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Sample records for optical biomolecule detectors

  1. Integrated Miniature Arrays of Optical Biomolecule Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltchenko, Vladimir; Maleki, Lute; Lin, Ying; Le, Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Integrated miniature planar arrays of optical sensors for detecting specific biochemicals in extremely small quantities have been proposed. An array of this type would have an area of about 1 cm2. Each element of the array would include an optical microresonator that would have a high value of the resonance quality factor (Q . 107). The surface of each microresonator would be derivatized to make it bind molecules of a species of interest, and such binding would introduce a measurable change in the optical properties of the microresonator. Because each microresonator could be derivatized for detection of a specific biochemical different from those of the other microresonators, it would be possible to detect multiple specific biochemicals by simultaneous or sequential interrogation of all the elements in the array. Moreover, the derivatization would make it unnecessary to prepare samples by chemical tagging. Such interrogation would be effected by means of a grid of row and column polymer-based optical waveguides that would be integral parts of a chip on which the array would be fabricated. The row and column polymer-based optical waveguides would intersect at the elements of the array (see figure). At each intersection, the row and column waveguides would be optically coupled to one of the microresonators. The polymer-based waveguides would be connected via optical fibers to external light sources and photodetectors. One set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the row waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the sources to the resonators; the other set of waveguides and fibers (e.g., the column waveguides and fibers) would couple light from the microresonators to the photodetectors. Each microresonator could be addressed individually by row and column for measurement of its optical transmission. Optionally, the chip could be fabricated so that each microresonator would lie inside a microwell, into which a microscopic liquid sample could be dispensed.

  2. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical Sensors for Biomolecules Using Nanoporous Sol-Gel Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Zhou, Jing C.; Lan, Esther H.; Dunn, Bruce; Gillman, Patricia L.; Smith, Scott M.

    2004-01-01

    An important consideration for space missions to Mars is the ability to detect biosignatures. Solid-state sensing elements for optical detection of biological entities are possible using sol-gel based biologically active materials. We have used these materials as optical sensing elements in a variety of bioassays, including immunoassays and enzyme assays. By immobilizing an appropriate biomolecule in the sol-gel sensing element, we have successfully detected analytes such as amino acids and hormones. In the case of the amino acid glutamate, the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase was the immobilized molecule, whereas in the case of the hormone cortisol, an anti-cortisol antibody was immobilized in the sensing element. In this previous work with immobilized enzymes and antibodies, excellent sensitivity and specificity were demonstrated in a variety of formats including bulk materials, thin films and fibers. We believe that the sol-gel approach is an attractive platform for bioastronautics sensing applications because of the ability to detect a wide range of entities such as amino acids, fatty acids, hopanes, porphyrins, etc. The sol-gel approach produces an optically transparent 3D silica matrix that forms around the biomolecule of interest, thus stabilizing its structure and functionality while allowing for optical detection. This encapsulation process protects the biomolecule and leads to a more "rugged" sensor. The nanoporous structure of the sol-gel matrix allows diffusion of small target molecules but keeps larger, biomolecules immobilized in the pores. We are currently developing these biologically active sol-gel materials into small portable devices for on-orbit cortisol detection

  4. Thermo-optical Characterization of Photothermal Optical Phase Shift Detection in Extended-Nano Channels and UV Detection of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hisashi; Miyawaki, Naoya; Asano, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2017-06-06

    The expansion of microfluidics research to nanofluidics requires absolutely sensitive and universal detection methods. Photothermal detection, which utilizes optical absorption and nonradiative relaxation, is promising for the sensitive detection of nonlabeled biomolecules in nanofluidic channels. We have previously developed a photothermal optical phase shift (POPS) detection method to detect nonfluorescent molecules sensitively, while a rapid decrease of the sensitivity in nanochannels and the introduction of an ultraviolet (UV) excitation system were issues to be addressed. In the present study, our primary aim is to characterize the POPS signal in terms of the thermo-optical properties and quantitatively evaluate the causes for the decrease in sensitivity. The UV excitation system is then introduced into the POPS detector to realize the sensitive detection of nonlabeled biomolecules. The UV-POPS detection system is designed and constructed from scratch based on a symmetric microscope. The results of simulations and experiments reveal that the sensitivity decreases due to a reduction of the detection volume, dissipation of the heat, and cancellation of the changes in the refractive indices. Finally, determination of the concentration of a nonlabeled protein (bovine serum albumin) is performed in a very thin 900 nm deep nanochannel. As a result, the limit of detection (LOD) is 2.3 μM (600 molecules in the 440 attoliter detection volume), which is as low as that previously obtained for our visible POPS detector. UV-POPS detection is thus expected be a powerful technique for the study of biomolecules, including DNAs and proteins confined in nanofluidic channels.

  5. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  6. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  7. Small biomolecule immunosensing with plasmonic optical fiber grating sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaut, Clotilde; Voisin, Valérie; Malachovská, Viera; Dubois, Valentin; Mégret, Patrice; Wattiez, Ruddy; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2016-03-15

    This study reports on the development of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) optical fiber biosensor based on tilted fiber Bragg grating technology for direct detection of small biomarkers of interest for lung cancer diagnosis. Since SPR principle relies on the refractive index modifications to sensitively detect mass changes at the gold coated surface, we have proposed here a comparative study in relation to the target size. Two cytokeratin 7 (CK7) samples with a molecular weight ranging from 78 kDa to 2.6 kDa, respectively CK7 full protein and CK7 peptide, have been used for label-free monitoring. This work has first consisted in the elaboration and the characterization of a robust and reproducible bioreceptor, based on antibody/antigen cross-linking. Immobilized antibodies were then utilized as binding agents to investigate the sensitivity of the biosensor towards the two CK7 antigens. Results have highlighted a very good sensitivity of the biosensor response for both samples diluted in phosphate buffer with a higher limit of detection for the larger CK7 full protein. The most groundbreaking nature of this study relies on the detection of small biomolecule CK7 peptides in buffer and in the presence of complex media such as serum, achieving a limit of detection of 0.4 nM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Hard X-ray-induced optical luminescence via biomolecule-directed metal clusters†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratx, Guillem; Sun, Conroy; Sakamoto, Masanori; Ahmad, Moiz; Volotskova, Olga; Ong, Qunxiang; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Harada, Yoshie

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that biomolecule-directed metal clusters are applicable in the study of hard X-ray excited optical luminescence, promising a new direction in the development of novel X-ray-activated imaging probes. PMID:24463467

  9. OPTICAL TRANSIENT DETECTOR (OTD) LIGHTNING V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Transient Detector (OTD) records optical measurements of global lightning events in the daytime and nighttime. The data includes individual point...

  10. Optical Pushing: A Tool for Parallelized Biomolecule Manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Laurens, N.; de Rijk, E.J.; Kress, H.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to measure and manipulate single molecules has greatly advanced the field of biophysics. Yet, the addition of more single-molecule tools that enable one to measure in a parallel fashion is important to diversify the questions that can be addressed. Here we present optical pushing (OP), a

  11. Geomicrobial Optical Logging Detectors (GOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramall, N. E.; Stoker, C. R.; Price, P. B.; Coates, J. D.; Allamandola, L. J.; Mattioda, A. L.

    2008-12-01

    We will present concepts for downhole instrumentation that could be used in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). We envision optical borehole-logging instruments that could monitor bacterial concentration, mineralogy, aromatic organics, temperature and oxygen concentration, allowing for the in situ monitoring of time-dependent microbial and short-scale geologic processes and provide valuable in situ data on stratigraphy to supplement core analyses, especially where instances of missing or damaged core sections make such studies difficult. Incorporated into these instruments will be a sampling/inoculation tool to allow for the recovery and/or manipulation of particularly interesting sections of the borehole wall for further study, enabling a series of microbiological studies. The borehole tools we will develop revolve around key emerging technologies and methods, some of which are briefly described below: 1) Autofluorescence Spectroscopy: Building on past instruments, we will develop a new borehole logger that searches for microbial life and organics using fluorescence spectroscopy. Many important organic compounds (e.g. PAHs) and biomolecules (e.g. aromatic amino acids, proteins, methanogenic coenzymes) fluoresce when excited with ultraviolet and visible light. Through the careful selection of excitation wavelength(s) and temporal gating parameters, a borehole logging instrument can detect and differentiate between these different compounds and the mineral matrix in which they exist. 2) Raman Spectroscopy: Though less sensitive than fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy is more definitive: it can provide important mineral phase distribution/proportions and other chemical data enabling studies of mineralogy and microbe-mineral interactions (when combined with fluorescence). 3) Borehole Camera: Imaging of the borehole wall with extended information in the UV, visible, and NIR for a more informative view can provide a lot of insight

  12. Scintillators and other particle optical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipaux, R.

    2011-01-01

    The author reports and comments his researcher career in the field of particle optical detectors. He addresses the cases of organic scintillators (scintillating fibers, liquid scintillators), inorganic scintillators (crystals for electromagnetic calorimetry, crystals for solar neutrino spectroscopy), and Cherenkov Effect detectors. He also reports his works on Cd Te detectors and their modelling

  13. [INVITED] Surface plasmon cavities on optical fiber end-facets for biomolecule and ultrasound detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian; He, Xiaolong; Zhou, Xin; Lei, Zeyu; Wang, Yalin; Yang, Jie; Cai, De; Chen, Sung-Liang; Wang, Xueding

    2018-05-01

    Integrating surface plasmon resonance (SPR) devices upon single-mode fiber (SMF) end facets renders label-free sensing systems that have a simple dip-and-read configuration, a small form factor, high compatibility with fiber-optic techniques, and invasive testing capability. Such devices are not only low cost replacement of current equipments in centralized laboratories, but also highly desirable for opening paths to new applications of label-free optical sensing technologies, such as point-of-care immunological tests and intravascular ultrasound imaging. In this paper, we explain the requirements and challenges for such devices from the perspectives of biomolecule and ultrasound detection applications. In such a context, we review our recent work on SMF end-facet SPR cavities. This include a glue-and-strip fabrication method to transfer a nano-patterned thin gold film to the SMF end-facet with high yield, high quality and high alignment precision, the designs of distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and distributed feedback (DFB) SPR cavities that couple efficiently with the SMF guided mode and reach quality factors of over 100, and the preliminary results for biomolecule interaction sensing and ultrasound detection. The particular advantages and potential values of these devices have been discussed, in terms of sensitivity, data reliability, reproducibility, bandwidth, etc.

  14. Camera System MTF: combining optic with detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torben B.; Granger, Zachary A.

    2017-08-01

    MTF is one of the most common metrics used to quantify the resolving power of an optical component. Extensive literature is dedicated to describing methods to calculate the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for stand-alone optical components such as a camera lens or telescope, and some literature addresses approaches to determine an MTF for combination of an optic with a detector. The formulations pertaining to a combined electro-optical system MTF are mostly based on theory, and assumptions that detector MTF is described only by the pixel pitch which does not account for wavelength dependencies. When working with real hardware, detectors are often characterized by testing MTF at discrete wavelengths. This paper presents a method to simplify the calculation of a polychromatic system MTF when it is permissible to consider the detector MTF to be independent of wavelength.

  15. Ionizing radiation detector using multimode optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, J.J.; Poret, J.C.; Rosen, M.; Rifkind, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    An optical ionizing radiation detector, based on the attenuation of 850-nm light in 50/125-μm multimode fibers, is described. The detector is especially well suited for application on spacecraft because of its small design. The detection element consists of a section of coiled fibers that has been designed to strip higher-order optical modes. Cylindrical radiation shields with atomic numbers ranging from Z = 13 (aluminum too) Z = 82 (lead) were placed around the ionizing radiation detector so that the effectiveness of the detector could be measured. By exposing the shields and the detector to 1.25-MeV cobalt 60 radiation, the mass attenuation coefficients of the shields were measured. The detector is based on the phenomenon that radiation creates optical color centers in glass fibers. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy performed on the 50/125-μm fibers showed the presence of germanium oxide and phosphorus-based color centers. The intensity of these centers is directly related to the accumulated gamma radiation

  16. Optically directed molecular transport and 3D isoelectric positioning of amphoteric biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeman, Dean G.; Harkins, James B.; Witkowski, Charles E. II; Lewis, Nathan S.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Thundat, Thomas George

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the formation of charged molecular packets and their transport within optically created electrical force-field traps in a pH-buffered electrolyte. We call this process photoelectrophoretic localization and transport (PELT). The electrolyte is in contact with a photoconductive semiconductor electrode and a counterelectrode that are connected through an external circuit. A light beam directed to coordinates on the photoconductive electrode surface produces a photocurrent within the circuit and electrolyte. Within the electrolyte, the photocurrent creates localized force-field traps centered at the illuminated coordinates. Charged molecules, including polypeptides and proteins, electrophoretically accumulate into the traps and subsequently can be transported in the electrolyte by moving the traps over the photoconductive electrode in response to movement of the light beam. The molecules in a single trap can be divided into aliquots, and the aliquots can be directed along multiple routes simultaneously by using multiple light beams. This photoelectrophoretic transport of charged molecules by PELT resembles the electrostatic transport of electrons within force-field wells of solid-state charge-coupled devices. The molecules, however, travel in a liquid electrolyte rather than a solid. Furthermore, we have used PELT to position amphoteric biomolecules in three dimensions. A 3D pH gradient was created in an electrolyte medium by controlling the illumination position on a photoconductive anode where protons were generated electrolytically. Photoelectrophoretic transport of amphoteric molecules through the pH gradient resulted in accumulation of the molecules at their apparent 3D isoelectric coordinates in the medium.

  17. Ground Optical Lightning Detector (GOLD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John, Jr.; Simmons, David

    A photometer developed to characterize lightning from the ground is discussed. The detector and the electronic signal processing and data storage systems are presented along with field data measured by the system. The discussion will include improvements that will be incorporated to enhance the measurement of lightning and the data storage capability to record for many days without human involvement. Finally, the calibration of the GOLD system is presented.

  18. Optically sensitive Medipix2 detector for adaptive optics wavefront sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Vallerga, John; Tremsina, Anton; Siegmund, Oswald; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan G; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    A new hybrid optical detector is described that has many of the attributes desired for the next generation adaptive optics (AO) wavefront sensors. The detector consists of a proximity focused microchannel plate (MCP) read out by multi-pixel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chips developed at CERN ("Medipix2") with individual pixels that amplify, discriminate and count input events. The detector has 256 x 256 pixels, zero readout noise (photon counting), can be read out at 1 kHz frame rates and is abutable on 3 sides. The Medipix2 readout chips can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few microseconds with an accuracy of 10 ns. When used in a Shack-Hartmann style wavefront sensor, a detector with 4 Medipix chips should be able to centroid approximately 5000 spots using 7 x 7 pixel sub-apertures resulting in very linear, off-null error correction terms. The quantum efficiency depends on the optical photocathode chosen for the bandpass of interest.

  19. Optically sensitive Medipix2 detector for adaptive optics wavefront sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallerga, John; McPhate, Jason; Tremsin, Anton; Siegmund, Oswald; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan

    2005-01-01

    A new hybrid optical detector is described that has many of the attributes desired for the next generation adaptive optics (AO) wavefront sensors. The detector consists of a proximity focused microchannel plate (MCP) read out by multi-pixel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chips developed at CERN ('Medipix2') with individual pixels that amplify, discriminate and count input events. The detector has 256x256 pixels, zero readout noise (photon counting), can be read out at 1 kHz frame rates and is abutable on 3 sides. The Medipix2 readout chips can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few microseconds with an accuracy of 10 ns. When used in a Shack-Hartmann style wavefront sensor, a detector with 4 Medipix chips should be able to centroid approximately 5000 spots using 7x7 pixel sub-apertures resulting in very linear, off-null error correction terms. The quantum efficiency depends on the optical photocathode chosen for the bandpass of interest

  20. Fluorescence monitoring of capillary electrophoresis separation of biomolecules with monolithically integrated optical waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongre, C.; Dekker, R.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Martinez-Vazquez, R.; Osellame, R.; Ramponi, R.; Cerullo, G.; van Weeghel, R.; Besselink, G.A.J.; van den Vlekkert, H.H.; Pollnau, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic integration of optical waveguides in a commercial lab-on-a-chip by femtosecond-laser material processing enables arbitrary 3D geometries of optical sensing structures in combination with fluidic microchannels. Integrated fluorescence monitoring of molecular separation, as applicable in

  1. Optical fiber Cherenkov detector for beam current monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pishchulin, I.V.; Solov'ev, N.G.; Romashkin, O.B.

