decay. They can also be used to restore teeth that are cracked or fractured if the damage is not severe enough to require a dental crown. The use of onlays requires less tooth reduction than does the use of metal fillings. This allows dentists to conserve more of a patient's natural tooth structure in the treatment process. The aims of this study are to evaluate the biomechanical comportment of the dental onlays, by using the 3D photo elasticity method and to investigate the integrity of the structures and their fitting to the dental support. For this optical coherence tomography and micro-computed tomography were employed. Both methods were used to investigate 37 dental onlays, 17 integral polymeric and 20 integral ceramic. The results permit to observe materials defects inside the ceramic or polymeric onlays situate in the biomechanically tensioned areas that could lead to fracture of the prosthetic structure. Marginal fitting problems of the onlays related to the teeth preparations were presented in order to observe the possibility of secondary cavities. The resulted images from the optical coherence tomography were verified by the micro-computed tomography. In conclusion, the optical coherence tomography can be used as a clinical method in order to evaluate the integrity of the dental ceramic and polymeric onlays and to investigate the quality of the marginal fitting to the teeth preparations.

  2. Space optical remote sensor image motion velocity vector computational modeling, error budget and synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi Wang; Ping Yu; Changxiang Yan; Jianyue Ren; Bin He

    2005-01-01

    @@ For space optical remote sensor (SORS) with either film or time delay and integrate charge coupled device (TDI-CCD) imaging, in order to achieve higher resolution it requires more accurate real-time image motion compensation.

  3. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ~9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ~3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also removes spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears.

  4. Computer Tomography and Hybrid Optical/Digital Methods for Aerodynamic Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-28

    on a separate optical table. This system included a mirror mounted on a piezo-electric crystal with a feedback control system for varying the phase by...Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. Escuela de Ingenieria . Santiago, equal. The optical path length difference (OPD) be- Chile. tween the two rays...manufacturing, defense and energy research requires a precise control of the laser output: spatial, spectral, temporal, energy and power. Ability to

  5. Computational and in vivo investigation of optical reflectance from human brain to assist neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, M; Giller, C; Liu, H

    1998-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive disease involving the globus pallidus (GP), which is a gray matter mass, surrounded by white matter deep within the brain. During a neurosurgery procedure, a thin probe is inserted into the GP to create a lesion that often relieves the cardinal symptoms of PD. The goal of this study is to develop an optical method to accurately locate the GP border. In theory, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to predict the optical reflectance from brain tissue. In experiment, a portable, real-time display spectrometer with a fiber optic reflectance probe was developed and used during human surgery. Optical reflectance values were recorded at 1 mm intervals to obtain a spatial profile of the tissue as the probe passed through regions of gray and white matter. The simulation and in vivo studies of the reflectance from the brain are in good agreement with one another. The clinical data show that the reflectance from gray matter is approximately 50% or less than that from white matter between 650 and 800 nm. A slope algorithm is developed to distinguish gray and white matter in vivo. This study provides previously unknown optical reflectance of the human brain. © 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  6. Joint Reconstruction of Absorbed Optical Energy Density and Sound Speed Distribution in Photoacoustic Computed Tomography: A numerical Investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chao; Schoonover, Robert W; Wang, Lihong V; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a rapidly emerging bioimaging modality that seeks to reconstruct an estimate of the absorbed optical energy density within an object. Conventional PACT image reconstruction methods assume a constant speed-of-sound (SOS), which can result in image artifacts when acoustic aberrations are significant. It has been demonstrated that incorporating knowledge of an object's SOS distribution into a PACT image reconstruction method can improve image quality. However, in many cases, the SOS distribution cannot be accurately and/or conveniently estimated prior to the PACT experiment. Because variations in the SOS distribution induce aberrations in the measured photoacoustic wavefields, certain information regarding an object's SOS distribution is encoded in the PACT measurement data. Based on this observation, a joint reconstruction (JR) problem has been proposed in which the SOS distribution is concurrently estimated along with the sought-after absorbed optical energy density ...

  7. Decrease-radix design principle for carrying/borrowing free multi-valued and application in ternary optical computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN JunYong; JIN Yi; ZUO KaiZhong

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a new theory referred to as the decrease-radix design (DRD) is proposed,which is found in the research of logic units of ternary (tri-valued) optical computer.Based on the theory proposed,the principles and the regulations of the DRD for making operation units of multi-valued operation with carrying/borrowing free are also presented.The research work has come to the following important conclusion:let D be a special state contained in n physical informative states,then one may figure out any multi-valued processors within n(n×n) carrying/borrowing free n-valued units by the composition some of n×n×(n-1) simplest basic operating units according to the regulations of DRD proposed in this paper.The detailed systematic way of our design regulations is highlighted step by step in the paper with an example of design of a tri-valued logic optical operating unit.The real architecture,the procedure,and the experimental results of our sample in tri-valued logic operating unit are given.Finally,a re-constructible model of ternary logical optical processor is introduced.The theory proposed in the paper has laid down a solid foundation for the design of re-constructible carrying/borrowing free operating units in ternary optical computers and can be widely used as the designing reference in a variety of multi-valued logic operating units.

  8. A simple computer program to quantify red desaturation in patients with optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Yehoshua; Gepstein, Raz; Nemet, Arie Y

    2014-08-01

    Red desaturation is a subjective, sensitive test for patients with optic nerve disease. There is no quantitative clinical test to measure the severity of color desaturation. The current study introduces a simple PowerPoint presentation for quantification of red desaturation in patients with optic neuritis. A Microsoft Office PowerPoint presentation was designed. A red square is shown on each half of the screen. The degree of desaturation on one side is increased in each successive slide. The patient holds a black cardboard divider between his/her eyes, such that each eye can see one-half of the screen. The patient uses the mouse to forward through the slides, thereby gradually increasing the desaturation of the red square presented to the normal eye until it matches the color of the red square seen with the tested eye. Desaturation is graded by the number of slide changes needed until subjective equal color between the eyes is perceived. The test was presented to normal volunteers and to patients with optic neuritis. The difference in saturation levels between the right and the left eyes in patients with optic neuritis vs controls was compared. A total of 83 patients were included. Patients with optic neuritis had significantly increased desaturation compared to controls (6.17 ± 3.3 vs 0.24 ± 2.8 respectively; p < 0.0001). This test is easy to create and efficiently quantifies the severity of red desaturation.

  9. Synthesis and experimental-computational characterization of nonlinear optical properties of triazacyclopentafluorene-coumarin derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Santiago; Vázquez, Juan L.; Rentería, Marvin; Aguilar-Garduño, Isis G.; Delgado, Francisco; Trejo-Durán, Mónica; García-Revilla, Marco A.; Alvarado-Méndez, Edgar; Vázquez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    A series of novel 3-(2,2a,3-triazacyclopenta[jk]fluoren-1-yl)-2H-chromen-2-one derivatives 5a-c have been synthesized by [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between the corresponding 3-(imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidines)-2-yl)-2H-chromen-2-one 4a-c with 2-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl triflates as benzyne precursor in 65-80% yields. The strategic incorporation of triazacyclopentafluorene group at the 3-position of the coumarin molecules resulted in dyes with excellent nonlinear optical properties. The nonlinear optical properties of third order (compounds 5a-c) were studied using Z-scan technique. The high nonlinear response is of 10-7 cm2/W order. The nonlinearity of the compounds is an indication of a promising material for applications at low power, such as optical switching, waveguides, nonlinear contrast phase, among others. Theoretical results of HOMO-LUMO gaps and oscillator strengths are used to rationalize the high efficiency of the novel compound in the nonlinear optical behavior. In particular, 5b displays the best nonlinear optical properties and at the same time the smaller HOMO-LUMO gap and the highest oscillator strength.

  10. Dental wear estimation using a digital intra-oral optical scanner and an automated 3D computer vision method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Agnes Batista; Vieira, Antonio Wilson; Corpas, Livia; Vandenberghe, Bart; Bastos, Flavia Souza; Lambrechts, Paul; Campos, Mario Montenegro; Las Casas, Estevam Barbosa de

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to propose an automated and direct process to grade tooth wear intra-orally. Eight extracted teeth were etched with acid for different times to produce wear and scanned with an intra-oral optical scanner. Computer vision algorithms were used for alignment and comparison among models. Wear volume was estimated and visual scoring was achieved to determine reliability. Results demonstrated that it is possible to directly detect submillimeter differences in teeth surfaces with an automated method with results similar to those obtained by direct visual inspection. The investigated method proved to be reliable for comparison of measurements over time.

  11. Fast calculation method of computer generated hologram animation for viewpoint parallel shift and rotation using Fourier transform optical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2016-01-20

    Computer generated hologram (CGH) animations can be made by switching many CGHs on an electronic display. Some fast calculation methods for CGH animations have been proposed, but one for viewpoint movement has not been proposed. Therefore, we designed a fast calculation method of CGH animations for viewpoint parallel shifts and rotation. A Fourier transform optical system was adopted to expand the viewing angle. The results of experiments were that the calculation time of our method was over 6 times faster than that of the conventional method. Furthermore, the degradation in CGH animation quality was found to be sufficiently small.

  12. Optical memory system based on incoherent recorder and coherent reader of multiplexed computer generated one-dimensional Fourier transform holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinokov, Sergey; Zlokazov, Evgenii; Donchenko, Sergey; Verenikina, Nina

    2017-09-01

    The present article highlights the development results of archive memory holographic system based on application of computer generated Fourier holograms. The proposed idea allows realization of holographic principles of digital data record using simple and compact optical devices. Special interest is paid to synthesis and multiplexed record of one-dimensional Fourier transform holograms. The principal schemes of constructed prototypes of incoherent data recorder and coherent data reader are described in the present paper. The results of experimental implementation of the constructed devices are presented.

  13. MODA: a new algorithm to compute optical depths in multi-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, A; Cabezon, R; Rosswog, S; Liebendoerfer, M

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for the calculation of multidimensional optical depths in approximate radiative transport schemes, equally applicable to neutrinos and photons. Motivated by (but not limited to) neutrino transport in three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers, our method makes no assumptions about the geometry of the matter distribution, apart from expecting optically transparent boundaries. Based on local information about opacities, the algorithm figures out an escape route that tends to minimize the optical depth without assuming any pre-defined paths for radiation. Its adaptivity makes it suitable for a variety of astrophysical settings with complicated geometry (e.g., core-collapse supernovae, compact binary mergers, tidal disruptions, star formation, etc.). We implement the MODA algorithm into both a Eulerian hydrodynamics code with a fixed, uniform grid and into an SPH code where we make use a tree structure that is otherwise used for searching neighb...

  14. The role of robotics in computer controlled polishing of large and small optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David; Dunn, Christina; Yu, Guoyu; Bibby, Matt; Zheng, Xiao; Wu, Hsing Yu; Li, Hongyu; Lu, Chunlian

    2015-08-01

    Following formal acceptance by ESO of three 1.4m hexagonal off-axis prototype mirror segments, one circular segment, and certification of our optical test facility, we turn our attention to the challenge of segment mass-production. In this paper, we focus on the role of industrial robots, highlighting complementarity with Zeeko CNC polishing machines, and presenting results using robots to provide intermediate processing between CNC grinding and polishing. We also describe the marriage of robots and Zeeko machines to automate currently manual operations; steps towards our ultimate vision of fully autonomous manufacturing cells, with impact throughout the optical manufacturing community and beyond.

  15. Error-rejecting quantum computing with solid-state spins assisted by low-Q optical microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-12-01

    We present an efficient proposal for error-rejecting quantum computing with quantum dots (QDs) embedded in single-sided optical microcavities based on the interface between the circularly polarized photon and QDs. An almost unity fidelity of the quantum entangling gate (EG) can be implemented with a detectable error that leads to a recycling EG procedure, which improves further the efficiency of our proposal along with the robustness to the errors involved in imperfect input-output processes. Meanwhile, we discuss the performance of our proposal for the EG on two solid-state spins with currently achieved experiment parameters, showing that it is feasible with current experimental technology. It provides a promising building block for solid-state quantum computing and quantum networks.

  16. Computational analysis of responses of a wedge-shaped-tip optical fiber probe in bubble measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, A; Saito, T

    2012-07-01

    Optical-fiber probing is widely employed in bubble/droplet measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Several types of optical fiber probes with a very high S/N ratio and high performance have been developed, but further improvement in the probes' measurement accuracy and reliability for industrial applications is desired. We tried to eliminate optical noise in the probe measurements, and we found that the signals include some peak signs that have potential for advanced measurement with optical-fiber probing. We developed a ray-tracing numerical simulator and identified the mechanisms underlying the generation of the signals. In order to numerically simulate the optical probing signals, the simulator must use 3D frameworks composed of incident beams, the reflection and refraction on the surfaces of the optical elements (i.e., an optical fiber, a sensing tip, an air phase, and a water phase), and beams returning from the sensing tip to the other tip through the fiber. We used all of these in a simple rendering framework based on a ray-tracing algorithm with Fresnel's law, and we observed the mechanism of some promising signals that may be useful for extracting the hidden potential of optical-fiber probing. To verify the simulator's performance, we carried out three comparative experiments with fundamental setups using a wedge-shaped single-tip optical fiber probe, examining: (1) the beam trajectories and energy leaking out from the sensing tip into the surrounding air phase or water phase, (2) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip at the air-water free interface in light of the three-dimensional deformation, and (3) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip into a bubble in light of the three-dimensional bubble shape. As a result, (a) we found that an optical fiber probe with a wedge-shaped tip has particular characteristics of beam emissions from the tip, and the emitting angles switched depending on the phases covering

  17. Heuristic algorithms for joint optimization of unicast and anycast traffic in elastic optical network–based large–scale computing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markowski Marcin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years elastic optical networks have been perceived as a prospective choice for future optical networks due to better adjustment and utilization of optical resources than is the case with traditional wavelength division multiplexing networks. In the paper we investigate the elastic architecture as the communication network for distributed data centers. We address the problems of optimization of routing and spectrum assignment for large-scale computing systems based on an elastic optical architecture; particularly, we concentrate on anycast user to data center traffic optimization. We assume that computational resources of data centers are limited. For this offline problems we formulate the integer linear programming model and propose a few heuristics, including a meta-heuristic algorithm based on a tabu search method. We report computational results, presenting the quality of approximate solutions and efficiency of the proposed heuristics, and we also analyze and compare some data center allocation scenarios.

  18. Fault-tolerant linear optical quantum computing with small-amplitude coherent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A P; Ralph, T C; Haselgrove, H L

    2008-01-25

    Quantum computing using two coherent states as a qubit basis is a proposed alternative architecture with lower overheads but has been questioned as a practical way of performing quantum computing due to the fragility of diagonal states with large coherent amplitudes. We show that using error correction only small amplitudes (alpha>1.2) are required for fault-tolerant quantum computing. We study fault tolerance under the effects of small amplitudes and loss using a Monte Carlo simulation. The first encoding level resources are orders of magnitude lower than the best single photon scheme.

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  20. Adaptive guided image filter for warping in variational optical flow computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tu, Z.; Poppe, R.W.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    The variational optical flow method is considered to be the standard method to calculate an accurate dense motion field between successive frames. It assumes that the energy function has spatiotemporal continuities and appearance motions are small. However, for real image sequences, the temporal con

  1. Computational and Theoretical Investigations of Strongly Correlated Fermions in Optical Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    speaker, \\Physics of Superconductor - Insulator Transition and related topics", Argonne National Laboratory, November 16-19, 2010; talk titled \\Single...and two-particle spectral functions across the disorder- driven superconductor - insulator transition ". 22. Invited speaker, \\Fermions in Optical...energy gaps across the disorder- driven superconductor - insulator transition ", October 7, 2010, Harvard. 27. Seminar on \\Probing Quantum Phases of

  2. OPTICAL COMPUTING: Analysis of the tomographic contrast during the immersion bleaching of layered biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, I. V.; Yarovenko, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    The control of optical properties of biological tissues irradiated by a cw laser source is considered. Within the framework of the stationary model of the radiation transfer, basic factors affecting the tomographic contrast of a layered medium are revealed theoretically and numerically, when immersion liquids, decreasing the radiation scattering level in a medium, are used.

  3. Computer simulation of time-resolved optical imaging of objects hidden in turbid media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.; Raedt, H. De; Przeslawski, J.; Garcia, N.

    1998-01-01

    We review research on time-resolved optical imaging of objects hidden in strongly scattering media, with emphasis on the application to breast cancer detection. A method is presented to simulate the propagation of light in turbid media. Based on a numerical algorithm to solve the time-dependent diff

  4. Optical Computing 88. Book of Summaries. August 29 - September 2, 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-02

    Dhe Tedc61 Comlite wiehee to tha n h Organizing end Local C, oW #or me ft eperon of the meet nmd too associated social -W O #Wdm OgsingCoponcring end...2), generated optically, is shown In the left part for a composite rectangular grating of three frequencies . In this representacion the horizontal

  5. Excitation spectroscopy in multispectral optical fluorescence tomography: methodology, feasibility and computer simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Ahn, Sangtae; Levenson, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular probes used for in vivo optical fluorescence tomography (OFT) studies in small animals are typically chosen such that their emission spectra lie in the 680-850 nm wavelength range. This is because tissue attenuation in this spectral band is relatively low, allowing optical photons even from deep sites in tissue to reach the animal surface and consequently be detected by a CCD camera. The wavelength dependence of tissue optical properties within the 680-850 nm band can be exploited for emitted light by measuring fluorescent data via multispectral approaches and incorporating the spectral dependence of these optical properties into the OFT inverse problem—that of reconstructing underlying 3D fluorescent probe distributions from optical data collected on the animal surface. However, in the aforementioned spectral band, due to only small variations in the tissue optical properties, multispectral emission data, though superior for image reconstruction compared to achromatic data, tend to be somewhat redundant. A different spectral approach for OFT is to capitalize on the larger variations in the optical properties of tissue for excitation photons than for the emission photons by using excitation at multiple wavelengths as a means of decoding source depth in tissue. The full potential of spectral approaches in OFT can be realized by a synergistic combination of these two approaches, that is, exciting the underlying fluorescent probe at multiple wavelengths and measuring emission data multispectrally. In this paper, we describe a method that incorporates both excitation and emission spectral information into the OFT inverse problem. We describe a linear algebraic formulation of the multiple wavelength illumination-multispectral detection forward model for OFT and compare it to models that use only excitation at multiple wavelengths or those that use only multispectral detection techniques. This study is carried out in a realistic inhomogeneous mouse atlas

  6. A Practical Deconvolution Computation Algorithm to Extract 1D Spectra from 2D Images of Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guangwei; Bai, Zhongrui

    2015-01-01

    Bolton and Schlegel presented a promising deconvolution method to extract 1D spectra from a 2D optical fiber spectral CCD image. The method could eliminate the PSF difference between fibers, extract spectra to the photo noise level, as well as improve the resolution. But the method is limited by its huge computation requirement and thus cannot be implemented in actual data reduction. In this article, we develop a practical computation method to solve the computation problem. The new computation method can deconvolve a 2D fiber spectral image of any size with actual PSFs, which may vary with positions. Our method does not require large amounts of memory and can extract a 4k multi 4k noise-free CCD image with 250 fibers in 2 hr. To make our method more practical, we further consider the influence of noise, which is thought to be an intrinsic illposed problem in deconvolution algorithms. We modify our method with a Tikhonov regularization item to depress the method induced noise. Compared with the results of tra...

  7. Deterministic Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for High-Energy X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computer-controlled polishing process for large X-ray mirror mandrels is presented. Using tool s influence function and material removal rate extracted from polishing experiments, design considerations of polishing laps and optimized operating parameters are discussed

  8. Optimisation of post mortem cardiac computed tomography compared to optical coherence tomography and histopathology - Technical note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Precht, Helle; Leth, Peter Mygind; Thygesen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality. New technological developments in computed tomography (CT), including dual energy, iterative reconstructions and high definition scanning, could significantly improve the non-invasive identification of atherosclerosis plaques...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  12. Synthesis, structure, spectroscopic investigations, and computational studies of optically pure β-ketoamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtat, D.; Touati, R.; Guerfel, T.; Walha, K.; Ben Hassine, B.

    2016-12-01

    Chemical preparation, X-ray single crystal diffraction, IR and NMR spectroscopic investigations of a novel nonlinear optical organic compound (C17H22NO2Cl) are described. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with the non-centrosymmetric sp. gr. P212121. In the crystal structure, molecules are interconnected by N-H…O hydrogen bonds forming infinite chains along a axis. The Hirshfeld surface and associated fingerprint plots of the compound are presented to explore the nature of intermolecular interactions and their relative contributions in building the solid-state architecture. The molecular HOMO-LUMO compositions and their respective energy gaps are also drawn to explain the activity of the compound. The first hyperpolarizability βtot of the title compound is determined using DFT calculations. The optical properties are also investigated by UV-Vis absorption spectrum.

  13. Optical interconnection network for parallel access to multi-rank memory in future computing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Gu, Huaxi; Yang, Yintang; Wang, Kun

    2015-08-10

    With the number of cores increasing, there is an emerging need for a high-bandwidth low-latency interconnection network, serving core-to-memory communication. In this paper, aiming at the goal of simultaneous access to multi-rank memory, we propose an optical interconnection network for core-to-memory communication. In the proposed network, the wavelength usage is delicately arranged so that cores can communicate with different ranks at the same time and broadcast for flow control can be achieved. A distributed memory controller architecture that works in a pipeline mode is also designed for efficient optical communication and transaction address processes. The scaling method and wavelength assignment for the proposed network are investigated. Compared with traditional electronic bus-based core-to-memory communication, the simulation results based on the PARSEC benchmark show that the bandwidth enhancement and latency reduction are apparent.

  14. A Computational Model for the Stereoscopic Optics of a Head-Mounted Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Non-linear field distortion causes straight lines on the screen to appear curved. This can be corrected for in the graphics system by predistorting the...the peripheral field will be positioned wrong. The only way to avoid this unpleasant choice is to predistort the image to correct the optical...transformations in the pipeline are linear. It is tempting to run only the polygon vertices through the predistortion function and let the very

  15. Computational Study of Chalcopyrite Semiconductors and Their Non-Linear Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-12

    SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM Air Force Office of AFOSR Scientific Research Donald J. Silversmith 4015 Wilson Blvd Room 713 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT...34First-principles Calculations Based Desing of Chalcopyrite Semicon- ductors for Nonlinear Optical frequency Conversion," Walter R. L. Lambrecht...in ZnGeP 2 ," X. Jiang, M. S. Miao and W. R. L. Lambrecht, Research Showcase 2004, at Case Western Reserve University, April 2, 2004, 5. "Does the

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  17. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  18. Computer driven optical keratometer and method of evaluating the shape of the cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroth, Edmund C. (Inventor); Mouneimme, Samih A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the shape of the cornea utilize only one reticle to generate a pattern of rings projected onto the surface of a subject's eye. The reflected pattern is focused onto an imaging device such as a video camera and a computer compares the reflected pattern with a reference pattern stored in the computer's memory. The differences between the reflected and stored patterns are used to calculate the deformation of the cornea which may be useful for pre-and post-operative evaluation of the eye by surgeons.

