WorldWideScience

Sample records for optical biosensing applications

  1. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, D.; Zabel, T.; Hürlimann, T.;

    2009-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine s...

  2. Integrated optical silicon IC compatible nanodevices for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Laura M.; Sepulveda, Borja; Llobera, Andreu; Calle, Ana; Dominguez, Carlos M.

    2003-04-01

    Biological and chemical sensing is one of the application fields where integrated optical nanodevices can play an important role [1]. We present a Silicon Integrated Mach-Zehnder Interferometer Nanodevice using a Total Internal Refraction waveguide configuration. The induced changes due to a biomolecular interactions in the effective refractive index of the waveguide,is monitored by the measurement of the change in the properties of the propagating light. For using this device as a biosensor, the waveguides of the structure must verify two conditions: work in the monomode regime and to have a Surface Sensivity as high as possible in the sensing arm. The MZI device structure is: (i) a Si wafer with a 500 mm thickness (ii) a 2 mm thick thermal Silicon-Oxide layer with a refractive index of 1.46 (iii) a LPCVD Silicon Nitride layer of 100 nm thickness and a refractive index of 2.00, which is used as the guiding layer. To achieve monomode behavior is needed to define a rib structure, with a depth of only 3 nm, on the Silicon Nitride layer by a lithographic step. This rib structure is performed by RIE and is the most critical step in the microfabrication of the device. Over the structure a protective layer of LPCVD SiO2 is deposited, with a 2 mm thickness and a refractive index of 1.46, which is patterned (photolithography) and etched (RIE) to define the sensing arm. The high sensivity of these devices makes them quite suitable for biosensing applications. For that, without loosing their activity the receptors biomolecules are covanlently immobilized, at nanometer scale , on the sensor area surface. Biospecific molecular recognition takes places when the complementary analyte to the receptor is flowed over the receptor using a flow system. Several biosensing applications have been performed with this device as enviromental pollutant control, immunosensing or genetic detection.

  3. Chemical modification of TiO2 nanotube arrays for label-free optical biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Monica; Galstyan, Vardan; Rea, Ilaria; Casalino, Maurizio; De Stefano, Luca; Sbervegleri, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we have fabricated TiO2 nanotube arrays by the potentiostatic anodic oxidation of Ti foils in fluoride-containing electrolyte and explored them as versatile devices for biosensing applications. TiO2 nanotubes have been chemically modified in order to bind Protein A as a specific target analyte for the optical biosensing. The obtained structures have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, water contact angle, fluorescence microscopy, spectroscopic reflectometry and photoluminescence. Investigations show that the prepared TiO2 nanotubes, 2.5 μm long and 75 nm thick, can be easily and efficiently bio-modified, and the obtained structures are strongly photoluminescent, thus suitable for the label-free biosensing applications in the range of μM, due to their peculiar optical properties.

  4. Aluminum Nanoholes for Optical Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Angulo Barrios

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sub-wavelength diameter holes in thin metal layers can exhibit remarkable optical features that make them highly suitable for (biosensing applications. Either as efficient light scattering centers for surface plasmon excitation or metal-clad optical waveguides, they are able to form strongly localized optical fields that can effectively interact with biomolecules and/or nanoparticles on the nanoscale. As the metal of choice, aluminum exhibits good optical and electrical properties, is easy to manufacture and process and, unlike gold and silver, its low cost makes it very promising for commercial applications. However, aluminum has been scarcely used for biosensing purposes due to corrosion and pitting issues. In this short review, we show our recent achievements on aluminum nanohole platforms for (biosensing. These include a method to circumvent aluminum degradation—which has been successfully applied to the demonstration of aluminum nanohole array (NHA immunosensors based on both, glass and polycarbonate compact discs supports—the use of aluminum nanoholes operating as optical waveguides for synthesizing submicron-sized molecularly imprinted polymers by local photopolymerization, and a technique for fabricating transferable aluminum NHAs onto flexible pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes, which could facilitate the development of a wearable technology based on aluminum NHAs.

  5. Micromolded U-shaped PDMS optical waveguide for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Nirmal; Khatri, Anjali; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2013-09-01

    Integrated optical waveguide sensors are usually fabricated using materials like silicon, silica, SU-8, etc. Their fabrication requires clean room processes which are expensive and time-consuming. We demonstrated the fabrication of PDMS based optical waveguide in non-cleanroom environment using soft lithography technique. A master-mold was fabricated using Acralyn. PDMS polymer was chosen for waveguide fabrication, as it provides low refractive index contrast in the sensing region. These PDMS waveguides were found to be 5-times more sensitive than SU-8 waveguides. High sensitivity along with mechanical robustness and ease of fabrication of PDMS waveguides provides a promising and versatile platform for biosensor application.

  6. Optical and Electric Multifunctional CMOS Image Sensors for On-Chip Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Sasagawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the concept, design, performance, and a functional demonstration of multifunctional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS image sensors dedicated to on-chip biosensing applications are described. We developed a sensor architecture that allows flexible configuration of a sensing pixel array consisting of optical and electric sensing pixels, and designed multifunctional CMOS image sensors that can sense light intensity and electric potential or apply a voltage to an on-chip measurement target. We describe the sensors’ architecture on the basis of the type of electric measurement or imaging functionalities.

  7. Optical Near Field Studies of Plasmonic and Optical Antennas For Sensitive and Selective Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Ryan M.

    For biosensing applications a useful device needs at least two properties: high sensitivity and high selectivity. Optical spectroscopy offers unique advantages over other sensing techniques however one big challenge to overcome is the mismatch between wavelength and the size of biologically relevant molecules. In order to have high enough sensitivity to approach the single-molecule limit, the interaction between the light and the molecule should be strong. However, the diffraction limit of light is approximately half the incidence wavelength, on the order of 100 nm for the smallest nondestructive wavelengths. This presents a significant mismatch between the size of the molecule and the smallest focus spot of the light. The photo-excitation should be compressed more than 100 fold to interact strongly. We must use metallic antennas that convert the incidence radiation into plasmonic modes which can then be compressed well below the wavelength diffraction limit. Studying the near field characteristics of these metallic nanostructures will help us gain insight into this emerging field and allow us to better use them in developing next generation devices. We have developed different geometries of these antennas and simulated their performance using Finite Difference Time Domain software. We have concentrated our efforts in the mid-infrared because that is the natural molecular vibration frequency region and also the near infrared because at these frequencies there exists a mature industry for compact sources, detectors, and fiber optic components. Our simulations show a 6,000 fold mode compression for a bowtie antenna and a million fold compression for a plasmonic photonic crystal (ppc) antenna. The bull's-eye antenna does not have as a high a mode compression but it has a natural geometry for molecular sensing due to the central metallic disc. Experimentally, we have measured the near field of these antennas with a custom back reflection apertureless NSOM setup in both

  8. Biosensing with optical fiber gratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiavaioli Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical fiber gratings (OFGs, especially long-period gratings (LPGs and etched or tilted fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs, are playing an increasing role in the chemical and biochemical sensing based on the measurement of a surface refractive index (RI change through a label-free configuration. In these devices, the electric field evanescent wave at the fiber/surrounding medium interface changes its optical properties (i.e. intensity and wavelength as a result of the RI variation due to the interaction between a biological recognition layer deposited over the fiber and the analyte under investigation. The use of OFG-based technology platforms takes the advantages of optical fiber peculiarities, which are hardly offered by the other sensing systems, such as compactness, lightness, high compatibility with optoelectronic devices (both sources and detectors, and multiplexing and remote measurement capability as the signal is spectrally modulated. During the last decade, the growing request in practical applications pushed the technology behind the OFG-based sensors over its limits by means of the deposition of thin film overlays, nanocoatings, and nanostructures, in general. Here, we review efforts toward utilizing these nanomaterials as coatings for high-performance and low-detection limit devices. Moreover, we review the recent development in OFG-based biosensing and identify some of the key challenges for practical applications. While high-performance metrics are starting to be achieved experimentally, there are still open questions pertaining to an effective and reliable detection of small molecules, possibly up to single molecule, sensing in vivo and multi-target detection using OFG-based technology platforms.

  9. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios) that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory. PMID:22438731

  10. A new polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microcantilever with integrated optical waveguide for biosensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanati Nezhad, A.; Ghanbari, M.; Agudelo, C. G.; Packirisamy, M.; Bhat, R.

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports a novel biosensor monolithically integrate optical waveguide into PDMS microcantilever. The sensor consists of buried optical fibers, integrated optical waveguide and horizontal PDMS microcantilever suspended into microfluidic channel. The thin PDMS layer involves microcantilever, microfluidic cannels and optical channels fabricated using soft lithography technique. The thin layer is covered by semi-bonding of a glass slide and a PDMS layer to enable introducing the material of waveguide core into the waveguide channel embedded into PDMS microcantilever. The covering layers are then replaced by other PDMS layers which have hollow features to release the microcantilever for free deflection and to seal microfluidic network. The input and output multimode fibers are horizontally inserted into the optical channels. The light received at the input fiber is conducted through the optical waveguide microcantilever and is delivered to the output fiber. Numerical model is presented to simulate the optical performance of the optical waveguide PDMS microcantilever under fluid flow testing and to find the proper dimensions and waveguide material. The deflection of microcantilever under flow loading distorts the light and causes power loss at the output fiber. COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 is used to perform fluid structure interaction analysis to assess the cantilever defection due to fluid flow and the optical simulation to estimate the power loss due to cantilever deflection. The proposed biosensor can be used to measure the force within the range of living cell growth force and to be integrated within bio-sensing microdevices to carefully measure the fluid flow rate.

  11. Optical Microfibre Based Photonic Components and Their Applications in Label-Free Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical microfibre photonic components offer a variety of enabling properties, including large evanescent fields, flexibility, configurability, high confinement, robustness and compactness. These unique features have been exploited in a range of applications such as telecommunication, sensing, optical manipulation and high Q resonators. Optical microfibre biosensors, as a class of fibre optic biosensors which rely on small geometries to expose the evanescent field to interact with samples, have been widely investigated. Due to their unique properties, such as fast response, functionalization, strong confinement, configurability, flexibility, compact size, low cost, robustness, ease of miniaturization, large evanescent field and label-free operation, optical microfibres based biosensors seem a promising alternative to traditional immunological methods for biomolecule measurements. Unlabeled DNA and protein targets can be detected by monitoring the changes of various optical transduction mechanisms, such as refractive index, absorption and surface plasmon resonance, since a target molecule is capable of binding to an immobilized optical microfibre. In this review, we critically summarize accomplishments of past optical microfibre label-free biosensors, identify areas for future research and provide a detailed account of the studies conducted to date for biomolecules detection using optical microfibres.

  12. Photo-physical characterization of fluorophore Ru(bpy32+ for optical biosensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Sciuto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied absorption, emission and lifetime of the coordination compound tris(2,2′-bipyridylruthenium(II fluorophore (Ru(bpy32+ both dissolved in water solutions and dried. Lifetime measurements were carried out using a new detector, the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM, which is more sensitive and physically much smaller than conventional optical detectors, such as imager and scanner. Through these analyses and a morphological characterization with transmission electron microscopy, revealed its usability for sensor applications, in particular, as dye in optical DNA-chip technology, a viable alternative to the conventional CY5 fluorophore. The use of Ru(bpy32+ would solve some of the typical disadvantages related to Cy5’s application, such as self-absorption of fluorescence and photobleaching. In addition, the Ru(bpy32+ longer lifetime may play a key role in the definition of new optical DNA-chip.

  13. Recent Developments in Optical Detection Technologies in Lab-on-a-Chip Devices for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Miguel Matos Pires

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of microfluidics has yet to develop practical devices that provide real clinical value. One of the main reasons for this is the difficulty in realizing low-cost, sensitive, reproducible, and portable analyte detection microfluidic systems. Previous research has addressed two main approaches for the detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices: (a study of the compatibility of conventional instrumentation with microfluidic structures, and (b integration of innovative sensors contained within the microfluidic system. Despite the recent advances in electrochemical and mechanical based sensors, their drawbacks pose important challenges to their application in disposable microfluidic devices. Instead, optical detection remains an attractive solution for lab-on-a-chip devices, because of the ubiquity of the optical methods in the laboratory. Besides, robust and cost-effective devices for use in the field can be realized by integrating proper optical detection technologies on chips. This review examines the recent developments in detection technologies applied to microfluidic biosensors, especially addressing several optical methods, including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, absorbance and surface plasmon resonance.

  14. Recent developments in optical detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Ulrik; Hoivik, Nils

    2014-08-21

    The field of microfluidics has yet to develop practical devices that provide real clinical value. One of the main reasons for this is the difficulty in realizing low-cost, sensitive, reproducible, and portable analyte detection microfluidic systems. Previous research has addressed two main approaches for the detection technologies in lab-on-a-chip devices: (a) study of the compatibility of conventional instrumentation with microfluidic structures, and (b) integration of innovative sensors contained within the microfluidic system. Despite the recent advances in electrochemical and mechanical based sensors, their drawbacks pose important challenges to their application in disposable microfluidic devices. Instead, optical detection remains an attractive solution for lab-on-a-chip devices, because of the ubiquity of the optical methods in the laboratory. Besides, robust and cost-effective devices for use in the field can be realized by integrating proper optical detection technologies on chips. This review examines the recent developments in detection technologies applied to microfluidic biosensors, especially addressing several optical methods, including fluorescence, chemiluminescence, absorbance and surface plasmon resonance.

  15. Nanointaglio fabrication of optical lipid multilayer diffraction gratings with applications in biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Troy Warren

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at microscopic and nanoscopic levels. Exploiting the self-organization and innate biofunctionality of lyotropic liquid crystalline phospholipids, a novel nanofabrication process called "nanointaglio" was invented in order to rapidly and scalably integrate lipid nanopatterns onto the surface. The work presented here focuses on using nanointaglio fabricated lipid diffraction micro- and nanopatterns for the development of new sensing and bioactivity studies. The lipids are patterned as diffraction gratings for sensor functionality. The lipid multilayer gratings operate as nanomechanical sensor elements that are capable of transducing molecular binding to fluid lipid multilayers into optical signals in a label free manner due to shape changes in the lipid nanostructures. To demonstrate the label free detection capabilities, lipid nanopatterns are shown to be suitable for the integration of chemically different lipid multilayer gratings into a sensor array capable of distinguishing vapors by means of an optical nose. Sensor arrays composed of six different lipid formulations are integrated onto a surface and their optical response to three different vapors (water, ethanol and acetone) in air as well as pH under water is monitored as a function of time. Principal component analysis of the array response results in distinct clustering, indicating the suitability of the arrays for distinguishing these analytes. Importantly, the nanointaglio process used is capable of producing lipid gratings out of different materials with sufficiently uniform heights for the fabrication of an optical nose. A second main application is demonstrated for the study of membrane binding proteins. Although in vitro methods for assaying the catalytic activity of individual enzymes are well established, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of

  16. Optical Microbubble Resonators with High Refractive Index Inner Coating for Bio-Sensing Applications: An Analytical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Barucci

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators (WGMRs used as an optical transducer for biosensing represents the first and crucial step towards the optimization of the final device performance in terms of sensitivity and Limit of Detection (LoD. Here, we propose an analytical method for the design of an optical microbubble resonator (OMBR-based biosensor. In order to enhance the OMBR sensing performance, we consider a polymeric layer of high refractive index as an inner coating for the OMBR. The effect of this layer and other optical/geometrical parameters on the mode field distribution, sensitivity and LoD of the OMBR is assessed and discussed, both for transverse electric (TE and transverse magnetic (TM polarization. The obtained results do provide physical insights for the development of OMBR-based biosensor.

  17. Optical Microbubble Resonators with High Refractive Index Inner Coating for Bio-Sensing Applications: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucci, Andrea; Berneschi, Simone; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Cosci, Alessandro; Pelli, Stefano; Farnesi, Daniele; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Soria, Silvia; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero

    2016-01-01

    The design of Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators (WGMRs) used as an optical transducer for biosensing represents the first and crucial step towards the optimization of the final device performance in terms of sensitivity and Limit of Detection (LoD). Here, we propose an analytical method for the design of an optical microbubble resonator (OMBR)-based biosensor. In order to enhance the OMBR sensing performance, we consider a polymeric layer of high refractive index as an inner coating for the OMBR. The effect of this layer and other optical/geometrical parameters on the mode field distribution, sensitivity and LoD of the OMBR is assessed and discussed, both for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarization. The obtained results do provide physical insights for the development of OMBR-based biosensor. PMID:27898015

  18. Quantum Dot / Optical Protein Bio-Nano Hybrid System for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    modulation mechanism for bio -nano electronic application. We have utilized ionic-self assembled monolayer (I-SAM) techniques to create a novel alternating...the QD photonic output based on proximity to bR in the ISAM films could provide a direct method to modulate the electrical output for bio -nano sensing applications.

  19. Reporter Proteins in Whole-Cell Optical Bioreporter Detection Systems, Biosensor Integrations, and Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan M.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell, genetically modified bioreporters are designed to emit detectable signals in response to a target analyte or related group of analytes. When integrated with a transducer capable of measuring those signals, a biosensor results that acts as a self-contained analytical system useful in basic and applied environmental, medical, pharmacological, and agricultural sciences. Historically, these devices have focused on signaling proteins such as green fluorescent protein, aequorin, firefly luciferase, and/or bacterial luciferase. The biochemistry and genetic development of these sensor systems as well as the advantages, challenges, and common applications of each one will be discussed. PMID:22291559

  20. Reporter Proteins in Whole-Cell Optical Bioreporter Detection Systems, Biosensor Integrations, and Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Sayler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell, genetically modified bioreporters are designed to emit detectable signals in response to a target analyte or related group of analytes. When integrated with a transducer capable of measuring those signals, a biosensor results that acts as a self-contained analytical system useful in basic and applied environmental, medical, pharmacological, and agricultural sciences. Historically, these devices have focused on signaling proteins such as green fluorescent protein, aequorin, firefly luciferase, and/or bacterial luciferase. The biochemistry and genetic development of these sensor systems as well as the advantages, challenges, and common applications of each one will be discussed.

  1. NanoBiosensing Principles, Development and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Huangxian; Wang, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This book will cover the full scope of nanobiosensing, which combines the newest research results in the cross-disciplines of chemistry, biology, and materials science with biosensing and bioanalysis to develop novel detection principles, sensing mechanisms, and device engineering methods. It not only covers the important types of nanomaterials for biosensing applications, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofiber, quantum dots, fullerenes, fluorescent and biological molecules, etc., but also illustrates a wide range of sensing principles, including electrochemical detection, fluorescence, chemiluminesence, antibody-antigen interactions, and magnetic detection. The book details novel developments in the methodology and devices of biosensing and bioanalysis combined with nanoscience and nanotechnology, as well as their applications in biomedicine and environmental monitoring. Furthermore, the reported works on the application and biofunction of nanoparticles have attracted extensive attention and interest, ...

  2. Cellular biosensing using optical spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Adam

    2016-03-01

    The interaction of light with biological cells can provide a unique tool for studying their biophysical properties. Optical spectroscopy of biological cells can reveal detailed information on their structure and dynamics in a way that is not possible with traditional microscopy techniques. Histological evaluation can only obtain a snapshot of the activity of individual cells, relying instead on large ensembles to develop a picture of their temporal evolution. On the other hand optical spectroscopy can be applied to cells with little to no preparation and can enable studies of the same live cells at extended time intervals. Our research group has developed a suite of optical spectroscopic tools to assess the structure and function of biological cells and modulation due to the onset of disease. The wavelength dependence of the interaction of cells with light provides information of cell features through elastic scattering across the visible and near infrared spectrum. Alternatively, the angular dependence of scattered light can also be used to reveal cell properties. We will discuss how both modes of elastic scattering can be used to evaluate cell status. Finally, the recent advances in the use of optical phase imaging to create contrast in nearly transparent biological cells will also be discussed as related to the role of this modality in biosensing.

  3. Bismuth nanoparticles for phenolic compounds biosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Cadevall, Miquel; Guix, Maria; Ros, Josep; Merkoçi, Arben

    2013-02-15

    The rapid determination of trace phenolic compounds is of great importance for evaluating the total toxicity of contaminated water samples. Nowadays, electrochemical tyrosinase (Tyr) based biosensors constitute a promising technology for the in situ monitoring of phenolic compounds because of their advantages such as high selectivity, low production cost, promising response speed, potential for miniaturization, simple instrumentation and easy automatization. A mediator-free amperometric biosensor for phenolic compounds detection based on the combination of bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) and Tyr for phenol detections will be hereby reported. This is achieved through the integration of BiNPs/Tyr onto the working electrode of a screen printed electrode (SPE) by using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. BiNPs/Tyr biosensor is evaluated by amperometric measurements at -200 mV DC and a linear range of up to 71 μM and 100 μM and a correlation coefficient of 0.995 and 0.996 for phenol and catechol, respectively. The very low DC working potential ensures the avoidance of interferences making this biosensor an advantageous device for real sample applications. In addition, the response mechanism including the effect of BiNPs based on electrochemical studies and optical characterizations will be also discussed. The obtained results may open the way to many other BiNPs applications in the biosensing field.

  4. Noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V

    2012-01-01

    .... In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes...

  5. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  6. Aptamer-Modified Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Yongxiang; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-07-28

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted extensive interest in the biosensing area because of their properties, such as narrow and symmetric emission with tunable colors, high quantum yield, high stability and controllable morphology. The introduction of various reactive functional groups on the surface of semiconductor quantum dots allows one to conjugate a spectrum of ligands, antibodies, peptides, or nucleic acids for broader and smarter applications. Among these ligands, aptamers exhibit many advantages including small size, high chemical stability, simple synthesis with high batch-to-batch consistency and convenient modification. More importantly, it is easy to introduce nucleic acid amplification strategies and/or nanomaterials to improve the sensitivity of aptamer-based sensing systems. Therefore, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers brings more opportunities in bioanalysis. Here we summarize recent advances on aptamer-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots in biosensing applications. Firstly, we discuss the properties and structure of semiconductor quantum dots and aptamers. Then, the applications of biosensors based on aptamer-modified semiconductor quantum dots by different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical, electrochemical and electrogenerated chemiluminescence approaches, is discussed. Finally, our perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this promising field are provided.

  7. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica Erin

    2014-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable smart therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  8. Nanostructure materials for biosensing and bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Wing Cheung

    In the first part of the thesis our work on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor will be presented. It will begin with understanding the working principle of SPR sensing technology and the basic concept of SPR biosensing. In SPR technology, there are different coupling schemes to excite surface plasmons such as prism coupler, grating coupler and waveguide coupler. Our setup will be based on the attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism coupling configuration. A gold sensing film is attached to one face of the prism. The samples are flowing over the gold surface and the light source is directed to the prism side. The reflected beam containing SPR information is collected and analyzed. SPR biosensors have become powerful tools in biological and chemical sensing application because of their capability of real-time monitoring and label-free sensing. Quantitative measurements such as the binding kinetics and the binding affinity between two biomolecules can be readily calculated from the SPR sensorgram. In our design, SPR phase will be monitored using photoelastic modulation (PEM) technique. The PEM is used to produce a modulation signal so that the phase quantity can be extracted by measuring the relative amplitudes of the harmonic signals. Since this system contains no moving component and only single beam and single detector are used, precise component alignment, which may be troublesome in making the setup compact and robust, can be eliminated. In order to demonstrate the operation of the proposed approach, two experiments were performed. The first one was to measure the refractive index change caused by varying the concentration of glycerin-water mixtures. The second one was to monitor the binding reactions between biotin and streptavidin--BSA complex at the sensor surface. Recently, the use of metallic nanoparticle on SPR platform has received great attention due to the capability of sensitivity enhancement. Although the mechanism of the enhancement is still

  9. Chalcogenide Glass Optical Waveguides for Infrared Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Marie-Laure; Keirsse, Julie; Nazabal, Virginie; Hyodo, Koji; Inoue, Satoru; Boussard-Pledel, Catherine; Lhermite, Hervé; Charrier, Joël; Yanakata, Kiyoyuki; Loreal, Olivier; Le Person, Jenny; Colas, Florent; Compère, Chantal; Bureau, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Due to the remarkable properties of chalcogenide (Chg) glasses, Chg optical waveguides should play a significant role in the development of optical biosensors. This paper describes the fabrication and properties of chalcogenide fibres and planar waveguides. Using optical fibre transparent in the mid-infrared spectral range we have developed a biosensor that can collect information on whole metabolism alterations, rapidly and in situ. Thanks to this sensor it is possible to collect infrared spectra by remote spectroscopy, by simple contact with the sample. In this way, we tried to determine spectral modifications due, on the one hand, to cerebral metabolism alterations caused by a transient focal ischemia in the rat brain and, in the other hand, starvation in the mouse liver. We also applied a microdialysis method, a well known technique for in vivo brain metabolism studies, as reference. In the field of integrated microsensors, reactive ion etching was used to pattern rib waveguides between 2 and 300 μm wide. This technique was used to fabricate Y optical junctions for optical interconnections on chalcogenide amorphous films, which can potentially increase the sensitivity and stability of an optical micro-sensor. The first tests were also carried out to functionalise the Chg planar waveguides with the aim of using them as (bio)sensors. PMID:22423209

  10. Ambient light-based optical biosensing platform with smartphone-embedded illumination sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Min; Han, Yong Duk; Chun, Hyeong Jin; Yoon, Hyun C

    2017-07-15

    We present a hand-held optical biosensing system utilizing a smartphone-embedded illumination sensor that is integrated with immunoblotting assay method. The smartphone-embedded illumination sensor is regarded as an alternative optical receiver that can replaces the conventional optical analysis apparatus because the illumination sensor can respond to the ambient light in a wide range of wavelengths, including visible and infrared. To demonstrate the biosensing applicability of our system employing the enzyme-mediated immunoblotting and accompanying light interference, various types of ambient light conditions including outdoor sunlight and indoor fluorescent were tested. For the immunoblotting assay, the biosensing channel generating insoluble precipitates as an end product of the enzymatic reaction is fabricated and mounted on the illumination sensor of the smartphone. The intensity of penetrating light arrives on the illumination sensor is inversely proportional to the amount of precipitates produced in the channel, and these changes are immediately analyzed and quantified via smartphone software. In this study, urinary C-terminal telopeptide fragment of type II collagen (uCTX-II), a biomarker of osteoarthritis diagnosis, was tested as a model analyte. The developed smartphone-based sensing system efficiently measured uCTX-II in the 0-5ng/mL concentration range with a high sensitivity and accuracy under various light conditions. These assay results show that the illumination sensor-based optical biosensor is suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optical Biosensing: Kinetics of Protein A-IGG Binding Using Biolayer Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jo Leanna; Scott, Israel M.; McMurry, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment has been developed using biolayer interferometry (BLI), an optical biosensing technique similar to surface plasmon resonance (SPR), in which students obtain and analyze kinetic data for a protein-protein interaction. Optical biosensing is a technique of choice to determine kinetic and affinity…

  12. MEMS-Based Power Generation Techniques for Implantable Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lueke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantable biosensing is attractive for both medical monitoring and diagnostic applications. It is possible to monitor phenomena such as physical loads on joints or implants, vital signs, or osseointegration in vivo and in real time. Microelectromechanical (MEMS-based generation techniques can allow for the autonomous operation of implantable biosensors by generating electrical power to replace or supplement existing battery-based power systems. By supplementing existing battery-based power systems for implantable biosensors, the operational lifetime of the sensor is increased. In addition, the potential for a greater amount of available power allows additional components to be added to the biosensing module, such as computational and wireless and components, improving functionality and performance of the biosensor. Photovoltaic, thermovoltaic, micro fuel cell, electrostatic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric based generation schemes are evaluated in this paper for applicability for implantable biosensing. MEMS-based generation techniques that harvest ambient energy, such as vibration, are much better suited for implantable biosensing applications than fuel-based approaches, producing up to milliwatts of electrical power. High power density MEMS-based approaches, such as piezoelectric and electromagnetic schemes, allow for supplemental and replacement power schemes for biosensing applications to improve device capabilities and performance. In addition, this may allow for the biosensor to be further miniaturized, reducing the need for relatively large batteries with respect to device size. This would cause the implanted biosensor to be less invasive, increasing the quality of care received by the patient.

  13. An Optical Biosensing Platform using Reprecipitated Polyaniline Microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzer, Louis; Epstein, Arthur

    2009-03-01

    A great deal of effort remains focused on the goal of developing a continuous in vivo glucose monitoring system for patients with diabetes mellitus. We report a proof-of-concept study on a reagentless optical biosensing platform that circumvents the problems usually associated with direct glucose detection by utilizing the UV-VIS absorption properties of polyaniline, a biocompatible polymer. When the enzyme glucose oxidase is entrapped within reprecipitated polyaniline microparticles, a glucose molecule readily donates two protons and two electrons to the polyaniline, reversibly altering the polymer's oxidation state. The resultant change can be monitored by measuring the absorption at wavelengths that fall within the ``optical window'' for skin. The micro-structured morphology also insures a high surface-area to volume ratio. Data from in vitro prototype devices indicate that in the low enzyme-loading regime, the response can be fit to the Michaelis-Menten model for enzyme kinetics, but at higher enzyme loading, diffusion effects dominate. As a biosensing platform, the system also has the potential to be adapted to detect other biologically relevant analytes, including cholesterol and ethanol.

  14. Angularly resolved ellipsometric optical biosensing by means of Bloch surface waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinibaldi, Alberto; Anopchenko, Aleksei; Rizzo, Riccardo; Danz, Norbert; Munzert, Peter; Rivolo, Paola; Frascella, Francesca; Ricciardi, Serena; Michelotti, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    In label-free biosensing, a continuous improvement of the limit of detection is necessary to resolve the small change of the surface refractive index produced by interacting biomolecules at a very small concentration. In the present work, optical sensors based on one-dimensional photonic crystals supporting Bloch surface waves are proposed and adopted for label-free optical biosensing. We describe the implementation of an angularly resolved ellipsometric optical sensing scheme based on Bloch surface waves sustained by tantala/silica multilayers. The angular operation is obtained using a focused beam at fixed wavelength and detection of the angular reflectance spectrum by means of an array detector. The results show that the experimental limit of detection for a particular photonic crystal design is 6.5 × 10(-7) refractive index units (RIU)/Hz(1/2) and further decrease could be obtained. For the first time, we report on the practical application of this technique to a cancer biomarker protocol that aims at the detection of a specific glycoprotein (angiopoietin 2) involved in angiogenesis and inflammation processes.

  15. Fluorescent carbon dots for biolmaging and biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitang; Wei, Jianfei; Qiang, Li; Chen, Xue; Meng, Xianwei

    2014-10-01

    Due to the excellent biocompatibility, carbon dots (CDs), which are attracting considerable attention as new quantum-sized carbon-containing fluorescent nanoparticles, are becoming both an important class of imaging probes and a versatile platform for biosensors. In the process of transferring carbon dots from proof-of-concept studies to real bioimaging and biosensing applications, major advances have already been made in their synthesis, structure, properties, mechanism of fluorescence, and evaluation of biocompatibility and bio-applications. This review aims to summarize the recent developments and trends in carbon dots. Investigations of preparation methods, fluorescent properties and applications as biosensors and in bioimaging for carbon dots are described. In addition, this review highlights on the design and construct of a carbon dot fluorescent ratiometric biosensing platform for the detection of enzymatic activity, substrate and inhibitor concentrations related to the production or consumption of H2O2. This review provides perspectives on future opportunities and the remaining challenges confronting this research field.

  16. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolzinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction. Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than just an enhanced surface area.

  17. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-08-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area.

  18. Polymeric Cantilever Arrays for Biosensing Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.; Johansson, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    We report the fabrication of arrays of polymeric cantilevers for biochemistry applications. The cantilevers are fabricated in the polymer SU-8. The use of a polymer as the component material for the cantilevers provides the sensors with very high sensitivity due to convenient mechanical material...... properties. The fabrication process is based on spin coating of the photosensitive polymer and near-ultraviolet exposure. The method allows obtaining well-controlled and uniform mechanical properties of the cantilevers. The elastic constant of the cantilevers was measured, and their dynamic response...

  19. Fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matharu, Zimple; Bandodkar, Amay Jairaj; Gupta, Vinay; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2012-02-07

    Organization of biomolecules in two/three dimensional assemblies has recently aroused much interest in nanobiotechnology. In this context, the development of techniques for controlling spatial arrangement and orientation of the desired molecules to generate highly-ordered nanostructures in the form of a mono/multi layer is considered highly significant. The studies of monolayer films to date have focused on three distinct methods of preparation: (i) the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique, involving the transfer of a monolayer assembled at the gas-liquid interface; (ii) self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface, based on spontaneous adsorption of desired molecules from a solution directly onto a solid surface; and (iii) Layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly at a liquid-solid interface, based on inter-layer electrostatic attractions for fabrication of multilayers. A variety of monolayers have been utilized to fabricate biomolecular electronic devices including biosensors. The composition of a monolayer based matrix has been found to influence the activity(ies) of biomolecule(s). We present comprehensive and critical analysis of ordered molecular assemblies formed by LB and self-assembly with potential applications to affinity biosensing. This critical review on fundamentals and application of ordered molecular assemblies to affinity biosensing is likely to benefit researchers working in this as well as related fields of research (401 references).

  20. Generation of aptamer for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, U.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Ruslinda, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), an in vitro strategy which involves generation of aptamer. Aptamer is an artificial antibody, behave very similar to antibody and several instances reported to be better than antibodies. In this study, an attempt has been made to generate aptamer against factor IX, a potential candidate involve in human blood coagulation cascade. Totally, 10 selection cycles have been performed and molecules from 10th cycle have shown higher binding affinity with factor IX as 56 and 68% against the factor IX concentrations of 100 and 200 nM, respectively. With these higher binding affinities, it is clear that these molecules have higher potential for sensing applications.

  1. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene and its Application in Electrochemical Biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ying; Shao, Yuyan; Matson, Dean W.; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-05-05

    Chemical doping with foreign atoms is an effective method to intrinsically modify the properties of host materials. Among them, nitrogen (N) doping plays a critical role in regulating the electronic properties of carbon materials. Recently, graphene as a true 2-dimensional carbon material has shown fascinating applications in bioelectronics and biosensors. In this paper, we report a facile strategy to prepare N-doped graphene by using plasma treatment of pristine graphene synthesized via chemical method. Meanwhile, a possible schematic diagram has been proposed to detail the structure of N-doped graphene. By controlling the exposure time, N percentage in host grapheme can be regulated ranging from 0.11% to 1.35%. Moreover, the as prepared N-doped graphene has displayed high electrocatalytic activity to hydrogen peroxide and further been used for glucose biosensing with concentration as low as 0.01 mM in the presence of interferences.

  2. Phase sensitive spectral domain interferometry for label free biomolecular interaction analysis and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirvi, Sajal

    Biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) plays vital role in wide variety of fields, which include biomedical research, pharmaceutical industry, medical diagnostics, and biotechnology industry. Study and quantification of interactions between natural biomolecules (proteins, enzymes, DNA) and artificially synthesized molecules (drugs) is routinely done using various labeled and label-free BIA techniques. Labeled BIA (Chemiluminescence, Fluorescence, Radioactive) techniques suffer from steric hindrance of labels on interaction site, difficulty of attaching labels to molecules, higher cost and time of assay development. Label free techniques with real time detection capabilities have demonstrated advantages over traditional labeled techniques. The gold standard for label free BIA is surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) that detects and quantifies the changes in refractive index of the ligand-analyte complex molecule with high sensitivity. Although SPR is a highly sensitive BIA technique, it requires custom-made sensor chips and is not well suited for highly multiplexed BIA required in high throughput applications. Moreover implementation of SPR on various biosensing platforms is limited. In this research work spectral domain phase sensitive interferometry (SD-PSI) has been developed for label-free BIA and biosensing applications to address limitations of SPR and other label free techniques. One distinct advantage of SD-PSI compared to other label-free techniques is that it does not require use of custom fabricated biosensor substrates. Laboratory grade, off-the-shelf glass or plastic substrates of suitable thickness with proper surface functionalization are used as biosensor chips. SD-PSI is tested on four separate BIA and biosensing platforms, which include multi-well plate, flow cell, fiber probe with integrated optics and fiber tip biosensor. Sensitivity of 33 ng/ml for anti-IgG is achieved using multi-well platform. Principle of coherence multiplexing for multi

  3. Polydopamine-modified nanocrystalline diamond thin films as a platform for bio-sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Georgievski, Ognen, E-mail: georgievski@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky sq. 2, 16206 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Neykova, Neda, E-mail: neykova@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Proks, Vladimir [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky sq. 2, 16206 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Houdkova, Jana; Ukraintsev, Egor; Zemek, Josef; Kromka, Alexander [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rypaček, František [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky sq. 2, 16206 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-30

    Diamond exhibits good biocompatibility and a large electrochemical potential window, and thus, it is particularly suitable for bio-functionalization and bio-sensing. Modification of the diamond surface can be achieved through mussel-inspired surface chemistry based on polydopamine (PDA) while maintaining the intrinsic properties of the surface. We present a comparative study on the polymerization/deposition of PDA from an aqueous solution of dopamine on hydrogen- (H) and oxygen- (O) terminated nanocrystalline diamond films (NCD). The dopamine polymerization/deposition was performed under mild conditions, which resulted in a confluent PDA layer. A detailed investigation of the growth kinetics of the PDA film on H- and O-terminated NCD substrates was performed using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The chemical composition, the functional group distribution, the surface topography and the wetting properties of the adherent PDA films were evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and water contact angle goniometry, respectively. According to the results, a PDA layer can be used as a platform for future bio-functionalization and/or optical bio-sensing applications. - Highlights: ► Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) was modified through polydopamine (PDA) chemistry. ► PDA's growth kinetics on H- and O-terminated NCD films were investigated. ► The growth kinetics and composition of PDA were independent of the NCD termination.

  4. Optical biosensing of bacteria and cells using porous silicon based, photonic lamellar gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Y.; Nahor, A.; Edrei, E.; Massad-Ivanir, N.; Bonanno, L. M.; Segal, E.; Sa'ar, A.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a method to extend the optical sensing capabilities of conventional RIFTS (reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy) biosensors for real-time detection of large microorganisms, such as bacteria and cells. Using macro porous silicon based 2D arrays of phase (lamellar) grating, we demonstrate that the zero-order optical reflectivity exhibits a similar interference pattern to that obtained for ordinary RIFTS biosensors, which can be Fourier transformed into optical thickness and exploited for biosensing. The sensing capabilities are demonstrated for Escherichia coli bacteria that were captured inside the macro-pores. The entrapment process is monitored and verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  5. Printed organo-functionalized graphene for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisitsoraat, A; Mensing, J Ph; Karuwan, C; Sriprachuabwong, C; Jaruwongrungsee, K; Phokharatkul, D; Daniels, T M; Liewhiran, C; Tuantranont, A

    2017-01-15

    Graphene is a highly promising material for biosensors due to its excellent physical and chemical properties which facilitate electron transfer between the active locales of enzymes or other biomaterials and a transducer surface. Printing technology has recently emerged as a low-cost and practical method for fabrication of flexible and disposable electronics devices. The combination of these technologies is promising for the production and commercialization of low cost sensors. In this review, recent developments in organo-functionalized graphene and printed biosensor technologies are comprehensively covered. Firstly, various methods for printing graphene-based fluids on different substrates are discussed. Secondly, different graphene-based ink materials and preparation methods are described. Lastly, biosensing performances of printed or printable graphene-based electrochemical and field effect transistor sensors for some important analytes are elaborated. The reported printed graphene based sensors exhibit promising properties with good reliability suitable for commercial applications. Among most reports, only a few printed graphene-based biosensors including screen-printed oxidase-functionalized graphene biosensor have been demonstrated. The technology is still at early stage but rapidly growing and will earn great attention in the near future due to increasing demand of low-cost and disposable biosensors.

  6. Recent Advances in Bioprinting and Applications for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Dias

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Future biosensing applications will require high performance, including real-time monitoring of physiological events, incorporation of biosensors into feedback-based devices, detection of toxins, and advanced diagnostics. Such functionality will necessitate biosensors with increased sensitivity, specificity, and throughput, as well as the ability to simultaneously detect multiple analytes. While these demands have yet to be fully realized, recent advances in biofabrication may allow sensors to achieve the high spatial sensitivity required, and bring us closer to achieving devices with these capabilities. To this end, we review recent advances in biofabrication techniques that may enable cutting-edge biosensors. In particular, we focus on bioprinting techniques (e.g., microcontact printing, inkjet printing, and laser direct-write that may prove pivotal to biosensor fabrication and scaling. Recent biosensors have employed these fabrication techniques with success, and further development may enable higher performance, including multiplexing multiple analytes or cell types within a single biosensor. We also review recent advances in 3D bioprinting, and explore their potential to create biosensors with live cells encapsulated in 3D microenvironments. Such advances in biofabrication will expand biosensor utility and availability, with impact realized in many interdisciplinary fields, as well as in the clinic.

  7. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavanova, Kateryna; Bakakina, Yulia; Burkova, Inna; Shtepliuk, Ivan; Viter, Roman; Ubelis, Arnolds; Beni, Valerio; Starodub, Nickolaj; Yakimova, Rositsa; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr

    2016-02-06

    The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D) materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct "beyond graphene" domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical). A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  8. Application of 2D Non-Graphene Materials and 2D Oxide Nanostructures for Biosensing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Shavanova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of graphene and its unique properties has inspired researchers to try to invent other two-dimensional (2D materials. After considerable research effort, a distinct “beyond graphene” domain has been established, comprising the library of non-graphene 2D materials. It is significant that some 2D non-graphene materials possess solid advantages over their predecessor, such as having a direct band gap, and therefore are highly promising for a number of applications. These applications are not limited to nano- and opto-electronics, but have a strong potential in biosensing technologies, as one example. However, since most of the 2D non-graphene materials have been newly discovered, most of the research efforts are concentrated on material synthesis and the investigation of the properties of the material. Applications of 2D non-graphene materials are still at the embryonic stage, and the integration of 2D non-graphene materials into devices is scarcely reported. However, in recent years, numerous reports have blossomed about 2D material-based biosensors, evidencing the growing potential of 2D non-graphene materials for biosensing applications. This review highlights the recent progress in research on the potential of using 2D non-graphene materials and similar oxide nanostructures for different types of biosensors (optical and electrochemical. A wide range of biological targets, such as glucose, dopamine, cortisol, DNA, IgG, bisphenol, ascorbic acid, cytochrome and estradiol, has been reported to be successfully detected by biosensors with transducers made of 2D non-graphene materials.

  9. Tellurium based glasses for bio-sensing and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Allison Anne

    2009-12-01

    Te2As3Se5 (TAS) fibers are often used in bio-sensing applications requiring direct contact between the fiber and live cells. However, the toxicity and stability of chalcogenide glasses typically used in such bio-sensing applications are not well known. The stability and toxicity of TAS glass fibers were therefore examined. The surface of TAS fibers stored for up to three years in air were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that an oxide layer develops on the surface of TAS fibers stored in air. This oxide layer is highly soluble in water and therefore easily removed. Additional studies using cyclic voltammetry show that the fresh TAS glass surface is insoluble in water for at least a few days, and attenuation measurements show that oxidation does not affect the transmission properties of the glass fibers. It was also determined that old, oxidized fibers pose a toxic threat to cells, while washed and new fibers show no toxic effect. Therefore, it is concluded that a soluble oxide layer forms on the surface of TAS fibers stored in air and that this layer has a toxic effect on cells in an aqueous environment. However, through etching, the oxide layer and the toxicity can be easily removed. In other applications of telluride glasses, such as the search for possible signs of life on exoplanets, a glass transmitting further into the IR is required in order to detect molecules, such as CO2. A new family of Tellurium based glasses from the Ge-Te-I ternary system has therefore been investigated for use in space and bio-sensing applications. A systematic series of compositions has been synthesized in order to explore the ternary phase diagram in an attempt to optimize the glass composition for the fiber drawing and molding process. The resulting glass transition temperature range lies between 139°C and 174°C, with DeltaT values between 64°C and 124

  10. Ferrocene-functionalized graphene electrode for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabti, Amal [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Université de Tunis El–Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie (LR99ES15), Campus universitaire de Tunis El–Manar, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C.; Baptista-Pires, Luis [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Raouafi, Noureddine, E-mail: n.raouafi@fst.rnu.tn [Université de Tunis El–Manar, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Electrochimie (LR99ES15), Campus universitaire de Tunis El–Manar, 2092, Tunis (Tunisia); Merkoçi, Arben, E-mail: arben.merkoci@icn2.cat [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2016-07-05

    A novel ferrocene-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-based electrode is proposed. It was fabricated by the drop casting of ferrocene-functionalized graphene onto polyester substrate as the working electrode integrated within screen-printed reference and counter electrodes. The ferrocene-functionalized rGO has been fully characterized using FTIR, XPS, contact angle measurements, SEM and TEM microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The XPS and EDX analysis showed the presence of Fe element related to the introduced ferrocene groups, which is confirmed by a clear CV signal at ca. 0.25 V vs. Ag/AgCl (0.1 KCl). Mediated redox catalysis of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and bio-functionalization with glucose oxidase for glucose detection were achieved by the bioelectrode providing a proof for potential biosensing applications. - Graphical abstract: An easy-to-prepare standalone graphene electrode was obtained by the drop-casting ferrocene-functionalized rGO on PET polymer. This electrode can be used as an enzymeless electrochemical sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide or as an amperometric enzyme-based biosensor for sensitive glucose detection. - Highlights: • A novel ferrocene-functionalized reduced graphene oxide based electrode. • Ease of preparation by drop-casting of Fc-modified graphene and chitosan mixture. • Well-defined and exploitable ferrocene CV signal for sensing purposes. • Sensitive enzymeless detection of hydrogen peroxide at low potentials. • Enzymatic Sensitive detection of glucose on GOx-modified graphene electrode.

  11. Localized biosensing with Topas microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Bang, Ole

    2007-01-01

    We present what is believed to be the first microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) fabricated from Topas cyclic olefin copolymer, which has attractive material and biochemical properties. This polymer allows for a novel type of fiber-optic biosensor, where localized sensor layers may...

  12. From nano-plasmonic optics toward molecules bio-sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kai-Hung

    A systematic study on optical properties of nano-metallic particles was investigated. Nano metallic particle plasmon resonant peak wavelengths are significantly red-shifted from that of a single particle because of near-field coupling when two nano-particles are placed closer to each other. The shift decays approximately exponentially with increasing particle spacing and become negligible when the gap between the two particles exceeds about 2.5 times the particle short-axis length. While resonant peak of a finite 1D nano-particles chain is also significantly red-shifted, the peak wavelength is found to be non-monotonic and oscillating with the variation of the chain length. The results shown to occurs only for larger particles where phase retardation effects are important in plasmon coupling. Based on the coupling results from nano-particle interaction studies, we develop a new type of tunable plasmon resonance nano-particles, named tunable nano-plasmonic resonator (TNPR) which consists multi-layered Au/SiO2 nanodisks. Compared to single layered Au nanodisks, multilayered nanodisks TNPR exhibit several distinctive properties including significantly enhanced plasmon resonances and tunable resonance wavelengths which can be tailored to desired values by simply varying dielectric layer thickness while the particle diameter is kept constant. This tunable and augmented plasmon resonance holds a great potential in the applications of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Characterized TNPR enhancement factor reaches as high as 4.7 x 10 10 for individual TNPRs, among the highest enhancement factor reported in single nanoparticle, indicating that our designed TNPR can serve as a great SERS active-substrate by matching the laser pumping frequency to maximize SERS enhancement. TNPR design was implemented for real bio-application. The sensitivity of non-optimized TNPR for in vitro proteolytic PSA assays reaches to 6pM. Compared to other cancer biomarker detection assays

  13. Localized biosensing with Topas microstructured polymer optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy; Jensen, Jesper B; Bang, Ole; Hoiby, Poul E; Pedersen, Lars H; Kjaer, Erik M; Lindvold, Lars

    2007-03-01

    We present what is believed to be the first microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) fabricated from Topas cyclic olefin copolymer, which has attractive material and biochemical properties. This polymer allows for a novel type of fiber-optic biosensor, where localized sensor layers may be activated on the inner side of the air holes in a predetermined section of the mPOF. The concept is demonstrated using a fluorescence-based method for selective detection of fluorophore-labeled antibodies.

  14. Nanomaterials-based enzyme electrochemical biosensors operating through inhibition for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-15

    In recent years great progress has been made in applying nanomaterials to design novel biosensors. Use of nanomaterials offers to biosensing platforms exceptional optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Nanomaterials can increase the surface of the transducing area of the sensors that in turn bring an increase in catalytic behaviors. They have large surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology and structure that also favor miniaturization, an interesting advantage when the sample volume is a critical issue. Biosensors have great potential for achieving detect-to-protect devices: devices that can be used in detections of pollutants and other treating compounds/analytes (drugs) protecting citizens' life. After a long term focused scientific and financial efforts/supports biosensors are expected now to fulfill their promise such as being able to perform sampling and analysis of complex samples with interest for clinical or environment fields. Among all types of biosensors, enzymatic biosensors, the most explored biosensing devices, have an interesting property, the inherent inhibition phenomena given the enzyme-substrate complex formation. The exploration of such phenomena is making remarkably important their application as research and applied tools in diagnostics. Different inhibition biosensor systems based on nanomaterials modification has been proposed and applied. The role of nanomaterials in inhibition-based biosensors for the analyses of different groups of drugs as well as contaminants such as pesticides, phenolic compounds and others, are discussed in this review. This deep analysis of inhibition-based biosensors that employ nanomaterials will serve researchers as a guideline for further improvements and approaching of these devices to real sample applications so as to reach society needs and such biosensor market demands.

  15. Diffraction microgratings as a novel optical biosensing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikova, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Pavel A.; Gonchukov, Sergey A.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Khmelnitskii, Roman A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Nguyen, Trang T. H.; Rudenko, Andrey A.; Saraeva, Irina N.; Svistunova, Tatiana S.; Zayarny, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Using a micro-hole grating in a supported silver film as a laser-fabricated novel optical platform for surface-enhanced IR absoprtion/reflection spectroscopy, characteristic absorption bands of Staphylococcus aureus, in particular, its buried carotenoid fragments, were detected in FT-IR spectra with 10-fold analytical enhancement, paving the way for the spectral express-identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

  16. Multi-antibody biosensing with Topas microstructured polymer optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Bang, Ole; Hoiby, Poul E.

    We present a Topas based microstructured polymer optical fiber multi-antibody biosensor. This polymer allows localized activation of sensor layers on the inner side of the air holes. This concept is used to create two different sensor sections in the same fiber. Simultaneous detection of two kinds...

  17. On-a-chip biosensing with nano-optical resonators (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quidant, Romain; Yavas, Ozlem; Sanz, Vanesa; Acimovic, Srdjan; Dobosz, Paulina

    2016-09-01

    Optical biosensing based on gold nanoparticles supporting localized surface plasmoncs (LSPR) potentially offers great opportunities for compact, sensitive and low cost diagnostic devices. While last two decades have witnessed a diversity of nanoplasmonic systems with outstanding sensitivity, the implementation of LSPR sensing into a real analytical device is only at its infancy. In this context, we present here our latest advances in the optical, label free detection of biomolecules based on gold nanoantennas integrated into a state-of-the-art microfluidic platform. We first demonstrate the capability of our platform to detect low concentrations (research demonstrates the high potential of gold nanoparticles for the detection of different biomarkers in real biological samples and thus gets us closer to future LSPR-based point-of-care devices.

  18. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip for biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jönsson, Alexander; Senkbeil, Silja;

    2016-01-01

    The marriage of highly sensitive biosensor designs with the versatility in sample handling and fluidic manipulation offered by lab-on-a-chip systems promises to yield powerful tools for analytical and, in particular, diagnostic applications. The field where these two technologies meet is rapidly ...... improvements to existing methods. Recent examples, showing a staggering variety of lab-on-a-chip systems for biosensing applications, are presented, tabularized for overview, and briefly discussed....

  19. Chemical Modification of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for Applications to Biosensors and Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svítková, Jana; Ignat, Teodora; Švorc, Ľubomír; Labuda, Ján; Barek, Jiří

    2016-05-03

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) is a prospective electrode material that possesses many exceptional properties including wide potential window, low noise, low and stable background current, chemical and mechanical stability, good biocompatibility, and last but not least exceptional resistance to passivation. These characteristics extend its usability in various areas of electrochemistry as evidenced by increasing number of published articles over the past two decades. The idea of chemically modifying BDD electrodes with molecular species attached to the surface for the purpose of creating a rational design has found promising applications in the past few years. BDD electrodes have appeared to be excellent substrate materials for various chemical modifications and subsequent application to biosensors and biosensing. Hence, this article presents modification strategies that have extended applications of BDD electrodes in electroanalytical chemistry. Different methods and steps of surface modification of this electrode material for biosensing and construction of biosensors are discussed.

  20. Understanding the role of thiol and disulfide self-assembled DNA receptor monolayers for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Laura G; Martínez, Lidia; Huttel, Yves; Román, Elisa; Lechuga, Laura M

    2010-09-01

    A detailed study of the immobilization of three differently sulfur-modified DNA receptors for biosensing applications is presented. The three receptors are DNA-(CH)n-SH-, DNA-(CH)n-SS-(CH)n-DNA, and DNA-(CH)n-SS-DMTO. Nanomechanical and surface plasmon resonance biosensors and fluorescence and radiolabelling techniques were used for the experimental evaluation. The results highlight the critical role of sulfur linker type in DNA self-assembly, affecting the kinetic adsorption and spatial distribution of DNA chains within the monolayer and the extent of chemisorption and physisorption. A spacer (mercaptohexanol, MCH) is used to evaluate the relative efficiencies of chemisorption of the three receptors by analysing the extent to which MCH can remove physisorbed molecules from each type of monolayer. It is demonstrated that -SH derivatization is the most suitable for biosensing purposes as it results in densely packed monolayers with the lowest ratio of physisorbed probes.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and biosensing application of novel hybrid nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shun

    response was more significant with larger TRGO resistance and higher antibody areal density. The detection limit of the TRGO FET biosensor could be improved to 0.2 ng/ml level by tuning the TRGO resistance and the antibody areal density. The hybrid nanomaterial-based biosensing platforms are thus useful for in vitro diagnostics as they can be used to detect various target biomolecules by functionalizing the CNT/TRGO with desired Au NP-antibody conjugates.