    1991-01-01

    The results obtained in calculation of an optical fiber Cherenkov detector for accelerated beam current monitoring are presented. The technique of beam parameters monitoring is based on Cherenkov radiation excitation by accelerated electrons in the optical fiber. The formulas for calculations of optical power and time dependence of Cherenkov radiation pulse are given. The detector sensitivity and time resolution dependence on the fiber material characteristics are investigated. Parameters of a 10μm one-mode quartz optical fiber detector for the free electron laser photoinjector are calculated. The structure of a monitoring system with the optical fiber Cherenkov detector is considered. Possible applications of this technique are discussed and some recommendations are given

  2. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman optical activity (ROA) provides...

  3. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and...

  4. Development of Optical Fiber Detector for Measurement of Fast Neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YAGI, Takahiro; KAWAGUCHI, Shinichi; MISAWA, Tsuyoshi; PYEON, Cheol Ho; UNESAKI, Hironobu; SHIROYA, Seiji; OKAJIMA, Shigeaki; TANI, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of fast neutron flux is important for investigation of characteristic of fast reactors. In order to insert a neutron detector in a narrow space such as a gap of between fuel plates and measure the fast neutrons in real time, a neutron detector with an optical fiber has been developed. This detector consists of an optical fiber whose tip is covered with mixture of neutron converter material and scintillator such as ZnS(Ag). The detector for fast neutrons uses ThO 2 as converter material because 232 Th makes fission reaction with fast neutrons. The place where 232 Th can be used is limited by regulations because 232 Th is nuclear fuel material. The purpose of this research is to develop a new optical fiber detector to measure fast neutrons without 232 Th and to investigate the characteristic of the detector. These detectors were used to measure a D-T neutron generator and fast neutron flux distribution at Fast Critical Assembly. The results showed that the fast neutron flux distribution of the new optical fiber detector with ZnS(Ag) was the same as it of the activation method, and the detector are effective for measurement of fast neutrons. (authors)

  5. OPTICALLY BASED CHARGE INJECTION SYSTEM FOR IONIZATION DETECTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHEN, H.; CITTERIO, M.; LANNI, F.; LEITE, M.A.L.; RADEKA, V.; RESCIA, S.; TAKAI, H.

    2001-01-01

    An optically coupled charge injection system for ionization based radiation detectors which allows a test charge to be injected without the creation of ground loops has been developed. An ionization like signal from an external source is brought into the detector through an optical fiber and injected into the electrodes by means of a photodiode. As an application example, crosstalk measurements on a liquid Argon electromagnetic calorimeter readout electrodes were performed

  6. DMAP-BODIPY alkynes: a convenient tool for labeling biomolecules for bimodal PET-optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizet, Bertrand; Goncalves, Victor; Bernhard, Claire; Harvey, Pierre D; Denat, Franck; Goze, Christine

    2014-09-26

    Several new boron dipyrromethene/N,N-dimethylaminopyridine (BODIPY-DMAP) assemblies were synthesized as precursors for bimodal imaging probes (optical imaging, OI/positron emission tomography, PET). The photophysical properties of the new compounds were also studied. The first proof-of-concept was obtained with the preparation of several new BODIPY-labeled bombesins and evaluation of the affinity for bombesin receptors by using a competition binding assay. Fluorination reactions were investigated on DMAP-BODIPY precursors as well as on DMAP-BODIPY-labeled bombesins. Chemical modifications on the BODIPY core were also performed to obtain luminescent dyes emitting in the therapeutic window (650-900 nm), suitable for in vivo imaging, making these compounds promising precursors for PET/optical dual-modality imaging agents. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Optical data links for the ATLAS SCT and Pixel Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, I.M.; Weidberg, A.R.; Lee, S.C.; Chu, M.L.; Teng, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    ATLAS (The ATLAS Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-33) is one of the large electronic particle detectors at LHC (The LHC Conceptual Design, Report- The Yellow Book, CERN/AC/95-05(LHC)) which will become operational in 2005. It is planned to use radiation tolerant optical links for the data transfer from the SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) (ATLAS Inner Detector Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 97-16 and CERN/LHCC 97-17). and Pixel Detector (ATLAS Pixel Detector Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 98-13) systems to the acquisition electronics over a distance up to 140m. The overall architecture and the performance of these optical data links are described. One of the three candidate designs for an on-detector Opto-Package is presented

  8. Radiation imaging with optically read out GEM-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunbauer, F. M.; Lupberger, M.; Oliveri, E.; Resnati, F.; Ropelewski, L.; Streli, C.; Thuiner, P.; van Stenis, M.

    2018-02-01

    Modern imaging sensors allow for high granularity optical readout of radiation detectors such as MicroPattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs). Taking advantage of the high signal amplification factors achievable by MPGD technologies such as Gaseous Electron Multipliers (GEMs), highly sensitive detectors can be realised and employing gas mixtures with strong scintillation yield in the visible wavelength regime, optical readout of such detectors can provide high-resolution event representations. Applications from X-ray imaging to fluoroscopy and tomography profit from the good spatial resolution of optical readout and the possibility to obtain images without the need for extensive reconstruction. Sensitivity to low-energy X-rays and energy resolution permit energy resolved imaging and material distinction in X-ray fluorescence measurements. Additionally, the low material budget of gaseous detectors and the possibility to couple scintillation light to imaging sensors via fibres or mirrors makes optically read out GEMs an ideal candidate for beam monitoring detectors in high energy physics as well as radiotherapy. We present applications and achievements of optically read out GEM-based detectors including high spatial resolution imaging and X-ray fluorescence measurements as an alternative readout approach for MPGDs. A detector concept for low intensity applications such as X-ray crystallography, which maximises detection efficiency with a thick conversion region but mitigates parallax-induced broadening is presented and beam monitoring capabilities of optical readout are explored. Augmenting high resolution 2D projections of particle tracks obtained with optical readout with timing information from fast photon detectors or transparent anodes for charge readout, 3D reconstruction of particle trajectories can be performed and permits the realisation of optically read out time projection chambers. Combining readily available high performance imaging sensors with compatible

  9. Experience with parallel optical link for the CDF silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, S.

    2003-01-01

    The Dense Optical Interface Module (DOIM) is a byte-wide optical link developed for the Run II upgrade of the CDF silicon tracking system [1]. The module consists of a transmitter with a laser-diode array for conversion of digitized detector signals to light outputs, a 22 m optical fiber ribbon cable for light transmission, and a receiver converting the light pulses back to electrical signals. We report on the design feature, characteristics, and radiation tolerance

  10. Promising Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Isabel; Carvalho, Ana L; Radhouani, Hajer; Gonçalves, Cristiana; Oliveira, J Miguel; Reis, Rui L

    2018-01-01

    The osteochondral defect (OD) comprises the articular cartilage and its subchondral bone. The treatment of these lesions remains as one of the most problematic clinical issues, since these defects include different tissues, requiring distinct healing approaches. Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has been used for two decades, and it is an effective example of translational medicine; one of the most used cell-based repair strategies includes implantation of autologous cells in degradable scaffolds such as alginate, agarose, collagen, chitosan, chondroitin sulfate, cellulose, silk fibroin, hyaluronic acid, and gelatin, among others. Concerning the repair of osteochondral defects, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine started to design single- or bi-phased scaffold constructs, often containing hydroxyapatite-collagen composites, usually used as a bone substitute. Biomolecules such as natural and synthetic have been explored to recreate the cartilage-bone interface through multilayered biomimetic scaffolds. In this chapter, a succinct description about the most relevant natural and synthetic biomolecules used on cartilage and bone repair, describing the procedures to obtain these biomolecules, their chemical structure, common modifications to improve its characteristics, and also their application in the biomedical fields, is given.

  11. Control of the neutron detector count rate by optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquemore, A.L.; Johnson, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    The signal processing electronics used for the NE451 detectors on the TFTR multichannel neutron collimator are presently showing saturation effects at high counting rates equivalent to neutron yields of ∼10 16 n/s. While nonlinearity due to pulse pileup can be corrected for in most present TFTR experiments, additional steps are required for neutron source strengths above ∼3x10 16 n/s. These pulse pileup effects could be reduced by inserting sleeves in the collimator shielding to reduce the neutron flux in the vicinity of the detectors or by reducing the volume of detector exposed to the flux. We describe a novel method of avoiding saturation by optically controlling the number neutron events processed by the detector electronics. Because of the optical opacity of the ZnS-plastic detectors such as NE451, photons from a proton-recoil scintillation arise from a spatially localized area of the detector. By imaging a selected portion of the detector onto a photomultiplier, we reduce the effective volume of the detector in a controllable, reversible way. A prototype system, consisting of a focusing lens, a field lens, and a variable aperture, has been constructed. Results of laboratory feasibility tests are presented

  12. An optical fibre-type silicate glass thermoluminescent detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zheng; Dai Honggui; Hu Shangze; Liu Jian; Fang Jie

    1991-01-01

    A description of dosimetric properties and the preparation method of an optical fibre-type silicate glass thermoluminescent detector (TLD) is presented. Results showed that this new phosphor is a good one which could be used as a routine dosimeter in the range 10 -1 -10 3 Gy. The preparation method is a new one which differs greatly from all previous ones. Furthermore this kind of detector is small and of low weight. (orig.)

  13. Photoacoustic projection imaging using an all-optical detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, J.; Felbermayer, K.; Berer, T.

    2018-02-01

    We present a prototype for all-optical photoacoustic projection imaging. By generating projection images, photoacoustic information of large volumes can be retrieved with less effort compared to common photoacoustic computed tomography where many detectors and/or multiple measurements are required. In our approach, an array of 60 integrating line detectors is used to acquire photoacoustic waves. The line detector array consists of fiber-optic MachZehnder interferometers, distributed on a cylindrical surface. From the measured variation of the optical path lengths of the interferometers, induced by photoacoustic waves, a photoacoustic projection image can be reconstructed. The resulting images represent the projection of the three-dimensional spatial light absorbance within the imaged object onto a two-dimensional plane, perpendicular to the line detector array. The fiber-optic detectors achieve a noise-equivalent pressure of 24 Pascal at a 10 MHz bandwidth. We present the operational principle, the structure of the array, and resulting images. The system can acquire high-resolution projection images of large volumes within a short period of time. Imaging large volumes at high frame rates facilitates monitoring of dynamic processes.

  14. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  15. Optical Links for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gregor, Ingrid-Maria

    In der vorliegenden Dissertation wird eine strahlentolerante optische Datenstrecke mit hoher Datenrate für den Einsatz in dem Hochenergiephysikexperiment Atlas am Lhc Beschleuniger entwickelt. Da die Lhc-Experimente extremen Strahlenbelastungen ausgesetzt sind, müssen die Komponenten spezielle Ansprüche hinsichtlich der Strahlentoleranz erfüllen. Die Qualifikation der einzelnen Bauteile wurde im Rahmen dieser Arbeit durchgeführt. Die zu erwartenden Fluenzen im Atlas Inner Detector für Silizium und Gallium Arsenid (GaAs) wurden berechnet. Siliziumbauteile werden einer Fluenz von bis zu 1.1.1015neq /cm2 in 1 MeV äquivalenten Neutronen ausgesetzt sein, wohingegen GaAs Bauteile bis zu 7.8.1015neq /cm2 ausgesetzt sein werden. Die Strahlentoleranz der einzelnen benötigten Komponenten wie z.B. der Laserdioden sowie der jeweiligen Treiberchips wurde untersucht. Sowohl die Photo- als auch die Laserdioden haben sich als strahlentolerant für die Fluenzen an dem vorgesehenen Radius erwiesen. Aus de...

  16. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurm, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hofmann, M.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Moellenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Todor, S.; Winter, J. [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lachenmaier, T.; Traunsteiner, C. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Undagoitia, T. Marrodan [Physik-Department E15, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str., D-85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurstr. 189, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  17. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurm, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Göger-Neff, M; Hofmann, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lewke, T; Marrodán Undagoitia, T; Meindl, Q; Möllenberg, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Tippmann, M; Todor, S; Traunsteiner, C; Winter, J

    2010-05-01

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  18. NbN nanowire optical detectors for high speed applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, O; Pagano, S; Ejrnaes, M; Nappi, C; Pessina, E; Fontana, F

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel geometry for single photon optical detectors (SSPD) based on NbN nanowires. Traditionally the SSPD are realized in a meander structure in order to realize a reasonable (few square microns) collecting area. This has the disadvantage of generating a large detector inductance, mostly of kinetic origin, that strongly limits the detector operation in high speed applications, such as telecommunication. Moreover the extreme aspect ratio of the detector (a nanowire a fraction of mm long and 100 nm wide) puts strong requirements on the nanofabrication processes, with negative effects on the production yield. Our novel proposed geometry is based on a parallel stripes configuration designed in such a way that the light induced switching of a single stripe generates the switching of all the other through a cascade mechanism. The net result is an SSPD device that has a much lower intrinsic inductance, and consequently a much wider bandwidth (up to 10 GHz range). Moreover the signal amplitude generated is much larger than that of traditional SSPD, due to the contribution of all the parallel stripe. We present here the design and results of numerical simulation of the response of this novel type of SSPD. In particular we discuss of the design solutions that allow the cascade operation of the detector, by realizing a very fast and synchronous switching of all the parallel lines. Key issues, such as the optimal number of parallel lines, with respect to fabrication and operation constraints of the detectors are also discussed

  19. Dynamics of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of the biomolecules is shown by the example of myoglobin (Mb). The photodissociation of MbCO with a laser flash and the recapture process of CO were followed optically in the temperature region of 2 to 350 K. The binding procedure exhibits four components which stretch out over many orders of magnitude of time. Above 250 K, the time dependence of the components is exponential, below 180 K, only one component is present which follows an exponential equation. A potential barrier model is shown to explain the observed courses of binding. See also 'Biochemistry', in printing. (BJ/LH) [de

  20. Optical aurora detectors: using natural optics to motivate education and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Way, Jesse M.; Pust, Nathan J.; Nugent, Paul W.; Coate, Hans; Balster, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Natural optical phenomena enjoy a level of interest sufficiently high among a wide array of people to provide ideal education and outreach opportunities. The aurora promotes particularly high interest, perhaps because of its relative rarity in the areas of the world where most people live. A project is being conducted at Montana State University to use common interest and curiosity about auroras to motivate learning and outreach through the design and deployment of optical sensor systems that detect the presence of an auroral display and send cell phone messages to alert interested people. Project participants learn about the physics and optics of the aurora, basic principles of optical system design, radiometric calculations and calibrations, electro-optical detectors, electronics, embedded computer systems, and computer software. The project is moving into a stage where it will provide greatly expanded outreach and education opportunities as optical aurora detector kits are created and disbursed to colleges around our region.

  1. Biomolecule-based nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Willner, Bilha

    2010-10-13

    Biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotube) hybrid systems provide new materials that combine the unique optical, electronic, or catalytic properties of the nanoelements with the recognition or biocatalytic functions of biomolecules. This article summarizes recent applications of biomolecule-nanoparticle (or carbon nanotubes) hybrid systems for sensing, synthesis of nanostructures, and for the fabrication of nanoscale devices. The use of metallic nanoparticles for the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes, and as catalytic labels for the development of electrochemical biosensors is discussed. Similarly, biomolecule-quantum dot hybrid systems are implemented for optical biosensing, and for monitoring intracellular metabolic processes. Also, the self-assembly of biomolecule-metal nanoparticle hybrids into nanostructures and functional nanodevices is presented. The future perspectives of the field are addressed by discussing future challenges and highlighting different potential applications.

  2. On the possibilities of large-scale radio and fiber optics detectors in cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, G. A.; Markov, M. A.; Zheleznykh, I. M.

    1985-01-01

    Different variants of radio and fiber optics detectors for registration of super high energy cascades in the atmosphere and in dense media are discussed. Particularly the possibilities for investigation of quasi horizontal cosmic ray showers (CRS) and simulated muons from these CRS with the help of radio detectors and fiber optics detectors located on the ice surface are considered.

  3. Evaluation of a digital optical ionizing radiation particle track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.R.