  19. Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The pixelated rectangle we spend most of our day staring at in silence is not the television as many long feared, but the computer-the ubiquitous portal of work and personal lives. At this point, the computer is almost so common we don't notice it in our view. It's difficult to envision that not that long ago it was a gigantic, room-sized structure only to be accessed by a few inspiring as much awe and respect as fear and mystery. Now that the machine has decreased in size and increased in popular use, the computer has become a prosaic appliance, little-more noted than a toaster. These dramati

  20. Physics Education through Computational Tools: The Case of Geometrical and Physical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Y.; Santana, A.; Mendoza, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, with the development of more powerful and accurate computational tools, the inclusion of new didactic materials in the classroom is known to have increased. However, the form in which these materials can be used to enhance the learning process is still under debate. Many different methodologies have been suggested for constructing new…

  1. Physics Education through Computational Tools: The Case of Geometrical and Physical Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Y.; Santana, A.; Mendoza, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, with the development of more powerful and accurate computational tools, the inclusion of new didactic materials in the classroom is known to have increased. However, the form in which these materials can be used to enhance the learning process is still under debate. Many different methodologies have been suggested for constructing new…

  2. Space-frequency analysis with parallel computing in a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer distributed sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Xiaonan; Ye, Taihang; Zheng, Shilie; Zhou, Jinhai; Chi, Hao; Jin, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Xianmin

    2014-10-01

    For a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer (ϕ-OTDR) distributed sensor system, space-frequency analysis can reduce the false alarm by analyzing the frequency distribution compared with the traditional difference value method. We propose a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel computing method to perform multichannel fast Fourier transform (FFT) and realize the real-time space-frequency analysis. The experiment results show that the time taken by the multichannel FFT decreased considerably based on this GPU parallel computing. The method can be completed with a sensing fiber up to 16 km long and an entry-level GPU. Meanwhile, the GPU can reduce the computing load of the central processing unit from 70% down to less than 20%. We carried out an experiment on a two-point space-frequency analysis, and the results clearly and simultaneously show the vibration point locations and frequency components. The sensor system outputs the real-time space-frequency spectra continuously with a spatial resolution of 16.3 m and frequency resolution of 2.25 Hz.

  3. Pipelining Computational Stages of the Tomographic Reconstructor for Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Multi-GPU System

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali

    2014-11-01

    The European Extremely Large Telescope project (E-ELT) is one of Europe\\'s highest priorities in ground-based astronomy. ELTs are built on top of a variety of highly sensitive and critical astronomical instruments. In particular, a new instrument called MOSAIC has been proposed to perform multi-object spectroscopy using the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) technique. The core implementation of the simulation lies in the intensive computation of a tomographic reconstruct or (TR), which is used to drive the deformable mirror in real time from the measurements. A new numerical algorithm is proposed (1) to capture the actual experimental noise and (2) to substantially speed up previous implementations by exposing more concurrency, while reducing the number of floating-point operations. Based on the Matrices Over Runtime System at Exascale numerical library (MORSE), a dynamic scheduler drives all computational stages of the tomographic reconstruct or simulation and allows to pipeline and to run tasks out-of order across different stages on heterogeneous systems, while ensuring data coherency and dependencies. The proposed TR simulation outperforms asymptotically previous state-of-the-art implementations up to 13-fold speedup. At more than 50000 unknowns, this appears to be the largest-scale AO problem submitted to computation, to date, and opens new research directions for extreme scale AO simulations. © 2014 IEEE.

  4. Measurement of micro moulded parts by Computed Tomography and comparison to optical and tactile techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagüe, J.A.; Tosello, Guido; Carmignato, S

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on dimensional verification of two micro-injection moulded components, selected from actual industrial productions, using CT metrological tools. In addition to CT scanning, also a tactile Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) with sub-micrometer uncertainty and an Optical Coordinate...... Measuring Machine (OCMM) allowing fast measurements suitable for in-line quality control were employed as validation instruments. The experimental work carried out and the analysis of the results provide valuable conclusions about the advantages and drawbacks of using CT metrology in comparison with CMM...

  5. A structure preserving Lanczos algorithm for computing the optical absorption spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Meiyue; Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    We present a new structure preserving Lanczos algorithm for approximating the optical absorption spectrum in the context of solving full Bethe--Salpeter equation without Tamm--Dancoff approximation. The new algorithm is based on a structure preserving Lanczos procedure, which exploits the special block structure of Bethe--Salpeter Hamiltonian matrices. A recently developed technique of generalized averaged Gauss quadrature is incorporated to accelerate the convergence. We also establish the connection between our structure preserving Lanczos procedure with several existing Lanczos procedures developed in different contexts. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of our Lanczos algorithm.

  6. An Optical and Computational Investigation on the Effects of Transient Fuel Injections in Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Nicholas

    The effects of transient rate-of-injection profiles on high-pressure fuel jets have been studied in an optically accessible internal combustion engine. High-speed optical imaging measurements were applied over a range of ambient conditions, fuel types, and injection parameters. The optical data demonstrate that during the early part of the injection, while the liquid core of the jet is disintegrating, penetration is functionally linked to the orifice exit velocity up until a downstream distance hypothesized to be the jet breakup length. The jets then transition to a mixing dominated penetration behavior further downstream. Therefore, for cases that exhibit transient rate-of-injection (ROI) profiles, quasi-steady correlations for penetration have poor agreement with the empirical data. The lack of agreement between models using quasi-steady approximations and the high-speed experimental data, and the experimental evidence of liquid core physics impacting the transient jet penetration, motivated the development of a new 1-D model that integrates liquid core penetration physics and eliminates quasi-steady approximations. The new 1-D modeling methodology couples the transport equations for the evolution of the liquid core of the jet and the surrounding sheath of droplets resulting from breakup. The results of the model are validated against the aforementioned optical transient jet measurements. Finally, experimental results for two jet fuels and a diesel fuel are studied with the aid of the model. Differences in fuel properties cause the diesel fuel jet to transition from an incomplete spray to a complete spray later than the jet fuels during the transient injection process. Increasing ambient density causes the transition to happen earlier during the injection transient for all three fuels. The ignition delay and liftoff length appeared to be relatively unaffected by the late transition from incomplete to complete spray at low ambient density and low injection

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  9. Computational Investigation of the Electronic and Optical Properties of Planar Ga-Doped Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Creange

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulate the optical and electrical responses in gallium-doped graphene. Using density functional theory with a local density approximation, we simulate the electronic band structure and show the effects of impurity doping (0–3.91% in graphene on the electron density, refractive index, optical conductivity, and extinction coefficient for each doping percentage. Here, gallium atoms are placed randomly (using a 5-point average throughout a 128-atom sheet of graphene. These calculations demonstrate the effects of hole doping due to direct atomic substitution, where it is found that a disruption in the electronic structure and electron density for small doping levels is due to impurity scattering of the electrons. However, the system continues to produce metallic or semimetallic behavior with increasing doping levels. These calculations are compared to a purely theoretical 100% Ga sheet for comparison of conductivity. Furthermore, we examine the change in the electronic band structure, where the introduction of gallium electronic bands produces a shift in the electron bands and dissolves the characteristic Dirac cone within graphene, which leads to better electron mobility.

  10. Optical nonlinearity and charge transfer analysis of pyrene adsorbed on silver: Computational and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeta Felscia, U.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M.; Sankar, Pranitha; Philip, Reji; Briget Mary, M.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of pyrene on silver has been investigated using both experimental and computational methods. Hyperpolarizabilities computed theoretically together with experimental nonlinear absorption from open aperture Z-scan measurements, point towards a possible use of pyrene adsorbed on silver in the rational design of NLO devices. Presence of a red shift in both simulated and experimental UV-Vis spectra confirms the adsorption on silver, which is due to the electrostatic interaction between silver and pyrene, inducing variations in the structural parameters of pyrene. Fukui calculations along with MEP plot predict the electrophilic nature of the silver cluster in the presence of pyrene, with NBO analysis revealing that the adsorption causes charge redistribution from the first three rings of pyrene towards the fourth ring, from where the 2p orbitals of carbon interact with the valence 5s orbitals of the cluster. This is further confirmed by the downshifting of ring breathing modes in both the experimental and theoretical Raman spectra.

  11. Summaries of Papers Presented at the Optical Computing Topical Meeting Held in Salt Lake City, Utah on 27 February thru 1 March 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-31

    Crystal" by Carsten Peterson and Steve Redfield of MCC. Octopus Recently, MCC has undertaken a study for DARPA on the injection of optics into existing...was promising. It was awarded to MC and we have just started the work which we call Octopus , for Optical Component Technology for Parallel Computer...used. For example, the recognition of camouflaged vehicles in aerial reconnaissance photographs can not, after 25 years of work, be done using spatial

  12. Quasi-phase-matched concurrent nonlinearities in periodically poled KTiOPO(4) for quantum computing over the optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysher, Matthew; Bahabad, Alon; Peng, Peng; Arie, Ady; Pfister, Olivier

    2010-02-15

    We report the successful design and experimental implementation of three coincident nonlinear interactions, namely ZZZ (type 0), ZYY (type I), and YYZ/YZY (type II) second-harmonic generation of 780 nm light from a 1560 nm pump beam in a single, multigrating, periodically poled KTiOPO(4) crystal. The resulting nonlinear medium is the key component for making a scalable quantum computer over the optical frequency comb of a single optical parametric oscillator.

  13. Computed tomography and optical remote sensing: Development for the study of indoor air pollutant transport and dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Anushka Christina [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This thesis investigates the mixing and dispersion of indoor air pollutants under a variety of conditions using standard experimental methods. It also extensively tests and improves a novel technique for measuring contaminant concentrations that has the potential for more rapid, non-intrusive measurements with higher spatial resolution than previously possible. Experiments conducted in a sealed room support the hypothesis that the mixing time of an instantaneously released tracer gas is inversely proportional to the cube root of the mechanical power transferred to the room air. One table-top and several room-scale experiments are performed to test the concept of employing optical remote sensing (ORS) and computed tomography (CT) to measure steady-state gas concentrations in a horizontal plane. Various remote sensing instruments, scanning geometries and reconstruction algorithms are employed. Reconstructed concentration distributions based on existing iterative CT techniques contain a high degree of unrealistic spatial variability and do not agree well with simultaneously gathered point-sample data.

  14. Application of color image processing and low-coherent optical computer tomography in evaluation of adhesive interfaces of dental restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Genina, Elina A.; Sadovnikov, Alexandr V.

    2015-03-01

    Durability of bonded interfaces between dentin and a polymer material in resin-based composite restorations remains a clinical dentistry challenge. In the present study the evolution of bonded interfaces in biological active environment is estimated in vivo. A novel in vivo method of visual diagnostics that involves digital processing of color images of composite restorations and allows the evaluation of adhesive interface quality over time, has been developed and tested on a group of volunteers. However, the application of the method is limited to the analysis of superficial adhesive interfaces. Low-coherent optical computer tomography (OCT) has been tested as a powerful non-invasive tool for in vivo, in situ clinical diagnostics of adhesive interfaces over time. In the long-term perspective adhesive interface monitoring using standard methods of clinical diagnostics along with colour image analysis and OCT could make it possible to objectivise and prognosticate the clinical longevity of composite resin-based restorations with adhesive interfaces.

  15. A computationally efficient autoregressive method for generating phase screens with frozen flow and turbulence in optical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Srinath, Sriakr; Rudy, Alexander R; Ammons, S Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a sample-based, autoregressive (AR) method for the generation and time evolution of atmospheric phase screens that is computationally efficient and uses a single parameter per Fourier mode to vary the power contained in the frozen flow and stochastic components. We address limitations of Fourier-based methods such as screen periodicity and low spatial frequency power content. Comparisons of adaptive optics (AO) simulator performance when fed AR phase screens and translating phase screens reveal significantly elevated residual closed-loop temporal power for small increases in added stochastic content at each time step, thus displaying the importance of properly modeling atmospheric "boiling". We present preliminary evidence that our model fits to AO telemetry are better reflections of real conditions than the pure frozen flow assumption.

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  3. A virtual reality instrument: near-future perspective of computer simulations of ion optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veryovkin, Igor V. E-mail: verigo@anl.gov; Calaway, Wallis F.; Pellin, Michael J

    2004-02-21

    The method of accurate modeling of complex ion optical systems is presented. It combines using SIMION 3D{sup (c)} with external software generating input ion sets and processing results of ion trajectory simulations. This method was used to simulate time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer of secondary neutrals SARISA (Surface Analysis by Resonance Ionization of Sputtered Atoms), and results of simulations were compared to results of the experiments. It is demonstrated that the accuracy of the presented modeling method is sufficient to reproduce experimental TOF (mass) spectra and dependencies of the instrument useful yield on sputtering and ionization conditions. A concept of 'virtual reality instrument' as a logical extension of the method is discussed.

  4. Light-field-characterization in a continuous hydrogen-producing photobioreactor by optical simulation and computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krujatz, Felix; Illing, Rico; Krautwer, Tobias; Liao, Jing; Helbig, Karsten; Goy, Katharina; Opitz, Jörg; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-12-01

    Externally illuminated photobioreactors (PBRs) are widely used in studies on the use of phototrophic microorganisms as sources of bioenergy and other photobiotechnology research. In this work, straightforward simulation techniques were used to describe effects of varying fluid flow conditions in a continuous hydrogen-producing PBR on the rate of photofermentative hydrogen production (rH2 ) by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158. A ZEMAX optical ray tracing simulation was performed to quantify the illumination intensity reaching the interior of the cylindrical PBR vessel. 24.2% of the emitted energy was lost through optical effects, or did not reach the PBR surface. In a dense culture of continuously producing bacteria during chemostatic cultivation, the illumination intensity became completely attenuated within the first centimeter of the PBR radius as described by an empirical three-parametric model implemented in Mathcad. The bacterial movement in chemostatic steady-state conditions was influenced by varying the fluid Reynolds number. The "Computational Fluid Dynamics" and "Particle Tracing" tools of COMSOL Multiphysics were used to visualize the fluid flow pattern and cellular trajectories through well-illuminated zones near the PBR periphery and dark zones in the center of the PBR. A moderate turbulence (Reynolds number = 12,600) and fluctuating illumination of 1.5 Hz were found to yield the highest continuous rH2 by R. sphaeroides DSM 158 (170.5 mL L(-1) h(-1) ) in this study.

  5. Analog optical computing based on a dielectric meta-reflect array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chizari, Ata; Abdollahramezani, Sajjad; Jamali, Mohammad Vahid; Salehi, Jawad A

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we realize the concept of analog computing using an engineered gradient dielectric meta-reflect-array. The proposed configuration consists of individual subwavelength silicon nanobricks, in combination with a fused silica spacer and silver ground plane, realizing a reflection beam with full phase coverage of 2π degrees, as well as an amplitude range of 0 to 1. Spectrally overlapping electric and magnetic dipole resonances, such high-index dielectric metasurfaces can locally and independently manipulate the amplitude and phase of the incident electromagnetic wave. This practically feasible structure overcomes substantial limitations imposed by plasmonic metasurfaces such as absorption losses and low polarization conversion efficiency in the visible range. Using such CMOS-compatible and easily integrable platforms promises highly efficient ultrathin planar wave-based computing systems that circumvent the drawbacks of conventional bulky lens-based signal processors. Based on these key properties and the general concept of spatial Fourier transformation, we design and realize broadband mathematical operators such as the differentiator and integrator in the telecommunication wavelengths.

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  13. L-Asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, G; Gottfried, C; Silva, A M; Caetano, E W S; Sales, F A M; Freire, V N

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p-carboxyl, C 2p-side chain, and C 2p-carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  14. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C. [Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 90035-003 Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil); Silva, A. M. [Universidade Estadual do Piauí, 64260-000 Piripiri-Pi (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S., E-mail: ewcaetano@gmail.com [Instituto de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza-CE (Brazil); Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, 60455-760 Fortaleza-CE (Brazil)

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p–carboxyl, C 2p–side chain, and C 2p–carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  15. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging and computer aided diagnosis of human cervical tissue specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazant-Hegemark, F.; Stone, N.; Read, M. D.; McCarthy, K.; Wang, R. K.

    2007-07-01

    The keyword for management of cervical cancer is prevention. The present program within the UK, the 'National Health Service (NHS) cervical screening programme' (NHSCSP), is based on cytology. Although the program has reduced the incidence of cervical cancer, this program requires patient follow ups and relies on diagnostic biopsying. There is potential for reducing costs and workload within the NHS, and relieving anxiety of patients. In this study, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was investigated for its capability to improve this situation. Our time domain bench top system used a superluminescent diode (Superlum), centre wave length ~1.3 μm, resolution (air) ~15 μm. Tissue samples were obtained according to the ethics approval by Gloucestershire LREC, Nr. 05/Q2005/123. 1387 images of 199 participants have been compared with histopathology results and categorized accordingly. Our OCT images do not reach the clarity and resolution of histopathology. Further, establishing and recognizing features of diagnostic significance seems difficult. Automated classification would allow one to take decision-making to move from the subjective appraisal of a physician to an objective assessment. Hence we investigated a classification algorithm for its ability in recognizing pre-cancerous stages from OCT images. The initial results show promise.

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  17. Automated X-ray and Optical Analysis of the Virtual Observatory and Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, A.; Krughoff, S.; Connolly, A.

    2011-07-01

    We are developing a system to combine the Web Enabled Source Identification with X-Matching (WESIX) web service, which emphasizes source detection on optical images,with the XAssist program that automates the analysis of X-ray data. XAssist is continuously processing archival X-ray data in several pipelines. We have established a workflow in which FITS images and/or (in the case of X-ray data) an X-ray field can be input to WESIX. Intelligent services return available data (if requested fields have been processed) or submit job requests to a queue to be performed asynchronously. These services will be available via web services (for non-interactive use by Virtual Observatory portals and applications) and through web applications (written in the Django web application framework). We are adding web services for specific XAssist functionality such as determining the exposure and limiting flux for a given position on the sky and extracting spectra and images for a given region. We are improving the queuing system in XAssist to allow for "watch lists" to be specified by users, and when X-ray fields in a user's watch list become publicly available they will be automatically added to the queue. XAssist is being expanded to be used as a survey planning tool when coupled with simulation software, including functionality for NuStar, eRosita, IXO, and the Wide-Field Xray Telescope (WFXT), as part of an end-to-end simulation/analysis system. We are also investigating the possibility of a dedicated iPhone/iPad app for querying pipeline data, requesting processing, and administrative job control. This work was funded by AISRP grant NNG06GE59G.

  18. Automated X-ray and Optical Analysis of the Virtual Observatory and Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, A.; Krughoff, S.; Connolly, A.

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a system to combine the Web Enabled Source Identification with X-Matching (WESIX) web service, which emphasizes source detection on optical images,with the XAssist program that automates the analysis of X-ray data. XAssist is continuously processing archival X-ray data in several pipelines. We have established a workflow in which FITS images and/or (in the case of X ray data) an X-ray field can be input to WESIX. Intelligent services return available data (if requested fields have been processed) or submit job requests to a queue to be performed asynchronously. These services will be available via web services (for non-interactive use by Virtual Observatory portals and applications) and through web applications (written in the Django web application framework). We are adding web services for specific XAssist functionality such as determining .the exposure and limiting flux for a given position on the sky and extracting spectra and images for a given region. We are improving the queuing system in XAssist to allow for "watch lists" to be specified by users, and when X-ray fields in a user's watch list become publicly available they will be automatically added to the queue. XAssist is being expanded to be used as a survey planning 1001 when coupled with simulation software, including functionality for NuStar, eRosita, IXO, and the Wide Field Xray Telescope (WFXT), as part of an end to end simulation/analysis system. We are also investigating the possibility of a dedicated iPhone/iPad app for querying pipeline data, requesting processing, and administrative job control.

  19. HADES. A computer code for fast neutron cross section from the Optical Model; HADES. Un programa numerico para el calculo de seccciones eficaces neutronicas mediante el modelo optico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Navarro, C.

    1973-07-01

    A FORTRAN V computer code for UNIVAC 1108/6 using a local Optical Model with spin-orbit interaction is described. The code calculates fast neutron cross sections, angular distribution, and Legendre moments for heavy and intermediate spherical nuclei. It allows for the possibility of automatic variation of potential parameters for experimental data fitting. (Author) 55 refs.

  20. Computational Nanophotonics: modeling optical interactions and transport in tailored nanosystem architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, George [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ratner, Mark [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2014-02-27

    This report describes research by George Schatz and Mark Ratner that was done over the period 10/03-5/09 at Northwestern University. This research project was part of a larger research project with the same title led by Stephen Gray at Argonne. A significant amount of our work involved collaborations with Gray, and there were many joint publications as summarized later. In addition, a lot of this work involved collaborations with experimental groups at Northwestern, Argonne, and elsewhere. The research was primarily concerned with developing theory and computational methods that can be used to describe the interaction of light with noble metal nanoparticles (especially silver) that are capable of plasmon excitation. Classical electrodynamics provides a powerful approach for performing these studies, so much of this research project involved the development of methods for solving Maxwell’s equations, including both linear and nonlinear effects, and examining a wide range of nanostructures, including particles, particle arrays, metal films, films with holes, and combinations of metal nanostructures with polymers and other dielectrics. In addition, our work broke new ground in the development of quantum mechanical methods to describe plasmonic effects based on the use of time dependent density functional theory, and we developed new theory concerned with the coupling of plasmons to electrical transport in molecular wire structures. Applications of our technology were aimed at the development of plasmonic devices as components of optoelectronic circuits, plasmons for spectroscopy applications, and plasmons for energy-related applications.