  2. A Novel ZnO-Methylene Blue Nanocomposite Matrix for Biosensing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Saha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid matrix of zinc oxide-methylene blue (ZnO-MB has been successfully developed for biosensing application. The introduction of methylene blue into the ZnO thin film leads to reduction in the charge transfer resistance and suggests an increase in the electron transfer capacity of the composite. Glucose oxidase (GOx was chosen as the model enzyme and effectively immobilized on the surface of hybrid ZnO-MB nanocomposite matrix. Electrochemical measurements were employed to study biosensing response of the GOx/ZnO-MB/ITO bioelectrode as a function of glucose concentration. The low oxidation potential (−0.23 V of the hybrid bioelectrode, in a mediatorless electrolyte, makes it resistant against interference from other bio-molecules. The low value of Michaelis-Menten constant (2.65 mM indicates that immobilized GOx retains its enzymatic activity significantly on the surface of nanocomposite hybrid matrix that results in an enhanced affinity towards its substrate (glucose. The ZnO-MB nanocomposite hybrid matrix, exhibiting enhanced sensing response (0.2 μAmM−1cm−2 with long shelf-life (>10 weeks, has potential for the realization of an integrated biosensing device.

  3. Tuneable and robust long range surface plasmon resonance for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méjard, Régis; Dostálek, Jakub; Huang, Chun-Jen; Griesser, Hans; Thierry, Benjamin

    2013-10-01

    A multilayered biosensing architecture based on long range surface plasmons (LRSPs) is reported. LRSPs originate from the coupling of surface plasmons on the opposite sides of a thin metal film embedded in a symmetrical refractive index environment. With respect to regular SPs, LRSPs are characterized by extended electromagnetic field profiles and lower losses, making them of high interest in biosensing, especially for large biological entities. LRSPs-supporting layer structures are typically prepared by using fluoropolymers with refractive indices close to that of water. Unfortunately, fluoropolymers have low surface energies which can translate into poor adhesion to substrates and sub-optimal properties of coatings with surface plasmon resonance-active metal layers such as gold. In this work, a multilayered fluoropolymer structure with tuneable average refractive index is described and used to adjust the penetration depth of LRSP from the sensor surface. The proposed methodology also provides a simple solution to increase the adhesion of LRSP-supporting structures to glass substrates. Towards taking full advantage of long range surface plasmon resonance sensors, a novel approach based on the plasma-polymerization of allylamine is also described to improve the quality of gold layers on fluoropolymers such as Teflon AF. Through these advancements, long range surface plasmon resonance sensors were fabricated with figures of merit as high as 466 RIU-1. The remarkable performance of these sensors combined with their high stability is expected to foster applications of LRSPR in biosensing.

  4. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    -stranded DNA. Nanomaterials can be designed and synthesized in needed sizes and shapes, and they possess unique chemical and physical properties, which make them useful as DNA carriers or assistants, excellent signal reporters, transducers, and amplifiers. When nanomaterials are combined with functional DNAs to create novel assay platforms, highly sensitive biosensing and high-resolution imaging result. For example, gold nanoparticles and graphene oxides can quench fluorescence efficiently to achieve low background and effectively increase the signal-to-background ratio. Meanwhile, gold nanoparticles themselves can be colorimetric reporters because of their different optical absorptions between monodispersion and aggregation. DNA self-assembled nanomaterials contain several properties of both DNA and nanomaterials. Compared with DNA-nanomaterial complexes, DNA self-assembled nanomaterials more closely resemble living beings, and therefore they have lower cytotoxicity at high concentrations. Functional DNA self-assemblies also have high density of DNA for multivalent reaction and three-dimensional nanostructures for cell uptake. Now and in the future, we envision the use of DNA bases in making designer molecules for many challenging applications confronting chemists. With the further development of artificial DNA bases using smart organic synthesis, DNA macromolecules based on elegant molecular assembly approaches are expected to achieve great diversity, additional versatility, and advanced functions.

  5. New anthracene-tetrathiafulvalene derivative-encapsulated SWNT nanocomposite and its application for biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Liu, Wei; Zuo, Jinglin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a novel anthracene-tetrathiafulvalene derivative has been synthesized and immobilized on single-walled carbon nanotubes through non-covalent sidewall functionalization. The new anthracene-tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative-encapsulated SWNT nanocomposites were characterized using SEM, TEM, and Raman spectra and were utilized for biomolecular recognition. Our observations demonstrate that the new anthracene-TTF derivative-encapsulated SWNT nanocomposites can readily facilitate the biosensing and sensitive detection of DNA, which could be further explored for promising applications in bioelectronics and biosensors.

  6. Current Developments on Optical Feedback Interferometry as an All-Optical Sensor for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Perchoux

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical feedback interferometry (OFI sensors are experiencing a consistent increase in their applications to biosensing due to their contactless nature, low cost and compactness, features that fit very well with current biophotonics research and market trends. The present paper is a review of the work in progress at UPC-CD6 and LAAS-CNRS related to the application of OFI to different aspects of biosensing, both in vivo and ex vivo. This work is intended to present the variety of opportunities and potential applications related to OFI that are available in the field. The activities presented are divided into two main sensing strategies: The measurement of optical path changes and the monitoring of flows, which correspond to sensing strategies linked to the reconstruction of changes of amplitude from the interferometric signal, and to classical Doppler frequency measurements, respectively. For optical path change measurements, measurements of transient pulses, usual in biosensing, together with the measurement of large displacements applied to designing palliative care instrumentation for Parkinson disease are discussed. Regarding the Doppler-based approach, progress in flow-related signal processing and applications in real-time monitoring of non-steady flows, human blood flow monitoring and OFI pressure myograph sensing will be presented. In all cases, experimental setups are discussed and results presented, showing the versatility of the technique. The described applications show the wide capabilities in biosensing of the OFI sensor, showing it as an enabler of low-cost, all-optical, high accuracy biomedical applications.

  7. Envirobiosens. New trends in bio-sensing for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, S. [Cranfield Biothechnology Centre, Cranfield University (United Kingdom); Cosnier, S. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, Lab. d' Electrochimie Organique et de Photochimie Redox, UMR CNRS 5630, 38 (France); Magner, E. [Limerick University, Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Sciences (Ireland)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The development of useful sensor systems to monitor multiple pollutants is needed for many environmental applications like the pollution monitoring and processing. The advantages of chemical sensors, bio-sensors and bio-mimetic systems should be exploited to fill specific niche applications in environmental engineering. Sensors offer particular advantages as they can be used for rapid field assessment of pollution risks, including the effects of pollutant mixtures. This conference reviews the current state of the art for bio-sensors operating in the environment and in environmental processes to develop bio-sensors practical applications in the environmental technology. The papers are presented in three parts: enzymatic sensors for environmental monitoring; affinity sensors for environmental application; cell and tissue sensors for environmental analysis, future prospects. (A.L.B.)

  8. LED-controlled tuning of ZnO nanowires’ wettability for biosensing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushalkumar Bhavsar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wettability is an important property of solid materials which can be controlled by surface energy. Dynamic control over the surface wettability is of great importance for biosensing applications. Zinc oxide (ZnO is a biocompatible material suitable for biosensors and microfluidic devices. Nanowires of ZnO tend to show a hydrophobic nature which decelerates the adhesion or adsorption of biomolecules on the surface and, therefore, limits their application. Methods: Surface wettability of the ZnO nanowires can be tuned using light irradiation. However, the control over wettability using light-emitting diodes (LEDs and the role of wavelength in controlling the wettability of ZnO nanowires are unclear. This is the first report on LED-based wettability control of nanowires, and it includes investigations on tuning the desired wettability of ZnO nanowires using LEDs as a controlling tool. Results: The investigations on spectral properties of the LED emission on ZnO nanowires' wettability have shown strong dependency on the spectral overlap of LED emission on ZnO absorption spectra. Results indicate that LEDs offer an advanced control on dynamically tuning the wettability of ZnO nanowires. Conclusion: The spectral investigations have provided significant insight into the role of irradiating wavelength of light and irradiation time on the surface wettability of ZnO nanowires. This process is suitable to realize on chip based integrated sensors and has huge potential for eco-friendly biosensing and environmental sensing applications.

  9. Stretchable Conductive Elastomers for Soldier Biosensing Applications: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    for hair follicle penetration and improved signal-to-noise. 5) Refining our embedded systems for validation of EEG hardware. 6) Identifying online...scalp interface for hair follicle penetration and improved signal to noise. We identified this research objective in Year 1 but did not have an...actual functional usability within the EEG target application domain. 3.2.3.2 Validation Methods for EEG Material samples were placed in

  10. Carbohydrate-protein interactions and their biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Andrade, Cesar A S; Oliveira, Maria D L; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-04-01

    Carbohydrate recognition is clearly present throughout nature, playing a major role in the initial attachment of one biological entity to another. The important question is whether these prevalent interactions could provide a real suitable alternative to the use of antibodies or nucleic acid for detection and identification. Currently, examples of carbohydrates being employed in biological detection systems are limited. The challenges of using carbohydrate recognition for detection mainly come from the weak affinity of carbohydrate-protein interactions, the lack of versatile carbohydrate scaffolds with well-defined structures, and the less developed high-information-content, real-time, and label-free assay technology. In this review, we focus on discussing the characteristics of carbohydrate-protein interactions in nature and the methods for carbohydrate immobilization based on surface coupling chemistry in terms of their general applicability for developing carbohydrate- and lectin-based label-free sensors. Furthermore, examples of innovative design of multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions for sensor applications are given. We limit our review to show the feasibility of carbohydrate and lectin as recognition elements for label-free sensor development in several representative cases to formulate a flexible platform for their use as recognition elements for real-world biosensor applications.

  11. Nano-structured carbon materials for improved biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razumiene, J., E-mail: julija.razumiene@bchi.vu.lt [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Sakinyte, I. [Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Mokslininku 12, Vilnius 08662 (Lithuania); Barkauskas, J. [Faculty of Chemistry, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania); Baronas, R. [Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius University, Naugarduko 24, Vilnius 03225 (Lithuania)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel protocols of graphite oxidation were used for successful synthesis of GOPs. • Newly synthesized GOPs were applicable for electrode design in reagentless bioelectrocatalytic systems operating on direct electron transfer. • We show that bioelectrocatalytic processes strongly depend on functionalities, morphology and structural features of GOPs. - Abstract: A set of oxidized graphite samples have been newly synthesized using different protocols. Atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis revealed the changes in structure and functionalities of obtained graphite oxidation products (GOPs) compared to pristine graphite. The substances have been tested as electrode materials applicable for bioelectrocatalytic systems using pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-GDH). The application of GOPs allowed achieving the direct electron transfer (DET) from active site of PQQ-GDH to the electrode surface. Needless of additional electron transfer (ET) mediating compounds highly improved features of the biosensors. The efficiency of the biosensors has been evaluated for all types of biosensors varied from 32 μA/cm{sup 2} to 64 μA/cm{sup 2} using as electrode materials GOP1 and thermally reduced graphite oxide (TRGO), respectively. TRGO containing function groups (according TGA, ∼6% of the weight loss) and smallest particles (average diameter was ∼11 nm and the average height was ∼0.5 nm) exhibited the higher efficiency for ET acceleration in the biosensor acting on principle of DET.

  12. Slotted photonic crystal cavities with integrated microfluidics for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, M G; Di Falco, A; Krauss, T F

    2011-09-15

    We demonstrate the detection of dissolved avidin concentrations as low as 15 nM or 1 μg/ml using functionalized slotted photonic crystal cavities with integrated microfluidics. With a cavity sensing surface area of approximately 2.2 μm(2), we are able to detect surface mass densities of order 60 pg/mm(2) corresponding to a bound mass of approximately 100 ag. The ultra-compact size of the sensors makes them attractive for lab-on-a-chip applications where high densities of independent sensing elements are desired within a small area. The high sensitivity over an extremely small area is due to the strong modal overlap with the analyte enabled by the slotted waveguide cavity geometry that we employ. This strong overlap results in larger shifts in the cavity peak wavelength when compared to competing approaches.

  13. Description of an Advantageous Optical Label-Free Biosensing Interferometric Read-Out Method to Measure Biological Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Holgado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report a new, simple, and reliable optical read-out detection method able to assess Rotavirus present in human sera as well as in the viral pollution sources. It is based on the interference of two interferometers used as biophotonic transducers. The method significantly improves the optical label-free biosensing response measuring both, the concentration of the AgR and its corresponding size. Two different immunoassays were carried out: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA, and the recognition by its antibody (anti-BSA; and Rotavirus (AgR and the recognition by its antibody (anti-AgR. In the cases studied, and using as model interferometer a simple Fabry-Perot transducer, we demonstrate a biosensing enhancement of two orders of magnitude in the Limit of Detection (LoD. In fact, this read-out optical method may have significant implications to enhance other optical label-free photonic transducers reported in the scientific literature.

  14. The modelling of a capacitive microsensor for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, P. H.; Schoeman, J.; Joubert, T. H.

    2014-06-01

    Microsensing is a leading field in technology due to its wide application potential, not only in bio-engineering, but in other fields as well. Microsensors have potentially low-cost manufacturing processes, while a single device type can have various uses, and this consequently helps with the ever-growing need to provide better health conditions in rural parts of the world. Capacitive biosensors detect a change in permittivity (or dielectric constant) of a biological material, usually within a parallel plate capacitor structure which is often implemented with integrated electrodes of an inert metal such as gold or platinum on a microfluidic substrate typically with high dielectric constant. There exist parasitic capacitance components in these capacitive sensors, which have large influence on the capacitive measurement. Therefore, they should be considered for the development of sensitive and accurate sensing devices. An analytical model of a capacitive sensor device is discussed, which accounts for these parasitic factors. The model is validated with a laboratory device of fixed geometry, consisting of two parallel gold electrodes on an alumina (Al2O3) substrate mounted on a glass microscope slide, and with a windowed cover layer of poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS). The thickness of the gold layer is 1μm and the electrode spacing is 300μm. The alumina substrate has a thickness of 200μm, and the high relative permittivity of 11.5 is expected to be a significantly contributing factor to the total device capacitance. The 155μm thick PDMS layer is also expected to contribute substantially to the total device capacitance since the relative permittivity for PDMS is 2.7. The wideband impedance analyser evaluation of the laboratory device gives a measurement result of 2pF, which coincides with the model results; while the handheld RLC meter readout of 4pF at a frequency of 10kHz is acceptable within the measurement accuracy of the instrument. This validated model will

  15. Raman-spectroscopy-based biosensing for applications in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciano, Giulia; Capriglione, Paola; Pesce, Giuseppe; Zito, Gianluigi; Del Prete, Antonio; Cennamo, Giovanni; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Cell-based biosensors rely on the detection and identification of single cells as well as monitoring of changes induced by interaction with drugs and/or toxic agents. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to reach this goal, being non-destructive analytical technique, allowing also measurements of samples in aqueous environment. In addition, micro-Raman measurements do not require preliminary sample preparation (as in fluorescence spectroscopy), show a finger-print spectral response, allow a spatial resolution below typical cell sizes, and are relatively fast (few s or even less). All these properties make micro-Raman technique particularly promising for high-throughput on-line analysis integrated in lab-on-a-chip devices. Herein, we demonstrate some applications of Raman analysis in ophthalmology. In particular, we demonstrate that Raman analysis can provide useful information for the therapeutic treatment of keratitis caused by Acanthamoeba Castellanii (A.), an opportunistic protozoan that is widely distributed in the environment and is known to produce blinding keratitis and fatal encephalitis. In particular, by combining Raman analysis with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we have demonstrated that is possible to distinguish between live and dead cells, enabling, therefore to establish the effectiveness of therapeutic strategies to vanquish the protozoa. As final step, we have analyzed the presence of biochemical differences in the conjunctival epithelial tissues of patients affected by keratitis with respect to healthy people. As a matter of facts, it is possible to speculate some biochemical alterations of the epithelial tissues, rendering more favorable the binding of the protozoan. The epithelial cells were obtained by impression cytology from eyes of both healthy and keratitis-affected individuals. All the samples were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy within a few hours from cells removal from eyes. The results of this analysis are discussed.

  16. Anisotropic noble metal nanoparticles: Synthesis, surface functionalization and applications in biosensing, bioimaging, drug delivery and theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramasivam, Gokul; Kayambu, Namitharan; Rabel, Arul Maximus; Sundramoorthy, Ashok K; Sundaramurthy, Anandhakumar

    2017-02-01

    Anisotropic nanoparticles have fascinated scientists and engineering communities for over a century because of their unique physical and chemical properties. In recent years, continuous advances in design and fabrication of anisotropic nanoparticles have opened new avenues for application in various areas of biology, chemistry and physics. Anisotropic nanoparticles have the plasmon absorption in the visible as well as near-infrared (NIR) region, which enables them to be used for crucial applications such as biological imaging, medical diagnostics and therapy ("theranostics"). Here, we describe the progress in anisotropic nanoparticles achieved since the millennium in the area of preparation including various shapes and modification of the particle surface, and in areas of application by providing examples of applications in biosensing, bio-imaging, drug delivery and theranostics. Furthermore, we also explain various mechanisms involved in cellular uptake of anisotropic nanoparticles, and conclude with our opinion on various obstacles that limit their applications in biomedical field. Anisotropy at the molecular level has always fascinated scientists and engineering communities for over a century, however, the research on novel methods through which shape and size of nanoparticles can be precisely controlled has opened new avenues for anisotropic nanoparticles in various areas of biology, chemistry and physics. In this manuscript, we describe progress achieved since the millennium in the areas of preparation of various shapes of anisotropic nanoparticles, investigate various methods involved in modifying the surface of these NPs, and provide examples of applications in biosensing and bio-imaging, drug delivery and theranostics. We also present mechanisms involved in cellular uptake of nanoparticles, describe different methods of preparation of anisotropic nanoparticles including biomimetic and photochemical synthesis, and conclude with our opinion on various

  17. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Jönsson, Alexander; Senkbeil, Silja; Kutter, Jörg P

    2016-02-15

    The marriage of highly sensitive biosensor designs with the versatility in sample handling and fluidic manipulation offered by lab-on-a-chip systems promises to yield powerful tools for analytical and, in particular, diagnostic applications. The field where these two technologies meet is rapidly and almost violently developing. Yet, solutions where the full potentials are being exploited are still surprisingly rare. In the context of this review, sensor designs are often fairly advanced, whereas the lab-on-a-chip aspect is still rather simplistic in many cases, albeit already offering significant improvements to existing methods. Recent examples, showing a staggering variety of lab-on-a-chip systems for biosensing applications, are presented, tabularized for overview, and briefly discussed.

  18. Rare earth based nanostructured materials: synthesis, functionalization, properties and bioimaging and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Alberto; Becerro, Ana I.; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Núñez, Nuria O.; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Laguna, Mariano; González-Mancebo, Daniel; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2017-06-01

    Rare earth based nanostructures constitute a type of functional materials widely used and studied in the recent literature. The purpose of this review is to provide a general and comprehensive overview of the current state of the art, with special focus on the commonly employed synthesis methods and functionalization strategies of rare earth based nanoparticles and on their different bioimaging and biosensing applications. The luminescent (including downconversion, upconversion and permanent luminescence) and magnetic properties of rare earth based nanoparticles, as well as their ability to absorb X-rays, will also be explained and connected with their luminescent, magnetic resonance and X-ray computed tomography bioimaging applications, respectively. This review is not only restricted to nanoparticles, and recent advances reported for in other nanostructures containing rare earths, such as metal organic frameworks and lanthanide complexes conjugated with biological structures, will also be commented on.

  19. Photonics-on-a-chip: recent advances in integrated waveguides as enabling detection elements for real-world, lab-on-a-chip biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Adam L; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-01-21

    By leveraging advances in semiconductor microfabrication technologies, chip-integrated optical biosensors are poised to make an impact as scalable and multiplexable bioanalytical measurement tools for lab-on-a-chip applications. In particular, waveguide-based optical sensing technology appears to be exceptionally amenable to chip integration and miniaturization, and, as a result, the recent literature is replete with examples of chip-integrated waveguide sensing platforms developed to address a wide range of contemporary analytical challenges. As an overview of the most recent advances within this dynamic field, this review highlights work from the last 2-3 years in the areas of grating-coupled, interferometric, photonic crystal, and microresonator waveguide sensors. With a focus towards device integration, particular emphasis is placed on demonstrations of biosensing using these technologies within microfluidically controlled environments. In addition, examples of multiplexed detection and sensing within complex matrices--important features for real-world applicability--are given special attention.

  20. Graphene-like 2D nanomaterial-based biointerfaces for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-03-15

    Due to their unique structures and multifunctionalities, two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials have aroused increasing interest in the construction of the novel biointerfaces for biosensing applications. Efforts in constructing novel biointerfaces led to exploit the more versatile and tunable graphene-like 2D nanomaterials (e.g. graphitic carbon nitride, boron nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, and transition metal oxides) with various structural and compositional characteristics. This review highlights recent efforts in the design of graphene-like 2D nanomaterials and their derived biointerfaces and exploitation of their research on fluorescent sensors and a series of electrochemical sensors, including amperometric, electrochemiluminescence, photoelectrochemical and field-effect transistor sensors. Finally, we discuss some critical challenges and future perspectives in this field. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Indium tin oxide with zwitterionic interfacial design for biosensing applications in complex matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, Nadia T.; Alias, Yatimah; Khor, Sook Mei, E-mail: naomikhor@um.edu.my

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. • The resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of BSA–FITC and RBITC–Cyt c were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. • The antifouling interface allows detection of target analytes in highly complicated biological matrices. - Abstract: Biosensing interfaces consisting of linker molecules (COOH or NH{sub 2}) and charged, antifouling moieties ((-SO{sup 3−} and N{sup +}(Me){sub 3}) for biosensing applications were prepared for the first time by the in situ deposition of mixtures of aryl diazonium cations on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. A linker molecule is required for the attachment of biorecognition molecules (e.g., antibodies, enzymes, DNA chains, and aptamers) close to the transducer surface. The attached molecules improve the biosensing sensitivity and also provide a short response time for analyte detection. Thus, the incorporation of a linker and antifouling molecules is an important interfacial design for both affinity and enzymatic biosensors. The reductive adsorption behavior and electrochemical measurement were studied for (1) an individual compound and (2) a mixture of antifouling zwitterionic molecules together with linker molecules [combination 1: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 1,4-phenylenediamine (PPD); combination 2: 4-sulfophenyl (SP), 4-trimethylammoniophenyl (TMAP), and 4-aminobenzoic acid (PABA)] of aryl diazonium cations grafted onto an ITO electrode. The mixture ratios of SP:TMAP:PPD and SP:TMAP:PABA that provided the greatest resistance to non-specific protein adsorptions of bovine serum albumin labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA–FITC) and cytochrome c labeled with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC–Cyt c) were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). For the surface antifouling study

  2. Aluminum nitride thin film based acoustic wave sensors for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzeng

    In recent years, SAW devices have drawn enormous interest from the analytical assay and sensing business, especially in the biosensing area where highly sensitive, cost efficient and miniaturized sensors are in urgent needs. This dissertation focuses on the development of AIN thin film based SAW devices suitable for biosensing applications. AIN thin films have been synthesized on different orientations of sapphire substrates by a plasma source molecular beam epitaxy system. Surface and structural characterization techniques have been applied to investigate the film quality and the results show that high quality c-plane AIN was epitaxially grown on both c-plane and a-plane sapphire substrates. Complete process flows have been developed for the fabrication of SAW delay line and resonator devices. Important electrical parameters such as the insertion loss, bandwidth, and impedance have been measured to assist the design optimization and derivation the phase velocity, electromechanical coupling coefficient, and temperature coefficient of frequency. On both c-plane and a-plane sapphire substrates, the SAW phase velocities (˜5700 m/s) and electromechanical coupling coefficients (˜0.3%) have been thoroughly mapped out with respect to the propagation direction and film thickness to wavelength ratio. The data are of practical importance for designing AIN-based SAW devices. A higher velocity (>6000 m/s) shear horizontal SAW mode has been discovered only at isolated propagating directions. This mode is especially suitable for aqueous biosensing due to its weak energy coupling to liquid. Much stronger response of the SH-SAW mode has been detected on the c-plane AIN on a-plane sapphire structure than on the c-plane AIN on c-plane sapphire structure, which could be attributed to large anisotropy in a-plane sapphire substrate. Linear frequency-temperature relationship has also been observed for both modes. We further quantify the mass sensitivity of the SAW and SH-SAW by

  3. Gold-based hybrid nanomaterials for biosensing and molecular diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Choi, Ji Hye; Colas, Marion; Kim, Dong Ha; Lee, Hyukjin

    2016-06-15

    The properties of gold nanomaterials are particularly of interest to many researchers, since they show unique physiochemical properties such as optical adsorption of specific wavelength of light, high electrical conductance with rich surface electrons, and facile surface modification with sulfhydryl groups. These properties have facilitated the use of gold nanomaterials in the development of various hybrid systems for biosensors and molecular diagnostics. Combined with various synthetic materials such as fluorescence dyes, polymers, oligonucleotides, graphene oxides (GO), and quantum dots (QDs), the gold-based hybrid nanomaterials offer multi-functionalities in molecular detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These two aspects result in the increase of detection speed as well as the lower detection limits, having shown that this diagnosis method is more effective than other conventional ones. In this review, we have highlighted various examples of nanomaterials for biosensing and molecular diagnostics. The gold-based hybrid systems are categorized by three distinct detection approaches, in which include (1) optical, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), RAMAN, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), (2) fluorescence, such as förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanomaterial surface energy transfer (NSET), and (3) electrochemical, such as potentiometic, amperometric, and conductometric. Each example provides the detailed mechanism of molecular detection as well as the supporting experimental result with the limit of detection (LOD). Lastly, future perspective on novel development of gold-based hybrid nanomaterials is discussed as well as their challenges.

  4. Vertical One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Platforms for Label-Free (Bio)Sensing: Towards Drop-And- Measure Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In this work, all-silicon, integrated optofluidic platforms, fabricated by electrochemical micromachining technology, making use of vertical, one-dimensional high-aspect- ratio photonic crystals for flow-through (bio)sensing applications are reviewed. The potential of such platforms for point-of-care applications is discussed for both pressure-driven and capillarity- driven operations with reference to refractometry and biochemical sensing.

  5. Recent advance in fabricating monolithic 3D porous graphene and their applications in biosensing and biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hua-Jun; Guan, Yongxin; Luo, Pan; Wang, Yu

    2017-03-15

    Graphene shows great potential in biosensing and bioelectronics. To facilitate graphene's applications and enhance its performance, recently, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based materials especially free-standing porous graphene with tunable pore size and void space, have attracted increasing attention for bio-related applications owing to their special features. 3D graphene usually shows the following merits such as an interconnected porous network, a high electronic conductivity, a large active surface area, good chemical/thermal stability and can be more easily handled compared with dispersed graphene sheets. With modified surface properties, graphene can also be bio-friendly. These properties make 3D graphene a perfect candidate as high-performance electrode materials in bioelectronics devices. In this review, we discuss recent advance in fabricating monolithic 3D graphene and their applications in biosensing and biofuel cells.

  6. Nanoroughened plasmonic films for enhanced biosensing detection

    CERN Document Server

    Moal, Eric Le; Pottier, Marie-Claude; Fort, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Although fluorescence is the prevailing labeling technique in biosensing applications, sensitivity improvement is still a striving challenge. We show that coating standard microscope slides with nanoroughened silver films provides a high fluorescence signal enhancement due to plasmonic interactions. As a proof of concept, we applied these films with tailored plasmonic properties to DNA microarrays. Using common optical scanning devices, we achieved signal amplifications by more than 40-fold.

  7. Graphene and graphene-like 2D materials for optical biosensing and bioimaging: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands of bioassay and biomedical applications have significantly promoted the rational design and fabrication of a wide range of functional nanomaterials. Coupling these advanced nanomaterials with biomolecule recognition events leads to novel sensing and diagnostic platforms. Because of their unique structures and multifunctionalities, two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and graphene-like materials (e.g., graphitic carbon nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and transition metal oxides), have stimulated great interest in the field of optical biosensors and imaging because of their innovative mechanical, physicochemical and optical properties. Depending on the different applications, the graphene and graphene-like nanomaterials can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitters or efficient fluorescence quenchers, making them powerful platforms for fabricating a series of optical biosensors to sensitively detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This review highlights the recent progress in optical biosensors based on graphene and graphene-like 2D materials and their imaging applications. Finally, the opportunities and some critical challenges in this field are also addressed.

  8. Insight into the biosensing of graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide, a century old material has attracted the interest of researchers owing to its specific 2D structure and unique electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical and electrochemical properties. The recent advancements in the field of biotechnology and biomedical engineering are targeted at exploring the biosensing applications of graphene oxide due to its biocompatibility. It is considered to be one of the most versatile materials, with wide range of applications which can be tailored by functionalization of the different oxygen containing groups present in the structure. In this review the focus is on the biosensing applications of graphene oxide, detection of analytes with high sensitivity and selectivity. This would give insight into the designing of feasible protocols for the analysis of therapeutic diseases and environmental safety, thereby improving the quality of human life.

  9. Nanometal particle reagents for sensitive, MEMS based fiber-optic, multi-analyte, immuno-biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin

    Integration of nanotechnology to medical diagnostics has brought a new era to public health practice. An excellent example is the utilization of unique optoelectronic properties of nanoparticles to develop highly sensitive biosensing devices for point-of-care (POC) disease diagnosis/prognosis. Fluorophore mediated, immuno-biosensors are important disease detection tools. The property of intra-molecular fluorescence quenching of most fluorophores, however, limits the sensitivity of this type of sensors. A plasmon-rich nanometal particle (NMP) can transfer the lone pair electrons of a fluorophore, which normally participate in the fluorescence self-quenching, to its surface plasmon field, resulting in artificial fluorescence enhancement. The enhancement was found to depend on the metal type, the particle size, the distance between a particle and a fluorophore, and the quantum yield of a fluorophore. Some biocompatible solvents were also found to increase the fluorescence emission efficiency via effective dipole coupling between the fluorophore and the solvent molecule. The application of solvents in inmuno-sensing could additionally improve the fluorescence light retrieval by the conformational change of the protein complexes in solvent. The mixture of the NMP and the solvent, which we defined as nanometal particle reagent (NMPR), provided even higher enhancements. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) kill 1 person in every 6 seconds. Among the CVDs, acute myocardial infarction (AMI; commonly known as heart attack) is the most dangerous and time-sensitive killer. A rapid and accurate AMI diagnosis is crucial for saving many lives. For this purpose, a fluorophore mediated, immuno-reaction based, multi-cardiac-marker sensing device was developed, to quantify four myocardium-specific proteins simultaneously, accurately, rapidly, and user-friendly. The four cardiac markers of our choice were myoglobin (MG), C-reactive protein (CRP), cardiac troponin I (cTnI), and B

  10. Carbon nanotube-based electrochemical biosensing platforms: fundamentals, applications, and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, John H T; Male, Keith B; Hrapovic, Sabahudin

    2007-01-01

    Biosensors can be considered as a most plausible and exciting application area for nanobiotechnology. The recent bloom of nanofabrication technology and biofunctionalization methods of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has stimulated significant research interest to develop CNT-based biosensors for monitoring biorecognition events and biocatalytic processes. The unique properties of CNTs, rolled-up sheets of carbon atoms with a diameter less than 1 nm, offer excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events with electronic signal transduction. CNT-based biosensors could be developed to sense only a few or even a single molecule of a chemical or biological agent. Both hydrogen peroxide and NADH, two by-products of over 300 oxidoreductases, are efficiently oxidized by CNT-modified electrodes at significantly lower potentials with minimal surface fouling. This appealing feature enables the development of useful biosensors for diversified applications. Aligned CNT "forests" can act as molecular wires to allow efficient electron transfer between the detecting electrode and the redox centers of enzymes to fabricate reagentless biosensors. Electrochemical sensing for DNA can greatly benefit from the use of CNT based platforms since guanine, one of the four bases, can be detected with significantly enhanced sensitivity. CNTs fluoresce, or emit light after absorbing light, in the near infrared region and retain their ability to fluoresce over time. This feature will allow CNT-based sensors to transmit information from inside the body. The combination of micro/nanofabrication and chemical functionalization, particularly nanoelectrode assembly interfaced with biomolecules, is expected to pave the way to fabricate improved biosensors for proteins, chemicals, and pathogens. However, several technical challenges need to be overcome to tightly integrate CNT-based platforms with sampling, fluidic handling, separation, and other detection principles. The biosensing platform

  11. Fabrication of polyaniline/carboxymethyl cellulose/cellulose nanofibrous mats and their biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiapeng, E-mail: firgexiao@sina.cn; Pang, Zengyuan, E-mail: pangzengyuan1212@163.com; Yang, Jie, E-mail: young1993@126.com; Huang, Fenglin, E-mail: flhuang@jiangnan.edu.cn; Cai, Yibing, E-mail: yibingcai@jiangnan.edu.cn; Wei, Qufu, E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PANI nanorods have been grown onto the surface of CMC/cellulose nanofibers for the fabrication of biosensor substrate material. • The proposed laccase biosensor exhibited a low detection limit and high sensitivity in the detection of catechol. • Hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers are the promising material in the design of high-efficient biosensors. - Abstract: We report a facile approach to synthesizing and immobilizing polyaniline nanorods onto carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified cellulose nanofibers for their biosensing application. Firstly, the hierarchical PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers were fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline on the CMC-modified cellulose nanofiber. Subsequently, the PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibrous mat modified with laccase (Lac) was used as biosensor substrate material for the detection of catechol. PANI/CMC/cellulose nanofibers with highly conductive and three dimensional nanostructure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Under optimum conditions, the Lac/PANI/CMC/cellulose/glassy carbon electrode (GCE) exhibited a fast response time (within 8 s), a linear response range from 0.497 μM to 2.27 mM with a high sensitivity and low detection limit of 0.374 μM (3σ). The developed biosensor also displayed good repeatability, reproducibility as well as selectivity. The results indicated that the composite mat has potential application in enzyme biosensors.

  12. Graphene-Based Nanomaterials as Efficient Peroxidase Mimetic Catalysts for Biosensing Applications: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Garg

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available “Artificial enzymes”, a term coined by Breslow for enzyme mimics is an exciting and promising branch of biomimetic chemistry aiming to imitate the general and essential principles of natural enzymes using a variety of alternative materials including heterogeneous catalysts. Peroxidase enzymes represent a large family of oxidoreductases that typically catalyze biological reactions with high substrate affinity and specificity under relatively mild conditions and thus offer a wide range of practical applications in many areas of science. The increasing understanding of general principles as well as intrinsic drawbacks such as low operational stability, high cost, difficulty in purification and storage, and sensitivity of catalytic activity towards atmospheric conditions of peroxidases has triggered a dynamic field in nanotechnology, biochemical, and material science that aims at joining the better of three worlds by combining the concept adapted from nature with the processability of catalytically active graphene-based nanomaterials (G-NMs as excellent peroxidase mimetic catalysts. This comprehensive review discusses an up-to-date synthesis, kinetics, mechanisms, and biosensing applications of a variety of G-NMs that have been explored as promising catalysts to mimic natural peroxidases.

  13. The Application of Graphene and Its Derivatives to Energy Conversion, Storage, and Environmental and Biosensing Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Tahir, Asif; Ullah, Habib; Sudhagar, Pitchaimuthu; Asri Mat Teridi, Mohd; Devadoss, Anitha; Sundaram, Senthilarasu

    2016-06-01

    Graphene (GR) and its derivatives are promising materials on the horizon of nanotechnology and material science and have attracted a tremendous amount of research interest in recent years. The unique atom-thick 2D structure with sp(2) hybridization and large specific surface area, high thermal conductivity, superior electron mobility, and chemical stability have made GR and its derivatives extremely attractive components for composite materials for solar energy conversion, energy storage, environmental purification, and biosensor applications. This review gives a brief introduction of GR's unique structure, band structure engineering, physical and chemical properties, and recent energy-related progress of GR-based materials in the fields of energy conversion (e.g., photocatalysis, photoelectrochemical water splitting, CO2 reduction, dye-sensitized and organic solar cells, and photosensitizers in photovoltaic devices) and energy storage (batteries, fuel cells, and supercapacitors). The vast coverage of advancements in environmental applications of GR-based materials for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants, gas sensing, and removal of heavy-metal ions is presented. Additionally, the use of graphene composites in the biosensing field is discussed. We conclude the review with remarks on the challenges, prospects, and further development of GR-based materials in the exciting fields of energy, environment, and bioscience.

  14. The application of graphene for in vitro and in vivo electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janegitz, Bruno Campos; Silva, Tiago Almeida; Wong, Ademar; Ribovski, Laís; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Taboada Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2017-03-15

    Advances in analysis are required for rapid and reliable clinical diagnosis. Graphene is a 2D material that has been extensively used in the development of devices for the medical proposes due to properties such as an elevated surface area and excellent electrical conductivity. On the other hand, architectures have been designed with the incorporation of different biological recognition elements such as antibodies/antigens and DNA probes for the proposition of immunosensors and genosensors. This field presents a great progress in the last few years, which have opened up a wide range of applications. Here, we highlight a rather comprehensive overview of the interesting properties of graphene for in vitro, in vivo, and point-of-care electrochemical biosensing. In the course of the paper, we first introduce graphene, electroanalytical methods (potentiometry, voltammetry, amperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) followed by an overview of the prospects and possible applications of this material in electrochemical biosensors. In this context, we discuss some relevant trends including the monitoring of multiple biomarkers for cancer diagnostic, implantable devices for in vivo sensing and, development of point-of-care devices to real-time diagnostics.

  15. Graphene-Based Nanomaterials as Efficient Peroxidase Mimetic Catalysts for Biosensing Applications: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhaskar; Bisht, Tanuja; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2015-08-04

    "Artificial enzymes", a term coined by Breslow for enzyme mimics is an exciting and promising branch of biomimetic chemistry aiming to imitate the general and essential principles of natural enzymes using a variety of alternative materials including heterogeneous catalysts. Peroxidase enzymes represent a large family of oxidoreductases that typically catalyze biological reactions with high substrate affinity and specificity under relatively mild conditions and thus offer a wide range of practical applications in many areas of science. The increasing understanding of general principles as well as intrinsic drawbacks such as low operational stability, high cost, difficulty in purification and storage, and sensitivity of catalytic activity towards atmospheric conditions of peroxidases has triggered a dynamic field in nanotechnology, biochemical, and material science that aims at joining the better of three worlds by combining the concept adapted from nature with the processability of catalytically active graphene-based nanomaterials (G-NMs) as excellent peroxidase mimetic catalysts. This comprehensive review discusses an up-to-date synthesis, kinetics, mechanisms, and biosensing applications of a variety of G-NMs that have been explored as promising catalysts to mimic natural peroxidases.

  16. Biosensing International Research and Development

    CERN Document Server

    Schultz, Jerome; Mrksich, Milan

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this book is to disseminate information on the worldwide status and trends in biosensing R&D to government decisionmakers and the research community. The contributors critically analyze and compare biosensing research in the United States with that being pursued in Japan, Europe and other major industrialized countries. Biosensing includes systems that incorporate a variety of means, including electrical, electronic, and photonic devices; biological materials (e.g., tissue, enzymes, nucleic acids, etc.); and chemical analysis to produce detectable signals for the monitoring or identification of biological phenomena. In a broader sense, the study of biosensing includes any approach to detection of biological elements and the associated software or computer identification technologies (e.g., imaging) that identify biological characteristics. Biosensing is finding a growing number of applications in a wide variety of areas, including biomedicine, food production and processing, and detection of b...

  17. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Schlücker, Sebastian; Wenger, Jérôme; Regmi, Raju; Rigneault, Hervé; Calafiore, Giuseppe; West, Melanie; Cabrini, Stefano; Fleischer, Monika; van Hulst, Niek F.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Pucci, Annemarie; Cojoc, Dan; Hauser, Charlotte A. E.; Ni, Ming

    2016-06-01

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field.

  18. Roadmap on biosensing and photonics with advanced nano-optical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.

    2016-05-10

    This roadmap, through the contributions of ten groups worldwide, contains different techniques, methods and materials devoted to sensing in nanomedicine. Optics is used in different ways in the detection schemes. Raman, fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, plasmonics, second harmonic generation and optical tweezers are all used in applications from single molecule detection (both in highly diluted and in highly concentrated solutions) to single cell manipulation. In general, each optical scheme, through device miniaturization and electromagnetic field localization, exploits an intrinsic optical enhancement mechanism in order to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of the device with respect to the complex molecular construct. The materials used for detection include nanoparticles and nanostructures fabricated with different 2D and 3D lithographic methods. It is shown that sensitivity to a single molecule is already accessible whether the system under study is a single cell or a multitude of cells in a molecular mixture. Throughout the roadmap there is an attempt to foresee and to suggest future directions in this interdisciplinary field. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  19. Potential of SPR sensors based on multilayer interfaces with gold and LHM for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherifi, Abdellatif; Bouhafs, Benamar

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the subject on "plasmonics" has received significant attention in designing surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. In order to achieve extremely high-sensitivity sensing, multilayered configurations based on a variety of active materials and dielectrics have been exploited. In this work, a novel SPR sensor is proposed and investigated theoretically. The structure, analyzed in attenuated total reflection (ATR), consists of multilayer interfaces between gold and a metamaterial (LHM) separated by an analyte layer as a sensing medium. By interchanging between gold and LHM, under the effect of the refractive index (RI) of analyte set to be in the range of 1.00 to 1.99, the sharp peak reflectivity at the SPR angle takes two opposite behaviors predicted from the transfer matrix method. At the threshold value of 1.568 of the refractive index of analyte and when the LHM is the outer medium, the layered structure exhibits a giant sharp peak located at 43° of intensity up to 105 due to the Goos-Hànchen effect. With respect to the refractive index (RI) change and thickness of analyte, the characteristics (intensity, resonance condition, and quality factor) of the SPR mode, which make the proposed device have the potential for biosensing applications, have been analytically modelized.

  20. Selection and identification of DNA aptamers against okadaic acid for biosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Shimaa; Ng, Andy; Siaj, Mohamed; Tavares, Ana C; Zourob, Mohammed

    2013-12-17

    This work describes the selection and identification of DNA aptamers that bind with high affinity and specificity to okadaic acid (OA), a lipophilic marine biotoxin that accumulates in shellfish. The aptamers selected using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) exhibited dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. The aptamer with the highest affinity was then used for the fabrication of a label-free electrochemical biosensor for okadaic acid detection. The aptamer was first immobilized on the gold electrode by a self-assembly approach through Au-S interaction. The binding of okadaic acid to the aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface induces an alteration of the aptamer conformation causing a significant decrease in the electron-transfer resistance monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The aptasensor showed a linear range for the concentrations of OA between 100 pg/mL and 60 ng/mL with a detection limit of 70 pg/mL. The dissociation constant of okadaic acid with the aptamer immobilized on the electrode surface showed good agreement with that determined using fluorescence assay in solution. Moreover, the aptasensor did not show cross-reactivity toward toxins with structures similar to okadaic acid such as dinophysis toxin-1 and 2 (DTX-1, DTX-2). Further biosensing applications of the selected aptamers are expected to offer promising alternatives to the traditional analytical and immunological methods for OA detection.

  1. Zinc oxide nanostructure-modified textile and its application to biosensing, photocatalysis, and as antibacterial material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamie, Amir; Khan, Azam; Golabi, Mohsen; Turner, Anthony P F; Beni, Valerio; Mak, Wing Cheung; Sadollahkhani, Azar; Alnoor, Hatim; Zargar, Behrooz; Bano, Sumaira; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2015-10-06

    Recently, one-dimensional nanostructures with different morphologies (such as nanowires, nanorods (NRs), and nanotubes) have become the focus of intensive research, because of their unique properties with potential applications. Among them, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterials has been found to be highly attractive, because of the remarkable potential for applications in many different areas such as solar cells, sensors, piezoelectric devices, photodiode devices, sun screens, antireflection coatings, and photocatalysis. Here, we present an innovative approach to create a new modified textile by direct in situ growth of vertically aligned one-dimensional (1D) ZnO NRs onto textile surfaces, which can serve with potential for biosensing, photocatalysis, and antibacterial applications. ZnO NRs were grown by using a simple aqueous chemical growth method. Results from analyses such as X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the ZnO NRs were dispersed over the entire surface of the textile. We have demonstrated the following applications of these multifunctional textiles: (1) as a flexible working electrode for the detection of aldicarb (ALD) pesticide, (2) as a photocatalyst for the degradation of organic molecules (i.e., Methylene Blue and Congo Red), and (3) as antibacterial agents against Escherichia coli. The ZnO-based textile exhibited excellent photocatalytic and antibacterial activities, and it showed a promising sensing response. The combination of sensing, photocatalysis, and antibacterial properties provided by the ZnO NRs brings us closer to the concept of smart textiles for wearable sensing without a deodorant and antibacterial control. Perhaps the best known of the products that is available in markets for such purposes are textiles with silver nanoparticles. Our modified textile is thus providing acceptable antibacterial properties, compared to available commercial modified textiles.

  2. Instrument-Free Synthesizable Fabrication of Label-Free Optical Biosensing Paper Strips for the Early Detection of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wansun; Lee, Jae-Chul; Shin, Jae-Ho; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2016-05-17

    We introduce a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-functionalized, gold nanoparticle (GNP)-deposited paper strip capable of label-free biofluid sensing for the early detection of infectious eye diseases. The GNP biosensing paper strip was fabricated by the direct synthesis and deposition of GNPs on wax-divided hydrophilic areas of a permeable porous substrate through a facile, power-free synthesizable, and highly reproducible successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) technique. To maximize localized surface plasmon resonance-generated SERS activity, the concentration of the reactive solution and number of SILAR cycles were optimized by controlling the size and gap distance of GNPs and verified by computational modeling with geometrical hypotheses of Gaussian-estimated metallic nanoparticles. The responses of our SERS-functionalized GNP paper strip to Raman intensities exhibited an enhancement factor of 7.8 × 10(8), high reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 7.5%), and 1 pM 2-naphthalenethiol highly sensitive detection limit with a correlation coefficient of 0.99, achieved by optimized SILAR conditions including a 10/10 mM/mM HAuCl4/NaBH4 concentration and six SILAR cycles. The SERS-functionalized GNP paper is supported by a multivariate statistics-preprocessed machine learning-judged bioclassification system to provide excellent label-free chemical structure sensitivity for identifying infectious keratoconjunctivitis. The power-free synthesizable fabrication, label-free, rapid analysis, and high sensitivity feature of the SILAR-fabricated SERS-functionalized GNP biosensing paper strip makes it an excellent alternative in point-of-care applications for the early detection of various infectious diseases.

  3. A novel approach for application of nylon membranes in the biosensing domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahmand, Elham; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Hosseini, Samira [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Rothan, Hussin A.; Yusof, Rohana [Department of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Koole, Leo H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Djordjevic, Ivan, E-mail: ivandjordjevich@hotmail.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Center for Innovation in Medical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Polymer coated nylon membranes as bioreceptor surfaces. • Carboxylated porous surface for protein immobilization. • High level of biosensing performance for dengue virus detection. - Abstract: In this paper we report the polymer-coated microporous nylon membranes and their application as platforms for protein immobilization and subsequent detection of the dengue virus (DV) in blood serum. Protein recognition experiments were performed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The polymers used for coatings were synthesized by free-radical polymerization reaction between methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA) in different concentrations. The MAA monomer has carefully been chosen to generate polymers with pendant carboxyl (–COOH) groups, which also exist on polymer surfaces. A high degree of control over surface-exposed –COOH groups has been achieved through variation of monomers concentration in polymerization reaction. The general aspect of this work relies on the dengue antibody (Ab) immobilization on surface –COOH groups via physical attachment or covalent immobilization. Prior to Ab immobilization and ELISA experiment, polymer-coated nylon samples were analyzed in detail for their physical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and water-in-air contact angle (WCA) measurements. Membranes were further analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in order to establish the relationship between wettability, porosity, and surface roughness with chemical composition and concentration of –COOH groups on the coating's surface. Optimized coatings have shown high sensitivity towards dengue Ab molecules, revealing fundamental aspect of polymer–protein interfaces as a function of surface –COOH groups’ concentration.

  4. IC Compatible Wafer Level Fabrication of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moh, T.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    In biosensing, nano-devices such as Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors (SiNW FETs) are promising components/sensors for ultra-high sensitive detection, especially when samples are low in concentration or a limited volume is available. Current processing of SiNW FETs often relies on expensive

  5. IC Compatible Wafer Level Fabrication of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moh, T.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    In biosensing, nano-devices such as Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors (SiNW FETs) are promising components/sensors for ultra-high sensitive detection, especially when samples are low in concentration or a limited volume is available. Current processing of SiNW FETs often relies on expensive

  6. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    KAUST Repository

    Schrittwieser, Stefan

    2016-06-06

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation.

  7. Immobilization mechanisms of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) to hafnium dioxide (HfO2) surfaces for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkopf, Nicholas M; Rice, P Zachary; Bergkvist, Magnus; Deskins, N Aaron; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2012-10-24

    Immobilization of biomolecular probes to the sensing substrate is a critical step for biosensor fabrication. In this work we investigated the phosphate-dependent, oriented immobilization of DNA to hafnium dioxide surfaces for biosensing applications. Phosphate-dependent immobilization was confirmed on a wide range of hafnium oxide surfaces; however, a second interaction mode was observed on monoclinic hafnium dioxide. On the basis of previous materials studies on these films, DNA immobilization studies, and density functional theory (DFT) modeling, we propose that this secondary interaction is between the exposed nucleobases of single stranded DNA and the surface. The lattice spacing of monoclinic hafnium dioxide matches the base-to-base pitch of DNA. Monoclinic hafnium dioxide is advantageous for nanoelectronic applications, yet because of this secondary DNA immobilization mechanism, it could impede DNA hybridization or cause nonspecific surface intereactions. Nonetheless, DNA immobilization on polycrystalline and amorphous hafnium dioxide is predominately mediated by the terminal phosphate in an oriented manner which is desirable for biosensing applications.

  8. Selective Serial Multi-Antibody Biosensing with TOPAS Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Høiby, Poul E.; Pedersen, Lars H.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a fluorescence-based fiber-optical biosensor, which can selectively detect different antibodies in serial at preselected positions inside a single piece of fiber. The fiber is a microstructured polymer optical fiber fabricated from TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer, which allows...

  9. Label-free thioflavin T/G-quadruplex-based real-time strand displacement amplification for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi-Chen; Zhu, Li-Na; Kong, De-Ming

    2016-12-15

    To promote application of strand-displacement amplification (SDA) techniques in biosensing, a label-free, real-time monitoring strategy for isothermal nucleic acid amplification reactions was designed. G-quadruplex structures were introduced into SDA products using specific recognition of G-quadruplexes by the fluorogenic dye thioflavin T. Performance was good for real-time monitoring of traditional SDA by a linear-amplification mechanism and for exponential cross-triggered SDA amplification. The strategy worked on a commercial real-time PCR instrument, making it suitable for biosensing platforms. As examples, two highly sensitive and specific biosensors were designed for analysis of the activity of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) and the restriction endonuclease EcoRI. Detection limits were 6×10(-5)U/mL for UDG and 0.016U/mL for EcoRI. Detection of corresponding targets in complex matrices such as cell lysates or human serum was also demonstrated. Compared to traditional end-point detection methods, real-time SDA-based approaches have the advantages of simple, fast operation; high sensitivity; low risk of carryover contamination; and very high throughput. The introduction of real-time monitoring strategies may promote application of SDA reactions in biosensor design.

  10. Selective Serial Multi-Antibody Biosensing with TOPAS Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars H. Pedersen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a fluorescence-based fiber-optical biosensor, which can selectively detect different antibodies in serial at preselected positions inside a single piece of fiber. The fiber is a microstructured polymer optical fiber fabricated from TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer, which allows for UV activation of localized sensor layers inside the holes of the fiber. Serial fluorescence-based selective sensing of Cy3-labelled α-streptavidin and Cy5-labelled α-CRP antibodies is demonstrated.

  11. Selective serial multi-antibody biosensing with TOPAS microstructured polymer optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy; Høiby, Poul E; Pedersen, Lars H; Bang, Ole

    2013-03-08

    We have developed a fluorescence-based fiber-optical biosensor, which can selectively detect different antibodies in serial at preselected positions inside a single piece of fiber. The fiber is a microstructured polymer optical fiber fabricated from TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer, which allows for UV activation of localized sensor layers inside the holes of the fiber. Serial fluorescence-based selective sensing of Cy3-labelled α-streptavidin and Cy5-labelled α-CRP antibodies is demonstrated.

  12. Label-free biosensing with high sensitivity in dual-core microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Yuan, Wu; Vlachos, Kyriakos

    2011-01-01

    We present experimentally feasible designs of a dual-core microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF), which can act as a highly sensitive, label-free, and selective biosensor. An immobilized antigen sensing layer on the walls of the holes in the mPOF provides the ability to selectively capture...

  13. Experimental Studies on Biosensing by SPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Shiokawa, Showko; Matsui, Yosikazu

    1989-09-01

    Biosensing using surface plasmon resonance is experimentally studied. The results obtained by detecting the bioresponse of the α-Feto protein system and cyclic experiments show that this technique has potential application in the field of biosensing. The effects of an organic layer on detecting sensitivity and restoration of sensors are also discussed.