    1987-06-01

    An ionizing radiation particle track detector is outlined which can, in principle, determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of all the secondary electrons produced by the passage of ionizing radiation through a low-pressure (0.1 to 10 kPa) gas. The electrons in the particle track are excited by the presence of a high-frequency AC electric field, and two digital cameras image the optical radiation produced in electronic excitation collisions of the surroundings gas by the electrons. The specific requirements of the detector for neutron dosimetry and microdosimetry are outlined (i.e., operating conditions of the digital cameras, high voltage fields, gas mixtures, etc.) along with an estimate of the resolution and sensitivity achievable with this technique. The proposed detector is shown to compare favorable with other methods for obtaining the details of the track structure, particularly in the quality of the information obtainable about the particle track and the comparative simplicity and adaptability of the detector for measuring the secondary electron track structure for many forms of ionizing radiation over a wide range of energies

  4. Nonclassicality and entanglement criteria for bipartite optical fields characterized by quadratic detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peřina Jr., J.; Arkhipov, I.I.; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 4 (2017), s. 1-15, č. článku 043845. ISSN 2469-9926 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : parametric down-conversion * photon statistic * bipartite optical fields * quadratic detectors Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  5. Noise spectra in balanced optical detectors based on transimpedance amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalov, A. V.; Kuzhamuratov, A.; Lvovsky, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    We present a thorough theoretical analysis and experimental study of the shot and electronic noise spectra of a balanced optical detector based on an operational amplifier connected in a transimpedance scheme. We identify and quantify the primary parameters responsible for the limitations of the circuit, in particular, the bandwidth and shot-to-electronic noise clearance. We find that the shot noise spectrum can be made consistent with the second-order Butterworth filter, while the electronic noise grows linearly with the second power of the frequency. Good agreement between the theory and experiment is observed; however, the capacitances of the operational amplifier input and the photodiodes appear significantly higher than those specified in manufacturers' datasheets. This observation is confirmed by independent tests.

  6. 3m vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with optical multichanel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, P.; Peraza, C.; Blanco, F.; Campos, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper, describes the design and the performance of a normal incidence vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer, for the 300-2400 A spectral range. It is provided with a multichannel detection system. The monochromator is original design and it has been built at CIEMAT: It is equipped with a 3 m concave holographic grating with 2400 grooves/mm. The multichannel detector consists of a windowless double microchannel plate/phosphor screen image intensifier, coupled by fiber optic to a 1024 elements self-scanning linear photodiode array. The output from the arrays is digitized by a 12-bit analog to digital converter and stored in a computer for its later analysis. The necessary software to store and display data has been developed. (Author)

  7. 3m Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectrometer with Optical Multichannel Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Peraza, C.; Blanco, F.; Campos, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of a normal incidence vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer, for the 300-2400 A spectral range. It is provided with a multichannel detection system. The monochromator is original design and it has been built at CIEMAT. It is equipped with a 3 m concave holographic grating with 2400 grooves/mm. The multichannel detector consists of a windowless double microchannel plate / phosphor screen image intensifier, coupled by fiber optic to a 1024 elements self-scanning linear photodiode array. The output from the array is digitized by a 12-bit analog to digital converter and stored in a computer, for its later analysis. The necessary software to store and display data has been developed. (Author) 18 refs

  8. SERS detection of Biomolecules at Physiological pH via aggregation of Gold Nanorods mediated by Optical Forces and Plasmonic Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Barbara; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Foti, Antonino; Messina, Elena; Irrera, Alessia; Donato, Maria Grazia; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.

    2016-06-01

    Strategies for in-liquid molecular detection via Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) are currently based on chemically-driven aggregation or optical trapping of metal nanoparticles in presence of the target molecules. Such strategies allow the formation of SERS-active clusters that efficiently embed the molecule at the “hot spots” of the nanoparticles and enhance its Raman scattering by orders of magnitude. Here we report on a novel scheme that exploits the radiation pressure to locally push gold nanorods and induce their aggregation in buffered solutions of biomolecules, achieving biomolecular SERS detection at almost neutral pH. The sensor is applied to detect non-resonant amino acids and proteins, namely Phenylalanine (Phe), Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (Lys), reaching detection limits in the μg/mL range. Being a chemical free and contactless technique, our methodology is easy to implement, fast to operate, needs small sample volumes and has potential for integration in microfluidic circuits for biomarkers detection.

  9. SERS detection of Biomolecules at Physiological pH via aggregation of Gold Nanorods mediated by Optical Forces and Plasmonic Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Barbara; D’Andrea, Cristiano; Foti, Antonino; Messina, Elena; Irrera, Alessia; Donato, Maria Grazia; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for in-liquid molecular detection via Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) are currently based on chemically-driven aggregation or optical trapping of metal nanoparticles in presence of the target molecules. Such strategies allow the formation of SERS-active clusters that efficiently embed the molecule at the “hot spots” of the nanoparticles and enhance its Raman scattering by orders of magnitude. Here we report on a novel scheme that exploits the radiation pressure to locally push gold nanorods and induce their aggregation in buffered solutions of biomolecules, achieving biomolecular SERS detection at almost neutral pH. The sensor is applied to detect non-resonant amino acids and proteins, namely Phenylalanine (Phe), Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (Lys), reaching detection limits in the μg/mL range. Being a chemical free and contactless technique, our methodology is easy to implement, fast to operate, needs small sample volumes and has potential for integration in microfluidic circuits for biomarkers detection. PMID:27246267

  10. Linear position sensitive neutron detector using fiber optic encoded scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, P.L.; Wroe, H.

    1983-01-01

    A linear position sensitive slow neutron detector with 3 mm resolution is described. It uses the fiber optic coding principle in which the resolution elements are separate pieces of lithium loaded glass scintillator each coupled by means of flexible polymer optical fibers to a unique combination of 3 photo multipliers (PM's) out of a bank of 12. A decoder circuit repsponds to a triple coincidence between PM outputs and generates a 12 bit work which identifies the scintillator element which stopped the incident neutron. Some details of the construction and decoding electronics are given together with test results obtained using a laboratory isotope neutron source and a monochomated, collimated neutron beam from a reactor. The count rate in the absence of neutron sources is 2 to 3 c min - 1 per element; the element to element variation in response to a uniform flux is a few percent for 95% of the elements; the resolution as measured by a 1 mm wide prode neutron beam is 3 mm; the relative long term stability is about 0.1% over 3 days and the detection efficiency measured by comparison with an end windowed, high pressure gas counter is about 65% at a neutron wavelength of 0.9A 0

  11. Pure sources and efficient detectors for optical quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielnicki, Kevin

    Over the last sixty years, classical information theory has revolutionized the understanding of the nature of information, and how it can be quantified and manipulated. Quantum information processing extends these lessons to quantum systems, where the properties of intrinsic uncertainty and entanglement fundamentally defy classical explanation. This growing field has many potential applications, including computing, cryptography, communication, and metrology. As inherently mobile quantum particles, photons are likely to play an important role in any mature large-scale quantum information processing system. However, the available methods for producing and detecting complex multi-photon states place practical limits on the feasibility of sophisticated optical quantum information processing experiments. In a typical quantum information protocol, a source first produces an interesting or useful quantum state (or set of states), perhaps involving superposition or entanglement. Then, some manipulations are performed on this state, perhaps involving quantum logic gates which further manipulate or entangle the intial state. Finally, the state must be detected, obtaining some desired measurement result, e.g., for secure communication or computationally efficient factoring. The work presented here concerns the first and last stages of this process as they relate to photons: sources and detectors. Our work on sources is based on the need for optimized non-classical states of light delivered at high rates, particularly of single photons in a pure quantum state. We seek to better understand the properties of spontaneous parameteric downconversion (SPDC) sources of photon pairs, and in doing so, produce such an optimized source. We report an SPDC source which produces pure heralded single photons with little or no spectral filtering, allowing a significant rate enhancement. Our work on detectors is based on the need to reliably measure single-photon states. We have focused on

  12. Enzyme-assisted polymer film degradation-enabled biomolecule sensing with poly (N-isopropylacrylamide)-based optical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wei, Menglian; Carvalho, Wildemar S P; Serpe, Michael J

    2018-01-25

    A biosensor for mouse Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was generated from responsive polymer-based interference filters (etalons). To accomplish this, an excess amount of alkaline phosphatase-modified goat anti-mouse IgG (AP-GAM, F(ab') 2 fragment specific to mouse IgG) was added to mouse IgG, and allowed to react for some time. After a given reaction time, the bound AP-GAM could be isolated from the unbound, excess AP-GAM by addition of goat anti-mouse IgG (Fc fragment specific)-modified magnetic microspheres (GAM-M) that bind the mouse IgG bound to AP-GAM. After application of a magnetic field, the free, unbound AP-GAM was isolated from the mixture and exposed to an etalon that has its upper Au surface modified with phosphate-containing polymer that can be degraded by AP-GAM. By the phosphate-containing polymer being degraded by the excess AP-GAM, the cleaved phosphate groups can diffuse into the interference filter's active polymer layer that yields a change in the optical properties that can be related to the amount of IgG in the sample. This concept is extremely straightforward to implement, and can be modified to detect a variety of other analytes of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical concentrators for Čerenkov light detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    RICH1 (Ring Imaging Cherenkov) detector is an important part of COMPASS particle physics experiment in CERN. Its central area photon detection part is being upgraded from wire chambers with CsI layers to very fast UV extended Hamamatsu MAPMTs (Multi Anode Photo Multiplier Tubes) array. MAPMTs have approx. 3 times smaller active area than the covered region, thus optical concentrators transforming image from old system focal plane to the new photocathode were needed. System was expected to be efficient from 200 to 600nm with best performance at 300nm and with angular acceptance including all interesting physics processes. Several design types (including i.e. a hollow waveguide) were investigated and the “telescopic” two lens aspherical design concept was selected for its proven functionality in HERA-B experiment. Chosen material was UV grade fused silica. System consists of a field lens placed in the focal plane of the RICH mirrors and a condenser lens downstream. Designing procedure started with a high op...

  14. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul; Hwy, Limchang; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Kyehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwook [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution.

  15. Highly Sensitive Photon Counting Detectors for Deep Space Optical Communications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new type of a photon-counting photodetector is proposed to advance the state-of the-art in deep space optical communications technology. The proposed detector...

  16. Optical characterization of wide-gap detector-grade semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshazly, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    Wide bandgap semiconductors are being widely investigated because they have the potential to satisfy the stringent material requirements of high resolution, room temperature gamma-ray spectrometers. In particular, Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd 1-x Zn x Te, x∼0.1) and Thallium Bromide (Tl Br), due to their combination of high resistivity, high atomic number and good electron mobility, have became very promising candidates for use in X- and gamma-ray detectors operating at room temperature. In this study, carrier trapping times were measured in CZT and Tl Br as a function of temperature and material quality. Carrier lifetimes and tellurium inclusion densities were measured in detector-grade Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals grown by the High Pressure Bridgman method and Modified Bridgman method. Excess carriers were produced in the material using a pulsed YAG laser with a 1064 nm wavelength and 7 ns pulse width. Infrared microscopy was used to measure the tellurium defect densities in CZT crystals. The electronic decay was optically measured at room temperature. Spatial mapping of lifetimes and defect densities in CZT was performed to determine the relationship between defect density and electronic decay. A significant and strong correlation was found between the volume fraction of tellurium inclusions and the carrier trapping time. Carrier trapping times and tellurium inclusions were measured in CZT in the temperature range from 300 K to 110 K and the results were analyzed using a theoretical trapping model. Spatial mapping of carrier trapping times and defect densities in CZT was performed to determine the relationship between defect density and electronic decay. While a strong correlation between trapping time and defect density of tellurium inclusions was observed, there was no significant change in the trap energy. Carrier trapping times were measured in detector grade thallium bromide (Tl Br) and compared with the results for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) in

  17. Biomolecules in Astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Meringer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, distribution and future of life in the universe, biomolecules are molecules produced by living organisms. This talk reviews known facts and open questions about biomolecules in the context of Astrobiology and introduces a research project on "Creating a Reference Set of Amino Acids Structures for Use in Multiple Astrobiology Investigations" that tries to find answers using computational methods.

  18. Integrated refractive index optical ring resonator detector for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; White, Ian M; Suter, Jonathan D; Zourob, Mohammed; Fan, Xudong

    2007-02-01

    We developed a novel miniaturized and multiplexed, on-capillary, refractive index (RI) detector using liquid core optical ring resonators (LCORRs) for future development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) devices. The LCORR employs a glass capillary with a diameter of approximately 100 mum and a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The circular cross section of the capillary forms a ring resonator along which the light circulates in the form of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGM has an evanescent field extending into the capillary core and responds to the RI change due to the analyte conducted in the capillary, thus permitting label-free measurement. The resonating nature of the WGM enables repetitive light-analyte interaction, significantly enhancing the LCORR sensitivity. This LCORR architecture achieves dual use of the capillary as a sensor head and a CE fluidic channel, allowing for integrated, multiplexed, and noninvasive on-capillary detection at any location along the capillary. In this work, we used electro-osmotic flow and glycerol as a model system to demonstrate the fluid transport capability of the LCORRs. In addition, we performed flow speed measurement on the LCORR to demonstrate its flow analysis capability. Finally, using the LCORR's label-free sensing mechanism, we accurately deduced the analyte concentration in real time at a given point on the capillary. A sensitivity of 20 nm/RIU (refractive index units) was observed, leading to an RI detection limit of 10-6 RIU. The LCORR marries photonic technology with microfluidics and enables rapid on-capillary sample analysis and flow profile monitoring. The investigation in this regard will open a door to novel high-throughput CE devices and lab-on-a-chip sensors in the future.

  19. Reference detectors for low flux optical radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellouati-Ghazi, Amal

    2003-01-01

    The parametric down conversion of photons generated in a non-linear crystal gives rise to two correlated photons. Associated to a System of counting of coincidences, this phenomenon makes possible the quantum efficiency measurements of detectors working on photon counting levels, without using neither sources nor detectors of references. This new method was developed at BNMINM with the aim to realize new standards detectors in the field of weak flows. It allows the determination of quantum efficiency with a relative uncertainty of 1,1%. A comparison with the IENGF (Italy) bearing on the quantum determination of efficiency of one of BNM-FNM detectors made possible to confront the exactitude of the measuring equipment. This detector was also made the object of a comparison with the French reference of radiometry, the cryogenic radiometer, the results were in agreement with uncertainties of measurements. (author) [fr

  20. Nano-optical observation of cascade switching in a parallel superconducting nanowire single photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, Robert M.; Tanner, Michael G.; Casaburi, Alessandro; Hadfield, Robert H.; Webster, Mark G.; San Emeterio Alvarez, Lara; Jiang, Weitao; Barber, Zoe H.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The device physics of parallel-wire superconducting nanowire single photon detectors is based on a cascade process. Using nano-optical techniques and a parallel wire device with spatially separate pixels, we explicitly demonstrate the single- and multi-photon triggering regimes. We develop a model for describing efficiency of a detector operating in the arm-trigger regime. We investigate the timing response of the detector when illuminating a single pixel and two pixels. We see a change in the active area of the detector between the two regimes and find the two-pixel trigger regime to have a faster timing response than the one-pixel regime

  1. Optical readout in a multi-module system test for the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flick, Tobias; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Gerlach, Peter; Kersten, Susanne; Maettig, Peter; Nderitu Kirichu, Simon; Reeves, Kendall; Richter, Jennifer; Schultes, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The innermost part of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, CERN, will be a pixel detector, which is presently under construction. The command messages and the readout data of the detector are transmitted over an optical data path. The readout chain consists of many components which are produced at several locations around the world, and must work together in the pixel detector. To verify that these parts are working together as expected a system test has been built up. It consists of detector modules, optoboards, optical fibres, Back of Crate cards, Readout Drivers, and control computers. In this paper, the system test setup and the operation of the readout chain are described. Also, some results of tests using the final pixel detector readout chain are given

  2. Optical readout and control interface for the BTeV pixel vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vergara-Limon, S; Sheaff, M; Vargas, M A

    2002-01-01

    Optical links will be used for sending data back and forth from the counting room to the detector in the data acquisition systems for future high energy physics experiments, including ATLAS and CMS in the LHC at CERN (Switzerland) and BTeV at Fermilab (USA). This is because they can be ultra-high speed and are relatively immune to electro-magnetic interference (EMI). The baseline design for the BTeV Pixel Vertex Detector includes two types of optical link, one to control and monitor and the other to read out the hit data from the multi-chip modules on each half-plane of the detector. The design and performance of the first prototype of the Optical Readout and Control Interface for the BTeV Pixel Vertex Detector is described.

  3. Optical readout of a triple-GEM detector by means of a CMOS sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marafini, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Patera, V. [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Pinci, D., E-mail: davide.pinci@roma1.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Sarti, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Sciubba, A. [INFN Sezione di Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma (Italy); Spiriti, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    In last years, the development of optical sensors has produced objects able to provide very interesting performance. Large granularity is offered along with a very high sensitivity. CMOS sensors with millions of pixels able to detect as few as two or three photons per pixel are commercially available and can be used to read-out the optical signals provided by tracking particle detectors. In this work the results obtained by optically reading-out a triple-GEM detector by a commercial CMOS sensor will be presented. A standard detector was assembled with a transparent window below the third GEM allowing the light to get out. The detector is supplied with an Ar/CF{sub 4} based gas mixture producing 650 nm wavelength photons matching the maximum quantum efficiency of the sensor.