  1. One-way quantum computing with arbitrarily large time-frequency continuous-variable cluster states from a single optical parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Wang, Pei; Sridhar, Niranjan; Chen, Moran; Pfister, Olivier; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2016-09-01

    One-way quantum computing is experimentally appealing because it requires only local measurements on an entangled resource called a cluster state. Record-size, but nonuniversal, continuous-variable cluster states were recently demonstrated separately in the time and frequency domains. We propose to combine these approaches into a scalable architecture in which a single optical parametric oscillator and simple interferometer entangle up to (3 ×103 frequencies) × (unlimited number of temporal modes) into a computationally universal continuous-variable cluster state. We introduce a generalized measurement protocol to enable improved computational performance on this entanglement resource.

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  3. Synthesis, an experimental and quantum chemical computational study of a new nonlinear optical material: 2-picolinium hydrogensquarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ufuk; Bulut, Ahmet

    2014-09-15

    The experimental and theoretical investigation results of a novel organic non-linear optical (NLO) organic squarate salt of 2-Picolinium hydrogensquarate (1), C6H8N+·C4HO4-, were reported in this study. The space group of the title compound was found in the monoclinic C2/c space group. It was found that the asymmetric unit consists of one monohydrogen squarate anion together with mono protonated 2-Picolinium, forming the (1) salt. The X-ray analysis clearly indicated that the crystal packing has shown the hydrogen bonding ring pattern of D2(2)(10) (α-dimer) through NH⋯O interactions. The hydrogensquarate anions form α-dimer, while 2-Picolinium molecule interacts through NH⋯O and CH⋯O with the hydrogensquarate anion. The structural and vibrational properties of the compound were also studied by computational methods of ab initio performed on the compound at DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) (2) and HF/6-31++G(d,p) (3) level of theory. The calculation results on the basis of two models for both the optimized molecular structure and vibrational properties for the 1 obtained are presented and compared with the X-ray analysis result. On the other the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), electronic absorption spectra, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), conformational flexibility and non-linear optical properties (NLO) of the title compound were also studied at the 2 level and the results are reported. In order to evaluate the suitability for NLO applications thermal analysis (TG, DTA and DTG) data of 1 were also obtained.

  4. 基于三值光学计算机的旅行商问题的求解实现%Solving TSP based on ternary optical computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈云付; 樊孝领

    2011-01-01

    根据三值光计算机具有的巨并行性特点,对给定城市数的旅行商问题进行研究.首先将旅行商问题进行预处理,并转换为改进的符号数(modified signed-digit,MSD)表示形式;然后根据三值光学计算机的位数众多和MSD加法的无进位过程,建立了相应的计算方法,用自主开发的三值逻辑光处理器系统进行求解.结果表明,在数据量同样的情况下,与电子计算机相比,三值光学计算机需较少的计算步数就可以解决旅行商问题,显示出三值光学计算机潜在的优势.%Through the ternary optical computer, this paper studied the traveling salesman problem with arbitrarily definite number of nodes. The traveling salesman problem was first preproeessed and transformed into the form of modified signed-digit ( MSD ) data format. Then based on the characteristic of giant parallelism of the ternary optical computer and the MSD addition of non-carry process, established a calculation to solve the problem using the self-developed ternary optical processor system.Experiments show that under the same amount of data, as compared with the electronic computer, ternary optical computer can solve the traveling salesman problem with less number of steps, which demonstrates the potential advantages of ternary optical computer.

  5. Development of an online radiative module for the computation of aerosol optical properties in 3-D atmospheric models: validation during the EUCAARI campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aouizerats

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining a good description of aerosol optical properties for a physically and chemically complex evolving aerosol is computationally very expensive at present. The goal of this work is to propose a new numerical module computing the optical properties for complex aerosol particles at low numerical cost so that it can be implemented in atmospheric models. This method aims to compute the optical properties online as a function of a given complex refractive index deduced from the aerosol chemical composition and the size parameters corresponding to the particles.

    The construction of look-up tables from the imaginary and the real part of the complex refractive index and size parameters will also be explained. This approach is validated for observations acquired during the EUCAARI campaign on the Cabauw tower during May 2008 and its computing cost is also estimated.

    These comparisons show that the module manages to reproduce the scattering and absorbing behaviour of the aerosol during most of the fifteen-day period of observation with a very cheap computationally cost.

  6. Ab-initio and DFT methodologies for computing hyperpolarizabilities and susceptibilities of highly conjugated organic compounds for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, A.; Karakaya, M.; Ceylan, Y.; El Kouari, Y.; Taboukhat, S.; Boughaleb, Y.; Sofiani, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, after a short introduction on the methodologies used for computing dipole polarizability (α), second and third-order hyperpolarizability and susceptibility; the results of theoretical studies performed on density functional theory (DFT) and ab-initio quantum mechanical calculations of nonlinear optical (NLO) properties for a few selected organic compounds and polymers will be explained. The electric dipole moments (μ) and dispersion-free first hyperpolarizabilities (β) for a family of azo-azulenes and a styrylquinolinium dye have been determined by DFT at B3LYP level. To reveal the frequency-dependent NLO behavior, the dynamic α, second hyperpolarizabilities (γ), second (χ(2)) and third-order (χ(3)) susceptibilites have been evaluated using time-dependent HartreeFock (TDHF) procedure. To provide an insight into the third-order NLO phenomena of a series of pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene-based molecules and pushpull azobenzene polymers, two-photon absorption (TPA) characterizations have been also investigated by means of TDHF. All computed results of the examined compounds are compared with their previous experimental findings and the measured data for similar structures in the literature. The one-photon absorption (OPA) characterizations of the title molecules have been theoretically obtained by configuration interaction (CI) method. The highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) and the HOMO-LUMO band gaps have been revealed by DFT at B3LYP level for azo-azulenes, styrylquinolinium dye, push-pull azobenzene polymers and by parametrization method 6 (PM6) for pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene-based molecules.

  7. Evaluation of flow velocities after carotid artery stenting through split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Barry; Genis, Helen; Wong, Ronnie; Ramjist, Joel; Jivraj, Jamil; Farooq, Hamza; Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor X D

    2014-12-01

    Hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis, specifically in regions of curved vasculature such as bifurcations exhibiting irregular blood flow profiles. Carotid atherosclerotic disease can be intervened by stent implantation, but this may result in greater alterations to local blood flow and consequently further complications. This study demonstrates the use of a variant of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) known as split spectrum DOCT (ssDOCT) to evaluate hemodynamic patterns both before and after stent implantation in the bifurcation junction in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed to simulate blood velocity profiles and compared to the findings achieved through ssDOCT images. Both methods demonstrated noticeable alterations in hemodynamic patterns following stent implantation, with features such as slow velocity regions at the neck of the bifurcation and recirculation zones at the stent struts. Strong correlation between CFD models and ssDOCT images demonstrate the potential of ssDOCT imaging in the optimization of stent implantation in the clinical setting.

  8. In-situ assessment of biofilm formation in submerged membrane system using optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Fortunato, Luca

    2016-09-09

    This paper introduces a novel approach to study the biofouling development on gravity driven submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR). The on-line monitoring of biofilm formation on a flat sheet membrane was conducted non-destructively using optical coherence tomography (OCT), allowing the in-situ investigation of the biofilm structure for 43 d. The OCT enabled to obtain a time-lapse of biofilm development on the membrane under the continuous operation. Acquired real-time information on the biofilm structure related to the change in the flux profile confirming the successful monitoring of the dynamic evolution of the biofouling layer. Four different phases were observed linking the permeate flux with the change of biofilm morphology. In particular, a stable flux of 2.1±0.1 L/m2 h was achieved with the achievement of steady biofilm morphology after 30 d of operation. Biofilm descriptors, such as thickness, biofilm area, macro-porosity and roughness (absolute and relative), were calculated for each OCT acquired scans. Interestingly, relative roughness was correlated with the flux decrease. Furthermore, the precise biofilm morphology obtained from the OCT scans was used in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to better understand the role of biofilm structure on the filtration mechanism. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) as a radiology reporting tool by using optical character recognition (OCR) and macro program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2012-12-01

    The objectives are (1) to introduce a new concept of making a quantitative computed tomography (QCT) reporting system by using optical character recognition (OCR) and macro program and (2) to illustrate the practical usages of the QCT reporting system in radiology reading environment. This reporting system was created as a development tool by using an open-source OCR software and an open-source macro program. The main module was designed for OCR to report QCT images in radiology reading process. The principal processes are as follows: (1) to save a QCT report as a graphic file, (2) to recognize the characters from an image as a text, (3) to extract the T scores from the text, (4) to perform error correction, (5) to reformat the values into QCT radiology reporting template, and (6) to paste the reports into the electronic medical record (EMR) or picture archiving and communicating system (PACS). The accuracy test of OCR was performed on randomly selected QCTs. QCT as a radiology reporting tool successfully acted as OCR of QCT. The diagnosis of normal, osteopenia, or osteoporosis is also determined. Error correction of OCR is done with AutoHotkey-coded module. The results of T scores of femoral neck and lumbar vertebrae had an accuracy of 100 and 95.4 %, respectively. A convenient QCT reporting system could be established by utilizing open-source OCR software and open-source macro program. This method can be easily adapted for other QCT applications and PACS/EMR.

  10. Development of a software interface for optical disk archival storage for a new life sciences flight experiments computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Peter N.

    1989-01-01

    The current Life Sciences Laboratory Equipment (LSLE) microcomputer for life sciences experiment data acquisition is now obsolete. Among the weaknesses of the current microcomputer are small memory size, relatively slow analog data sampling rates, and the lack of a bulk data storage device. While life science investigators normally prefer data to be transmitted to Earth as it is taken, this is not always possible. No down-link exists for experiments performed in the Shuttle middeck region. One important aspect of a replacement microcomputer is provision for in-flight storage of experimental data. The Write Once, Read Many (WORM) optical disk was studied because of its high storage density, data integrity, and the availability of a space-qualified unit. In keeping with the goals for a replacement microcomputer based upon commercially available components and standard interfaces, the system studied includes a Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) for interfacing the WORM drive. The system itself is designed around the STD bus, using readily available boards. Configurations examined were: (1) master processor board and slave processor board with the SCSI interface; (2) master processor with SCSI interface; (3) master processor with SCSI and Direct Memory Access (DMA); (4) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board; and (5) master processor controlling a separate STD bus SCSI board with DMA.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging Performance with Phantom-Based Test Methods And Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anant

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful medical imaging modality that uniquely produces high-resolution cross-sectional images of tissue using low energy light. Its clinical applications and technological capabilities have grown substantially since its invention about twenty years ago, but efforts have been limited to develop tools to assess performance of OCT devices with respect to the quality and content of acquired images. Such tools are important to ensure information derived from OCT signals and images is accurate and consistent, in order to support further technology development, promote standardization, and benefit public health. The research in this dissertation investigates new physical and computational models which can provide unique insights into specific performance characteristics of OCT devices. Physical models, known as phantoms, are fabricated and evaluated in the interest of establishing standardized test methods to measure several important quantities relevant to image quality. (1) Spatial resolution is measured with a nanoparticle-embedded phantom and model eye which together yield the point spread function under conditions where OCT is commonly used. (2) A multi-layered phantom is constructed to measure the contrast transfer function along the axis of light propagation, relevant for cross-sectional imaging capabilities. (3) Existing and new methods to determine device sensitivity are examined and compared, to better understand the detection limits of OCT. A novel computational model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, which simulates the physics of light behavior at the sub-microscopic level within complex, heterogeneous media, is developed to probe device and tissue characteristics influencing the information content of an OCT image. This model is first tested in simple geometric configurations to understand its accuracy and limitations, then a highly realistic representation of a biological cell, the retinal

  12. 200Gb/s 10-channel miniature optical interconnect transmitter module for high-performance computing (HPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Edris; Au, Hinmeng

    2010-02-01

    A major breakthrough to alleviating the interconnect bottleneck in intra cabinet system in HPC may happen by bringing optics directly to the processor package. In order to do so efficient and compact optical interconnect subassembly modules that utilize simple optical and electrical interfacing schemes are needed. In our current work the development of a novel 10-channel, miniature 7mm(W)x1.8mm(L)x3mm(H), optical interconnect transmitter subassembly module is described. The module consists of a high precision molded optical alignment unit with integrated microlens arrays, highspeed coplanar waveguide (CPW) electrical interfaces and a VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser) array chip which is flip chip mounted. The module is designed to uniquely interface vertically with high-speed electrical I/O lines on a microprocessor style package or a motherboard to convert electrical signals to optical for transmission to other similar units using a standard (Multi-Terminal) MT style optical connector. We report on optical coupling efficiency, misalignment tolerance and high-speed electrical and optical measurements of the module. We have measured 40Gb/s electrical eye for the CPW interfaces on the module and 20Gb/s clear optical eyes for VCSEL assembled module from all the 10 channels to produce an aggregate transmitter bandwidth of 200Gb/s. We also measured 30Gb/s electrical and 20Gb/s optical eyes for the optical subassembly module that is bonded onto a microprocessor style package substrate.

  13. A bio-inspired, computational model suggests velocity gradients of optic flow locally encode ordinal depth at surface borders and globally they encode self-motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Ringbauer, Stefan; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-09-01

    Visual navigation requires the estimation of self-motion as well as the segmentation of objects from the background. We suggest a definition of local velocity gradients to compute types of self-motion, segment objects, and compute local properties of optical flow fields, such as divergence, curl, and shear. Such velocity gradients are computed as velocity differences measured locally tangent and normal to the direction of flow. Then these differences are rotated according to the local direction of flow to achieve independence of that direction. We propose a bio-inspired model for the computation of these velocity gradients for video sequences. Simulation results show that local gradients encode ordinal surface depth, assuming self-motion in a rigid scene or object motions in a nonrigid scene. For translational self-motion velocity, gradients can be used to distinguish between static and moving objects. The information about ordinal surface depth and self-motion can help steering control for visual navigation.

  14. Architectures for Optical Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    strcpy() (string copy) in Linear C, while cryptic- b[#Q!*#aJ - *#a; 2 -is not particularly more so than the "standard" code from Kernighan and Ritchie...Press, Cambridge, 1985 Iverson, K, A Programming Language, Wiley, NY, 1962 Kernighan , B., and D. Ritchie, The C Programming Language, Prentice Hall...Switches forwarded to assembler and linker The gcc compiler system forwards several switches on to the Unix assembler as, and the Unix linker id, which

  15. Three-dimensional structure of CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampus——Optical recording of LSM and computer simulation of fractal structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯春华; 刘力; 刘守忠; 宁红; 孙海坚; 郭爱克

    1995-01-01

    The optical recording of three-dimensional(3-D)reconstruction of CA1 pyramidal cells wasderived from the studies on the CA1 region of the hippocampus in adult male Wistar rats.The recordingwas produced by the Confocal Laser Scan Microscope(LSM-10).The attemption was to outline themorphological neural network of CA1 pyramidal cells organization,following the trail of axo-dendritic connec-tions in 3-D spatial distributions among neurons.The fractal structure of neurons with their dendritic andaxonal trees using fractal algorithm was noticed,and 2—18 simulated cells were obtained using PC-486 comput-er.The simulational cells are similar in morphology to the natural CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells.There-fore,the exploitation of an advanced neurohistological research technique combining optical recording of theLSM-10 and computer simulation of fractal structure can provide the quantitative fractal structural basis forchaosic dynamics of brain.

  16. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: I. Measurement and reduction strategies with planar diffuse source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granton, Patrick V; Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-04-07

    Optical cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanning of 3D radiochromic dosimeters may provide a practical method for 3D dose verification in radiation therapy. However, in cone-beam geometry stray light contaminates the projection images, degrading the accuracy of reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients. Stray light was measured using a beam pass aperture array (BPA) and structured illumination methods. The stray-to-primary ray ratio (SPR) along the central axis was found to be 0.24 for a 5% gelatin hydrogel, representative of radiochromic hydrogels. The scanner was modified by moving the spectral filter from the detector to the source, changing the light's spatial fluence pattern and lowering the acceptance angle by extending distance between the source and object. These modifications reduced the SPR significantly from 0.24 to 0.06. The accuracy of the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients for uniform carbon black liquids was compared to independent spectrometer measurements. Reducing the stray light increased the range of accurate transmission readings. In order to evaluate scanner performance for the more challenging application to small field dosimetry, a carbon black finger gel phantom was prepared. Reconstructions of the phantom from CBCT and fan-beam CT scans were compared. The modified source resulted in improved agreement. Subtraction of residual stray light, measured with BPA or structured illumination from each projection further improved agreement. Structured illumination was superior to BPA for measuring stray light for the smaller 1.2 and 0.5 cm diameter phantom fingers. At the costs of doubling the scanner size and tripling the number of scans, CBCT reconstructions of low-scattering hydrogel dosimeters agreed with those of fan-beam CT scans.

  17. Stray light in cone beam optical computed tomography: I. Measurement and reduction strategies with planar diffuse source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granton, Patrick V.; Dekker, Kurtis H.; Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J.

    2016-04-01

    Optical cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) scanning of 3D radiochromic dosimeters may provide a practical method for 3D dose verification in radiation therapy. However, in cone-beam geometry stray light contaminates the projection images, degrading the accuracy of reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients. Stray light was measured using a beam pass aperture array (BPA) and structured illumination methods. The stray-to-primary ray ratio (SPR) along the central axis was found to be 0.24 for a 5% gelatin hydrogel, representative of radiochromic hydrogels. The scanner was modified by moving the spectral filter from the detector to the source, changing the light’s spatial fluence pattern and lowering the acceptance angle by extending distance between the source and object. These modifications reduced the SPR significantly from 0.24 to 0.06. The accuracy of the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficients for uniform carbon black liquids was compared to independent spectrometer measurements. Reducing the stray light increased the range of accurate transmission readings. In order to evaluate scanner performance for the more challenging application to small field dosimetry, a carbon black finger gel phantom was prepared. Reconstructions of the phantom from CBCT and fan-beam CT scans were compared. The modified source resulted in improved agreement. Subtraction of residual stray light, measured with BPA or structured illumination from each projection further improved agreement. Structured illumination was superior to BPA for measuring stray light for the smaller 1.2 and 0.5 cm diameter phantom fingers. At the costs of doubling the scanner size and tripling the number of scans, CBCT reconstructions of low-scattering hydrogel dosimeters agreed with those of fan-beam CT scans.

  18. Evaluation of an X-Ray Dose Profile Derived from an Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter during Computed Tomographic Fluoroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Hasegawa

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate scatter radiation dose to the subject surface during X-ray computed tomography (CT fluoroscopy using the integrated dose ratio (IDR of an X-ray dose profile derived from an optically stimulated luminescent (OSL dosimeter. We aimed to obtain quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during previous CT fluoroscopy. A multislice CT scanner was used to perform this study. OSL dosimeters were placed on the top and the lateral side of the chest phantom so that the longitudinal direction of dosimeters was parallel to the orthogonal axis-to-slice plane for measurement of dose profiles in CT fluoroscopy. Measurement of fluoroscopic conditions was performed at 120 kVp and 80 kVp. Scatter radiation dose was evaluated by calculating the integrated dose determined by OSL dosimetry. The overall percent difference of the integrated doses between OSL dosimeters and ionization chamber was 5.92%. The ratio of the integrated dose of a 100-mm length area to its tails (-50 to -6 mm, 50 to 6 mm was the lowest on the lateral side at 80 kVp and the highest on the top at 120 kVp. The IDRs for different measurement positions were larger at 120 kVp than at 80 kVp. Similarly, the IDRs for the tube voltage between the primary X-ray beam and scatter radiation was larger on the lateral side than on the top of the phantom. IDR evaluation suggested that the scatter radiation dose has a high dependence on the position and a low dependence on tube voltage relative to the primary X-ray beam for constant dose rate fluoroscopic conditions. These results provided quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during CT fluoroscopy in previous studies.

  19. Optical Computing. Organization of the 1993 Photonics Science Topical Meetings Held in Palm Springs, California on March 16 - 19, 1993. Technical Digest Series, Volume 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-19

    Bruno W Acklin. Jirgen Jahns. AT&T Bell Laboratr-;. We pre- matrix as a photonic backplane, Michel Charier, Bruno Houssay . sent a specific example for...MASSIVELY PARALLEL COMPUTERS USING HOLOGRAPHIC MATRIX AS A PHOTONIC BACKPLANE M. Charrier, B. Houssay , T. Lemoine, S. Paineau - Thomson CSF - RCM Division 178...34International conference on Advances in Interconnection and Packaging" (2) C. Vergnolle, C. Sebillotte, B. Houssay , S. Paineau - "Optical Interconnection

  20. Characterization of a Reconfigurable Free-Space Optical Channel for Embedded Computer Applications with Experimental Validation Using Rapid Prototyping Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Gil-Otero

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Free-space optical interconnects (FSOIs are widely seen as a potential solution to current and future bandwidth bottlenecks for parallel processors. In this paper, an FSOI system called optical highway (OH is proposed. The OH uses polarizing beam splitter-liquid crystal plate (PBS/LC assemblies to perform reconfigurable beam combination functions. The properties of the OH make it suitable for embedding complex network topologies such as completed connected mesh or hypercube. This paper proposes the use of rapid prototyping technology for implementing an optomechanical system suitable for studying the reconfigurable characteristics of a free-space optical channel. Additionally, it reports how the limited contrast ratio of the optical components can affect the attenuation of the optical signal and the crosstalk caused by misdirected signals. Different techniques are also proposed in order to increase the optical modulation amplitude (OMA of the system.

  1. Characterization of a Reconfigurable Free-Space Optical Channel for Embedded Computer Applications with Experimental Validation Using Rapid Prototyping Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Free-space optical interconnects (FSOIs are widely seen as a potential solution to current and future bandwidth bottlenecks for parallel processors. In this paper, an FSOI system called optical highway (OH is proposed. The OH uses polarizing beam splitter-liquid crystal plate (PBS/LC assemblies to perform reconfigurable beam combination functions. The properties of the OH make it suitable for embedding complex network topologies such as completed connected mesh or hypercube. This paper proposes the use of rapid prototyping technology for implementing an optomechanical system suitable for studying the reconfigurable characteristics of a free-space optical channel. Additionally, it reports how the limited contrast ratio of the optical components can affect the attenuation of the optical signal and the crosstalk caused by misdirected signals. Different techniques are also proposed in order to increase the optical modulation amplitude (OMA of the system.