  14. [Review on label-free optical bio-sensing technology based on whisper-gallery-mode].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun-feng; Liu, Tie-gen; Li, Hai-wei; Hui, Rong-qing; Liu, Kuni; Zhang, Yi-mo

    2010-11-01

    Optical biosensors are becoming an important tool for drug research and life science, and the label-free optical biosensor based on whisper-gallery-mode (WGM) is reviewed in the present paper. The WGM-based sensors are categorized into three types according to the microcavity structure. The biosensor using microsphere got extensive research because of high quality factor, and its response to protein, virus, and bacteria had been studied. The models based on single photon resonant state and perturbation theory were established. The biosensor using microdisk was proposed early since it can make use of mature lithography technology; however, the quality factor was increased greatly only after the thermal reflow process was introduced and single molecule measurement was then realized. The biosensor using microring has simpler mode structure and materials such as polymer, silicon nitride and silicon-on-insulator had been used for sensor fabrication. As a 3-dimension expansion, sensor using microtube can combine the optical channel and fluidic channel, which attracting more and more attention.

  15. Polymeric bionanocomposite cast thin films with in situ laccase-catalyzed polymerization of dopamine for biosensing and biofuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yueming; Deng, Wenfang; Li, Yunyong; Huang, Zhao; Meng, Yue; Xie, Qingji; Ma, Ming; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2010-04-22

    We report here on the facile preparation of polymer-enzyme-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) cast films accompanying in situ laccase (Lac)-catalyzed polymerization for electrochemical biosensing and biofuel cell applications. Lac-catalyzed polymerization of dopamine (DA) as a new substrate was examined in detail by UV-vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, quartz crystal microbalance, and scanning electron microscopy. Casting the aqueous mixture of DA, Lac and MWCNTs on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) yielded a robust polydopamine (PDA)-Lac-MWCNTs/GCE that can sense hydroquinone with 643 microA mM(-1) cm(-2) sensitivity and 20-nM detection limit (S/N = 3). The DA substrate yielded the best biosensing performance, as compared with aniline, o-phenylenediamine, or o-aminophenol as the substrate for similar Lac-catalyzed polymerization. Casting the aqueous mixture of DA, glucose oxidase (GOx), Lac, and MWCNTs on a Pt electrode yielded a robust PDA-GOx-Lac-MWCNTs/Pt electrode that exhibits glucose-detection sensitivity of 68.6 microA mM(-1) cm(-2). In addition, 2,2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt (ABTS) was also coimmobilized to yield a PDA-Lac-MWCNTs-ABTS/GCE that can effectively catalyze the reduction of O(2), and it was successfully used as the biocathode of a membraneless glucose/O(2) biofuel cell (BFC) in pH 5.0 Britton-Robinson buffer. The proposed biomacromolecule-immobilization platform based on enzyme-catalyzed polymerization may be useful for preparing many other multifunctional polymeric bionanocomposites for wide applications.

  16. Applications of Optical Microcavity Resonators in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, James H; Bailey, Ryan C

    2016-06-12

    Optical resonator sensors are an emerging class of analytical technologies that use recirculating light confined within a microcavity to sensitively measure the surrounding environment. Bolstered by advances in microfabrication, these devices can be configured for a wide variety of chemical or biomolecular sensing applications. We begin with a brief description of optical resonator sensor operation, followed by discussions regarding sensor design, including different geometries, choices of material systems, methods of sensor interrogation, and new approaches to sensor operation. Throughout, key developments are highlighted, including advancements in biosensing and other applications of optical sensors. We discuss the potential of alternative sensing mechanisms and hybrid sensing devices for more sensitive and rapid analyses. We conclude with our perspective on the future of optical microcavity sensors and their promise as versatile detection elements within analytical chemistry.

  17. Model-Based Evaluation Of System Scalability: Bandwidth Analysis For Smartphone-Based Biosensing Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patou, François; Madsen, Jan; Dimaki, Maria

    2016-01-01

    , methodologies enabling scalability analysis of multidomain, complex systems, are still missing. In acknowledgment of the importance for complex systems to present the ability to change or evolve, we present in this work a systemlevel model-based methodology allowing the multidisciplinary parametric evaluation......Scalability is a design principle often valued for the engineering of complex systems. Scalability is the ability of a system to change the current value of one of its specification parameters. Although targeted frameworks are available for the evaluation of scalability for specific digital systems......-engineering efforts for scaling a system specification efficaciously. We demonstrate the value of our methodology by investigating a smartphone-based biosensing instrumentation platform. Specifically, we carry out scalability analysis for the system’s bandwidth specification: the maximum analog voltage waveform...

  18. Bacteriophages: biosensing tools for multi-drug resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, N; Sacher, E; Mandeville, R; Meunier, M

    2014-03-21

    Pathogen detection is of utmost importance in many sectors, such as in the food industry, environmental quality control, clinical diagnostics, bio-defence and counter-terrorism. Failure to appropriately, and specifically, detect pathogenic bacteria can lead to serious consequences, and may ultimately be lethal. Public safety, new legislation, recent outbreaks in food contamination, and the ever-increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections have fostered a worldwide research effort targeting novel biosensing strategies. This review concerns phage-based analytical and biosensing methods targeted towards theranostic applications. We discuss and review phage-based assays, notably phage amplification, reporter phage, phage lysis, and bioluminescence assays for the detection of bacterial species, as well as phage-based biosensors, including optical (comprising SPR sensors and fiber optic assays), electrochemical (comprising amperometric, potentiometric, and impedimetric sensors), acoustic wave and magnetoelastic sensors.

  19. Optical materials and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wakaki, Moriaki; Kudo, Keiei

    2012-01-01

    The definition of optical material has expanded in recent years, largely because of IT advances that have led to rapid growth in optoelectronics applications. Helping to explain this evolution, Optical Materials and Applications presents contributions from leading experts who explore the basic concepts of optical materials and the many typical applications in which they are used. An invaluable reference for readers ranging from professionals to technical managers to graduate engineering students, this book covers everything from traditional principles to more cutting-edge topics. It also detai

  20. Ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets: a low-cost, green, and highly efficient electrocatalyst toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and its glucose biosensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jingqi; Liu, Qian; Ge, Chenjiao; Xing, Zhicai; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Al-Youbi, Abdulrahman O.; Sun, Xuping

    2013-09-01

    In this communication, we demonstrate for the first time that ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets can serve as a low-cost, green, and highly efficient electrocatalyst toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. We further demonstrate its application for electrochemical glucose biosensing in both buffer solution and human serum medium with a detection limit of 11 μM and 45 μM, respectively.In this communication, we demonstrate for the first time that ultrathin graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanosheets can serve as a low-cost, green, and highly efficient electrocatalyst toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. We further demonstrate its application for electrochemical glucose biosensing in both buffer solution and human serum medium with a detection limit of 11 μM and 45 μM, respectively. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section and supplementary figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02031b

  1. Synthesis and characterization of MgO nanocrystals for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongji [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Mingji, E-mail: limingji@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communication Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Qiu, Guojun [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Organic Solar Cells and Photochemical Conversion, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Li, Cuiping; Qu, Changqing; Yang, Baohe [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Film Electronic and Communication Devices, School of Electronics Information Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • MgO nanocrystals were prepared using DC arc plasma jet CVD method. • The growth time does not exceed 10 min in process of the synthesis. • The samples were found to consist of cubic MgO nanobelts and nanosheets. • Nanocrystals contain contacts, rough edges, vacancies, and doping defects. • The samples exhibited excellent electrochemical biosensing properties. - Abstract: MgO nanocrystals were prepared using a simple direct current arc plasma jet chemical vapor deposition method. Magnesium nitrate was used as source material and Mo film was used as a substrate and catalyst. The high-temperature plasma produced ensured rapid synthesis of the MgO nanocrystals. The as-prepared nanocrystals were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry, and photoluminescence measurements. The as-synthesized samples were found to consist of cubic MgO nanobelts and nanosheets with large surface areas and low coordination oxide ions, and contained numerous contacts, rough edges, vacancies, and doping defects. The nanostructures exhibited excellent electrochemical sensing properties with high-sensing sensitivity toward ascorbic acid. Their high electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the effect of defects and the surface electron transfer ability of the one-dimensional MgO nanobelts.

  2. Fabrication of gold-deposited plasmonic crystal based on nanoimprint lithography for label-free biosensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Kiichi; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-08-01

    Here, we developed a highly sensitive label-free plasmonic crystal (PC). The PC is composed of two types of nanoperiodic metal structures, nanodiscs and nanohole arrays, fabricated simultaneously by nanoimprint lithography using a nanostructured polymer mold. The PC absorbed light at specific wavelengths based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). The strongly enhanced electric field was excited by the combined structures of nanodiscs and nanohole arrays; thus, highly sensitive biosensing was possible. The LSPR-based optical characteristics of the PC were analyzed by finite-difference time-domain simulation; the structure (metal layer thickness) was optimized to respond to changes in the surrounding refractive index with high sensitivity. PC-based biosensor chips were prepared by immobilizing anti-human immunoglobulin G, which was successfully detected in the 200 pg/mL to 200 ng/mL range. Our approach introduces an easy and rapid process allowing large-area fabrication of PCs, resulting in a highly sensitive label-free biosensor device.

  3. Rational design of carboxyl groups perpendicularly attached to a graphene sheet: a platform for enhanced biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Alessandra; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based materials offer great potential for biofunctionalization with applications ranging from biosensing to drug delivery. Such biofunctionalization utilizes specific functional groups, typically a carboxyl moiety, as anchoring points for biomolecule. However, due to the fact that the exact chemical structure of GO is still largely unknown and poorly defined (it was postulated to consist of various oxygen-containing groups, such as epoxy, hydroxyl, carboxyl, carbonyl, and peroxy in varying ratios), it is challenging to fabricate highly biofunctionalized GO surfaces. The predominant anchoring sites (i.e., carboxyl groups) are mainly present as terminal groups on the edges of GO sheets and thus account for only a fraction of the oxygen-containing groups on GO. Herein, we suggest a direct solution to the long-standing problem of limited abundance of carboxyl groups on GO; GO was first reduced to graphene and consequently modified with only carboxyl groups grafted perpendicularly to its surface by a rational synthesis using free-radical addition of isobutyronitrile with subsequent hydrolysis. Such grafted graphene oxide can contain a high amount of carboxyl groups for consequent biofunctionalization, at which the extent of grafting is limited only by the number of carbon atoms in the graphene plane; in contrast, the abundance of carboxyl groups on "classical" GO is limited by the amount of terminal carbon atoms. Such a graphene platform embedded with perpendicularly grafted carboxyl groups was characterized in detail by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and its application was exemplified with single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. It was found that the removal of oxygen functionalities after the chemical reduction enhanced the electron-transfer rate of the graphene. More importantly, the introduction of carboxyl groups promoted a more efficient immobilization of DNA probes on the

  4. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  5. Design and synthesis of monofunctionalized, water-soluble conjugated polymers for biosensing and imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Christopher A; Bakus, Ronald C; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2011-08-17

    Water-soluble conjugated polymers with controlled molecular weight characteristics, absence of ionic groups, high emission quantum yields, and end groups capable of selective reactions of wide scope are desirable for improving their performance in various applications and, in particular, fluorescent biosensor schemes. The synthesis of such a structure is described herein. 2-Bromo-7-iodofluorene with octakis(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether chains at the 9,9'-positions, i.e., compound 4, was prepared as the reactive premonomer. A high-yielding synthesis of the organometallic initiator (dppe)Ni(Ph)Br (dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) was designed and implemented, and the resulting product was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Polymerization of 4 by (dppe)Ni(Ph)Br can be carried out in less than 30 s, affording excellent control over the average molecular weight and polydispersity of the product. Quenching of the polymerization with [2-(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]magnesium bromide yields silylacetylene-terminated water-soluble poly(fluorene) with a photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 80%. Desilylation, followed by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction, yields a straightforward route to introduce a wide range of specific end group functionalities. Biotin was used as an example. The resulting biotinylated conjugated polymer binds to streptavidin and acts as a light-harvesting chromophore to optically amplify the emission of Alexa Fluor-488 chromophores bound onto the streptavidin. Furthermore, the biotin end group makes it possible to bind the polymer onto streptavidin-functionalized cross-linked agarose beads and thereby incorporate a large number of optically active segments.

  6. pH sensing characteristics and biosensing application of solution-gated reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Il-Yung; Kim, Duck-Jin; Jung, Jin-Heak; Yoon, Ok Ja; Thanh, Tien Nguyen; Quang, Trung Tran; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2013-07-15

    Solution-gated reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors (R-GO FETs) were investigated for pH sensing and biochemical sensing applications. A channel of a networked R-GO film formed by self-assembly was incorporated as a sensing layer into a solution-gated FET structure for pH sensing and the detection of acetylcholine (Ach), which is a neurotransmitter in the nerve system, through enzymatic reactions. The fabricated R-GO FET was sensitive to protons (H(+)) with a pH sensitivity of 29 mV/pH in terms of the shift of the charge neutrality point (CNP), which is attributed to changes in the surface potential caused by the interaction of protons with OH surface functional groups present on the R-GO surface. The R-GO FET immobilized with acetylcholinesterase (AchE) was used to detect Ach in the concentration range of 0.1-10mM by sensing protons generated during the enzymatic reactions. The results indicate that R-GO FETs provide the capability to detect protons, demonstrating their applicability as a biosensing device for enzymatic reactions.

  7. Synthesis of Water-Dispersed Ferrecene/Phenylboronic Acid-Modified Bifunctional Gold Nanoparticles and the Application in Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenylboronic acids can form tight covalent bonds with diol-containing biomolecules. In this work, water-dispersed bifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs modified with ferrecene (Fc-derivatized peptides and 4-mercaptophenylboronic acids (MBA (denoted as Fc–MBA–AuNPs were synthesized and characterized by UV/vis spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. To demonstrate the application and the analytical merits of the nanoparticles in biosensing, glycoprotein avidin was tested as a model analyte. Specifically, avidin was captured by the biotin-covered gold electrode via the strong biotin-avidin interaction. Then, Fc–MBA–AuNPs were attached by the captured avidin through the formation of tight covalent bonds between the boronic acid moieties of Fc–MBA–AuNPs and the oligosaccharides of avidin. As a result, a detection limit of 0.2 pM was achieved. We believe that the bifunctional nanoparticles would found many applications in amplified detection of diol-containing species by rational design of the surface chemistry of electrode.

  8. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo C. Righini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whispering gallery mode (WGM microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed.

  9. Biosensing by WGM Microspherical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, Giancarlo C.; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators, thanks to their unique properties, have allowed researchers to achieve important results in both fundamental research and engineering applications. Among the various geometries, microspheres are the simplest 3D WGM resonators; the total optical loss in such resonators can be extremely low, and the resulting extraordinarily high Q values of 108–109 lead to high energy density, narrow resonant-wavelength lines and a lengthy cavity ringdown. They can also be coated in order to better control their properties or to increase their functionality. Their very high sensitivity to changes in the surrounding medium has been exploited for several sensing applications: protein adsorption, trace gas detection, impurity detection in liquids, structural health monitoring of composite materials, detection of electric fields, pressure sensing, and so on. In the present paper, after a general introduction to WGM resonators, attention is focused on spherical microresonators, either in bulk or in bubble format, to their fabrication, characterization and functionalization. The state of the art in the area of biosensing is presented, and the perspectives of further developments are discussed. PMID:27322282

  10. Optical Polarizationin Biomedical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tuchin, Valery V; Zimnyakov, Dmitry A

    2006-01-01

    Optical Polarization in Biomedical Applications introduces key developments in optical polarization methods for quantitative studies of tissues, while presenting the theory of polarization transfer in a random medium as a basis for the quantitative description of polarized light interaction with tissues. This theory uses the modified transfer equation for Stokes parameters and predicts the polarization structure of multiple scattered optical fields. The backscattering polarization matrices (Jones matrix and Mueller matrix) important for noninvasive medical diagnostic are introduced. The text also describes a number of diagnostic techniques such as CW polarization imaging and spectroscopy, polarization microscopy and cytometry. As a new tool for medical diagnosis, optical coherent polarization tomography is analyzed. The monograph also covers a range of biomedical applications, among them cataract and glaucoma diagnostics, glucose sensing, and the detection of bacteria.

  11. Hollow plasmonic high Q-factor absorber for bio-sensing in mid-infrared application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Payam; Zarrabi, Ferdows B.; Naser-Moghadasi, Mohammad; Saee Arezoomand, Afsaneh; Heydari, Samaneh

    2017-07-01

    High Q-factor elements have been noticed for detecting biological particles with more accuracy, and in this current research, we have noticed a High Q- Factor absorber for bio sensing and as the first result we have confirmed that the higher Q- Factor is given more figure of merit in the presence of various biological materials. A parametric study has been revealed that how the dimensions effect the resonance of the absorber and the reflection. Finally, based on the manner of surface plasmon in absorbers in the interface of the metal and dielectric layer, we have developed an optical sensor by implementing a thin layer of active material. Therefore, the final structure is useful for bio sensing and energy harvesting applications. Our results revealed that the absorber particle enhanced the Absorption Cross Section for final model with an active layer of InGaAsSb and the current is increased more than 4 times in comparison with the case that we do not have any cylindrical particle.

  12. Electromagnetic modeling of surface plasmon resonance with Kretschmann configuration for biosensing applications in a CMOS-compatible interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, A.; Camacho-Leon, S.; Rossetto, O.; Martínez-Chapa, S. O.

    2013-03-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a wave phenomenon occurring at an interface between a dielectric and a metal. SPR has applications in label-free biodetection systems, where advances in microfabrication techniques are fostering the development of SPR-based labs-on-a-chip. This work presents a numerical analysis for the excitation of SPR using Kretschmann's configuration. With a SiO2 prism, an Au metal layer, and water as the dielectric, the system is made to be compatible with a post-CMOS microfabrication process. The results obtained from both theory and software simulation show that for a light source at 633 nm, a 50 nm thick Au film is optimal, with the reflectivity falling to a minimum of ~2% at an angle of ~68.5°, due to maximum electromagnetic SPR coupling. Simulations with a Ti adhesion layer were also performed, showing a negative effect by increasing to ~17% the minimum reflectivity when SPR is achieved, thus reducing the dynamic range of the signal captured by the system's photodetector. SPR biosensors work by monitoring changes on the refractive index close to the SPR interface, these changes were simulated showing that a change of ~10-4 RIU on the dielectric medium produces a ~0.01°change in the SPR angle. These results will facilitate the physical implementation of label-free biosensing platforms with a CMOS image sensor (CIS) photodetection stage.

  13. Time-resolved luminescent biosensing based on inorganic lanthanide-doped nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Tu, Datao; Huang, Ping; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Zhuo; Chen, Xueyuan

    2015-03-11

    Time-resolved (TR) photoluminescence (PL) biosensing has been widely adopted in many research and medical institutions. However, commercial molecular TRPL bioprobes like lanthanide (Ln(3+))-chelates suffer from poor photochemical stability and long-term toxicity. Inorganic Ln(3+)-doped nanocrystals (NCs), owing to their superior physicochemical properties over Ln(3+)-chelates, are regarded as a new generation of luminescent nanoprobes for TRPL biosensing. The long-lived PL of Ln(3+)-doped NCs combined with the TRPL technique is able to completely suppress the interference of the short-lived background, resulting in a background-free signal and therefore a remarkable sensitivity for biosensing. In this feature article, we summarize the latest advancements in inorganic Ln(3+)-doped NCs as TRPL nano-bioprobes from their fundamental optical properties to their potential applications for ultrasensitive biodetection and high-resolution bioimaging. Future efforts towards the commercialization of these nanoprobes are also proposed.

  14. Mobile phone-based biosensing: An emerging "diagnostic and communication" technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-González, Daniel; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-06-15

    In this review we discuss recent developments on the use of mobile phones and similar devices for biosensing applications in which diagnostics and communications are coupled. Owing to the capabilities of mobile phones (their cameras, connectivity, portability, etc.) and to advances in biosensing, the coupling of these two technologies is enabling portable and user-friendly analytical devices. Any user can now perform quick, robust and easy (bio)assays anywhere and at any time. Among the most widely reported of such devices are paper-based platforms. Herein we provide an overview of a broad range of biosensing possibilities, from optical to electrochemical measurements; explore the various reported designs for adapters; and consider future opportunities for this technology in fields such as health diagnostics, safety & security, and environment monitoring.

  15. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  16. Fourier plane colorimetric sensing using broadband imaging of surface plasmons and application to biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, P.; Krishnan, A., E-mail: ananthk@iitm.ac.in [Centre for NEMS and Nano Photonics (CNNP), Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036 (India); Experimental Optics Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600036 (India)

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate an optical technique for refractive index and thickness sensing of sub-wavelength-thick dielectric analytes. The technique utilizes the broadband, multimode, directional leakage radiation arising from the excitation of hybrid mode surface plasmons (SP) on low aspect ratio periodic plasmonic substrates with period ≈λ. The approach requires relaxed fabrication tolerances compared to extra ordinary transmission-based sensing techniques, wherein minor shifts in the fabricated dimensions result in a very large change from the designed resonant wavelength. We show that refractive index perturbations due to about 10-nm-thick dielectric can be captured optically by the usage of carefully designed plasmonic substrates, a halogen lamp source, free-space optical components, polarizers, and a low-end, consumer-grade charge coupled device camera. The plasmonic substrates were designed for converting the signature of hybrid mode SP excitation into a transmission peak by utilizing a thin homogeneous metal layer sandwiched between the periodic plasmonic structures and the substrate. The resonance is highly sensitive to the refractive index and thickness of the analyte superstrate. The excitation of hybrid mode SP results in a polarization rotation of 90° of the leaked radiation at resonant wavelength. In order to eliminate the problem of image registration (i.e., placing the same feature in the same pixel of the image, for comparison before and after a change in refractive index) for sensing, we perform the color analysis in the Fourier plane. The change in color of the bright emitted spot with highest momentum, corresponding to the leakage of fundamental SP mode, was used to measure the changes in refractive index, whereas the number and color of spots of lower momenta, corresponding to higher-order Fabry Perot modes, was used to measure the variation in thickness. We further show that the Fourier plane analysis can also be used to sense the index of thicker

  17. Energy Transfer with Semiconductor Quantum Dot Bioconjugates: A Versatile Platform for Biosensing, Energy Harvesting, and Other Developing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Niko; Spillmann, Christopher M; Algar, W Russ; Pons, Thomas; Stewart, Michael H; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Díaz, Sebastian A; Delehanty, James B; Medintz, Igor L

    2017-01-25

    Luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are one of the more popular nanomaterials currently utilized within biological applications. However, what is not widely appreciated is their growing role as versatile energy transfer (ET) donors and acceptors within a similar biological context. The progress made on integrating QDs and ET in biological configurations and applications is reviewed in detail here. The goal is to provide the reader with (1) an appreciation for what QDs are capable of in this context, (2) how this field has grown over a relatively short time span, and, in particular, (3) how QDs are steadily revolutionizing the development of new biosensors along with a myriad of other photonically active nanomaterial-based bioconjugates. An initial discussion of QD materials along with key concepts surrounding their preparation and bioconjugation is provided given the defining role these aspects play in the QDs ability to succeed in subsequent ET applications. The discussion is then divided around the specific roles that QDs provide as either Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or charge/electron transfer donor and/or acceptor. For each QD-ET mechanism, a working explanation of the appropriate background theory and formalism is articulated before examining their biosensing and related ET utility. Other configurations such as incorporation of QDs into multistep ET processes or use of initial chemical and bioluminescent excitation are treated similarly. ET processes that are still not fully understood such as QD interactions with gold and other metal nanoparticles along with carbon allotropes are also covered. Given their maturity, some specific applications ranging from in vitro sensing assays to cellular imaging are separated and discussed in more detail. Finally a perspective on how this field will continue to evolve is provided.

  18. Efficient protein immobilization on polyethersolfone electrospun nanofibrous membrane via covalent binding for biosensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudifard, Matin [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soudi, Sara [Stem Cell Biology Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soleimani, Masoud [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Simzar [Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering Department, Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeili, Elaheh [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vossoughi, Manouchehr, E-mail: vosoughi@sharif.edu [Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun nanofibrous membrane based on ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling chemistry. To present the high performance of proposed biosensors, anti-staphylococcus enterotoxin B (anti-SEB) was used as a model to demonstrate the utility of our proposed system. Polymer solution of polyethersolfone was used to fabricate fine nanofibrous membrane. Moreover, industrial polyvinylidene fluoride membrane and conventional microtiter plate were also used to compare the efficiency of antibody immobilization. Scanning electron microscopy images were taken to study the morphology of the membranes. The surface activation of nanofibrous membrane was done with the help of O{sub 2} plasma. PES nanofibrous membrane with carboxyl functional groups for covalent attachment of antibodies were treated by EDC/NHS coupling agent. The quantity of antibody immobilization was measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was performed to confirm the covalent immobilization of antibody on membrane. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and invert fluorescence microscopy were used to analyze the antibody distribution pattern on solid surfaces. Results show that oxygen plasma treatment effectively increased the amount of antibody immobilization through EDC/NHS coupling chemistry. It was found that the use of nanofibrous membrane causes the improved detection signal of ELISA based biosensors in comparison to the standard assay carried out in the 96-well microtiter plate. This method has the potential to improve the ELISA-based biosensor and we believe that this technique can be used in various biosensing methods. - Highlights: • Introduction of novel strategy for antibody immobilization using high surface area electrospun

  19. Integration of programmable microfluidics and on-chip fluorescence detection for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J. W.; Olson, M. A.; Kim, J.; Ozcelik, D.; Cai, H.; Carrion, R.; Patterson, J. L.; Mathies, R. A.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schmidt, H.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the integration of an actively controlled programmable microfluidic sample processor with on-chip optical fluorescence detection to create a single, hybrid sensor system. An array of lifting gate microvalves (automaton) is fabricated with soft lithography, which is reconfigurably joined to a liquid-core, anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) silicon chip fabricated with conventional microfabrication. In the automaton, various sample handling steps such as mixing, transporting, splitting, isolating, and storing are achieved rapidly and precisely to detect viral nucleic acid targets, while the optofluidic chip provides single particle detection sensitivity using integrated optics. Specifically, an assay for detection of viral nucleic acid targets is implemented. Labeled target nucleic acids are first captured and isolated on magnetic microbeads in the automaton, followed by optical detection of single beads on the ARROW chip. The combination of automated microfluidic sample preparation and highly sensitive optical detection opens possibilities for portable instruments for point-of-use analysis of minute, low concentration biological samples. PMID:25584111

  20. Integration of programmable microfluidics and on-chip fluorescence detection for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J W; Olson, M A; Kim, J; Ozcelik, D; Cai, H; Carrion, R; Patterson, J L; Mathies, R A; Hawkins, A R; Schmidt, H

    2014-09-01

    We describe the integration of an actively controlled programmable microfluidic sample processor with on-chip optical fluorescence detection to create a single, hybrid sensor system. An array of lifting gate microvalves (automaton) is fabricated with soft lithography, which is reconfigurably joined to a liquid-core, anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) silicon chip fabricated with conventional microfabrication. In the automaton, various sample handling steps such as mixing, transporting, splitting, isolating, and storing are achieved rapidly and precisely to detect viral nucleic acid targets, while the optofluidic chip provides single particle detection sensitivity using integrated optics. Specifically, an assay for detection of viral nucleic acid targets is implemented. Labeled target nucleic acids are first captured and isolated on magnetic microbeads in the automaton, followed by optical detection of single beads on the ARROW chip. The combination of automated microfluidic sample preparation and highly sensitive optical detection opens possibilities for portable instruments for point-of-use analysis of minute, low concentration biological samples.

  1. Cellular biosensing: chemical and genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya

    2006-05-24

    Biosensors have been developed to determine the concentration of specific compounds in situ. They are already widely employed as a practical technology in the clinical and healthcare fields. Recently, another concept of biosensing has been receiving attention: biosensing for the evaluation of molecular potency. The development of this novel concept has been supported by the development of related technologies, as such as molecular design, molecular biology (genetic engineering) and cellular/tissular engineering. This review is addresses this new concept of biosensing and its application to the evaluation of the potency of chemicals in biological systems, in the field of cellular/tissular engineering. Cellular biosensing may provide information on both pharmaceutical and chemical safety, and on drug efficacy in vitro as a screening tool.

  2. Oriented Immobilization of Antibodies through Recombinant Protein-G on Assembled Gold Nanorods for Label-Free Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguero Villarreal, Victor Efrain

    Conjugation of biomolecules on gold nanorod(GNR) surfaces is the basis for successful biosensing applications. Current functionalization methods are problematic as they are inefficient, they modify the antibody native structure and they do not orient the antibody on the sensor surface. Instead of the intensive surface modification of GNRs and random immobilization approach, a facile oriented immobilization method using recombinant protein-G(RPG) to functionalize any type of antibody on the GNR surface was developed. GNRs synthesized using the bi-surfactant seed-mediated growth method were covalently immobilized to the glass substrate using 10% MPTMS solution. A 21 x 18 x 9.7 mm PLA disposable custom-made chamber was implemented to serve as incubation site for all biomolecular reactions. A layer-by-layer approach was utilized to deposit the protein layers on the GNR surface. Anti-human IgG and anti-rabbit IgG were successfully oriented and immobilized on the GNR surface using a combination of thiol-PEG-biotin, streptavidin and biotinylated RPG molecules. The spectral response of the RPG biochip to 600 nM anti-human IgG was 12 times larger than covalent-modified biosensors. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence intensity confirmed antibody binding on the GNR surface. The RPG biochip increased the surface mass density of antibody by 80% in comparison to random immobilized techniques. The RPG biochip decreased the development cost by 307% with a net sensor worth of $3.21 dollars. Concentrations from 20 to 320 nM of human IgG were detected and the sensor surface was successfully regenerated. Developed immobilization technique clearly surpassed the antibody efficiency deposition of random methods.

  3. Poly(pyrrole) microwires fabrication process on flexible thermoplastics polymers: application as a biosensing material

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Cruz, Alvaro; Lee, Michael; Zine, Nadia; Sigaud, Monique; Bausells, Joan; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2015-01-01

    The authors would like to thank to Carole FARRE (Institute of Analytical Sciences, Univ. Lyon I) for the optical microscopy guidance; International audience; We present a new low-cost technology to fabricate poly(pyrrole) microwires (PPy-mu Ws)by micro contact printing (mu CP) and controlled chemical polymerization (mu CP-CCP) using three different techniques ("grafting printing", "addressed printing", and "direct printing". These developed techniques provide a platform to regulate PPy wire s...

  4. Electron Irradiation Effects on Nanocrystal Quantum Dots Used in Bio-Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, R.; Nadeau, J.; Evans, K.; Paskova, T.; Monemar, B.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of electron irradiation on some of the optical properties in organic CdSe nanocrystals coated in trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and biologically compatible CdSe nanocrystals coated in mercaptoacetic acid, as CdSe as CdSe nanocrystals conjugated with the protein are investigated using the technique of cathodoluminescence. Effects of varying the beam energy and temperatures were examined and faster degradation at cryogenic temperatures and higher beam energies was found under some conditions.

  5. Sensitive optical bio-sensing of p-type WSe2 hybridized with fluorescent dye attached DNA by doping and de-doping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Jun Young; Jo, Seong Gi; Seo, Changwon; Kim, Jeongyong; Joo, Jinsoo

    2017-10-01

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides, such as MoS2, WSe2 and WS2, are exciting two-dimensional (2D) materials because they possess tunable optical and electrical properties that depend on the number of layers. In this study, the nanoscale photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of the p-type WSe2 monolayer, and WSe2 layers hybridized with the fluorescent dye Cy3 attached to probe-DNA (Cy3/p-DNA), have been investigated as a function of the concentration of Cy3/DNA by using high-resolution laser confocal microscopy. With increasing concentration of Cy3/p-DNA, the measured PL intensity decreases and its peak is red-shifted, suggesting that the WSe2 layer has been p-type doped with Cy3/p-DNA. Then, the PL intensity of the WSe2/Cy3/p-DNA hybrid system increases and the peak is blue-shifted through hybridization with relatively small amounts of target-DNA (t-DNA) (50–100 nM). This effect originates from charge and energy transfer from the Cy3/DNA to the WSe2. For t-DNA detection, our systems using p-type WSe2 have the merit in terms of the increase of PL intensity. The p-type WSe2 monolayers can be a promising nanoscale 2D material for sensitive optical bio-sensing based on the doping and de-doping responses to biomaterials.

  6. Protein detection on biotin-derivatized polyallylamine by optical microring resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullien, D.; Harmsma, P.J.; Abdulla, S.M.C.; De Boer, B.M.; Bosma, D.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.; Jager, W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon optical microring resonators (MRRs) are sensitive devices that can be used for biosensing. We present a novel biosensing platform based on the application of polyelectrolyte (PE) layers on such MRRs. The top PE layer was covalently labeled with biotin to ensure binding sites for antibodies v

  7. Lysozyme-Mediated Formation of Protein-Silica Nano-Composites for Biosensing Applications (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-05

    application to biosensor development. Various surfaces coated with titania nanoparticles , for example, have found increasing application in fields as diverse...as photocatalysis , photovoltaics, photoelectrochromics and sensors due to the high photocatalytic activities of titania coatings [1–4]. Enzymes have...properties of titania nanoparticles , i.e. high refractive index and dielectric constants have enabled their use as waveguides when coated on glass

  8. Design, characterization and applications of new ionic liquid matrices for multifunctional analysis of biomolecules: A novel strategy for pathogenic bacteria biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Assuit University, Assuit, 71515 (Egypt); Khan, M Shahnawaz [Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Hui-Fen, E-mail: hwu@faculty.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, 800, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, 804, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Design and characterize novel UV absorbed-ionic liquid matrices series. • Apply the new series for different analytes. • Introduce a novel methodology for pathogenic bacteria biosensing. • Tabulate the physical parameters of the new series. - Abstract: The design, preparation and performance for novel UV-light absorbing (room-temperature) ionic liquid matrices (UV-RTILMs) for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) were reported. A series of UV-RTILMs was prepared by ultrasonication of equimolar of acid (mefenamic acid) and bases (aniline (ANI), pyridine (Pyr), dimethyl aniline (DMANI) and 2-methyl picoline (2-P)). The UV-RTILMs have not only significant absorbance at the desired wavelength (337 nm of the N{sub 2} Laser), but also have available protons that can easily undergo proton transfer reactions to ionize the target molecules. The novel UV-RTILMs have the ability to ionize different and wide classes of compounds such as drugs, carbohydrate, and amino acids. The new UV-RTILMs series have been successfully and selectively applied for biosensing the lysates of pathogenic bacteria in the presence of the cell macromolecules. A new strategy for biosensing pathogens was presented via sensing the pathogens lysate in the cell suspension. The new materials can effectively detect the bacterial toxins without separation or any pretreatment. They offered excellent ionization of labile oligosaccharides with protonated peaks. They could significantly enhance the analyte signals, produce homogeneous spotting, reducing spot-to-spot variation, excellent vacuum stability, higher ion peak intensity, and wide application possibility. The physical parameters such as molar refractivity, molar volume, parachor, surface tension, density and polarizability were calculated and tabulated. The new UV-RTILMs could offer excellent reproducibility and great repeatability and they are promising matrices for wide applications on MALDI-MS.

  9. Gold Nanoparticles Like A Matrix For Covalent Immobilization Of Cholesterol Oxidase – Application For Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojnarowska R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising agents for various areas of material science as well as nanotechnology, electronics and medicine. The interest in this material is provided due to its unique optical, electronic and molecular-recognition properties. This paper presents results of preparation, characterization and biofunctionalization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles have been conjugated with the cholesterol oxidase enzyme in order to prepare the active element for biosensors. Cholesterol oxidase is one of the most important analytical enzyme, used for cholesterol assay in clinical diagnostics, and there is still a necessity in improvement of existing analytical techniques, including bio-nanotechnological approaches based on modern nanosystems. The prepared bio-nanosystem was characterized by the enzyme activity test. Obtained results showed a stable binding of the enzyme with nanoparticles and preserved the bioactivity approves which gives possibility to use the prepared bio-nanosystems for analytical purposes.

  10. Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM): An emerging material for electrochemical bio(sensing) applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-02-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have received attention due to their large surface areas with high concentration of functional end groups to bind biological material. They are monodisperse and hyper-branched polymers which include active functional groups outside its surface. These functional groups have been used for immobilizing the biorecognition molecules. They act as bioconjugating reagents and they have various applications in the fields of chemical and biochemical biosensors. Electrochemical techniques (amperometric, impedimetric, potentiometric, electrochemiluminescence) are useful for the determination of target molecules, with high sensitivity and selectivity. Dendrimer-modified enzyme biosensors, DNA biosensors, immunosensors and chemical sensors have been fabricated by using PAMAM dendrimer. This review provides a brief description of PAMAM dendrimers and its applications in biosensors and sensors. These sensors' limit of detection values are also compared in detail. Also this is the first review that assesses PAMAM dendrimers from the point of its usability in biosensor and sensor technologies.

  11. Strategies to extend the lifetime of bioelectrochemical enzyme electrodes for biosensing and biofuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenwolf, Stefanie; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2011-03-01

    Enzymes are powerful catalysts for biosensor and biofuel cell electrodes due to their unique substrate specificity. This specificity is defined by the amino acid chain's complex three-dimensional structure based on non-covalent forces, being also responsible for the very limited enzyme lifetime of days to weeks. Many electrochemical applications, however, would benefit from lifetimes over months to years. This mini-review provides a critical overview of strategies and ideas dealing with the problem of short enzyme lifetime, which limits the overall lifetime of bioelectrochemical electrodes. The most common approaches aim to stabilize the enzyme itself. Various immobilization techniques have been used to reduce flexibility of the amino acid chain by introducing covalent or non-covalent binding forces to external molecules. The enzyme can also be stabilized using genetic engineering methods to increase the binding forces within the protein or by optimizing the environment in order to reduce destabilizing interactions. In contrast, renewing the inactivated catalyst decouples overall system lifetime from the limited enzyme lifetime and thereby promises theoretically unlimited electrode lifetimes. Active catalyst can be supplied by exchanging the electrolyte repeatedly. Alternatively, integrated microorganisms can display the enzymes on their surface or secrete them to the electrolyte, allowing unattended power supply for long-term applications.

  12. Cross-slot nano-antenna with graphene coat for bio-sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Ferdows B.; Naser-Moghadasi, Mohammad; Heydari, Samaneh; Maleki, Mahshid; Arezomand, Afsaneh Saee

    2016-07-01

    we present a compact cross-shaped nano-aperture for biomedical and spectroscopy applications. Furthermore, by adding a graphene coat to structure, we achieved a reconfigurable particle with more transmittance. Finally, a cross shape chain of silicon dioxide is added to structure and it is placed on graphene layer and over the aperture slot. The structure is modeled with FDTD simulation by the CST microwave studio and for substrate, we selected SiN with n=1.98 and thickness of 80 nm. The palik model is used for gold layer with thickness of 30 nm and the 2 nm graphene layer is selected for coat. The simulations emphasize that adding graphene coat and silicon dioxide chain is applicable in order to improve the transmittance at mid infrared (IR) frequency. In addition, here we show that the chain structure is useful for enhancement of the E-field in both X and Y direction and it is made useful this particle for energy harvesting. Figure of merit (FOM) is studied for different additional material effects on prototype structure and ∆(E) variation. Finally, we revealed that the current device is highly practical for making differential sensor for detecting nano-particle with more accuracy and sensitivity.

  13. Programmable DNA triple-helix molecular switch in biosensing applications: from in homogenous solutions to in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pinting; Zheng, Jing; Tang, Jianru; Ma, Dandan; Xu, Weijian; Li, Jishan; Cao, Zhong; Yang, Ronghua

    2017-02-21

    Herein, we demonstrated a new gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-integrated programmable triple-helix molecular switch (THMS) to realize the biosensing of multiple targets from in homogenous solution to in living cells. The results demonstrated that this proposed programmable THMS could be successfully used for imaging multiple messenger RNA (mRNA) in living cells and it significantly extends the scope of the THMS sensing platform.

  14. Development of printed-circuit-board based industry-compatible point-of-care biosensing and bioprocessing technology with applications

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Hsiu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of a technology employing printed circuit board (PCB) technology to facilitate the performance and translation of point-of-care (POC) biosensing and bioprocessing devices toward practical products. Key features of the proposed technology are a universal, standardized platform and a set of techniques, featuring integrated functional units, three-dimensional (3D) configurations, convenient device-instrumentation interconnections, and industry-compatible prec...

  15. Non-faradaic impedance characterization of an evaporating droplet for microfluidic and biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dak, Piyush; Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad A

    2014-07-21

    We have developed a general numerical/analytical theory of non-faradaic impedance of an evaporating droplet, and validated the model by experiments involving droplets of various analyte concentrations deposited on a surface defined by coplanar electrodes. The impedance of the droplet Z(n0,t,f) is analyzed as a function of the concentration (n0) of the ions in the solution, the measurement frequency (f) and the evaporation time (t). We illustrate the versatility of the model by determining the sensitivity enhancement α(t) of the droplet-based impedimetric nano-biosensor under different regimes of operation. The model should have broad applications in the characterization/optimization of droplet-based systems, especially lab-on-chip components involving digital microfluidics.

  16. Emerging applications of label-free optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Giuliano; Lanfranco, Roberta; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bellini, Tommaso; Buscaglia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Innovative technical solutions to realize optical biosensors with improved performance are continuously proposed. Progress in material fabrication enables developing novel substrates with enhanced optical responses. At the same time, the increased spectrum of available biomolecular tools, ranging from highly specific receptors to engineered bioconjugated polymers, facilitates the preparation of sensing surfaces with controlled functionality. What remains often unclear is to which extent this continuous innovation provides effective breakthroughs for specific applications. In this review, we address this challenging question for the class of label-free optical biosensors, which can provide a direct signal upon molecular binding without using secondary probes. Label-free biosensors have become a consolidated approach for the characterization and screening of molecular interactions in research laboratories. However, in the last decade, several examples of other applications with high potential impact have been proposed. We review the recent advances in label-free optical biosensing technology by focusing on the potential competitive advantage provided in selected emerging applications, grouped on the basis of the target type. In particular, direct and real-time detection allows the development of simpler, compact, and rapid analytical methods for different kinds of targets, from proteins to DNA and viruses. The lack of secondary interactions facilitates the binding of small-molecule targets and minimizes the perturbation in single-molecule detection. Moreover, the intrinsic versatility of label-free sensing makes it an ideal platform to be integrated with biomolecular machinery with innovative functionality, as in case of the molecular tools provided by DNA nanotechnology.

  17. A compact hybrid-multiplexed potentiostat for real-time electrochemical biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramfos, Ioannis; Vassiliadis, Nikolaos; Blionas, Spyridon; Efstathiou, Konstantinos; Fragoso, Alex; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Birbas, Alexios

    2013-09-15

    The architecture and design of a compact, multichannel, hybrid-multiplexed potentiostat for performing electrochemical measurements on continuously-biased electrode arrays is presented. The proposed architecture utilises a combination of sequential and parallel measurements, to enable high performance whilst keeping the system low-cost and compact. The accuracy of the signal readout is maintained by following a special multiplexing approach, which ensures the continuous biasing of all the working electrodes of an array. After sampling the results, a digital calibration technique factors out errors from component inaccuracies. A prototype printed circuit board (PCB) was designed and built using off-the-shelf components for the real-time measurement of the amperometric signal of 48 electrodes. The operation and performance of the PCB was evaluated and characterised through a wide range of testing conditions, where it exhibited high linearity (R(2)>0.999) and a resolution of 400pA. The effectiveness of the proposed multiplexing scheme is demonstrated through electrochemical tests using KCl and [Fe(CN)6](3-) in KCl solutions. The applicability of the prototype multichannel potentiostat is also demonstrated using real biosensors, which were applied to the detection of IgA antibodies.

  18. A multi-channel femtoampere-sensitivity conductometric array for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Amit; Chakrabartty, Shantanu; Pal, Sudeshna; Alocilja, Evangelyn

    2006-01-01

    Rapid detection of pathogens using field deployable biosensors requires integrated sensing and data processing. Detection of low concentration of biological agents is possible using accurate and real-time signal characterization devices. This paper presents a multi-channel conductometric array that can detect and measure current up to femtoampere range. The architecture uses a novel semi-synchronous SigmaDelta modulation that allows measurement of ultra-small currents by using a hysteretic comparison technique. The architecture achieves higher energy efficiency over a conventional SigmaDelta by reducing the total switching cycles of the comparator. A 3 mm x 3 mm chip implementing a 42 channel potentiostat array has been prototyped in a 0.5 microm CMOS technology. Measured results show 10 bits of resolution, with a sensitivity of upto 50 fA of current. The power consumption of the potentiostat is 11 microW per channel at a sampling rate of 250 kHz. The multi-channel potentiostat has been integrated with a conductometric biosensor for field deployable applications. Results with a Bacillus Cereus based biosensor demonstrate the effectiveness of the potentiostat in characterizing different concentration levels of pathogens in realtime.

  19. A 0.18 μm CMOS fluorescent detector system for bio-sensing application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Nan; Chen Guoping; Hong Zhiliang

    2009-01-01

    A CMOS fluorescent detector system for biological experiment is presented. This system integrates a CMOS compatible photodiode, a capacitive trans-impedance amplifier (CTIA), and a 12 bit pipelined analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and is implemented in a 0.18 μm standard CMOS process. Some special techniques, such as a "contact imaging" detecting method, pseudo-differential architecture, dummy photodiodes, and a T-type reset switch, are adopted to achieve low-level sensing application. Experiment results show that the Nwell/Psub photodi-ode with CTIA pixel achieves a sensitivity of 0.1 A/W at 515 nm and a dark current of 300 fA with 300 mV reverse biased voltage. The maximum differential and integral nonlinearity of the designed ADC are 0.8 LSB and 3 LSB, respectively. With an integrating time of 50 ms, this system is sensitive to the fluorescence emitted by the fluorescein solution with concentration as low as 20 ng/mL and can generate 7 fA photocurrent. This chip occupies 3 mm2 and consumes 37 mW.

  20. Top-Down Nanofabrication and Characterization of 20 nm Silicon Nanowires for Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Nuzaihan, M N; Hashim, U; Md Arshad, M K; Rahim Ruslinda, A; Rahman, S F A; Fathil, M F M; Ismail, Mohd H

    2016-01-01

    A top-down nanofabrication approach is used to develop silicon nanowires from silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and involves direct-write electron beam lithography (EBL), inductively coupled plasma-reactive ion etching (ICP-RIE) and a size reduction process. To achieve nanometer scale size, the crucial factors contributing to the EBL and size reduction processes are highlighted. The resulting silicon nanowires, which are 20 nm in width and 30 nm in height (with a triangular shape) and have a straight structure over the length of 400 μm, are fabricated precisely at the designed location on the device. The device is applied in biomolecule detection based on the changes in drain current (Ids), electrical resistance and conductance of the silicon nanowires upon hybridization to complementary target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). In this context, the scaled-down device exhibited superior performances in terms of good specificity and high sensitivity, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 fM, enables for efficient label-free, direct and higher-accuracy DNA molecules detection. Thus, this silicon nanowire can be used as an improved transducer and serves as novel biosensor for future biomedical diagnostic applications.

  1. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  2. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence of Si quantum dots in neutral aqueous solution and its biosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yong-Ping; Wang, Jiao; Peng, Ying; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2017-03-15

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) has been considered as a powerful technique in the fabrication of biosensor, however, high-toxicity of heavy metal ion containing in QDs severely limits their further applications, and the search for the alternative benign nanomaterials with high ECL efficiency is urgent. Herein, ECL behavior of eco-friendly silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) was reported in neutral aqueous condition. Stable and intense cathodic ECL emission was obtained in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) with K2S2O8 as coreactant. ECL resonance energy transfer (ECL-RET) system was established with SiQDs ECL as energy donor and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as energy acceptor, based on which a novel ECL biosensor was fabricated. AuNPs was connected at the terminal of hairpin DNA to form a signal probe. When the probe was modified on SiQDs, ECL-RET occurred due to the short distance between AuNPs and SiQDs, resulting in the apparent decrease of ECL signal. Target DNA can open the loop of hairpin DNA, and move AuNPs away from the electrode surface. As a result, the ECL-RET process was hampered, and the ECL emission resumed. The increased ECL signals varied linearly with the target DNA concentrations in the range of 0.1fM to 1pM with the detection limit of 0.016fM (3σ). The proposed ECL sensor exhibited highly sensitivity and good selectivity in the detection of target DNA.

  3. Maxwell Optics III. Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, S A

    2002-01-01

    A new formalism of beam-optics and polarization has been recently presented, based on an exact matrix representation of the Maxwell equations. This is described in Part-I and Part-II. In this Part, we present the application of the above formalism to the specific example of the axially symmetric graded index fiber. This formalism leads to the wavelength-dependent modifications of the six aberrations present in the traditional prescriptions and further gives rise to the remaining three aberrations permitted by the axial symmetry. Besides, it also gives rise to a wavelength-dependent image rotation. The three extra aberrations and the image rotation are not found in any of the traditional approaches.

  4. Applications of lobster eye optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.; Pina, L.; Inneman, A.; Tichy, V.

    2015-05-01

    Applications of wide field Lobster Eye X ray telescopes are presented and discussed. The wide field X ray optics was originally proposed for use in X-ray astronomy, but there are numerous other application areas as well.

  5. Nanodevices for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hargsoon; Deshpande, Devesh C.; Ramachandran, Vasuda; Hankins, Phillip T.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    This research discusses the development of biosensors with vertically aligned nanowires, and the evaluation of their physical properties, electrochemical performance and biocompatibility. The developments include neurotransmitter (dopamine) sensors, glucose sensors for continuous monitoring, potassium ion sensors and integration of those sensors. A hemi-cylindrical nanocavity structure has been developed for dopamine sensing using redox cycling with radial diffusion within the cavities. By immobilization of enzymes in a conducting polymer matrix on vertically aligned nanowires, glucose sensing electrodes have been obtained with high sensitivity and selectivity. In addition, potassium sensing, potentially useful for monitoring changes of extracellular potassium concentration during myocardial ischemia, has been demonstrated using ion selective membranes (ISM) on nanowires. Sensor developments and measurement results are included in the presentation along with descriptions of top-down and bottom-up nano-/micro-fabrication technologies such as lithography and thin film deposition.

  6. Applications of nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2008-01-01

    * The only book describing applications of nonlinear fiber optics * Two new chapters on the latest developments: highly nonlinear fibers and quantum applications* Coverage of biomedical applications* Problems provided at the end of each chapterThe development of new highly nonlinear fibers - referred to as microstructured fibers, holey fibers and photonic crystal fibers - is the next generation technology for all-optical signal processing and biomedical applications. This new edition has been thoroughly updated to incorporate these key technology developments.The bo

  7. Nonlinear Optics: Principles and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    As nonlinear optics further develops as a field of research in electromagnetic wave propagation, its state-of-the-art technologies will continue to strongly impact real-world applications in a variety of fields useful to the practicing scientist and engineer. From basic principles to examples...... of applications, Nonlinear Optics: Principles and Applications effectively bridges physics and mathematics with relevant applied material for real-world use. The book progresses naturally from fundamental aspects to illustrative examples, and presents a strong theoretical foundation that equips the reader...... and matter, this text focuses on the physical understanding of nonlinear optics, and explores optical material response functions in the time and frequency domain....