  4. Universal squash model for optical communications using linear optics and threshold detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H. F.; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-01-01

    Transmission of photons through open-air or optical fibers is an important primitive in quantum-information processing. Theoretical descriptions of this process often consider single photons as information carriers and thus fail to accurately describe experimental implementations where any number of photons may enter a detector. It has been a great challenge to bridge this big gap between theory and experiments. One powerful method for achieving this goal is by conceptually squashing the received multiphoton states to single-photon states. However, until now, only a few protocols admit a squash model; furthermore, a recently proven no-go theorem appears to rule out the existence of a universal squash model. Here we show that a necessary condition presumed by all existing squash models is in fact too stringent. By relaxing this condition, we find that, rather surprisingly, a universal squash model actually exists for many protocols, including quantum key distribution, quantum state tomography, Bell's inequality testing, and entanglement verification.

  5. Modelling of the Optical Detector System in a Compact Disc Player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    The cross-couplings between focus and radial tracking servos in compact disc players are important, but the optical cross couplings are not well described in the literature. In this paper an optical model of a compact disc player based on the three beam single foucault detector principle is found...

  6. Scintillation Particle Detectors Based on Plastic Optical Fibres and Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Alessandro; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, development, and experimental validation of two types of scintillation particle detectors with high spatial resolution. The first one is based on the well established scintillating fibre technology. It will complement the ATLAS (A Toroidal Large ApparatuS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second detector consists in a microfabricated device used to demonstrate the principle of operation of a novel type of scintillation detector based on microfluidics. The first part of the thesis presents the work performed on a scintillating fibre tracking system for the ATLAS experiment. It will measure the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC collider at the ATLAS interaction point. The luminosity of an accelerator characterizes its performance. It is a process-independent parameter that is completely determined by the properties of the colliding beams and it relates the cross section of a ...

  7. Negative optical inertia for enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, Farid; Danilishin, Stefan; Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge; Miao Haixing; Zhao Chunnong; Chen Yanbei

    2011-01-01

    We consider enhancing the sensitivity of future gravitational-wave detectors by using double optical spring. When the power, detuning and bandwidth of the two carriers are chosen appropriately, the effect of the double optical spring can be described as a 'negative inertia', which cancels the positive inertia of the test masses and thus increases their response to gravitational waves. This allows us to surpass the free-mass standard quantum limit (SQL) over a broad frequency band, through signal amplification, rather than noise cancellation, which has been the case for all broadband SQL-beating schemes so far considered for gravitational-wave detectors. The merit of such signal amplification schemes lies in the fact that they are less susceptible to optical losses than noise-cancellation schemes. We show that it is feasible to demonstrate such an effect with the Gingin High Optical Power Test Facility, and it can eventually be implemented in future advanced GW detectors.

  8. Synthesis of selenium nanorods with assistance of biomolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that the optical band gap energy is increased with aging time up to 1 day, whereas it decreases in 4 days aging ... researchers have used biomolecule substances such as oleic ..... ther investigation is needed to determine the changes of Se.

  9. Ultra-wide frequency response measurement of an optical system with a DC photo-detector

    KAUST Repository

    Kuntz, Katanya B.; Wheatley, Trevor A.; Song, Hongbin; Webb, James G.; Mabrok, Mohamed; Huntington, Elanor H.; Yonezawa, Hidehiro

    2017-01-01

    Precise knowledge of an optical device's frequency response is crucial for it to be useful in most applications. Traditional methods for determining the frequency response of an optical system (e.g. optical cavity or waveguide modulator) usually rely on calibrated broadband photo-detectors or complicated RF mixdown operations. As the bandwidths of these devices continue to increase, there is a growing need for a characterization method that does not have bandwidth limitations, or require a previously calibrated device. We demonstrate a new calibration technique on an optical system (consisting of an optical cavity and a high-speed waveguide modulator) that is free from limitations imposed by detector bandwidth, and does not require a calibrated photo-detector or modulator. We use a low-frequency (DC) photo-detector to monitor the cavity's optical response as a function of modulation frequency, which is also used to determine the modulator's frequency response. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent modulation depth allows us to more precisely determine the cavity's characteristics (free spectral range and linewidth). The precision and repeatability of our technique is demonstrated by measuring the different resonant frequencies of orthogonal polarization cavity modes caused by the presence of a non-linear crystal. Once the modulator has been characterized using this simple method, the frequency response of any passive optical element can be determined to a fine resolution (e.g. kilohertz) over several gigahertz.

  10. Ultra-wide frequency response measurement of an optical system with a DC photo-detector

    KAUST Repository

    Kuntz, Katanya B.

    2017-01-09

    Precise knowledge of an optical device\\'s frequency response is crucial for it to be useful in most applications. Traditional methods for determining the frequency response of an optical system (e.g. optical cavity or waveguide modulator) usually rely on calibrated broadband photo-detectors or complicated RF mixdown operations. As the bandwidths of these devices continue to increase, there is a growing need for a characterization method that does not have bandwidth limitations, or require a previously calibrated device. We demonstrate a new calibration technique on an optical system (consisting of an optical cavity and a high-speed waveguide modulator) that is free from limitations imposed by detector bandwidth, and does not require a calibrated photo-detector or modulator. We use a low-frequency (DC) photo-detector to monitor the cavity\\'s optical response as a function of modulation frequency, which is also used to determine the modulator\\'s frequency response. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent modulation depth allows us to more precisely determine the cavity\\'s characteristics (free spectral range and linewidth). The precision and repeatability of our technique is demonstrated by measuring the different resonant frequencies of orthogonal polarization cavity modes caused by the presence of a non-linear crystal. Once the modulator has been characterized using this simple method, the frequency response of any passive optical element can be determined to a fine resolution (e.g. kilohertz) over several gigahertz.

  11. A study on the optimization of optical guide of gamma camera detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Cho, Gyu Seong; Kim, Ho Kyung; Lee, Wan No; Kim, Young Soo

    2000-01-01

    An optical guide, which is a light guide located between NaI(Tl) scintillation-crystal and array of photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) in the gamma camera detector system, is an essential component to deliver the spatial information recorded in scintillator to the PMTs. Without the optical guide, the spatial information within the range of a single PMT could not be obtained. For the design of the optimal optical guide, it is necessary to characterize its properties, especially sensitivity and spatial resolution of detector. In this study, the thickness and the refractive index of optical guide, which affect not only on the sensitivity but also on the spatial resolution of gamma-camera detector, were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation. A 12'x12'x3/8' NaI(Tl) and 23 PMTs with each 5' diameter were considered as a gamma-camera detector components. Interactions of optical photons in the scintillator and the optical guide were simulated using a commercial code DETECT97, and the spatial resolution, mainly interfered by the intrinsic inward distortion within the PMT, was investigated using our own ANGER program, which was developed to calculate positions of incident photons in the gamma camera. From the simulation results, it was found that an optical guide with 1.6 of refractive index and 10 mm of thickness give maximum sensitivity and minimum spatial distortion, respectively

  12. Multisector scintillation detector with fiber-optic light collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampilogov, N. V.; Denisov, S. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Prokopenko, N. N.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Unatlokov, I. B.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-07-01

    A new type of scintillation detector for the use in high energy physics is described. The octagonal detector consists of eight triangular scintillator sectors with total area of 1 m2. Each sector represents two plates of 2 cm thick plastic scintillator. Seven 1 mm thick WLS fibers are laid evenly between the plates. The space between the fibers is filled with silicone compound to provide better light collection. Fiber ends from all eight sectors are gathered in the central part of the detector into a bunch and docked to the cathode of a FEU-115m photomultiplier. The read-out of the counter signals is carried out from 7th and 12th dynodes, providing a wide dynamic range up to about 10000 particles. The front-end electronics of the detector is based on the flash-ADC with a sampling frequency of 200 MHz. The features of detecting and recording systems of the multisector scintillation detector (MSD) and the results of its testing are discussed.

  13. Optical coupling study of plastic scintillation detectors: evaluation of different silicon products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, M.M.; Madi Filho, T.; Mesquita, C.H. de

    1990-01-01

    Properties of different optical oils and greases in the range of 320-560 nm were studied. Several parameters as the transmitance, index of refraction, plastic scintillator fluorescence emission and its influence in the resolution and pulse height of the detection system were described. This paper shows a design to analyse the optical quality or adequacy of the silicon oils and greases in the coupling between the detector and the photocathode of the photomultiplier. (author) [pt

  14. Frustration in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2014-11-01

    Biomolecules are the prime information processing elements of living matter. Most of these inanimate systems are polymers that compute their own structures and dynamics using as input seemingly random character strings of their sequence, following which they coalesce and perform integrated cellular functions. In large computational systems with finite interaction-codes, the appearance of conflicting goals is inevitable. Simple conflicting forces can lead to quite complex structures and behaviors, leading to the concept of frustration in condensed matter. We present here some basic ideas about frustration in biomolecules and how the frustration concept leads to a better appreciation of many aspects of the architecture of biomolecules, and especially how biomolecular structure connects to function by means of localized frustration. These ideas are simultaneously both seductively simple and perilously subtle to grasp completely. The energy landscape theory of protein folding provides a framework for quantifying frustration in large systems and has been implemented at many levels of description. We first review the notion of frustration from the areas of abstract logic and its uses in simple condensed matter systems. We discuss then how the frustration concept applies specifically to heteropolymers, testing folding landscape theory in computer simulations of protein models and in experimentally accessible systems. Studying the aspects of frustration averaged over many proteins provides ways to infer energy functions useful for reliable structure prediction. We discuss how frustration affects folding mechanisms. We review here how the biological functions of proteins are related to subtle local physical frustration effects and how frustration influences the appearance of metastable states, the nature of binding processes, catalysis and allosteric transitions. In this review, we also emphasize that frustration, far from being always a bad thing, is an essential feature

  15. The design of the optical components and gas control systems of the CERN Omega Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apsimon, R.J.; Cowell, J.; Flower, P.S.

    1985-06-01

    A large Ring Imaging Cerenkov Detector (RICH) has been commissioned for use at the CERN Omega Spectrometer. The general design of the device is discussed, and the dependence of the attainable spatial resolution and range of particle identification on its optical parameters is illustrated. The construction and performance of the major optical components and gas systems of the detector are also described. (author)

  16. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  17. Fiber-Optic Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris Impact Detector System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Tennyson, R. C.; Morison, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a reliable, lightweight micrometeoroid/orbital debris (MMOD) detection system that can be located at strategic positions of "high consequence" to provide real-time warning of a penetration, its location, and the extent of the damage to a spacecraft. The concept is to employ fiber-optic sensors to detect impact damage and penetration of spacecraft structures. The fibers are non-electrical, employ light waves, and are immune to electromagnetic interference. The fiber-optic sensor array can be made as a stand-alone product, being bonded to a flexible membrane material or a structure that is employed as a MMOD shield material. The optical sensors can also be woven into hybrid MMOD shielding fabrics. The glass fibers of the fiber-optic sensor provide a dual purpose in contributing to the breakup of MMOD projectiles. The grid arrays can be made in a modular configuration to provide coverage over any area desired. Each module can be connected to a central scanner instrument and be interrogated in a continuous or periodic mode.

  18. Electrical and optical properties of multiple quantum well structures and their applications to infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgesen, P.

    1992-04-01

    In this work the author investigate the subband nature of multiple quantum well structures by photoconductance spectroscopy, optical absorption measurements and tunneling experiments. Both interband and intraband transitions have been studied. The work is aimed at making an infrared detector using wide band gap semiconductors. 14 refs

  19. Scintillating plastic optical fiber radiation detectors in high energy particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the application of scintillating optical fiber in instrumentation for high energy particle physics. The basic physics of the scintillation process in polymers is discussed first and then we outline the fundamentals of scintillating fiber technology. Fiber performance, optimization, and characterization measurements are given. Detector applications in the areas of particle tracking and particle energy determination are then described. 13 refs., 12 figs

  20. Performance of the RASNIK Optical Alignment Monitoring System for the LHCb Outer Tracker Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Szczekowski, Marek; Ukleja, Artur; Pellegrino, Antonio; Hart, Robert; Syryczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    We present the results collected by an optical system for position control of the Outer Tracker detector stations in the LHCb experiment. This system has been constructed using the RASNIK three-point alignment monitors. The measurements are based on data taken in Run 2 of LHC.

  1. Research of optical coherence tomography microscope based on CCD detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Xu, Zhongbao; Zhang, Shuomo

    2008-12-01

    The reference wave phase was modulated with a sinusoidal vibrating mirror attached to a Piezoelectric Transducer (PZT), the integration was performed by a CCD, and the charge storage period of the CCD image sensor was one-quarter period of the sinusoidal phase modulation. With the frequency- synchronous detection technique, four images (four frames of interference pattern) were recorded during one period of the phase modulation. In order to obtain the optimum modulation parameter, the values of amplitude and phase of the sinusoidal phase modulation were determined by considering the measurement error caused by the additive noise contained in the detected values. The PZT oscillation was controlled by a closed loop control system based on PID controller. An ideal discrete digital sine function at 50Hz with adjustable amplitude was used to adjust the vibrating of PZT, and a digital phase shift techniques was used to adjust vibrating phase of PZT so that the phase of the modulation could reach their optimum values. The CCD detector was triggered with software at 200Hz. Based on work above a small coherent signal masked by the preponderant incoherent background with a CCD detector was obtained.

  2. Parameters affecting temporal resolution of Time Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron Detector (TRION)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mor, I; Vartsky, D; Bar, D; Feldman, G; Goldberg, M B; Brandis, M; Dangendorf, V; Tittelmeier, K; Bromberger, B; Weierganz, M

    2013-01-01

    The Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron (TRION) detector was developed for Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), a fast-neutron transmission imaging method that exploits characteristic energy-variations of the total scattering cross-section in the E n = 1–10 MeV range to detect specific elements within a radiographed object. As opposed to classical event-counting time of flight (ECTOF), it integrates the detector signal during a well-defined neutron Time of Flight window corresponding to a pre-selected energy bin, e.g., the energy-interval spanning a cross-section resonance of an element such as C, O and N. The integrative characteristic of the detector permits loss-free operation at very intense, pulsed neutron fluxes, at a cost however, of recorded temporal resolution degradation This work presents a theoretical and experimental evaluation of detector related parameters which affect temporal resolution of the TRION system

  3. Thermal noise from optical coatings in gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory M; Armandula, Helena; Black, Eric; Crooks, D R M; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Hough, Jim; Murray, Peter; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Sneddon, Peter; Fejer, Martin M; Route, Roger; Penn, Steven D

    2006-03-01

    Gravitational waves are a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity. These waves are created by massive objects, like neutron stars or black holes, oscillating at speeds appreciable to the speed of light. The detectable effect on the Earth of these waves is extremely small, however, creating strains of the order of 10(-21). There are a number of basic physics experiments around the world designed to detect these waves by using interferometers with very long arms, up to 4 km in length. The next-generation interferometers are currently being designed, and the thermal noise in the mirrors will set the sensitivity over much of the usable bandwidth. Thermal noise arising from mechanical loss in the optical coatings put on the mirrors will be a significant source of noise. Achieving higher sensitivity through lower mechanical loss coatings, while preserving the crucial optical and thermal properties, is an area of active research right now.

  4. Neptunium detector using fiber-optic light guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Killeen, T.E.; Herold, T.R.

    1981-01-01

    A colorimeter has been constructed and installed to detect neptunium (IV) on-line as it elutes from an ion exchange column in a plant process stream. Because of the high radiation and corrosive atmosphere at the monitoring location, the instrument was designed using remote electronics and glass fiber optic cables. The five-foot cables transmit pulsed white light into a glass monitoring window in a containment box and return the transmitted portion to a photosensor. A simple spring clamp was designed to couple the cables to the monitoring window without modifying existing processes. Details of the design, installation, and operational problems are discussed. Other applications and modifications of the present colorimeter for other actinides, as well as preliminary results on a fiber optic spectrophotometer, are presented

  5. Optical modeling of waveguide coupled TES detectors towards the SAFARI instrument for SPICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, N.; Bracken, C.; Doherty, S.; Gao, J. R.; Glowacka, D.; Goldie, D.; Griffin, D.; Hijmering, R.; Jackson, B.; Khosropanah, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Morozov, D.; Murphy, A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Ridder, M.; Withington, S.