  2. Evaluation of the aero-optical properties of the SOFIA cavity by means of computional fluid dynamics and a super fast diagnostic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engfer, Christian; Pfüller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5 m reflecting telescope housed in an open cavity on board of a Boeing 747SP. During observations, the cavity is exposed to transonic flow conditions. The oncoming boundary layer evolves into a free shear layer being responsible for optical aberrations and for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic disturbances within the cavity. While the aero-acoustical excitation of an airborne telescope can be minimized by using passive flow control devices, the aero-optical properties of the flow are difficult to improve. Hence it is important to know how much the image seen through the SOFIA telescope is perturbed by so called seeing effects. Prior to the SOFIA science fights Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations using URANS and DES methods were carried out to determine the flow field within and above the cavity and hence in the optical path in order to provide an assessment of the aero-optical properties under baseline conditions. In addition and for validation purposes, out of focus images have been taken during flight with a Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC). Depending on the binning factor and the sub-array size, the SFDC is able to take and to read out images at very high frame rates. The paper explains the numerical approach based on CFD to evaluate the aero-optical properties of SOFIA. The CFD data is then compared to the high speed images taken by the SFDC during flight.

  3. Optical Backplane Interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1991-01-01

    Optical backplane interconnection (OBIT), method of optically interconnecting many parallel outputs from data processor to many parallel inputs of other data processors by optically changing wavelength of output optical beam. Requires only one command: exact wavelength necessary to make connection between two desired processors. Many features, including smallness advantageous to incorporate OBIT into integrated optical device. Simplifies or eliminates wiring and speeds transfer of data over existing electrical or optical interconnections. Computer hookups and fiber-optical communication networks benefit from concept.

  4. Anatomic relationship of the optic nerve channel with sphenoid al sinus: a computed tomography study; Relacao anatomica do nervo optico com o seio esfenoidal: estudo por tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Paulo Cesar J. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil); Albernaz, Pedro Luiz M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Otorrinolaringologia e Disturbios da Comunicacao Humana; Yamashida, Helio K. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2004-09-15

    The sphenoid sinus, out of the facial sinuses, is certainly the most neglected as far as diagnosis is concerned. The surgical approach requires a detailed anatomical knowledge, considering the serious complications resulting from injuries of vital structures adjacent to this region. Aim: the objective of our research is to evaluate the anatomic relationship of the optic nerve with the sphenoid sinus making use of the computed tomography. Study design: series report. Material and method: the authors present a retrospective analysis of 203 computed tomographies of facial sinus belonging to individuals of both sexes aged 14 and over. The examinations were evaluated observing the course of the optic nerve, obtained through the degree of its projection on the wall of the sphenoid sinus. The method used was the modified classification of Delano, evaluating the absence of bone reduction (dehiscence) of the optic nerve in the sphenoid sinus. We analysed the degree of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus, using Hammer's classification adapted by Guerrero, apart from the pneumatization of the anterior clinoidal process and pterigoid and the presence of the Onodi cell. Results: most of the patients (78.96%) presented their optic nerve with a type 1 course. Type 2 was observed in 16.83% of the patients, type 3 in 3.47% and type 4 in 0.74%. The presence of dehiscence of the optic nerve in the wall of the sphenoid sinus was evidenced in 21.29% of the cases. Related to pneumatization, we noticed that the pre-selar type was observed in 6.44%, the post-selar type appeared in 39.11%, the selar type appeared in 54.45%, and the apneumatized type was not observed in any of the cases. The pneumatization of the anterior clinoidal process was verified in 10.64% of the cases, while the pterigoid process was apparent in 21.29% of the cases. The Onodi cell (sphenoetmoidal) was found in 7.92% of the cases. Conclusion: the presence of dehiscence of the optic nerve is related with the

  5. User's manual for DELSOL2: a computer code for calculating the optical performance and optimal system design for solar-thermal central-receiver plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellin, T.A.; Fish, M.J.; Yang, C.L.

    1981-08-01

    DELSOL2 is a revised and substantially extended version of the DELSOL computer program for calculating collector field performance and layout, and optimal system design for solar thermal central receiver plants. The code consists of a detailed model of the optical performance, a simpler model of the non-optical performance, an algorithm for field layout, and a searching algorithm to find the best system design. The latter two features are coupled to a cost model of central receiver components and an economic model for calculating energy costs. The code can handle flat, focused and/or canted heliostats, and external cylindrical, multi-aperture cavity, and flat plate receivers. The program optimizes the tower height, receiver size, field layout, heliostat spacings, and tower position at user specified power levels subject to flux limits on the receiver and land constraints for field layout. The advantages of speed and accuracy characteristic of Version I are maintained in DELSOL2.

  6. The influence of glass fibers on elongational viscosity studied by means of optical coherence tomography and X-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, M., E-mail: michael.aigner@jku.at; Köpplmayr, T., E-mail: thomas.koepplmayr@jku.at, E-mail: Christian.lang@jku.at; Lang, C., E-mail: thomas.koepplmayr@jku.at, E-mail: Christian.lang@jku.at; Burzic, I., E-mail: ivana.burzic@jku.at, E-mail: juergen.miethlinger@jku.at; Miethlinger, J., E-mail: ivana.burzic@jku.at, E-mail: juergen.miethlinger@jku.at [Institute of Polymer Extrusion and Compounding, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Salaberger, D., E-mail: dietmar.salaberger@fh-wels.at [University of Applied Sciences Upper Austria (Austria); Buchsbaum, A., E-mail: andreas.buchsbaum@recendt.at; Leitner, M. [Research Center for Non Destructive Testing GmbH (Austria); Heise, B., E-mail: bettina.heise@jku.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, ZONA, Austria and Institute for Knowledge-based Mathematical Systems, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Schausberger, S. E., E-mail: stefan.schausberger@jku.at; Stifter, D. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Microscopic and Spectroscopic Material Characterization, ZONA (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    We report on the flow characteristics of glass-fiber-reinforced polymers in elongational rheometry. Unlike polymers with geometrically isotropic fillers, glass-fiber-reinforced polymers exhibit flow behavior and rheology that depend heavily on the orientation, the length distribution and the content of the fibers. One of the primary objectives of this study was to determine the effect of fiber orientation, concentration and distribution on the entrance pressure drop by means of optical coherence tomography (OCT), full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM), and X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). Both pressure drop and melt flow were analyzed using a special elongation die (Thermo Scientific X-Die [3]) for inline measurements. Samples with a variety of fiber volume fractions, fiber lengths and processing temperatures were measured.

  7. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  8. Prospectively electrocardiogram-triggered high-pitch spiral acquisition coronary computed tomography angiography for assessment of biodegradable vascular scaffold expansion: Comparison with optical coherence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Alfonso, Maria Grazia [Interventional Cardiology Unit University Of Florence, Heart and Vessels department, AOU Careggi, Florence (Italy); Mattesini, Alessio, E-mail: amattesini@gmail.com [Interventional Cardiology Unit University Of Florence, Heart and Vessels department, AOU Careggi, Florence (Italy); Meucci, Francesco [Interventional Cardiology Unit University Of Florence, Heart and Vessels department, AOU Careggi, Florence (Italy); Acquafresca, Manlio [Radiology Unit 4, Radiology Department, AOU Careggi, Florence (Italy); Gensini, Gian Franco; Valente, Serafina [Interventional Cardiology Unit University Of Florence, Heart and Vessels department, AOU Careggi, Florence (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    BVS polymeric struts are transparent to the light so that the vessel wall contour can be easily visualized using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Therefore OCT represents a unique tool for both the evaluation of the resorption process and for the assessment of acute BVS mechanical failure. Similarly, the metal-free struts allow unrestricted coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), thus this non invasive method might become the gold standard for a non invasive assessment of BVS. In this case we show the ability of CCTA, performed with a low X-Ray dose, to provide a good evaluation of scaffold expansion. The quantitative measurements were in agreement with those obtained with OCT.

  9. Fast and slow recovery phases of goldfish behavior after transection of the optic nerve revealed by a computer image processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S; Devadas, M; Okada, K; Shimada, Y; Ohkawa, M; Muramoto, K; Takizawa, N; Matsukawa, T

    1999-01-01

    As the goldfish is a common experimental animal for vision research, including psychophysical behavior, it is very important to quantitatively score fish behavior. We have previously developed a computer image processing system which can acquire the positional coordinates of goldfish moving freely in an aquarium and determine turning directions (go straight, right or left turn). In the present study, an algorithm to determine tilting angles of moving goldfish was constructed. We also made histograms for quantifying the interaction between pairs of goldfish (two-point distance). By using these histograms, we estimated the time-course of behavioral regeneration after optic nerve transection in goldfish. Control goldfish showed an equal percentage of right or left turns and maintained an upright position in a dorsoventral axis. When the optic nerve of a goldfish was unilaterally sectioned, the goldfish showed predominant turning and slight tilting toward the intact eye. The abnormal turning and tilting behaviors lasted for 10-14 days and then gradually decreased, returning to control behaviors by one month after the unilateral transection. When the optic nerve of a single goldfish was bilaterally sectioned, it did not show any preferential turning and tilting behavior, which is similar to what was observed in control goldfish. However, the trace maps showed that, after bilateral sectioning, fish preferred to cross the center of the tank, which was unlike control fish. In control pairs, one goldfish chased the other with a fixed small range of two-point distances. However, in pairs of goldfish with bilateral transection of the optic nerve, the blind goldfish behaved independently of each other, with a long two-point distance. The long two-point distance of the blind goldfish lasted for at least two months and then slowly returned to control two-point distance by four months after bilateral transection. Such fast and slow recovery in goldfish behaviors evoked after

  10. Evaluation and study of advanced optical contamination, deposition, measurement, and removal techniques. [including computer programs and ultraviolet reflection analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, R. M. F.; Allen, T. H.; Dillow, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program is described to design, fabricate and install an experimental work chamber assembly (WCA) to provide a wide range of experimental capability. The WCA incorporates several techniques for studying the kinetics of contaminant films and their effect on optical surfaces. It incorporates the capability for depositing both optical and contaminant films on temperature-controlled samples, and for in-situ measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet reflectance. Ellipsometer optics are mounted on the chamber for film thickness determinations, and other features include access ports for radiation sources and instrumentation. Several supporting studies were conducted to define specific chamber requirements, to determine the sensitivity of the measurement techniques to be incorporated in the chamber, and to establish procedures for handling samples prior to their installation in the chamber. A bibliography and literature survey of contamination-related articles is included.

  11. Trinary flip-flops using Savart plate and spatial light modu-lator for optical computation in multivalued logic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Areal K Ghosh; Amitabha Basuray

    2008-01-01

    The memory devices in multi-valued logic are of most significance in modern research. This paper deals with the imple-mentation of basic memory devices in multi-valued logic using Savart plate and spatial light modulator (SLM) basedoptoelectronic circuits. Photons are used here as the carrier to speed up the operations. Optical tree architecture (OTA) hasbeen also utilized in the optical interconnection network. We have exploited the advantages of Savart plates, SLMs andOTA and proposed the SLM based high speed JK, D-type and T-type flip-flops in a trinary system.

  12. Pipelining Computational Stages of the Tomographic Reconstructor for Multi-Object Adaptive Optics on a Multi?GPU System

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali

    2014-05-04

    European Extreme Large Telescope (E-ELT) is a high priority project in ground based astronomy that aims at constructing the largest telescope ever built. MOSAIC is an instrument proposed for E-ELT using Multi- Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO) technique for astronomical telescopes, which compensates for effects of atmospheric turbulence on image quality, and operates on patches across a large FoV.

  13. International Conference on Optical Computing Held in Edinburgh, Scotland on August 22-25, 1994. Technical Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-24

    Barcelona, Departament do Fisica , Laboraton d’Optice. 08193 Bollaterra, Barcelona, Spain. Abstdrct. The uso of Minimum Average Correlation Energy...comunicaci6a Cludad Universitaria 28040 - Madrid Spain Telephone: +34-1-336 73 04 Fax: +34-1-336 73 19 AB•-AT A new method able to evaluate the behaviour of an

  14. Computation of the Fluid and Optical Fields About the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the Coupling of Fluids, Dynamics, and Control Laws on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    The June 1992 to May 1993 grant NCC-2-677 provided for the continued demonstration of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as applied to the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). While earlier grant years allowed validation of CFD through comparison against experiments, this year a new design proposal was evaluated. The new configuration would place the cavity aft of the wing, as opposed to the earlier baseline which was located immediately aft of the cockpit. This aft cavity placement allows for simplified structural and aircraft modification requirements, thus lowering the program cost of this national astronomy resource. Three appendices concerning this subject are presented.

  15. Trifunctional Polymeric Nanocomposites Incorporated with Fe₃O₄/Iodine-Containing Rare Earth Complex for Computed X-ray Tomography, Magnetic Resonance, and Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Mengqi; Yan, Kai; Li, Penghui; Pang, Long; Gong, Ying; Li, Qing; Liu, Ruiqing; Xu, Zushun; Xu, Haibo; Chu, Paul K

    2015-11-11

    In this study, a novel polymerizable CT contrast agent integrating iodine with europium(III) has been developed by a facile and universal coordination chemistry method. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles are then incorporated into this iodine-containing europium complex by seed-emulsifier-free polymerization. The nanocomposites combining the difunctional complex and superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which have uniform size dispersion and high encapsulation rate, are suitable for computed X-ray tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and optical imaging. They possess good paramagnetic properties with a maximum saturation magnetization of 2.16 emu/g and a transverse relaxivity rate of 260 mM(-1) s(-1), and they exhibit obvious contrast effects with an iodine payload less than 4.8 mg I/mL. In the in vivo optical imaging assessment, vivid fluorescent dots can be observed in the liver and spleen by two-photon confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM). All the results showed that nanocomposites as polymeric trifunctional contrast agents have great clinical potential in CT, MR, and optical imaging.

  16. Design of a fiber optic multi-tapped computer bus for a pulsed power control system application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritton, D.G.; Berkbigler, L.W.; Oicles, J.A.

    1979-10-11

    Control system techniques developed and proven on the Shiva laser have been extended to incorporate new electronic and electo-optic devices as well as conform to unique operational requirements of the 300 terawatt Nova laser system. This paper describes one segment of the control system being designed for the Nova laser currently under design/construction at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The specific segment covered is the control system bus structure responsible for power conditioning and real-time control functions.

  17. Computational Modeling of the Size Effects on the Optical Vibrational Modes of H-Terminated Ge Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cruz-Irisson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The vibrational dispersion relations of porous germanium (pGe and germanium nanowires (GeNWs were calculated using the ab initio density functional perturbation theory with a generalized gradient approximation with norm-conserving pseudopotentials. Both pores and nanowires were modeled using the supercell technique. All of the surface dangling bonds were saturated with hydrogen atoms. To address the difference in the confinement between the pores and the nanowires, we calculated the vibrational density of states of the two materials. The results indicate that there is a slight shift in the highest optical mode of the Ge-Ge vibration interval in all of the nanostructures due to the phonon confinement effects. The GeNWs exhibit a reduced phonon confinement compared with the porous Ge due to the mixed Ge-dihydride vibrational modes around the maximum bulk Ge optical mode of approximately 300 cm−1; however, the general effects of such confinements could still be noticed, such as the shift to lower frequencies of the highest optical mode belonging to the Ge vibrations.

  18. Computing Optical Variable Periods of BL Lac Object S5 0716+714 with Period04 Analysis Method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Junping Fu; Xiong Zhang; Dingrong Xiong

    2014-09-01

    From a large volume of literature, we have collected effective observation of BL Lac object S5 0716+714 in the optical band, and constructed its long-term light curve from 1994 to 2006 AD. The light curve shows that S5 0716+714 is very active and exhibits very complicated non-sinusoidal variations. We used Period04 to analyse the period of light curve variation. Our results show that for S5 0716+714, the long-term period of variation is 3.3 yr which is consistent with the result of Raiter et al. (2003).

  19. University of South Carolina CB Support, Basic Research in Materials and Techniques for Optical Computing Standoff Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    to date te contact-mode atomtc force microscopy by scoring tI polymer electrochemistry of poly(para-phenyleneethynylene)s (PPEs), filn with a blade and...bobneo The problem of interfrents the anlyte dye. A cmparison of this eitimation against the Optical spectroscopy is an effective tool for...dramatically improves the SkesetComkm l, aCs 2W mt 1- 1 opoii estimation of anlytes in the mixtures. Umwa onWw _ I ... .iii. Mmum 02 01 64 Application

  20. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing - Research Area 6 Physics 6.3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    2 electrons and a hole) allows for fast (psec) rotations of the electron spin. The program achieved several milestones summarized in the annual...Computing-Research Area 6 Physics 6.3.2 The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an...state (2 electrons and a hole) allows for fast (psec) rotations of the electron spin. The program achieved several milestones summarized in the

  1. Decomposition Storage of Information Based on Computer-Generated Hologram Interference and its Application in Optical Image Encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongkang; Huang, Qizhong; Du, Jinglei; Zhang, Yixiao

    2001-06-01

    An information-encryption method based on computer-generated hologram (CGH) interference is presented. In this method the original information is decomposed into two parts, and then each part is encoded on a separate CGH. When these two encoded CGHs are aligned and illuminated, a combined interference pattern is formed. The original information is obtained from this pattern. It is impossible to decrypt the original information from one CGH alone; two matched CGHs must be put together to make it available.

  2. Characterization of liquid-core/liquid-cladding optical waveguides of a sodium chloride solution/water system by computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Junya; Asanuma, Soto; Murata, Hiroyasu; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Hotta, Hiroki; Sato, Kiichi; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi

    2013-12-01

    A stable liquid/liquid optical waveguide (LLW) was formed using a sheath flow, where a 15% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution functioned as the core solution and water functioned as the cladding solution (15% NaCl/water LLW). The LLW was at least 200 mm in length. The concentration distributions of the liquid core and liquid cladding solutions in the LLW system were predicted by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to validate the characteristics of the waveguide. The broadening of the region of the fluorescence of Rhodamine B excited by the guided light and the increase in the critical angle of the guided light with the increase in the contact time of the core and the cladding solutions were well explained by CFD calculations. However, no substantial leakage of the guided light was observed despite the considerably large change in the refractive index profile of the LLW; thus, a narrower and longer waveguide was realized.

  3. Speckle reduction by combination of digital filter and optical suppression in a modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm computer-generated hologram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yue; Deng, Qing-Long; Wu, Pei-Jung; Lin, Bor-Shyh; Chang, Hsuan T; Hwang, Hone-Ene; Huang, Guan-Syun

    2014-09-20

    A speckleless illuminated modified-Gerchberg-Saxton-algorithm-type computer-generated hologram, which adopts a lower frequency of the iterative algorithm and calculation time, is proposed to code a hologram with two signals and position a multiplexing phase-only function, which can reconstruct the left and the right viewing holograms on the pupillary-distance position after the decryption and still maintain the content with high contrast and definition. The reconstructed image quality presents root mean square error of 0.03, with a diffraction efficiency of 87%, and signal-to-noise ratio of 8 dB after the analysis. Furthermore, two denoising techniques for the digital filter and optical suppression are combined, in which the speckle suppression with pseudorandom phase modulation and a rotating diffuser are utilized for successfully reducing the speckle contrast, which was reduced to below 4%. The goal was to reduce visual fatigue for the viewers.

  4. Hybrid centralized pre-computing/local distributed optimization of shared disjoint-backup path approach to GMPLS optical mesh network intelligent restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Xu, Rong; Lin, Jintong

    2004-04-01

    Wavelength Division Multiplexed (WDM) networks that route optical connections using intelligent optical cross-connects (OXCs) is firmly established as the core constituent of next generation networks. Rapid failure recovery is fundamental to building reliable transport networks. Mesh restoration promises cost effective failure recovery compared with legacy ring networks, and is now seeing large-scale deployment. Many carriers are migrating away from SONET ring restoration for their core transport networks and replacing it with mesh restoration through "intelligent" O-E-O cross-connects (XC). The mesh restoration is typically provided via two fiber-disjoint paths: a service path and a restoration path. this scheme can restore any single link failure or node failure. And by used shared mesh restoration, although every service route is assigned a restoration route, no dedicated capacity needs to be reserved for the restoration route, resulting in capacity savings. The restoration approach we propose is Centralized Pre-computing, Local Distributed Optimization, and Shared Disjoint-backup Path. This approach combines the merits of centralized and distributed solutions. It avoids the scalability issues of centralized solutions by using a distributed control plane for disjoint service path computation and restoration path provisioning. Moreover, if the service routes of two demands are disjoint, no single failure will affect both demands simultaneously. This means that the restoration routes of these two demands can share link capacities, because these two routes will not be activated at the same time. So we can say, this restoration capacity sharing approach achieves low restoration capacity and fast restoration speed, while requiring few control plane changes.

  5. The potential of computer vision, optical backscattering parameters and artificial neural network modelling in monitoring the shrinkage of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwude, Daniel I; Hashim, Norhashila; Abdan, Khalina; Janius, Rimfiel; Chen, Guangnan

    2017-07-30

    Drying is a method used to preserve agricultural crops. During the drying of products with high moisture content, structural changes in shape, volume, area, density and porosity occur. These changes could affect the final quality of dried product and also the effective design of drying equipment. Therefore, this study investigated a novel approach in monitoring and predicting the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. Drying experiments were conducted at temperatures of 50-70 °C and samples thicknesses of 2-6 mm. The volume and surface area obtained from camera vision, and the perimeter and illuminated area from backscattered optical images were analysed and used to evaluate the shrinkage of sweet potato during drying. The relationship between dimensionless moisture content and shrinkage of sweet potato in terms of volume, surface area, perimeter and illuminated area was found to be linearly correlated. The results also demonstrated that the shrinkage of sweet potato based on computer vision and backscattered optical parameters is affected by the product thickness, drying temperature and drying time. A multilayer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural network with input layer containing three cells, two hidden layers (18 neurons), and five cells for output layer, was used to develop a model that can monitor, control and predict the shrinkage parameters and moisture content of sweet potato slices under different drying conditions. The developed ANN model satisfactorily predicted the shrinkage and dimensionless moisture content of sweet potato with correlation coefficient greater than 0.95. Combined computer vision, laser light backscattering imaging and artificial neural network can be used as a non-destructive, rapid and easily adaptable technique for in-line monitoring, predicting and controlling the shrinkage and moisture changes of food and agricultural crops during drying. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Computer modeling of the optical properties and heating of spherical gold and silica-gold nanoparticles for laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalov, V; Astafyeva, L; Jean, B

    2009-06-03

    Recently, several groups of investigators (Anderson, Halas, Zharov, El-Sayed and their co-workers (Pitsillides et al 2003 Biophys. J. 84 4023-31, Zharov et al 2003 Appl. Phys. Lett. 83 4897-9, Zharov et al 2004 Proc. SPIE 5319 291-9, Loo et al 2005 Nano Lett. 5 709-11, Gobin et al 2007 Nano Lett. 7 1929-34, Fu et al 2008 Nanotechnology 19 045103, Huang et al 2006 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128 2115-20, Jain et al 2006 J. Phys. Chem. B 110 7238-48, Jain et al 2007 Nano Today 2 18-29)) demonstrated, through pioneering results, the great potential of laser thermal therapy of cells and tissues conjugated with gold nanoparticles. It was also proposed to use combined diagnostics and therapy on the basis of nanoparticle selection for achievement of efficient contrast for laser imaging applications, as well as for photothermal therapy. However, the current understanding of the relationship between optical properties (absorption, backscattering) of nanoparticles, the efficiency of nanoparticle heating and the possibility to use them for combined imaging and therapy is limited. Here, we report the results of computer modeling of optical absorption and backscattering properties and laser heating of gold and silica-gold spherical nanoparticles for laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment of cells and tissues conjugated with nanoparticles. The efficiencies of nanoparticle heating and backscattering by nanoparticles, depending upon their radii, structure and optical properties of the metal, were investigated. This paper focuses on the analysis and determination of appropriate ranges of nanoparticle sizes for the purposes of laser combined imaging and photothermal treatment. The possibility to use spherical gold and silica-gold nanoparticles in determined ranges of radii for these purposes for laser wavelengths 532 and 800 nm is investigated.