  8. BioSense 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Kelley G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To familiarize public health practitioners with the BioSense 2.0 application and its use in all hazard surveillance. Introduction BioSense 2.0 protects the health of the American people by providing timely insight into the health of communities, regions, and the nation by offering a variety of features to improve data collection, standardization, storage, analysis, and collaboration. BioSense 2.0 is the result of a partnership between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the public health community to track the health and well-being of communities across the country. In 2010, the BioSense Program began a redesign effort to improve features such as centralized data mining and addressing concerns that the system could not meet its original objective to provide early warning or detect local outbreaks. Methods Using the latest technology, BioSense 2.0 integrates current health data shared by health departments from a variety of sources to provide insight on the health of communities and the country. By getting more information faster, local, state, and federal public health partners can detect and respond to more outbreaks and health events more quickly. From flu outbreaks to car accidents, BioSense 2.0 provides the critical data, information, and tools that public health officials need to better understand and address health problems at the local, state, regional, and national levels. Also, by knowing what is happening across local borders, public health professionals can anticipate potential health problems and respond effectively to protect the health of all people. The demonstration will include a basic overview of the BioSense 2.0 application and the functionality available to public health departments and their data providers. The presenter will also show an example of how BioSense 2.0 can be used in a real-world public health example. Conclusions Over the past two years much has been accomplished during the redesign effort. BioSense

  9. NADH dehydrogenase-like behavior of nitrogen-doped graphene and its application in NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Pan-Pan; Zhao, Cui-E; Wang, Ying; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-12-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensing platform for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent dehydrogenase catalysis was designed using the nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), which had properties similar to NADH dehydrogenase (CoI). NG mimicked flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in CoI and efficiently catalyzed NADH oxidation. NG also acted as an electron transport "bridge" from NADH to the electrode due to its excellent conductivity. In comparison with a bare gold electrode, an 800 mV decrease in the overpotential for NADH oxidation and CoI-like behavior were observed at NG-modified electrode, which is the largest decrease in overpotential for NADH oxidation reported to date. The catalytic rate constant (k) for the CoI-like behavior of NG was estimated to be 2.3×10(5) M(-1) s(-1), which is much higher than that of other previously reported FMN analogs. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of NG was 26 μM, which is comparable to the Km of CoI (10 μM). Electrodes modified with NG and NG/gold nanoparticals/formate dehydrogenase (NG/AuNPs/FDH) showed excellent analytical performance for the detection of NADH and formate. This electrode fabrication strategy could be used to create a universal biosensing platform for developing NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenase biosensors and biofuel cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and functionalization of monodisperse near-ultraviolet and visible excitable multifunctional Eu3+, Bi3+:REVO4 nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Alberto; Carrillo-Carrión, Carolina; Zyuzin, Mikhail V.; Ashraf, Sumaira; Hartmann, Raimo; Núñez, Nuria O.; Ocaña, Manuel; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2016-06-01

    Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be tuned by adjusting the amount of PAA. The Eu- Bi-doped REVO4 based nanophosphors show the typical red luminescence of Eu(iii), which can be excited through an energy transfer process from the vanadate anions, resulting in a much higher luminescence intensity in comparison to the direct excitation of the europium cations. The incorporation of Bi into the REVO4 structure shifts the original absorption band of the vanadate anions towards longer wavelengths, giving rise to nanophosphors with an excitation maximum at 342 nm, which can also be excited in the visible range. The suitability of such nanophosphors for bioimaging and biosensing applications, as well as their colloidal stability in different buffer media of biological interest, their cytotoxicity, their degradability at low pH, and their uptake by HeLa cells have been evaluated. Their suitability for bioimaging and biosensing applications is also demonstrated.Near-ultraviolet and visible excitable Eu- and Bi-doped NPs based on rare earth vanadates (REVO4, RE = Y, Gd) have been synthesized by a facile route from appropriate RE precursors, europium and bismuth nitrate, and sodium orthovanadate, by homogeneous precipitation in an ethylene glycol/water mixture at 120 °C. The NPs can be functionalized either by a one-pot synthesis with polyacrylic acid (PAA) or by a Layer-by-Layer approach with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and PAA. In the first case, the particle size can also be

  11. Optical tweezers principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Philip; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Combining state-of-the-art research with a strong pedagogic approach, this text provides a detailed and complete guide to the theory, practice and applications of optical tweezers. In-depth derivation of the theory of optical trapping and numerical modelling of optical forces are supported by a complete step-by-step design and construction guide for building optical tweezers, with detailed tutorials on collecting and analysing data. Also included are comprehensive reviews of optical tweezers research in fields ranging from cell biology to quantum physics. Featuring numerous exercises and problems throughout, this is an ideal self-contained learning package for advanced lecture and laboratory courses, and an invaluable guide to practitioners wanting to enter the field of optical manipulation. The text is supplemented by www.opticaltweezers.org, a forum for discussion and a source of additional material including free-to-download, customisable research-grade software (OTS) for calculation of optical forces, dig...

  12. Simple direct formation of self-assembled N-heterocyclic carbene monolayers on gold and their application in biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crudden, Cathleen M.; Horton, J. Hugh; Narouz, Mina R.; Li, Zhijun; Smith, Christene A.; Munro, Kim; Baddeley, Christopher J.; Larrea, Christian R.; Drevniok, Benedict; Thanabalasingam, Bheeshmon; McLean, Alastair B.; Zenkina, Olena V.; Ebralidze, Iraklii I.; She, Zhe; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard; Mosey, Nicholas J.; Saunders, Lisa N.; Yagi, Akiko

    2016-09-01

    The formation of organic films on gold employing N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) has been previously shown to be a useful strategy for generating stable organic films. However, NHCs or NHC precursors typically require inert atmosphere and harsh conditions for their generation and use. Herein we describe the use of benzimidazolium hydrogen carbonates as bench stable solid precursors for the preparation of NHC films in solution or by vapour-phase deposition from the solid state. The ability to prepare these films by vapour-phase deposition permitted the analysis of the films by a variety of surface science techniques, resulting in the first measurement of NHC desorption energy (158+/-10 kJ mol-1) and confirmation that the NHC sits upright on the surface. The use of these films in surface plasmon resonance-type biosensing is described, where they provide specific advantages versus traditional thiol-based films.

  13. Optical fibers for FTTH application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzowski, Bartlomiej; Tosik, Grzegorz; Lisik, Zbigniew; Bedyk, Michal; Kubiak, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the specifics of FTTH (Fiber To The Home) networks in terms of requirements for optical fibers has been presented. Optical fiber samples used in FTTH applications acquired from the worldwide leading manufacturers were subjected to small diameter mandrel wraps tests. The detailed procedures of performed tests and the measurement results has been presented.

  14. Organic silicone sol-gel polymer as a noncovalent carrier of receptor proteins for label-free optical biosensor application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jun; Wang, Linghua; Han, Xiuyou; Cheng, Jianfang; Lv, Huanlin; Wang, Jinyan; Jian, Xigao; Zhao, Mingshan; Jia, Lingyun

    2013-01-23

    Optical biosensing techniques have become of key importance for label-free monitoring of biomolecular interactions in the current proteomics era. Together with an increasing emphasis on high-throughput applications in functional proteomics and drug discovery, there has been demand for facile and generally applicable methods for the immobilization of a wide range of receptor proteins. Here, we developed a polymer platform for microring resonator biosensors, which allows the immobilization of receptor proteins on the surface of waveguide directly without any additional modification. A sol-gel process based on a mixture of three precursors was employed to prepare a liquid hybrid polysiloxane, which was photopatternable for the photocuring process and UV imprint. Waveguide films were prepared on silicon substrates by spin coating and characterized by atomic force microscopy for roughness, and protein adsorption. The results showed that the surface of the polymer film was smooth (rms = 0.658 nm), and exhibited a moderate hydrophobicity with the water contact angle of 97°. Such a hydrophobic extent could provide a necessary binding strength for stable immobilization of proteins on the material surface in various sensing conditions. Biological activity of the immobilized Staphylococcal protein A and its corresponding biosensing performance were demonstrated by its specific recognition of human Immunoglobulin G. This study showed the potential of preparing dense, homogeneous, specific, and stable biosensing surfaces by immobilizing receptor proteins on polymer-based optical devices through the direct physical adsorption method. We expect that such polymer waveguide could be of special interest in developing low-cost and robust optical biosensing platform for multidimensional arrays.

  15. In situ synthesis of peptide nucleic acids in porous silicon for drug delivery and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kelsey R; Mares, Jeremy W; Swartz, Caleb M; Zhao, Yiliang; Weiss, Sharon M; Duvall, Craig L

    2014-07-16

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are a unique class of synthetic molecules that have a peptide backbone and can hybridize with nucleic acids. Here, a versatile method has been developed for the automated, in situ synthesis of PNA from a porous silicon (PSi) substrate for applications in gene therapy and biosensing. Nondestructive optical measurements were performed to monitor single base additions of PNA initiated from (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane attached to the surface of PSi films, and mass spectrometry was conducted to verify synthesis of the desired sequence. Comparison of in situ synthesis to postsynthesis surface conjugation of the full PNA molecules showed that surface mediated, in situ PNA synthesis increased loading 8-fold. For therapeutic proof-of-concept, controlled PNA release from PSi films was characterized in phosphate buffered saline, and PSi nanoparticles fabricated from PSi films containing in situ grown PNA complementary to micro-RNA (miR) 122 generated significant anti-miR activity in a Huh7 psiCHECK-miR122 cell line. The applicability of this platform for biosensing was also demonstrated using optical measurements that indicated selective hybridization of complementary DNA target molecules to PNA synthesized in situ on PSi films. These collective data confirm that we have established a novel PNA-PSi platform with broad utility in drug delivery and biosensing.

  16. Nanohybrids Near-Field Optical Microscopy: From Image Shift to Biosensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayla El-Kork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-Field Optical Microscopy is a valuable tool for the optical and topographic study of objects at a nanometric scale. Nanoparticles constitute important candidates for such type of investigations, as they bear an important weight for medical, biomedical, and biosensing applications. One, however, has to be careful as artifacts can be easily reproduced. In this study, we examined hybrid nanoparticles (or nanohybrids in the near-field, while in solution and attached to gold nanoplots. We found out that they can be used for wavelength modulable near-field biosensors within conditions of artifact free imaging. In detail, we refer to the use of topographic/optical image shift and the imaging of Local Surface Plasmon hot spots to validate the genuineness of the obtained images. In summary, this study demonstrates a new way of using simple easily achievable comparative methods to prove the authenticity of near-field images and presents nanohybrid biosensors as an application.

  17. Emerging applications of label-free optical biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanchetta Giuliano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovative technical solutions to realize optical biosensors with improved performance are continuously proposed. Progress in material fabrication enables developing novel substrates with enhanced optical responses. At the same time, the increased spectrum of available biomolecular tools, ranging from highly specific receptors to engineered bioconjugated polymers, facilitates the preparation of sensing surfaces with controlled functionality. What remains often unclear is to which extent this continuous innovation provides effective breakthroughs for specific applications. In this review, we address this challenging question for the class of label-free optical biosensors, which can provide a direct signal upon molecular binding without using secondary probes. Label-free biosensors have become a consolidated approach for the characterization and screening of molecular interactions in research laboratories. However, in the last decade, several examples of other applications with high potential impact have been proposed. We review the recent advances in label-free optical biosensing technology by focusing on the potential competitive advantage provided in selected emerging applications, grouped on the basis of the target type. In particular, direct and real-time detection allows the development of simpler, compact, and rapid analytical methods for different kinds of targets, from proteins to DNA and viruses. The lack of secondary interactions facilitates the binding of small-molecule targets and minimizes the perturbation in single-molecule detection. Moreover, the intrinsic versatility of label-free sensing makes it an ideal platform to be integrated with biomolecular machinery with innovative functionality, as in case of the molecular tools provided by DNA nanotechnology.

  18. Finite Element Method-based Design and Simulations of Micro-cantilever Platform for Chemical and Bio-sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Agarwal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS-based cantilever platform have capability for the detection of chemical and biological agents. This paper reports about the finite element method (FEM based design and simulations of MEMS-based piezoresistor cantilever platform to be used for detection of chemical and biological toxic agents. Bulk micromachining technique is adopted for the realisation of the device structure. MEMS piezoresistive biosensing platforms are having potential for a field-based label-free detection of various types of bio-molecules. Using the MEMMECH module of CoventorWare® simulations are performed on the designed model of the device and it is observed that principal stress is maximum along the length (among other dimensions of the micro-cantilever and remains almost constant for 90 per cent of the length of the micro-cantilever. The dimensions of piezoresistor are optimised and the output voltage vs. stress analysis for various lengths of the piezoresistor is performed using the MEMPZR module of the CoventorWare®.

  19. Self-assembled NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes sponge for enhanced glucose biosensing application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingchun; Zhao, Minggang, E-mail: zhaomg@ouc.edu.cn; Chen, Jing; Fan, Sisi; Liang, Jingjing; Ding, Longjiang; Chen, Shougang, E-mail: sgchen@ouc.edu.cn

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Self-assembled NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CNTs sponge was prepared by ice-templating method. • The mechanism of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} modified CNTs relied on π-π interactions and static cling. • The porous structure made for GO{sub x} load, electrons transport and reactants diffusion. • Double catalysis and enhanced glucose sensing were achieved with elements Ni and Fe. - Abstract: In this work, self-assembled NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) sponge was prepared by ice-templating method. The device synergized the advantageous features of both the 3D porous nanostructure and the catalytic properties of CNTs with GOx and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The porous network construction of the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CNTs sheets offered enlarged specific surface for GOx immobilization and opened channels for facilitating the electrons transport and reactants diffusion. With the help of the abnormal-valence elements Ni and Fe, double catalysis has happened and the enhanced glucose biosensing performance has been achieved. The fabricated glucose biosensor exhibited two large linear ranges (0–3.0 and 3.2–12.4 mM) and distinct sensitivities (84.1 and 24.6 μA mM{sup −1} cm{sup −2}).

  20. Nonlinear optics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chunfei

    2017-01-01

    This book reflects the latest advances in nonlinear optics. Besides the simple, strict mathematical deduction, it also discusses the experimental verification and possible future applications, such as the all-optical switches. It consistently uses the practical unit system throughout. It employs simple physical images, such as "light waves" and "photons" to systematically explain the main principles of nonlinear optical effects. It uses the first-order nonlinear wave equation in frequency domain under the condition of “slowly varying amplitude approximation" and the classical model of the interaction between the light and electric dipole. At the same time, it also uses the rate equations based on the energy-level transition of particle systems excited by photons and the energy and momentum conservation principles to explain the nonlinear optical phenomenon. The book is intended for researchers, engineers and graduate students in the field of the optics, optoelectronics, fiber communication, information tech...

  1. Molecular Imprinting of Silica Nanoparticle Surfaces via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Polymerization for Optical Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluz, Zehra; Nayab, Sana; Kursun, Talya Tugana; Caykara, Tuncer; Yameen, Basit; Duran, Hatice

    Azo initiator modified surface of silica nanoparticles were coated via reversible addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using 2-phenylprop 2-yl dithobenzoate as chain transfer agent. Using L-phenylalanine anilide as template during polymerization led molecularly imprinted nanoparticles. RAFT polymerization offers an efficient control of grafting process, while molecularly imprinted polymers shows enhanced capacity as sensor. L-phenylalanine anilide imprinted silica particles were characterized by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Performances of the particles were followed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) after coating the final product on gold deposited glass substrate against four different analogous of analyte molecules: D-henylalanine anilide, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine. Characterizations indicated that silica particles coated with polymer layer do contain binding sites for L-phenylalanine anilide, and are highly selective for the molecule of interest. This project was supported by TUBITAK (Project No:112M804).

  2. Characterization of thin poly(pyrrole-benzophenone) film morphologies electropolymerized on indium tin oxide coated optic fibers for electrochemical and optical biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konry, T.; Heyman, Y. [Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Cosnier, S.; Gorgy, K. [Departement de Chimie Moleculaire, UMR-5250, ICMG FR-2607, CNRS, Universite Joseph Fourier BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Marks, R.S. [Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2008-06-30

    We report that electropolymerization parameters (duration and voltage) modulate the properties and morphological structures of photoactive polymers which influence both the efficiency of bioreceptor attachment to the polymer surface, and the resulting biosensor assay performance. We have compared two biosensor technologies, optical and electrochemical, for the detection of anti-cholera toxin antibodies using our singular conductive optic fibers, albeit at this stage in separate experiments. Both biosensor systems were more sensitive than conventional detection and pave the way for the possibility to one day make simultaneous optical and electrochemical sensing using the same biosensor. (author)

  3. On-Fly Femtosecond-Laser Fabrication of Self-Organized Plasmonic Nanotextures for Chemo- and Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchmizhak, Aleksandr; Pustovalov, Evgenii; Syubaev, Sergey; Vitrik, Oleg; Kulchin, Yuri; Porfirev, Aleksey; Khonina, Svetlana; Kudryashov, Sergey; Danilov, Pavel; Ionin, Andrey

    2016-09-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced photoluminescence (SEPL) are emerging as versatile widespread methods for biological, chemical, and physical characterization in close proximity of nanostructured surfaces of plasmonic materials. Meanwhile, single-step, facile, cheap, and green technologies for large-scale fabrication of efficient SERS or SEPL substrates, routinely demonstrating both broad plasmonic response and high enhancement characteristics, are still missing. In this research, single-pulse spallative micron-size craters in a thick Ag film with their internal nanotexture in the form of nanosized tips are for the first time shown to demonstrate strong polarization-dependent enhancement of SEPL and SERS responses from a nanometer-thick covering Rhodamine 6G layer with average enhancement factors of 40 and 2 × 10(6), respectively. Additionally, the first detailed experimental study is reported for physical processes, underlying the formation mechanisms of ablative nanotextures on such "thick" metal films. Such mechanisms demonstrate a complex "hybrid" fluence-dependent ablation character-appearance of spallative craters, typical for bulk material, at low fluences and formation of upright standing nanotips (frozen nanojets), usually associated with thin-film ablation, in the crater centers at higher fluences. Moreover, special emphasis was made on the possibility to reshape the nanotopography of such spallative craters through multipulse laser-induced merging of their small nanotips into larger ones. The presented approach holds promise to be one of the cheapest and easiest-to-implement ways to mass-fabricate various efficient spallation-nanotextured single-element plasmonic substrates for routine chemo- and biosensing, using MHz-repetition-rate femtosecond fiber laser sources with multiplexed laser-beams.

  4. Characterization of optical whispering gallery mode resonance and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Haiyong

    The whispering-gallery mode microdisk or microsphere resonators have supercompact size, high energy storage, very narrow resonance bandwidth, and high sensitivity. These appealing properties have attracted much attention in the realization of microlasers, narrow filters, optical switching, biosensing, high resolution spectroscopy, and so on. In this dissertation, the optical and energy transport phenomena of whispering-gallery mode resonance and its potentials in some optical sensing applications will be characterized. A 2D theoretical analysis is first presented based on the method of separation of variables and by deriving several appropriate and reasonable boundary conditions to describe the electrical field distribution at resonance modes. This analytical model can precisely predict the intrinsic resonance frequencies of isolated whispering-gallery mode resonators. To consider the coupling of light-delivery waveguides with resonators and investigate the resonance phenomena of the resonator-waveguide system and/or device, simulations using a Finite Element Method solver of Maxwell's equations are conducted. The results indicate the influences of the geometric dimensions, refractive indices, gap distances, and excitation wavelengths on the main characteristics of the resonance modes such as the quality factor Q, the finesse, the mode intensity, and so on. Furthermore, the gap effects are detailedly studied by both theoretical analysis and simulation modeling. The optimal gap for the maximum coupling efficiency and the optimum gap for the best sensing application of the whispering gallery mode resonators are introduced and discussed based on simulation data and theoretical estimations. Three prospective applications of the whispering gallery mode-based sensors are introduced and proof-of-concept studies are demonstrated. The design schemes and fabrication process of the on-chip resonance device made of the Si3N4/SiO2 material system using nanofabrication

  5. Plasmonic nanoholes as SERS devices for biosensing applications: An easy route for nanostructures fabrication on glass substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Candeloro, Patrizio

    2016-12-26

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been largely exploited in the last decade for biochemical and biomedical research. But some issues still require attention before transferring SERS to bioclinical routinely practices, such as reproducibility, quantitative analysis and signal background interference. In this work we propose an easy and cheap route, based on a template stripping technique, for producing plasmonic nanostructured films with SERS capabilities. We focus our attention to nanoholes in a continuous gold film, conversely to the majority of the literature which is dealing with individual nanostructures. Plasmon resonances occur at the holes edges, thus enabling the possibility of SERS signals from biomolecules and the potential application as biosensors. One advantage of the nanoholes patterned film is the optical-subdiffraction pitch, which prevents any Raman and/or fluorescence signal arising from the bottom slide. This effect paves the way to standard glass slides, much cheaper than CaF2 ones, as suitable substrates for SERS devices, without any interfering signal coming from the glass itself.

  6. Optical Metamaterials Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Wenshan

    2010-01-01

    Metamaterials—artificially structured materials with engineered electromagnetic properties—have enabled unprecedented flexibility in manipulating electromagnetic waves and producing new functionalities. In just a few years, the field of optical metamaterials has emerged as one of the most exciting topics in the science of light, with stunning and unexpected outcomes that have fascinated scientists and the general public alike. This volume details recent advances in the study of optical metamaterials, ranging from fundamental aspects to up-to-date implementations, in one unified treatment. Important recent developments and applications such as superlenses and cloaking devices are also treated in detail and made understandable. Optical Metamaterials will serve as a very timely book for both newcomers and advanced researchers in this rapidly evolving field. Early praise for Optical Metamaterials: "...this book is timely bringing to students and other new entrants to the field the most up to date concepts. Th...

  7. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  8. DNA biosensing with 3D printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Adeline Huiling; Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2017-01-16

    3D printing, an upcoming technology, has vast potential to transform conventional fabrication processes due to the numerous improvements it can offer to the current methods. To date, the employment of 3D printing technology has been examined for applications in the fields of engineering, manufacturing and biological sciences. In this study, we examined the potential of adopting 3D printing technology for a novel application, electrochemical DNA biosensing. Metal 3D printing was utilized to construct helical-shaped stainless steel electrodes which functioned as a transducing platform for the detection of DNA hybridization. The ability of electroactive methylene blue to intercalate into the double helix structure of double-stranded DNA was then exploited to monitor the DNA hybridization process, with its inherent reduction peak serving as an analytical signal. The designed biosensing approach was found to demonstrate superior selectivity against a non-complementary DNA target, with a detection range of 1-1000 nM.

  9. Optical Disc Applications in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a variety of library applications of optical disc storage technology, including CD-ROM, digital videodisc, and WORM. Research and development projects at the Library of Congress, National Library of Medicine, and National Agricultural Library are described, products offered by library networks are reviewed, and activities in academic and…

  10. MEMS/MOEMS application to optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2001-09-01

    The paper describes brief summary of current MEMS technology and its application to optics. The optical application is one of the most important applications of MEMS because of two reasons; one is that the micromachine technology can provide high performances and new functionalities for optical systems and the other is that those optical microsystems can satisfy market demands for optical communication networks, displays, data storage and sensors. Opportunities for MEMS-based devices in optical communication networks are discussed. Some specific examples of MEMS optical switches are described.

  11. Prospects of Nanobiomaterials for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra P. Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress and development in biosensor development will inevitably focus upon the technology of the nanomaterials that offer promise to solve the biocompatibility and biofouling problems. The biosensors using smart nanomaterials have applications for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line and/or real-time detection of pesticides, antibiotics, pathogens, toxins, proteins, microbes, plants, animals, foods, soil, air, and water. Thus, biosensors are excellent analytical tools for pollution monitoring, by which implementation of legislative provisions to safeguard our biosphere could be made effectively plausible. The current trends and challenges with nanomaterials for various applications will have focus biosensor development and miniaturization. All these growing areas will have a remarkable influence on the development of new ultrasensitive biosensing devices to resolve the severe pollution problems in the future that not only challenges the human health but also affects adversely other various comforts to living entities. This review paper summarizes recent progress in the development of biosensors by integrating functional biomolecules with different types of nanomaterials, including metallic nanoparticles, semiconductor nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, inorganic/organic hybrid, dendrimers, and carbon nanotubes/graphene.

  12. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Zhao, Ye

    2013-12-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO{sub 2}) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity.

  13. Photorefractive optics materials, properties, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Francis T S

    1999-01-01

    The advances of photorefractive optics have demonstrated many useful and practical applications, which include the development of photorefractive optic devices for computer communication needs. To name a couple significant applications: the large capacity optical memory, which can greatly improve the accessible high-speed CD-ROM and the dynamic photorefractive gratings, which can be used for all-optic switches for high-speed fiber optic networks. This book is an important reference both for technical and non-technical staffs who are interested in this field. * Covers the recent development in materials, phenomena, and applications * Includes growth, characterization, dynamic gratings, and liquid crystal PR effect * Includes applications to photonic devices such as large capacity optical memory, 3-D interconnections, and dynamic holograms * Provides the recent overall picture of current trends in photorefractive optics * Includes optical and electronic properties of the materials as applied to dynamic photoref...

  14. CDC BioSense: Tarrant County, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Tarrant County Public Health (TCPH) and Biosense collaboration is an effort to visualize TCPH health data collected by Biosense using Google Fusion Table...

  15. Optical fiber-based devices and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perry Ping SHUM; Jonathan C. KNIGHT; Jesper LAEGSGAARD; Dora Juan Juan HU

    2010-01-01

    @@ Optical fiber technology has undergone tremendous growth and development over the last 40 years. Optical fibers constitute an information super highway and are vital in enabling the proliferating use of the Internet. Optical fiber is also an enabling technology which can find applications in sensing, imaging, biomedical, machining, etc. There have been a few milestones in the advancement of optical fiber technology. Firstly, the invention and development of the laser some 50 years ago made optical communications possible. Secondly, the fabrication of low-loss optical fibers has been a key element to the success of optical communication.

  16. Optical Negasensors and Prospects of Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.Filinyuk; P.A.Molchanov; O.O.Lazarev; I.M.; Petrosyuk; A.I.Luchenko

    2003-01-01

    The basic types of optical negasensors - sensors based on the application of negative resistance, negative inductance and negative capacitance, R, L, C-negatrons are presented. It is shown, that application of negative inductance and capacitance is not connected with stability decreasing as at application of negative resistance and allows to rise sensitivity of a optical sensor theoretically ad infinitum. The example design of multielement optical negasensor for airborne, underwater or biomedical imagin...

  17. Optical Negasensors and Prospects of Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.Filinyuk; P.A.Molchanov; O.O.Lazarev; I.M. Petrosyuk; A.I.Luchenko

    2003-01-01

    The basic types of optical negasensors - sensors based on the application of negative resistance, negative inductance andnegative capacitance, R, L, C-negatrons are presented. It is shown, that application of negative inductance andcapacitance is not connected with stability decreasing as at application of negative resistance and allows to risesensitivity of a optical sensor theoretically ad infinitum. The example design of multielement optical negasensor forairborne, underwater or biomedical imaging is given.

  18. Electrical nanogap devices for biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Chen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For detecting substances that are invisible to the human eye or nose, and particularly those biomolecules, the devices must have very small feature sizes, be compact and provide a sufficient level of sensitivity, often to a small number of biomolecules that are just a few nanometres in size. Electrical nanogap devices for biosensing have emerged as a powerful technique for detecting very small quantities of biomolecules. The most charming feature of the devices is to directly transduce events of biomolecules specific binding into useful electrical signals such as resistance/impedance, capacitance/dielectric, or field-effect. Nanogap devices in electrical biosensing have become a busy area of research which is continually expanding. A wealth of research is available discussing planar and vertical nanogap devices for biosensing. Planar nanogap devices including label-free, gold nanoparticle-labeled, nanoparticles-enhanced, nanogapped gold particle film, and carbon nanotube nanogap devices as well as vertical nanogap devices with two and three terminals for biosensing are carefully reviewed. The aim of this paper is to provide an updated overview of the work in this field. In each part, we discuss the principles of operation of electrical biosensing and consider major strategies for enhancing their performance and/or key challenges and opportunities in current stages, and in their further development.

  19. Noncovalent Protein and Peptide Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Biodelivery and Optical Sensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Alessandra; Kupis-Rozmysłowicz, Justyna; Boghossian, Ardemis A

    2017-04-05

    The exquisite structural and optical characteristics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), combined with the tunable specificities of proteins and peptides, can be exploited to strongly benefit technologies with applications in fields ranging from biomedicine to industrial biocatalysis. The key to exploiting the synergism of these materials is designing protein/peptide-SWCNT conjugation schemes that preserve biomolecule activity while keeping the near-infrared optical and electronic properties of SWCNTs intact. Since sp(2) bond-breaking disrupts the optoelectronic properties of SWCNTs, noncovalent conjugation strategies are needed to interface biomolecules to the nanotube surface for optical biosensing and delivery applications. An underlying understanding of the forces contributing to protein and peptide interaction with the nanotube is thus necessary to identify the appropriate conjugation design rules for specific applications. This article explores the molecular interactions that govern the adsorption of peptides and proteins on SWCNT surfaces, elucidating contributions from individual amino acids as well as secondary and tertiary protein structure and conformation. Various noncovalent conjugation strategies for immobilizing peptides, homopolypeptides, and soluble and membrane proteins on SWCNT surfaces are presented, highlighting studies focused on developing near-infrared optical sensors and molecular scaffolds for self-assembly and biochemical analysis. The analysis presented herein suggests that though direct adsorption of proteins and peptides onto SWCNTs can be principally applied to drug and gene delivery, in vivo imaging and targeting, or cancer therapy, nondirect conjugation strategies using artificial or natural membranes, polymers, or linker molecules are often better suited for biosensing applications that require conservation of biomolecular functionality or precise control of the biomolecule's orientation. These design rules are intended to

  20. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  1. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Arjun; Fratto, Brian E; Privman, Vladimir; Katz, Evgeny

    2016-07-05

    We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s) as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed.

  2. Design of Flow Systems for Improved Networking and Reduced Noise in Biomolecular Signal Processing in Biocomputing and Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Verma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider flow systems that have been utilized for small-scale biomolecular computing and digital signal processing in binary-operating biosensors. Signal measurement is optimized by designing a flow-reversal cuvette and analyzing the experimental data to theoretically extract the pulse shape, as well as reveal the level of noise it possesses. Noise reduction is then carried out numerically. We conclude that this can be accomplished physically via the addition of properly designed well-mixing flow-reversal cell(s as an integral part of the flow system. This approach should enable improved networking capabilities and potentially not only digital but analog signal-processing in such systems. Possible applications in complex biocomputing networks and various sense-and-act systems are discussed.

  3. Gradient-index optics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez-Reino, Carlos; Bao, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Gradient-Index (GRIN) optics provides a comprehensive and thorough treatment on fundamentals and applications of light propagation through inhomogeneous media. The book can be used both as a classroom text for students in physics and engineering and as a reference for specialists. A description of the phenomena, components and technology used in GRIN Optics are presented. The relationship to lenses, waveguides, optical connections, spatial solitons and vision is demonstrated. Applications of GRIN components and hybrid structures for optical connections, optical sensing and Talbot effect are analyzed.

  4. Synthesis of hybrid chitosan/calcium aluminosilicate using a sol-gel method for optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnahrawy, Amany Mohamed [Department of Solid State, Physics Division, National Research Center (NRC), Giza 12622, Cairo (Egypt); Kim, Yong Soo, E-mail: yskim2@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Energy Harvest-Storage Research Center (EHSRC), University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of); Ali, Ahmed I., E-mail: Ahmed_ali_2010@helwan.edu.eg [Department of Physics and Energy Harvest-Storage Research Center (EHSRC), University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610 (Korea, Republic of); Basic Science Department, Faculty of Industrial Education & Technology, Helwan University, Cairo 11281 (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Hybrid chitosan (CS)/calcium aluminosilicate nanocomposites thin films and membranes were prepared using a sol–gel method with three different concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5, 7 and 10 mol. %). The prepared nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The optical properties of the prepared samples were analyzed by UV/Vis spectrophotometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The optical parameters revealed an increase in both the refractive index and band gap of the nanocomposites with increasing Al concentration. In addition, the PL spectra revealed a blue shift that was consistent with an increase in the optical band gap. These results suggest that CS/calcium aluminosilicate in two different forms can be a good candidate for optical sensors applications. - Highlights: • We show a large specific surface area of hybrid CS/calcium aluminosilicate thin films and membranes using sol-gel method. • Inorganic SiO{sub 2}-based phase are perfectly embedded onto chitosan matrix has a reliable stability. • CS/calcium aluminosilicate could be usable for optical sensors, planar waveguide, and bio-sensing.

  5. Advance and application of lake optics research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The mainstreams of lake optics research in recent decades include optical properties of lakewater,observation, transmission and calculation of underwater radiation, determination of absorption coefficient S of yellow substance, influence of UV-B radiation of lake primary productivity by bio-optical model. Major lake optics applications, such as calculation of lake primary productivity and chl-a, analysis of factors restricting eutrophication, and protection against lake eutrophication are summarized.

  6. Biomedical Optical Imaging Technologies Design and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to design of biomedical optical imaging technologies and their applications. The main topics include: fluorescence imaging, confocal imaging, micro-endoscope, polarization imaging, hyperspectral imaging, OCT imaging, multimodal imaging and spectroscopic systems. Each chapter is written by the world leaders of the respective fields, and will cover: principles and limitations of optical imaging technology, system design and practical implementation for one or two specific applications, including design guidelines, system configuration, optical design, component requirements and selection, system optimization and design examples, recent advances and applications in biomedical researches and clinical imaging. This book serves as a reference for students and researchers in optics and biomedical engineering.

  7. Optical Biosensors Based on Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl J. Martín-Palma

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of semiconductor-based nanostructures with novel and unique properties has sparked widespread interest in their use in the field of biosensing. The precise control over the size, shape and composition of these nanostructures leads to the accurate control of their physico-chemical properties and overall behavior. Furthermore, modifications can be made to the nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems, leading to such interesting properties as enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility or bio-recognition. In the present work, the most significant applications of semiconductor nanostructures in the field of optical biosensing will be reviewed. In particular, the use of quantum dots as fluorescent bioprobes, which is the most widely used application, will be discussed. In addition, the use of some other nanometric structures in the field of biosensing, including porous semiconductors and photonic crystals, will be presented.

  8. Fibre Optics in Undersea Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Talwar

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of optical fibres for underwater communication cables and hydrophones is discussed. The fibre optics cables provide an excellent solution to the historical bandwidth-diameter problems of conventional coaxial cables.Fibre optic hydrophones are found to have many more advantages apart from high sensitivity and large dynamic range, over the classical sound sensors used in underwater work.

  9. Classical Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2009-02-01

    Preface; Introduction; 1. Abbe's sine condition; 2. Fourier optics; 3. Effect of polarization on diffraction in systems of high numerical aperture; 4. Gaussian beam optics; 5. Coherent and incoherent imaging; 6. First-order temporal coherence in classical optics; 7. The Van Cittert-Zernike theorem; 8. Partial polarization, Stokes parameters, and the Poincarè Sphere; 9. Second-order coherence and the Hanbury Brown - Twiss experiment; 10. What in the world are surface plasmons?; 11. Surface plasmon polaritons on metallic surfaces; 12. The Faraday effecy; 13. The magneto-optical Kerr effect; 14. The Sagnac interferometer; 15. Fabry-Perot etalons in polarized light; 16. The Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem; 17. Reciprocity in classical Linear optics; 18. Optical pulse compression; 19. The uncertainty principle in classical optics; 20. Omni-directional dielectric mirrors; 21. Optical vortices; 22. Geometric-optical rays, Poynting's vector, and field momenta; 23. Doppler shift, stellar aberration, and convection of light by moving Media; 24. Diffraction gratings; 25. Diffractive optical elements; 26. The talbot effect; 27. Some quirks of total internal reflection; 28. Evanescent coupling; 29. Internal and external conical refraction; 30. Transmission of light through small elliptical apertures; 31. The method of Fox and Li; 32. The beam propagation method; 33. Launching light into a Fiber; 34. The optics of demiconductor fiode Laser; 35. Michelson's dtellar interferometer; 36. Bracewell's interferometric telescope; 37. Scanning optical microscopy; 38. Zernike's method of phase contrast; 39. Polarization microscopy; 40. Nomarski's differential interference contrast microscope; 41. The Van Leeuwenhoek microscope; 42. Projection photolithography; 43. Interaction of light with subwavelength structures; 44 The Ronchi test; 45. The Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor; 46. Ellipsometry; 47. Holography and holographic interferometry; 48. Self-focusing in non-linear optical media; 49

  10. 3D optical vortices generated by micro-optical elements and its novel applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU J.; LIN J.; K. J. Moh; B. P. S. Ahluwalia; CHEN H. L.; PENG X.; NIU H. B.; YUAN X.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on recent development in the areas of optical vortices generated by micro-optical elements and applications of optical vortices, including optical manipulation, radial polarization and secure free space optical communication

  11. Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Biosensing with Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigo, Daniel; Janner, Davide; Etezadi, Dordaneh; de Abajo, F Javier García; Pruneri, Valerio; Altug, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is the technique of choice for chemical identification of biomolecules through their vibrational fingerprints. However, infrared light interacts poorly with nanometric size molecules. Here, we exploit the unique electro-optical properties of graphene to demonstrate a high-sensitivity tunable plasmonic biosensor for chemically-specific label-free detection of protein monolayers. The plasmon resonance of nanostructured graphene is dynamically tuned to selectively probe the protein at different frequencies and extract its complex refractive index. Additionally, the extreme spatial light confinement in graphene, up to two orders of magnitude higher than in metals, produces an unprecedentedly high overlap with nanometric biomolecules, enabling superior sensitivity in the detection of their refractive index and vibrational fingerprints. The combination of tunable spectral selectivity and enhanced sensitivity of graphene opens exciting prospects for biosensing.

  12. Combinatorial Chemistry for Optical Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-García, M. E.; Luis, G. Pina; Rivero-Espejel, I. A.

    The recent interest in combinatorial chemistry for the synthesis of selective recognition materials for optical sensing applications is presented. The preparation, screening, and applications of libraries of ligands and chemosensors against molecular species and metal ions are first considered. Included in this chapter are also the developments involving applications of combinatorial approaches to the discovery of sol-gel and acrylic-based imprinted materials for optical sensing of antibiotics and pesticides, as well as libraries of doped sol-gels for high-throughput optical sensing of oxygen. The potential of combinatorial chemistry applied to the discovery of new sensing materials is highlighted.

  13. Vectorial optical fields fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Polarization is a vector nature of light that plays an important role in optical science and engineering. While existing textbook treatments of light assume beams with spatially homogeneous polarization, there is an increasing interest in vectorial optical fields with spatially engineered states of polarization. New effects and phenomena have been predicted and observed for light beams with these unconventional polarization states. This edited review volume aims to provide a comprehensive overview and summarize the latest developments in this important emerging field of optics. This book will cover the fundamentals including mathematical and physical descriptions, experimental generation, manipulation, focusing, propagation, and the applications of the engineered vectorial optical fields in focal field engineering, plasmonic focusing and optical antenna, single molecular imaging, optical tweezers/trapping, as well as optical measurements and instrumentations. Readership: Students, professionals, post-graduat...

  14. High-power optics lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the basics, realization and materials for high power laser systems and high power radiation interaction with  matter. The physical and technical fundamentals of high intensity laser optics and adaptive optics and the related physical processes in high intensity laser systems are explained. A main question discussed is: What is power optics? In what way is it different from ordinary optics widely used in cameras, motion-picture projectors, i.e., for everyday use? An undesirable consequence of the thermal deformation of optical elements and surfaces was discovered during studies of the interaction with powerful incident laser radiation. The requirements to the fabrication, performance and quality of optical elements employed within systems for most practical applications are also covered. The high-power laser performance is generally governed by the following: (i) the absorption of incident optical radiation (governed primarily by various absorption mechanisms), (ii) followed by a temperature ...

  15. Introduction: Optical trapping and applications feature issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Mariscal, Carlos; McGloin, David

    2013-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on "Optical Trapping and Applications." The works presented in the papers within this issue include were the focus of the third OTA Topical Meeting that was held on April 14-18, 2013, in Waikoloa, Hawaii.

  16. Electronic Structure Engineering of Cu2O Film/ZnO Nanorods Array All-Oxide p-n Heterostructure for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Property and Self-powered Biosensing Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhuo; Yan, Xiaoqin; Wang, Yunfei; Bai, Zhiming; Liu, Yichong; Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Pei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Haoge; Zhang, Xueji; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We have engineered the electronic structure at the interface between Cu2O and ZnO nanorods (NRs) array, through adjusting the carrier concentration of Cu2O. The electrodeposition of Cu2O at pH 11 acquired the highest carrier concentration, resulting in the largest interfacial electric field between Cu2O and ZnO, which finally led to the highest separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers. The optimized Cu2O/ZnO NRs array p-n heterostructures exhibited enhanced PEC performance, such as elevated photocurrent and photoconversion efficiency, as well as excellent sensing performance for the sensitive detection of glutathione (GSH) in PBS buffer even at applied bias of 0 V which made the device self-powered. Besides, the favorable selectivity, high reproducibility and extremely wide detection range, make such heterostructure a promising candidate for PEC biosensing applications, probably for the extended field of PEC water splitting or other solar photovoltaic beacons.

  17. Optical coherence tomography: Technique and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jakob Borup; Sander, Birgit; Mogensen, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging modality providing real-time video rate images in two and three dimensions of biological tissues with micrometer resolution. OCT fills the gap between ultrasound and confocal microscopy, since it has a higher resolution than ultr...... of retinal diseases. The potential of OCT in many other applications is currently being explored, such as in developmental biology, skin cancer diagnostics, vulnerable plaque detection in cardiology, esophageal diagnostics and a number of other applications within oncology....

  18. Automated online optical biosensing system for continuous real-time determination of microcystin-LR with high sensitivity and specificity: early warning for cyanotoxin risk in drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Han-Chang; Song, Bao-Dong; Long, Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; He, Miao; Lv, Qing; Yang, Hai-Yang

    2013-05-07

    The accelerated eutrophication of surface water sources and climate change have led to an annual occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms in many drinking water resources. To minimize the health risks to the public, cyanotoxin detection methods that are rapid, sensitive, real time, and high frequency must be established. In this study, an innovative automated online optical biosensing system (AOBS) was developed for the rapid detection and early warning of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), one of the most toxic cyanotoxins and most frequently detected in environmental water. In this system, the capturing molecular MC-LR-ovalbumin (MC-LR-OVA) was covalently immobilized onto a biochip surface. By an indirect competitive detection mode, samples containing different concentrations of MC-LR were premixed with a certain concentration of fluorescence-labeled anti-MC-LR-mAb, which binds to MC-LR with high specificity. Then, the sample mixture was pumped onto the biochip surface, and a higher concentration of MC-LR led to less fluorescence-labeled antibody bound onto the biochip surface and thus to lower fluorescence signal. The quantification of MC-LR ranges from 0.2 to 4 μg/L, with a detection limit determined as 0.09 μg/L. The high specificity and selectivity of the sensor were evaluated in terms of its response to a number of potentially interfering cyanotoxins. Potential interference of the environmental sample matrix was assessed by spiked samples, and the recovery of MC-LR ranged from 90 to 120% with relative standard deviation values online analysis that satisfies the high demand for ensuring the safety of drinking water sources. The AOBS can also serve as early warning system for accidental or intentional water pollution.

  19. International Symposium on Optics and its Applications (OPTICS-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Calvo, Maria L.; Kazaryan, Eduard M.; Papoyan, Aram V.; Sarkisyan, Hayk A.

    2012-03-01

    OPTICS Logo PREFACE The papers selected for this volume were reported at the International Symposium 'Optics and its applications' (OPTICS-2011, Yerevan & Ashtarak, Armenia, September 5-9, 2011), http://www.ipr.sci.am/optics2011/. The Symposium was organized by the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter and major Armenian R&D organizations, universities and industrial companies working in the field of basic and applied optics: Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Yerevan State University, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, and LT-PYRKAL Closed Joint Stock Company. OPTICS-2011 was primarily intended to support and promote the involvement of students and young scientists in various fields of modern optics, giving them the possibility to attend invited talks by prominent scientists and to present and discuss their own results. Furthermore, the Symposium allowed foreign participants from 14 countries to become acquainted with the achievements of optical science and technology in Armenia, which became a full member of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) in 2011. To follow this concept, the Symposium sessions were held in various host institutions. The creative and friendly ambience established at OPTICS-2011 promoted further international collaboration in the field and motivated many students to take up research in optics and photonics as a career. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series covers thematic sections of the Symposium (both oral and poster), which represent the main fields of interest in optics for Armenian scientists: quantum optics & information, laser spectroscopy, optical properties of nanostructures, photonics & fiber optics, and optics of liquid crystals. Such wide coverage is consistent with the general scope of the Symposium, allowing all the students involved in optics to present, discuss and publish their recent results, and for those who are making their first steps in science to choose

  20. Recombinant methods in protein and whole-cell biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, R. S.; Salins, Lyndon L.; Ramanathan, S.; Daunert, Sylvia

    1999-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of fluorescently- labeled binding proteins and genetically engineered bacterial cells for sensing of phosphate, glucose, and L- arabinose. To optimize the performance of the labeled binding proteins for biosensing purposes, a few key considerations were taken into account. A site-selective labeling protocol of the fluorescent reporter to the protein was used to ensure that the probe reported from a specific domain of the protein. The labeling sites chosen were hypothesized to undergo a physicochemical change when the biorecognition element binds the analyte. Cysteine mutations were introduced into the binding proteins by site-directed mutagenesis using the polymerase chain reaction. The residues selected were all in close proximity to the binding cleft, a region that is affected the most by the conformational change that accompanies ligand binding. The cysteine residues were then labeled with environment- sensitive fluorophores and changes in the fluorescence properties of the conjugates were monitored and related to the amount of ligand present. The application of microorganisms in sensing systems represent new advances in the development of novel analytical techniques for the detection of a target analyte. In these systems, a genetically engineered organism generates an analytically useful signal when it encounters a specific target substance due to selective recognition and binding properties towards that particular compound. This concept has been demonstrated using an optical bacteria-based sensing system capable of detecting the monosaccharide L-arabinose that employed the green fluorescent protein as a reporter protein.

  1. Recent Advances in Biosensing With Photonic Crystal Surfaces: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, B T; Zhang, M; Zhuo, Y; Kwon, L; Race, C

    2016-05-15

    Photonic crystal surfaces that are designed to function as wavelength-selective optical resonators have become a widely adopted platform for label-free biosensing, and for enhancement of the output of photon-emitting tags used throughout life science research and in vitro diagnostics. While some applications, such as analysis of drug-protein interactions, require extremely high resolution and the ability to accurately correct for measurement artifacts, others require sensitivity that is high enough for detection of disease biomarkers in serum with concentrations less than 1 pg/ml. As the analysis of cells becomes increasingly important for studying the behavior of stem cells, cancer cells, and biofilms under a variety of conditions, approaches that enable high resolution imaging of live cells without cytotoxic stains or photobleachable fluorescent dyes are providing new tools to biologists who seek to observe individual cells over extended time periods. This paper will review several recent advances in photonic crystal biosensor detection instrumentation and device structures that are being applied towards direct detection of small molecules in the context of high throughput drug screening, photonic crystal fluorescence enhancement as utilized for high sensitivity multiplexed cancer biomarker detection, and label-free high resolution imaging of cells and individual nanoparticles as a new tool for life science research and single-molecule diagnostics.

  2. Superwettable Microchips as a Platform toward Microgravity Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tailin; Shi, Wanxin; Huang, Jinrong; Song, Yongchao; Zhang, Feilong; Xu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Shutao

    2017-01-24

    The construction of the Space Station provides a spaceflight laboratory, which enables us to accomplish tremendous short- and long-duration research such as astronomy, physics, material sciences, and life sciences in a microgravity environment. Continuous innovation and development of spaceflight laboratory prompted us to develop a facile detection approach to meet stringent requirements in a microgravity environment that traditional experimental approaches cannot reach. Here we introduce superhydrophilic microwells onto superhydrophobic substrates that are capable of capturing and transferring microdroplets, demonstrating a proof-of-concept study of a biosensing platform toward microgravity application. The capability of manipulating microdroplets originates from the capillary force of the nanoscale dendritic coating in superhydrophilic microwells. Based on theoretical modeling, capillary forces of the superhydrophilic microwells can dominate the behavior of microdroplets against the gravity. Direct naked-eye observation monitoring of daily physiological markers, such as glucose, calcium, and protein can be achieved by colorimetric tests without the requirement of heavy optical or electrical equipment, which greatly reduced the weight, and will bring a promising clue for biodetection in microgravity environments.

  3. Cool application for Optical Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    In a new first for CERN, optical fibres have been put on test to measure very low temperatures. If these tests prove successful, this new technology could lead to important cost-saving changes in the way the temperatures of superconducting magnets are measured. There was excitement in the air last March when the team led by Walter Scandale and Luc Thévenaz tested very low temperature measurement using optical fibres. This spring in CERN's Cryogenics lab an idea was put to the test as a new kind of low-temperature thermometry using optical fibres was tested down to 2 Kelvin (around 300 degrees below room temperature), and the first results are looking good. Optical fibres are well known for their ability to carry large amounts of data around the world, but it is less well known that they can be used for measuring temperatures. The intuition that they might be able to measure very low temperatures - such as those of the LHC magnets - came to the attention of CERN's Walter Scandale at the Optical Fi...

  4. Duality based optical flow algorithms with applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakêt, Lars Lau

    We consider the popular TV-L1 optical flow formulation, and the so-called duality based algorithm for minimizing the TV-L1 energy. The original formulation is extended to allow for vector valued images, and minimization results are given. In addition we consider different definitions of total...... variation regularization, and related formulations of the optical flow problem that may be used with a duality based algorithm. We present a highly optimized algorithmic setup to estimate optical flows, and give five novel applications. The first application is registration of medical images, where X......-ray images of different hands, taken using different imaging devices are registered using a TV-L1 optical flow algorithm. We propose to regularize the input images, using sparsity enhancing regularization of the image gradient to improve registration results. The second application is registration of 2D...

  5. Duality based optical flow algorithms with applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakêt, Lars Lau

    We consider the popular TV-L1 optical flow formulation, and the so-called duality based algorithm for minimizing the TV-L1 energy. The original formulation is extended to allow for vector valued images, and minimization results are given. In addition we consider different definitions of total...... variation regularization, and related formulations of the optical flow problem that may be used with a duality based algorithm. We present a highly optimized algorithmic setup to estimate optical flows, and give five novel applications. The first application is registration of medical images, where X......-ray images of different hands, taken using different imaging devices are registered using a TV-L1 optical flow algorithm. We propose to regularize the input images, using sparsity enhancing regularization of the image gradient to improve registration results. The second application is registration of 2D...

  6. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

  7. Functional monolayers for direct electrical biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Tami Lasseter

    Frequency-dependent electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been used to characterize changes in electrical response that accompany specific binding of a protein to its substrate, using the biotin-avidin system as a model. This thesis work shows that avidin, at concentrations in the nanomolar range, can be detected electrically in a completely label-free manner under conditions of zero average current flow and without the use of any auxiliary redox agents. Electrical circuit modeling of the interface was used to relate the frequency-dependent electrical response to the physical picture of the interface before and after avidin binding. The interaction of proteins with semiconductors such as silicon and diamond is of great interest for applications such as electronic biosensing. Investigations into the use of covalently bound oligo(ethylene glycol), EG, monolayers on diamond and silicon to minimize nonspecific protein adsorption were conducted. Protein adsorption was monitored by fluorescence scanning as a function the length of the ethylene glycol chain (EG3 through EG6) and the terminal functional group (methyl- versus hydroxyl-terminated EG3 monolayer). More quantitative measurements were made by eluting adsorbed avidin from the surface and measuring the intensity of fluorescence in the solution. This thesis work shows that high quality EG monolayers are formed on silicon and diamond and that these EG3 monolayers are as effective as EG3 self-assembled monolayers on gold at resisting nonspecific avidin adsorption. These results show promise for use of silicon and diamond materials in many potential applications such as biosensing and medical implants. Substrate roughness is shown to play a role in nonspecific protein adsorption, where carbon-based surfaces having features less than approximately 5 nm, are highly resistant to protein adsorption. Functionalization of the surfaces with hexaethylene glycol confers additional resistance to protein adsorption. These

  8. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Mattoussi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are a recentlydeveloped class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping tocreate a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest forbiosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow sizetunablephotoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching andchemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for severalpredominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, asgeneralized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when workingwith QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s and appropriate strategies forattaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  9. Microcantilever-based platforms as biosensing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Mar; Lechuga, Laura M

    2010-05-01

    The fast and progressive growth of the biotechnology and pharmaceutical fields forces the development of new and powerful sensing techniques for process optimization and detection of biomolecules at very low concentrations. During the last years, the simplest MEMS structures, i.e. microcantilevers, have become an emerging and promising technology for biosensing applications, due to their small size, fast response, high sensitivity and their compatible integration into "lab-on-a-chip" devices. This article provides an overview of some of the most interesting bio-detections carried out during the last 2-3 years with the microcantilever-based platforms, which highlight the continuous expansion of this kind of sensor in the medical diagnosis field, reaching limits of detection at the single molecule level.

  10. Nonlinear optical and multiphoton processes for in situ manipulation and conversion of photons: applications to energy and healthcare (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Paras N.

    2017-02-01

    Chiral control of nonlinear optical functions holds a great promise for a wide range of applications including optical signal processing, bio-sensing and chiral bio-imaging. In chiral polyfluorene thin films, we demonstrated extremely large chiral nonlinearity. The physics of manipulating excitation dynamics for photon transformation will be discussed, along with nanochemistry control of upconversion in hierarchically built organic chromophore coupled-core-multiple shell nanostructures which enable introduce new, organic-inorganic energy transfer routes for broadband light harvesting and increased upconversion efficiency via multistep cascaded energy transfer. We are pursuing the applications of photon conversion technology in IR harvesting for photovoltaics, high contrast bioimaging, photoacoustic imaging, photodynamic therapy, and optogenetics. An important application is in Brain research and Neurophotonics for functional mapping and modulation of brain activities. Another new direction pursued is magnetic field control of light in in a chiral polymer nanocomposite to achieve large magneto-optic coefficient which can enable sensing of extremely weak magnetic field due to brain waves. Finally, we will consider the thought provoking concept of utilizing photons to quantify, through magneto-optics, and augment - through nanoptogenetics, the cognitive states, thus paving the path way to a quantified human paradigm.

  11. Application of Optical Forces in Microphotonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    wavelength of a semiconductor laser by mechanically modifying the optical cavity is an intriguing application of optomechanical devices. Alegre et al. [48...nanocavities," Applied Physics Letters 83, 4294-4296 (2003). [19]. J. Chan, M. Eichenfield, R. Camacho , and O. Painter, "Optical and mechanical...design of a "zipper" photonic crystaloptomechanical cavity," Opt. Express 17, 3802-3817 (2009). [20]. M. Eichenfield, R. Camacho , J. Chan, K. J. Vahala

  12. Industrial applications of fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desforges, Francois X.; Blocksidge, Robert

    1996-08-01

    Thanks to the growth of the fiber optics telecommunication industry, fiber optic components have become less expensive, more reliable and well known by potential fiber optic sensor users. LEDs, optical fibers, couplers and connectors are now widely distributed and are the building blocks for the fiber optic sensor manufacturer. Additionally, the huge demand in consumer electronics of the past 10 years has provided the manufacturer with cheap and powerful programmable logic components which reduce the development time as well as the cost of the associated instrumentation. This market trend has allowed Photonetics to develop, manufacture and sell fiber optic sensors for the last 10 years. The company contribution in the fields of fiber optic gyros (4 licenses sold world wide), white light interferometry and fiber optic sensor networks is widely recognized. Moreover, its 1992 acquisition of some of the assets of Metricor Inc., greatly reinforced its position and allowed it to pursue new markets. Over the past four years, Photonetics has done an important marketing effort to better understand the need of its customers. The result of this research has fed R&D efforts towards a new generation instrument, the Metricor 2000, better adapted to the expectations of fiber optic sensors users, thanks to its unique features: (1) universality -- the system can accept more than 20 different sensors (T, P, RI, . . .). (2) scalability -- depending on the customer needs, the system can be used with 1 to 64 sensors. (3) performance -- because of its improved design, overall accuracies of 0.01% FS can be reached. (4) versatility -- its modular design enables a fast and easy custom design for specific applications. This paper presents briefly the Metricor 2000 and its family of FO probes. Then, it describes two fiber optic sensing (FOS) applications/markets where FOS have proven to be very useful.