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of space missions targeting far-infrared wavelengths will require large-format arrays of extremely sensitive detectors. The development of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) array technology is being developed for future Far-Infrared (FIR) space applications such as the SAFARI instrument for SPICA where low-noise and high sensitivity is required to achieve ambitious science goals. In this paper we describe a modal analysis of multi-moded horn antennas feeding integrating cavities housing TES detectors with superconducting film absorbers. In high sensitivity TES detector technology the ability to control the electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical environment of the detector is critical. Simulating and understanding optical behaviour of such detectors at far IR wavelengths is difficult and requires development of existing analysis tools. The proposed modal approach offers a computationally efficient technique to describe the partial coherent response of the full pixel in terms of optical efficiency and power leakage between pixels. Initial wok carried out as part of an ESA technical research project on optical analysis is described and a prototype SAFARI pixel design is analyzed where the optical coupling between the incoming field and the pixel containing horn, cavity with an air gap, and thin absorber layer are all included in the model to allow a comprehensive optical characterization. The modal approach described is based on the mode matching technique where the horn and cavity are described in the traditional way while a technique to include the absorber was developed. Radiation leakage between pixels is also included making this a powerful analysis tool.

  6. Optical characteristics of the thin-film scintillator detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muga, L.; Burnsed, D.

    1976-01-01

    A study of the thin-film detector (TFD) was made in which various light guide and scintillator film support configurations were tested for efficiency of light coupling. Masking of selected portions of the photomultiplier (PM) tube face revealed the extent to which emitted light was received at the exposed PM surfaces. By blocking off selected areas of the scintillator film surface from direct view of the PM tube faces, a measure of the light-guiding efficiency of the film and its support could be estimated. The picture that emerges is that, as the light which is initially trapped in the thin film spreads radially outward from the ion entrance/exit point, it is scattered out of the film by minute imperfections. Optimum signals were obtained by a configuration in which the thin scintillator film was supported on a thin rectangular Celluloid frame inserted within a highly polished metal cylindrical sleeve

  7. Novel Electro-Optical Coupling Technique for Magnetic Resonance-Compatible Positron Emission Tomography Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Olcott

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-compatible positron emission tomography (PET detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  8. Novel electro-optical coupling technique for magnetic resonance-compatible positron emission tomography detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Peter D; Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible positron emission tomography (PET) detector design is being developed that uses electro-optical coupling to bring the amplitude and arrival time information of high-speed PET detector scintillation pulses out of an MRI system. The electro-optical coupling technology consists of a magnetically insensitive photodetector output signal connected to a nonmagnetic vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) diode that is coupled to a multimode optical fiber. This scheme essentially acts as an optical wire with no influence on the MRI system. To test the feasibility of this approach, a lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a single pixel of a solid-state photomultiplier array was placed in coincidence with a lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystal coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube with both the new nonmagnetic VCSEL coupling and the standard coaxial cable signal transmission scheme. No significant change was observed in 511 keV photopeak energy resolution and coincidence time resolution. This electro-optical coupling technology enables an MRI-compatible PET block detector to have a reduced electromagnetic footprint compared with the signal transmission schemes deployed in the current MRI/PET designs.

  9. Biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Xu, Fu-Jian

    2013-04-21

    Functional polymer brushes have been utilized extensively for the immobilization of biomolecules, which is of crucial importance for the development of biosensors and biotechnology. Recent progress in polymerization methods, in particular surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), has provided a unique means for the design and synthesis of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes. This current review summarizes such recent research activities. The different preparation strategies for biomolecule immobilization through polymer brush spacers are described in detail. The functional groups of the polymer brushes used for biomolecule immobilization include epoxide, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, aldehyde, and amine groups. The recent research activities indicate that functional polymer brushes become versatile and powerful spacers for immobilization of various biomolecules to maximize their functionalities. This review also demonstrates that surface-initiated ATRP is used more frequently than other polymerization methods in the designs of new biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes.

  10. Optical response of laser-doped silicon carbide for an uncooled midwave infrared detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geunsik; Manzur, Tariq; Kar, Aravinda

    2011-06-10

    An uncooled mid-wave infrared (MWIR) detector is developed by doping an n-type 4H-SiC with Ga using a laser doping technique. 4H-SiC is one of the polytypes of crystalline silicon carbide and a wide bandgap semiconductor. The dopant creates an energy level of 0.30  eV, which was confirmed by optical spectroscopy of the doped sample. This energy level corresponds to the MWIR wavelength of 4.21  μm. The detection mechanism is based on the photoexcitation of electrons by the photons of this wavelength absorbed in the semiconductor. This process modifies the electron density, which changes the refractive index, and, therefore, the reflectance of the semiconductor is also changed. The change in the reflectance, which is the optical response of the detector, can be measured remotely with a laser beam, such as a He-Ne laser. This capability of measuring the detector response remotely makes it a wireless detector. The variation of refractive index was calculated as a function of absorbed irradiance based on the reflectance data for the as-received and doped samples. A distinct change was observed for the refractive index of the doped sample, indicating that the detector is suitable for applications at the 4.21  μm wavelength.

  11. Area detectors technology and optics-Relations to nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PeIka, Jerzy B.

    2005-01-01

    Relations between natural vision and the artificial 2D imaging systems are discussed. A variety of animal vision as well as its main functional parts are briefly reviewed and compared with the artificial vision equivalents. An increasing advancement observed in human constructions of imaging devices due to recent rapid progress in science and technology is shown to resemble some sophisticated natural solutions formed by evolution in biological systems. The issues of the similarities and differences between the two kinds of vision are discussed. Main focus is put on optical systems forming the image, with special examples of the imaging systems designed to work in the region of the X-ray radiation. Examples of bio-inspired technological vision devices are presented

  12. Modifications of the optical properties for DAM-ADC nuclear track detector exposed to alpha particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammah, Y. S.; Awad, E. M.

    2018-05-01

    Modifications of the optical properties of diallyl maleate-allyl diglycol carbonate (DAM-ADC) nuclear detector induced by alpha particles are described. DAM-ADC samples were irradiated perpendicularly by thin 241Am disk source that emits alpha particles with 5.48 MeV. The optical absorption has been measured using the ultraviolet-visible (UV-1100) spectroscopy. It was found that DAM-ADC polymer shows substantial modifications in its optical characteristics upon irradiated with alpha particles with different energies. The optical energy band gap (Egap) for the detector was calculated for the direct and the indirect allowed transitions in K-space using two approaches (Tauc's model and absorption spectrum fitting (ASF) method). Urbach's energy (Ea), number of carbon atoms per conjugated length (N), number of carbon atoms per cluster (M), and refractive index (n) for the present samples were determined. Results reveal that the values of energy gap in direct transition are greater than those of indirect, before and after irradiation. (Egap), (Ea), (N), (M), and (n) of the present samples are changed significantly with irradiation time and value of alpha energy. Results reflect the possibility of using DAM-ADC polymer track detectors to estimate alpha particle energies using the variation of the absorbance.

  13. Large arrays of discrete ionizing radiation detectors multiplexed using fluorescent optical converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, E.E.; Edelman, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides a radiation imaging system employing arrays of scintillators. An object of the invention is to produce a detector with high spatial resolution, high gamma-photon absorption efficiency, excellent source and detector scatter rejection, and utilizing low-cost solid state opto-electronic devices. In one embodiment, it provides a radiation detection and conversion apparatus having an array of optically isolated radiation sensitive elements that emit optical radiation upon absorption of ionizing radiation. An array of channels, comprising a material that absorbs and traps the radiation emitted and transports it or radiation that has been shifted to longer wavelengths, is placed near the radiation-sensitive elements. Electro-optical detectors that convert the transported radiation into electrical signals are coupled to the channels. The activation of one of the electro-optical devices by radiation from one of the channels indicates that at least one of the radiation-sensitive elements near that channel has absorbed a quantity of radiation

  14. Heralded linear optical quantum Fredkin gate based on one auxiliary qubit and one single photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Chang-Hua; Cao Xin; Quan Dong-Xiao; Pei Chang-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Linear optical quantum Fredkin gate can be applied to quantum computing and quantum multi-user communication networks. In the existing linear optical scheme, two single photon detectors (SPDs) are used to herald the success of the quantum Fredkin gate while they have no photon count. But analysis results show that for non-perfect SPD, the lower the detector efficiency, the higher the heralded success rate by this scheme is. We propose an improved linear optical quantum Fredkin gate by designing a new heralding scheme with an auxiliary qubit and only one SPD, in which the higher the detection efficiency of the heralding detector, the higher the success rate of the gate is. The new heralding scheme can also work efficiently under a non-ideal single photon source. Based on this quantum Fredkin gate, large-scale quantum switching networks can be built. As an example, a quantum Beneš network is shown in which only one SPD is used. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  15. Improved optical properties and detectivity of an uncooled silicon carbide mid-wave infrared optical detector with increased dopant concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Geunsik; Kar, Aravinda; Manzur, Tariq

    2012-01-01

    An n-type 4H-SiC substrate is doped with gallium using a laser doping technique and its optical response is investigated at the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) wavelength 4.21 μm as a function of the dopant concentration. The dopant creates a p-type energy level of 0.3 eV, which is the energy of a photon corresponding to the MWIR wavelength 4.21 μm. Therefore, Ga-doped SiC can be used as an uncooled MWIR detector because an optical signal was obtained at this wavelength when the sample was at room temperature. The energy level of the Ga dopant in the substrate was confirmed by optical absorption spectroscopy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) of the doped samples revealed an enhancement in the solid solubility of Ga in the substrate when doping is carried out by increasing the number of laser scans. A higher dopant concentration increases the number of holes in the dopant energy level, enabling photoexcitation of more electrons from the valence band by the incident MWIR photons. The detector performance improves as the dopant concentration increases from 1.15 × 10 19 to 6.25 × 10 20 cm −3 . The detectivity of the optical photodetector is found to be 1.07 × 10 10 cm Hz 1/2 W −1 for the case of doping with four laser passes. (paper)

  16. A 2-10 GHz GaAs MMIC opto-electronic phase detector for optical microwave signal generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Marlene; Gliese, Ulrik Bo; Petersen, Anders Kongstad

    1994-01-01

    Optical transmission of microwave signals becomes increasingly important. Techniques using beat between optical carriers of semiconductor lasers are promising if efficient optical phase locked loops are realized. A highly efficient GaAs MMIC optoelectronic phase detector for a 2-10 GHz OPLL...

  17. PREFACE: International Workshop on Neutron Optics and Detectors (NOP&D 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Every two-three years scientists involved in developments of neutron optics gather together for the International Workshop on Neutron Optics (NOP). Neutron optics has always been considered very important for the development of new neutron instrumentation. The limited brilliance of existing or future neutron sources requires the more effective usage of emitted neutrons. Indeed, improvements of the neutron optical system or an optimization of the neutron-optical tracts of instruments can result in a significant enhancement of their performance. This is especially important at present when the neutron scattering community is strongly engaged in developments of new instrumentation around the spallation neutron sources - SNS, ESS, J-PARC and Second Target Station at ISIS. In 2013 the workshop was organized by the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science of the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH and was held at the Conference Centre in Ismaning next to Munich on July 2-7, 2013 on the eve of the ICNS-2013 in Edinburg. It carried on the series of Neutron Optics workshops held in Villigen (1999, 2007), Tokyo (2004) and Alpe d'Huez (2010). This time it is also aimed to compliment the International Conference on Neutron Scattering in Edinburgh (ICNS-2013) by providing a platform for detailed discussions on the latest developments in the field of neutron optics. The scope of the workshop was extended to the neutron detectors (in a way similar to the NOP-2004 held in Tokyo) and was labelled as the International Workshop on Neutron Optics and Detectors, NOP&D-2013. However, in contrast to the Tokyo workshop, the focus of discussions was not the detector technologies (which are the subject of many dedicated meetings), rather than the use of detectors for the purpose of the design of modern instrumentation aiming to inform detector developers about real detectors requirements for new advanced instrumental concepts. The three-full-days workshop gathered a record number of participants, more

  18. EUV high resolution imager on-board solar orbiter: optical design and detector performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halain, J. P.; Mazzoli, A.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Stockman, Y.; Berghmans, D.; BenMoussa, A.; Auchère, F.

    2017-11-01

    The EUV high resolution imager (HRI) channel of the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) on-board Solar Orbiter will observe the solar atmospheric layers at 17.4 nm wavelength with a 200 km resolution. The HRI channel is based on a compact two mirrors off-axis design. The spectral selection is obtained by a multilayer coating deposited on the mirrors and by redundant Aluminum filters rejecting the visible and infrared light. The detector is a 2k x 2k array back-thinned silicon CMOS-APS with 10 μm pixel pitch, sensitive in the EUV wavelength range. Due to the instrument compactness and the constraints on the optical design, the channel performance is very sensitive to the manufacturing, alignments and settling errors. A trade-off between two optical layouts was therefore performed to select the final optical design and to improve the mirror mounts. The effect of diffraction by the filter mesh support and by the mirror diffusion has been included in the overall error budget. Manufacturing of mirror and mounts has started and will result in thermo-mechanical validation on the EUI instrument structural and thermal model (STM). Because of the limited channel entrance aperture and consequently the low input flux, the channel performance also relies on the detector EUV sensitivity, readout noise and dynamic range. Based on the characterization of a CMOS-APS back-side detector prototype, showing promising results, the EUI detector has been specified and is under development. These detectors will undergo a qualification program before being tested and integrated on the EUI instrument.

  19. Noiseless imaging detector for adaptive optics with kHz frame rates

    CERN Document Server

    Vallerga, J V; Mikulec, Bettina; Tremsin, A; Clark, Allan G; Siegmund, O H W; CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    A new hybrid optical detector is described that has many of the attributes desired for the next generation AO wavefront sensors. The detector consists of a proximity focused MCP read out by four multi-pixel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chips developed at CERN (â€ワMedipix2”) with individual pixels that amplify, discriminate and count input events. The detector has 512 x 512 pixels, zero readout noise (photon counting) and can be read out at 1 kHz frame rates. The Medipix2 readout chips can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few microseconds with an accuracy of 10 nanoseconds. When used in a Shack-Hartman style wavefront sensor, it should be able to centroid approximately 5000 spots using 7 x 7 pixel sub-apertures resulting in very linear, off-null error correction terms. The quantum efficiency depends on the optical photocathode chosen for the bandpass of interest. A three year development effort for this detector technology has just been funded as part of the...

  20. Electro-optical measurements of 3D-stc detectors fabricated at ITC-irst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Department of ICT, University of Trento, via Sommarive, 14 - 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)], E-mail: zoboli@dit.unitn.it; Boscardin, Maurizio [ITC-irst, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive, 18 - 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Bosisio, Luciano [INFN and Department of Physics, University of Trieste, via A. Valerio, 2 - 34127 Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Department of ICT, University of Trento, via Sommarive, 14 - 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Piemonte, Claudio; Pozza, Alberto; Ronchin, Sabina; Zorzi, Nicola [ITC-irst, Microsystems Division, via Sommarive, 18 - 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2007-12-11

    In the past two years 3D silicon radiation detectors have been developed at ITC-irst (Trento, Italy). As a first step toward full 3D devices, simplified structures featuring columnar electrodes of one doping type only were fabricated. This paper reports the electro-optical characterization of 3D test diodes made with this approach. Experimental results and TCAD simulations provide good insight into the charge collection mechanism and response speed limitation of these structures.

  1. Optical layout of the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatka, Miroslav; Schovánek, Petr; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Vlček, Martin; Řídký, Jan; Grygar, Jiří; Soukup, Ladislav; Prouza, Michael; Boháčová, Martina

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, 2-3 (2003), s. 445-456 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A006; GA MŠk LA 134; GA AV ČR IAA1010928 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : fluorescence detector * optica l layout Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.221, year: 2003

  2. Electric field manipulation in Al/CdTe/Pt detectors under optical perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turturici, A.A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Franc, J.; Grill, R.; Dědič, V. [Institute of Physics of Charles University, MFF, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Abbene, L., E-mail: leonardo.abbene@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy); Principato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, Palermo 90128 (Italy)

    2017-06-21

    Al/CdTe/Pt detectors are very attractive devices for high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy, even though they suffer from polarization phenomena, which cause a progressive time degradation of the spectroscopic performance. In this work we investigated on the time dependence of the electric field of an Al/CdTe/Pt detector under optical perturbation by means of Pockels effect measurements. A tunable laser with wavelengths ranging within 700−1000 nm and a 940 nm light emitting diode (LED) were used. The measurements of both the electric field profile and the total current were used to better understand the effects of the optical perturbation on polarization phenomena. The results point out as the above band-gap light, due to the trapping of photo-generated holes at the anode (the Al/CdTe blocking contact), brings to a reduction of the negative space charge caused by the bias voltage (bias induced polarization) and the LED irradiation (radiation induced polarization). The reduction of the negative space charge ensures a quite stable and uniform electric field distribution, typically termed depolarization. Conversely, optical perturbation with sub-band-gap light enhances the polarization with the formation of two oppositely charged regions within the detector.