  7. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paoli Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast and preoperative (radiographic template models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  8. Performance evaluation of an improved optical computed tomography polymer gel dosimeter system for 3D dose verification of static and dynamic phantom deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O; Langen, K M; Meeks, S L; Kupelian, P A; Zeidan, O A; Maryanski, M J

    2008-09-01

    The performance of a next-generation optical computed tomography scanner (OCTOPUS-5X) is characterized in the context of three-dimensional gel dosimetry. Large-volume (2.2 L), muscle-equivalent, radiation-sensitive polymer gel dosimeters (BANG-3) were used. Improvements in scanner design leading to shorter acquisition times are discussed. The spatial resolution, detectable absorbance range, and reproducibility are assessed. An efficient method for calibrating gel dosimeters using the depth-dose relationship is applied, with photon- and electron-based deliveries yielding equivalent results. A procedure involving a preirradiation scan was used to reduce the edge artifacts in reconstructed images, thereby increasing the useful cross-sectional area of the dosimeter by nearly a factor of 2. Dose distributions derived from optical density measurements using the calibration coefficient show good agreement with the treatment planning system simulations and radiographic film measurements. The feasibility of use for motion (four-dimensional) dosimetry is demonstrated on an example comparing dose distributions from static and dynamic delivery of a single-field photon plan. The capability to visualize three-dimensional dose distributions is also illustrated.

  9. Organization of the Topical Meeting on Optical Computing Held in Toulon, France on 29 August-2 September 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-02

    Coherent Processing With Infra-Red or Millimeter Waves E. L. Rope, J. Nilles , and Dr. G. Tricoles General Dynamics Electronics Div., P.O.Box 85227, San...Johnson, Lise Cutter, Ling Zhang, and Jack Btgner Center for OptoelectronLc Computing Systems University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado 80309-0425...NAKAYAMA, T. D2 153 KOSAKA, N. P304 205 NEFJODOV, S.M. Ei 58 KUROKAWA, T. E, 181 NILLES , J. Pi09 40 KUZIN, E.A. As 97 NOMURA, T. P308 213 KUZNETSOV, A.A

  10. Concept for Inclusion of Analytical and Computational Capability in Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) for Measurement of Neutron Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Marshall Clint; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers are working on many fronts to make possible high-speed, automated classification and quantification of constituent materials in numerous environments. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has implemented a system for rocket engine flowfields/plumes. The Optical Plume Anomaly Detector (OPAD) system was designed to utilize emission and absorption spectroscopy for monitoring molecular and atomic particulates in gas plasma. An accompanying suite of tools and analytical package designed to utilize information collected by OPAD is known as the Engine Diagnostic Filtering System (EDiFiS). The current combination of these systems identifies atomic and molecular species and quantifies mass loss rates in H2/O2 rocket plumes. Capabilities for real-time processing are being advanced on several fronts, including an effort to hardware encode components of the EDiFiS for health monitoring and management. This paper addresses the OPAD with its tool suites, and discusses what is considered a natural progression: a concept for taking OPAD to the next logical level of high energy physics, incorporating fermion and boson particle analyses in measurement of neutron flux.

  11. Accurately computing the optical pathlength difference for a michelson interferometer with minimal knowledge of the source spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Mark H

    2005-12-01

    Astrometric measurements using stellar interferometry rely on precise measurement of the central white light fringe to accurately obtain the optical pathlength difference of incoming starlight to the two arms of the interferometer. One standard approach to stellar interferometry uses a channeled spectrum to determine phases at a number of different wavelengths that are then converted to the pathlength delay. When throughput is low these channels are broadened to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Ultimately the ability to use monochromatic models and algorithms in each of the channels to extract phase becomes problematic and knowledge of the spectrum must be incorporated to achieve the accuracies required of the astrometric measurements. To accomplish this an optimization problem is posed to estimate simultaneously the pathlength delay and spectrum of the source. Moreover, the nature of the parameterization of the spectrum that is introduced circumvents the need to solve directly for these parameters so that the optimization problem reduces to a scalar problem in just the pathlength delay variable. A number of examples are given to show the robustness of the approach.

  12. Fluorescent Styryl Dyes from 4-Chloro-2-(Diphenylamino)-1, 3-Thiazole-5-Carbaldehyde-Synthesis, Optical Properties and TDDFT Computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nagaiyan; Umape, Prashant G; Patil, Sharad R

    2015-11-01

    4-Chloro-2-(diphenylamino)-1,3-thiazole-5-carbaldehyde was reacted with an active methylene compounds, cyanomethyl benzimidazole, cyanomethyl benzothiazole, barbituric acid and Meldrum's acid under Knoevenagel conditions to give novel push-pull styryl chromophores 8a-8d. The synthesized styryl chromophores were characterized by FT-IR, Mass and (1)H NMR spectral analysis. The photophysical characteristics of these styryl chromophores were evaluated. The effect of solvent polarity and viscosity on the absorption and emission properties of these chromophores was studied. The structural, molecular, electronic and photophysical parameters of the push-pull dyes were studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computations. The ratio of the ground to the excited state dipole moment of the synthesized novel styryl dyes were calculated by Bakhshiev and Bilot-Kawski correlations.

  13. A Paralleled Scheme for Computing the Multigrid Optical Flow%一种新型的并行化多栅光流计算实现方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔峰

    2015-01-01

    The new trends in computer architecture show that parallel processing is getting into some new areas of computing by using the many-core processors and multi-core embedded chips. It means that the traditional areas have to use the parallel programming to develop applications and especially useful in the biomedical image processing. This paper investigates parallelism and scalability on computing multigrid optical flow. The major challenges are to extract enough parallelism from the serial application and to improve scalability. It is difficult to use traditionally multithread programming method to develop the application. Fortunately, Intel’s Concurrent Collections (CnC), TBB, ArBB and Cilk++ multi-core programming models are now available. We use simple and effective CnC programming model to modeling the multigrid optical flow computing. We describe how to use CnC to implement a high-performance mulitgrid optical flow application and compare it against existing approaches. On a platform with two Xeon Processor X5460 3.16GHz 8-core CPUs, the parallelized solution exceeded serial codes performance by up to 6x. Our performance compared with alternative parallelized solutions, including ArBB, Cilk++ and SIMD. Our approach got around 10%performance gain compared to the existing performance of the paralleled implementation approach of SIMD, ArBB and Cilk++.%计算机架构发展的新趋势表明,并行处理正在进入通过许多核心处理器和多核嵌入式芯片进行计算的新领域,这意味着传统的计算机领域必须使用并行编程开发应用程序,特别是在生物医学图像处理领域并行应用程序将起到关键的作用。本论文研究了多栅光流计算的并行性和可扩展性。主要难点是从串行程序中提取完成并行计算需要的足够多的并行性,并提高可扩展性。目前我们很难使用现有的多线程编程方法来开发应用程序。幸好Intel公司推出CnC, TBB ArBB和Cilk++多核

  14. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  15. Virtual and Actual Humanoid Robot Control with Four-Class Motor-Imagery-Based Optical Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa M. Batula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor-imagery tasks are a popular input method for controlling brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, partially due to their similarities to naturally produced motor signals. The use of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS in BCIs is still emerging and has shown potential as a supplement or replacement for electroencephalography. However, studies often use only two or three motor-imagery tasks, limiting the number of available commands. In this work, we present the results of the first four-class motor-imagery-based online fNIRS-BCI for robot control. Thirteen participants utilized upper- and lower-limb motor-imagery tasks (left hand, right hand, left foot, and right foot that were mapped to four high-level commands (turn left, turn right, move forward, and move backward to control the navigation of a simulated or real robot. A significant improvement in classification accuracy was found between the virtual-robot-based BCI (control of a virtual robot and the physical-robot BCI (control of the DARwIn-OP humanoid robot. Differences were also found in the oxygenated hemoglobin activation patterns of the four tasks between the first and second BCI. These results corroborate previous findings that motor imagery can be improved with feedback and imply that a four-class motor-imagery-based fNIRS-BCI could be feasible with sufficient subject training.

  16. Red Emitting Coumarin-Azo Dyes : Synthesis, Characterization, Linear and Non-linear Optical Properties-Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tathe, Abhinav B; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2016-07-01

    The coumarin molecules with 7-(N,N-diethylamino) substitution and aryl azo (Ar-N=N-) at 3-position were synthesized, by reacting diazonium salt of substituted amines and 7-(N, N-diethylamino)-4-hydroxy coumarin under basic conditions. They were found to be fluorescent despite the presence of azo group. The azo group rotation was blocked by complexing with -BF2, so as to get a red shift in absorption. The azo molecules show charge transfer, whereas BF2-complexes do not. The dipole moment ratios between the ground and excited states calculated suggest highly polar excited state and an intra-molecular charge transfer at the excited state in the case of azo dyes. The NLO properties were calculated by solvatochromic method and computationally. Second order hyperpolarizability was found to be 46 to 1083 times more than urea. DFT and TDTDF calculations were performed to understand the electronic properties of the molecules at the ground as well as excited states.

  17. A beam optics study of a modular multi-source X-ray tube for novel computed tomography applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brandon J.; Radtke, Jeff; Chen, Guang-Hong; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    A modular implementation of a scanning multi-source X-ray tube is designed for the increasing number of multi-source imaging applications in computed tomography (CT). An electron beam array coupled with an oscillating magnetic deflector is proposed as a means for producing an X-ray focal spot at any position along a line. The preliminary multi-source model includes three thermionic electron guns that are deflected in tandem by a slowly varying magnetic field and pulsed according to a scanning sequence that is dependent on the intended imaging application. Particle tracking simulations with particle dynamics analysis software demonstrate that three 100 keV electron beams are laterally swept a combined distance of 15 cm over a stationary target with an oscillating magnetic field of 102 G perpendicular to the beam axis. Beam modulation is accomplished using 25 μs pulse widths to a grid electrode with a reverse gate bias of -500 V and an extraction voltage of +1000 V. Projected focal spot diameters are approximately 1 mm for 138 mA electron beams and the stationary target stays within thermal limits for the 14 kW module. This concept could be used as a research platform for investigating high-speed stationary CT scanners, for lowering dose with virtual fan beam formation, for reducing scatter radiation in cone-beam CT, or for other industrial applications.

  18. Computer-assisted analysis of anatomical relationships of the ethmoidal foramina and optic canal along the medial orbital wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Servet; Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Kazak, Zuhal; Govsa, Figen

    2015-11-01

    Typically, the medial orbital wall contains an anterior ethmoidal foramen (EF) and a posterior EF, but may also have multiple EFs transmitting the arteries and nerves between the orbit and the anterior cranial fossa. The aim of this study is to determine a patient-friendly landmark of the medial orbital wall and to specify a precise location of the ethmoidal foramens (EF) in order to standardize certain anatomical marks as safe ethmoidal arteries. Orientation points on the anterior ethmoidal foramen (AEF), posterior ethmoidal foramen (PEF) and middle ethmoidal foramen (MEF) were investigated in 262 orbits. Using a software program, distances between each foramen and the midpoint of the anterior lacrimal crest (ALC), the optic canal (OC), and some important angles were measured. The EFs were identified as single in 0.8%, double in 73.7%, triple 24,4% and quadruple in 1.1% specimens. The mean distances between ALC and AEF, ALC and PEF and ALC and MEF were 27.7, 10.6, and 12.95 mm, respectively. The distances from ALC-AEF, AEF-PEF, and PEF-OC were 27.7 ± 2.8, 10.6 ± 3.3, 5.4 ± 1 mm. The angles from the plane of the EF to the medial border of the OC were calculated as 13.2° and 153°, respectively. The angle from the AEF to the medial border of the OC was based on the plane between the ALC and AEF was 132°. The occurrence of multiple EF with an incidence of 25% narrows the borders of the safe region in the medial orbital wall. Safe distance of the ALC-EF was measured as 22.1 mm on medial wall. The line of the location of the EF was calculated 16.2 mm. In this study, it was possible to investigate the variability of the orbital orifice of the EF and the feasibility of the EA, to observe various angles of the orbital wall bones and to calculate the lengths of some parameters with the help of certain software.

  19. Optical Disk Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, George L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This special feature focuses on recent developments in optical disk technology. Nine articles discuss current trends, large scale image processing, data structures for optical disks, the use of computer simulators to create optical disks, videodisk use in training, interactive audio video systems, impacts on federal information policy, and…

  20. Integrated Optics Some Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hradaynath

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Status of some key individual integrated optics components, their application in the field of telecommunications, integrated optoelectronic circuits, fibre optics sensors, optical interconnects and logic devices are highlighted in this paper. Possibilities of opto-opto processors in the computers field are also outlined.

  1. Biomechanics of the chick embryonic heart outflow tract at HH18 using 4D optical coherence tomography imaging and computational modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiping Liu

    Full Text Available During developmental stages, biomechanical stimuli on cardiac cells modulate genetic programs, and deviations from normal stimuli can lead to cardiac defects. Therefore, it is important to characterize normal cardiac biomechanical stimuli during early developmental stages. Using the chicken embryo model of cardiac development, we focused on characterizing biomechanical stimuli on the Hamburger-Hamilton (HH 18 chick cardiac outflow tract (OFT, the distal portion of the heart from which a large portion of defects observed in humans originate. To characterize biomechanical stimuli in the OFT, we used a combination of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging, physiological measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling. We found that, at HH18, the proximal portion of the OFT wall undergoes larger circumferential strains than its distal portion, while the distal portion of the OFT wall undergoes larger wall stresses. Maximal wall shear stresses were generally found on the surface of endocardial cushions, which are protrusions of extracellular matrix onto the OFT lumen that later during development give rise to cardiac septa and valves. The non-uniform spatial and temporal distributions of stresses and strains in the OFT walls provide biomechanical cues to cardiac cells that likely aid in the extensive differential growth and remodeling patterns observed during normal development.

  2. Temperature Experiment and Computer Simulation Analysis of Fiber Optical Gyroscope%光纤陀螺的温度实验与仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨昌均; 冯志刚; 廖良斌; 杨宏源

    2011-01-01

    Thermally induced non reciprocity phase shift has affected working-accuracy of fiber optical gyroscope (FOG). By the analysis of this phase shift, the relationship of it and temperature characteristic (TC)in FOG were established. Based on it, the temperature experiment (TE)and computer simulation analysis (SA)have been carried on. The results show that SA of temperature distribution(TD)in FOG can be realized, and the way of TC and SA can help to clear up TC in FOG.%热致非互易相移的存在影响了光纤陀螺的工作精度.通过对热致非互易相移的分析,把握了该相移与光纤陀螺温度特性的关系.在此基础上,进行了光纤陀螺的温度实验与仿真分析.结果表明,仿真分析光纤陀螺的整体温度分布是可行的;温度实验与仿真分析相结合的办法有助于光纤陀螺温度特性的把握.

  3. How does the increment of hetero-cyclic conjugated moieties affect electro-optical and charge transport properties of novel naphtha-difuran derivatives? A computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Aijaz Rasool; Ahmed, R; Irfan, Ahmad; Muhammad, Shabbir; Shaari, A; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated computationally the effects of π-conjugation extension on naphtha[2,1-b:6,5-b'] difuran (DPNDF); where we increase the number of fused NDF (central core) and furan rings in the parent molecule. The molecular structures of all analogues have been optimized at the ground (S0) and first excited (S1) states using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), respectively. Then highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs), the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs), photophysical properties, adiabatic/vertical electron affinities (EAa)/(EAv), adiabatic/vertical ionization potentials (IPa)/(IPv), and hole/electron reorganization energies λh/λe have been investigated. The effect of NDF and furan rings on structural and electro-optical properties has also been studied. Our calculated reorganization energies of 1a, 1b, and 2c reveal them, materials with balanced hole/electron charge transport, whereas 2a and 2b are good hole-transport materials. By increasing the number of furan rings; the photostability was augmented in 2a, 2b, and 2c.

  4. Computational Analysis of the Optical and Charge Transport Properties of Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis-Grown Zinc Oxide/Graphene Hybrid Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amgad Ahmed; Hashim, Abdul Manaf

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a systematic computational analysis of the measured optical and charge transport properties of the spray pyrolysis-grown ZnO nanostructures, i.e. nanosphere clusters (NSCs), nanorods (NRs) and nanowires (NWs) for the first time. The calculated absorbance spectra based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) shows very close similarity with the measured behaviours under UV light. The atomic models and energy level diagrams for the grown nanostructures were developed and discussed to explain the structural defects and band gap. The induced stresses in the lattices of ZnO NSCs that formed during the pyrolysis process seem to cause the narrowing of the gap between the energy levels. ZnO NWs and NRs show homogeneous distribution of the LUMO and HOMO orbitals all over the entire heterostructure. Such distribution contributes to the reduction of the band gap down to 2.8 eV, which has been confirmed to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. ZnO NWs and NRs exhibited better emission behaviours under the UV excitation as compared to ZnO NSCs and thin film as their visible range emissions are strongly quenched. Based on the electrochemical impedance measurement, the electrical models and electrostatic potential maps were developed to calculate the electron lifetime and to explain the mobility or diffusion behaviours in the grown nanostructure, respectively.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics comparisons of wall shear stress in patient-specific coronary artery bifurcation using coronary angiography and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric; Thondapu, Vikas; Chin, Cheng; Scheerlinck, Cedric; Zahtila, Tony; Mamon, Chris; Nguyen, Wilson; Ooi, Andrew; Barlis, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics directly influence biology of the arterial wall, and are closely linked with the development of coronary artery disease. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers may be employed to analyze the hemodynamic environment in patient-specific reconstructions of coronary arteries. Although coronary X-ray angiography (CA) is the most common medical imaging modality for 3D arterial reconstruction, models reconstructed from CA assume a circular or elliptical cross-sectional area. This limitation can be overcome with a reconstruction technique fusing CA with intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT scans the interior of an artery using near-infrared light, achieving a 10-micron resolution and providing unprecedented detail of vessel geometry. We compared 3D coronary artery bifurcation models generated using CA alone versus OCT-angiography fusion. The model reconstructed from CA alone is unable to identify the detailed geometrical variations of diseased arteries, and also under-estimates the cross-sectional vessel area compared to OCT-angiography fusion. CFD was performed in both models under pulsatile flow in order to identify and compare regions of low wall shear stress, a hemodynamic parameter directly linked with progression of atherosclerosis. Supported by ARC LP150100233 and VLSCI VR0210.

  6. Comparisons of the diagnostic accuracies of optical coherence tomography, micro-computed tomography, and histology in periodontal disease: an ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that may be useful for both qualitative and quantitative analyses of the periodontium. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is another noninvasive imaging technique capable of providing submicron spatial resolution. The purpose of this study was to present periodontal images obtained using ex vivo dental OCT and to compare OCT images with micro-CT images and histologic sections. Methods Images of ex vivo canine periodontal structures were obtained using OCT. Biologic depth measurements made using OCT were compared to measurements made on histologic sections prepared from the same sites. Visual comparisons were made among OCT, micro-CT, and histologic sections to evaluate whether anatomical details were accurately revealed by OCT. Results The periodontal tissue contour, gingival sulcus, and the presence of supragingival and subgingival calculus could be visualized using OCT. OCT was able to depict the surface topography of the dentogingival complex with higher resolution than micro-CT, but the imaging depth was typically limited to 1.2–1.5 mm. Biologic depth measurements made using OCT were a mean of 0.51 mm shallower than the histologic measurements. Conclusions Dental OCT as used in this study was able to generate high-resolution, cross-sectional images of the superficial portions of periodontal structures. Improvements in imaging depth and the development of an intraoral sensor are likely to make OCT a useful technique for periodontal applications. PMID:28261522

  7. Nicholas Metropolis Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Work in Computational Physics: Quantum many-body physics of ultracold molecules in optical lattices: models and simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Experimental progress in generating and manipulating synthetic quantum systems, such as ultracold atoms and molecules in optical lattices, has revolutionized our understanding of quantum many-body phenomena and posed new challenges for modern numerical techniques. Ultracold molecules, in particular, feature long-range dipole-dipole interactions and a complex and selectively accessible internal structure of rotational and hyperfine states, leading to many-body models with long range interactions and many internal degrees of freedom. Additionally, the many-body physics of ultracold molecules is often probed far from equilibrium, and so algorithms which simulate quantum many-body dynamics are essential. Numerical methods which are to have significant impact in the design and understanding of such synthetic quantum materials must be able to adapt to a variety of different interactions, physical degrees of freedom, and out-of-equilibrium dynamical protocols. Matrix product state (MPS)-based methods, such as the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG), have become the de facto standard for strongly interacting low-dimensional systems. Moreover, the flexibility of MPS-based methods makes them ideally suited both to generic, open source implementation as well as to studies of the quantum many-body dynamics of ultracold molecules. After introducing MPSs and variational algorithms using MPSs generally, I will discuss my own research using MPSs for many-body dynamics of long-range interacting systems. In addition, I will describe two open source implementations of MPS-based algorithms in which I was involved, as well as educational materials designed to help undergraduates and graduates perform research in computational quantum many-body physics using a variety of numerical methods including exact diagonalization and static and dynamic variational MPS methods. Finally, I will mention present research on ultracold molecules in optical lattices, such as the exploration of

  8. Optical system design

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Honed for more than 20 years in an SPIE professional course taught by renowned optical systems designer Robert E. Fischer, Optical System Design, Second Edition brings you the latest cutting-edge design techniques and more than 400 detailed diagrams that clearly illustrate every major procedure in optical design. This thoroughly updated resource helps you work better and faster with computer-aided optical design techniques, diffractive optics, and the latest applications, including digital imaging, telecommunications, and machine vision. No need for complex, unnecessary mathematical derivations-instead, you get hundreds of examples that break the techniques down into understandable steps. For twenty-first century optical design without the mystery, the authoritative Optical Systems Design, Second Edition features: Computer-aided design use explained through sample problems Case studies of third-millennium applications in digital imaging, sensors, lasers, machine vision, and more New chapters on optomechanic...