  13. Coherent optical pulse sequencer for quantum applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Sparkes, Ben M; Hétet, Gabriel; Longdell, Jevon J; Lam, Ping Koy; Buchler, Ben C

    2009-09-10

    The bandwidth and versatility of optical devices have revolutionized information technology systems and communication networks. Precise and arbitrary control of an optical field that preserves optical coherence is an important requisite for many proposed photonic technologies. For quantum information applications, a device that allows storage and on-demand retrieval of arbitrary quantum states of light would form an ideal quantum optical memory. Recently, significant progress has been made in implementing atomic quantum memories using electromagnetically induced transparency, photon echo spectroscopy, off-resonance Raman spectroscopy and other atom-light interaction processes. Single-photon and bright-optical-field storage with quantum states have both been successfully demonstrated. Here we present a coherent optical memory based on photon echoes induced through controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening. Our scheme allows storage of multiple pulses of light within a chosen frequency bandwidth, and stored pulses can be recalled in arbitrary order with any chosen delay between each recalled pulse. Furthermore, pulses can be time-compressed, time-stretched or split into multiple smaller pulses and recalled in several pieces at chosen times. Although our experimental results are so far limited to classical light pulses, our technique should enable the construction of an optical random-access memory for time-bin quantum information, and have potential applications in quantum information processing.

  14. Very large aperture optics for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwath, T. G.; Smith, J. P.; Johnson, M. T.

    1994-09-01

    A new type of space optics technology is presented which promises the realization of very large apertures (tens of meters), while packagable into lightweight, small volume containers compatible with conventional launch vehicles. This technology makes use of thin foils of circular shape which are uniformly mass loaded around the perimeter. Once unfurled and set into rapid rotation about the transversal axis, the foil is stretched into a perfectly flat plane by the centrifugal forces acting on the peripheral masses. The simplest applications of this novel technology are optically flat reflectors, using metallized foils of Mylar, Kevlar, or Kapton. Other more complex optical components can be realized by use of binary optics techniques, such as depositing holograms by selective local microscale removal of the reflective surface. Electrostatic techniques, in conjunction with an auxiliary foil, under local, distributed real-time control of the optical parameters, allow implementation of functions like beam steering and focal length adjustments. Gas pressurization allows stronger curvatures and thus smaller focal ratios for non-imaging applications. Limits on aperture are imposed primarily by manufacturing capabilities. Applications of such large optics in space are numerous. They range from military, such as space based lasers, to the civilian ones of power beaming, solar energy collection, and astronomy. This paper examines this simple and innovative concept in detail, discusses deployment and attitude control issues and presents approaches for realization.

  15. Optical networks, last mile access and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitgeb, E.; Gebhart, M.; Birnbacher, U.

    Free Space Optical (FSO) links can be used to setup FSO communication networks or to supplement radio and optical fiber networks. Hence, it is the broadband wireless solution for closing the "last mile" connectivity gap throughout metropolitan networks. Optical wireless fits well into dense urban areas and is ideally suited for urban applications. This paper gives an overview of free-space laser communications. Different network architectures will be described and investigated regarding reliability. The usage of "Optical Repeaters", Point-to-Point and Point-to-Multipoint solutions will be explained for setting up different network architectures. After having explained the different networking topologies and technologies, FSO applications will be discussed in section 2, including terrestrial applications for short and long ranges, and space applications. Terrestrial applications for short ranges cover the links between buildings on campus or different buildings of a company, which can be established with low-cost technology. For using FSO for long-range applications, more sophisticated systems have to be used. Hence, different techniques regarding emitted optical power, beam divergence, number of beams and tracking will be examined. Space applications have to be divided into FSO links through the troposphere, for example up- and downlinks between the Earth and satellites, and FSO links above the troposphere (e.g., optical inter-satellite links). The difference is that links through the troposphere are mainly influenced by weather conditions similar but not equal to terrestrial FSO links. Satellite orbits are above the atmosphere and therefore, optical inter-satellite links are not influenced by weather conditions. In section 3 the use of optical wireless for the last mile will be investigated and described in more detail. Therefore important design criteria for connecting the user to the "backbone" by FSO techniques will be covered, e.g., line of sight, network

  16. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Lepage Dominic; Carrier Dominic; Jiménez Alvaro; Beauvais Jacques; Dubowski Jan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral r...

  17. Microstructured optical fibers - Fundamentals and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    In recent years optical fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane have attracted much attention from both researchers and industry. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect. Among the many unique applications offered...... by these fibers are mode guidance in air, highly flexible dispersion engineering, and the use of very heterogeneous material combinations. In this paper, we review the different types and applications of microstructured optical fibers, with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  18. Bioinspired polydopamine as the scaffold for the active AuNPs anchoring and the chemical simultaneously reduced graphene oxide: characterization and the enhanced biosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Juan; Deng, Sheng-Yuan; Li, Da-Li; Shan, Dan; He, Wei; Zhang, Xue-Ji; Shi, You

    2013-11-15

    We report here an efficient approach to enhance the performance of biosensing platform based on graphene or graphene derivate. Initially, graphene oxides (GO) nanosheets were reduced and surface functionalized by one-step oxidative polymerization of dopamine in basic solution at environment friendly condition to obtain the polydopamine (Pdop) modified reduced graphene oxides (PDRGO). The bioinspired surface was further used as a support to anchor active gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The morphology and structure of the as-prepared AuNPs/PDRGO nanocomposite were investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Electrochemical studies demonstrate that the as-prepared AuNPs/PDRGO hybrid materials possess excellent electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH at low potential (0.1 V vs. SCE) with the fast response (15s) and the broad linear range (5.0 × 10(-8)-4.2 × 10(-5)M). Thus, this AuNPs/PDRGO nanocomposite can be further used to fabricate a sensitive alcohol biosensor using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), by simply incorporating the specific enzyme within the composite matrix with the aid of chitosan (Chit).

  19. Novel optical microresonators for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hanzheng

    Optical microresonators have been proven as an effective means for sensing applications. The high quality (Q) optical whispering gallery modes (WGMs) circulating around the rotationally symmetric structures can interact with the local environment through the evanescent field. The high sensitivity in detection was achieved by the long photon lifetime of the high-Q resonator (thus the long light-environment interaction path). The environmental variation near the resonator surface leads to the effective refractive index change and thus a shift at the resonance wavelength. In this dissertation, we present our recent research on the development of new optical microresonators for sensing applications. Different structures and materials are used to develop optical resonator for broad sensing applications. Specifically, a new coupling method is designed and demonstrated for efficient excitation of microsphere resonators. The new coupler is made by fusion splicing an optical fiber with a capillary tube and consequently etching the capillary wall to a thickness of a few microns. Light is coupled through the peripheral contact between inserted microsphere and the etched capillary wall. Operating in the reflection mode and providing a robust mechanical support to the microresonator, the integrated structure has been experimentally proven as a convenient probe for sensing applications. Microspheres made of different materials (e.g., PMMA, porous glass, hollow core porous, and glass solid borosilicate glass) were successfully demonstrated for different sensing purposes, including temperature, chemical vapor concentration, and glucose concentration in aqueous solutions. In addition, the alignment free, integrated microresonator structure may also find other applications such as optical filters and microcavity lasers.

  20. Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osche, Gregory R.

    2002-07-01

    A comprehensive treatment of the fundamentals of optical detection theory Laser system applications are becoming more numerous, particularly in the fields of communications and remote sensing. Filling a significant gap in the literature, Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications addresses the theoretical aspects of optical detection and associated phenomenologies, describing the fundamental optical, statistical, and mathematical principles of the modern laser system. The book is especially valuable for its extensive treatment of direct detection statistics, which has no analog in radar detection theory and which has never before been compiled in a cohesive manner in a single book. Coverage includes: * A review of mathematical statistics and statistical decision theory * Performance of truncated and untruncated coherent and direct detection systems using Huygens-Fresnel and Gaussian beam theories * Rough surface scatter and atmospheric propagation effects * Single-pulse detection statistics for direct and coherent detection systems * Multi-pulse detection statistics for direct and coherent detection systems Supported by additional comments providing further insights into the physics or mathematics discussed and an extensive list of classic references, Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications comprises a much-needed reference for the professional scientist or engineer, as well as a solid textbook for advanced students.

  1. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepage Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A surface plasmon resonance (SPR scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  2. Plasmonic propagations distances for interferometric surface plasmon resonance biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Dominic; Carrier, Dominic; Jiménez, Alvaro; Beauvais, Jacques; Dubowski, Jan J

    2011-05-17

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme is proposed in which the local phase modulations of the coupled plasmons can interfere and yield phase-sensitive intensity modulations in the measured signal. The result is an increased traceability of the SPR shifts for biosensing applications. The main system limitation is the propagation distance of the coupled plasmon modes. This aspect is therefore studied for thin film microstructures operating in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The surface roughness of the substrate layer is examined for different dielectrics and deposition methods. The Au layer, on which the plasmonic modes are propagating and the biosensing occurs, is also examined. The surface roughness and dielectric values for various deposition rates of very thin Au films are measured. We also investigate an interferometric SPR setup where, due to the power flux transfer between plasmon modes, the specific choice of grating coupler can either decrease or increase the plasmon propagation length.

  3. Applications of Optical Technology: Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary Ann

    1991-01-01

    Discusses applications of optical technology, especially CD-ROMs, to information management needs. Information retrieval problems are discussed; design questions that concern the format of the data, indexing methods, and retrieval capabilities are presented; the need for updates is considered; access requirements are discussed; and the importance…

  4. Special Polymer Optical Fibres and Devices for Photonic Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang-Ding Peng

    2003-01-01

    Remarkable progresses have been made in developing special polymer optical fibres and devices for photonic applications in recent years. This presentation will mainly report on the development of electro-optic, photosensitive and photorefractive polymer optical fibres and related devices.

  5. Fiber optic transmissions in electrical utility applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Louis

    2000-12-01

    The application of optic and photonic technology in electric networks in many cases is subject to constraints that differ from telecommunication or commercial applications. Starting by an overview of the quality of service (QoS) needed, in the first part of this paper we summarise some issues that confronted Hydro-Quebec in applying fibre optic technologies to its network. We explore by presenting lab and field trials some issues related to optical ground wires (OPGW) design and network architecture. We present temperature, vibration, ageing and short circuit current effects. We submit the results and analysis of a first field trial of and OC-48 link over a 265 km OPGW line, PMD measurements and an overview of the final design that is being implemented presently using Raman amplification. In the last section of the paper, we will discuss shortly of non-conventional photonic based technologies, local and distributed sensors and optical phenomenon that are used or have been discovered in utilities optical networks.

  6. Optically Stimulated Luminescence Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKeever, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The book discusses advanced modern applications of optically stimulated luminescence including the appropriate fundamentals of the process. It features major chapters on the use of OSL in space radiation dosimetry, medical physics, personnel dosimetry, security, solid-state physics and other related applications. In each case, the underlying theory is discussed on an as-needed basis for a complete understanding of the phenomena, but with an emphasis of the practical applications of the technique. After an introductory chapter, Chapters 2 to 6 cover basic theory and practical aspects, personal

  7. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method w...

  8. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yibing; Zhao, Ye

    2013-12-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Active materials for integrated optic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Funk, David S.; Veasey, David L.; Peters, Philip M.; Sanford, Norman A.

    1999-11-01

    The ability to engineer glass properties through the selection and adjustment of chemical composition continues to make glass a leading material in both active and passive applications. The development of optimal glass compositions for integrated optical applications requires a number of considerations that are often at variance with one another. Of critical importance is that the glass offers compatibility with standard ion exchange technologies, allowing fabrication of guided wave structures. In addition, for application as an active material, the resultant structures must be characterized by absence of inclusions and low absorption at the lasing wavelength, putting demands on both the selection and identity of the raw materials used to prepare the glass. We report on the development of an optimized glass composition for integrated optic applications that combines good laser properties with good chemical durability allowing for a wide range of chemical processing steps to be employed without substrate deterioration. In addition, care was taken during the development of this glass to insure that the selected composition was consistent with manufacturing technology for producing high optical quality glass. We present the properties of the resultant glasses, including results of detailed chemical and laser properties, for use in the design and modeling of active waveguides prepared with these glasses.

  10. Optical fibre cantilever sensor for biological application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Zhou, Y. X.; Patterson, G.; Shu, W. M.; Maier, R. R. J.; Fowler, R.; Hand, D. P.; MacPherson, W. N.

    2014-05-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors have shown great promise in a wide range of application are as including chemical and biological sensing. However, many of these devices are based upon a sensor `chip' that requires careful alignment between the cantilever and the read-out system, which can be challenging. Furthermore, optical interrogation typically involves a bulky free-space system. Optical fibre addressed cantilevers have been reported previously in the literature and in this paper we propose techniques to design and fabricate polymer micro-cantilevers for attachment onto the end of standard single mode fibres using laser machining. Low-cost optical sources and a fibre coupled spectrometer are employed to monitor the cantilever deflection and therefore observe biological binding between a species of interest and an activated cantilever. Proof-of-concept experiments show that the sensor is capable of detecting pathogen concentration with down to a level of 105cfu/ml.

  11. Advance ultra sensitive multi-layered nano plasmonic devices for label free biosensing targeting immunodiagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Dwivedi, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    The rapid advancement in technology has envisaged and drafted the use of optical bio-sensing units into label free and multiplexed bio-sensing, exploring the surface plasmon polaritons, which has turned into a gold standard on the commercial basis, but they are bulky and find difficulty in scaling up for the throughput detection. The integration of plasmonic crystals with microfluidics on the bio-sensing frontier offers a multi-level validation of results with the ease of real-time detection and imaging and holds a great promise to develop ultra-sensitive, fast, portable device for the point-of-care diagnostics. The paper describes the fast, low cost approach of designing and simulating label free biosensor using open source MEEP and other software tools targeting Immunodiagnostics.

  12. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as an effective peroxidase mimetic and its application in visual biosensing of glucose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jianxin [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); College of Resources and Environment, Yuxi Normal University, Yunnan 653100 (China); Cao, Haiyan; Jiang, Huan; Chen, Yujin [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Shi, Wenbing [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing 408003 (China); Zheng, Huzhi [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Huang, Yuming, E-mail: yuminghuang2000@yahoo.com [The Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Real-time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2013-09-24

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •The well-dispersed Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on rGO surfaces were successfully synthesized. •The as-obtained Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites exhibit an effective peroxidase-like activity. •They can catalyze the oxidation of TMB by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to produce an intensified blue reaction. •The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO-based colorimetric and visual biosensing of glucose was developed. -- Abstract: The well-dispersed Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) surfaces were successfully prepared by in situ controlled nucleation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on GO sheets and subsequent in situ reduction of GO by low temperature hydrothermal reaction in ethanol media. The as-prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectra. It was found that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were successfully decorated and well dispersed on the surface of rGO sheet without agglomeration. We discovered that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and catalase-like activity, and could catalytically oxidize 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) to produce a intensified colour reaction. Results of electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments demonstrated that the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/rGO nanocomposites showed catalytic ability to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition into ·OH radicals. On this basis, a simple and selective method for glucose detection was developed by coupling the oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase (GOx). As low as 1 × 10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} glucose could be detected with a linear range from 1 × 10{sup −6} to 1 × 10{sup −4} mol L{sup −1}. The visual detection of glucose can be realized easily through the observable color change from colorless to blue by the naked

  13. Additive manufacturing of glass for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Glasses including fused quartz have significant scientific and engineering applications including optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. This paper investigates a filament fed process for Additive Manufacturing (AM) of fused quartz. Additive manufacturing has several potential benefits including increased design freedom, faster prototyping, and lower processing costs for small production volumes. However, current research in AM of glasses is limited and has focused on non-optical applications. Fused quartz is studied here because of its desirability for high-quality optics due to its high transmissivity and thermal stability. Fused quartz also has a higher working temperature than soda lime glass which poses a challenge for AM. In this work, fused quartz filaments are fed into a CO2 laser generated melt pool, smoothly depositing material onto the work piece. Single tracks are printed to explore the effects that different process parameters have on the morphology of printed fused quartz. A spectrometer is used to measure the thermal radiation incandescently emitted from the melt pool. Thin-walls are printed to study the effects of layer-to-layer height. Finally, a 3D fused quartz cube is printed using the newly acquired layer height and polished on each surface. The transmittance and index homogeneity of the polished cube are both measured. These results show that the filament fed process has the potential to print fused quartz with optical transparency and of index of refraction uniformity approaching bulk processed glass.

  14. Optics for coherent X-ray applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabashi, Makina, E-mail: yabashi@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tono, Kensuke [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mimura, Hidekazu [The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ishikawa, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2014-08-27

    Developments of optics for coherent X-ray applications and their role in diffraction-limited storage rings are described. Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  15. SERS substrates for in-situ biosensing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Priyamvada; Quilis, Nestor; Jakub, Dostalek; Wolfgang, Knoll

    2017-06-01

    Abstract: Recent years have seen a rapid progress in the field of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) which is attributed to the thriving field of plasmonics [1]. SERS is a susceptible technique that can address basic scientific questions and technological problems. In both cases, it is highly dependent upon the plasmonic substrate, where excitation of the localized surface plasmon resonance enhances the vibrational scattering signal of the analyte molecules adsorbed on to the surface [2]. In this work, using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method we investigate the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures with tuned plasmonic resonances as a function of dielectric environment and geometric parameters. An optimized geometry will be discussed based on the plasmonic resonant position and the SERS intensity. These SERS substrates will be employed for the detection of changes in conformation caused by interactions between an aptamer and analyte molecules. This will be done by using a microfluidic channel designed within the configuration of the lab-on-a-chip concept based on the intensity changes of the SERS signal. More efficient and reproducible results are obtained for such a quantitative measurement of analytes at low concentration levels. We will also demonstrate that the plasmonic substrates fabricated by top down approach such as e-beam lithography (EBL) and laser interference lithography (LIL) are highly reproducible, robust and can result in high electric field enhancement. Our results demonstrate the potential to use SERS substrates for highly sensitive detection schemes opening up the window for a wide range of applications including biomedical diagnostics, forensic investigation etc. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), project NANOBIOSENSOR (I 2647). References: [1] J. N. Anker, W. P. Hall, O. Lyandres, N. C. Shah, J. Zhao and R. P. V. Duyne., " Biosensing with plasmonic nanosensors," Nature

  16. Optical engine initiation: multiple compartment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    Modern day propulsion systems are used in aerospace applications for different purposes. The aerospace industry typically requires propulsion systems to operate in a rocket mode in order to drive large boost vehicles. The defense industry generally requires propulsion systems to operate in an air-breathing mode in order to drive missiles. A mixed system could use an air-breathing first stage and a rocket-mode upper stage for space access. Thus, propulsion systems can be used for high mass payloads and where the payload is dominated by the fuel/oxidizer mass being used by the propulsion system. The pulse detonation wave engine (PDWE) uses an alternative type of detonation cycle to achieve the same propulsion results. The primary component of the PDWE is the combustion chamber (or detonation tube). The PDWE represents an attractive propulsion source since its engine cycle is thermodynamically closest to that of a constant volume reaction. This characteristic leads to the inference that a maximum of the potential energy of the PDWE is put into thrust and not into flow work. Consequently, the volume must be increased. The technical community has increasingly adopted the alternative choice of increasing total volume by designing the engine to include a set of banks of smaller combustion chambers. This technique increases the complexity of the ignition subsystem because the inter-chamber timing must be considered. Current approaches to igniting the PDWE have involved separate shock or blast wave initiators and chemical additives designed to enhance detonatibility. An optical ignition subsystem generates a series of optical pulses, where the optical pulses ignite the fuel/oxidizer mixture such that the chambers detonate in a desired order. The detonation system also has an optical transport subsystem for transporting the optical pulses from the optical ignition subsystem to the chambers. The use of optical ignition and transport provides a non-toxic, small, lightweight

  17. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  18. Optical Properties of the Self-Assembling Polymeric Colloidal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Mocanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, optical materials have gained much interest due to the high number of possible applications involving path or intensity control and filtering of light. The continuous emerging technology in the field of electrooptical devices or medical applications allowed the development of new innovative cost effective processes to obtain optical materials suited for future applications such as hybrid/polymeric solar cells, lasers, polymeric optical fibers, and chemo- and biosensing devices. Considering the above, the aim of this review is to present recent studies in the field of photonic crystals involving the use of polymeric materials.

  19. Optical coherence tomography technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, James

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue.  Between 30 to 40 Million OCT imaging procedures are performed per year in ophthalmology.  The overall market is estimated at more than 0.5 Billion USD.  A new generation OCT technology was developed, dramatically increasing resolution and speed, achieving in vivo optical biopsy, i.e. the visualization of tissue architectural morphology in situ and in real time.  Functional extensions of OCT technology enable non-invasive, depth resolved functional assessment and imaging of tissue.  The book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from the biomedical and clinical perspective. This second edition is widely extended and covers significantly more topics then the first edition of this book. The chapters are written leading intern...

  20. A paper based graphene-nanocauliflower hybrid composite for point of care biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrs, S. L.; Sidhu, R.; Bhargava, M.; Kiernan-Lewis, J.; Schwalb, N.; Rong, Y.; Gomes, C.; Claussen, J.; Vanegas, D. C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene paper has diverse applications in printed circuit board electronics, bioassays, 3D cell culture, and biosensing. Although development of nanometal-graphene hybrid composites is commonplace in the sensing literature, to date there are only a few examples of nanometal-decorated graphene paper for use in biosensing. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the synthesis and application of Pt nano cauliflower-functionalized graphene paper for use in electrochemical biosensing of small molecules (glucose, acetone, methanol) or detection of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7). Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to show that graphene oxide deposited on nanocellulose crystals was partially reduced by both thermal and chemical treatment. Fractal platinum nanostructures were formed on the reduced graphene oxide paper, producing a conductive paper with an extremely high electroactive surface area, confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To show the broad applicability of the material, the platinum surface was functionalized with three different biomaterials: 1) glucose oxidase (via chitosan encapsulation); 2) a DNA aptamer (via covalent linking), or 3) a chemosensory protein (via his linking). We demonstrate the application of this device for point of care biosensing. The detection limit for both glucose (0.08 +/- 0.02 μM) and E. coli O157:H7 (1.3 +/- 0.1 CFU mL-1) were competitive with, or superior to, previously reported devices in the biosensing literature. The response time (6 sec for glucose and 10 min for E. coli) were also similar to silicon biochip and commercial electrode sensors. The results demonstrate that the nanocellulose-graphene-nanoplatinum material is an excellent paper-based platform for development of electrochemical biosensors targeting small molecules or whole cells for use in point of care biosensing.

  1. Carbon Nanodots as Peroxidase Nanozymes for Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Garg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available ‘Nanozymes’, a term coined by Scrimin, Pasquato, and co-workers to describe nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics, represent an exciting and emerging research area in the field of artificial enzymes. Indubitably, the last decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the design of a variety of functional nanoscale materials, including metal oxides and carbon-based nanomaterials, which mimic the structures and functions of naturally occurring enzymes. Among these, carbon nanodots (C-dots or carbon quantum dots (CQDs offer huge potential due to their unique properties as compared to natural enzymes and/or classical artificial enzymes. In this mini review, we discuss the peroxidase-like catalytic activities of C-dots and their applications in biosensing. The scope intends to cover not only the C-dots but also graphene quantum dots (GQDs, doped C-dots/GQDs, carbon nitride dots, and C-dots/GQDs nanocomposites. Nevertheless, this mini review is designed to be illustrative, not comprehensive.

  2. Microfluidic enzymatic biosensing systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mross, Stefan; Pierrat, Sebastien; Zimmermann, Tom; Kraft, Michael

    2015-08-15

    Microfluidic biosensing systems with enzyme-based detection have been extensively studied in the last years owing to features such as high specificity, a broad range of analytes and a high degree of automation. This review gives an overview of the most important factors associated with these systems. In the first part, frequently used immobilization protocols such as physisorption and covalent bonding and detection techniques such as amperometry and fluorescence measurements are discussed with respect to effort, lifetime and measurement range. The Michaelis-Menten model describing the kinetics of enzymatic reactions, the role of redox mediators and the limitations of the linear measurement range of enzymatic sensors are introduced. Several possibilities of extending the linear measurement range in microfluidic systems such as diffusion-limiting membranes and the flow injection setup are presented. Regarding the integration of enzymes into microfluidic systems during the fabrication process, the constraints imposed by the biomolecules due to the limited usage of high temperatures and solvents are addressed. In the second part, the most common forms of enzyme integration into microfluidic systems, i.e. in channels and on electrodes, on microparticles, on paper and thread and as injected enzyme solutions, are reviewed, focusing on fabrication, applications and performance.

  3. Optical thin films and coatings from materials to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Flory, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Optical coatings, including mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, beam splitters, and filters, are an integral part of most modern optical systems. This book provides an overview of thin film materials, the properties, design and manufacture of optical coatings and their use across a variety of application areas.$bOptical coatings, including mirrors, anti-reflection coatings, beam splitters, and filters, are an integral part of most modern optical systems. Optical thin films and coatings provides an overview of thin film materials, the properties, design and manufacture of optical coatings and their use across a variety of application areas. Part one explores the design and manufacture of optical coatings. Part two highlights unconventional features of optical thin films including scattering properties of random structures in thin films, optical properties of thin film materials at short wavelengths, thermal properties and colour effects. Part three focusses on novel materials for optical thin films and coatings...

  4. Optical frequency standards for time and length applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng-Lei

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed tremendous progress in research on optical frequency metrology. Optical frequency standards using optical lattice and single-ion trap technologies have reached levels of stability and accuracy that surpass the performance of the best Cs fountain atomic clocks by orders of magnitude. Optical frequency standards are also used for various applications including length metrology. Optical frequency measurement and links using optical frequency combs and optical fibres play important roles in the development of optical frequency standards. This article introduces optical frequency standards recommended by the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) along with updates provided by recent research results. Frequency ratio measurements and remote frequency comparisons are addressed in relation to the work whose goal is to redefine the second. Optical frequency standard and optical frequency comb applications are also described.

  5. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  6. Inverse optical design and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Julia Angela

    We present a new method for determining the complete set of patient-specific ocular parameters, including surface curvatures, asphericities, refractive indices, tilts, decentrations, thicknesses, and index gradients. The data consist of the raw detector outputs of one or more Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors (WFSs); unlike conventional wavefront sensing, we do not perform centroid estimation, wavefront reconstruction, or wavefront correction. Parameters in the eye model are estimated by maximizing the likelihood. Since a purely Gaussian noise model is used to emulate electronic noise, maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation reduces to nonlinear least-squares fitting between the data and the output of our optical design program. Bounds on the estimate variances are computed with the Fisher information matrix (FIM) for different configurations of the data-acquisition system, thus enabling system optimization. A global search algorithm called simulated annealing (SA) is used for the estimation step, due to multiple local extrema in the likelihood surface. The ML approach to parameter estimation is very time-consuming, so rapid processing techniques are implemented with the graphics processing unit (GPU). We are leveraging our general method of reverse-engineering optical systems in optical shop testing for various applications. For surface profilometry of aspheres, which involves the estimation of high-order aspheric coefficients, we generated a rapid raytracing algorithm that is well-suited to the GPU architecture. Additionally, reconstruction of the index distribution of GRIN lenses is performed using analytic solutions to the eikonal equation. Another application is parameterized wavefront estimation, in which the pupil phase distribution of an optical system is estimated from multiple irradiance patterns near focus. The speed and accuracy of the forward computations are emphasized, and our approach has been refined to handle large wavefront aberrations and nuisance

  7. Silicon quantum dots for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jeslin J.

    Luminescent silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) are emerging as attractive materials for optoelectronic devices, third generation photovoltaics, and bioimaging. Their applicability in the real world is contingent on their optical properties and long-term environmental stability; and in biological applications, factors such as water solubility and toxicity must also be taken into consideration. The aforementioned properties are highly dependent on the QDs' surface chemistry. In this work, SiQDs were engineered for the respective applications using liquid-phase and gas-phase functionalization techniques. Preliminary work in luminescent downshifting for photovoltaic systems are also reported. Highly luminescent SiQDs were fabricated by grafting unsaturated hydrocarbons onto the surface of hydrogen-terminated SiQDs via thermal and photochemical hydrosilylation. An industrially attractive, all gas-phase, nonthermal plasma synthesis, passivation (aided by photochemical reactions), and deposition process was also developed to reduce solvent waste. With photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQYs) nearing 60 %, the alkyl-terminated QDs are attractive materials for optical applications. The functionalized SiQDs also exhibited enhanced thermal stability as compared to their unfunctionalized counterparts, and the photochemically-hydrosilylated QDs further displayed photostability under UV irradiation. These environmentally-stable SiQDs were used as luminescent downshifting layers in photovoltaic systems, which led to enhancements in the blue photoresponse of heterojunction solar cells. Furthermore, the QD films demonstrated antireflective properties, improving the coupling efficiency of sunlight into the cell. For biological applications, oxide, amine, or hydroxyl groups were grafted onto the surface to create water-soluble SiQDs. Luminescent, water-soluble SiQDs were produced in by microplasma treating the QDs in water. Stable QYs exceeding 50 % were obtained. Radical-based and

  8. Applications of lasers and electro-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, B. C.; Low, K. S.; Chen, Y. H.; Ahmad, Harith; Tou, T. Y.

    Supported by the IRPA Programme on Laser Technology and Applications, many types of lasers have been designed, constructed and applied in various areas of science, medicine and industries. Amongst these lasers constructed were high power carbon dioxide lasers, rare gas halide excimer lasers, solid state Neodymium-YAG lasers, nitrogen lasers, flashlamp pumped dye lasers and nitrogen and excimer laser pumped dye lasers. These lasers and the associated electro-optics system, some with computer controlled, are designed and developed for the following areas of applications: (1) industrial applications of high power carbon dioxide lasers for making of i.c. components and other materials processing purposes -- prototype operational systems have been developed; (2) Medical applications of lasers for cancer treatment using the technique of photodynamic therapy -- a new and more effective treatment protocol has been proposed; (3) agricultural applications of lasers in palm oil and palm fruit-fluorescence diagnostic studies -- fruit ripeness signature has been developed and palm oil oxidation level were investigated; (4) development of atmospheric pollution monitoring systems using laser lidar techniques -- laboratory scale systems were developed; and (5) other applications of lasers including laser holographic and interferometric methods for the non destructive testing of materials.

  9. Synthesis of complex fluorides for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepleton, Seth Eugene

    Large single crystals of alkali metal fluorides are desirable for many reasons. Fluoride laser crystals have a wide transmission range and on account of their low phonon energies, many efficient laser emissions have been obtained from 285 nm to 4.34 microm.1,2 Inorganic fluoride single crystals feature large bandgaps, very wide optical transmittance ranges from vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) to mid-IR wavelength regions, lower refractive indices than those of oxides, and typically lower phonon energies (which drastically reduce multiphonon relaxation rates of rare earth ions).3 The main goal of this work was to investigate the hydrothermal synthesis of alkali metal fluorides. Melt techniques have been used thoroughly to research a variety of fluoride systems and showed many phases that were inaccessible due to incongruent melting or phase stability. The existence of these phases was shown but never characterized or grown as a crystalline material. Solution growth in supercritical water was an ideal way to attempt the synthesis of novel compounds and phases. New synthetic routes to known phases and compounds also arose as a part of this work. Optically clear colorless crystals of K2BeF4 were synthesized up to 2 mm in size, and showed no phase transitions up to 1029 K, which suggests paraelectricitys at room temperature, contradicting previous reports.4 Attempts to incorporate a rare earth ion into the fluoroberyllate lattice proved unsuccessful however reactions between beryllium fluoride and lanthanide fluorides could be exploited as a synthetic route to single crystal rare earth fluorides. Hydrothermal reactions with KF produced crystals of three different phases: hexagonal KY2F7, trigonal KYF4 and orthorhombic K2YF5. All were optically clear, colorless crystals, with the K2YF5 crystals growing the largest. This compound is beneficial due to its application as a radiation dosimeter and laser host. 5,6 Optical quality colorless crystals of RbY2F7 and CsY2F7 up to 4 mm in

  10. Vibrational optical activity principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nafie, Laurence A

    2011-01-01

    This unique book stands as the only comprehensive introduction to vibrational optical activity (VOA) and is the first single book that serves as a complete reference for this relatively new, but increasingly important area of molecular spectroscopy. Key features:A single-source reference on this topic that introduces, describes the background and foundation of this area of spectroscopy.Serves as a guide on how to use it to carry out applications with relevant problem solving.Depth and breadth of the subject is presented in a logical, complete and progressive fashion. A

  11. Optics for coherent X-ray applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Mimura, Hidekazu; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Tanaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Tamasaku, Kenji; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2014-09-01

    Developments of X-ray optics for full utilization of diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs) are presented. The expected performance of DLSRs is introduced using the design parameters of SPring-8 II. To develop optical elements applicable to manipulation of coherent X-rays, advanced technologies on precise processing and metrology were invented. With propagation-based coherent X-rays at the 1 km beamline of SPring-8, a beryllium window fabricated with the physical-vapour-deposition method was found to have ideal speckle-free properties. The elastic emission machining method was utilized for developing reflective mirrors without distortion of the wavefronts. The method was further applied to production of diffraction-limited focusing mirrors generating the smallest spot size in the sub-10 nm regime. To enable production of ultra-intense nanobeams at DLSRs, a low-vibration cooling system for a high-heat-load monochromator and advanced diagnostic systems to characterize X-ray beam properties precisely were developed. Finally, new experimental schemes for combinative nano-analysis and spectroscopy realised with novel X-ray optics are discussed.

  12. Novel nanoarchitectures for electrochemical biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Michelle M.

    Sensitive, real-time detection of biomarkers is of critical importance for rapid and accurate diagnosis of disease for point-of-care (POC) technologies. Current methods, while sensitive, do not adequately allow for POC applications due to several limitations, including complex instrumentation, high reagent consumption, and cost. We have investigated two novel nanoarchitectures, the nanocoax and the nanodendrite, as electrochemical biosensors towards the POC detection of infectious disease biomarkers to overcome these limitations. The nanocoax architecture is composed of vertically-oriented, nanoscale coaxial electrodes, with coax cores and shields serving as integrated working and counter electrodes, respectively. The dendritic structure consists of metallic nanocrystals extending from the working electrode, increasing sensor surface area. Nanocoaxial- and nanodendritic-based electrochemical sensors were fabricated and developed for the detection of bacterial toxins using an electrochemical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Proof-of-concept was demonstrated for the detection of cholera toxin (CT). Both nanoarchitectures exhibited levels of sensitivity that are comparable to the standard optical ELISA used widely in clinical applications. In addition to matching the detection profile of the standard ELISA, these electrochemical nanosensors provide a simple electrochemical readout and a miniaturized platform with multiplexing capabilities toward POC implementation. Further development as suggested in this thesis may lead to increases in sensitivity, enhancing the attractiveness of the architectures for future POC devices.

  13. Passive electro optical materials and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekstall, K.; Gutu-Nelle, A.; Lauckner, J.; Lutz, F.; Mueller, S.; Seibold, G.; Schichl, H.; Volz, H.

    1980-12-01

    Electro-optical ceramics made of lead/lanthanum/zirconates/titanates (PLZT) can be economically manufactured by coprecipitation of the base materials and by vacuum sintering of the sintering of the green blocks. Magnesium additives reduce by half the operating voltage required to achieve an equal contrast ratio. Transparent electrodes deposited by sputtering tin-indium oxide remain transparent up to 2400 nm. The contrast ratio in the scattering mode amounts typically to 100 : 1 at 500 nm and 5 : 1 at 1000 nm, while in the birefrigence mode it amounts typically to 10,000 : 1 at 800 V/mm, at a thickness of 0.4 mm. Functional blocks were designed to demonstrate and test applications: a laser modular; a light intensity attenuator; welding protection goggles; and numerical displays. The first promising results with sputtered thin films indicate future suitability for displays. Multiple light modulators for opto-electronic nonimpact printing presently appear to be the most important application area.

  14. Suitable combination of noble/ferromagnetic metal multilayers for enhanced magneto-plasmonic biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regatos, David; Sepúlveda, Borja; Fariña, David; Carrascosa, Laura G; Lechuga, Laura M

    2011-04-25

    We present a theoretical and experimental study on the biosensing sensitivity of Au/Co/Au multilayers as transducers of the magneto-optic surface-plasmon-resonance (MOSPR) sensor. We demonstrate that the sensing response of these magneto-plasmonic (MP) transducers is a trade-off between the optical absorption and the magneto-optical activity, observing that the MP multilayer with larger MO effect does not provide the best sensing response. We show that it is possible to design highly-sensitive MP transducers able to largely surpass the limit of detection of the conventional surface-plasmon-resonance (SPR) sensor. This was proved comparing the biosensing performance of both sensors for the label-free detection of short DNA chains hybridization. For this purpose, we used and tested a novel label-free biofunctionalization protocol based on polyelectrolytes, which increases the resistance of MP transducers in aqueous environments.

  15. Optical scattering methods applicable to drops and bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Philip L.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of optical scattering properties of drops and bubbles is presented. The properties lead to unconventional methods for optically monitoring the size or shape of a scatterer and are applicable to acoustically levitated objects. Several of the methods are applicable to the detection and measurement of small amplitude oscillations. Relevant optical phenomena include: (1) rainbows; (2) diffraction catastrophes from spheroids; (3) critical angle scattering; (4) effects of coatings; (5) glory scattering; and (6) optical levitation.

  16. Optical cavity coupled surface plasmon resonance sensing for enhanced sensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zheng; Xin Zhao; Jinsong Zhu; Jim Diamond

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing system based on the optical cavity enhanced detection tech-nique is experimentally demonstrated. A fiber-optic laser cavity is built with a SPR sensor inside. By measuring the laser output power when the cavity is biased near the threshold point, the sensitivity, defined as the dependence of the output optical intensity on the sample variations, can be increased by about one order of magnitude compared to that of the SPR sensor alone under the intensity interrogation scheme. This could facilitate ultra-high sensitivity SPR biosensing applications. Further system miniaturization is possible by using integrated optical components and waveguide SPR sensors.

  17. Microfabricated actuators and their application to optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Garcia, E.J.

    1994-12-31

    Several authors have given overviews of microelectromechanical systems, including microactuators. In our presentation we will review some of these results, and provide a brief description of the basic principles of operation, fabrication, and application, of a few selected microactuators (electrostatic and surface tension driven). We present a description of a three-level mechanical polysilicon surface-micromachining technology with a discussion of the advantages of this level of process complexity. This technology, is capable of forming complex, batch-fabricated, interconnected, and interactive, microactuated micromechanisms which include optical elements. The inclusion of a third deposited layer of mechanical polysilicon greatly extends the degree of complexity available for micromechanism design. Two examples of microactuators fabricated using this process are provided to illustrate the capabilities and usefulness of the technology. The first actuator is an example of a novel actuation mechanism based on the effect of surface tension at these micro-scale dimensions and of a microstructure within a microstructure. The second is a comb-drive-based microengine which has direct application as a drive and power source for micro optical elements, specifically, micro mirrors and micro shutters. This design converts linear oscillatory motion from electrostatic comb drive actuators into rotational motion via a direct linkage connection. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque to a micromechanism.

  18. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  19. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally valid...

  20. Promises and Challenges of Nanoplasmonic Devices for Refractometric Biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Andreas B; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Höök, Fredrik; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in metallic thin films are currently standard tools for measuring molecular binding kinetics and affinities - an important task for biophysical studies and pharmaceutical development. Motivated by recent progress in the design and fabrication of metallic nanostructures, such as nanoparticles or nanoholes of various shapes, researchers have been pursuing a new generation of biosensors harnessing tailored plasmonic effects in these engineered nanostructures. Nanoplasmonic devices, while demanding nanofabrication, offer tunability with respect to sensor dimension and physical properties, thereby enabling novel biological interfacing opportunities and extreme miniaturization. Here we provide an integrated overview of refractometric biosensing with nanoplasmonic devices and highlight some recent examples of nanoplasmonic sensors capable of unique functions that are difficult to accomplish with conventional SPR. For example, since the local field strength and spatial distribution can be readily tuned by varying the shape and arrangement of nanostructures, biomolecular interactions can be controlled to occur in regions of high field strength. This may improve signal-to-noise and also enable sensing a small number of molecules. Furthermore, the nanoscale plasmonic sensor elements may, in combination with nanofabrication and materials-selective surface-modifications, make it possible to merge affinity biosensing with nanofluidic liquid handling.

  1. Introduction to the bio-optics: design and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkaczyk, Tomasz; Xu, Chris

    2015-12-01

    The "Bio-Optics: Design and Application" symposium, held on April 12-15, 2015, in Vancouver, BC, was an important step in a continuous journey to closely connect technological design advancement and biomedical applications. The symposium presented a broad range of innovations in diagnostic devices, endoscopy, optical microscopy, optical coherence tomography, multi-modal imaging, and highlighted specific applications including cancer diagnostics, detection of infectious disease and point of care, as well as microsurgery treatment.

  2. Advanced applications of scatterometry based optical metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Dhairya; Keller, Nick; Kagalwala, Taher; Recchia, Fiona; Lifshitz, Yevgeny; Elia, Alexander; Todi, Vinit; Fronheiser, Jody; Vaid, Alok

    2017-03-01

    The semiconductor industry continues to drive patterning solutions that enable devices with higher memory storage capacity, faster computing performance, and lower cost per transistor. These developments in the field of semiconductor manufacturing along with the overall minimization of the size of transistors require continuous development of metrology tools used for characterization of these complex 3D device architectures. Optical scatterometry or optical critical dimension (OCD) is one of the most prevalent inline metrology techniques in semiconductor manufacturing because it is a quick, precise and non-destructive metrology technique. However, at present OCD is predominantly used to measure the feature dimensions such as line-width, height, side-wall angle, etc. of the patterned nano structures. Use of optical scatterometry for characterizing defects such as pitch-walking, overlay, line edge roughness, etc. is fairly limited. Inspection of process induced abnormalities is a fundamental part of process yield improvement. It provides process engineers with important information about process errors, and consequently helps optimize materials and process parameters. Scatterometry is an averaging technique and extending it to measure the position of local process induced defectivity and feature-to-feature variation is extremely challenging. This report is an overview of applications and benefits of using optical scatterometry for characterizing defects such as pitch-walking, overlay and fin bending for advanced technology nodes beyond 7nm. Currently, the optical scatterometry is based on conventional spectroscopic ellipsometry and spectroscopic reflectometry measurements, but generalized ellipsometry or Mueller matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry data provides important, additional information about complex structures that exhibit anisotropy and depolarization effects. In addition the symmetry-antisymmetry properties associated with Mueller matrix (MM) elements

  3. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figus, Cristiana; Quochi, Francesco; Artizzu, Flavia; Saba, Michele; Marongiu, Daniela; Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia; Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  4. Thickness controlled sol-gel silica films for plasmonic bio-sensing devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figus, Cristiana, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Quochi, Francesco, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Artizzu, Flavia, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Saba, Michele, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Marongiu, Daniela, E-mail: cristiana.figus@dsf.unica.it; Mura, Andrea; Bongiovanni, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Cagliari, S.P. Km 0.7, I-09042 Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Floris, Francesco; Marabelli, Franco; Patrini, Maddalena; Fornasari, Lucia [Dipartimento di Fisica - University of Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (PV) (Italy); Pellacani, Paola; Valsesia, Andrea [Plasmore S.r.l. -Via Grazia Deledda 4, I-21020 Ranco (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    Plasmonics has recently received considerable interest due to its potentiality in many fields as well as in nanobio-technology applications. In this regard, various strategies are required for modifying the surfaces of plasmonic nanostructures and to control their optical properties in view of interesting application such as bio-sensing, We report a simple method for depositing silica layers of controlled thickness on planar plasmonic structures. Tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was used as silica precursor. The control of the silica layer thickness was obtained by optimizing the sol-gel method and dip-coating technique, in particular by properly tuning different parameters such as pH, solvent concentration, and withdrawal speed. The resulting films were characterized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier-transform (FT) spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Furthermore, by performing the analysis of surface plasmon resonances before and after the coating of the nanostructures, it was observed that the position of the resonance structures could be properly shifted by finely controlling the silica layer thickness. The effect of silica coating was assessed also in view of sensing applications, due to important advantages, such as surface protection of the plasmonic structure.

  5. Applied optics fundamentals and device applications nano, MOEMS, and biotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Mentzer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    How does the field of optical engineering impact biotechnology? Perhaps for the first time, Applied Optics Fundamentals and Device Applications: Nano, MOEMS, and Biotechnology answers that question directly by integrating coverage of the many disciplines and applications involved in optical engineering, and then examining their applications in nanobiotechnology. Written by a senior U.S. Army research scientist and pioneer in the field of optical engineering, this book addresses the exponential growth in materials, applications, and cross-functional relevance of the many convergent disciplines

  6. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  7. Optical nanoparticles: synthesis and biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung Tran, Hong; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Thuy Duong Vu, Thi; Chu, Viet Ha; Huan Le, Quang; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thanh Nguyen, Lai; Pham, Duc Minh; Thuan Tong, Kim; Hoa Do, Quang; Vu, Duong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Tan Pham, Minh; Nguyen Duong, Cao; Thuy Tran, Thanh; Son Vu, Van; Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Nguyen, Thi Bich Ngoc; Tran, Anh Duc; Thuong Trinh, Thi; Nguyen, Thi Thai An

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of our results on studies of synthesis and biomedical application of optical nanoparticles. Gold, dye-doped silica based and core-shell multifunctional multilayer (SiO2/Au, Fe3O4/SiO2, Fe3O4/SiO2/Au) water-monodispersed nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical route and surface modified with proteins and biocompatible chemical reagents. The particles were conjugated with antibody or aptamer for specific detecting and imaging bacteria and cancer cells. The photothermal effects of gold nanoshells (SiO2/Au and Fe3O4/SiO2/Au) on cells and tissues were investigated. The nano silver substrates were developed for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to detect melamine.

  8. Optical Microresonators Theory, Fabrication, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Heebner, John; Ibrahim, Tarek

    2008-01-01

    This book explains why microresonators came to be important components in the photonic toolbox. While functionally similar to the Fabry-Perot, microring resonators offer a planar nature which is naturally compatible with monolithic microfabrication technologies. In these chapters lie the principles required to characterize, design, construct, and implement microresonators as lasers, amplifiers, sensors, filters, demultiplexers, switches, routers, and logic gates. Additionally, much like quantum dots and photonic crystals, it will be shown how microresonators offer an alternative method for creating engineerable materials with designer linear and nonlinear responses tailored for advanced functionalities operating at ultrafast speeds and compact scales. This is the first detailed text on the theory, fabrication, and applications of optical microresonators, and will be found useful by both graduate students and researchers. With an emphasis on building intuition with distilled equations and graphical illustratio...

  9. A Prototype Fibre Optic Gyroscope for Missile Guidance Applications,

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes the design of a prototype fibre optic gyro, which is intended for missile guidance applications. Important design constraints...beam-splitter. Serrodyne phase ramps are impressed on the light propagating round the fibre optic sensor coil connected to the integrated optics chip

  10. Two Lagrange-like optical invariants and some applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrente, Fabio; Onorato, Pasquale

    2011-05-01

    Geometric optics can be completely derived from Fermat's principle, as classical mechanics can be obtained by the application of the Hamilton principle. In Lagrangian optics, for optical systems with rotational symmetry, is known the invariant L₃, the Lagrange optical invariant. For systems built only with spherical lenses, we demonstrate there are two other optical invariants, L₁ and L₂, analogous to L₃. A proof based on Snell's law, the Weierstrass-Erdman jump condition, and the expression of the ray between two optical surfaces in the Hamiltonian formalism is reported. The presence of a conserved vector, L, allows us to write the equation of an emerging ray without any approximation.

  11. 3rd Symposium on Space Optical Instruments and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guangjun

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains selected and expanded contributions presented at the 3rd Symposium on Space Optical Instruments and Applications in Beijing, China June 28 – 29, 2016. This conference series is organised by the Sino-Holland Space Optical Instruments Laboratory, a cooperation platform between China and the Netherlands. The symposium focused on key technological problems of optical instruments and their applications in a space context. It covered the latest developments, experiments and results regarding theory, instrumentation and applications in space optics. The book is split across five topical sections. The first section covers space optical remote sensing system design, the second advanced optical system design, the third remote sensor calibration and measurement. Remote sensing data processing and information extraction is then presented, followed by a final section on remote sensing data applications. .

  12. Nonlinear optical properties of metal nanoparticle composites for optical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Y. E-mail: takeda.yoshihiko@nims.go.jp; Kishimoto, N

    2003-05-01

    Optical absorption and nonlinear optical response were investigated for nanoparticle composites in amorphous SiO{sub 2} fabricated by negative Ta ion implantation at 60 keV. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify Ta and the oxide formation in the matrix. Optical absorption clearly indicated a surface plasmon peak at 2.2 eV and the peak resulted from formation of nanoparticles embedded in the matrix. The measured absorption was compared with calculated ones, evaluated by Maxwell-Garnett theory. Nonlinear absorption was measured with a pump-probe method using a femtosecond laser system. The pumping laser transiently bleached the surface plasmon band and lead to the nonlinearity. The transient response recovered in several picoseconds and behaved in terms of electron dynamics in metallic nanoparticles. The Ta nanoparticle composite is one of the promising candidates for nonlinear optical materials with good thermal stability.

  13. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Sun, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high loading capacity. MIPs have been intensively employed in classical solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction. More recently, MIPs have been combined with magnetic bead extraction, which greatly simplifies sample handling procedures. Studies have consistently shown that MIPs can effectively minimize complex food matrix effects, and improve recoveries and detection limits. In addition to sample preparation, MIPs have also been viewed as promising alternatives to bio-receptors due to the inherent molecular recognition abilities and the high stability in harsh chemical and physical conditions. MIPs have been utilized as receptors in biosensing platforms such as electrochemical, optical and mass biosensors to detect various analytes in food. In this review, we will discuss the current state-of-the-art of MIP synthesis and applications in the context of food analysis. We will highlight the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given.

  14. Integrated optics for astronomical interferometry; 1, Concept and astronomical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Malbet, M; Schanen-Duport, J P; Berger, J P; Rousselet-Perraut, K; Benech, P

    1999-01-01

    We propose a new instrumental concept for long-baseline optical single-mode interferometry using integrated optics which were developed for telecommunication. Visible and infrared multi-aperture interferometry requires many optical functions (spatial filtering, beam combination, photometric calibration, polarization control) to detect astronomical signals at very high angular resolution. Since the 80's, integrated optics on planar substrate have become available for telecommunication applications with multiple optical functions like power dividing, coupling, multiplexing, etc. We present the concept of an optical / infrared interferometric instrument based on this new technology. The main advantage is to provide an interferometric combination unit on a single optical chip. Integrated optics are compact, provide stability, low sensitivity to external constrains like temperature, pressure or mechanical stresses, no optical alignment except for coupling, simplicity and intrinsic polarization control. The integra...

  15. Highly sensitive biosensing based on interference from light scattering in capillary tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.S.; Larsen, N.B.; Latham, J.C.;

    2006-01-01

    Human IgG interactions with surface bound protein A are monitored label-free using microinterferometric backscatter detection. An electromagnetic wave-based model is developed and used to quantitatively describe the change in interference pattern as a consequence of the molecular interaction with...... to other specific interacting layers, and simplicity of the optical sensor make this technique a powerful tool in biosensing. (c) 2006 American Institute of Physics....

  16. Photonic Applications Using Electrooptic Optical Signal Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    DPMZM transmitter, the laser source of 1550nm, the erbium-doped fiber amplifier ( EDFA ), the local oscillator (LO), and the optical filter (FBG). The LO...is generated using an optical modulator, operating at 12.25278 GHz along with an optical filter (FBG) to separate the sideband. The EDFA was used to

  17. Gold nanoprobe functionalized with specific fusion protein selection from phage display and its application in rapid, selective and sensitive colorimetric biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Han, Lei; Wang, Fei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most ubiquitous pathogens in public healthcare worldwide. It holds great insterest in establishing robust analytical method for S. aureus. Herein, we report a S. aureus-specific recognition element, isolated from phage monoclone GQTTLTTS, which was selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against S. aureus in a high-throughput way. By functionalizing cysteamine (CS)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CS-AuNPs) with S. aureus-specific pVIII fusion protein (fusion-pVIII), a bifunctional nanoprobe (CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII) for S. aureus was developed. In this strategy, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be induced to aggregate quickly in the presence of target S. aureus, resulting in a rapid colorimetric response of gold nanoparticles. More importantly, the as-designed probe exhibited excellent selectivity over other bacteria. Thus, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be used as the indicator of target S. aureus. This assay can detect as low as 19CFUmL(-1)S. aureus within 30min. Further, this approach can be applicable to detect S. aureus in real water samples. Due to its sensitivity, specificity and rapidness, this proposed method is promising for on-site testing of S. aureus without using any costly instruments.