  3. Nonlinear excitations in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrard, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the workshop entitled ''Nonlinear Excitations in Biomolecules'' is to attempt to bridge the gap between the physicists and biologists communities which is mainly due to language and cultural barriers. The progress of nonlinear science in the last few decades which have shown that the combination of nonlinearity, which characterize most biological phenomena, and cooperative effects in a system having a large number of degrees of freedom, can give rise to coherent excitations with remarkable properties. New concepts, such as solitons nd nonlinear energy localisation have become familiar to physicists and applied mathematicians. It is thus tempting to make an analogy between these coherent excitations and the exceptional stability of some biological processes, such as for instance DNA transcription, which require the coordination of many events in the ever changing environment of a cell. Physicists are now invoking nonlinear excitations to describe and explain many bio-molecular processes while biologists often doubt that the seemingly infinite variety of phenomena that they are attempting to classify can be reduced to such simple concepts. A large part of the meeting is devoted to tutorial lectures rather than to latest research results. The book provides a pedagogical introduction to the two topics forming the backbone of the meeting: the theory of nonlinear excitations and solitons, and their application in biology; and the structure and function of biomolecules, as well as energy and charge transport in biophysics. In order to emphasize the link between physics and biology, the volume is not divided along these two topics but according to biological subjects. Each chapter starts with a short introduction attempting to help the reader to find his way among the contributions and point out the connection between them. 23 lectures over the 32 presented have been selected and refers to quantum properties of macro-molecules. (J.S.)

  4. Signal and noise analysis in TRION-Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Fast Neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartsky, D; Feldman, G; Mor, I; Goldberg, M B; Bar, D; Dangendorf, V

    2009-01-01

    TRION is a sub-mm spatial resolution fast neutron imaging detector, which employs an integrative optical time-of-flight technique. The detector was developed for fast neutron resonance radiography, a method capable of detecting a broad range of conventional and improvised explosives. In this study we have analyzed in detail, using Monte-Carlo calculations and experimentally determined parameters, all the processes that influence the signal and noise in the TRION detector. In contrast to event-counting detectors where the signal-to-noise ratio is dependent only on the number of detected events (quantum noise), in an energy-integrating detector additional factors, such as the fluctuations in imparted energy, number of photoelectrons, system gain and other factors will contribute to the noise. The excess noise factor (over the quantum noise) due to these processes was 4.3, 2.7, 2.1, 1.9 and 1.9 for incident neutron energies of 2, 4, 7.5, 10 and 14 MeV, respectively. It is shown that, even under ideal light collection conditions, a fast neutron detection system operating in an integrative mode cannot be quantum-noise-limited due to the relatively large variance in the imparted proton energy and the resulting scintillation light distributions.

  5. The large-area hybrid-optics CLAS12 RICH detector: Tests of innovative components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contalbrigo, M.; Baltzell, N.; Benmokhtar, F.; Barion, L.; Cisbani, E.; El Alaoui, A.; Hafidi, K.; Hoek, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lagamba, L.; Lucherini, V.; Malaguti, R.; Mirazita, M.; Montgomery, R.; Movsisyan, A.; Musico, P.; Orecchini, D.; Orlandi, A.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Pereira, S.

    2014-01-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadronization and hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and densely packed and highly segmented photon detectors. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). The preliminary results of individual detector component tests and of the prototype performance at test-beams are reported here. - Highlights: • A novel hybrid-optics configuration was proven to work with a large RICH prototype. • Innovative RICH components were studied both in laboratory tests and test-beams. • Aerogel of large Rayleigh scattering length at n=1.05 was characterized. • Novel vs commercially available multi-anode photomultipliers were compared. • The response of SiPM matrices to Cherenkov light was tested at various temperatures

  6. Modelling the transport of optical photons in scintillation detectors for diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncali, Emilie; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Badano, Aldo

    2017-10-01

    Computational modelling of radiation transport can enhance the understanding of the relative importance of individual processes involved in imaging systems. Modelling is a powerful tool for improving detector designs in ways that are impractical or impossible to achieve through experimental measurements. Modelling of light transport in scintillation detectors used in radiology and radiotherapy imaging that rely on the detection of visible light plays an increasingly important role in detector design. Historically, researchers have invested heavily in modelling the transport of ionizing radiation while light transport is often ignored or coarsely modelled. Due to the complexity of existing light transport simulation tools and the breadth of custom codes developed by users, light transport studies are seldom fully exploited and have not reached their full potential. This topical review aims at providing an overview of the methods employed in freely available and other described optical Monte Carlo packages and analytical models and discussing their respective advantages and limitations. In particular, applications of optical transport modelling in nuclear medicine, diagnostic and radiotherapy imaging are described. A discussion on the evolution of these modelling tools into future developments and applications is presented. The authors declare equal leadership and contribution regarding this review.

  7. The large-area hybrid-optics CLAS12 RICH detector: Tests of innovative components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contalbrigo, M., E-mail: contalbrigo@fe.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and University of Ferrara (Italy); Baltzell, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Benmokhtar, F. [Christopher Newport University, VA (United States); Duquesne University, PA (United States); Barion, L. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and University of Ferrara (Italy); Cisbani, E. [INFN Sezione di Roma – Gruppo Collega to Sanità (Italy); Italian National Institute of Health (Italy); El Alaoui, A. [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso (Chile); Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Hafidi, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Hoek, M. [Glasgow University (United Kingdom); J. Gutenberg Universität, Mainz (Germany); Kubarovsky, V. [Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, VA (United States); Lagamba, L. [INFN Sezione di Bari, University of Bari (Italy); Lucherini, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Malaguti, R. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and University of Ferrara (Italy); Mirazita, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Montgomery, R. [Glasgow University (United Kingdom); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Movsisyan, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and University of Ferrara (Italy); Musico, P. [INFN Sezione di Genova (Italy); Orecchini, D.; Orlandi, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Pappalardo, L.L. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara and University of Ferrara (Italy); Pereira, S. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); and others

    2014-12-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadronization and hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and densely packed and highly segmented photon detectors. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). The preliminary results of individual detector component tests and of the prototype performance at test-beams are reported here. - Highlights: • A novel hybrid-optics configuration was proven to work with a large RICH prototype. • Innovative RICH components were studied both in laboratory tests and test-beams. • Aerogel of large Rayleigh scattering length at n=1.05 was characterized. • Novel vs commercially available multi-anode photomultipliers were compared. • The response of SiPM matrices to Cherenkov light was tested at various temperatures.

  8. Analysis of Current-mode Detectors For Resonance Detection In Neutron Optics Time Reversal Symmetry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Grant; Noptrex Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    One of the most promising explanations for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry in our universe is the search for new sources of time-reversal (T) symmetry violation. The current amount of violation seen in the kaon and B-meson systems is not sufficient to describe this asymmetry. The Neutron Optics Time Reversal Experiment Collaboration (NOPTREX) is a null test for T violation in polarized neutron transmission through a polarized 139La target. Due to the high neutron flux needed for this experiment, as well as the ability to effectively subtract background noise, a current-mode neutron detector that can resolve resonances at epithermal energies has been proposed. In order to ascertain if this detector design would meet the requirements for the eventual NOPTREX experiment, prototypical detectors were tested at the NOBORU beam at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (JPARC) facility. Resonances in In and Ta were measured and the collected data was analyzed. This presentation will describe the analysis process and the efficacy of the detectors will be discussed. Department of Energy under Contract DE-SC0008107, UGRAS Scholarship.

  9. Electrically Excited Plasmonic Nanoruler for Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, André; Ziegler, Mario; Hübner, Uwe; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Stranik, Ondrej

    2016-09-14

    Plasmon-based sensors are excellent tools for a label-free detection of small biomolecules. An interesting group of such sensors are plasmonic nanorulers that rely on the plasmon hybridization upon modification of their morphology to sense nanoscale distances. Sensor geometries based on the interaction of plasmons in a flat metallic layer together with metal nanoparticles inherit unique advantages but need a special optical excitation configuration that is not easy to miniaturize. Herein, we introduce the concept of nanoruler excitation by direct, electrically induced generation of surface plasmons based on the quantum shot noise of tunneling currents. An electron tunneling junction consisting of a metal-dielectric-semiconductor heterostructure is directly incorporated into the nanoruler basic geometry. With the application of voltage on this modified nanoruler, the plasmon modes are directly excited without any additional optical component as a light source. We demonstrate via several experiments that this electrically driven nanoruler possesses similar properties as an optically exited one and confirm its sensing capabilities by the detection of the binding of small biomolecules such as antibodies. This new sensing principle could open the way to a new platform of highly miniaturized, integrated plasmonic sensors compatible with monolithic integrated circuits.

  10. A source for microhydrated biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Förstel, M.; Hergenhahn, U., E-mail: uwe.hergenhahn@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Neustetter, M.; Denifl, S. [Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Lelievre, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); University Paris-Sud 11, Faculté des Science d’Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-15

    We describe the construction of an apparatus for the production of a molecular jet of microhydrated biomolecules. Our design uses a water reservoir producing water vapour, which then passes through a separate reservoir containing a vapour of a sublimated biomolecule. The mixture coexpands into a molecular beam apparatus through a conical nozzle. Mass spectra showing water-adenin and water-uracil complexes are shown as typical examples. Suitable expansion conditions are reached without the use of an inert carrier gas.

  11. Characterization of a cylindrical plastic β-detector with Monte Carlo simulations of optical photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guadilla, V., E-mail: victor.guadilla@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen H-4026 (Hungary); Tain, J.L.; Agramunt, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Äystö, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Briz, J.A.; Cucoanes, A. [Subatech, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes, EMN, F-44307 Nantes (France); Eronen, T. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Estienne, M.; Fallot, M. [Subatech, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes, EMN, F-44307 Nantes (France); Fraile, L.M. [Universidad Complutense, Grupo de Física Nuclear, CEI Moncloa, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ganioğlu, E. [Department of Physics, Istanbul University, 34134 Istanbul (Turkey); Gelletly, W. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, GU2 7XH Guildford (United Kingdom); Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); Jordan, D. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Koponen, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 (Finland); and others

    2017-05-11

    In this work we report on the Monte Carlo study performed to understand and reproduce experimental measurements of a new plastic β-detector with cylindrical geometry. Since energy deposition simulations differ from the experimental measurements for such a geometry, we show how the simulation of production and transport of optical photons does allow one to obtain the shapes of the experimental spectra. Moreover, taking into account the computational effort associated with this kind of simulation, we develop a method to convert the simulations of energy deposited into light collected, depending only on the interaction point in the detector. This method represents a useful solution when extensive simulations have to be done, as in the case of the calculation of the response function of the spectrometer in a total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy analysis.

  12. A Fiber-Optic Neutron Detector for a Drive-By Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, H.S.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement scenario of a neutron source driving by a detector has been evaluated. It is possible to use PNNL lithium-loaded fiber optics to measure the source, even at reasonably high speeds. A detector sufficient to detect the neutrons from the source at a high confidence level can be produced in a compact and robust configuration for a reasonable cost. In addition, the PNNL solution measures gamma-ray signals and will effectively add the function of a proximity sensor, lower the false-alarm rate, and allow discrimination between certain neutron source scenarios. Finally, the need for definition of confidence levels (both the method of computation and the required false alarm probability), emplacement form-factor, and electronic interface is required of a potential user to revise or customize the design outlined in this paper

  13. Biomolecule labelling by 186 Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, Valeria Viorica; Mihailescu, Gabriela; Dumitrescu, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop and improve the existing radiolabelling techniques of peptides and monoclonal antibodies with 186 Re and 188 Re as potential agents for cancer targeted radiotherapy. We selected the following methods and techniques for direct labelling of peptides and monoclonal antibody: 1. Prereduction of -S-S- bridges of biomolecule to sulfhydryls using reducing agents: ascorbic acid, cysteine, active hydrogen, 2,3 dimercaptopropanol. The prereduction reactions are controlled by massic ratios of reduction agents/biomolecule, pH, temperature and time of incubation; 2. Reduction of 186 Re O 4 - stannous chloride in acid and alkaline pH; 3. Coupling reaction of 186 Re (red) with the biomolecule controlled by the time and temperature of incubation, the influence of pH regarding the binding of 186 Re to the biomolecules. The quality control was effected by chromatography techniques (paper and elution gel chromatography) on labeled biomolecule before and after purification. The elution gel chromatography was spectrophotometricaly monitored at 280 nm. In the same time the radioactivity of samples was measured using a gamma counter. All the results confirm in vitro stability of labeled biomolecule. The biological evaluation studies regarding accumulation and biological affinity will be controlled by scintigraphy method. Biodistribution studies will be effected to Walker tumor bearing animals at 4 and 24 hours after injections. (authors)

  14. Quantum variational measurement and the optical lever intracavity topology of gravitational-wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalili, F. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    The intracavity topologies of laser gravitational-wave detectors proposed several years ago are the promising way to obtain sensitivity of these devices significantly better than the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL). In essence, the intracavity detector is a two-stage device where the end mirrors displacement created by the gravitational wave is transferred to the displacement of an additional local mirror by means of the optical rigidity. The local mirror positions have to be monitored by an additional local meter. It is evident that the local meter precision defines the sensitivity of the detector. To overcome the SQL, the quantum variational measurement can be used in the local meter. In this method a frequency-dependent correlation between the meter backaction noise and measurement noise is introduced, which allows us to eliminate the backaction noise component from the meter output signal. This correlation is created by means of an additional filter cavity. In this article the sensitivity limitations of this scheme imposed by the optical losses both in the local meter itself and in the filter cavity are estimated. It is shown that the main sensitivity limitation stems from the filter cavity losses. In order to overcome it, it is necessary to increase the filter cavity length. In a preliminary prototype experiment, an approximate 10 m long filter cavity can be used to obtain sensitivity approximately 2-3 times better than the SQL. For future Quantum Non-Demolition (QND) gravitational-wave detectors with sensitivity about 10 times better than the SQL, the filter cavity length should be within kilometer range

  15. Optical properties studies of glass samples for prototyping a TORCH detector module

    CERN Multimedia

    Castillo García, L

    2014-01-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) ) is a proposed particle identification system to achieve positive π/K/p separation at a ≥3σ level in the momentum range below 10 GeV/c. Cherenkov photons are generated from charged particle tracks crossing a 1cm-thick quartz plate. They propagate by total internal reflection to the edge and are focused onto an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. Their position and arrival time are recorded. This allows the reconstruction of the photon trajectory and the particle crossing time. Results on optical tests are presented.

  16. A microcontroller-based compensated optical proximity detector employing the switching-mode synchronous detection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, Anjan; Chatterjee, Amitava

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a microcontroller-based optical proximity detector that can provide a low-cost yet powerful obstacle-sensing mechanism for mobile robots. The system is developed with the switching-mode synchronous detection technique to provide satisfactory performance over a wide range of operating conditions and is developed with the facility of externally setting a threshold, for reliable operation. The system is dynamically compensated against ambient illumination variations. Experimental studies demonstrate how the minimum distance of activation can be varied with different choices of thresholds. (paper)

  17. Numerical simulation and optimal design of Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for Electro-Optical Reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Qiuhui; Shen, Yijie; Yuan, Meng; Gong, Mali

    2017-12-01

    Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for Electro-Optical Reconnaissance (SPIDER) is a cutting-edge electro-optical imaging technology to realize miniaturization and complanation of imaging systems. In this paper, the principle of SPIDER has been numerically demonstrated based on the partially coherent light theory, and a novel concept of adjustable baseline pairing SPIDER system has further been proposed. Based on the results of simulation, it is verified that the imaging quality could be effectively improved by adjusting the Nyquist sampling density, optimizing the baseline pairing method and increasing the spectral channel of demultiplexer. Therefore, an adjustable baseline pairing algorithm is established for further enhancing the image quality, and the optimal design procedure in SPIDER for arbitrary targets is also summarized. The SPIDER system with adjustable baseline pairing method can broaden its application and reduce cost under the same imaging quality.

  18. An automatic analyzer of solid state nuclear track detectors using an optic RAM as image sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staderini, E.M.; Castellano, A.