  9. INVERSE COMPUTATION OF OPTICAL-ABSORPTIONCOEFFICIENT IN INHOMOGENEOUS MATERIAL WITH VARIED THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY%具有变化热导率的不均匀材料中的光吸收系数的反演计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建新

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,for an inhomogeneous material in which the thermal conductivity varies as a function of depth,an efficient treatment is proposed to inversely calculate the depth distribution of optical-absorption coefficient by the surface temperature of the material.It is demonstrated that the results of inverse computation by that method are more similar to the experimental ones measured by some destructive method.Thus,the treatment is more feasible to nondestructively estimate the distribution.

  10. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  11. Optic glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  12. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  13. Improved Optical Keyboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Optical keyboard surfaces used in typewriters, computer terminals, and telephone inexpensively fabricated using stack of printed-circuit cards set in laminate. Internal laminations carry all illuminating and sensing light conductors to keys.

  14. High-resolution CT of lesions of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyster, R.G.; Hoover, E.D.; Hershey, B.L.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-05-01

    The optic nerves are well demonstrated by high-resolution computed tomography. Involvement of the optic nerve by optic gliomas and optic nerve sheath meningiomas is well known. However, nonneoplastic processes such as increased intracranial pressure, optic neuritis, Grave ophthalmopathy, and orbital pseudotumor may also alter the appearance of the optic nerve/sheath on computed tomography. Certain clinical and computed tomographic features permit distinction of these nonneoplastic tumefactions from tumors.

  15. Real-time optical information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    1994-01-01

    Real-Time Optical Information Processing covers the most recent developments in optical information processing, pattern recognition, neural computing, and materials for devices in optical computing. Intended for researchers and graduate students in signal and information processing with some elementary background in optics, the book provides both theoretical and practical information on the latest in information processing in all its aspects. Leading researchers in the field describe the significant signal processing algorithms architectures in optics as well as basic hardware concepts,

  16. Optical controlled keyboard system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, Łukasz; Długosz, Dariusz; Niewiarowski, Bartosz; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2011-06-01

    Control systems of our computers are common devices, based on the manipulation of keys or a moving ball. Completely healthy people have no problems with the operation of such devices. Human disability makes everyday activities become a challenge and create trouble. When a man can not move his hands, the work becomes difficult or often impossible. Controlled optical keyboard is a modern device that allows to bypass the limitations of disability limbs. The use of wireless optical transmission allows to control computer using a laser beam, which cooperates with the photodetectors. The article presents the construction and operation of non-contact optical keyboard for people with disabilities.

  17. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  18. Loss Tolerant Optical Qubits

    CERN Document Server

    Ralph, T C; Gilchrist, A; Gilchrist, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    We present a linear optics quantum computation scheme that employs a new encoding approach that incrementally adds qubits and is tolerant to photon loss errors. The scheme employs a circuit model but uses techniques from cluster state computation and achieves comparable resource usage. To illustrate our techniques we describe a quantum memory which is fault tolerant to photon loss.

  19. Optical engineering of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Rabeau, James R

    2013-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on the engineering of diamond optical devices. It will give readers an up-to-date account of the properties of optical quality synthetic diamond (single crystal, nanodiamond and polycrystalline) and reviews the large and growing field of engineering of diamond-based optical devices, with applications in quantum computation, nano-imaging, high performance lasers, and biomedicine. It aims to provide scientists, engineers and physicists with a valuable resource and reference book for the design and performance of diamond-based optical devices.

  20. Computational mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  1. Electronics and computer acronyms

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Phil

    1988-01-01

    Electronics and Computer Acronyms presents a list of almost 2,500 acronyms related to electronics and computers. The material for this book is drawn from a number of subject areas, including electrical, electronics, computers, telecommunications, fiber optics, microcomputers/microprocessors, audio, video, and information technology. The acronyms also encompass avionics, military, data processing, instrumentation, units, measurement, standards, services, organizations, associations, and companies. This dictionary offers a comprehensive and broad view of electronics and all that is associated wi

  2. Optical closure of parameterized bio-optical relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuangyan; Fischer, Jürgen; Schaale, Michael; He, Ming-xia

    2014-03-01

    An optical closure study on bio-optical relationships was carried out using radiative transfer model matrix operator method developed by Freie Universität Berlin. As a case study, the optical closure of bio-optical relationships empirically parameterized with in situ data for the East China Sea was examined. Remote-sensing reflectance ( R rs) was computed from the inherent optical properties predicted by these biooptical relationships and compared with published in situ data. It was found that the simulated R rs was overestimated for turbid water. To achieve optical closure, bio-optical relationships for absorption and scattering coefficients for suspended particulate matter were adjusted. Furthermore, the results show that the Fournier and Forand phase functions obtained from the adjusted relationships perform better than the Petzold phase function. Therefore, before bio-optical relationships are used for a local sea area, the optical closure should be examined.

  3. Summaries of Papers Presented at the Topical Meeting on Optical Computing Held in Incline Village, Nevada on March 16-18, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-31

    Jean F. Morhange, Hyatt M. Gibbs, Nasser - TuD7 Passive Single-Mode Optical Networks for Cohe- Peyghambarian, U. Arizona; Feng-Yu Juang, Pallab K... Piaget and C. Lemonier of LEP for lending the microchannel plate image intensifiers used in the experiment. Pehrenc-s: 1. G.M. Morris, Opt. Engin. 24,86...ME? Monro. D, M. -- TuE9 Cri, A t A6 Morhange. Jean F. .- TuE5% U’iltoll P S MD2 Morris. G. Michael -MD8 Murdlocca. M. J,.- MB20 Haobihy. 5 F. MD5

  4. 计算机与光学相结合的体视全息三维显示%Three-dimensional Stereoscopic Holographoc Display Combining Computer-generated Hologram and Optical Hologram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨上供; 甘亮勤

    2011-01-01

    Based on computer-generated holography and optical holography, a new three-dimensional stereoscopic display technique combining computer-generated hologram (CGH) and optical hologram is proposed. Firstly, a pair of stereogram with parallax is obtained using camera, and two computer-generated holograms(H1) is created from the stereogram. Then, re-illuminating H1, a pair of images with parallax is acquired, and the rainbow hologram(H2) is recorded when interfering with reference beam. FinaUy, a three- dimensional reconstruction is synthesized through H2 under natural light. This method utilizes the advantages of CGH and optical hologram, and Fast-Fourier-transform is introduced to speed up the calculation of CGH.%在计算机制全息技术和光学全息技术的基础上,研究用计算机一光学方法联合制作体视全息三维立体显示技术.根据人眼立体视觉原理获取三维物体带有视差信息的体视图,通过计算机计算得到计算全息图H1;将H1严格对位,用激光再现获得带有视差信息的再现像,并以此再现像为对象,用光学全息的方法拍摄彩虹全息图H2;用白光再现H2,通过双眼综合出三维立体图像.在全息图的计算过程中,采用快速傅里叶变换算法提高了计算速度,将计算全息与光学全息相结合,发挥了各自的优势.

  5. Optical pulse generator using liquid crystal light valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical optical computing is discussed. A design for an optical pulse generator using a Hughes Liquid crystal light valve and intended for application as an optical clock in a numerical optical computer is considered. The pulse generator is similar in concept to the familiar electronic multivibrator, having a flip-flop and delay units.

  6. Experimental observation of optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation using a single SOI microdisk chip

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ting; Liu, Li; Liao, Shasha; Tan, Sisi; Shi, Lei; Gao, Dingshan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2013-01-01

    Optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation play important roles in communications, computing, information processing and signal analysis in optical domain which offering huge bandwidth. Meanwhile, silicon-based photonic integrated circuits are preferable in all-optical signal processing due to their intrinsic advantages of low power consumption, compact footprint and ultra-high speed. In this study, we analyze the interrelation between first-order optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation and then experimentally demonstrate a feasible integrated scheme which can simultaneously function as first-order optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation based on a single microdisk resonator. This finding may motivate the development of integrated optical signal processors.

  7. Growth, structural, physical and computational perspectives of trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline: a promising organic nonlinear optical material with large laser-induced damage threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumurugan, Ramaiah; Anitha, Kandasamy

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a systematic study of an organic nonlinear optical (NLO) material, trans-4-hydroxy-l-proline (THP), C5H9NO3 is reported. An optical quality single crystals of THP have been successfully grown by using slow evaporation solution growth technique (SEST). The single crystal x-ray diffraction (SXRD) analysis reveals that grown crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system with non-centrosymmetric space group (NCS), P212121. Powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis shows relatively a good crystalline nature. The molecular structure of THP was recognized by NMR (1H and 13C) studies and its vibrational modes were confirmed by FTIR and FT-Raman vibrational studies. UV-Vis-NIR spectrum of grown crystal shows high optical transparency in the visible and near-IR region with low near-UV cut-off wavelength at 218 nm. Photoluminescence study confirms ultraviolet wavelength emission of THP crystal. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of grown crystal is 1.6 times greater with respect to standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP). Nonlinear refractive index (n 2) and nonlinear absorption coefficient (β) were determined using the Z-scan technique. The title compound owns high thermal stability of 294 °C and specific heat capacity (C P) of 1.21 J g-1 K-1 at 300 K and 11.33 J g-1 K-1 at 539 K (melting point). The laser-induced damage threshold (LDT) value of grown crystal was measured as 7.25 GW cm-2. The crystal growth mechanism and defects of grown crystal were studied by chemical etching technique. Mechanical strength was extensively studied by Vickers microhardness test and crystal void percentage analysis. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out to probe the Mulliken charge distribution, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and first order hyperpolarizability (β) of the optimized molecular structure to get a better insight of the molecular properties. These characterization results endorse that grown THP crystal as a

  8. Demonstrational Optics Part 2: Coherent and Statistical Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Marchenko, Oleg; Windholz, Laurentius

    2007-01-01

    Demonstrational Optics presents a new didactical approach to the study of optics. Emphasizing the importance of elaborate new experimental demonstrations, pictorial illustrations, computer simulations and models of optical phenomena in order to ensure a deeper understanding of wave and geometric optics. It includes problems focused on the pragmatic needs of students, secondary school teachers, university professors and optical engineers. Part 2, Coherent and Statistical Optics, contains chapters on interference, diffraction, Fourier optics, light quanta, thermal radiation (Shot noise and Gaussian light), Correlation of light fields and Correlation of light intensities. A substantial part of this volume is devoted to thermal radiation and its properties, especially with partial coherence. A detailed treatment of the photo-effect with respect to statistical properties leads to the basics of statistical optics. To illustrate the phenomena covered by this volume, a large number of demonstration experiments are de...

  9. Optic flow and autonomous navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campani, M; Giachetti, A; Torre, V

    1995-01-01

    Many animals, especially insects, compute and use optic flow to control their motion direction and to avoid obstacles. Recent advances in computer vision have shown that an adequate optic flow can be computed from image sequences. Therefore studying whether artificial systems, such as robots, can use optic flow for similar purposes is of particular interest. Experiments are reviewed that suggest the possible use of optic flow for the navigation of a robot moving in indoor and outdoor environments. The optic flow is used to detect and localise obstacles in indoor scenes, such as corridors, offices, and laboratories. These routines are based on the computation of a reduced optic flow. The robot is usually able to avoid large obstacles such as a chair or a person. The avoidance performances of the proposed algorithm critically depend on the optomotor reaction of the robot. The optic flow can be used to understand the ego-motion in outdoor scenes, that is, to obtain information on the absolute velocity of the moving vehicle and to detect the presence of other moving objects. A critical step is the correction of the optic flow for shocks and vibrations present during image acquisition. The results obtained suggest that optic flow can be successfully used by biological and artificial systems to control their navigation. Moreover, both systems require fast and accurate optomotor reactions and need to compensate for the instability of the viewed world.

  10. Handbook of optical design

    CERN Document Server

    Malacara-Hernández, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Handbook of Optical Design, Third Edition covers the fundamental principles of geometric optics and their application to lens design in one volume. It incorporates classic aspects of lens design along with important modern methods, tools, and instruments, including contemporary astronomical telescopes, Gaussian beams, and computer lens design. Written by respected researchers, the book has been extensively classroom-tested and developed in their lens design courses. This well-illustrated handbook clearly and concisely explains the intricacies of optical system design and evaluation. It also di

  11. Theoretical Optics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Römer, Hartmann

    2004-01-01

    Starting from basic electrodynamics, this volume provides a solid, yet concise introduction to theoretical optics, containing topics such as nonlinear optics, light-matter interaction, and modern topics in quantum optics, including entanglement, cryptography, and quantum computation. The author, with many years of experience in teaching and research, goes way beyond the scope of traditional lectures, enabling readers to keep up with the current state of knowledge. Both content and presentation make it essential reading for graduate and phD students as well as a valuable reference for researche

  12. User's guide for MIRVAL: a computer code for comparing designs of heliostat-receiver optics for central receiver solar power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, P L; Hankins, J D

    1979-02-01

    MIRVAL is a Monte Carlo program which simulates the heliostats and a portion of the receiver for solar energy central receiver power plants. Models for three receiver types and four kinds of heliostats are included in the code. The three receiver types modeled are an external cylinder, a cylindrical cavity with a downward-facing aperature, and a north-facing cavity. Three heliostats which track in elevation and azimuth are modeled, one of which is enclosed in a plastic dome. The fourth type consists of a rack of louvered reflective panels with the rack rotatable about a fixed horizontal axis. Phenomena whose effects are simulated are shadowing, blocking, mirror tracking, random errors in tracking and in the conformation of the reflective surface, optical figure of the reflective surface, insolation, angular distribution of incoming sun rays to account for limb darkening and scattering, attenuation of light between the mirrors and the receiver, reflectivity of the mirror surface, and mirror aiming strategy.

  13. Optical modular arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlichin, Dmitri S.; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    Nanoscale integrated photonic devices and circuits offer a path to ultra-low power computation at the few-photon level. Here we propose an optical circuit that performs a ubiquitous operation: the controlled, random-access readout of a collection of stored memory phases or, equivalently, the computation of the inner product of a vector of phases with a binary selector" vector, where the arithmetic is done modulo 2pi and the result is encoded in the phase of a coherent field. This circuit, a collection of cascaded interferometers driven by a coherent input field, demonstrates the use of coherence as a computational resource, and of the use of recently-developed mathematical tools for modeling optical circuits with many coupled parts. The construction extends in a straightforward way to the computation of matrix-vector and matrix-matrix products, and, with the inclusion of an optical feedback loop, to the computation of a weighted" readout of stored memory phases. We note some applications of these circuits for error correction and for computing tasks requiring fast vector inner products, e.g. statistical classification and some machine learning algorithms.

  14. Computer-generated image hologram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takeshi Yamaguchi; Hiroshi Yoshikawa

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the computer-generated hologram with full parallax and which can be reconstructed with white light. The object of the hologram is processed from three-dimensional computer graphics polygon data and has shaded surface for hidden surface removal. The optically reconstructed image from the printed hologram is evaluated.%We investigate the computer-generated hologram with full parallax and which can be reconstructed with white light.The object of the hologram is processed from three-dimensional computer graphics polygon data and has shaded surface for hidden surface removal.The optically reconstructed image from the printed hologram is evaluated.

  15. Applying a new computational method for biological tissue optics based on the time-dependent two-dimensional radiative transfer equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Fumeron, Sebastien

    2012-07-01

    Optical tomography is a medical imaging technique based on light propagation in the near infrared (NIR) part of the spectrum. We present a new way of predicting the short-pulsed NIR light propagation using a time-dependent two-dimensional-global radiative transfer equation in an absorbing and strongly anisotropically scattering medium. A cell-vertex finite-volume method is proposed for the discretization of the spatial domain. The closure relation based on the exponential scheme and linear interpolations was applied for the first time in the context of time-dependent radiative heat transfer problems. Details are given about the application of the original method on unstructured triangular meshes. The angular space (4πSr) is uniformly subdivided into discrete directions and a finite-differences discretization of the time domain is used. Numerical simulations for media with physical properties analogous to healthy and metastatic human liver subjected to a collimated short-pulsed NIR light are presented and discussed. As expected, discrepancies between the two kinds of tissues were found. In particular, the level of light flux was found to be weaker (inside the medium and at boundaries) in the healthy medium than in the metastatic one.

  16. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of manganese (II) complex of picolinate: A combined experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    A novel manganese (II) complex with picolinic acid (pyridine 2-carboxylic acid, Hpic), namely, [Mn(pic)2(H2O)2] was prepared and its crystal structure was fully characterized by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Picolinate (pic) ligands were coordinated to the central manganese(II) ion as bidentate N,O-donors through the nitrogen atoms of pyridine rings and the oxygen atoms of carboxylate groups forming five-membered chelate rings. The spectroscopic characterization of Mn(II) complex was performed by the applications of FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis and EPR techniques. In order to support these studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out by using B3LYP level. IR and Raman spectra were simulated at B3LYP level, and obtained results indicated that DFT calculations generally give compatible results to the experimental ones. The electronic structure of the Mn(II) complex was predicted using time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method with polarizable continuum model (PCM). Molecular stability, hyperconjugative interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and bond strength were investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Nonlinear optical properties of Mn(II) complex were investigated by the determining of molecular polarizability (α) and hyperpolarizability (β) parameters.

  17. Nonlinear fibre optics overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travers, J. C.; Frosz, Michael Henoch; Dudley, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    , provides a background to the associated nonlinear optical processes, treats the generation mechanisms from continuous wave to femtosecond pulse pump regimes and highlights the diverse applications. A full discussion of numerical methods and comprehensive computer code are also provided, enabling readers...

  18. Quantum optics, what next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirac, J. Ignacio; Kimble, H. Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Quantum optics is a well-established field that spans from fundamental physics to quantum information science. In the coming decade, areas including computation, communication and metrology are all likely to experience scientific and technological advances supported by this far-reaching research field.

  19. All-optical adder/subtractor based on tera-hertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dilip Kumar Gayen; Rajat Kumar Pal; Jitendra Nath Roy

    2009-01-01

    An all-optical adder/subtractor (A/S) unit with the help of terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) is proposed.Tile all-optical A/S unit with a set of all-optical full-adders and optical exclusive-ORs (XORs),can be used to perform a fast central processor unit using optical hardware components.We try to exploit the advantages of TOAD-based optical switch to design an integrated all-optical circuit which can perform binary addition and subtraction.With computer simulation results confirming the described methods,conclusions are given.

  20. Bidirectional all-optical switches based on highly nonlinear optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjun; Yang, Chunyu; Liu, Mengli; Yu, Weitian; Zhang, Yujia; Lei, Ming; Wei, Zhiyi

    2017-05-01

    All-optical switches have become one of the research focuses of nonlinear optics due to their fast switching speed. They have been applied in such fields as ultrafast optics, all-optical communication and all-optical networks. In this paper, based on symbolic computation, bidirectional all-optical switches are presented using analytic two-soliton solutions. Various types of soliton interactions are analyzed through choosing the different parameters of high-order dispersion and nonlinearity. Results indicate that bidirectional all-optical switches can be effectively achieved using highly nonlinear optical fibers.

  1. Modern optics

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, B D

    2015-01-01

    Modern Optics is a fundamental study of the principles of optics using a rigorous physical approach based on Maxwell's Equations. The treatment provides the mathematical foundations needed to understand a number of applications such as laser optics, fiber optics and medical imaging covered in an engineering curriculum as well as the traditional topics covered in a physics based course in optics. In addition to treating the fundamentals in optical science, the student is given an exposure to actual optics engineering problems such as paraxial matrix optics, aberrations with experimental examples, Fourier transform optics (Fresnel-Kirchhoff formulation), Gaussian waves, thin films, photonic crystals, surface plasmons, and fiber optics. Through its many pictures, figures, and diagrams, the text provides a good physical insight into the topics covered. The course content can be modified to reflect the interests of the instructor as well as the student, through the selection of optional material provided in append...

  2. Optic Neuritis

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Demyelinating optic neuritis is the most common cause of unilateral painful visual loss in the United States. Although patients presenting with demyelinating optic neuritis have favorable long-term visual prognosis, optic neuritis is the initial clinical manifestation of multiple sclerosis in 20% of patients. The Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial (ONTT) has helped stratify the risk of developing multiple sclerosis after the first episode of optic neuritis based on abnormal findings on brain MRI....

  3. Spectral, optical, thermal, Hirshfeld, antimicrobial studies and computational calculations of a new organic crystal, 1H-benzo[d]imidazol-3-ium-3,5-dinitrobenzoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, K.; Dhamodharan, P.; Dhandapani, M.

    2017-06-01

    Single crystals of 1H-benzo[d]imidazol-3-ium-3,5-dinitrobenzoate (BDNB) were grown by reacting 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid and benzimidazole by slow evaporation method. UV-Vis-NIR spectral studies of the BDNB show that the crystal is excellently transparent in entire visible region. Chemically and magnetically equivalent protons in BDNB were identified by 1H NMR technique. The carbon frame work of the molecule was established by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Proton transfer mechanism was confirmed by the presence of N+H group in BDNB by FT-IR spectroscopic technique. TG/DTA analyses confirmed that the crystal is stable up to172 °C. Single crystal XRD analysis was carried out to ascertain the molecular structure and the crystal belongs to monoclinic system with space group P21/c. Computational studies that include optimization of molecular geometry, natural bond analysis, Mulliken population analysis and HOMO-LUMO analysis were performed using B3LYP method at 6-31 g level. The low HOMO-LUMO energy gap of BDNB confirms high reactivity of BDNB. Hirshfeld analysis expose that O⋯H/H⋯O interactions are the prominent interactions. Theoretical calculations indicate that first order hyperpolarizability is 16 times greater than urea. The results show that the BDNB may be used for opto-electronic applications. The antimicrobial and antioxidant analyses shows concentration of the compound increases inhibition activity also increases.