  18. Development of high-sensitive, reproducible colloidal surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy active substrate using silver nanocubes for potential biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasna, Kudilatt; Lakshmi, Kiran; Ezhuthachan Jayaraj, Madambi Kunjukuttan; Kumar, Kumaran Rajeev; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2016-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has emerged as one of the thrust research areas that could find potential applications in bio and chemical sensing. We developed colloidal SERS active substrate with excellent sensitivity and high reproducibility using silver nanocube (AgNC) synthesized via the solvothermal method. Finite-difference time-domain simulation was carried out in detail to visualize dipole generation in the nanocube during localized surface plasmon resonance and to locate the respective hot spots in AgNC responsible for the huge Raman enhancement. The prediction is verified by the SERS analysis of the synthesized nanocubes using Rhodamine 6G molecule. An excellent sensitivity with a detection limit of 10-17 M and a very high enhancement factor of 1.2×108 confirms the "hot spots" in the nanocube. SERS activity is also carried out for crystal violet and for food adulterant Sudan I molecule. Finally, label-free DNA detection is performed to demonstrate the versatility of SERS as a potential biosensor.

  19. Synthesis of one-dimensional gold nanostructures and the electrochemical application of the nanohybrid containing functionalized graphene oxide for cholesterol biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandini, Seetharamaiah; Nalini, Seetharamaiah; Reddy, M B Madhusudana; Suresh, Gurukar Shivappa; Melo, Jose Savio; Niranjana, Pathappa; Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2016-08-01

    This manuscript reports a new approach for the synthesis of one dimensional gold nanostructure (AuNs) and its application in the development of cholesterol biosensor. Au nanostructures have been synthesized by exploiting β-diphenylalanine (β-FF) as an sacrificial template, whereas the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by ultrasound irradiation. X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been employed to characterize the morphology and composition of the prepared samples. With the aim to develop a highly sensitive cholesterol biosensor, cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) was immobilized on AuNs which were appended on the graphite (Gr) electrode via chemisorption onto thiol-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-SH). This Gr/GO-SH/AuNs/ChOx biosensor has been characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. CV results indicated a direct electron transfer between the enzyme and the electrode surface. A new potentiostat intermitant titration technique (PITT) has been studied to determine the diffusion coefficient and maxima potential value. The proposed biosensor showed rapid response, high sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. Furthermore, our AuNs modified electrode showed excellent selectivity, repeatability, reproducibility and long term stability. The proposed electrode has also been used successfully to determine cholesterol in serum samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct Electrochemistry of Glucose Oxidase Immobilized on Chitosan-gold Nanoparticle Composite Film on Glassy Carbon Electrodes and Its Biosensing Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase (Gox) immobilized on a composite matrix based on chitosan (CHIT) and Au nanoparticles (Au NP) underlying on a glassy carbon electrode was achieved. The cyclic voltam-metry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified electrode. In deaerated buffer solutions, the cyclic voltammetry of the composite films of Gox-Au NP-CHIT showed a pair of well-behaved redox peaks that were assigned to the redox reaction of Gox, confirming the effective immobilization of Gox on the composite film. The electron transfer rate constant was estimated to be 15.6 s-1, indicating a high electron transfer between the Gox redox center and electrode. The combination of CHIT and Au NP also promoted the stability of Gox in the composite film and retained its bioactivity, which might have the potential application to glucose determination. The calculated apparent Michaelis-Menten constant was 10.1 mmol·L-1. Furthermore, the proposed biosensor could be used for the determination of glucose in human plasma samples.

  1. Science Letters: Demonstration of a new biosensing concept for immunodiagnostic applications based on change in surface conductance of antibodies after biomolecular interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VASHIST Sandeep Kumar; KAUR Inderpreet; BAJPAI Ram Prakash; BHARADWAJ Lalit Mohan; TEWARI Rupinder; RAITERI Roberto

    2006-01-01

    We report an important observation that the surface conductivity of antibody layer immobilized on polylysine-coated glass substrate decreases upon the formation of complex with their specific antigens. This change in conductivity has been observed for both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. The conductance of monoclonal mouse IgG immobilized on polylysine-coated glass substrate changed from 1.02×l0-8 Ω-1 to 1.41×l0-11 Ω-1 at 10 V when complex is formed due to the specific biomolecular interactions with rabbit anti-mouse IgG F(ab')2. Similar behavior was observed when the same set up was tested in two clinical assays: (1) anti-Leishmania antigen polyclonal antibodies taken from Kala Azar positive patient serum interacting with Leishmania promastigote antigen, and (2) anti-p21 polyclonal antibodies interacting with p21 antigen. The proposed concept can represent a new immunodiagnostic technique and may have wide ranging applications in biosensors and nanobiotechnology too.

  2. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-28

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  3. A review on optical microfibers in fluidic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shao-cheng; Xu, Fei

    2017-09-01

    Fiber-based opto-fluidics with the distinct benefit of alignment-free optics has been a new rising area by integrating optical fiber and microfluidics in recent years. Optical microfibers with large accessible evanescent field and great configurability have more advantages on the integration with microfluidics than traditional fibers. Based on the strong light-liquid interaction, the fluid has the ability to modulate optical microfiber devices by changing physical and chemical properties such as refractive index, temperature, flow rate, chemicals dissolved in the fluid, etc. The light in the microfiber can also be used to manipulate particles which can move in the fluidic channel. Here we review the broad opto-fluidic applications of optical microfibers such as measurement of liquid characteristics, nonlinear effects, laser generation and optical manipulations with miniaturization, low cost, and high sensitivity. The microfiber-based microfluidic platform may provide more strategies for physical and chemical sensing applications and in particular contactless optical diagnostics.

  4. Fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, M. J., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We have developed a hand-held fiber optic based optical coherence tomography (OCT) system for scanning of the oral cavity We have produced, using this scanning device, in viva cross-sectional images of hard and soft dental tissues in human volunteers Clinically relevant anatomical structures, including the gingival margin, periodontal sulcus, and dento-enamel junction, were visible in all the images The dento-enamel junction and the alveolar bone were identifiable in approximately two thirds of the images These images represent, to our knowledge, the first in viva OCT images of human dental tissue.

  5. Graphene and Graphene Analogs toward Optical, Electronic, Spintronic, Green-Chemical, Energy-Material, Sensing, and Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour, M Reza; Myung, Chang Woo; Yun, Jeonghun; Ghassami, Amirreza; Li, Nannan; Yu, Seong Uk; Hajibabaei, Amir; Park, Youngsin; Kim, Kwang S

    2017-07-26

    This spotlight discusses intriguing properties and diverse applications of graphene (Gr) and Gr analogs. Gr has brought us two-dimensional (2D) chemistry with its exotic 2D features of density of states. Yet, some of the 2D or 2D-like features can be seen on surfaces and at interfaces of bulk materials. The substrate on Gr and functionalization of Gr (including metal decoration, intercalation, doping, and hybridization) modify the unique 2D features of Gr. Despite abundant literature on physical properties and well-known applications of Gr, spotlight works based on the conceptual understanding of the 2D physical and chemical nature of Gr toward vast-ranging applications are hardly found. Here we focus on applications of Gr, based on conceptual understanding of 2D phenomena toward 2D chemistry. Thus, 2D features, defects, edges, and substrate effects of Gr are discussed first. Then, to pattern Gr electronic circuits, insight into differentiating conducting and nonconducting regions is introduced. By utilizing the unique ballistic electron transport properties and edge spin states of Gr, Gr nanoribbons (GNRs) are exploited for the design of ultrasensitive molecular sensing electronic devices (including molecular fingerprinting) and spintronic devices. The highly stable nature of Gr can be utilized for protection of corrosive metals, moisture-sensitive perovskite solar cells, and highly environment-susceptible topological insulators (TIs). Gr analogs have become new types of 2D materials having novel features such as half-metals, TIs, and nonlinear optical properties. The key insights into the functionalized Gr hybrid materials lead to the applications for not only energy storage and electrochemical catalysis, green chemistry, and electronic/spintronic devices but also biosensing and medical applications. All these topics are discussed here with the focus on conceptual understanding. Further possible applications of Gr, GNRs, and Gr analogs are also addressed in a

  6. Recent developments in plastic optical fiber components for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, James R.; Jennings, Kurt L.; Lynn, Mark A.; Steele, Robert E.

    1993-02-01

    The majority of production applications using plastic optical fiber (POF) have been for illumination applications. These applications continue to be refined and new illumination applications continue to be introduced. Point-to-point data communication applications of POF are beginning to appear in production vehicles. New developments in connection systems and networking components are occurring rapidly. This paper discusses recently developed components for illumination and data communications. The illumination components were designed for three different applications: lamp monitoring, keyhole illumination, and PRNDL indication (gear shift). Components for data communications include two connection systems and two passive stars designed for networking. The two connections systems are a 16 electrical/1 optical system for point-to-point links and a 5 electrical/2 optical for two-way optical communications. The two stars are a 16 node star and 7 node star. Performance characteristics and design advantages are described for all components.

  7. Novel applications of the dispersive optical model

    CERN Document Server

    Dickhoff, W H; Mahzoon, M H

    2016-01-01

    A review of recent developments of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Starting from the original work of Mahaux and Sartor, several necessary steps are developed and illustrated which increase the scope of the DOM allowing its interpretation as generating an experimentally constrained functional form of the nucleon self-energy. The method could therefore be renamed as the dispersive self-energy method. The aforementioned steps include the introduction of simultaneous fits of data for chains of isotopes or isotones allowing a data-driven extrapolation for the prediction of scattering cross sections and level properties in the direction of the respective drip lines. In addition, the energy domain for data was enlarged to include results up to 200 MeV where available. An important application of this work was implemented by employing these DOM potentials to the analysis of the (\\textit{d,p}) transfer reaction using the adiabatic distorted wave approximation (ADWA). We review the fully non-local DOM...

  8. Nonlinear super-resolution nano-optics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jingsong

    2015-01-01

    This book covers many advances in the subjects of nano-optics and nano photonics. The author describes the principle and technical schematics of common methods for breaking through the optical diffraction limit and focuses on realizing optical super-resolution with nonlinear effects of thin film materials. The applications of nonlinear optical super-resolution effects in nano-data storage, nanolithography, and nano-imaging are also presented. This book is useful to graduate students majoring in optics and nano science and also serves as a reference book for academic researchers, engineers, technical professionals in the fields of super-resolution optics and laser techniques, nano-optics and nano photonics, nano-data storage, nano imaging, micro/nanofabrication and nanolithography and nonlinear optics.

  9. [Applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in neuro-ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernstock, C; Friebe, K; Tonagel, F

    2013-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has revolutionised ophthalmology. Due to modern instruments with extremely high resolution there are more and more applications also in neuro-ophthalmological disorders. This review gives an overview on typical changes in OCT for the following diseases: autosomal dominant optic atrophy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, toxic, traumatic and compressive optic neuropathy, optic nerve drusen, anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy, optic disc pit, papilledema, optic neuritis (isolated or associated with multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica), neurodegenerative diseases and hereditary retinal diseases. A diagnosis exclusively based on an OCT examination is not always possible, but in several diseases there are pathognomonic changes that directly lead to the correct diagnosis. Particularly with the often complex settings in neuro-ophtalmology the OCT should be seen as a supplementary modality and not as a replacement for other techniques.

  10. Information Optics and Photonics Algorithms, Systems, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    This book addresses applications, recent advances, and emerging areas in fields with applications in information optics and photonics systems. The objective of this book is to illustrate and discuss novel approaches, analytical techniques, models, and technologies that enhance sensing, measurement, processing, interpretation, and visualization of information using free space optics and photonics. The material in this book concentrates on integration of diverse fields for cross-disciplinary applications including bio-photonics, digitally enhanced sensing and imaging systems, multi-dimensional optical imaging and image processing, bio-inspired imaging, 3D visualization, 3D displays, imaging on the nano-scale, quantum optics, super resolution imaging, photonics for biological applications, and holographic information systems. As a result, this book is a useful resource for researchers, engineers, and graduate students who work in the diverse fields comprising information optics and photonics.

  11. Structural and Optical Properties and Emerging Applications of Metal Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tammy Y.Olson; Jin Z.Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess intriguing optical properties that depend sensitively on size, shape, and material content of the structures. Controlling such structural characteristics of the nanostructures allows the tailoring of their physical and chemical properties, e.9. optical, electronic, and catalytic, to achieve what is desired for specific applications of interest. This review will cover the development of various shapes for silver and gold nanomaterials with emphasis on their relation to optical properties. Examples of various modern synthetic methods and characterization techniques are highlighted. The influence of the metal nanomaterial's shape and optical absorption on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and a final note on new emerging applications of metal nanostructures are also discussed.

  12. Optical Characterization of Window Materials for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Clark, Natalie; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    An optical metrology laboratory has been developed to characterize the optical properties of optical window materials to be used for aerospace applications. Several optical measurement systems have been selected and developed to measure spectral transmittance, haze, clarity, birefringence, striae, wavefront quality, and wedge. In addition to silica based glasses, several optical lightweight polymer materials and transparent ceramics have been investigated in the laboratory. The measurement systems and selected empirical results for non-silica materials are described. These measurements will be used to form the basis of acceptance criteria for selection of window materials for future aerospace vehicle and habitat designs.

  13. Optical characterization of window materials for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Clark, Natalie; Humphreys, William M.

    2013-09-01

    An optical metrology laboratory has been developed to characterize the optical properties of optical window materials to be used for aerospace applications. Several optical measurement systems have been selected and developed to measure spectral transmittance, haze, clarity, birefringence, striae, wavefront quality, and wedge. In addition to silica based glasses, several optical lightweight polymer materials and transparent ceramics have been investigated in the laboratory. The measurement systems and selected empirical results for non-silica materials are described. These measurements will be used to form the basis of acceptance criteria for selection of window materials for future aerospace vehicle and habitat designs.

  14. Applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqiang

    longitudinal resolution and the imaging depth for OCT imaging. Doppler OCT is becoming an increasingly popular field of investigation within optical coherence tomography with potentially important applications in cardiovascular and microfluidic research. We have spent some of the effort on searching for accurate and efficient methods for processing the experimental data. We applied the pseudo Wigner time-frequency distribution method to the data processing of Doppler OCT and compared its performance to that of the short-time Fourier transform method, the Hilbert-based phase-resolved method and the autocorrelation method. We concluded that the pseudo Wigner-distribution signal processing method is overall more precise than other often-used methods in Doppler OCT for the analysis of cross-sectional velocity distributions, especially in the high velocity regime. We also discovered the advantage of using the time-domain instead of the frequency domain for Doppler OCT for some applications where precise Doppler-speed metrology is essential. Based on the fact that the obtained local OCT interference signal is almost a single periodic waveform, we have developed a novel, simple and less time-consuming processing method based on the zero-crossing points in an OCT signal for the measurement of the Doppler frequency in a laminar flow. This method was compared to other processing approaches currently used in Doppler OCT. The results show that in the case of laminar flow, the zero-crossing method gives the more precise results, especially in the higher velocity regime with a substantial economy in processing time and an increase in dynamic range which can reach 70 dB. This feature becomes a major advantage in metrology if one wants to measure velocities over several orders of magnitude. We have applied this technique to some real flow models and the preliminary results on flow velocity distributions obtained in the case of a microfluidic circuit and in that of a phantom of a blood vessel

  15. Novel applications of the dispersive optical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, W. H.; Charity, R. J.; Mahzoon, M. H.

    2017-03-01

    A review of recent developments of the dispersive optical model (DOM) is presented. Starting from the original work of Mahaux and Sartor, several necessary steps are developed and illustrated which increase the scope of the DOM allowing its interpretation as generating an experimentally constrained functional form of the nucleon self-energy. The method could therefore be renamed as the dispersive self-energy method. The aforementioned steps include the introduction of simultaneous fits of data for chains of isotopes or isotones allowing a data-driven extrapolation for the prediction of scattering cross sections and level properties in the direction of the respective drip lines. In addition, the energy domain for data was enlarged to include results up to 200 MeV where available. An important application of this work was implemented by employing these DOM potentials to the analysis of the (d, p) transfer reaction using the adiabatic distorted wave approximation. We review these calculations which suggest that physically meaningful results are easier to obtain by employing DOM ingredients as compared to the traditional approach which relies on a phenomenologically-adjusted bound-state wave function combined with a global (nondispersive) optical-model potential. Application to the exotic 132Sn nucleus also shows great promise for the extrapolation of DOM potentials towards the drip line with attendant relevance for the physics of FRIB. We note that the DOM method combines structure and reaction information on the same footing providing a unique approach to the analysis of exotic nuclei. We illustrate the importance of abandoning the custom of representing the non-local Hartree–Fock (HF) potential in the DOM by an energy-dependent local potential as it impedes the proper normalization of the solution of the Dyson equation. This important step allows for the interpretation of the DOM potential as representing the nucleon self-energy permitting the calculations of

  16. Optical wireless communications: Theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminikashani, Mohammadreza

    on the potentials of currently used FSO systems. Furthermore, utilizing this new statistical channel model, closed-form expressions for the diversity gain and the error rate performance of FSO links with spatial diversity are derived. In addition to addressing ways to improve outdoor FSO communication sys- tems, this dissertation addresses some major challenges in indoor visible light communication (VLC). VLC is an advantageous technique that is proposed for wireless indoor communications. In VLC systems, the existence of multiple paths between the transmitter and receiver causes multipath distortion, particularly in links using non-directional transmitters and receivers, or in links relying upon non-line of-sight propagation. This multipath distortion can lead to intersymbol interference (ISI) at high bit rates. Multicarrier modulation usually implemented by orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) can be used to mitigate ISI and multipath dispersion. Nevertheless, the performance of VLC systems employing OFDM modulation is significantly affected by nonlinear characteristic of light-emitting diode (LED) due to the large peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of OFDM signal. In other words, signal amplitudes below the LED turn-on-voltage and above the LED saturation point are clipped. This dissertation targets these important issues and successfully addresses them by developing some techniques to reduce high PAPR of optical OFDM signal and determining the optimum operating characteristics of LEDs for combined lighting and communications applications. VLC can also provide a practical solution for indoor positioning as global po- sitioning system (GPS) does not provide an accurate and rapid indoor positioning since GPS radio signals are attenuated and scattered by walls of large buildings and other objects. A practical VLC system would be likely to deploy the same configuration for both positioning and communication purposes where high speed data rates are desired

  17. Application of portable optical laboratory in high schools and colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Gregory B.; Belashenkov, Nickolai R.; Ermolaev, Vladimir S.; Inochkin, Mickle V.; Karasev, Vyatcheslav B.

    1995-10-01

    The present paper describes the experience of application of portable optical laboratory in optical practicum developed directly for training and demonstrations of basic optical laws and phenomena in high-schools, colleges and nontechnical universities all over Russia. The laboratory includes the portable optical platform with built-in laser and lamp sources, kit of optical components and software. These accessories provide the attractive and smart teaching in general optics during lectures, lessons and practice at schools and colleges. The portable optical laboratory provides 28 basic lab works and demonstrations in reflection, refraction, absorption and dispersion of light, interference, diffraction, polarization of light, image formation and waveguide propagation of light in optical fibers. Due to their interdependence one can teach and learn a whole course of general optics. The individual work of students and school children with optical kit stimulates and develops their creative abilities and experimental skills, as well increases the effectiveness of education. The kit is provided with optional elements for a number of extra experiments with holography, polarizing light propagation, simple optical devices etc. These extensions allow to modify the education process according to teacher's point of view. The conception of optical class-room based on portable optical laboratories is discussed. The effectiveness of individual and small-group training is analyzed.

  18. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects....... The technology is based on compact and low-cost laser sources such as Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The methods characterise the object motion by speckle translation in the near field (imaging) or far field (optical Fourier transform) by optical spatial filtering velocimetry. The volume...

  19. Current Trends in Ubiquitous Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    peptide display technology, the extremely fast replication rate of bacteria is exploited, and biological components (e.g., modified proteins) on an E...fundamental advances have been made in the synergistic combination of research in the fields of microfluidics and optics, coined “optofluidics” [24-26

  20. Electrocatalytic tuning of biosensing response through electrostatic or hydrophobic enzyme-graphene oxide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista-Pires, Luis; Pérez-López, Briza; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Morales-Narváez, Eden; Domingo, Neus; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M; Merkoçi, Arben

    2014-11-15

    The effect of graphene oxidative grades upon the conductivity and hydrophobicity and consequently the influence on an enzymatic biosensing response is presented. The electrochemical responses of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been compared with the responses obtained from the oxide form (oGO) and their performances have been accordingly discussed with various evidences obtained by optical techniques. We used tyrosinase enzyme as a proof of concept receptor with interest for phenolic compounds detection through its direct adsorption onto a screen-printed carbon electrode previously modified with oGO or rGO with a carbon-oxygen ratio of 1.07 or 1.53 respectively. Different levels of oGO directly affect the (bio)conjugation properties of the biosensor due to changes at enzyme/graphene oxide interface coming from the various electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions with biomolecules. The developed biosensor was capable of reaching a limit of detection of 0.01 nM catechol. This tuning capability of the biosensor response can be of interest for building several other biosensors, including immunosensors and DNA sensors for various applications.

  1. Microfabricated Reference Electrodes and their Biosensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jamal Deen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, there has been an increasing trend towards miniaturization of both biological and chemical sensors and their integration with miniaturized sample pre-processing and analysis systems. These miniaturized lab-on-chip devices have several functional advantages including low cost, their ability to analyze smaller samples, faster analysis time, suitability for automation, and increased reliability and repeatability. Electrical based sensing methods that transduce biological or chemical signals into the electrical domain are a dominant part of the lab-on-chip devices. A vital part of any electrochemical sensing system is the reference electrode, which is a probe that is capable of measuring the potential on the solution side of an electrochemical interface. Research on miniaturization of this crucial component and analysis of the parameters that affect its performance, stability and lifetime, is sparse. In this paper, we present the basic electrochemistry and thermodynamics of these reference electrodes and illustrate the uses of reference electrodes in electrochemical and biological measurements. Different electrochemical systems that are used as reference electrodes will be presented, and an overview of some contemporary advances in electrode miniaturization and their performance will be provided.

  2. Application of Semipermeable Membranes in Glucose Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay Kulkarni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose biosensors have received significant attention in recent years due to the escalating mortality rate of diabetes mellitus. Although there is currently no cure for diabetes mellitus, individuals living with diabetes can lead a normal life by maintaining tight control of their blood glucose levels using glucose biosensors (e.g., glucometers. Current research in the field is focused on the optimization and improvement in the performance of glucose biosensors by employing a variety of glucose selective enzymes, mediators and semipermeable membranes to improve the electron transfer between the active center of the enzyme and the electrode substrate. Herein, we summarize the different semipermeable membranes used in the fabrication of the glucose biosensor, that result in improved biosensor sensitivity, selectivity, dynamic range, response time and stability.

  3. Threading DNA through nanopores for biosensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyta, Maria

    2015-07-01

    This review outlines the recent achievements in the field of nanopore research. Nanopores are typically used in single-molecule experiments and are believed to have a high potential to realize an ultra-fast and very cheap genome sequencer. Here, the various types of nanopore materials, ranging from biological to 2D nanopores are discussed together with their advantages and disadvantages. These nanopores can utilize different protocols to read out the DNA nucleobases. Although, the first nanopore devices have reached the market, many still have issues which do not allow a full realization of a nanopore sequencer able to sequence the human genome in about a day. Ways to control the DNA, its dynamics and speed as the biomolecule translocates the nanopore in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the reading-out process are examined in this review. Finally, the advantages, as well as the drawbacks in distinguishing the DNA nucleotides, i.e., the genetic information, are presented in view of their importance in the field of nanopore sequencing.

  4. Microfluidic Biosensing Systems Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Keplinger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Microfluidic biosensing systems using magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giouroudi, Ioanna; Keplinger, Franz

    2013-09-09

    In recent years, there has been rapidly growing interest in developing hand held, sensitive and cost-effective on-chip biosensing systems that directly translate the presence of certain bioanalytes (e.g., biomolecules, cells and viruses) into an electronic signal. The impressive and rapid progress in micro- and nanotechnology as well as in biotechnology enables the integration of a variety of analytical functions in a single chip. All necessary sample handling and analysis steps are then performed within the chip. Microfluidic systems for biomedical analysis usually consist of a set of units, which guarantees the manipulation, detection and recognition of bioanalytes in a reliable and flexible manner. Additionally, the use of magnetic fields for performing the aforementioned tasks has been steadily gaining interest. This is because magnetic fields can be well tuned and applied either externally or from a directly integrated solution in the biosensing system. In combination with these applied magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles are utilized. Some of the merits of magnetic nanoparticles are the possibility of manipulating them inside microfluidic channels by utilizing high gradient magnetic fields, their detection by integrated magnetic microsensors, and their flexibility due to functionalization by means of surface modification and specific binding. Their multi-functionality is what makes them ideal candidates as the active component in miniaturized on-chip biosensing systems. In this review, focus will be given to the type of biosening systems that use microfluidics in combination with magnetoresistive sensors and detect the presence of bioanalyte tagged with magnetic nanoparticles.

  6. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2010-01-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects...

  7. Application of optical polymers in lens design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanova, Nina; Kasarova, Stefka; Nikolov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Optical, some thermal and elastic properties of optical polymers which are of importance in lens design are considered. Results are based on precise measurement of refraction of materials. Ultrasonic investigation of elastic moduli is carried out. Comparison to properties of Schott glasses is accomplished. Examples on the design of all-plastic and hybrid glass-plastic systems are presented.

  8. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M. L.; Dolganova, I. N.; Gevorgyan, N.; Guzman, A.; Papoyan, A.; Sarkisyan, H.; Yurchenko, S.

    2016-01-01

    The SPIE.FOCUS Armenia: 3rd International Symposium ''Optics and its Applications'' (OPTICS-2015) http://rau.am/optics2015/ was held in Yerevan, Armenia, in the period October 1 - 5, 2015. The symposium was organized by the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), the Armenian SPIE student chapter with collaboration of the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-PYRKAL, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the SPIE & OSA student chapters of BMSTU, the Armenian OSA student chapter, and the SPIE student chapters of Lund University and Wroclaw University of Technology. The symposium OPTICS-2015 was dedicated to the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies. OPTICS-2015 was devoted to modern topics and optical technologies such as: optical properties of nanostructures, silicon photonics, quantum optics, singular optics & its applications, laser spectroscopy, strong field optics, biomedical optics, nonlinear & ultrafast optics, photonics & fiber optics, and mathematical methods in optics. OPTICS-2015 was attended by 100 scientists and students representing 17 countries: Armenia, China, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Germany, India, Iran, Italy, Latvia, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Ukraine, and USA. Such a broad international community confirmed the important mission of science to be a uniting force between different countries, religions, and nations. We hope that OPTICS-2015 inspired and motivated students and young scientists to work in optics and in science in general. The present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes proceedings of the symposium covering various aspects of modern problems in optics. We are grateful to all people who were involved in the organization process. We gratefully acknowledge support from

  9. Label-controlled optical packet routing technologies and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koonen, A.M.J.; Yan, N.; Vegas Olmos, Juan José;

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of various optical packet labeling techniques. The architecture and technologies are discussed for optical packet routing nodes using orthogonal labeling with optoelectronic label processing, and for nodes using time-serial labeling with all-optical time-serial label processing....... An example of a nearterm application is given, and a comparison of routing technologies is made regarding their cost and reliability aspects....

  10. Adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Mark William; Wick, David Victor

    2004-11-01

    The combination of phase diversity and adaptive optics offers great flexibility. Phase diverse images can be used to diagnose aberrations and then provide feedback control to the optics to correct the aberrations. Alternatively, phase diversity can be used to partially compensate for aberrations during post-detection image processing. The adaptive optic can produce simple defocus or more complex types of phase diversity. This report presents an analysis, based on numerical simulations, of the efficiency of different modes of phase diversity with respect to compensating for specific aberrations during post-processing. It also comments on the efficiency of post-processing versus direct aberration correction. The construction of a bench top optical system that uses a membrane mirror as an active optic is described. The results of characterization tests performed on the bench top optical system are presented. The work described in this report was conducted to explore the use of adaptive optics and phase diversity imaging for responsive space applications.

  11. Recent advances in semiconductor optical amplifiers and their applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian; Mikkelsen, Benny; Djurhuus, Torsten;

    1992-01-01

    The authors review recent advances in SOAs (semiconductor optical amplifiers) and some of their applications. SOAs are under rapid development to achieve polarization independent gain, low facet reflectivities, good coupling to optical fibers, and high saturation power. The package SOA can be made...

  12. Acousto-optic tuneable filters: advances and applications to microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, C. N.; Wachman, E. S.; Farkas, D. L.; Ward, J.; Seale, W.

    2006-02-01

    The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is one example of a small number of commercially available optical filter technologies that lend themselves to imaging applications. In recent years the demand for high specification devices has increased significantly, and diffraction limited performance is being achieved.

  13. Nonlinear Optical Absorption of Organic Molecules for Applications in Optical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Boni, Leonardo De; Daniel S. Correa; Mendonca, Cleber R.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter aimed to describe the resonant nonlinear optical properties of four important organic molecules: Chlorophyll A, Indocyanine Green, Ytterbium Bisphthalocyanine and Cytochrome C, which are materials that present interesting optical nonlinearities for applications in optical devices. It was shown that Chlorophyll A solution exhibits a RSA process for Q-switched and mode-locked laser pulses, with an intersystem-crossing time relatively fast and a triplet state cross section value twi...

  14. Handbook of fiber optics theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Chai

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Yeh supplies a firm theoretical foundation in such topics as propagation of light through fibers, fiber fabrication, loss mechanisms, and dispersion properties. He then expands from this into such practical areas as fiber splicing, measuring loss in fibers, fiber-based communications networks, remote fiber sensors, and integrated optics. Whether involved in fiber optics research, design, or practical implementation of systems, this handbook will be extremely useful.Key Features* Here is a comprehensive, ""one-stop"" reference with state-of-the-art information on fiber optics Included is da

  15. Fiber optic communications fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication systems have advanced dramatically over the last four decades, since the era of copper cables, resulting in low-cost and high-bandwidth transmission. Fiber optics is now the backbone of the internet and long-distance telecommunication. Without it we would not enjoy the benefits of high-speed internet, or low-rate international telephone calls. This book introduces the basic concepts of fiber-optic communication in a pedagogical way. The important mathematical results are derived by first principles rather than citing research articles. In addition, physical interpre

  16. Application of Beyond Bound Decoding for High Speed Optical Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bomin; Larsen, Knud J.; Vegas Olmos, Juan José;

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the application of beyond bound decoding method for high speed optical communications. This hard-decision decoding method outperforms traditional minimum distance decoding method, with a total net coding gain of 10.36 dB.......This paper studies the application of beyond bound decoding method for high speed optical communications. This hard-decision decoding method outperforms traditional minimum distance decoding method, with a total net coding gain of 10.36 dB....

  17. Novel biosensing methodologies for ultrasensitive detection of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming Soon; Toh, Chee-Seng

    2013-11-07

    Various infectious diseases caused by the spread of viruses create adverse implications on global biosecurity. Increasing demands for virus surveillance and effective control of the spread of diseases reveal the need for rapid and sensitive virus diagnostic devices. Due to the remarkable sensitivity and specificity of biosensors, they appear as a potential and promising tool for accurate and quantitative detection of viruses. Furthermore, recent advancements in transduction systems, nanotechnology and genetic engineering offer various strategies to improve the detection performance of biosensors. This review presents an overview of the current states of novel biosensing methodologies for the ultrasensitive detection of viruses with highly promising applications for future disease diagnosis. Additionally, a brief summary of the recent state-of-the-art virus diagnostic molecular technologies is included.

  18. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ariel, E-mail: hecht@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Kinnunen, Paivo, E-mail: pkkinn@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); McNaughton, Brandon, E-mail: bmcnaugh@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Kopelman, Raoul, E-mail: kopelman@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  19. Nanostructured gold and platinum electrodes on silicon structures for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogurtsov, V. I.; Sheehan, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Gold and platinum metal electrodes on Si/SiO2 having undergone anisotropic potassium hydroxide (KOH) etch treatment are considered. This treatment etches at different rates and directions in the material resulting in creation of numerous pyramid shaped holes in the silicon substrate. This surface is used to make metal electrodes with increased electrode efficiency. The electrodes can serve as the sensors or as the sensor substrates (for surface polymer modification) and because both gold and platinum are inert they have applications for food safety biosensing. Wine, an economically significant food product, was chosen as a matrix, and impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was selected as a method of investigation of electrode behaviour. Based on results of EIS, different complexity equivalent circuits were determined by applying fitting mean square root optimisation of sensor complex impedance measurements.

  20. Alternative high-resolution lithographic technologies for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitner, Uwe D.; Weichelt, Tina; Bourgin, Yannick; Kinder, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Modern optical applications have special demands on the lithographic fabrication technologies. This relates to the lateral shape of the structures as well as to their three dimensional surface profile. On the other hand optical nano-structures are often periodic which allows for the use of dedicated lithographic exposure principles. The paper briefly reviews actual developments in the field of optical nano-structure generation. Special emphasis will be given to two technologies: electron-beam lithography based on a flexible cell-projection method and the actual developments in diffractive mask aligner lithography. Both offer a cost effective fabrication alternative for high resolution structures or three-dimensional optical surface profiles.

  1. Processing, properties, and applications of sol-gel silica optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogues, Jean-Luc R.; LaPaglia, Anthony J.

    1989-12-01

    For many years the market share maintained by U.S. optics manufacturers has been declining continuously caused in part by intense competition principally from countries in the Far East, and in part by the lack of a highly trained cadre of opticians to replace the current generation. This fact could place in jeopardy the defense system of the United States in case of international war. For example, in 1987, optical glass component imports accounted for approximately 50 percent of the Department of Defense (DOD) consumption. GELTECH's sol-gel technology is a new process for making a high quality optical glass and components for commercial and military uses. This technology offers in addition to being a local source of optics, the possibility to create new materials for high-tech optical applications, and the elimination of the major part of grinding and polishing for which the skill moved off-shore. This paper presents a summary of the solgel technology for the manufacture of high quality optical glass and components. Properties of pure silica glass made by solgel process (Type V and Type VI silicas) are given and include: ultraviolet, visible and near infrared spectrophotometry, optical homogeneity and thermal expansion. Many applications such as near net shape casting or Fresnel lens surface replication are discussed. Several potential new applications offered by the solgel technology such as organic-inorganic composites for non linear optics or scintillation detection are also reported in this paper.

  2. ADVANTAGES OF DIFFRACTIVE OPTICAL ELEMENTS APPLICATION IN SIMPLE OPTICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Zoric

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the influence of diffractive optical elements on the optical aberrations. The correction of optical aberrations was investigated in the simple optical systems with one and two lenses (singlet and doublet. The advantages of diffractive optical elements are their ability to generate arbitrary complex wave fronts from a piece of optical material that is essentially flat. The optical systems consisting of the standard surfaces were designed and optimized by using the same starting points. Further, the diffractive and aspheric surfaces were introduced into the developed systems. The resulting hybrid systems were optimized. To compare the complicity of the development of narrow field systems and wide field optical systems, the optimization has been done separately for these two types of the instruments. The optical systems were designed by using special Optical Design Software. Тhe characteristics of designed diffractive surfaces were controlled in Software DIFSYS 2.30. Due to the application of diffractive optical elements the longitudinal chromatic aberration was 5 times reduced for the narrow field systems. The absolute value of Seidel coefficient related to the spherical aberration was reduced in the range of 0.03. Considering that diffractive optical elements have the known disadvantages, like possible parasitic diffraction orders and probable decrease of the transmission, we also developed and analyzed the optical systems with combined aspheric and diffractive surfaces. A combination of the aspheric and diffractive surfaces in the optical disk system of the disk reading lens, gave cutting down of the longitudinal color aberrations almost 15 times on-axis, comparing to the lens consisting of the aspherical and standard surfaces. All of the designed diffractive optical elements possess the parameters within the fabrication limits.

  3. Parametric and scattering characterization of PDMS membranes for optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Alvarado, A.; Vazquez Montiel, S.; Munoz-Lopez, J.; Castro-Ramos, J.; Delgado Atencio, J. A.

    2009-08-01

    Today elastic membranes are being used more frequent as optical surfaces in the science or in the industry. This due to the advantages that they display in their handling and in their cost of production. These characteristics make them ideals to apply them in micro-optical components and Tunable Focus Liquid Filled Length Lens (TFLFLL). In order to know if a membrane of PDMS (PDMS Sylgard 184) is feasible for a specific application within the field of the optics, it is necessary to know its mechanical, optical and chemical properties. In this work the parametric membrane characterization is reported for an optical application. An important factor in the performance of these membranes is related with their scattering factor that is produced due to the roughness and impurities (micro-bubbles or dust particles). These membranes are used as refractive surface in TFLFLL. Experimental results of the characterization process and device performance are presented.

  4. The Parameters Selection of SMA Optically Activated an Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-min; CHEN Yu-ming; YU Xiao-lei

    2002-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy ( SMA ) optically activated is the key technology of optical SMA activator.According to the shape memory mechanism of SMA, researches are done on the activating response time and light wavelength of activating source etc of SMA optically activated to approach the parameters selection of optical activation. SMA has the optimum efficiency in the range of 13 seconds to 27 seconds when SMA is illuminated continuously by wavelength of 675um; The power of light wave has a low effect on SMA; The longer the activating wavelength, the quicker the response time of SMA activated. If the proper activating time and activating wavelength are adopted, and the structure deformation of composite material of SMA imbedded may be actively controlled, an ideal effect will be gotten. The research provides an evidence for the design of optical SMA activator and is of great significance to its application. The research on smart structure has a wide application prospect.

  5. Engineering of Glasses for Advanced Optical Fiber Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Carlie

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Advanced optical applications (such as fiber opticsdemand the engineering of innovative materialswhich provide the requisite optical performance in aform with specific functionality necessary for thedesired application. We will report on recent effortsto engineer new non-oxide glasses with tailoredphoto-sensitive response, and multi-component oxideglasses optimized for use in next generation Ramanamplification applications. The ultimate performanceof such glasses relies on control of the formation andstability of defective and/or metastable structuralconfigurations and their impact on physical as well aslinear and nonlinear optical properties. Direct laserwriting has drawn considerable attention since thedevelopment of femtosecond lasers and therecognition that such systems possess the requisiteintensity to modify, reversibly or irreversibly thephysical properties of optical materials. Such“structuring” has emerged as one of several possibleroutes for the fabrication of waveguides and otherphoto-induced structures.

  6. Optical Nonlinearities in Chalcogenide Glasses and their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zakery, A

    2007-01-01

    Photonics, which uses photons for information and image processing, has been labeled the technology of the 21st century, for which non-linear optical processes provide the key functions of frequency conversion and optical switching. Chalcogenide glass fiber is one of the most promising candidates for use as a non-linear optical medium because of its high optical nonlinearity and long interaction length. Since the chalcogenide glass fibers transmit into the IR, there are numerous potential applications in the civil, medical and military areas. One of the most exciting developments in the future is going to be in the area of rare-earth ion doping of chalcogenide fibers for IR fluorescence emission. The IR light sources, lasers and amplifiers developed using this phenomena will be very useful in civil, medical and military applications. Remote IR spectroscopy and imaging using flexible fibers will be realized for applications. Other future research areas which will inevitably be explored includes non-linear opti...

  7. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  8. Optical sensors for harsh environment applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R.; Maity, S.; Bekal, A.; Vartak, S.; Sridharan, A. K.; Mitra, C.

    2015-05-01

    The development of a harsh environment ammonia slip sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. A hybrid optical sensor design, through combination of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and alignment control, is proposed as an approach towards reliable in-situ measurements in misalignment prone harsh environments. 1531.59 nm, 1553.4 nm and 1555.56 nm are suggested as possible absorption lines for trace ammonia measurement (system are presented in detail. Effect of misalignment related measurement degradation is investigated and significant improvement in measurement fidelity is demonstrated through the use of the hybrid optical sensor design.

  9. Adaptive optics applications in vision science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Scot S.

    2003-06-01

    Adaptive optics can be used to correct the aberrations in the human eye caused by imperfections in the cornea and the lens and thereby, improve image quality both looking into and out of the eye. Under the auspices of the NSF Center for Adaptive Optics and the DOE Biomedical Engineering Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has joined together with leading vision science researchers around the country to develop and test new ophthalmic imaging systems using novel wavefront corrector technologies. Results of preliminary comparative evaluations of these technologies in initial system tests show promise for future clinical utility.

  10. Application of Optical Coatings in Automotive Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Yuan-dong; ZHONG Di-sheng

    2005-01-01

    From a production viewpoint, the optical thin films used to transparent substrates such as window glass for automobiles and the coating treatment process are reviewed. The state of the art of the technologies, and the problems to be solved and possible solutions are discussed. Market trends are forecasted.

  11. Organic transistors in optical displays and microelectronic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelinck, G.H.; Heremans, P.; Nomoto, K.; Anthopoulos, T.D.

    2010-01-01

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer unprecedented opportunities for implementation in a broad range of technological applications spanning from large-volume microelectronics and optical displays to chemical and biological sensors. In this Progress Report, we review the application of organic

  12. Grayscale optical correlator for CAD/CAC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Lu, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes JPL's recent work on high-performance automatic target recognition (ATR) processor consisting of a Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and neural network for various Computer Aided Detection and Computer Aided Classification (CAD/CAC) applications. A simulation study for sonar mine and mine-like target detection and classification is presented. Applications to periscope video ATR is also presented.

  13. Nonlinear fiber applications for ultrafast all-optical signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Konstantin

    In the present dissertation different aspects of all-optical signal processing, enabled by the use of nonlinear fibers, are studied. In particular, we focus on applications of a novel heavily GeO2-doped (HD) nonlinear fiber, that appears to be superior to many other types of nonlinear fibers because of its high nonlinearity and suitability for the use in nonlinear optical loop mirrors (NOLMs). Different functions, such as all-optical switching, thresholding, and wavelength conversion, are demonstrated with the HD fibers in the NOLM configuration. These basic functions are later used for realization of ultrafast time-domain demultiplexers, clock recovery, detectors of short pulses in stealth communications, and primitive elements for analog computations. Another important technology that benefits from the use of nonlinear fiber-based signal processing is optical code-division multiple access (CDMA). It is shown in both theory and experiment that all-optical thresholding is a unique way of improving existing detection methods for optical CDMA. Also, it is the way of implementation of true asynchronous optical spread-spectrum networks, which allows full realization of optical CDMA potential. Some aspects of quantum signal processing and manipulation of quantum states are also studied in this work. It is shown that propagation and collisions of Thirring solitons lead to a substantial squeezing of quantum states, which may find applications for generation of squeezed light.

  14. Optimization of polyetherimide processing parameters for optical interconnect applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Johnson, Peter; Wall, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    ULTEM® polyetherimide (PEI) resins have been used in opto-electronic markets since the optical properties of these materials enable the design of critical components under tight tolerances. PEI resins are the material of choice for injection molded integrated lens applications due to good dimensional stability, near infrared (IR) optical transparency, low moisture uptake and high heat performance. In most applications, parts must be produced consistently with minimal deviations to insure compatibility throughout the lifetime of the part. With the large number of lenses needed for this market, injection molding has been optimized to maximize the production rate. These optimized parameters for high throughput may or may not translate to an optimized optical performance. In this paper, we evaluate and optimize PEI injection molding processes with a focus on optical property performance. A commonly used commercial grade was studied to determine factors and conditions which contribute to optical transparency, color, and birefringence. Melt temperature, mold temperature, injection speed and cycle time were varied to develop optimization trials and evaluate optical properties. These parameters could be optimized to reduce in-plane birefringence from 0.0148 to 0.0006 in this study. In addition, we have studied an optically smooth, sub-10nm roughness mold to re-evaluate material properties with minimal influence from mold quality and further refine resin and process effects for the best optical performance.

  15. Organic transistors in optical displays and microelectronic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinck, Gerwin; Heremans, Paul; Nomoto, Kazumasa; Anthopoulos, Thomas D

    2010-09-08

    Organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) offer unprecedented opportunities for implementation in a broad range of technological applications spanning from large-volume microelectronics and optical displays to chemical and biological sensors. In this Progress Report, we review the application of organic transistors in the fields of flexible optical displays and microelectronics. The advantages associated with the use of OTFT technology are discussed with primary emphasis on the latest developments in the area of active-matrix electrophoretic and organic light-emitting diode displays based on OTFT backplanes and on the application of organic transistors in microelectronics including digital and analog circuits.

  16. Optical carrier-based microwave interferometers for sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Wang, Hanzheng; Yuan, Lei; Xiao, Hai

    2014-06-01

    Optical fiber interferometers (OFIs) have been extensively utilized for precise measurements of various physical/chemical quantities (e.g., temperature, strain, pressure, rotation, refractive index, etc.). However, the random change of polarization states along the optical fibers and the strong dependence on the materials and geometries of the optical waveguides are problematic for acquiring high quality interference signal. Meanwhile, difficulty in multiplexing has always been a bottleneck on the application scopes of OFIs. Here, we present a sensing concept of optical carrier based microwave interferometry (OCMI) by reading optical interferometric sensors in microwave domain. It combines the advantages from both optics and microwave. The low oscillation frequency of the microwave can hardly distinguish the optical differences from both modal and polarization dispersion making it insensitive to the optical waveguides/materials. The phase information of the microwave can be unambiguitly resolved so that it has potential in fully distributed sensing. The OCMI concept has been implemented in different types of interferometers (i.e., Michelson, Mach-Zehnder, Fabry-Perot) among different optical waveguides (i.e., singlemode, multimode, and sapphire fibers) with excellent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and low polarization dependence. A spatially continuous distributed strain sensing has been demonstrated.

  17. Modified chalcogenide glasses for optical device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on two different, but complementary, aspects of the modification of gallium lanthanum sulphide (GLS) glasses. Firstly the addition of transition metal ions as dopants is examined and their potential for use as active optical materials is explored. It is also argued that the spectroscopic analysis of transition metal ions is a useful tool for evaluating the local environment of their host. Secondly femtosecond (fs) laser modification of GLS is investigated as a method for waveguide formation.

  18. Military Applications of Fiber Optics Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    I. P., D. Marcuse , and H.M. Presby, "Multimode Fiber Bandwidth: Theory and Practice," Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol. 68 , No. 10, October 1980, pp...Li, Tingye, "Structures, Parameters, and Transmission Properties of Optical Fibers," Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol. 68 , No. 10, October 1980, pp. 1175...121. Sigel, George H., Jr., "Fiber Transmission Losses in High-Radiation Fields," Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol. 68 , No. 10, October 1980, pp. 1236

  19. Studies in Statistical Optics - Theory & Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-29

    page 9. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Coherence and statistical optics; scattering; propagation; reflection and refraction . 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Scattering from Quasi-Homogeneous Media”, Opt. Commun., 294, 43-48 (2013). 7. M. Lahiri and E. Wolf, “Theory of Refraction and Reflection with Partially... Refraction and on Reflection ”, JOSA A, 30, 1107-1112 (2013). 9. S. B. Raghunathan, T. D. Visser, and E. Wolf, “Far-zone Properties of Electromagnetic

  20. Temperature insensitive fiber optic interferometer and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Kent A.

    1989-01-01

    A method of modifying a uÌ ber optic fused biconical tapered coupler to produce a relatively temperature insensitive Michelson interferometer is presented. The modification was accomplished by cleaving the coupler after the minimum taper region and polishing, perpendicular to the endface, to a point just short of the interaction region. This allows one of the two fiber cores, which are within micrometers of each other with their claddings fused together, to be coated at its end...

  1. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2006-01-01

    Optical and photonic systems and devices have significant potential for homeland security. Optical Imaging Sensors and Systems for Homeland Security Applications presents original and significant technical contributions from leaders of industry, government, and academia in the field of optical and photonic sensors, systems and devices for detection, identification, prevention, sensing, security, verification and anti-counterfeiting. The chapters have recent and technically significant results, ample illustrations, figures, and key references. This book is intended for engineers and scientists in the relevant fields, graduate students, industry managers, university professors, government managers, and policy makers. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications focuses on research monographs in the areas of -Recognition and identification (including optical imaging, biometrics, authentication, verification, and smart surveillance systems) -Biological and chemical threat detection (including bios...

  2. Nonlinear Optical BBO Crystals: Growth, Properties and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐鼎元

    2000-01-01

    Low temperature phase barium metaborate β-BaB2O4 (BBO) is an important nonlinear optical material. Up to now, the BBO single crystals with large size and good optical quality were grown from Na2O or NaF fluxed solvents by the top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) technique with or without pulling. In order to improve the growth rate and quality of BBO crystals, several new techniques such as continuous feeding, forced stirring and cooling growing crystals etc. have been suggested. Applications of BBO as an excellent nonlinear optical crystal include mainly frequency conversion of various laser radiation, high average power frequency conversion, frequency doubling of ultrashort pulses and broadly tunable optical parametric oscillators (OPO).This paper is a brief review on the growth, properties and applications of BBO crystals.

  3. All-optical signal processing data communication and storage applications

    CERN Document Server

    Eggleton, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the state-of-the art of optical signal processing technologies and devices. It presents breakthrough solutions for enabling a pervasive use of optics in data communication and signal storage applications. It presents presents optical signal processing as solution to overcome the capacity crunch in communication networks. The book content ranges from the development of innovative materials and devices, such as graphene and slow light structures, to the use of nonlinear optics for secure quantum information processing and overcoming the classical Shannon limit on channel capacity and microwave signal processing. Although it holds the promise for a substantial speed improvement, today’s communication infrastructure optics remains largely confined to the signal transport layer, as it lags behind electronics as far as signal processing is concerned. This situation will change in the near future as the tremendous growth of data traffic requires energy efficient and ful...

  4. General optical discrete z transform: design and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Nam Quoc

    2016-12-20

    This paper presents a generalization of the discrete z transform algorithm. It is shown that the GOD-ZT algorithm is a generalization of several important conventional discrete transforms. Based on the GOD-ZT algorithm, a tunable general optical discrete z transform (GOD-ZT) processor is synthesized using the silica-based finite impulse response transversal filter. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, the design and simulation of a tunable optical discrete Fourier transform (ODFT) processor as a special case of the synthesized GOD-ZT processor is presented. It is also shown that the ODFT processor can function as a real-time optical spectrum analyzer. The tunable ODFT has an important potential application as a tunable optical demultiplexer at the receiver end of an optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing transmission system.

  5. Study on application of optical clearing technique in skin diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hao; Liang, Yanmei; Wang, Jingyi; Li, Yan

    2012-11-01

    So far, the study of the optical clearing is almost always about healthy tissue. However, the ultimate goal is to detect diseases for clinical application. Optical clearing on diseased skins is explored. The effect is evaluated by applying a combined liquid paraffin and glycerol mixed solution on several kinds of diseased skins in vitro. Scanning experiments from optical coherence tomography show that it has different effects among fibroma, pigmented nevus, and seborrheic keratosis. Based on the results, we conclude that different skin diseases have different compositions and structures, and their optical parameters and biological characteristics should be different, which implies that the optical clearing technique may have selectivity and may not be suitable for all kinds of skin diseases.

  6. Magnetic Particles Coupled to Disposable Screen Printed Transducers for Electrochemical Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasensitive biosensing is currently a growing demand that has led to the development of numerous strategies for signal amplification. In this context, the unique properties of magnetic particles; both of nano- and micro-size dimensions; have proved to be promising materials to be coupled with disposable electrodes for the design of cost-effective electrochemical affinity biosensing platforms. This review addresses, through discussion of selected examples, the way that nano- and micro-magnetic particles (MNPs and MMPs; respectively have contributed significantly to the development of electrochemical affinity biosensors, including immuno-, DNA, aptamer and other affinity modes. Different aspects such as type of magnetic particles, assay formats, detection techniques, sensitivity, applicability and other relevant characteristics are discussed. Research opportunities and future development trends in this field are also considered.

  7. Magnetic Particles Coupled to Disposable Screen Printed Transducers for Electrochemical Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Campuzano, Susana; Pingarrón, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasensitive biosensing is currently a growing demand that has led to the development of numerous strategies for signal amplification. In this context, the unique properties of magnetic particles; both of nano- and micro-size dimensions; have proved to be promising materials to be coupled with disposable electrodes for the design of cost-effective electrochemical affinity biosensing platforms. This review addresses, through discussion of selected examples, the way that nano- and micro-magnetic particles (MNPs and MMPs; respectively) have contributed significantly to the development of electrochemical affinity biosensors, including immuno-, DNA, aptamer and other affinity modes. Different aspects such as type of magnetic particles, assay formats, detection techniques, sensitivity, applicability and other relevant characteristics are discussed. Research opportunities and future development trends in this field are also considered. PMID:27681733

  8. Astronomy applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Brian J.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2003-06-01

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  9. Optical correlation filters for large-class OCR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasent, David P.; Iyer, Anand K.; Gopalaswamy, Srinivasan

    1991-08-01

    The performance of two new optical correlation filters (G-MACE and MINACE) for large class (many fonts and true class words) OCR (optical character recognition) applications is considered. We consider filters that can recognize many key words in upper case (UC) and mixed case (MC) and various point sizes in the presence of OCR scanner sampling errors. New results are presented and guidelines for large class filters are advanced.

  10. Astronomy Applications of Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T

    2003-04-23

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  11. Monomer diffusion in sustainable photopolymers for diffractive optics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gallego Rico, Sergi; Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Marini, Stephan; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto

    2011-01-01

    Photopolymers have many applications in optics. However, one of the main drawbacks of these materials is the high toxicity of their components. One of the most widely studied photopolymers is polyvinyl-alcohol/acrylamide, and the carcinogenic potential of acrylamide is well known. In this paper we propose a new sustainable photopolymer as a substitute for acrylamide based photopolymers in the manufacture of diffractive optical elements. Diffraction efficiencies of around 40% were achieved for...