    1986-01-01

    An optic RAM is a conventional digital random access read/write dynamic memory device featuring a quartz windowed package and memory cells regularly ordered on the chip. Such a device is used as an image sensor because each cell retains data stored in it for a time depending on the intensity of the light incident on the cell itself. The authors have developed a system which uses an optic RAM to acquire and digitize images from electrochemically etched CR39 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) in the track count rate up to 5000 cm -2 . On the digital image so obtained, a microprocessor, with appropriate software, performs image analysis, filtering, tracks counting and evaluation. (orig.)

  19. Effect of the phosphor screen optics on the Swank noise performance in indirect-conversion x-ray imaging detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C H; Moon, M-K; Kam, S; Han, J C; Yun, S; Youn, H; Kim, H K; Jeon, H

    2014-01-01

    The optics between the scintillators and photodiode arrays of indirect-conversion x-ray imaging systems requires careful design because it can be a cause of secondary quantum sink, which reduces the detective quantum efficiency at high spatial frequencies. The aim of this study was the investigation of the effect of the optical properties of granular phosphor screens — including optical coupling materials and passivation layers in photodiode arrays — on the imaging performance of indirect-conversion x-ray imaging detectors using the Monte Carlo technique. In the Monte Carlo simulations, various design parameters were considered, such as the refractive index of the optical coupler and the passivation layer, the reflection coefficient at the screen backing, and the thickness of the optical coupler. We developed a model that describes the optical pulse-height distributions based on the depth-dependent collection efficiency obtained from the simulations. We used the model to calculate the optical Swank noise. A loss in the number of collected optical photons was inevitable owing to the introduction of intermediate optics and mismatches in the optical design parameters. However, the collection efficiency marginally affected the optical Swank factor performance. The results and methodology of this study will facilitate better designs and optimization of indirect-conversion x-ray detectors

  20. Aligning the CMS Muon Endcap Detector with a System of Optical Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Hohlmann, Marcus; Guragain, Samir; Andreev, Valery; Yang, Xiaofeng; Bellinger, James; Carlsmith, Duncan; Feyzi, Farshid; Loveless, Richard J; Northacker, David; Eartly, David P; Prokofiev, Oleg; Sknar, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The positions and orientations of one sixth of 468 large cathode strip chambers in the endcaps of the CMS muon detector are directly monitored by several hundred sensors including 2-D optical sensors with linear CCDs illuminated by cross-hair lasers. Position measurements obtained by photogrammetry and survey under field-off conditions show that chambers in the +Z endcap have been placed on the yoke disks with an average accuracy of $\\approx 1$ mm in all 3 dimensions. We reconstruct absolute Z$_{CMS}$ positions and orientations of chambers at B=0T and B=4T using data from the optical alignment system. The measured position resolution and sensitivity to relative motion is about 60 $\\mu m$. The precision for measuring chamber positions taking into account mechanical tolerances is \\mbox{$\\approx 270 \\mu m$}. Comparing reconstruction of optical alignment data and photogrammetry measurements at B=0T indicates an accuracy of $\\approx$ 680 $\\mu m$ currently achieved with the hardware alignment system. Optical positi...

  1. Large-format platinum silicide microwave kinetic inductance detectors for optical to near-IR astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szypryt, P; Meeker, S R; Coiffard, G; Fruitwala, N; Bumble, B; Ulbricht, G; Walter, A B; Daal, M; Bockstiegel, C; Collura, G; Zobrist, N; Lipartito, I; Mazin, B A

    2017-10-16

    We have fabricated and characterized 10,000 and 20,440 pixel Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) arrays for the Dark-speckle Near-IR Energy-resolved Superconducting Spectrophotometer (DARKNESS) and the MKID Exoplanet Camera (MEC). These instruments are designed to sit behind adaptive optics systems with the goal of directly imaging exoplanets in a 800-1400 nm band. Previous large optical and near-IR MKID arrays were fabricated using substoichiometric titanium nitride (TiN) on a silicon substrate. These arrays, however, suffered from severe non-uniformities in the TiN critical temperature, causing resonances to shift away from their designed values and lowering usable detector yield. We have begun fabricating DARKNESS and MEC arrays using platinum silicide (PtSi) on sapphire instead of TiN. Not only do these arrays have much higher uniformity than the TiN arrays, resulting in higher pixel yields, they have demonstrated better spectral resolution than TiN MKIDs of similar design. PtSi MKIDs also do not display the hot pixel effects seen when illuminating TiN on silicon MKIDs with photons with wavelengths shorter than 1 µm.

  2. The system of digital-image optical microscope in semiconductor particle detector development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lixiang; Li Zhankui; Jin Genming; Wang Zhusheng; Xiao Guoqing

    2009-01-01

    Optical microscopic detection is very important in the process of semiconductor particle detector development. A system of digital-image optical microscope has been constructed with rather low price, which performance is comparable with the moderate-level imports. The system mounts powerful dry objective, and a 2μm resolution could be achieved. Observations with bright and dark field, polarized light,and interference light can be carried out on it. The system have large area on-line monitor,and the photographic device can be controlled by PC. It can be used in the control of defects and contaminations, pattern test, identification of crystal backing, inspection of the smoothness and the flatness of the crystal surface. It can also be used in some precise procedures, such as test, assembly, packaging and repairing. The quality of the bond could be examined by observing the appearance of the bond point and the microscopic structure of the solder. The surface fluctuation can be precisely measured under the microscope with the technology of multi-beam interference. In the article, the application of this system for semiconductor particle detector development has been illustrated, and the construction information has been described in detail. (authors)

  3. Simulation of optical configurations and signal processing methods in Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.T.; Strauss, M.G.; Brenner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial linearity and resolution of Anger-type neutron-position scintillation detectors are studied using a semi-empirical model. Detector optics with either an air gap or optical grease between the scintillator and the dispersive light guide are considered. Three signal processing methods which truncate signals from PMT's distant from the scintillation are compared with the linear resistive weighting method. Air gap optics yields a 15% improvement in spatial resolution and 50% reduction in differential and integral nonlinearity relative to grease coupled optics, using linear processing. Using signal truncation instead of linear processing improves the resolution 15-20% for the air gap and 20-30% for the grease coupling case. Thus, the initial discrepancy in the resolution between the two optics nearly vanished, however the linearity of the grease coupled system is still significantly poorer

  4. An optical fiber-based flexible readout system for micro-pattern gas detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Feng, C. Q.; Zhu, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; An, Q.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an optical fiber-based readout system that is intended to provide a general purpose multi-channel readout solution for various Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors (MPGDs). The proposed readout system is composed of several front-end cards (FECs) and a data collection module (DCM). The FEC exploits the capability of an existing 64-channel generic TPC readout ASIC chip, named AGET, to implement 256 channels readout. AGET offers FEC a large flexibility in gain range (4 options from 120 fC to 10 pC), peaking time (16 options from 50 ns to 1 us) and sampling freqency (100 MHz max.). The DCM contains multiple 1 Gbps optical fiber serial link interfaces that allow the system scaling up to 1536 channels with 6 FECs and 1 DCM. Further scaling up is possible through cascading of multiple DCMs, by configuring one DCM as a master while other DCMs in slave mode. This design offers a rapid readout solution for different application senario. Tests indicate that the nonlinearity of each channel is less than 1%, and the equivalent input noise charge is typically around 0.7 fC in RMS (root mean square), with a noise slope of about 0.01 fC/pF. The system level trigger rate limit is about 700 Hz in all channel readout mode. When in hit channel readout mode, supposing that typically 10 percent of channels are fired, trigger rate can go up to about 7 kHz. This system has been tested with Micromegas detector and GEM detector, confirming its capability in MPGD readout. Details of hardware and FPGA firmware design, as well as system performances, are described in the paper.

  5. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  6. The development of the room temperature LWIR HgCdTe detectors for free space optics communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Piotr; Gawron, Waldemar; Mikołajczyk, Janusz

    2017-10-01

    There are many room temperature applications to include free space optics (FSO) communication system combining quantum cascade lasers sources where HgCdTe long-wave (8-12 micrometer) infrared radiation (LWIR) detector reaching ultrafast response time 109 cmHz1/2/W. Since commercially available FSO could operate separately in SWIR, MWIR and LWIR range - the dual band detectors should be implemented into FSO. This paper shows theoretical performance of the dual band back-to-back MWIR and LWIR HgCdTe detector operating at 300 K pointing out the MWIR active layer influence on LWIR operating regime.

  7. Modelling the performance of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors with realistically imperfect optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochner, Brett

    1998-12-01

    The LIGO project is part of a world-wide effort to detect the influx of Gravitational Waves upon the earth from astrophysical sources, via their interaction with laser beams in interferometric detectors that are designed for extraordinarily high sensitivity. Central to the successful performance of LIGO detectors is the quality of their optical components, and the efficient optimization of interferometer configuration parameters. To predict LIGO performance with optics possessing realistic imperfections, we have developed a numerical simulation program to compute the steady-state electric fields of a complete, coupled-cavity LIGO interferometer. The program can model a wide variety of deformations, including laser beam mismatch and/or misalignment, finite mirror size, mirror tilts, curvature distortions, mirror surface roughness, and substrate inhomogeneities. Important interferometer parameters are automatically optimized during program execution to achieve the best possible sensitivity for each new set of perturbed mirrors. This thesis includes investigations of two interferometer designs: the initial LIGO system, and an advanced LIGO configuration called Dual Recycling. For Initial-LIGO simulations, the program models carrier and sideband frequency beams to compute the explicit shot-noise-limited gravitational wave sensitivity of the interferometer. It is demonstrated that optics of exceptional quality (root-mean-square deformations of less than ~1 nm in the central mirror regions) are necessary to meet Initial-LIGO performance requirements, but that they can be feasibly met. It is also shown that improvements in mirror quality can substantially increase LIGO's sensitivity to selected astrophysical sources. For Dual Recycling, the program models gravitational- wave-induced sidebands over a range of frequencies to demonstrate that the tuned and narrow-banded signal responses predicted for this configuration can be achieved with imperfect optics. Dual Recycling

  8. WE-AB-BRB-12: Nanoscintillator Fiber-Optic Detector System for Microbeam Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, J [University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Dooley, J; Chang, S [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Belley, M; Yoshizumi, T [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Stanton, I; Langloss, B; Therien, M [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiation therapy that has demonstrated a higher therapeutic ratio than conventional radiation therapy in animal studies. There are several roadblocks in translating the promising treatment technology to clinical application, one of which is the lack of a real-time, high-resolution dosimeter. Current clinical radiation detectors have poor spatial resolution and, as such, are unsuitable for measuring microbeams with submillimeter-scale widths. Although GafChromic film has high spatial resolution, it lacks the real-time dosimetry capability necessary for MRT preclinical research and potential clinical use. In this work we have demonstrated the feasibility of using a nanoscintillator fiber-optic detector (nanoFOD) system for real-time MRT dosimetry. Methods: A microplanar beam array is generated using a x-ray research irradiator and a custom-made, microbeam-forming collimator. The newest generation nanoFOD has an effective size of 70 µm in the measurement direction and was calibrated against a kV ion chamber (RadCal Accu-Pro) in open field geometry. We have written a computer script that performs automatic data collection with immediate background subtraction. A computer-controlled detector positioning stage is used to precisely measure the microbeam peak dose and beam profile by translating the stage during data collection. We test the new generation nanoFOD system, with increased active scintillation volume, against the previous generation system. Both raw and processed data are time-stamped and recorded to enable future post-processing. Results: The real-time microbeam dosimetry system worked as expected. The new generation dosimeter has approximately double the active volume compared to the previous generation resulting in over 900% increase in signal. The active volume of the dosimeter still provided the spatial resolution that meets the Nyquist criterion for our microbeam widths. Conclusion: We have

  9. Gamma irradiation effects on the thermal, optical and structural properties of Cr-39 nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.; Said, A.F.; Atta, M.R.; EL-Mellegy, W.M.; EL-Meniawi, S.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 KGy. Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermo-gravimetry (TG), differential thermo-gravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to obtain the activation energy of decomposition and the transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. The variation of onset temperature of decomposition (To) thermal activation energy of decomposition (Ea) melting temperature (Tm) refractive index (n) and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase with the gamma dose were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via the degradation and cross linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose gave an advantage for increasing the correlation between the thermal stability of CR-39 polymer and the bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation

  10. Ancient Biomolecules and Evolutionary Inference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellini, Enrico; Prohaska, Ana; Racimo, Fernando

    2018-01-01

    Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules-particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids-have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleo...

  11. LHC optics determination with proton tracks measured in the CT-PPS detectors in 2016, before TS2

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, F

    2017-01-01

    Novel optics estimation methods have been developed for the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS), in order to determine the horizontal dispersion function $D_{x}$ and the orbit between IP5 and the Roman Pot detectors. The tools have been successfully applied at $\\sqrt{s} = $13 TeV collision energy and $\\beta^{*} = $0.4 m optics with $\\alpha = 370\\,\\mu$rad horizontal crossing angle (settings valid in 2016 before Technical Stop 2 - TS2).

  12. Optical quality assurance procedures for the sensors of CBM STS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrik, Evgeny [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR aims to study the properties of nuclear matter at high net-baryon densities. The Silicon Tracking System (STS) is the key detector to reconstruct charged particle tracks created in heavy-ion interactions. In order to assure the quality of about 1300 silicon sensors, highly efficient and highly automated procedures need to be developed. In this contribution we report on a microscope camera based optical inspection system, used to scan along the individual sensors to recognize and classify sensor defects. Examples of these defects are: photo-resist residues, top metallization layer lithography defects, surface scratches. In order to separate and classify these defects various image-processing algorithms are used, including: pattern recognition, object classification etc.

  13. Opto-box: Optical modules and mini-crate for ATLAS pixel and IBL detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertsche David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The opto-box is a custom mini-crate for housing optical modules which process and transfer optoelectronic data. Many novel solutions were developed for the custom design and manufacturing. The system tightly integrates electrical, mechanical, and thermal functionality into a small package of size 35×10x8 cm3. Special attention was given to ensure proper shielding, grounding, cooling, high reliability, and environmental tolerance. The custom modules, which incorporate Application Specific Integrated Circuits, were developed through a cycle of rigorous testing and redesign. In total, fourteen opto-boxes have been installed and loaded with modules on the ATLAS detector. They are currently in operation as part of the LHC run 2 data read-out chain. This conference proceeding is in support of the poster presented at the International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics (ICNFP 2015 [1].

  14. Application of nuclear pumped laser to an optical self-powered neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, N.; Takahashi, H.; Iguchi, T.; Nakazawa, M.; Kakuta, T.; Yamagishi, H.; Katagiri, M.

    1996-05-01

    A Nuclear Pumped Laser (NPL) using 3He/Ne/Ar gas mixture is investigated for a purpose of applying to an optical self-powered neutron detector. Reactor experiments and simulations on lasing mechanism have been made to estimate the best gas pressure and mixture ratios on the threshold input power density (or thermal neutron flux) in 3He/Ne/Ar mixture. Calculational results show that the best mixture pressure is 3He/Ne/Ar=2280/60/100 Torr and thermal neutron flux threshold 5×1012 n/cm2 sec, while the reactor experiments made in the research reactor ``YAYOI'' of the University of Tokyo and ``JRR-4'' of JAERI also demonstrate that excitational efficiency is maximized in a similar gas mixture predicted by the calculation.

  15. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, O.

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO 2 /Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix

  16. Transparent silicon strip sensors for the optical alignment of particle detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, W.; Kroha, H.; Widmann, P.

    1995-05-01

    Modern large-area precision tracking detectors require increasing accuracy for the alignment of their components. A novel multi-point laser alignment system has been developed for such applications. The position of detector components with respect to reference laser beams is monitored by semi-transparent optical position sensors which work on the principle of silicon strip photodiodes. Two types of custom designed transparent strip sensors, based on crystalline and on amorphous silicon as active material, have been studied. The sensors are optimised for the typical diameters of collimated laser beams of 3-5 mm over distances of 10-20 m. They provide very high position resolution, on the order of 1 μm, uniformly over a wide measurement range of several centimeters. The preparation of the sensor surfaces requires special attention in order to achieve high light transmittance and minimum distortion of the traversing laser beams. At selected wavelengths, produced by laser diodes, transmission rates above 90% have been achieved. This allows to position more than 30 sensors along one laser beam. The sensors will be equipped with custom designed integrated readout electronics. (orig.)

  17. Generation of a multi-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state with linear optical elements and photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X B; Pahlke, K; Mathis, W

    2005-01-01

    We present a scheme to generate a multi-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state by using single-photon sources, linear optical elements and photon detectors. Such a maximum entanglement has wide applications in the demonstration of quantum nonlocality and quantum information processing

  18. Applications of optical links to the protective instrumentation of nuclear power stations and to stabilisation of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuze, G.