  4. Multifunctional BaYbF5: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo tri-modal upconversion optical, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yi, Zhigao; Xue, Zhenluan; Zeng, Songjun; Liu, Hongrong

    2017-06-01

    Development of high-quality upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with combination of the merits of multiple molecular imaging techniques, such as, upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, could significantly improve the accuracy of biological diagnosis. In this work, multifunctional BaYbF5: Gd/Er (50:2mol%) UCNPs were synthesized via a solvothermal method using oleic acid (OA) as surface ligands (denoted as OA-UCNPs). The OA-UCNPs were further treated by diluted HCl to form ligand-free UCNPs (LF-UCNPs) for later bioimaging applications. The cytotoxicity assay in HeLa cells shows low cell toxicity of these LF-UCNPs. Owing to the efficient UCL of BaYbF5: Gd/Er, the LF-UCNPs were successfully used as luminescent bioprobe in UCL bioimaging. And, X-ray CT imaging reveals that BaYbF5: Gd/Er UCNPs can act as potential contrast agents for detection of the liver and spleen in the live mice owing to the high-Z elements (e.g., Ba, Yb, and Gd) in host matrix. Moreover, with the addition of Gd, the as-designed UCNPs exhibit additional positive contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MR imaging. These findings demonstrate that BaYbF5: Gd/Er UCNPs are potential candidates for tri-modal imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational modeling of the class I low-mass protostar Elias 29 applying optical constants of ices processed by high energy cosmic ray analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, W R M

    2015-01-01

    We present the study of the effects of high energy cosmic rays (CRs) over the astrophysical ices, observed toward the embedded class I protostar Elias 29, by using computational modeling and laboratory data. Its spectrum was observed with {\\it Infrared Space Observatory - ISO}, covering 2.3 - 190 $\\mu$m. The modeling employed the three-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code RADMC-3D (Dullemond et al. 2012) and laboratory data of bombarded ice grains by CRs analogs, and unprocessed ices (not bombarded). We are assuming that Elias 29 has a self-irradiated disk with inclination $i =$ 60$^{\\circ}$, surrounded by an envelope with bipolar cavity. The results show that absorption features toward Elias 29, are better reproduced by assuming a combination between unprocessed astrophysical ices at low temperature (H$_2$O, CO, CO$_2$) and bombarded ices (H$_2$O:CO$_2$) by high energy CRs. Evidences of the ice processing around Elias 29 can be observed by the good fitting around 5.5-8.0 $\\mu$m, by polar and apola...

  6. Implementation Of A Prototype Digital Optical Cellular Image Processor (DOCIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K. S.; Sawchuk, A. A.; Jenkins, B. K.; Chavel, P.; Wang, J. M.; Weber, A. G.; Wang, C. H.; Glaser, I.

    1989-02-01

    A processing element of a prototype digital optical cellular image processor (DOCIP) is implemented to demonstrate a particular parallel computing and interconnection architecture. This experimental digital optical computing system consists of a 2-D array of 54 optical logic gates, a 2-D array of 53 subholograms to provide interconnections between gates, and electronic input/output interfaces. The multi-facet interconnection hologram used in this system is fabricated by a computer-controlled optical system to offer very flexible interconnections.

  7. Fiber optic Adaline neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anjan K.; Trepka, Jim; Paparao, Palacharla

    1993-02-01

    Optoelectronic realization of adaptive filters and equalizers using fiber optic tapped delay lines and spatial light modulators has been discussed recently. We describe the design of a single layer fiber optic Adaline neural network which can be used as a bit pattern classifier. In our realization we employ as few electronic devices as possible and use optical computation to utilize the advantages of optics in processing speed, parallelism, and interconnection. The new optical neural network described in this paper is designed for optical processing of guided lightwave signals, not electronic signals. We analyzed the convergence or learning characteristics of the optically implemented Adaline in the presence of errors in the hardware, and we studied methods for improving the convergence rate of the Adaline.

  8. Hardware implementation of converting ternary optical computer MSD into standard binary data%三值光学计算机MSD转换为标准二进制数的硬件实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江家宝; 陈迅雷; 欧阳山

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the storage and conversion efficiency of ternary optical computers , a serial and parallel hybrid method is presented for converting N bits modified signed digit (MSD) into N bits standard binary data .The logic structure of a hardware converter is designed using polarizers , liquid crystals ,optical splitters , mirrors, decoders and photoelectric tubes and so on based on the conversion method proposed here .The result can be output in standard binary data using a converter SD11a,nd the storage efficiency is improved by 50%,and the hardware implementation of MSD trans -formation is realized .%为了提高三值光学计算机的存储与转换效率,该文提出1种把N位改进的有符号数(MSD)转换成N位标准二进制数的串并混合转换方法。基于此转换方法利用偏振片、液晶、分光器、反射镜、译码器和光电管等光电器件设计了硬件转换器逻辑结构。使用转换器SD11可以直接以标准二进制形式输出结果,从而使存储效率提高50%,同时实现MSD数据转换硬件化。

  9. EDITORIAL: Optical orientation Optical orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAME ADDRESS *, Yuri; Landwehr, Gottfried

    2008-11-01

    radiation. The major results of the systematic work on optical orientation, both experimental and theoretical, at the Ioffe Institute and the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris are documented in the book Optical Orientation, edited by F Meier and B P Zakharchenya in the series Modern Problems in Condensed Matter Sciences [4], in which the foundations of optical orientation are comprehensively presented by renowned authors. This book is still the unsurpassed standard work in the field. If one asks what has become new since that publication in 1984 it is obviously the arrival of low-dimensional structures, two-dimensional heterostructures and zero-dimensional quantum dots. It has turned out that the quantum confinement can significantly modify the spin lifetime and the spin relaxation. The experimental work on spin alignment was done by a relative small number of researchers. However, the situation has substantially changed during the last decade. Research on spin-related phenomena has become very popular and the word 'spintronics' was coined. Spin research is no longer considered to be somewhat esoteric, since the replacement of silicon microelectronics based on the electron charge by spin-based electronics is being discussed. Whether these proposals can be realized remains to be seen. But one consequence has been a worldwide increase of high level basic research in spin phenomena. Another line of current research which has contributed to the popularity of spin-related research is quantum computing, based on spin-qubits. To be useful, solid state systems require long spin relaxation times and weak interaction with the environment. This is indispensable for low error rates. The difficulties in achieving these goals have been extensively discussed in the literature. Nowadays, because of the volume and diversity of spin-related work worldwide, a book on optical orientation like that edited by Meyer and Zakharchenya does not seem possible, so in this special issue of

  10. Engineering Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  11. An optical fan for light beams for high-precision optical measurements and optical switching

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Jiang, Yun-Kun; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Shuai; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2014-01-01

    The polarization and orbital angular momentum properties of light are of great importance in optical science and technology in the fields of high precision optical measurements and high capacity and high speed optical communications. Here we show, a totally new method, based on a combination of these two properties and using the thermal dispersion and electro-optical effect of birefringent crystals, the construction of a simple and robust scheme to rotate a light beam like a fan. Using a computer-based digital image processing technique, we determine the temperature and the thermal dispersion difference of the crystal with high resolution. We also use the rotation phenomenon to realize thermo-optic and electro-optic switches. The basic operating principles for measurement and switching processes are presented in detail. The methods developed here will have wide practical applicability in various fields, including remote sensing, materials science and optical communication networks.

  12. Electron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Grivet, Pierre; Bertein, F; Castaing, R; Gauzit, M; Septier, Albert L

    1972-01-01

    Electron Optics, Second English Edition, Part I: Optics is a 10-chapter book that begins by elucidating the fundamental features and basic techniques of electron optics, as well as the distribution of potential and field in electrostatic lenses. This book then explains the field distribution in magnetic lenses; the optical properties of electrostatic and magnetic lenses; and the similarities and differences between glass optics and electron optics. Subsequent chapters focus on lens defects; some electrostatic lenses and triode guns; and magnetic lens models. The strong focusing lenses and pris

  13. Optical Solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    1. Optical solitons in fibres: theoretical review A. Hasegawa; 2. Solitons in optical fibres: an experimental account L. F. Mollenauer; 3. All-optical long-distance soliton-based transmission systems K. Smith and L. F. Mollenauer; 4. Nonlinear propagation effects in optical fibres: numerical studies K. J. Blow and N. J. Doran; 5. Soliton-soliton interactions C. Desem and P. L. Chu; 6. Soliton amplification in erbium-doped fibre amplifiers and its application to soliton communication M. Nakazawa; 7. Nonlinear transformation of laser radiation and generation of Raman solitons in optical fibres E. M. Dianov, A. B. Grudinin, A. M. Prokhorov and V. N. Serkin; 8. Generation and compression of femtosecond solitons in optical fibers P. V. Mamyshev; 9. Optical fibre solitons in the presence of higher order dispersion and birefringence C. R. Menyuk and Ping-Kong A. Wai; 10. Dark optical solitons A. M. Weiner; 11. Soliton Raman effects J. R. Taylor; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Synthesis, vapor growth, polymerization, and characterization of thin films of novel diacetylene derivatives of pyrrole. The use of computer modeling to predict chemical and optical properties of these diacetylenes and poly(diacetylenes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, M. S.; Frazier, D. O.; Abeledeyem, H.; Mcmanus, S. P.; Zutaut, S. E.

    1992-01-01

    In the present work two diacetylene derivatives of pyrrole which are predicted by semiempirical AM1 calculations to have very different properties, are synthesized; the polymerizability of these diacetylenes in the solid state is determined, and the results are compared to the computer predictions. Diacetylene 1 is novel in that the monomer is a liquid at room temperature; this may allow for the possibility of polymerization in the liquid state as well as the solid state. Thin poly(diacetylene) films are obtained from compound 1 by growing films of the monomer using vapor deposition and polymerizing with UV light; these films are then characterized. Interestingly, while the poly(diacetylene) from 1 does not possess good nonlinear optical properties, the monomer exhibits very good third-order effects (phase conjugation) in solution. Dilute acetone solutions of the monomer 1 give intensity-dependent refractive indices on the order of 10 exp -6 esu; these are 10 exp 6 times better than for CS2.

  15. Optical biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biose...

  16. Optical keyboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James T.; Feichtner, John D.; Phillips, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An optical keyboard includes an optical panel having optical waveguides stacked together. First ends of the waveguides define an inlet face, and opposite ends thereof define a screen. A projector transmits a light beam outbound through the waveguides for display on the screen as a keyboard image. A light sensor is optically aligned with the inlet face for sensing an inbound light beam channeled through the waveguides from the screen upon covering one key of the keyboard image.

  17. Optical fiber crossbar switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Michael K.; Beccue, Stephen M.; Brar, Berinder; Robinson, G.; Pedrotti, Kenneth D.; Haber, William A.

    1990-07-01

    Advances in high performance computers and signal processing systems have led to parallel system architectures. The main limitation in achieving the performance expected of these parallel systems has been the realization of an efficient means to interconnect many processors into a effective parallel system. Electronic interconnections have proved cumbersome, costly and ineffective. The Optical Fiber Crossbar Switch (OFCS) is a compact low power, multi-gigahertz bandwidth multi-channel switch which can be used in large scale computer and telecommunication applications. The switch operates in the optical domain using GaAs semiconductor lasers to transmit wideband multiple channel optical data over fiber optic cables. Recently, a 32 X 32 crossbar switching system was completed and demonstrated. Error free performance was obtained at a data bandwidth of 410 MBPS, using a silicon switch IC. The switch can be completely reconfigured in less than 50 nanoseconds under computer control. The fully populated OFCS has the capability to handle 12.8 gigabits per second (GBPS) of data while switching this data over 32 channels without the loss of a single bit during switching. GaAs IC technology has now progressed to the point that 16 X 16 GaAs based crossbar switch Ics are available which have increased the data bandwidth capability to 2.4 GBPS. The present optical interfaces are integrated GaAs transmitter drivers, GaAs lasers, and integrated GaAs optical receivers with data bandwidths exceeding 2.4 GBPS. A system using all Ill-V switching and optoelectronic components is presently under development for both NASA and DoD programs. The overall system is designed to operate at 1.3 GBPS. It is expected that these systems will find wide application in high capacity computing systems based on parallel microprocessor architecture which require high data bandwidth communication between processors. The OFCS will also have application in commercial optical telecommunication systems

  18. Holographic quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordrup, Karl; Negretti, Antonio; Mølmer, Klaus

    2008-07-25

    We propose to use a single mesoscopic ensemble of trapped polar molecules for quantum computing. A "holographic quantum register" with hundreds of qubits is encoded in collective excitations with definite spatial phase variations. Each phase pattern is uniquely addressed by optical Raman processes with classical optical fields, while one- and two-qubit gates and qubit readout are accomplished by transferring the qubit states to a stripline microwave cavity field and a Cooper pair box where controllable two-level unitary dynamics and detection is governed by classical microwave fields.

  19. Optical interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ray T

    2006-01-01

    This book describes fully embedded board level optical interconnect in detail including the fabrication of the thin-film VCSEL array, its characterization, thermal management, the fabrication of optical interconnection layer, and the integration of devices on a flexible waveguide film. All the optical components are buried within electrical PCB layers in a fully embedded board level optical interconnect. Therefore, we can save foot prints on the top real estate of the PCB and relieve packaging difficulty reduced by separating fabrication processes. To realize fully embedded board level optical

  20. Optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, J; Boutruche, J P

    1986-01-01

    Optical Fibers covers numerous research works on the significant advances in optical fibers, with particular emphasis on their application.This text is composed of three parts encompassing 15 chapters. The first part deals with the manufacture of optical fibers and the materials used in their production. The second part describes optical-fiber connectors, terminals and branches. The third part is concerned with the major optoelectronic components encountered in optical-communication systems.This book will be of value to research scientists, engineers, and patent workers.

  1. Nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear Optics is an advanced textbook for courses dealing with nonlinear optics, quantum electronics, laser physics, contemporary and quantum optics, and electrooptics. Its pedagogical emphasis is on fundamentals rather than particular, transitory applications. As a result, this textbook will have lasting appeal to a wide audience of electrical engineering, physics, and optics students, as well as those in related fields such as materials science and chemistry.Key Features* The origin of optical nonlinearities, including dependence on the polarization of light* A detailed treatment of the q

  2. Optical information capacity of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Modern computing and data storage systems increasingly rely on parallel architectures where processing and storage load is distributed within a cluster of nodes. The necessity for high-bandwidth data links has made optical communication a critical constituent of modern information systems and silicon the leading platform for creating the necessary optical components. While silicon is arguably the most extensively studied material in history, one of its most important attributes, an analysis of its capacity to carry optical information, has not been reported. The calculation of the information capacity of silicon is complicated by nonlinear losses, phenomena that emerge in optical nanowires as a result of the concentration of optical power in a small geometry. Nonlinear losses are absent in silica glass optical fiber and other common communication channels. While nonlinear loss in silicon is well known, noise and fluctuations that arise from it have never been considered. Here we report sources of fluctuations...

  3. Education of optics with Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miks, Antonin; Novak, Jiri

    2003-11-01

    In our work there is shown one of possible approaches to education of various parts of optics with a mathematical system MATLAB. The work is focused mainly on education of interference and diffraction of light and the diffraction theory of optical imaging. In our laboratories students can simply perform a computer simulation of various problems, which they can meet in practice, e.g. two-beam interferometry, imaging in coherent, partially coherent or incoherent light, diffraction from gratings of different types, etc. The system Matlab can be also used for simulating problems in holography and holographic interferometry of static and dynamic events. Students can further simulate transforming of optical beams through a simple lens or a system of lenses by means of ray tracing. For every described part of optics we have the software programmed in the Matlab system. Matlab seems to be a very good tool for numerical modelling of properties of various optical systems and for teaching optics.

  4. Computer Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncarz, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Looks at computer engineers and describes their job, employment outlook, earnings, and training and qualifications. Provides a list of resources related to computer engineering careers and the computer industry. (JOW)

  5. Computer Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Perry R.

    This chapter covers algorithms, technologies, computer languages, and systems for computer music. Computer music involves the application of computers and other digital/electronic technologies to music composition, performance, theory, history, and the study of perception. The field combines digital signal processing, computational algorithms, computer languages, hardware and software systems, acoustics, psychoacoustics (low-level perception of sounds from the raw acoustic signal), and music cognition (higher-level perception of musical style, form, emotion, etc.).

  6. Visual guide to optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Isaac C. D.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Nieminen, Timo A.

    2017-05-01

    It is common to introduce optical tweezers using either geometric optics for large particles or the Rayleigh approximation for very small particles. These approaches are successful at conveying the key ideas behind optical tweezers in their respective regimes. However, they are insufficient for modelling particles of intermediate size and large particles with small features. For this, a full field approach provides greater insight into the mechanisms involved in trapping. The advances in computational capability over the last decade have led to better modelling and understanding of optical tweezers. Problems that were previously difficult to model computationally can now be solved using a variety of methods on modern systems. These advances in computational power allow for full field solutions to be visualised, leading to increased understanding of the fields and behaviour in various scenarios. In this paper we describe the operation of optical tweezers using full field simulations calculated using the finite difference time domain method. We use these simulations to visually illustrate various situations relevant to optical tweezers, from the basic operation of optical tweezers, to engineered particles and evanescent fields.

  7. Applied optics and optical design

    CERN Document Server

    Conrady, A E

    2011-01-01

    ""For the optical engineer it is an indispensable work."" - Journal, Optical Society of America""As a practical guide this book has no rival."" - Transactions, Optical Society""A noteworthy contribution,"" - Nature (London)Part I covers all ordinary ray-tracing methods, together with the complete theory of primary aberrations and as much of higher aberration as is needed for the design of telescopes, low-power microscopes and simple optical systems. Chapters: Fundamental Equations, Spherical Aberration, Physical Aspect of Optical Images, Chromatic Aberration, Design of Achromatic Object-Glass

  8. Introduction to computer networking

    CERN Document Server

    Robertazzi, Thomas G

    2017-01-01

    This book gives a broad look at both fundamental networking technology and new areas that support it and use it. It is a concise introduction to the most prominent, recent technological topics in computer networking. Topics include network technology such as wired and wireless networks, enabling technologies such as data centers, software defined networking, cloud and grid computing and applications such as networks on chips, space networking and network security. The accessible writing style and non-mathematical treatment makes this a useful book for the student, network and communications engineer, computer scientist and IT professional. • Features a concise, accessible treatment of computer networking, focusing on new technological topics; • Provides non-mathematical introduction to networks in their most common forms today;< • Includes new developments in switching, optical networks, WiFi, Bluetooth, LTE, 5G, and quantum cryptography.

  9. READING, COMPUTER AND HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide use of computer information media in education process and children and teenagers' leisure activities set new tasks for hygienists and physiologists in assessment of the influence of computer lessons on health, as well as in substantiation and development of ways of formatting and presenting materials from the viewpoint of legibility and regulation of teaching modes. In this work, data related to the study of response of students' optical system depending on the ways of presenting the information (on a screen or on a paper medium, assessment of functional status of children and teenagers after computer classes, are presented, analysis and assessment of modern electronic tutorials are given.Key words: children, reading, computers, electronic tutorials, health.

  10. Nonlinear optical thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Thomas M.

    1993-01-01

    A focused approach to development and evaluation of organic polymer films for use in optoelectronics is presented. The issues and challenges that are addressed include: (1) material synthesis, purification, and the tailoring of the material properties; (2) deposition of uniform thin films by a variety of methods; (3) characterization of material physical properties (thermal, electrical, optical, and electro-optical); and (4) device fabrication and testing. Photonic materials, devices, and systems were identified as critical technology areas by the Department of Commerce and the Department of Defense. This approach offers strong integration of basic material issues through engineering applications by the development of materials that can be exploited as the active unit in a variety of polymeric thin film devices. Improved materials were developed with unprecedented purity and stability. The absorptive properties can be tailored and controlled to provide significant improvement in propagation losses and nonlinear performance. Furthermore, the materials were incorporated into polymers that are highly compatible with fabrication and patterning processes for integrated optical devices and circuits. By simultaneously addressing the issues of materials development and characterization, keeping device design and fabrication in mind, many obstacles were overcome for implementation of these polymeric materials and devices into systems. We intend to considerably improve the upper use temperature, poling stability, and compatibility with silicon based devices. The principal device application that was targeted is a linear electro-optic modulation etalon. Organic polymers need to be properly designed and coupled with existing integrated circuit technology to create new photonic devices for optical communication, image processing, other laser applications such as harmonic generation, and eventually optical computing. The progression from microscopic sample to a suitable film

  11. Silicon photonics: optical modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, G. T.; Gardes, F. Y.; Hu, Youfang; Thomson, D.; Lever, L.; Kelsall, R.; Ikonic, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon Photonics has the potential to revolutionise a whole raft of application areas. Currently, the main focus is on various forms of optical interconnects as this is a near term bottleneck for the computing industry, and hence a number of companies have also released products onto the market place. The adoption of silicon photonics for mass production will significantly benefit a range of other application areas. One of the key components that will enable silicon photonics to flourish in all of the potential application areas is a high performance optical modulator. An overview is given of the major Si photonics modulator research that has been pursued at the University of Surrey to date as well as a worldwide state of the art showing the trend and technology available. We will show the trend taken toward integration of optical and electronic components with the difficulties that are inherent in such a technology.

  12. The optical rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tandrup, T; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    1997-01-01

    The optical rotator is an unbiased, local stereological principle for estimation of cell volume and cell surface area in thick, transparent slabs, The underlying principle was first described in 1993 by Kieu Jensen (T. Microsc. 170, 45-51) who also derived an estimator of length, In this study we...... further discuss the methods derived from this principle and present two new local volume estimators. The optical rotator benefits from information obtained in all three dimensions in thick sections but avoids over-/ underprojection problems at the extremes of the cell. Using computer-assisted microscopes...... the extra measurements demand minimal extra effort and make this estimator even more efficient when it comes to estimation of individual cell size than many of the previous local estimators, We demonstrate the principle of the optical rotator in an example (the cells in the dorsal root ganglion of the rat...