  12. The Characteristics and Application of Polymer Optical Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Bo; JI Xiao-li; ZHANG Chao-can

    2003-01-01

    The recent development of polymer optical fiber (POF) at home and abroad was summarized.The special characteristics of the perfluorinated POF were introduced and its wide potential application was predicted. POF is the most suitable in conjunction network project, especially using with quartz optical fibers . Facing this market opportunity, it is a right choice to unit colleges, research institntions and manufacture corporations to accelerate the imdustrialization of POF.

  13. Scientific Applications of Optical Instruments to Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is a unique environment for materials and biotechnology processing. Microgravity minimizes or eliminates some of the effects that occur in one g. This can lead to the production of new materials or crystal structures. It is important to understand the processes that create these new materials. Thus, experiments are designed so that optical data collection can take place during the formation of the material. This presentation will discuss scientific application of optical instruments at MSFC. These instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a miniaturized holographic system, and a phase-shifting interferometer.

  14. Optical code division multiple access fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Prucnal, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    Code-division multiple access (CDMA) technology has been widely adopted in cell phones. Its astonishing success has led many to evaluate the promise of this technology for optical networks. This field has come to be known as Optical CDMA (OCDMA). Surveying the field from its infancy to the current state, Optical Code Division Multiple Access: Fundamentals and Applications offers the first comprehensive treatment of OCDMA from technology to systems.The book opens with a historical perspective, demonstrating the growth and development of the technologies that would eventually evolve into today's

  15. Living Brain Optical Imaging: Technology, Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Bernardelli, Chad; Maslov, Konstantin I.

    2017-01-01

    Within the last few decades, optical imaging methods have yielded revolutionary results when applied to all parts of the central nervous system. The purpose of this review is to analyze research possibilities and limitations of several novel imaging techniques and show some of the most interesting achievements obtained by these methods. Here we covered intrinsic optical imaging, voltage-sensitive dye, photoacoustic, optical coherence tomography, near-infrared spectroscopy and some other techniques. All of them are mainly applicable for experimental neuroscience but some of them also suitable for the clinical studies.

  16. Scientific Applications of Optical Instruments to Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is a unique environment for materials and biotechnology processing. Microgravity minimizes or eliminates some of the effects that occur in one g. This can lead to the production of new materials or crystal structures. It is important to understand the processes that create these new materials. Thus, experiments are designed so that optical data collection can take place during the formation of the material. This presentation will discuss scientific application of optical instruments at MSFC. These instruments include a near-field scanning optical microscope, a miniaturized holographic system, and a phase-shifting interferometer.

  17. Optical intersatellite links - Application to commercial satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D.; Faris, F.; Garlow, R.; Inukai, T.; Pontano, B.; Razdan, R.; Ganz, Aura; Caudill, L.

    1992-01-01

    Application of optical intersatellite links for commercial satellite communications services is addressed in this paper. The feasibility of commercialization centers around basic issues such as the need and derived benefits, implementation complexity and overall cost. In this paper, commercialization of optical ISLs is assessed in terms of the services provided, systems requirements and feasibility of appropriate technology. Both long- and short-range ISLs for GEO-GEO, GEO-LEO and LEO applications are considered. Impact of systems requirements on the payload design and use of advanced technology in reducing its mass, power, and volume requirements are discussed.

  18. New development in optical fibers for data center applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Shubochkin, Roman; Zhu, Benyuan

    2015-01-01

    VCSEL-multimode optical fiber based links is the most successful optical technology in Data Centers. Laser-optimized multimode optical fibers, OM3 and OM4, have been the primary choice of physical media for 10 G serial, 4 x 10 G parallel, 10 x 10 G parallel, and 4 x 25 G parallel optical solutions in IEEE 802.3 standards. As the transition of high-end servers from 10 Gb/s to 40 Gb/s is driving the aggregation of speeds to 40 Gb/s now, and to 100 Gb/s and 400 Gb/s in near future, industry experts are coming together in IEEE 802.3bs 400 Gb/s study group and preliminary discussion of Terabit transmission for datacom applications has also been commenced. To meet the requirement of speed, capacity, density, power consumption and cost for next generation datacom applications, optical fiber design concepts beyond the standard OM3 and OM4 MMFs have a revived research and developmental interest, for example, wide band multimode optical fiber using multiple dopants for coarse wavelength division multiplexing; multicore multimode optical fiber using plural multimode cores in a single fiber strand to improve spatial density; and perhaps 50 Gb/s per lane and few mode fiber in spatial division multiplexing for ultimate capacity increase in far future. This talk reviews the multitude of fiber optic media being developed in the industry to address the upcoming challenges of datacom growth. We conclude that multimode transmission using low cost VCSEL technology will continue to be a viable solution for datacom applications.

  19. Description of all-optical network test bed and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Douglas; Castagnozzi, Daniel M.; Hemenway, B. R.; Parikh, Salil A.; Stevens, Mark L.; Swanson, Eric A.; Thomas, Robert E.; Ozveren, C.; Kaminow, Ivan P.

    1995-12-01

    We describe an all-optical network testbed deployed in the Boston metropolitan area, and some of the experimental applications running over the network. The network was developed by a consortium of AT&T Bell Laboratories, Digital Equipment Corporation, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a grant from ARPA. The network is an optical WDM system organized as a hierarchy consisting of local, metropolitan, and wide area nodes that support optical broadcast and routing modes. Frequencies are shared and reused to enhance network scalability. Electronic access is provided through optical terminals that support multiple services having data rates between 10 Mbps/user and 10 Gbps/user. Novel components used to implement the network include fast-tuning 1.5 micrometers distributed Bragg reflector lasers, passive wavelength routers, and broadband optical frequency converters. An overlay control network implemented at 1.3 micrometers allows reliable out-of-band control and standardized network management of all network nodes. We have created interfaces between the AON and commercially available electronic circuit-switched and packet-switched networks. We will report on network applications that can dynamically allocate optical bandwidth between electronic packet-switches based on the offered load presented by users, without requiring interfaces between users and the AON control system. We will also describe video and telemedicine applications running over the network. We have demonstrated an audio/video codec that is directly interfaced to the optical network, and is capable of transmitting high-rate digitized video signals for broadcast or videoconferencing applications. We have also demonstrated a state-of-the-art radiological workstation that uses the AON to transport 2000 X 2000 X 16 bit images from a remote image server.

  20. Conjugated amplifying polymers for optical sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Sébastien; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-06-12

    Thanks to their unique optical and electrochemical properties, conjugated polymers have attracted considerable attention over the last two decades and resulted in numerous technological innovations. In particular, their implementation in sensing schemes and devices was widely investigated and produced a multitude of sensory systems and transduction mechanisms. Conjugated polymers possess numerous attractive features that make them particularly suitable for a broad variety of sensing tasks. They display sensory signal amplification (compared to their small-molecule counterparts) and their structures can easily be tailored to adjust solubility, absorption/emission wavelengths, energy offsets for excited state electron transfer, and/or for use in solution or in the solid state. This versatility has made conjugated polymers a fluorescence sensory platform of choice in the recent years. In this review, we highlight a variety of conjugated polymer-based sensory mechanisms together with selected examples from the recent literature.

  1. Optical Coherence Tomography: Modeling and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars

    in previous theoretical models of OCT systems. It is demonstrated that the shower curtain effect is of utmost importance in the theoretical description of an OCT system. The analytical model, together with proper noise analysis of the OCT system, enables calculation of the SNR, where the optical properties...... geometry, i.e., reflection geometry, is developed. As in the new OCT model, multiple scattered photons has been taken into account together with multiple scattering effects. As an important result, a novel method of creating images based on measurements of the momentum width of the Wigner phase......An analytical model is presented that is able to describe the performance of OCT systems in both the single and multiple scattering regimes simultaneously. This model inherently includes the shower curtain effect, well-known for light propagation through the atmosphere. This effect has been omitted...

  2. Optical coatings for laser fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.; Rainer, F.

    1980-04-24

    Lasers for fusion experiments use thin-film dielectric coatings for reflecting, antireflecting and polarizing surface elements. Coatings are most important to the Nd:glass laser application. The most important requirements of these coatings are accuracy of the average value of reflectance and transmission, uniformity of amplitude and phase front of the reflected or transmitted light, and laser damage threshold. Damage resistance strongly affects the laser's design and performance. The success of advanced lasers for future experiments and for reactor applications requires significant developments in damage resistant coatings for ultraviolet laser radiation.

  3. Simple fiber optic sensor for applications in security systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Karol, M.; Markowski, P.; Napierala, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate measurement results of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor used for the monitoring of the fiber optic link integrity to protect it against unauthorized access to classified information. The presented construction is based on the detection of changes of the modes distribution in a multimode fiber. Any mechanical stress on the multimode fiber causes changes of polarization and distribution of propagating modes, hence it changes the distribution of modes at the end of the multimode fiber. Observation of these changes using a narrow core single-mode fiber allows to use the structure as an optical fiber sensor. We used several kilometers long optical links to conduct field tests of laboratory sensor. On this basis the prototype module of modalmetric fiber optic sensor wasbuilt. The modification of optoelectronic part, the variation of sensor length and the change of the method of light reflection at the end of the fiber enable the use of the modalmetric fiber optic sensor in many applications. The sensor finds wide range of applications in security systems. It can be applied to protect the museum's collection, transmission lines and to protect objects of critical infrastructure.

  4. Perspective Application of Passive Optical Network with Optimized Bus Topology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lafata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Passive optical networks (PONs represent a promising solution for modern access telecommunication networks.These networks are able to meet the increasing demands on transmission rate for demanding multimedia services,while they can offer typical shared transmission speed of 1.25 or 2.5 Gbps. The major role in deploying opticaldistribution networks ODNs plays the maximum attenuable loss, which is caused mainly by passive optical splitters.This paper proposes an innovative application of passive optical networks with optimized bus topology especially forlocal backbone data networks. Due to using only passive components, it is necessary to optimize certain parameters,especially an overall attenuation balance. Considering the possibility of such optimization, the passive optical networkwith optimized bus topology provides several interesting opportunities for specific applications. This paper will presentselected aspects of passive optical networks and splitters with asymmetric splitting ratio. The essential part is focusedon the practical demonstration of their use to optimize the passive optical network with bus topology, which acts as alocal backbone network for structured cabling systems, and for local data networks in large buildings.

  5. Synthesis of Chromophores for Nonlinear Optics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    Investigacion de Quimica Aplicada Blvd. Enrique reyna, No. 140 Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico 25253 AFOSR FA9550-09-1-0017 12 March 2010...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER CENTRO DE INVESTIGACION EN QUIMICA APLICADA BLVD ENRIQUE REYNA NO 140 SALTILLO 25253 MEXICO...APPLICATIONS Eduardo Arias, Ivana Moggio and Ronald F. Ziolo Centro de Investigacion de Quimica Aplicada Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico 25253

  6. Light Scattering by Optically Soft Particles Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Subodh K

    2006-01-01

    The present monograph deals with a particular class of approximation methods in the context of light scattering by small particles. This class of approximations has been termed as eikonal or soft particle approximations. The eikonal approximation was studied extensively in the potential scattering and then adopted in optical scattering problems. In this context, the eikonal and other soft particle approximations pertain to scatterers whose relative refractive index compared to surrounding medium is close to unity. The study of these approximations is very important because soft particles occur abundantly in nature. For example, the particles that occur in ocean optics, biomedical optics, atmospheric optics and in many industrial applications can be classified as soft particles. This book was written in recognition of the long-standing and current interest in the field of scattering approximations for soft particles. It should prove to be a useful addition for researchers in the field of light scattering.

  7. Femtosecond Optical Frequency Comb Technology Principle, Operation and Application

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Jun

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a remarkable convergence among the fields of ultrafast optics, optical frequency metrology, and precision laser spectroscopy. This convergence has enabled unprecedented advances in control of the electric field of the pulses produced by femtosecond mode-locked lasers. The resulting spectrum consists of a comb of sharp spectral lines with well-defined frequencies. These new techniques and capabilities are generally known as "femtosecond comb technology." They have had dramatic impact on the diverse fields of precision measurement and extreme nonlinear optical physics. This book provides an introductory description of mode-locked lasers, the connection between time and frequency descriptions of their output and the physical origins of the electric field dynamics, together with an overview of applications of femtosecond comb technology. Individual chapters go into more detail on mode-locked laser development, spectral broadening in microstructure fiber, optical parametric ...

  8. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate.

  9. Optical fiber temperature sensors: applications in heat treatments for foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Morales, María Elena; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; López-Malo, Aurelio

    2010-10-01

    Heat treatments are important methods to provide safe foods. Conventional heat treatments involve the application of steam and recently microwave treatments have been studied and applied as they are considered as fast, clean and efficient. Optical fiber sensing is an excellent tool to measure the temperature during microwave treatments. This paper shows the application of optical fiber temperature sensing during the heat treatment of different foods such as vegetables (jalapeño pepper and cilantro), cheese and ostrich meat. Reaching the target temperature, important bacteria were inactivated: Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia coli. Thus, the use of optical fiber sensors has resulted be a useful way to develop protocols to inactivate microorganisms and to propose new methods for food processing.

  10. Microneedle arrays for biosensing and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Narayan, Roger; Miller, Philip; Polsky, Ronen; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2017-08-22

    Methods, structures, and systems are disclosed for biosensing and drug delivery techniques. In one aspect, a^ device for detecting an analyte and/or releasing a biochemical into a biological fluid can include an array of hollowed needles, in which each needle includes a protruded needle structure including an exterior wall forming a hollow interior and an opening at a terminal end of the protruded needle structure that exposes the hollow interior, and a probe inside the exterior wall to interact with one or more chemical or biological substances that come in contact with the probe via the opening to produce a probe sensing signal, and an array of wires that are coupled to probes of the array of hollowed needles, respectively, each wire being electrically conductive to transmit the probe sensing signal produced by a respective probe.

  11. Microneedle arrays for biosensing and drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joseph; Windmiller, Joshua Ray; Narayan, Roger; Miller, Philip

    2017-08-29

    Methods, structures, and systems are disclosed for biosensing and drug delivery techniques. In one aspect, a device for detecting an analyte and/or releasing a biochemical into a biological fluid can include an array of hollowed needles, in which each needle includes a protruded needle structure including an exterior wall forming a hollow interior and an opening at a terminal end of the protruded needle structure that exposes the hollow interior, and a probe inside the exterior wall to interact with one or more chemical or biological substances that come in contact with the probe via the opening to produce a probe sensing signal, and an array of wires that are coupled to probes of the array of hollowed needles, respectively, each wire being electrically conductive to transmit the probe sensing signal produced by a respective probe.

  12. Stress engineering and the applications of inhomogeneously polarized optical fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas G. BROWN; Amber M. BECKLEY

    2013-01-01

    Spatial inhomogeneities in the polarization of a light field can show fascinating effects in focusing, propagation, illumination, and imaging. This paper provides examples of these effects and describes how deterministic stress on the periphery of an optical element can be used in fundamental studies of beam propagation, as well as applications such as polarimetry.

  13. Applications of quantum stochastic processes in quantum optics

    OpenAIRE

    Bouten, Luc

    2008-01-01

    These lecture notes provide an introduction to quantum filtering and its applications in quantum optics. We start with a brief introduction to quantum probability, focusing on the spectral theorem. Then we introduce the conditional expectation and quantum stochastic calculus. In the last part of the notes we discuss the filtering problem.

  14. SU 8 used as optical waveguide in integrated optical microsensor for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Műller, Raluca; Obreja, P.; Kusko, M.; Esinenco, D.; Tibeica, C.; Conache, G.; Buia, L.; Apostol, D.; Damian, V.; Mateescu, M.; Diaconu, Mirela; Moldovan, Lucia

    2005-08-01

    We present preliminary experiments for an integrated optical sensor based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer for biological applications. The sensor is sensitive to refractive index change produced by the presence of a biological species in the cladding of the optical waveguide. A "window" can be patterned in the upper cladding, so that the evanescent wave can be in direct contact with the environmental (the sensitive layer). We investigated as optical waveguides a new material, SU-8, a negative photoresist well known from the development of 3D micromachmed structures. We structured, by photolithographic techniques, rib and channel optical waveguides. We studied the influence of the silicon substrate on propagation losses and the possibility to use these losses for the selective attenuation of the higher order modes on the vertical direction. As biological materials we experimented collagen, which is a bio-polymer which can bind different enzymes or antibodies.

  15. Optical phase noise engineering via acousto-optic interaction and its interferometric applications

    CERN Document Server

    Satapathy, Nandan; Bannerjee, Sourish; Ramachandran, Hema

    2013-01-01

    We exercise rapid and fine control over the phase of light by transferring digitally gen- erated phase jumps from radio frequency (rf) electrical signals onto light by means of acousto-optic interaction. By tailoring the statistics of phase jumps in the electrical signal and thereby engineering the optical phase noise, we manipulate the visibil- ity of interference fringes in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer that incorporates two acousto-optic modulators. Such controlled dephasing finds applications in modern experiments involving the spread or diffusion of light in an optical network. Further, we analytically show how engineered partial phase noise can convert the dark port of a stabilised interferometer to a weak source of highly correlated photons.

  16. DNA-functionalized solid state nanopore for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussi, V; Fanzio, P; Repetto, L; Firpo, G; Valbusa, U [Nanomed Labs, Physics Department, University of Genova, Advanced Biotechnology Center, Largo R. Benzi, 10 Genova, 16132 (Italy); Scaruffi, P; Stigliani, S; Tonini, G P, E-mail: mussi@fisica.unige.it [Translational Pediatric Oncology, National Institute for Cancer Research (IST), Largo R. Benzi, 10 Genova, 16132 (Italy)

    2010-04-09

    The possible use of nanopores for single DNA molecules biosensing has been demonstrated, but much remains to do in order to develop advanced engineered devices with enhanced stability, and controlled geometry and surface properties. Here we present morphological and electrical characterization of solid state silicon nitride nanopores fabricated by focused ion beam direct milling and chemically functionalized by probe oligonucleotides, with the final aim of developing a versatile tool for biosensing and gene expression profiling.

  17. Synthesis of a highly dispersive sinapinic acid@graphene oxide (SA@GO) and its applications as a novel surface assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for proteomics and pathogenic bacteria biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2015-03-07

    Graphene oxide (GO)-modified sinapinic acid (3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, SA) (SA@GO) was synthesized and characterized; it was then investigated as a new surface assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) for proteomics and pathogenic bacteria biosensing. SA@GO could effectively decrease the time necessary for sweet spotting searching, reducing the amount of organic matrix and solvent and enhance the sensitivity. SA@GO shows high performance as a matrix alone without the need to add trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). However, the analysis of the intact bacteria cells shows improvement in the signal intensity (2-5 fold) and offers a low limit of detection. All these analyses could be performed with low concentrations (1-10 fmol) and tiny volumes (0.5-1 μL). This study demonstrated that the exploration of new hybrid materials is pivotal to achieve high performance and high ionization. Because of the plane of GO, it assists protein-protein interactions that make it undergo softer ionization.

  18. Application of optical system simulation software in a fiber optic telecommunications program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Warren L. G.; Mandloi, Divya

    2004-10-01

    One of our objectives in the College of Applied Science and Technology at RIT is to offer our students some kind of "hands-on" experience along with theory. Providing a hands-on experience can be costly, however, especially in the field of optical communication. Although reasonably priced laboratory kits are available, the optical-electronic components in these kits are well below communication grade. Thus if we rely only on hardware, our students can only experiment with low power, low bit rate communication over a few kilometers of fiber. Computer simulation software offers an affordable alternative "hands-on" experience. With this software, a student can create a model of an optical system, execute the model and view measures of the system's performance. The system components can include DFB laser diodes, high-speed modulators, hundreds of kilometers of fiber, APD receivers and other optical and electrical components. The student can view the optical signals in the time or frequency domain, measure optical power and signal-to-noise ratio and much more. He or she can also view the effects of parameter variations or find the optimal value of a parameter. The software is easy to learn, especially if the student has previous experience with an electronic system simulator. This paper describes our application of an optical-electronic system simulator in the Telecommunications Engineering Technology program at RIT. We are developing a series of exercises to complement courses in fiber optic. These exercises will allow students to model and test systems that they have designed. We expect computer simulation to enhance our fiber optic courses significantly by adding a reasonably realistic and accessible test bed for student designs.

  19. Smart Materials for Electromagnetic and Optical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Prashanth

    dissertation demonstrates GaN as a candidate material well suited for novel microelectromechanical systems. The potential of GaN for MEMS is demonstrated via the design, analysis, fabrication, testing and characterization of an optical microswitch device actuated by piezoelectric and electrostrictive means. The piezoelectric and electrostrictive properties of GaN and its differences from common piezoelectrics are discussed before elaborating on the device configuration used to implement the microswitch device. Next, the development of two recent fabrication technologies, Photoelectrochemical etch and Bias-enabled Dark Electrochemical etch, used to realize the 3-dimensional device structure in GaN are described in detail. Finally, an ultra-low-cost, laser-based, non-contact approach to test and characterize the microswitch device is described, followed by the device testing results.

  20. An Optical Additive Solc Filter for Deep Ultraviolet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manka, Charles; Nikitin, Sergei

    2008-10-01

    A number of optical applications in the deep ultra violet (DUV) range have limitations due to the absence of simple and reliable optical notch filters. This is important for resonant Raman applications that employ frequency agile laser illumination at many sequential DUV wavelengths. Our filter is based on widely known birefringent filter design originally proposed by Solc [I. Solc ``Birefringent chain filters'' JOSA 55, p.621 (1965)]. Rather than the transmission filter design of Solc, the additive Solc filter (ASF) described here is suitable for narrow-line rejection (< 1 nm), as dictated by the requirements of UVRR and other applications. We have designed and constructed such a filter and present test results. Finally, we present a design which allows fiber delivery of DUV illumination wavelengths, rejects the quartz Raman lines generated in the fiber, but then rejects the backscattered unshifted light from a target and passes the Raman lines generated by the target material.

  1. Optical fibers and their applications for radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    When optical fibers are used in a strong radiation field, it is necessary to increase the radiation-resistant capacity. Aiming at the improvement of such property, the characteristics of recent optical fibers made from quartz-glass were reviewed and the newly developed techniques for radiation measurement using those fibers were summarized in this report. Since optical fibers became able to use in the levels near the core conditions, their applications have started in various fields of technologies related to radiation. By combining the optical fibers and a small sensor, it became possible to act as `Key Component` for measuring wide range radioactivity from a trace activity to a strong radiation field in the reactor core. Presently, the fibers are utilized for investigation of the optical mechanisms related in radiation, evaluation of their validities so on. Further, the optical fibers are expected to utilize in a multi-parametric measuring system which allows to concomitantly determine the radiation, temperature, pressure, flow amount etc. as an incore monitor. (M.N.)

  2. Applications of nonimaging optics for very high solar concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

    1997-12-31

    Using the principles and techniques of nonimaging optics, solar concentrations that approach the theoretical maximum can be achieved. This has applications in solar energy collection wherever concentration is desired. In this paper, we survey recent progress in attaining and using high and ultrahigh solar fluxes. We review a number of potential applications for highly concentrated solar energy and the current status of the associated technology. By making possible new and unique applications for intense solar flux, these techniques have opened a whole new frontier for research and development of potentially economic uses of solar energy.

  3. Introduction to fiber optics: Sensors for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R Y; Agrawal, Y K

    2011-01-01

    The paper focuses on the introduction of fiber optics, a fusion of science and engineering and describes the materials generally used for its construction along with the procedure used to design the fibers. It gives an idea of the materials used for the construction along with the pros and cons associated with them and various factors governing the emission of ultraviolet, infrared or visible radiations. The central core revolves around the applications of optical fibers in the medical and biomedical field and extending the use of the same in pharmaceutical industry as probes in quality control and dosage form analysis.

  4. Semiconductor optical fibres for infrared applications: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Anna C.; Healy, Noel

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a new class of optical fibre has emerged that incorporates semiconductor materials within the core. These fibres are rich in optoelectronic functionality and offer extended transmission bands across the infrared spectral region so that their application potential is vast. Various fabrication methods have been developed to produce fibres with a range of unary and compound semiconductor core materials, which can be either amorphous or crystalline in form. This review discusses the main fabrication procedures and the infrared optical properties of the semiconductor fibres that have been fabricated to date, then takes a look at the future prospects of this exciting new technology.

  5. Fiber optic sensors for environmental applications: A brief review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1992-04-01

    Understanding the flow a groundwater quality. This understanding is achieved by measurement of the appropriate chemical and physical subsurface parameters. The ideal measurement would accurately assess a parameter without affecting the parameter or its environment. Fiber optic spectroscopy offers some of the most promising techniques for accurate, non-invasive measurements of environmental parameters. Fiber optic sensors for subsurface applications are currently being developed by several Department of Energy laboratories. Some of these sensors have been successfully deployed in the field and are attaining the goals of accurate, noninvasive, real time measurements in the subsurface.

  6. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials.

  7. Control grid motion estimation for efficient application of optical flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zwart, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Motion estimation is a long-standing cornerstone of image and video processing. Most notably, motion estimation serves as the foundation for many of today's ubiquitous video coding standards including H.264. Motion estimators also play key roles in countless other applications that serve the consumer, industrial, biomedical, and military sectors. Of the many available motion estimation techniques, optical flow is widely regarded as most flexible. The flexibility offered by optical flow is particularly useful for complex registration and interpolation problems, but comes at a considerable compu

  8. An optical FSK transmitter based on an integrated DFB laser-EA modulator and its application in optical labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Chi, Nan; Holm-Nielsen, Pablo Villanueva;

    2003-01-01

    An optical frequency-shift-keying (FSK) transmitter based on an integrated distributed feedback laser-electroabsorption modulator is proposed and demonstrated. The feasibility of its application in optical labeling is also validated by the experimental results. The generated optical signal, consi...

  9. Inkjet Printing of Functional Materials for Optical and Photonic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alamán

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Inkjet printing, traditionally used in graphics, has been widely investigated as a valuable tool in the preparation of functional surfaces and devices. This review focuses on the use of inkjet printing technology for the manufacturing of different optical elements and photonic devices. The presented overview mainly surveys work done in the fabrication of micro-optical components such as microlenses, waveguides and integrated lasers; the manufacturing of large area light emitting diodes displays, liquid crystal displays and solar cells; as well as the preparation of liquid crystal and colloidal crystal based photonic devices working as lasers or optical sensors. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the materials employed as well as in the relevance of inkjet in the manufacturing of the different devices showing in each of the revised technologies, main achievements, applications and challenges.

  10. Bragg-Fresnel optics: New field of applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snigirev, A. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    Bragg-Fresnel Optics shows excellent compatibility with the third generation synchrotron radiation sources such as ESRF and is capable of obtaining monochromatic submicron focal spots with 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} photons/sec in an energy bandwidth of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -6} and in a photon energy range between 2-100 keV. New types of Bragg-Fresnel lenses like modified, ion implanted, bent and acoustically modulated were tested. Microprobe techniques like microdiffraction and microfluorescence based on Bragg-Fresnel optics were realised at the ESRF beamlines. Excellent parameters of the X-ray beam at the ESRF in terms of low emittance and quite small angular source size allow for Bragg-Fresnel optics to occupy new fields of applications such as high resolution diffraction, holography, interferometry and phase contrast imaging.

  11. Synergistic use of optical and microwave data in agrometeorological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, R. B.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1993-05-01

    Remotely sensed optical and microwave data can be synergistically used to infer land surface properties. Optical data can be used to estimate surface albedo, radiation absorption by vegetation canopies and their photosynthetic efficiencies. Vegetation canopy reflectance at red and near-infrared wavelengths can be used to correct for vegetation effect on microwave emissivities at low frequencies for estimating soil moisture. Optical data can also provide information about surface and air temperatures, precipitable water vapor, cloud top temperature and its water content. This information can be utilized to correct microwave data for atmospheric effects. These points are illustrated with theoretical analyses and by application to satellite data. The basic physical mechanisms operative at the various wavelengths are also discussed.

  12. Ghost imaging protocol for magneto-optical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meda, A; Avella, A; Berchera, I Ruo; Degiovanni, I P; Magni, A; Genovese, M

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new approach in magneto-optical imaging (MOI), applying for the first time a ghost imaging (GI) protocol to perform Faraday microscopy. MOI is one of the most exploited technique for the study of magnetic properties of a material, through Weiss domains form, distribution and dimension analysis. Nevertheless, a lack of imaging of domains in some extreme conditions as cryogenic temperatures or high magnetic fields application is present due to the difficulties related to the imaging setup construction limitation. Here we present a technique that separates the imaging optical path to the one illuminating the object. The technique is based on thermal light GI and exploits correlations between light beams. GI is applied to the Faraday magneto-optical observation of magnetic domains of an Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) sample.

  13. Ultrafast optical imaging technology: principles and applications of emerging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Hideharu; Gao, Liang; Goda, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    High-speed optical imaging is an indispensable technology for blur-free observation of fast transient dynamics in virtually all areas including science, industry, defense, energy, and medicine. High temporal resolution is particularly important for microscopy as even a slow event appears to occur "fast" in a small field of view. Unfortunately, the shutter speed and frame rate of conventional cameras based on electronic image sensors are significantly constrained by their electrical operation and limited storage. Over the recent years, several unique and unconventional approaches to high-speed optical imaging have been reported to circumvent these technical challenges and achieve a frame rate and shutter speed far beyond what can be reached with the conventional image sensors. In this article, we review the concepts and principles of such ultrafast optical imaging methods, compare their advantages and disadvantages, and discuss an entirely new class of applications that are possible using them.

  14. Recent progress in biomedical applications of persistent luminescence nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Qinqin; Wang, Yingqian; Shen, Haijing; Yuan, Quan

    2017-05-18

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are an emerging group of promising luminescent materials that can remain luminescent after the excitation ceases. In the past decade, PLNPs with intriguing optical properties have been developed and their applications in biomedicine have been widely studied. Due to the ultra-long decay time of persistent luminescence, autofluorescence interference in biosensing and bioimaging can be efficiently eliminated. Moreover, PLNPs can remain luminescent for hours, making them valuable in bio-tracing. Also, persistent luminescence imaging can guide cancer therapy with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and superior sensitivity. Briefly, PLNPs are demonstrated to be a newly-emerging class of functional materials with unprecedented advantages in biomedicine. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the preparation of PLNPs and the applications of PLNPs in biosensing, bioimaging and cancer therapy.

  15. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development.

  16. Physical Properties and Behaviour of Highly Bi-Substituted Magneto-Optic Garnets for Applications in Integrated Optics and Photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nur-E-Alam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth and Bi-substituted iron garnet thin film materials exhibit strong potential for application in various fields of science and frontier optical technologies. Bi-substituted iron garnets possess extraordinary optical and MO properties and are still considered as the best MO functional materials for various emerging integrated optics and photonics applications. However, these MO garnet materials are rarely seen in practical photonics use due to their high optical losses in the visible spectral region. In this paper, we report on the physical properties and magneto-optic behaviour of high-performance RF sputtered highly bismuth-substituted iron garnet and garnet-oxide nanocomposite films of generic composition type (Bi, Dy/Lu3(Fe, Ga/Al5O12. Our newly synthesized garnet materials form high-quality nanocrystalline thin film layers which demonstrate excellent optical and MO properties suitable for a wide range of applications in integrated optics and photonics.

  17. A fiber optics textile composite sensor for geotechnical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artières, Olivier; Dortland, Gerrit

    2010-09-01

    The fiber optics in structural health monitoring systems for civil engineering applications have been widely used. By integrating fiber optic sensing into a geotextile fabric, the TenCate GeoDetect® system is the first designed specifically for geotechnical applications. This monitoring solution embodies fiber optics on a geotextile fabric, e.g. a textile used into the soil, and combines the benefits of geotextile materials, such as high interface friction in contact with the soil, with the latest fiber optics sensing technologies. It aims to monitor geotechnical structure and to generate early warnings if it detects and localizes the early signs of malfunctioning, such as leaks or instability. This is a customizable solution: Fiber Bragg gratings, Brillouin and Raman scattering can be built into this system. These technologies measure both strain and temperature changes in soil structures. It can provide a leak and deformation location within accuracies resp. 1 l/min/m and 0.02%. The TenCate GeoDetect® solution provides objective, highly precise, and timely in-situ performance information, allowing the design professional and owner to understand system performance in addition to providing alerts for negative "geo-events" (subsidence) and other potentially deleterious events.

  18. Development and Application of Surface Plasmon Polaritons on Optical Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs along the interface between a metal and a dielectric has attracted significant attention due to its unique optical properties, which has inspired a plethora of fascinating applications in photonics and optoelectronics. However, SPPs suffer from large attenuation because of the ohmic losses in the metal layer. It has become the main bottom-neck problem for the development of high performance plasmonic devices. This limitation can be overcome by providing the material adjacent to the metal with optical gain. In this paper, a review of gain compensation to SPPs is presented. We focus on the spontaneous radiation amplification and simulated radiation amplification. The ohmic loss of metal was greatly improved by introducing optical gain. Then we introduce several gain mediums of dye doped, quantum dots, erbium ion, and semiconductor to compensate optical loss of SPPs. Using gain medium mentioned above can compensate losses and achieve many potential applications, for example, laser, amplifier, and LRSPP discussed.

  19. Kerr optical frequency combs: theory, applications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chembo, Yanne K.

    2016-06-01

    The optical frequency comb technology is one of the most important breakthrough in photonics in recent years. This concept has revolutionized the science of ultra-stable lightwave and microwave signal generation. These combs were originally generated using ultrafast mode-locked lasers, but in the past decade, a simple and elegant alternativewas proposed,which consisted in pumping an ultra-high-Q optical resonator with Kerr nonlinearity using a continuous-wave laser. When optimal conditions are met, the intracavity pump photons are redistributed via four-wave mixing to the neighboring cavity modes, thereby creating the so-called Kerr optical frequency comb. Beyond being energy-efficient, conceptually simple, and structurally robust, Kerr comb generators are very compact devices (millimetric down to micrometric size) which can be integrated on a chip. They are, therefore, considered as very promising candidates to replace femtosecond mode-locked lasers for the generation of broadband and coherent optical frequency combs in the spectral domain, or equivalently, narrow optical pulses in the temporal domain. These combs are, moreover, expected to provide breakthroughs in many technological areas, such as integrated photonics, metrology, optical telecommunications, and aerospace engineering. The purpose of this review article is to present a comprehensive survey of the topic of Kerr optical frequency combs.We provide an overview of the main theoretical and experimental results that have been obtained so far. We also highlight the potential of Kerr combs for current or prospective applications, and discuss as well some of the open challenges that are to be met at the fundamental and applied level.

  20. Kerr optical frequency combs: theory, applications and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chembo Yanne K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The optical frequency comb technology is one of the most important breakthrough in photonics in recent years. This concept has revolutionized the science of ultra-stable lightwave and microwave signal generation. These combs were originally generated using ultrafast mode-locked lasers, but in the past decade, a simple and elegant alternativewas proposed,which consisted in pumping an ultra-high-Q optical resonator with Kerr nonlinearity using a continuous-wave laser. When optimal conditions are met, the intracavity pump photons are redistributed via four-wave mixing to the neighboring cavity modes, thereby creating the so-called Kerr optical frequency comb. Beyond being energy-efficient, conceptually simple, and structurally robust, Kerr comb generators are very compact devices (millimetric down to micrometric size which can be integrated on a chip. They are, therefore, considered as very promising candidates to replace femtosecond mode-locked lasers for the generation of broadband and coherent optical frequency combs in the spectral domain, or equivalently, narrow optical pulses in the temporal domain. These combs are, moreover, expected to provide breakthroughs in many technological areas, such as integrated photonics, metrology, optical telecommunications, and aerospace engineering. The purpose of this review article is to present a comprehensive survey of the topic of Kerr optical frequency combs.We provide an overview of the main theoretical and experimental results that have been obtained so far. We also highlight the potential of Kerr combs for current or prospective applications, and discuss as well some of the open challenges that are to be met at the fundamental and applied level.

  1. Nanoscale optical interferometry with incoherent light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongfang; Feng, Jing; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Optical interferometry has empowered an impressive variety of biosensing and medical imaging techniques. A widely held assumption is that devices based on optical interferometry require coherent light to generate a precise optical signature in response to an analyte. Here we disprove that assumption. By directly embedding light emitters into subwavelength cavities of plasmonic interferometers, we demonstrate coherent generation of surface plasmons even when light with extremely low degrees of spatial and temporal coherence is employed. This surprising finding enables novel sensor designs with cheaper and smaller light sources, and consequently increases accessibility to a variety of analytes, such as biomarkers in physiological fluids, or even airborne nanoparticles. Furthermore, these nanosensors can now be arranged along open detection surfaces, and in dense arrays, accelerating the rate of parallel target screening used in drug discovery, among other high volume and high sensitivity applications. PMID:26880171

  2. ALON GRIN optics for visible-MWIR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Nagendra; Jha, Santosh; Sastri, Suri; Goldman, Lee M.; McCarthy, Peter; Schmidt, Greg R.; Bentley, Julie L.; Moore, Duncan T.

    2016-05-01

    Surmet continuously strives to develop novel, advanced optical ceramics products for current and future defense and commercial systems. Using conventional powder processing techniques, Surmet has made substantial progress in its ability to manufacture large ALON® sensor windows, lenses, domes and transparent armor. In addition to transparency, Surmet has demonstrated the ability to incorporate other capabilities into its optical ceramic components, including: EMI shielding, heating, internal antennas and cooling channels. Working closely with the University of Rochester, Surmet has developed gradient index (GRIN) optics in ALON for use in the visible through the MWIR applications. Surmet has demonstrated the ability to tailor the refractive index of ALON® Optical Ceramic by either varying its composition or through the addition of dopants. Smooth axial and radial gradient profiles with ~0.055 change in refractive index, over depths of 1-8 mm (axial) and over 20 mm radius (radial) have been demonstrated. Initial design studies have shown that such elements provide unique capabilities. Radial gradients in particular, with their optical power contribution, provide additional degrees of freedom for color correction in broadband imaging systems. Surmet continues to mature ALON® GRIN technology along with the associated metrology. Surmet is committed to the development of its ALON® GRIN capability as well as finding insertion opportunities in novel imaging solutions for military and other commercial systems.

  3. Coded access optical sensor (CAOS) imager and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2001, we proposed and extensively demonstrated (using a DMD: Digital Micromirror Device) an agile pixel Spatial Light Modulator (SLM)-based optical imager based on single pixel photo-detection (also called a single pixel camera) that is suited for operations with both coherent and incoherent light across broad spectral bands. This imager design operates with the agile pixels programmed in a limited SNR operations starring time-multiplexed mode where acquisition of image irradiance (i.e., intensity) data is done one agile pixel at a time across the SLM plane where the incident image radiation is present. Motivated by modern day advances in RF wireless, optical wired communications and electronic signal processing technologies and using our prior-art SLM-based optical imager design, described using a surprisingly simple approach is a new imager design called Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) that has the ability to alleviate some of the key prior imager fundamental limitations. The agile pixel in the CAOS imager can operate in different time-frequency coding modes like Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA), Code-Division Multiple Access (CDMA), and Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA). Data from a first CAOS camera demonstration is described along with novel designs of CAOS-based optical instruments for various applications.

  4. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-04-01

    Accomplishments during the first six months of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers.

  5. New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

    2007-12-31

    Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

  6. Optical and digital microscopic imaging techniques and applications in pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaodong Chen; Bin Zheng; Hong Liu

    2011-01-01

    The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications o...

  7. New Optical Sensing Materials for Application in Marine Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, S.; Klimant, I.

    2012-04-01

    Optical chemosensors are versatile analytical tools which find application in numerous fields of science and technology. They proved to be a promising alternative to electrochemical methods and are applied increasingly often in marine research. However, not all state-of-the- art optical chemosensors are suitable for these demanding applications since they do not fully fulfil the requirements of high luminescence brightness, high chemical- and photochemical stability or their spectral properties are not adequate. Therefore, development of new advanced sensing materials is still of utmost importance. Here we present a set of novel optical sensing materials recently developed in the Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Food Chemistry which are optimized for marine applications. Particularly, we present new NIR indicators and sensors for oxygen and pH which feature high brightness and low level of autofluorescence. The oxygen sensors rely on highly photostable metal complexes of benzoporphyrins and azabenzoporphyrins and enable several important applications such as simultaneous monitoring of oxygen and chlorophyll or ultra-fast oxygen monitoring (Eddy correlation). We also developed ulta-sensitive oxygen optodes which enable monitoring in nM range and are primary designed for investigation of oxygen minimum zones. The dynamic range of our new NIR pH indicators based on aza-BODIPY dyes is optimized for the marine environment. A highly sensitive NIR luminescent phosphor (chromium(III) doped yttrium aluminium borate) can be used for non-invasive temperature measurements. Notably, the oxygen, pH sensors and temperature sensors are fully compatible with the commercially available fiber-optic readers (Firesting from PyroScience). An optical CO2 sensor for marine applications employs novel diketopyrrolopyrrol indicators and enables ratiometric imaging using a CCD camera. Oxygen, pH and temperature sensors suitable for lifetime and ratiometric imaging of analytes

  8. All-silica nonsolarizing optical fibers for UV medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutnik, Bolesh J.; Foley, Brian

    1999-04-01

    Optical fibers and fiber bundles have been developed for UV applications in general but have specific benefits for UV applications within medicine such as excimer angioplasty and UV perforation of the heart wall in heart bypass operations. Optical fibers have been tested for transmission changes at 193 nm, 214 nm, 253 nm and 365 nm. Whereas standard synthetic silica optical fibers developed color centers within 10,000 pulses of 193 nm energy, the new CeramOptec fibers were observed to experience only minimal changes in attenuation after 100,000 pulses. Similarly under constant irradiation by a high power deuterium lamp only minor changes in the attenuation at both 214 nm and 253 nm were observed for the 'non-solarizing' UV fibers after 121 hours, whereas standard UV fibers lost up to 50% after only 24 hours of exposure. Fiber bundles have been produced which can stand up to the elevated temperatures experienced at the source end when strong UV sources are needed for specific applications. Test results and information on the testing as well as some information on the fibers tested is given below.

  9. Optical Refrigeration Science and Applications of Laser Cooling of Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Epstein, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Edited by the two top experts in the field with a panel of International contributors, this is a comprehensive up-to-date review of research and applications. Starting with the basic physical principles of laser cooling of solids, the monograph goes on to discuss the current theoretical issues being resolved and the increasing demands of growth and evaluation of high purity materials suitable for optical refrigeration, while also examining the design and applications of practical cryocoolers. An advanced text for scientists, researchers, engineers, and students (masters, PHDs and Postdoc) in l

  10. Study of magnetic and structural and optical properties of Zn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method for biomedical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rezay Marand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective(s: This paper describes synthesizing of magnetic nanocomposite with co-precipitation method. Materials and Methods: Magnetic ZnxFe3-xO4 nanoparticles with 0-14% zinc doping (x=0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1 and 0.125 were successfully synthesized by co-precipitation method. The prepared zinc-doped Fe 3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Results: results obtained from X-ray diffraction pattern have revealed the formation of single phase nanoparticles with cubic inverse spinal structures which size varies from 11.13 to 12.81 nm. The prepared nanoparticles have also possessed superparamagnetic properties at room temperature and high level of saturation magnetization with the maximum level of 74.60 emu/g for x=0.075. Ms changing in pure magnetite nanoparticles after impurities addition were explained based on two factors of “particles size” and “exchange interactions”. Optical studies results revealed that band gaps in all Zn-doped NPs are higher than pure Fe 3O4. As doping percent increases, band gap value decreases from 1.26 eV to 0.43 eV. Conclusion: these magnetic nanocomposite structures since having superparamagnetic property offer a high potential for biosensing and biomedical application.

  11. Development of fiber optic gyroscopes for industrial and consumer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Yukio; Yuhara, Toshiya; Kumagai, Tatsuya; Soekawa, Hirokazu; Kajioka, Hiroshi

    1995-01-01

    This paper will present the current status of the fiber optic gyroscope (FOG), a ring interferometric rotation sensor for commercial applications by industries and consumers. An open-loop FOG with all polarization-maintaining fiber components is being used in these applications. One primary application is in vehicle navigation systems for automobiles, and a mass-produced has already been installed in luxury automobiles in Japan. Another application is in sweeper robots, Other applications such as a route-measuring system for boreholes, an attitude-controlling system for industrial helicopters, and an optocompass or north-seeking instrument will also be described. These FOGs are compact and reliable and need only a +12 V or a +24 V DC power source. This bias error is determined by the electrical system rather than the optical system and varies between 0.01 and 36 deg/h depending on the design of the signal-processing unit. The scale factor error varies between 0.1% and 1% also depending on the design, however, it is stable over the temperature range from -30 to 85 degree(s)C.

  12. Developing fibre optic Raman probes for applications in clinical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Oliver; Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Stone, Nick

    2016-04-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown by various groups over the last two decades to have significant capability in discriminating disease states in bodily fluids, cells and tissues. Recent development in instrumentation, optics and manufacturing approaches has facilitated the design and demonstration of various novel in vivo probes, which have applicability for myriad of applications. This review focusses on key considerations and recommendations for application specific clinical Raman probe design and construction. Raman probes can be utilised as clinical tools able to provide rapid, non-invasive, real-time molecular analysis of disease specific changes in tissues. Clearly the target tissue location, the significance of spectral changes with disease and the possible access routes to the region of interest will vary for each clinical application considered. This review provides insight into design and construction considerations, including suitable probe designs and manufacturing materials compatible with Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Fabrication of biosensing surfaces using adhesive polydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hunghao; Yen, Chun-Wan; Hayden, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine can be induced to polymerize on a variety of substrates, providing a robust and bioinspired surface coating that can be used to tune substrate surface properties and to sequester other species at the interface. We first exploit the facile nature of this surface modification procedure to generate an array of polydopamine that, in conjunction with fluorescent tags, provides the ability to detect multiple protein targets simultaneously and with great specificity. We then demonstrate the use of polydopamine as a matrix to confine gold nanoparticles at the surface of glass and graphene substrates. The nanoparticles (NPs) are used to template further gold nanoparticle growth in situ at the interface; subsequent calcination to remove the polydopamine matrix and sinter the NPs generates a highly active surface enhanced Raman scattering surface that allows for sensitive molecular detection. These varied uses in surface modification/biosensing demonstrate the utility of polydopamine as a functional surface modification for control of physical and electronic properties at the interface. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also

  15. Optical Nano Antennas: State of the Art, Scope and Challenges as a Biosensor Along with Human Exposure to Nano-Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Sulaiman Mohammad Zahid Kausar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of optical antennas in physical optics is still evolving. Like the antennas used in the radio frequency (RF regime, the aspiration of optical antennas is to localize the free propagating radiation energy, and vice versa. For this purpose, optical antennas utilize the distinctive properties of metal nanostructures, which are strong plasmonic coupling elements at the optical regime. The concept of optical antennas is being advanced technologically and they are projected to be substitute devices for detection in the millimeter, infrared, and visible regimes. At present, their potential benefits in light detection, which include polarization dependency, tunability, and quick response times have been successfully demonstrated. Optical antennas also can be seen as directionally responsive elements for point detectors. This review provides an overview of the historical background of the topic, along with the basic concepts and parameters of optical antennas. One of the major parts of this review covers the use of optical antennas in biosensing, presenting biosensing applications with a broad description using different types of data. We have also mentioned the basic challenges in the path of the universal use of optical biosensors, where we have also discussed some legal matters.

  16. Optical nano antennas: state of the art, scope and challenges as a biosensor along with human exposure to nano-toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausar, Abu Sulaiman Mohammad Zahid; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Latef, Tarik Abdul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib; Karim, Mohammad Ershadul

    2015-04-15

    The concept of optical antennas in physical optics is still evolving. Like the antennas used in the radio frequency (RF) regime, the aspiration of optical antennas is to localize the free propagating radiation energy, and vice versa. For this purpose, optical antennas utilize the distinctive properties of metal nanostructures, which are strong plasmonic coupling elements at the optical regime. The concept of optical antennas is being advanced technologically and they are projected to be substitute devices for detection in the millimeter, infrared, and visible regimes. At present, their potential benefits in light detection, which include polarization dependency, tunability, and quick response times have been successfully demonstrated. Optical antennas also can be seen as directionally responsive elements for point detectors. This review provides an overview of the historical background of the topic, along with the basic concepts and parameters of optical antennas. One of the major parts of this review covers the use of optical antennas in biosensing, presenting biosensing applications with a broad description using different types of data. We have also mentioned the basic challenges in the path of the universal use of optical biosensors, where we have also discussed some legal matters.

  17. Fiber-Optic Network Architectures for Onboard Avionics Applications Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Ngo, Duc H.

    2003-01-01

    This project is part of a study within the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies program undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The main focus of the program is the improvement of air transportation, with particular emphasis on air transportation safety. Current and future advances in digital data communications between an aircraft and the outside world will require high-bandwidth onboard communication networks. Radiofrequency (RF) systems, with their interconnection network based on coaxial cables and waveguides, increase the complexity of communication systems onboard modern civil and military aircraft with respect to weight, power consumption, and safety. In addition, safety and reliability concerns from electromagnetic interference between the RF components embedded in these communication systems exist. A simple, reliable, and lightweight network that is free from the effects of electromagnetic interference and capable of supporting the broadband communications needs of future onboard digital avionics systems cannot be easily implemented using existing coaxial cable-based systems. Fiber-optical communication systems can meet all these challenges of modern avionics applications in an efficient, cost-effective manner. The objective of this project is to present a number of optical network architectures for onboard RF signal distribution. Because of the emergence of a number of digital avionics devices requiring high-bandwidth connectivity, fiber-optic RF networks onboard modern aircraft will play a vital role in ensuring a low-noise, highly reliable RF communication system. Two approaches are being used for network architectures for aircraft onboard fiber-optic distribution systems: a hybrid RF-optical network and an all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) network.

  18. Biosensing with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Coupling between Fluorophores and Nanocarbon Allotropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Ding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanocarbon allotropes (NCAs, including zero-dimensional carbon dots (CDs, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes (CNTs and two-dimensional graphene, exhibit exceptional material properties, such as unique electrical/thermal conductivity, biocompatibility and high quenching efficiency, that make them well suited for both electrical/electrochemical and optical sensors/biosensors alike. In particular, these material properties have been exploited to significantly enhance the transduction of biorecognition events in fluorescence-based biosensing involving Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET. This review analyzes current advances in sensors and biosensors that utilize graphene, CNTs or CDs as the platform in optical sensors and biosensors. Widely utilized synthesis/fabrication techniques, intrinsic material properties and current research examples of such nanocarbon, FRET-based sensors/biosensors are illustrated. The future outlook and challenges for the research field are also detailed.

  19. Studies on thin film materials on acrylics for optical applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Narasimha Rao

    2003-02-01

    Deposition of durable thin film coatings by vacuum evaporation on acrylic substrates for optical applications is a challenging job. Films crack upon deposition due to internal stresses and leads to performance degradation. In this investigation, we report the preparation and characterization of single and multi-layer films of TiO2, CeO2, Substance2 (E Merck, Germany), Al2O3, SiO2 and MgF2 by electron beam evaporation on both glass and PMMA substrates. Optical micrographs taken on single layer films deposited on PMMA substrates did not reveal any cracks. Cracks in films were observed on PMMA substrates when the substrate temperature exceeded 80°C. Antireflection coatings of 3 and 4 layers have been deposited and characterized. Antireflection coatings made on PMMA substrate using Substance2 (H2) and SiO2 combination showed very fine cracks when observed under microscope. Optical performance of the coatings has been explained with the help of optical micrographs.

  20. Polymer waveguide systems for nonlinear and electro-optic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelis, Philip; Hill, Julian R.; Kashyap, Raman

    1991-12-01

    Waveguides with photochromic or electro-optic properties have been fabricated by a new technique using spin coating of polymers, or guest/host-polymer systems, on to grooves etched in an indium phosphide wafer. Monomoded waveguides at 633 nm, and at 1320 and 1550 nm (wavelengths of telecommunications interest) have been fabricated. These guides have good quality cleaved ends which allow efficient coupling of light from monomoded standard lensed silica fibers. An example of an electro-optic application is given in the form of a phase modulator. This device uses a side-chain polymer as the waveguide core that develops linear electro-optic properties following an electric field alignment process. It was found to have a switching voltage of 30 V, for a (pi) phase change, and had a total insertion loss of 9.4 dB. Waveguides with photochromic properties have also been produced using Aberchrome 670 (a commercially available fulgide) as a guest in a poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer host. Refractive index, optical loss, photochromic activity, and film forming properties of differing concentrations of guest (up to 20% concentration by weight) have been measured and are reported.

  1. Overview of diffuse optical tomography and its clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Yoko; Yamada, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT), one of the most sophisticated optical imaging techniques for observations through biological tissue, allows 3-D quantitative imaging of optical properties, which include functional and anatomical information. With DOT, it is expected to be possible to overcome the limitations of conventional near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as well as offering the potential for diagnostic optical imaging. However, DOT has been under development for more than 30 years, and the difficulties in development are attributed to the fact that light is strongly scattered and that diffusive photons are used for the image reconstruction. The DOT algorithm is based on the techniques of inverse problems. The radiative transfer equation accurately describes photon propagation in biological tissue, while, because of its high computation load, the diffusion equation (DE) is often used as the forward model. However, the DE is invalid in low-scattering and/or highly absorbing regions and in the vicinity of light sources. The inverse problem is inherently ill-posed and highly undetermined. Here, we first summarize NIRS and then describe various approaches in the efforts to develop accurate and efficient DOT algorithms and present some examples of clinical applications. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of DOT.