  13. Fermionic Optical Lattices: A Computational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-22

    Kevin Schmidt, Shiwei Zhang. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method for strongly paired fermions, Physical Review A, (12 2011): 0. doi...10.1103/PhysRevA.84.061602 A. Euverte, F. Hébert, S. Chiesa, R. Scalettar, G. Batrouni. Kondo Screening and Magnetism at Interfaces, Physical Review Letters...contact interaction: Magnetic properties in a dilute Hubbard model, Physical Review A, (12 2010): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.061603 S. Zhou, D

  14. Computational methods for electromagnetic and optical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jarem, John M

    2014-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition""...a small but formidable book which rigorously sets out the basic theory, provides useful illustrative problems and directs the reader to relevant further reading from the excellent reference lists. The book is directed towards graduate students and researchers but selected sections would provide valuable undergraduate teaching material. It is the type of wide-ranging reference book that will find its way onto many bookshelves and, over the years, will become well-worn from frequent use.""-ProfBooks.com, 2001

  15. Computational optical biomedical spectroscopy and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, Sarhan M

    2015-01-01

    Applications of Vibrational Spectroscopic Imaging in Personal Care Studies; Guojin Zhang, Roger L. McMullen, Richard Mendelsohn, and Osama M. MusaFluorescence Bioimaging with Applications to Chemistry; Ufana Riaz and S.M. AshrafNew Trends in Immunohistochemical, Genome, and Metabolomics Imaging; G. Livanos, Aditi Deshpande, C. Narayan, Ying Na, T. Quang, T. Farrahi, R. Koglin, Suman Shrestha, M. Zervakis, and George C. GiakosDeveloping a Comprehensive Taxonomy for Human Cell Types; Richard Conroy and Vinay PaiFunctional Near-Infrared S

  16. RECENT MATHEMATICAL STUDIES IN THE MODELING OF OPTICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Bao

    2004-01-01

    This work is concerned with mathematical modeling, analysis, and computation of optics and electromagnetics, motivated particularly by optical and microwave applications.The main technical focus is on Maxwell's equations in complex linear and nonlinear media.

  17. Holographic Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, G.

    For the last two decades adaptive optics has been used as a technique for correcting imaging applications and directed energy/laser targeting and laser communications systems affected by atmospheric turbulence. Typically these systems are bulky and limited to system with the potential to operate at speeds of MHz. The system utilizes a hologram to perform an all-optical wavefront analysis that removes the need for any computer. Finally, the sensing is made on a modal basis so it is largely insensitive to scintillation and obscuration. We have constructed a prototype device and will present experimental results from our research. The holographic adaptive optics system begins with the creation of a multiplexed hologram. This hologram is created by recording the maximum and minimum response functions of every actuator in the deformable mirror against a unique focused reference beam. When a wavefront of some arbitrary phase is incident on the processed hologram, a number of focal spots are created -- one pair for each actuator in the DM. The absolute phase error at each particular actuator location is simply related to the ratio of the intensity of each pair of spots. In this way we can use an array of photodetectors to give a direct readout of phase error without the need for any calculations. The advantages of holographic adaptive optics are many. To begin with, the measurement of phase error is made all optically, so the wavefront sensor directly controls the actuators in the DM without any computers. Using fast, photon counting photodetectors allows for closed loop correction limited only by the speed of the deformable mirror which in the case of MEMS devices can be 100 kHz or more. All this can be achieved in an extremely compact and lightweight package making it perfectly suited to applications such as UAV surveillance imagery and free space optical communications systems. Lastly, since the correction is made on a modal basis instead of zonal, it is virtually

  18. Computer Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高振桥

    2002-01-01

    If you work with a computer,it is certain that you can not avoid dealing, with at least one computer virus.But how much do you know about it? Well,actually,a computer virus is not a biological' one as causes illnesses to people.It is a kind of computer program

  19. Grid Computing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-01

    A computing grid interconnects resources such as high performancecomputers, scientific databases, and computercontrolledscientific instruments of cooperating organizationseach of which is autonomous. It precedes and is quitedifferent from cloud computing, which provides computingresources by vendors to customers on demand. In this article,we describe the grid computing model and enumerate themajor differences between grid and cloud computing.

  20. Optical electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Yariv, Amnon

    1991-01-01

    This classic text introduces engineering students to the first principles of major phenomena and devices of optoelectronics and optical communication technology. Yariv's "first principles" approach employs real-life examples and extensive problems. The text includes separate chapters on quantum well and semiconductor lasers, as well as phase conjugation and its applications. Optical fiber amplification, signal and noise considerations in optical fiber systems, laser arrays and distributed feedback lasers all are covered extensively in major sections within chapters.

  1. [Optic neuritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, H; Heine, C; Tonagel, F

    2014-11-01

    Optic neuritis is a frequent neuro-ophthalmological disease in which the diagnosis can be based on just a few symptoms and findings. It is not only important to differentiate from other optic nerve disorders but also to recognise special types of optic neuritis, which is mostly only possible during the course of the disease. This article presents a review of the current state in diagnosis and therapy from the authors' personal point of view.

  2. Analog computing

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive introduction to analog computing. As most textbooks about this powerful computing paradigm date back to the 1960s and 1970s, it fills a void and forges a bridge from the early days of analog computing to future applications. The idea of analog computing is not new. In fact, this computing paradigm is nearly forgotten, although it offers a path to both high-speed and low-power computing, which are in even more demand now than they were back in the heyday of electronic analog computers.

  3. Formal analysis of electromagnetic optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Afshar, Sanaz; Hasan, Osman; Tahar, Sofiène

    2014-09-01

    Optical systems are increasingly being used in safety-critical applications. Due to the complexity and sensitivity of optical systems, their verification raises many challenges for engineers. Traditionally, the analysis of such systems has been carried out by paper-and-pencil based proofs and numerical computations. However, these techniques cannot provide accurate results due to the risk of human error and inherent approximations of numerical algorithms. In order to overcome these limitations, we propose to use theorem proving (i.e., a computer-based technique that allows to express mathematical expressions and reason about their correctness by taking into account all the details of mathematical reasoning) as a complementary approach to improve optical system analysis. This paper provides a higher-order logic (a language used to express mathematical theories) formalization of electromagnetic optics in the HOL Light theorem prover. In order to demonstrate the practical effectiveness of our approach, we present the analysis of resonant cavity enhanced photonic devices.

  4. Computational composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.; Redström, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Computational composite is introduced as a new type of composite material. Arguing that this is not just a metaphorical maneuver, we provide an analysis of computational technology as material in design, which shows how computers share important characteristics with other materials used in design...... and architecture. We argue that the notion of computational composites provides a precise understanding of the computer as material, and of how computations need to be combined with other materials to come to expression as material. Besides working as an analysis of computers from a designer’s point of view......, the notion of computational composites may also provide a link for computer science and human-computer interaction to an increasingly rapid development and use of new materials in design and architecture....

  5. Computational chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Computational chemistry has come of age. With significant strides in computer hardware and software over the last few decades, computational chemistry has achieved full partnership with theory and experiment as a tool for understanding and predicting the behavior of a broad range of chemical, physical, and biological phenomena. The Nobel Prize award to John Pople and Walter Kohn in 1998 highlighted the importance of these advances in computational chemistry. With massively parallel computers ...

  6. The VLT Adaptive Optics Facility Project: Adaptive Optics Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Robin; Hubin, Norbert; Stroebele, Stefan; Fedrigo, Enrico; Oberti, Sylvain; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Bacon, Roland; McDermid, Richard; Bonaccini-Calia, Domenico; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Riccardi, Armando; Donaldson, Rob; Lelouarn, Miska; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Conzelman, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Stuik, Remko; Paufique, Jerome; Kasper, Markus; Vernet, Elise; Downing, Mark; Esposito, Simone; Duchateau, Michel; Franx, Marijn; Myers, Richard; Goodsell, Steven

    2006-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility is a project to convert UT4 into a specialised Adaptive Telescope with the help of a Deformable Secondary Mirror (see previous article). The two instruments that have been identified for the two Nasmyth foci are: Hawk-I with its AO module GRAAL allowing a Ground Layer Adaptive Optics correction (GLAO) and MUSE with GALACSI for GLAO correction and Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics correction. This article describes the AO modules GRAAL and GALACSI and their Real-Time Computers based on SPARTA.

  7. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  8. Optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Roed, H; Sellebjerg, F

    2004-01-01

    To study the involvement of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands (CXCL9/Mig, CXCL10/IP-10, CXCL11/ITAC) in optic neuritis (ON).......To study the involvement of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands (CXCL9/Mig, CXCL10/IP-10, CXCL11/ITAC) in optic neuritis (ON)....

  9. Duality Computing in Quantum Computers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu; LIU Yang

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a duality computing mode, which resembles particle-wave duality property when a quantum system such as a quantum computer passes through a double-slit. In this mode, computing operations are not necessarily unitary. The duality mode provides a natural link between classical computing and quantum computing. In addition, the duality mode provides a new tool for quantum algorithm design.

  10. Adaptive-optics Optical Coherence Tomography Processing Using a Graphics Processing Unit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Brandon A.; Kriske, Jeffery E.; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Liu, Zhuolin; Lee, John Jaehwan; Miller, Donald T.

    2015-01-01

    Graphics processing units are increasingly being used for scientific computing for their powerful parallel processing abilities, and moderate price compared to super computers and computing grids. In this paper we have used a general purpose graphics processing unit to process adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AOOCT) images in real time. Increasing the processing speed of AOOCT is an essential step in moving the super high resolution technology closer to clinical viability. PMID:25570838

  11. Adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography processing using a graphics processing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Brandon A; Kriske, Jeffery E; Kocaoglu, Omer P; Turner, Timothy L; Liu, Zhuolin; Lee, John Jaehwan; Miller, Donald T

    2014-01-01

    Graphics processing units are increasingly being used for scientific computing for their powerful parallel processing abilities, and moderate price compared to super computers and computing grids. In this paper we have used a general purpose graphics processing unit to process adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AOOCT) images in real time. Increasing the processing speed of AOOCT is an essential step in moving the super high resolution technology closer to clinical viability.

  12. Optical implementation of neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2002-12-01

    An adaptive optical neuro-computing (ONC) using inexpensive pocket size liquid crystal televisions (LCTVs) had been developed by the graduate students in the Electro-Optics Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University. Although this neuro-computing has only 8×8=64 neurons, it can be easily extended to 16×20=320 neurons. The major advantages of this LCTV architecture as compared with other reported ONCs, are low cost and the flexibility to operate. To test the performance, several neural net models are used. These models are Interpattern Association, Hetero-association and unsupervised learning algorithms. The system design considerations and experimental demonstrations are also included.

  13. Optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. PMID:27365039

  14. Lagrangian optics

    CERN Document Server

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan; Thyagarajan, K

    2002-01-01

    Ingeometrical optics, light propagation is analyzed in terms of light rays which define the path of propagation of light energy in the limitofthe optical wavelength tending to zero. Many features oflight propagation can be analyzed in terms ofrays,ofcourse, subtle effects near foci, caustics or turning points would need an analysis based on the wave natureoflight. Allofgeometric optics can be derived from Fermat's principle which is an extremum principle. The counterpart in classical mechanics is of course Hamilton's principle. There is a very close analogy between mechanics ofparticles and optics oflight rays. Much insight (and useful results) can be obtained by analyzing these analogies. Asnoted by H. Goldstein in his book Classical Mechanics (Addison Wesley, Cambridge, MA, 1956), classical mechanics is only a geometrical optics approximation to a wave theory! In this book we begin with Fermat's principle and obtain the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian pictures of ray propagation through various media. Given the ...

  15. Optical transitions in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rupasov, Valery I. [ALTAIR Center LLC, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (United States) and Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: rupasov@townisp.com

    2007-03-19

    Employing the Maxwell equations and conventional boundary conditions for the radiation field on the nanostructure interfaces, we compute the radiative spontaneous decay rate of optical transitions in spherical semiconductor nanocrystals, core-shell nanocrystals and nanostructures comprising more than one shell. We also show that the coupling between optical transitions localized in the shell of core-shell nanocrystals and radiation field is determined by both conventional electro-multipole momenta and electro-multipole 'inverse' momenta. The latter are proportional to the core radius even for interband transitions that should result in very strong optical transitions.

  16. Computational manufacturing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general framework for computational manufacturing. The methodology of computational manufacturing aims at integrating computational geometry, machining principle, sensor information fusion, optimization, computational intelligence and virtual prototyping to solve problems of the modeling, reasoning, control, planning and scheduling of manufacturing processes and systems. There are three typical problems in computational manufacturing, i.e., scheduling (time-domain), geometric reasoning (space-domain) and decision- making (interaction between time-domain and space-domain). Some theoretical fundamentals of computational manufacturing are also discussed.

  17. Photorefractive optics materials, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Francis T S

    1999-01-01

    The advances of photorefractive optics have demonstrated many useful and practical applications, which include the development of photorefractive optic devices for computer communication needs. To name a couple significant applications: the large capacity optical memory, which can greatly improve the accessible high-speed CD-ROM and the dynamic photorefractive gratings, which can be used for all-optic switches for high-speed fiber optic networks. This book is an important reference both for technical and non-technical staffs who are interested in this field. * Covers the recent development in materials, phenomena, and applications * Includes growth, characterization, dynamic gratings, and liquid crystal PR effect * Includes applications to photonic devices such as large capacity optical memory, 3-D interconnections, and dynamic holograms * Provides the recent overall picture of current trends in photorefractive optics * Includes optical and electronic properties of the materials as applied to dynamic photoref...

  18. Contextual Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Porzel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This book uses the latest in knowledge representation and human-computer interaction to address the problem of contextual computing in artificial intelligence. It uses high-level context to solve some challenging problems in natural language understanding.

  19. Computer Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelle, Richard; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the nature and use of computer algebra and its applications to various physical sciences. Includes diagrams illustrating, among others, a computer algebra system and flow chart of operation of the Euclidean algorithm. (SK)

  20. Computational dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  1. Computational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Jens Vinge

    2017-01-01

    The Health Technology Program at Aarhus University applies computational biology to investigate the heterogeneity of tumours......The Health Technology Program at Aarhus University applies computational biology to investigate the heterogeneity of tumours...

  2. Quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization.

  3. Green Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shalini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Green computing is all about using computers in a smarter and eco-friendly way. It is the environmentally responsible use of computers and related resources which includes the implementation of energy-efficient central processing units, servers and peripherals as well as reduced resource consumption and proper disposal of electronic waste .Computers certainly make up a large part of many people lives and traditionally are extremely damaging to the environment. Manufacturers of computer and its parts have been espousing the green cause to help protect environment from computers and electronic waste in any way.Research continues into key areas such as making the use of computers as energy-efficient as Possible, and designing algorithms and systems for efficiency-related computer technologies.

  4. Computable models

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Computational models can be found everywhere in present day science and engineering. In providing a logical framework and foundation for the specification and design of specification languages, Raymond Turner uses this framework to introduce and study computable models. In doing so he presents the first systematic attempt to provide computational models with a logical foundation. Computable models have wide-ranging applications from programming language semantics and specification languages, through to knowledge representation languages and formalism for natural language semantics. They are al

  5. Phenomenological Computation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Open peer commentary on the article “Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition” by Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic. Upshot: The main problems with info-computationalism are: (1) Its basic concept of natural computing has neither been defined theoretically or implemented practically. (2. It cannot en...... cybernetics and Maturana and Varela’s theory of autopoiesis, which are both erroneously taken to support info-computationalism....

  6. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François

    be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction......Optical scanning is rapidly becoming ubiquitous. From industrial laser scanners to medical CT, MR and 3D ultrasound scanners, numerous organizations now have easy access to optical acquisition devices that provide huge volumes of image data. However, the raw geometry data acquired must first......, metric space, affine spaces, differential geometry, and finite difference methods for derivatives and differential equations Reviews geometry representations, including polygonal meshes, splines, and subdivision surfaces Examines techniques for computing curvature from polygonal meshes Describes...

  7. Computing fundamentals introduction to computers

    CERN Document Server

    Wempen, Faithe

    2014-01-01

    The absolute beginner's guide to learning basic computer skills Computing Fundamentals, Introduction to Computers gets you up to speed on basic computing skills, showing you everything you need to know to conquer entry-level computing courses. Written by a Microsoft Office Master Instructor, this useful guide walks you step-by-step through the most important concepts and skills you need to be proficient on the computer, using nontechnical, easy-to-understand language. You'll start at the very beginning, getting acquainted with the actual, physical machine, then progress through the most common

  8. Quantum Computing for Computer Architects

    CERN Document Server

    Metodi, Tzvetan

    2011-01-01

    Quantum computers can (in theory) solve certain problems far faster than a classical computer running any known classical algorithm. While existing technologies for building quantum computers are in their infancy, it is not too early to consider their scalability and reliability in the context of the design of large-scale quantum computers. To architect such systems, one must understand what it takes to design and model a balanced, fault-tolerant quantum computer architecture. The goal of this lecture is to provide architectural abstractions for the design of a quantum computer and to explore

  9. Computational Complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tenreiro Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems (CS involve many elements that interact at different scales in time and space. The challenges in modeling CS led to the development of novel computational tools with applications in a wide range of scientific areas. The computational problems posed by CS exhibit intrinsic difficulties that are a major concern in Computational Complexity Theory. [...

  10. Computational Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    of the new microprocessors and network technologies. However, the understanding of the computer represented within this program poses a challenge for the intentions of the program. The computer is understood as a multitude of invisible intelligent information devices which confines the computer as a tool...

  11. Distributed Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Jane N.

    1988-01-01

    The microcomputer revolution, in which small and large computers have gained tremendously in capability, has created a distributed computing environment. This circumstance presents administrators with the opportunities and the dilemmas of choosing appropriate computing resources for each situation. (Author/MSE)

  12. Computational vision

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Harry

    1990-01-01

    The book is suitable for advanced courses in computer vision and image processing. In addition to providing an overall view of computational vision, it contains extensive material on topics that are not usually covered in computer vision texts (including parallel distributed processing and neural networks) and considers many real applications.

  13. Phenomenological Computation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brier, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Open peer commentary on the article “Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition” by Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic. Upshot: The main problems with info-computationalism are: (1) Its basic concept of natural computing has neither been defined theoretically or implemented practically. (2. It cannot en...

  14. Computer Ease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenning, Susan; Getz, Lou

    1992-01-01

    Computer Ease is an intergenerational program designed to put an Ohio elementary school's computer lab, software library, staff, and students at the disposal of older adults desiring to become computer literate. Three 90-minute instructional sessions allow seniors to experience 1-to-1 high-tech instruction by enthusiastic, nonthreatening…

  15. Nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Bloembergen, Nicolaas

    1996-01-01

    Nicolaas Bloembergen, recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physics (1981), wrote Nonlinear Optics in 1964, when the field of nonlinear optics was only three years old. The available literature has since grown by at least three orders of magnitude.The vitality of Nonlinear Optics is evident from the still-growing number of scientists and engineers engaged in the study of new nonlinear phenomena and in the development of new nonlinear devices in the field of opto-electronics. This monograph should be helpful in providing a historical introduction and a general background of basic ideas both for expe

  16. Optical holography

    CERN Document Server

    Collier, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Optical Holography deals with the use of optical holography to solve technical problems, with emphasis on the properties of holograms formed with visible light. Topics covered include the Fourier transform, propagation and diffraction, pulsed-laser holography, and optical systems with spherical lenses. A geometric analysis of point-source holograms is also presented, and holograms and hologram spatial filters formed with spatially modulated reference waves are described. This book is comprised of 20 chapters and begins with an introduction to concepts that are basic to understanding hologr

  17. Optical metrology at the Optical Sciences Center: an historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creath, Katherine; Parks, Robert E.

    2014-10-01

    The Optical Sciences Center (OSC) begun as a graduate-level applied optics teaching institution to support the US space effort. The making of optics representative of those used in other space programs was deemed essential. This led to the need for optical metrology: at first Hartmann tests, but almost immediately to interferometric tests using the newly invented HeNe laser. Not only were new types of interferometers needed, but the whole infrastructure that went with testing, fringe location methods, aberration removal software and contour map generation to aid the opticians during polishing needed to be developed. Over the last half century more rapid and precise methods of interferogram data reduction, surface roughness measurement, and methods of instrument calibration to separate errors from those in the optic have been pioneered at OSC. Other areas of research included null lens design and the writing of lens design software that led into the design of computer generated holograms for asphere testing. More recently work has been done on the reduction of speckle noise in interferograms, methods to test large convex aspheres, and a return to slope measuring tests to increase the dynamic range of the types of aspheric surfaces amenable to optical testing including free-form surfaces. This paper documents the history of the development of optical testing projects at OSC and highlights the contributions some of the individuals associated with new methods of testing and the infrastructure needed to support the testing. We conclude with comments about the future trends optical metrology.

  18. Quantum Computation and Spin Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    DiVincenzo, David P.; Burkard, Guido; Loss, Daniel; Sukhorukov, Eugene V.

    1999-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the connection between mesoscopic physics and quantum computing. After giving a bibliography providing a general introduction to the subject of quantum information processing, we review the various approaches that are being considered for the experimental implementation of quantum computing and quantum communication in atomic physics, quantum optics, nuclear magnetic resonance, superconductivity, and, especially, normal-electron solid state physics. We discuss five ...

  19. Integrated Optical Interconnect Architectures for Embedded Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolescu, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a broad overview of current research in optical interconnect technologies and architectures. Introductory chapters on high-performance computing and the associated issues in conventional interconnect architectures, and on the fundamental building blocks for integrated optical interconnect, provide the foundations for the bulk of the book which brings together leading experts in the field of optical interconnect architectures for data communication. Particular emphasis is given to the ways in which the photonic components are assembled into architectures to address the needs of data-intensive on-chip communication, and to the performance evaluation of such architectures for specific applications.   Provides state-of-the-art research on the use of optical interconnects in Embedded Systems; Begins with coverage of the basics for high-performance computing and optical interconnect; Includes a variety of on-chip optical communication topologies; Features coverage of system integration and opti...

  20. Human Computation

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    What if people could play computer games and accomplish work without even realizing it? What if billions of people collaborated to solve important problems for humanity or generate training data for computers? My work aims at a general paradigm for doing exactly that: utilizing human processing power to solve computational problems in a distributed manner. In particular, I focus on harnessing human time and energy for addressing problems that computers cannot yet solve. Although computers have advanced dramatically in many respects over the last 50 years, they still do not possess the basic conceptual intelligence or perceptual capabilities...