  2. Wideband Optical Detector of Ultrasound for Medical Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Amir; Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Optical sensors of ultrasound are a promising alternative to piezoelectric techniques, as has been recently demonstrated in the field of optoacoustic imaging. In medical applications, one of the major limitations of optical sensing technology is its susceptibility to environmental conditions, e.g. changes in pressure and temperature, which may saturate the detection. Additionally, the clinical environment often imposes stringent limits on the size and robustness of the sensor. In this work, the combination of pulse interferometry and fiber-based optical sensing is demonstrated for ultrasound detection. Pulse interferometry enables robust performance of the readout system in the presence of rapid variations in the environmental conditions, whereas the use of all-fiber technology leads to a mechanically flexible sensing element compatible with highly demanding medical applications such as intravascular imaging. In order to achieve a short sensor length, a pi-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating is used, which acts as a resonator trapping light over an effective length of 350 µm. To enable high bandwidth, the sensor is used for sideway detection of ultrasound, which is highly beneficial in circumferential imaging geometries such as intravascular imaging. An optoacoustic imaging setup is used to determine the response of the sensor for acoustic point sources at different positions. PMID:24895083

  3. Implementation of Optical Characterization for Flexible Organic Electronics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskarakis, A.; Logothetidis, S.

    One of the most rapidly evolving sectors of the modern science and technology is the flexible organic electronic devices (FEDs) that are expected to significantly improve and revolutionize our everyday life. The FED application includes the generation of electricity by renewable sources (by organic photovoltaic cells - OPVs), power storage (thin film batteries), the visualization of information (by organic displays), the working and living environment (ambient lighting, sensors), safety, market (smart labels, radio frequency identification tags - RFID), textiles (smart fabrics with embedded display and sensor capabilities), as well as healthcare (smart sensors for vital sign monitoring), etc. Although there has been important progresses in inorganic-based Si devices, there are numerous advances in the organic (semiconducting, conducting), inorganic, and hybrid (organic-inorganic) materials that exhibit desirable properties and stability, and in the synthesis and preparation methods. The understanding of the organic material properties can lead to the fast progress of the functionality and performance of FEDs. The investigation of the optical properties of these materials can promote the understanding of the optical, electrical, structural properties of organic semiconductors and electrodes and can contribute to the optimization of the synthesis process and the tuning of their structure and morphology. In this chapter, we will describe briefly some of the advances toward the implementation of optical characterization methods, such as Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) from the infrared to the visible and ultraviolet spectral region for the study of materials (flexible polymer substrates, barrier layers, transparent electrodes) to be used for application in the fabrication of FEDs.

  4. Solution synthesis, optical properties, and bioimaging applications of silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Benjamin F P; Tilley, Richard D

    2014-10-21

    Understanding and unlocking the potential of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is important for future applications ranging from biomedical imaging contrast agents to the next generation of solar cells and LEDs. Silicon NCs (Si NCs) have key advantages compared with other semiconductor NCs due to silicon's high natural abundance, low toxicity and strong biocompatibility, and unique size, and surface dependent optical properties. In this Account, we review and discuss the synthesis, surface modification, purification, optical properties, and applications of Si NCs. The synthetic methods used to make Si NCs have improved considerably in the last 5-10 years; highly monodisperse Si NCs can now be produced on the near gram scale. Scaled-up syntheses have allowed scientists to drive further toward the commercial utilization of Si NCs. The synthesis of doped Si NCs, through addition of a simple elemental precursor to a reaction mixture or by the production of a single source precursor, has shown great promise. Doped Si NCs have demonstrated unique or enhanced properties compared with pure Si NCs, for example, magnetism due to the presence of magnetic metals like Fe and Mn. Surface reactions have reached a new level of sophistication where organic (epoxidation and diol formation) and click (thiol based) chemical reactions can be carried out on attached surface molecules. This has led to a wide range of biocompatible functional groups as well as a degree of emission tuneability. The purification of Si NCs has been improved through the use of size separation columns and size selective precipitation. These purification approaches have yielded highly monodisperse and pure Si NCs previously unachieved. This has allowed scientists to study the size and surface dependent properties and toxicity and enabled the use of Si NCs in biomedical applications. The optical properties of Si NCs are complex. Using a combination of characterization techniques, researchers have explored the

  5. Carbon Nanostructures for Tagging in Electrochemical Biosensing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Yáñez-Sedeño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing demand for developing ultrasensitive electrochemical bioassays has led to the design of numerous signal amplification strategies. In this context, carbon-based nanomaterials have been demonstrated to be excellent tags for greatly amplifying the transduction of recognition events and simplifying the protocols used in electrochemical biosensing. This relevant role is due to the carbon-nanomaterials’ large surface area, excellent biological compatibility and ease functionalization and, in some cases, intrinsic electrochemistry. These carbon-based nanomaterials involve well-known carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene as well as the more recent use of other carbon nanoforms. This paper briefly discusses the advantages of using carbon nanostructures and their hybrid nanocomposites for amplification through tagging in electrochemical biosensing platforms and provides an updated overview of some selected examples making use of labels involving carbon nanomaterials, acting both as carriers for signal elements and as electrochemical tracers, applied to the electrochemical biosensing of relevant (biomarkers.

  6. Toward practical application of fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Yip

    One of the most powerful techniques in fiber optical communication systems is wave-length division multiplexing (WDM). By utilizing the large (˜300 nm), low-loss (0.2--0.4 dB/km) transmission bandwidth, a single fiber can transmit many wavelengths. One fiber can potentially support transmission of tens of terabits per second of information over thousands of kilometers, to meet the exponentially-growing capacity demand. One of the key components for WDM systems is the optical amplifier; currently the most widely used optical amplifier is the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). However, its bandwidth and operating wavelength are limited. To mitigate the bandwidth limitation of EDFAs, alternative optical amplifiers have been investigated, and one of the most promising candidates is the fiber optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Fiber OPAs are based on the third-order nonlinear susceptibility chi (3) in fiber. They can exhibit large bandwidth, and may find applications as optical amplifiers for WDM transmission. They also generate another wavelength, called idler, which contains the same modulation information as the input signal, with an inverted spectrum. This phase-conjugated idler can be used not only for wavelength conversion in WDM networks, but also for mid-span spectral inversion (MSSI) which can combat fiber dispersion, and even some of the detrimental fiber nonlinearities. In this dissertation, a record high-performance fiber OPA with 60 dB signal gain, and a parametric wavelength converter with 40 dB of conversion gain and 3.8 dB of noise figure are experimentally demonstrated. An OPA with 92% pump depletion is analyzed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. Polarization-independent OPA, both in one-pump and two-pump configurations are investigated. The differences between the two configurations are discussed and other solutions are also proposed to address some issues of linear orthogonal two-pump OPA. In addition, the applications of OPA: as a

  7. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography: technologies and clinical applications [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gora, Michalina J; Suter, Melissa J; Tearney, Guillermo J; Li, Xingde

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we review the current state of technology development and clinical applications of endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). Key design and engineering considerations are discussed for most OCT endoscopes, including side-viewing and forward-viewing probes, along with different scanning mechanisms (proximal-scanning versus distal-scanning). Multi-modal endoscopes that integrate OCT with other imaging modalities are also discussed. The review of clinical applications of endoscopic OCT focuses heavily on diagnosis of diseases and guidance of interventions. Representative applications in several organ systems are presented, such as in the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems. A brief outlook of the field of endoscopic OCT is also discussed.

  8. Design, synthesis and characterization of novel nonlinear optical chromophores for electro-optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng

    This dissertation involves the design, synthesis and characterization of second order nonlinear optical chromophores for electro-optic applications. The design concept, that poling efficiency and macroscopic nonlinearities can be improved by modifying a chromophore's shape, has been explored. Chapter 1 gives an introduction into theoretical background of nonlinear optics and electro-optic phenomenon in organic molecules and poled polymers. Chapter 2 involves the design and synthesis of GLD-2 and GLD-3 chromophores, both with bulky substituents on the ring-fused bridge. The optical studies and HRS measurement show that the two alkyl groups on the bridge blueshift the lambdamax in chloroform by 20 nm and decrease the beta values. DSC and TGA thermal analysis show Td of GLD-2 and GLD-3 over 240°C. The maximum achievable r33 of GLD-2/PMMA is 61 pm/V, compared to the 92.4 pm/V of GLD-1/PMMA. But GLD-2/APC shows r33 of 45.2pm/V, higher than GLD-1/APC due to the improved compatibility with APC. The optical loss of 13 wt% GLD-2/PMMA at 1.55mum is 1.4 dB compared to the 2.3 dB of 17 wt% GLD-1/PMMA. Optical loss studies prove that adding two bulky substituents on bridge help attenuate electrostatic interactions. GLD-3 show deteriorated solubility in common used organic solvents, probably due to the combination of two TBDMS and two lengthy alkyl groups. Chapter 3 presents synthesis of thiophene-based chromophores with variously positioned TBDMS groups. The optical studies of these chromophores show one TBDMSO substitution on the thiophene bridge yields little influence on the lambda max in chloroform. FTCDS chromophore with two TBDMS groups, one on donor and one on thiophene bridge, shows to be the best structure with regards the thermal stability and achievable maximum EO coefficient value, 65.9 pm/V, at only 24 wt% loading density at 1.3 mum. Chapter 4 deals with three novel bridges for NLO chromophores. Synthetic methodologies of the diketone precursor of rigidified

  9. Optical Electronic Bragg Reflection Sensor System with Hydrodynamic Flow Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    This project, as described in the following report, involved design and fabrication of fiber optic sensors for the detection and measurement of dynamic fluid density variations. These devices are created using UV (ultraviolet) ablation and generally modified transverse holographic fiber grating techniques. The resulting phase gratings created on or immediately underneath the flat portion of D-shaped optical waveguides are characterized as evanescent field sensing devices. The primary applications include the sensor portion of a real-time localized or distributed measurement system for hydrodynamic flow, fluid density measurements, and phase change phenomena. Several design modifications were implemented in an attempt to accomplish the tasks specified in our original proposal. In addition, we have established key collaborative relationships with numerous people and institutions.

  10. Optical and Digital Microscopic Imaging Techniques and Applications in Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional optical microscope has been the primary tool in assisting pathological examinations. The modern digital pathology combines the power of microscopy, electronic detection, and computerized analysis. It enables cellular-, molecular-, and genetic-imaging at high efficiency and accuracy to facilitate clinical screening and diagnosis. This paper first reviews the fundamental concepts of microscopic imaging and introduces the technical features and associated clinical applications of optical microscopes, electron microscopes, scanning tunnel microscopes, and fluorescence microscopes. The interface of microscopy with digital image acquisition methods is discussed. The recent developments and future perspectives of contemporary microscopic imaging techniques such as three-dimensional and in vivo imaging are analyzed for their clinical potentials.

  11. Application of Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Mueller Ellipsometry to Optical Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Gaston, Jean-Paul; Yan, Li

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to provide a brief overview of both established and novel ellipsometry techniques, as well as their applications. Ellipsometry is an indirect optical technique in that information about the physical properties of a sample is obtained through modeling analysis. Standard ellipsometry is typically used to characterize optically isotropic bulk and/or layered materials. More advanced techniques like Mueller ellipsometry, also known as polarimetry in literature, are necessary for the complete and accurate characterization of anisotropic and/or depolarizing samples which occur in many instances, both in research and "real life" activities. In this article we cover three main areas of subject: basic theory of polarization, standard ellipsometry and Mueller ellipsometry. Section I is devoted to a short and pedagogical introduction of the formalisms used to describe light polarization. The following section is devoted to standard ellipsometry. The focus is on the experimental aspects, including both p...

  12. GaN heterostructures for biosensing and radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howgate, John D.

    2012-12-11

    In this thesis I show the results from our investigation of the interface between gallium nitride wide bandgap semiconductor heterostructures and (bio)molecular systems on their surfaces for biosensing, bioelectronics, and photoelectric applications, with a large emphasis on the processes arising from high energy ionizing irradiation, including heterostructure photoelectric gain mechanisms. Wide bandgap semiconductors, such as gallium nitride, have received increasing attention as potential components in advanced organic/inorganic hybrid systems. Working to further this topic, we determine a new semiconductor alignment required for low energy photo-induced charge transfer ionization of alkyl chains well below the energy normally required for molecular cleavage, show original results of the influence of binding methods on enzyme functionality in conjunction with a novel electrochemical and environmental control system and demonstrate new possibilities to significantly improve upon pH measurements through the use of high sensitivity devices. Furthermore, based on the extension of this work to support future studies of radiation effects on cell systems, we present a detailed characterization of new simultaneous chemical sensing and ionizing radiation dosimetry using single devices. We found that their pH sensitivity was retained during X-ray irradiation and that the fundamental characteristics can be used to separate the irradiation signal from the pH response without compromising operational stability. These data provide clear indications of the separate response mechanism tied to the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas channel. Here, we found new results exhibiting exceptionally high gains and independence of the well-known persistent photoconductivity for soft X-rays and high energy particles in the ultralow dose-rate regime. This material system provides the capability for high sensitivity and resolution real time monitoring, which is competitive with and

  13. Development of a strontium optical lattice clock for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-07-01

    With timekeeping being of paramount importance for modern life, much research and major scientific advances have been undertaken in the field of frequency metrology, particularly over the last few years. New Nobel-prize winning technologies have enabled a new era of atomic clocks; namely the optical clock. These have been shown to perform significantly better than the best microwave clocks reaching an inaccuracy of 1.6x10-18 [1]. With such results being found in large lab based apparatus, the focus now has shifted to portability - to enable the accuracy of various ground based clocks to be measured, and compact autonomous performance - to enable such technologies to be tested in space. This could lead to a master clock in space, improving not only the accuracy of technologies on which modern life has come to require such as GPS and communication networks. But also more fundamentally, this could lead to the redefinition of the second and tests of fundamental physics including applications in the fields of ground based and satellite geodesy, metrology, positioning, navigation, transport and logistics etc. Within the European collaboration, Space Optical Clocks (SOC2) [2-3] consisting of various institutes and industry partners across Europe we have tried to tackle this problem of miniaturisation whilst maintaining stability, accuracy (5x10-17) and robustness whilst keeping power consumption to a minimum - necessary for space applications. We will present the most recent results of the Sr optical clock in SOC2 and also the novel compact design features, new methods employed and outlook. References [1] B. J. Bloom, T. L. Nicholson, J. R. Williams, S. L. Campbell, M. Bishof, X. Zhang, W. Zhang, S. L. Bromley, and J. Ye, "An optical lattice clock with accuracy and stability at the 10-18 level," Nature 506, 71-75 (2014). [2] S. Schiller et al. "Towards Neutral-atom Space Optical Clocks (SOC2): Development of high-performance transportable and breadboard optical clocks and

  14. Editorial: Special issue on smart optical instruments and systems for space applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING; Fei

    2015-01-01

    Optical systems are playing more and more important roles for space applications,such as high accurate attitude determination and remote sensing systems etc.Innovations in optical systems have brought great advantages,some even revolutionary for the space applications.Accordingly,in this special issue of Smart Optical systems and instruments

  15. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Grist

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications.

  16. Optical and Acoustic Device Applications of Ferroelastic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Steven Wayne

    This dissertation presents the discovery of a means of creating uniformly periodic domain gratings in a ferroelastic crystal of neodymium pentaphosphate (NPP). The uniform and non-uniform domain structures which can be created in NPP have the potential applications as tunable active gratings for lasers, tunable diffraction gratings, tunable Bragg reflection gratings, tunable acoustic filters, optical modulators, and optical domain wall memories. The interaction of optical and acoustic waves with ferroelastic domain walls in NPP is presented in detail. Acoustic amplitude reflection coefficients from a single domain wall in NPP are much larger than other ferroelastic-ferroelectrics such as gadolinium molybdate (GMO). Domain walls of NPP are used to make two demonstration acoustic devices: a tunable comb filter and a tunable delay line. The tuning process is accomplished by moving the position of the reflecting surface (the domain wall). A theory of the reflection of optical waves from NPP domain walls is discussed. The optical reflection is due to a change in the polarization of the wave, and not a change in the index, as the wave crosses the domain wall. Theoretical optical power reflection coefficients show good agreement with the experimentally measured values. The largest optical reflection coefficient of a single domain wall is at a critical angle and is 2.2% per domain wall. Techniques of injecting periodic and aperiodic domain walls into NPP are presented. The nucleation process of the uniformly periodic domain gratings in NPP is described in terms of a newly-discovered domain structure, namely the ferroelastic bubble. A ferroelastic bubble is the elastic analogue to the well-known magnetic bubble. The period of the uniformly periodic domain grating is tunable from 100 to 0.5 microns and the grating period may be tuned relatively rapidly. The Bragg efficiency of these tunable gratings is 77% for an uncoated crystal. Several demonstration devices which use

  17. Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anushree

    Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical

  18. Interferometric biosensing platform for multiplexed digital detection of viral pathogens and biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaboul, George

    Label-free optical biosensors have been established as proven tools for monitoring specific biomolecular interactions. However, compact and robust embodiments of such instruments have yet to be introduced in order to provide sensitive, quantitative, and high-throughput biosensing for low-cost research and clinical applications. Here we present the interferometric reflectance-imaging sensor (IRIS). IRIS allows sensitive label free analysis using an inexpensive and durable multi-color LED illumination source on a silicon based surface. IRIS monitors biomolecular interaction through measurement of biomass addition to the sensor's surface. We demonstrate the capability of this system to dynamically monitor antigen---antibody interactions with a noise floor of 5.2 pg/mm 2 and DNA single mismatch detection under isothermal melting conditions in an array format. Ensemble detection of binding events using IRIS did not provide the sensitivity needed for detection of infectious disease and biomarkers at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, a new approach was adapted to the IRIS platform that allowed the detection and identification of individual nanoparticles on the sensor's surface. The new detection method was termed single-particle IRIS (SP-IRIS). We developed two detection modalities for SP-IRIS. The first modality is when the target is a nanoparticle such as a virus. We verified that SP-IRIS can accurately detect and size individual viral particles. Then we demonstrated that single nanoparticle counting and sizing methodology on SP-IRIS leads to a specific and sensitive virus sensor that can be multiplexed. Finally, we developed an assay for the detection of Ebola and Marburg. A detection limit of 3 x 103 PFU/ml was demonstrated for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotyped with Ebola or Marburg virus glycoprotein. We have demonstrated that virus detection can be done in human whole blood directly without the need for sample preparation. The second modality

  19. Label-free and selective nonlinear fiber-optical biosensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Heuck, Mikkel; Agger, Christian

    2008-01-01

    spectrum (a shift of the Stokes- or anti-Stokes wavelength) caused by the selective capture of biomolecules by a sensor layer immobilised on the walls of the holes in the fiber. We find that such changes in the MI gain spectrum can be made detectable, and that engineering of the dispersion is important...

  20. Fringe pattern analysis for optical metrology theory, algorithms, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Servin, Manuel; Padilla, Moises

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this book is to present the basic theoretical principles and practical applications for the classical interferometric techniques and the most advanced methods in the field of modern fringe pattern analysis applied to optical metrology. A major novelty of this work is the presentation of a unified theoretical framework based on the Fourier description of phase shifting interferometry using the Frequency Transfer Function (FTF) along with the theory of Stochastic Process for the straightforward analysis and synthesis of phase shifting algorithms with desired properties such

  1. Application of optical coherence tomography based microangiography for cerebral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Requirements of in vivo rodent brain imaging are hard to satisfy using traditional technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and two-photon microscopy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging tool that can easily reach at high speeds and provide high resolution volumetric images with a relatively large field of view for rodent brain imaging. Here, we provide the overview of recent developments of functional OCT based imaging techniques for neuroscience applications on rodents. Moreover, a summary of OCT-based microangiography (OMAG) studies for stroke and traumatic brain injury cases on rodents are provided.

  2. Optical-based smart structures for tamper-indicating applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliva, P.; Anheier, N.C.; Simmons, K.L.; Undem, H.A.

    1996-11-01

    This report is a compilation of several related projects performed from 1991 through 1996 concerning the design, construction, and application of optical-based smart structure to tamper-indicating and sensing secure containers. Due to several influences, the projects were carried through to varying degrees of completion. Cancellation of the overall project at the client level motivated the authors to gather all of the technology and ideas about smart structures developed during these several projects, whether completed or just conceptualized, into one document. Although each section individually discusses a specific project, the overall document is written chronologically with each successive section showing how increased smart structure complexity was integrated into the container.

  3. Organic structures design applications in optical and electronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Tahsin J

    2014-01-01

    ""Presenting an overview of the syntheses and properties of organic molecules and their applications in optical and electronic devices, this book covers aspects concerning theoretical modeling for electron transfer, solution-processed micro- and nanomaterials, donor-acceptor cyclophanes, molecular motors, organogels, polyazaacenes, fluorogenic sensors based on calix[4]arenes, and organic light-emitting diodes. The publication of this book is timely because these topics have become very popular nowadays. The book is definitely an excellent reference for scientists working in these a

  4. MEMS Torsion-Mirror Actuators for Optical Switching or Attenuating Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Novel MEMS torsion-mirror actuators with monolithically integrated fiber self-holding structures are fabricated, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. Their electromechanical and optical characteristics are acceptable for optical switching or attenuating applications.

  5. Application of optical remote sensing in the Wenchuan earthquake assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Lei, Liping; Zhang, Li; Liu, Liangyun; Zhu, Boqin; Zuo, Zhengli

    2009-06-01

    A mega-earthquake of magnitude 8 of Richter scale occurred in Wenchuan County, Sichuan Province, China on May 12, 2008. The earthquake inflicted heavy loss of human lives and properties. The Wenchuan earthquake induced geological disasters, house collapse, and road blockage. In this paper, we demonstrate an application of optical remote sensing images acquired from airborne and satellite platforms in assessing the earthquake damages. The high-resolution airborne images were acquired by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The pre- and post-earthquake satellite images of QuickBird, IKONOS, Landsat TM, ALOS, and SPOT were collected by the Center for Earth Observation & Digital Earth (CEODE), CAS, and some of the satellite data were provided by the United States, Japan, and the European Space Agency. The pre- and post-earthquake remote sensing images integrated with DEM and GIS data were adopted to monitor and analyze various earthquake disasters, such as road blockage, house collapse, landslides, avalanches, rock debris flows, and barrier lakes. The results showed that airborne optical images provide a convenient tool for quick and timely monitoring and assessing of the distribution and dynamic changes of the disasters over the earthquake-struck regions. In addition, our study showed that the optical remote sensing data integrated with GIS data can be used to assess disaster conditions such as damaged farmlands, soil erosion, etc, which in turn provides useful information for the postdisaster reconstruction.

  6. Engineering materials for mid-infrared optical sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson K. A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Planar optical structures based on functionalized chalcogenide glasses provide a superb device platform for chemical and biological sensing applications. Chalcogenide glasses have demonstrated promise as materials for infrared sensing as they exhibit transparency over a large range of infrared wavelengths and tunable optical properties through doping and/or compositional tailoring. Waveguides, resonators and other components processed on-chip (silicon, Si can be realized such that the strong enhancement in the electromagnetic field confined within a high index contrast resonator, leads to highly sensitive photon-matter interactions in a small footprint. In this paper we discuss the development of highly sensitive chalcogenide glass based microdisk resonator sensors that measure resonant peak shifts caused by refractive index change upon exposure to a chemical analyte. The specificity of the microdisk resonator sensors is enhanced by applying specialized polymer films and nanofoams that respond in a predictable fashion when exposed to a chemical analyte of interest. Discussed are key material science challenges needed to enable highly sensitive and specific sensors based on such complex multi-material assemblies and the fabrication issues that ultimately define resulting optical performance.

  7. Driving micro-optical imaging systems towards miniature camera applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Andreas; Duparré, Jacques; Dannberg, Peter; Leitel, Robert; Bräuer, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Up to now, multi channel imaging systems have been increasingly studied and approached from various directions in the academic domain due to their promising large field of view at small system thickness. However, specific drawbacks of each of the solutions prevented the diffusion into corresponding markets so far. Most severe problems are a low image resolution and a low sensitivity compared to a conventional single aperture lens besides the lack of a cost-efficient method of fabrication and assembly. We propose a microoptical approach to ultra-compact optics for real-time vision systems that are inspired by the compound eyes of insects. The demonstrated modules achieve a VGA resolution with 700x550 pixels within an optical package of 6.8mm x 5.2mm and a total track length of 1.4mm. The partial images that are separately recorded within different optical channels are stitched together to form a final image of the whole field of view by means of image processing. These software tools allow to correct the distortion of the individual partial images so that the final image is also free of distortion. The so-called electronic cluster eyes are realized by state-of-the-art microoptical fabrication techniques and offer a resolution and sensitivity potential that makes them suitable for consumer, machine vision and medical imaging applications.

  8. Optical Properties and Immunoassay Applications of Noble Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoli Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Noble metal, especially gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles exhibit unique and tunable optical properties on account of their surface plasmon resonance (SPR. In this paper, we mainly discussed the theory background of the enhanced optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. Mie theory, transfer matrix method, discrete dipole approximation (DDA method, and finite-difference time domain (FDTD method applied brute-force computational methods for different nanoparticles optical properties. Some important nanostructure fabrication technologies such as nanosphere lithography (NSL and focused ion beam (FIB are also introduced in this paper. Moreover, these fabricated nanostructures are used in the plasmonic sensing fields. The binding signal between the antibody and antigen, amyloid-derived diffusible ligands (ADDLs-potential Alzheimer's disease (AD biomarkers, and staphylococcal enterotixn B (SEB in nano-Moore per liter (nM concentration level are detected by our designed nanobiosensor. They have many potential applications in the biosensor, environment protection, food security, and medicine safety for health, and so forth, fields.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Optical Pyrometry Investigation for Turbine Engine Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevadeordal, Jordi; Nirmalan, Nirm; Wang, Guanghua; Thermal Systems Team

    2011-11-01

    An investigation of optical Pyrometry using multiple wavelengths and its application to turbine engine is presented. Current turbine engine Pyrometers are typically broadband Si-detector line-of-sight (LOS) systems. They identify hot spots and spall areas in blades and bucket passages by detection of bursts of higher voltage signals. However, the single color signal can be misleading for estimating temperature and emissivity variations in these bursts. Results of the radiant temperature, multi-color temperature and apparent emissivity are presented for turbine engine applications. For example, the results indicate that spall regions can be characterized using multi-wavelength techniques by showing that the temperature typically drops and the emissivity increases and that differentiates from the emissivity of the normal regions. Burst signals are analyzed with multicolor algorithms and changes in the LOS hot-gas-path properties and in the suction side, trailing edge, pressure side, fillet and platform surfaces characterized.

  10. Optical waveguides in lithium niobate: Recent developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazzan, Marco, E-mail: marco.bazzan@unipd.it; Sada, Cinzia, E-mail: cinzia.sada@unipd.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei,” Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The state of the art of optical waveguide fabrication in lithium niobate is reviewed, with particular emphasis on new technologies and recent applications. The attention is mainly devoted to recently developed fabrication methods, such as femtosecond laser writing, ion implantation, and smart cut waveguides as well as to the realization of waveguides with tailored functionalities, such as photorefractive or domain engineered structures. More exotic systems, such as reconfigurable and photorefractive soliton waveguides, are also considered. Classical techniques, such as Ti in-diffusion and proton exchange, are cited and briefly reviewed as a reference standpoint to highlight the recent developments. In all cases, the application-oriented point of view is preferred, in order to provide the reader with an up-to date panorama of the vast possibilities offered by lithium niobate to integrated photonics.

  11. Optical Properties and Biological Applications of Electromagnetically Coupled Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan Nathan

    The optical properties of metallic particles change dramatically as the size shrinks to the nanoscale. The familiar mirror-like sheen of bulk metals is replaced by the bright, sharp, colorful plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles. The resonances of plasmonic metal nanoparticles are highly tunable throughout the visible spectrum, depending on the size, shape, local dielectric environment, and proximity to other optical resonances. Fundamental and applied research in the nanoscience community in the past few decades has sought to understand and exploit these phenomena for biological applications. In this work, discrete nanoparticle assemblies were produced through biomolecular interactions and studied at the single particle level with darkfield spectroscopy. Pairs of gold nanoparticles tethered by DNA were utilized as molecular rulers to study the dynamics of DNA bending by the restriction enzyme EcoRV. These results substantiated that nanoparticle rulers, deemed "plasmon rulers", could measure the dynamics of single biomolecules with high throughput, long lifetime, and high temporal resolution. To extend these concepts for live cell studies, a plasmon ruler comprised of peptide-linked gold nanoparticle satellites around a core particle was synthesized and utilized to optically follow cell signaling pathways in vivo at the single molecule level. The signal provided by these plasmon rulers allowed continuous observation of caspase-3 activation at the single molecule level in living cells for over 2 hours, unambiguously identifying early stage activation of caspase-3 in apoptotic cells. In the last section of this dissertation, an experimental and theoretical study of electomagnetic coupling in asymmetric metal nanoparticle dimers is presented. A "heterodimer" composed of a silver particle and a gold particle is observed to have a novel coupling between a plasmon mode (free electron oscillations) and an inter-band absorption process (bound electron transitions). The

  12. Magneto-Optic Fiber Bragg Gratings with Application to High-Resolution Magnetic Field Sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Jian Wu; Ying Yang; Kun Qiu

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-optic fiber Bragg gratings (MFBG) based on magneto-optic materials have a lot of potential applications for sensing and optical signal processing. The transmission and reflection spectra of guided optical waves in the MFBG are investigated. According to the sensitivity of MFBG spectral lines to the magneto-optic coupling intensity varying with applied magnetic field, a novel magnetic field sensor of high-resolution up to 0.01 nm/(kA/m) is predicted.

  13. Optical fibers and photonics applications: topical tracks at Wilga conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a research survey of WILGA Symposium work, 2010-2012 Editions, concerned with Optical Fibers, Optoelectronic Devices, Sensors, Communication and Photonics Applications. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the three recent Wilga Symposia on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposia embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, photonic equipment for JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-274]. Wilga Symposia play a role of an universal integrator of young science in photonics and related areas in this country and also in this part of Europe. More than 5000 young scientists participated in scientific Wilga meetings and discussions during the last nearly two decades. Over 2500 papers were published, including over 1000 in Proc. SPIE.

  14. Application of optical non-invasive methods in skin physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Darvin, M.; Richter, H.; Antoniou, C.; Sterry, W.; Koch, S.

    2008-05-01

    In the present paper the application of optical non-invasive methods in dermatology and cosmetology is discussed. Laser scanning microscopy (LSM) and optical coherent tomography (OCT) are the most promising methods for this application. Using these methods, the analysis of different skin parameters like dryness and oiliness of the skin, the barrier function and the structure of furrows and wrinkles are discussed. Additionally the homogeneity of distribution of topically applied creams, as well as their penetration into the skin were investigated. It is shown that these methods are highly valuable in dermatology for diagnostic and therapy control and for basic research, for instance in the field of structure analysis of hair follicles and sweat glands. The vertical images of the tissue produced by OCT can be easily compared with histological sections. Unfortunately, the resolution of the OCT technique is not high enough to carry out measurements on a cellular level, as is possible by LSM. LSM has the advantage that it can be used for the investigation of penetration and storage processes of topically applied substances, if these substances have fluorescent properties or if they are fluorescent-labelled.

  15. Application of visual cryptography for learning in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Avikarsha; Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In the age data digitalization, important applications of optics and photonics based sensors and technology lie in the field of biometrics and image processing. Protecting user data in a safe and secure way is an essential task in this area. However, traditional cryptographic protocols rely heavily on computer aided computation. Secure protocols which rely only on human interactions are usually simpler to understand. In many scenarios development of such protocols are also important for ease of implementation and deployment. Visual cryptography (VC) is an encryption technique on images (or text) in which decryption is done by human visual system. In this technique, an image is encrypted into number of pieces (known as shares). When the printed shares are physically superimposed together, the image can be decrypted with human vision. Modern digital watermarking technologies can be combined with VC for image copyright protection where the shares can be watermarks (small identification) embedded in the image. Similarly, VC can be used for improving security of biometric authentication. This paper presents about design and implementation of a practical laboratory experiment based on the concept of VC for a course in media engineering. Specifically, our contribution deals with integration of VC in different schemes for applications like digital watermarking and biometric authentication in the field of optics and photonics. We describe theoretical concepts and propose our infrastructure for the experiment. Finally, we will evaluate the learning outcome of the experiment, performed by the students.

  16. Wavelength-agile integrated optical transmitters for analog applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Leif A.; Chen, Chin-Hui; Akulova, Yuliya A.; Fish, Gregory A.; Coldren, Larry A.

    2003-12-01

    A summary of current work involving the development of high performance, wavelength-tunable integrated optical transmitters for analog applications is given. The performance of sampled-grating DBR lasers integrated with an SOA and an electroabsorption or Mach-Zehnder modulator is evaluated in terms of E/O conversion efficiency, noise performance and dynamic range. Optimization options to maximize either gain, noise figure or spurious-free dynamic range in analog link applications are discussed. It is shown how the combination of chip-scale integration and the use of bulk waveguide Franz-Keldysh absorption allows coupling of a large optical power level into the electroabsorption modulator, and its effects on the modulation response and analog link performance. Link results on an integrated SGDBR-SOA-EAM device includes a sub-octave SFDR in the 125 to 127 dB/Hz4/5 range and a broadband SFDR of 103-107 dB/Hz2/3 limited by third order intermodulation products or 95-98 dB/Hz1/2, limited by second order intermodulation products, over a 1528 to 1573 nm wavelength range.

  17. Investigation of coupled optical parametric oscillators for novel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yujie J.

    2016-03-01

    In this proceedings article, we summarize our previous results on the novel applications using the coupled optical parametric oscillators (OPO's). In a conventional OPO, a single pump wavelength is capable of generating a pair of the signal and idler beams by placing a bulk nonlinear crystal inside an OPO cavity. When a nonlinear crystal composite consisting of periodically-inverted KTiOPO4 (KTP) plates bonded together by the adhesive-free-bonded (AFB) technique is used instead of the bulk nonlinear crystal, the optical parametric oscillation takes place at two sets of the new wavelengths for the signal and idler beams due to the phase shifts occurring at the interfaces of the adjacent domains making up the composite. These two sets of the signal and idler waves are effectively generated by the two OPO's being coupled to each other. These signals and idlers exhibit ultrastability in terms of their frequency separation. We review the progress made by us on the applications being realized by using such coupled OPO's such as THz generation and restoration of the blurred images after propagating through a distortion plate and a phase plate simulating atmospheric turbulence.

  18. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  19. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  20. Augmenting reality in Direct View Optical (DVO) overlay applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Tim; Edwards, Tim

    2014-06-01

    The integration of overlay displays into rifle scopes can transform precision Direct View Optical (DVO) sights into intelligent interactive fire-control systems. Overlay displays can provide ballistic solutions within the sight for dramatically improved targeting, can fuse sensor video to extend targeting into nighttime or dirty battlefield conditions, and can overlay complex situational awareness information over the real-world scene. High brightness overlay solutions for dismounted soldier applications have previously been hindered by excessive power consumption, weight and bulk making them unsuitable for man-portable, battery powered applications. This paper describes the advancements and capabilities of a high brightness, ultra-low power text and graphics overlay display module developed specifically for integration into DVO weapon sight applications. Central to the overlay display module was the development of a new general purpose low power graphics controller and dual-path display driver electronics. The graphics controller interface is a simple 2-wire RS-232 serial interface compatible with existing weapon systems such as the IBEAM ballistic computer and the RULR and STORM laser rangefinders (LRF). The module features include multiple graphics layers, user configurable fonts and icons, and parameterized vector rendering, making it suitable for general purpose DVO overlay applications. The module is configured for graphics-only operation for daytime use and overlays graphics with video for nighttime applications. The miniature footprint and ultra-low power consumption of the module enables a new generation of intelligent DVO systems and has been implemented for resolutions from VGA to SXGA, in monochrome and color, and in graphics applications with and without sensor video.

  1. Engineering Gold Nanorod-Based Plasmonic Nanocrystals for Optical Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic nanocrystals have a unique ability to support localized surface plasmon resonances and exhibit rich and intriguing optical properties. Engineering plasmonic nanocrystals can maximize their potentials for specific applications. In this dissertation, we developed three unprecedented Au nanorod-based plasmonic nanocrystals through rational design of the crystal shape and/or composition, and successfully demonstrated their applications in light condensation, photothermal conversion, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The “Au nanorod-Au nanosphere dimer” nanocrystal was synthesized via the ligand-induced asymmetric growth of a Au nanosphere on a Au nanorod. This dimeric nanostructure features an extraordinary broadband optical absorption in the range of 400‒1400nm, and it proved to be an ideal black-body material for light condensation and an efficient solar-light harvester for photothermal conversion. The “Au nanorod (core) @ AuAg alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was built through the epitaxial growth of homogeneously alloyed AuAg shells on Au nanorods by precisely controlled synthesis. The resulting core-shell structured, bimetallic nanorods integrate the merits of the AuAg alloy with the advantages of anisotropic nanorods, exhibiting strong, stable and tunable surface plasmon resonances that are essential for SERS applications in a corrosive environment. The “high-index faceted Au nanorod (core) @ AuPd alloy (shell)” nanocrystal was produced via site-specific epitaxial growth of AuPd alloyed horns at the ends of Au nanorods. The AuPd alloyed horns are bound with high-index side facets, while the Au nanorod concentrates an intensive electric field at each end. This unique configuration unites highly active catalytic sites with strong SERS sites into a single entity and was demonstrated to be ideal for in situ monitoring of Pd-catalyzed reactions by SERS. The synthetic strategies developed here are promising towards the fabrication of

  2. Lagrangian-Hamiltonian formulation of paraxial optics and applications: Study of gauge symmetries and the optical spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartora, C. A.; Cabrera, G. G.; Nobrega, K. Z.; Montagner, V. F.; Matielli, Marina H. K.; de Campos, Fillipi Klos Rodrigues; Filho, Horacio Tertuliano S.

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the paraxial regime, usually valid for optical frequencies and also in the microwave spectrum of guided waves, the propagation of electromagnetic fields can be analyzed through a paraxial wave equation, which is analogous to the nonrelativistic Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics but replacing time t with spatial coordinate z. Considering that, here it is shown that for lossless media in optical frequencies it is possible to construct a Lagrangian operator with an one-to-one correspondence with nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, which allows someone to use the same mathematical methods and techniques for solving problems. To demonstrate that, we explore a few applications in optics with increasing levels of complexity. In the spirit of a Hamiltonian formulation, the ray-tracing trajectories of geometric optics in paraxial regime are obtained in a clear manner. Following that, the gauge symmetries of the optical-field Lagrangian density is discussed in a detailed way, leading to the general form of the interaction Hamiltonian. Through the use of perturbation theory, we discuss a classical analog for a quantum not gate, making use of mode coupling in an isotropic chiral medium. At last, we explore the optical spin Hall effect and its possible applications using an effective geometric optics equation derived from an interaction Hamiltonian for the optical fields. We also predict within the framework of paraxial optics a spin Hall effect of light induced by gravitational fields.

  3. Planar Microfluidic System Based on Electrophoresis for Detection of 130-nm Magnetic Labels for Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Tsukasa; Morimoto, Yoshitaka; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2011-04-01

    Superparamagnetic beads (SPBs) used as magnetic labels offer potential for the realization of high sensitivity and low cost biosensors for point of care treatment (POCT). For better biomolecular affinity and higher sensitivity, it is desirable to use sub-200-nm-diameter SPBs comparable in size to actual biomolecules. However, the detection of small concentrations of such SPBs by magnetoresistive devices is extremely challenging due to small magnetic response of SPBs. As a solution to these limitations, we describe a simple detecting procedure where the capture of micro-SPBs by immobilized nano-target SPBs due to self-assembly induced by an external magnetic field, which was monitored under an optical microscope. Here we describe biosensing system based on self-assembly of micro-SPBs by nanoSPBs targets using a system without external pumps, thereby enabling greater miniaturization and portability.

  4. Nitrite Biosensing via Selective Enzymes—A Long but Promising Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gabriela Almeida

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decades have witnessed a steady increase of the social and political awareness for the need of monitoring and controlling environmental and industrial processes. In the case of nitrite ion, due to its potential toxicity for human health, the European Union has recently implemented a number of rules to restrict its level in drinking waters and food products. Although several analytical protocols have been proposed for nitrite quantification, none of them enable a reliable and quick analysis of complex samples. An alternative approach relies on the construction of biosensing devices using stable enzymes, with both high activity and specificity for nitrite. In this paper we review the current state-of-the-art in the field of electrochemical and optical biosensors using nitrite reducing enzymes as biorecognition elements and discuss the opportunities and challenges in this emerging market.

  5. All-optical switching and limiting properties of a Ru (II) Schiff-base complex for nonlinear optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunatha, K. B.; Rajarao, Ravindra; Umesh, G.; Ramachandra Bhat, B.; Poornesh, P.

    2017-08-01

    A salen-based ruthenium (Ru) (II) complex was synthesized for possible use in nonlinear optical device applications. The Ru complex was doped in a polymer matrix to fabricate films using a low-cost spin-coating technique. The third-order nonlinear optical parameters of the complex were investigated by Z-scan and degenerate four-wave mixing techniques. The study reveals two-order enhancement of third-order optical susceptibility χ (3) and exhibits superior limiting capability due to a reverse saturable absorption process. All-optical switching action for the films indicates that the sample can function as an optical inverter or a NOT gate. Hence, the Ru (II) Schiff-base complex materializes as a possible candidate for use in nonlinear optical devices.

  6. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Chen, Yongli; Li, Song; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-11-09

    A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO) for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target). The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA) that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  7. Ultrasensitive biosensing platform based on the luminescence quenching ability of plasmonic palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Sun, De-En; Liu, Zhihong

    2015-03-23

    An ultrasensitive biosensing platform for DNA and protein detection is constructed based on the luminescence quenching ability of plasmonic palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs). By growing the particles into large sizes (ca. 30 nm), the plasmonic light absorption of PdNPs is broadened and extended to the visible range with extinction coefficients as high as 10(9)  L mol(-1)  cm(-1) , enabling complete quenching of fluorescent dyes that emit at diverse ranges and that are tagged to bioprobes. Meanwhile the nonspecific quenching of the dyes (not bound to probes) is negligible, leading to extremely low background signal. Utilizing the affinity of PdNPs towards bioprobes, such as single-stranded (ss) DNA and polypeptide molecules, which is mainly assigned to the coordination interaction, nucleic acid assays with a quantification limit of 3 pM target DNA and protein assay are achieved with a simple mix-and-detect strategy based on the luminescence quenching-and-recovery protocol. This is the first demonstration of biosensing employing plasmonic absorption of nanopalladium, which offers pronounced sensing performances and can be reasonably expected for wide applications.

  8. Implementation of 3D Optical Scanning Technology for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdil Kuş

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Reverse engineering (RE is a powerful tool for generating a CAD model from the 3D scan data of a physical part that lacks documentation or has changed from the original CAD design of the part. The process of digitizing a part and creating a CAD model from 3D scan data is less time consuming and provides greater accuracy than manually measuring the part and designing the part from scratch in CAD. 3D optical scanning technology is one of the measurement methods which have evolved over the last few years and it is used in a wide range of areas from industrial applications to art and cultural heritage. It is also used extensively in the automotive industry for applications such as part inspections, scanning of tools without CAD definition, scanning the casting for definition of the stock (i.e. the amount of material to be removed from the surface of the castings model for CAM programs and reverse engineering. In this study two scanning experiments of automotive applications are illustrated. The first one examines the processes from scanning to re-manufacturing the damaged sheet metal cutting die, using a 3D scanning technique and the second study compares the scanned point clouds data to 3D CAD data for inspection purposes. Furthermore, the deviations of the part holes are determined by using different lenses and scanning parameters.

  9. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min ptissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  10. Improved antireflection coated microspheres for biological applications of optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Valentina; Sonnberger, Aaron; Abdosamadi, Mohammad K.; McDonald, Craig; Schäffer, Erik; McGloin, David

    2016-09-01

    The success of optical tweezers in cellular biology1 is in part due to the wide range of forces that can be applied, from femto- to hundreds of pico-Newtons; nevertheless extending the range of applicable forces to the nanoNewton regime opens access to a new set of phenomena that currently lie beyond optical manipulation. A successful approach to overcome the conventional limits on trapping forces involves the optimization of the trapped probes. Jannasch et al.2 demonstrated that an anti-reflective shell of nanoporous titanium dioxide (aTiO2, nshell = 1.75) on a core particle made out of titanium dioxide in the anatase phase (cTiO2, ncore = 2.3) results in trappable microspheres capable to reach forces above 1 nN. Here we present how the technique can be further improved by coating the high refractive index microspheres with an additional anti-reflective shell made out of silica (SiO2). This external shell not only improves the trap stability for microspheres of different sizes, but also enables the use of functionalization techniques already established for commercial silica beads in biological experiments. We are also investigating the use of these new microspheres as probes to measure adhesion forces between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in effector T-Cells and will present preliminary results comparing standard and high-index beads.

  11. High-grade optical polydimethylsiloxane for microfluidic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Robert Dean; Wolf, Heiko; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    Commercially available polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers, such as Sylgard 184® are widely used in soft lithography and for microfluidic applications. These PDMS elastomers contain fillers to enhance their mechanical stability. The reinforcing fillers, often sub-micrometer small SiO(2) particles, tend to aggregate, swell with water, and thereby become cognoscible in a way that can strongly interfere with the visualization of micro-scale events taking place next to PDMS structures. As PDMS microfluidics are often used for studying cells and micro-/nanoparticles and for creating/handling nanodroplets, it has become highly desirable to employ a PDMS having high optical quality and that allows microscopy observation without artifacts. Here, we present a PDMS formulation that is free of fillers and has sufficiently low viscosity to perform a filtration step of the mixed prepolymers before curing. By molding a bi-layer microfluidic network (MFN), composed of a thin filler-free PDMS layer and a thicker Sylgard 184® backing layer, PDMS MFNs featuring both high optical quality and mechanical stability, can be fabricated.

  12. Application of optical scanning for measurements of castings and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wieczorowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper application of non destructive method for dimensional control of elements in initial phase of car manufacturing, at Volks-wagen Poznań foundry was presented. VW foundry in Poznań is responsible of series production of chill and dies castings made of light alloys using contemporary technologies. Castings have a complex shape: they are die castings of housings for steering columns and gravity chill castings of cylinder heads, for which cores are manufactured using both hot box and cold box method. Manufacturing capabilities of VW foundry in Poznań reach 26.000 tons of aluminum castings per year. Optical system ATOS at Volkswagen Poznań foundry is used to digitize object and determination of all dimensions and shapes of inspected object. This technology is applied in car industry, reverse engineering, quality analysis and control and to solve many similar tasks. System is based on triangulation: sensor head projects different fringes patterns onto a measured object while scanner observes their trajectories using two cameras. Basing on optical transform equations a processing unit automatically and with a great accuracy calculates 3D coordinates for every pixel of camera. Depending on camera reso-lution as an effect of such a scan we obtain a cloud of up to 4 million points for every single measurement. In the paper examples of di-mensional analysis regarding castings and cores were presented.

  13. Optical properties and sensing applications of stellated and bimetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alison F.

    This dissertation focuses on developing guidelines to aid in the design of new bimetallic platforms for sensing applications. Stellated metal nanostructures are a class of plasmonic colloids in which large electric field enhancements can occur at sharp features, making them excellent candidates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and surface enhanced infrared spectroscopy (SE-IRS) platforms. Shape-dependent rules for convex polyhedra such as cubes or octahedra exist, which describe far-field scattering and near-field enhancements. However, such rules are lacking for their concave (stellated) counterparts. This dissertation presents the optical response of stellated Au nanocrystals with Oh, D4h, D3h, C2v, and T d symmetry, which were modeled to systematically investigate the role of symmetry, branching, and particle orientation with respect to excitation source using finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. Expanding on stellated nanostructures, bimetallic compositions introduce an interplay between overall architecture and composition to provide tunable optical properties and the potential of new functionality. However, decoupling the complex compositional and structural contributions to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) remains a challenge, especially when the monometallic counterparts are not synthetically accessible for comparison and the theoretical tools for capturing gradient compositions are lacking. This dissertation explores a stellated Au-Pd nanocrystal model system with Oh symmetry to decouple structural and complex compositional effects on LSPR. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  14. Development and Application of Multifunctional Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Zhongwei

    Microcirculation refers to the functions of capillaries and the neighboring lymphatic vessels. It plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of disorders in many clinical areas including cardiology, dermatology, neurology and ophthalmology, and so forth. It is crucial to develop imaging technologies that can provide both qualitative and quantitative information as to how microcirculation responds to certain injury and/or disease, and its treatment. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging technique for high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of specimens, with many applications in clinical medicine. Current state-of-the-art OCT systems operate in the Fourier domain, using either a broadband light source with a spectrometer, known as spectral domain OCT (SDOCT), or a rapidly tunable laser, known as swept source OCT (SSOCT). The current Fourier domain OCT systems have dramatically improvement in sensitivity, resolution and speed compared to time domain OCT. In addition to the improvement in the OCT system hardware, different methods for functional measurements of tissue beds have been developed and demonstrated. This includes but not limited to, i) Phase-resolved Doppler OCT for quantifying the blood flow, ii) OCT angiography for visualization of microvasculature, iii) Polarization sensitive OCT for measuring the intrinsic optical property/ birefringence of tissue, iv) spectroscopic OCT for measuring blood oxygenation, etc. Functional OCT can provide important clinical information that is not available in the typical intensity based structural OCT images. Among these functional OCT modalities, Doppler OCT and OCT angiography attract great interests as they show high capability for in vivo study of microvascular pathology. By analyzing the Doppler effect of a flowing particle on light frequency, Doppler OCT allows the quantification of the blood flow speed and blood flow rate. The most popular approach for Doppler OCT is achieved through

  15. A biaxial PZT optical scanner for pico-projector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, K.; Koyama, T.; Saito, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Toshiyoshi, H.

    2015-02-01

    We report a newly developed two-dimensional MEMS optical scanner based on the ADRIP (Arc Discharge Reactive Ion-Plating) deposited piezoelectric PZT film of typical 4 μm. A circular mirror of 1.2 mm in diameter is suspended within a pair of resonant mechanism that oscillates at 25 kHz for ±12° mechanical angle with a typical voltage of 10 V. A gimbal plate including the mirror is supported with another pair of meandering suspensions to tilt the plate in the orthogonal direction at 60 Hz for the off-resonant vertical motion of ±8° mechanical. Overall power consumption of the piezoelectric actuation was 100 mW or less. As a mechanical reinforce, a rib-structure was designed on the backside of the mirror by using a structural optimization tool TOSCA to suppress the dynamic curvature to 100 nm or less. A piezoelectric sensor was also integrated in the identical PZT film after optimizing the electrode shape to pick up the mechanical angle of the scanner and to give a trigger signal to the control system. A plug-in type pico-projector optics and electronics has been assembled in a 7.5 cm × 12 cm × 5 cm volume with RGB lasers to demonstrate a HD (high definition) class image projection of 720 horizontal lines. The fundamental resonance of the entire scanner mechanism was made to be 1 kHz or higher, thereby exhibiting a compatibility with vehicle applications.

  16. Characterization of Flexible Copolymer Optical Fibers for Force Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas J. Scherer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, different polymer optical fibres for applications in force sensing systems in textile fabrics are reported. The proposed method is based on the deflection of the light in fibre waveguides. Applying a force on the fibre changes the geometry and affects the wave guiding properties and hence induces light loss in the optical fibre. Fibres out of three different elastic and transparent copolymer materials were successfully produced and tested. Moreover, the influence of the diameter on the sensing properties was studied. The detectable force ranges from 0.05 N to 40 N (applied on 3 cm of fibre length, which can be regulated with the material and the diameter of the fibre. The detected signal loss varied from 0.6% to 78.3%. The fibres have attenuation parameters between 0.16–0.25 dB/cm at 652 nm. We show that the cross-sensitivies to temperature, strain and bends are low. Moreover, the high yield strength (0.0039–0.0054 GPa and flexibility make these fibres very attractive candidates for integration into textiles to form wearable sensors, medical textiles or even computing systems.

  17. Optically active quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  18. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Wolter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i Quantum cascade lasers (QCL based photoacoustic (PA systems; ii gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET sensors, and iii functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling.

  19. Optical and Electronic NOx Sensors for Applications in Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Cinzia; Elia, Angela; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Lugarà, Pietro Mario; Ieva, Eliana; Cioffi, Nicola; Torsi, Luisa; Bruno, Giovanni; Losurdo, Maria; Garcia, Michael A.; Wolter, Scott D.; Brown, April; Ricco, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Current production and emerging NOx sensors based on optical and nanomaterials technologies are reviewed. In view of their potential applications in mechatronics, we compared the performance of: i) Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) based photoacoustic (PA) systems; ii) gold nanoparticles as catalytically active materials in field-effect transistor (FET) sensors, and iii) functionalized III-V semiconductor based devices. QCL-based PA sensors for NOx show a detection limit in the sub part-per-million range and are characterized by high selectivity and compact set-up. Electrochemically synthesized gold-nanoparticle FET sensors are able to monitor NOx in a concentration range from 50 to 200 parts per million and are suitable for miniaturization. Porphyrin-functionalized III-V semiconductor materials can be used for the fabrication of a reliable NOx sensor platform characterized by high conductivity, corrosion resistance, and strong surface state coupling. PMID:22412315

  20. Quantum entanglement in electron optics generation, characterization, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    This monograph forms an interdisciplinary study in atomic, molecular, and quantum information (QI) science. Here a reader will find that applications of the tools developed in QI provide new physical insights into electron optics as well as properties of atoms & molecules which, in turn, are useful in studying QI both at fundamental and applied levels. In particular, this book investigates entanglement properties of flying electronic qubits generated in some of the well known processes capable of taking place in an atom or a molecule following the absorption of a photon. Here, one can generate Coulombic or fine-structure entanglement of electronic qubits. The properties of these entanglements differ not only from each other, but also from those when spin of an inner-shell photoelectron is entangled with the polarization of the subsequent fluorescence. Spins of an outer-shell electron and of a residual photoion can have free or bound entanglement in a laboratory.