    1979-01-01

    The description is given of a system of transmission by optical fibre opto-electronic links capable of carrying out many point by point transmissions of logical signals: between acquisition and protection processing units, between acquisition and protection processing units and the control room, between acquisition and protection processing units and logical safety units, and between logical safety units and control room. A short description is also given of an optical fibre signal transmission system constituting a new instrumentation for stabilising spectra coming from NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors. In addition to the remote control of the detectors such an instrumentation is capable of improving the stability performance of gamma ray cameras (a beam of monofibres is then necessary) as well as that of any detector placed in an inaccessible or hostile environment (fuel reprocessing plant, for example) [fr

  19. Ancient Biomolecules and Evolutionary Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellini, Enrico; Prohaska, Ana; Racimo, Fernando; Welker, Frido; Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Allentoft, Morten E; de Barros Damgaard, Peter; Gutenbrunner, Petra; Dunne, Julie; Hammann, Simon; Roffet-Salque, Mélanie; Ilardo, Melissa; Moreno-Mayar, J Víctor; Wang, Yucheng; Sikora, Martin; Vinner, Lasse; Cox, Jürgen; Evershed, Richard P; Willerslev, Eske

    2018-04-25

    Over the last decade, studies of ancient biomolecules-particularly ancient DNA, proteins, and lipids-have revolutionized our understanding of evolutionary history. Though initially fraught with many challenges, the field now stands on firm foundations. Researchers now successfully retrieve nucleotide and amino acid sequences, as well as lipid signatures, from progressively older samples, originating from geographic areas and depositional environments that, until recently, were regarded as hostile to long-term preservation of biomolecules. Sampling frequencies and the spatial and temporal scope of studies have also increased markedly, and with them the size and quality of the data sets generated. This progress has been made possible by continuous technical innovations in analytical methods, enhanced criteria for the selection of ancient samples, integrated experimental methods, and advanced computational approaches. Here, we discuss the history and current state of ancient biomolecule research, its applications to evolutionary inference, and future directions for this young and exciting field. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 87 is June 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  20. THz Pyro-Optical Detector Based on LiNbO3 Whispering Gallery Mode Microdisc Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Alessandro; Cerminara, Matteo; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Pelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes the capabilities of a LiNbO3 whispering gallery mode microdisc resonator as a potential bolometer detector in the THz range. The resonator is theoretically characterized in the stationary regime by its thermo-optic and thermal coefficients. Considering a Q-factor of 107, a minimum detectable power of 20 μW was evaluated, three orders of magnitude above its noise equivalent power. This value opens up the feasibility of exploiting LiNbO3 disc resonators as sensitive room-temperature detectors in the THz range. PMID:28134857

  1. Photochemical Microscale Electrophoresis Allows Fast Quantification of Biomolecule Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Friederike M; Kieß, Michael; Braun, Dieter

    2016-04-27

    Intricate spatiotemporal patterns emerge when chemical reactions couple to physical transport. We induce electrophoretic transport by a confined photochemical reaction and use it to infer the binding strength of a second, biomolecular binding reaction under physiological conditions. To this end, we use the photoactive compound 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, which releases a proton upon 375 nm irradiation. The charged photoproducts locally perturb electroneutrality due to differential diffusion, giving rise to an electric potential Φ in the 100 μV range on the micrometer scale. Electrophoresis of biomolecules in this field is counterbalanced by back-diffusion within seconds. The biomolecule concentration is measured by fluorescence and settles proportionally to exp(-μ/D Φ). Typically, binding alters either the diffusion coefficient D or the electrophoretic mobility μ. Hence, the local biomolecule fluorescence directly reflects the binding state. A fit to the law of mass action reveals the dissociation constant of the binding reaction. We apply this approach to quantify the binding of the aptamer TBA15 to its protein target human-α-thrombin and to probe the hybridization of DNA. Dissociation constants in the nanomolar regime were determined and match both results in literature and in control experiments using microscale thermophoresis. As our approach is all-optical, isothermal and requires only nanoliter volumes at nanomolar concentrations, it will allow for the fast screening of biomolecule binding in low volume multiwell formats.

  2. Infrared detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Rogalski, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    This second edition is fully revised and reorganized, with new chapters concerning third generation and quantum dot detectors, THz detectors, cantilever and antenna coupled detectors, and information on radiometry and IR optics materials. Part IV concerning focal plane arrays is significantly expanded. This book, resembling an encyclopedia of IR detectors, is well illustrated and contains many original references … a really comprehensive book.-F. Sizov, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine

  3. Two transparent optical sensors for the positioning of detectors using a reference laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriere, J.Ch.; Blumenfeld, H.; Bourdinaud, M.; Cloue, O.; Guyot, C.; Molinie, F.; Ponsot, P.; Saudemont, J.C.; Schuller, J.P.; Schune, Ph.; Sube, S. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France). Dept. d' Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee

    1999-07-01

    We have developed two different optical systems in order to position detectors with respect to a reference laser beam. The first system, a telescope, permits the absolute positioning of an element with respect to a reference laser beam. The resolution is of the order of 10 {mu}m in translation and 50 {mu}rad in rotation. It is highly transparent (-90%) permitting several elements to be aligned. A calibration procedure has also been studied and is currently being tested in order to obtain an absolute alignment information. The second system is a highly transparent (95%) two dimensional position sensor which allows the accurate positioning (below 20 {mu}m) of several (up to ten) elements to which each sensor is attached, transversally to a laser beam used as a reference straight line. The present useful area of the first sensor is 20 x 20 mm{sup 2} and is 15 x 15 mm{sup 2} for the second. In both case it can be further increased to meet the experiment's requirement. (authors)

  4. Two transparent optical sensors for the positioning of detectors using a reference laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriere, J.Ch.; Blumenfeld, H.; Bourdinaud, M.; Cloue, O.; Guyot, C.; Molinie, F.; Ponsot, P.; Saudemont, J.C.; Schuller, J.P.; Schune, Ph.; Sube, S.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed two different optical systems in order to position detectors with respect to a reference laser beam. The first system, a telescope, permits the absolute positioning of an element with respect to a reference laser beam. The resolution is of the order of 10 μm in translation and 50 μrad in rotation. It is highly transparent (-90%) permitting several elements to be aligned. A calibration procedure has also been studied and is currently being tested in order to obtain an absolute alignment information. The second system is a highly transparent (95%) two dimensional position sensor which allows the accurate positioning (below 20 μm) of several (up to ten) elements to which each sensor is attached, transversally to a laser beam used as a reference straight line. The present useful area of the first sensor is 20 x 20 mm 2 and is 15 x 15 mm 2 for the second. In both case it can be further increased to meet the experiment's requirement. (authors)

  5. Calibrating an optical scanner for quality assurance of large area radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Hildén, T.; Berdova, M.; Lauhakangas, R.; Heino, J.; Tuominen, E.; Franssila, S.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2014-11-01

    A gas electron multiplier (GEM) is a particle detector used in high-energy physics. Its main component is a thin copper-polymer-copper sandwich that carries Ø =70  ±  5 µm holes. Quality assurance (QA) is needed to guarantee both long operating life and reading fidelity of the GEM. Absence of layer defects and conformity of the holes to specifications is important. Both hole size and shape influence the detector’s gas multiplication factor and hence affect the collected data. For the scanner the required lateral measurement tolerance is ± 5 µm. We calibrated a high aspect ratio optical scanning system (OSS) to allow ensuring the quality of large GEM foils. For the calibration we microfabricated transfer standards, which were imaged with the OSS and which were compared to corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The calibration fulfilled the ISO/IEC 17025 and UKAS M3003 requirements: the calibration factor was 1.01  ±  0.01, determined at 95% confidence level across a 950  ×  950 mm2 area. The proposed large-scale scanning technique can potentially be valuable in other microfabricated products too.

  6. Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector and the Lightning Imaging Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated datasets, and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data an the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA:s Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. A quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available is also introduced. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in sc)iirce location, Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated datasets, and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three-station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg.

  7. Optical CDMA with Embedded Spectral-Polarization Coding over Double Balanced Differential-Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Fa; Yen, Chih-Ta; Chen, Bo-Hau

    A spectral-polarization coding (SPC) optical code-division multiple-access (OCDMA) configuration structured over arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) router is proposed. The polarization-division double balanced detector is adopted to execute difference detection and enhances system performance. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived by taking the effect of PIIN into account. The result indicates that there would be up to 9-dB SNR improvement than the conventional spectral-amplitude coding (SAC) structures with Walsh-Hadamard codes. Mathematical deriving results of the SNR demonstrate the system embedded with the orthogonal state of polarization (SOP) will suppress effectively phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN). In addition, we will analyze the relations about bit error rate (BER) vs. the number of active users under the different encoding schemes and compare them with our proposed scheme. The BER vs. the effective power under the different encoding scheme with the same number of simultaneous active user conditions are also revealed. Finally, the polarization-matched factor and the difference between simulated and experimental values are discussed.

  8. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible.

  9. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  10. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  11. Optical fiber detectors as in-vivo dosimetry method of quality assurance in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plazas, M.C.; Justus, B.L.; Falkenstein, P.; Huston, A.L.; Ning, H.; Miller, R.

    2004-01-01

    A new in-vivo dosimetry system has been under development for some time using radio luminescent phosphors. These phosphors are activated, metal ion doped glasses (Ex: Cu 1± doped quartz fiber), have excellent optical transparency and offer several potential advantages for radiation dosimetry; including: small size, high sensitivity, linearity of dose response insensitivity to electromagnetic interference. The utility of these phosphors as a detection modality has been limited in real-time dosimetry applications due to the production of Cerenkov radiation in the carrier fiber, which produces a contaminant signal proportional to dose rate as well as the size of the radiation field. One possible method for eliminating this signal is using an electronic gating signal from the accelerator to delay data acquisition during the actual beam pulse, when Cerenkov radiation is produced. Due to the intrinsic properties of our particular scintillator, this method offers the best mechanism for eliminating Cerenkov noise, while retaining the ability to detect individual beam pulses. The dosimeter was tested using an external beam radiotherapy machine that provided pulses of 6 MeV x-rays. Gated detection was used to discriminate the signal collected during the radiation pulses, which included contributions from Cerenkov radiation and native fiber fluorescence, from the signal collected between the radiation pulses, which contained only the long-lived phosphorescence from the Cu 1± doped fused quartz detector. Gated detection of the phosphorescence provided accurate, real-time dose measurements that were linear with absorbed dose, independent of dose rate and that were accurate for all field sizes studied. (author)

  12. Development of the optical components of an alignment system for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, P.

    1994-09-01

    In the framework of the development of an electro-optical alignment system for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector different types of optical sensors as well as components of a glass fiber network for the light distribution were studied for their suitability for a possible application. For the sensors a resolution of 10-20 μm in one and about 100 μm in the other coordinate is required. Especially for the application in the ATLAS detector developed silicon strip detectors permit in their current state of development a position resolution of 5-7 μm in the strip coordinate and 30 μm in the ohter coordinate (with current division on the strip). In the combination of several sensors in a beam the beam deviation by light refraction has been proved as additional error source. as much promising alternative strip sensors of amorphous silicon have been proved. These sensors allow in both directions an equally high position resolution. With a not transparent prototype resolutions of 1.8 μm in one and 2.3 μm in the second coordinate were reached without corrections. Additionally it is possible to fabricate these sensors in transparent form on glass substrates with optical quality, which may permit a complet abandonment on corrections of the beam deviation. The transmission of these sensors amounts at a wavelength of 690 nm currently to about 60%. By optimization of the layer thicknesses however transmission rates of up to 80% should be reachable. The studied components for the light distribution via glass fibers corresponded to their specifications. The application of one-mode fibers guarantees thereby the Gaussian profile of the laser beams collimated with objectives desirable for the position measurement with strip detectors

  13. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  14. Structures of Biomolecules by NMR Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    an edge over the X-ray method as it can be used to study biomolecules ... currently as an Associate. Professor. ... Such a wealth of data is made available to the NMR ... important step towards structural characterization of a biomolecule. Box 1.

  15. MSM optical detector on the basis of II-type ZnSe/ZnTe superlattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetzov, P. I., E-mail: pik218@ire216.msk.su; Averin, S. V., E-mail: sva278@ire216.msk.su; Zhitov, V. A.; Zakharov, L. Yu.; Kotov, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel’nikov Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics (Fryazino Branch) (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    On the basis of a type-II ZnSe/ZnTe superlattice, a MSM (metal—semiconductor–metal) photodetector is fabricated and investigated. The detector features low dark currents and a high sensitivity. The spectral characteristic of the detector provides the possibility of the selective detection of three separate spectral portions of visible and near-infrared radiation.

  16. An optical test bench for the precision characterization of absolute quantum efficiency for the TESS CCD detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright stars with Ic ∼< 13. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2018 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission, and is expected to discover a thousand or more planets that are smaller in size than Neptune. TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with a band-pass of 650 nm–1050 nm to detect temporary drops in brightness of stars due to planetary transits. The 1050 nm limit is set by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the CCDs. The detector assembly consists of four back-illuminated MIT Lincoln Laboratory CCID-80 devices. Each CCID-80 device consists of 2048×2048 imaging array and 2048×2048 frame store regions. Very precise on-ground calibration and characterization of CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data obtained in space. The characterization of the absolute QE of the CCD detectors is a crucial part of the characterization process because QE affects the performance of the CCD significantly over the redder wavelengths at which TESS will be operating. An optical test bench with significantly high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise QE measurements. The design of the test setup along with key hardware, methodology, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  17. Comparison of acrylic polymer adhesive tapes and silicone optical grease in light sharing detectors for positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Elburg, Devin J; Noble, Scott D; Hagey, Simone; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2018-02-26

    Optical coupling is an important factor in detector design as it improves optical photon transmission by mitigating internal reflections at light-sharing boundaries. In this work we compare optical coupling materials, namely double-sided acrylic polymer tapes and silicone optical grease (SiG), in the context of positron emission tomography. Four double-sided tapes from 3 M of varying thicknesses (0.229 mm-1.016 mm) and adhesive materials ('100MP', 'A100', and 'GPA') were characterized with spectrophotometer measurements as well as photopeak amplitude and energy resolution measurements using lutetium-yttrium oxy-orthosilicate (LYSO) coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Transmission spectra from the spectrophotometer showed over 80% transmission for all tapes at 420 nm and above, with 89.6% and 88.8% transmission for the 0.508 mm and 1.016 mm thick GPA tapes, respectively, at 420 nm. Measurements with single-pixel LYSO-PMT and 4  ×  4 array (one-to-one coupled) LYSO-SiPM setups determined that SiG had the greatest photopeak amplitude, with tapes showing 2.1%-14.8% reduction in photopeak amplitude with respect to SiG. Energy resolution changed by less than 4% on a relative basis between tapes and SiG with PMT measurements, however for the SiPM array measurements the energy resolution improved from 15.6%  ±  2.7% full-width at half-maximum to 11.4%  ±  1.2% for SiG and 1 mm GPA respectively. Data acquired with dual-layer offset LYSO arrays (light sharing detector designs) demonstrated that a detector coupled with 1 mm thick GPA tape produced equivalent detector flood histograms to those from a design coupled with SiG and a 1 mm thick glass lightguide. No significant degradation in photopeak amplitude and energy resolution was observed over five months of measurements, indicating the tapes maintain their coupling integrity over several months. Though minimal photopeak amplitude degradation

  18. Comparison of acrylic polymer adhesive tapes and silicone optical grease in light sharing detectors for positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Elburg, Devin J.; Noble, Scott D.; Hagey, Simone; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2018-03-01

    Optical coupling is an important factor in detector design as it improves optical photon transmission by mitigating internal reflections at light-sharing boundaries. In this work we compare optical coupling materials, namely double-sided acrylic polymer tapes and silicone optical grease (SiG), in the context of positron emission tomography. Four double-sided tapes from 3 M of varying thicknesses (0.229 mm-1.016 mm) and adhesive materials (‘100MP’, ‘A100’, and ‘GPA’) were characterized with spectrophotometer measurements as well as photopeak amplitude and energy resolution measurements using lutetium-yttrium oxy-orthosilicate (LYSO) coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). Transmission spectra from the spectrophotometer showed over 80% transmission for all tapes at 420 nm and above, with 89.6% and 88.8% transmission for the 0.508 mm and 1.016 mm thick GPA tapes, respectively, at 420 nm. Measurements with single-pixel LYSO-PMT and 4  ×  4 array (one-to-one coupled) LYSO-SiPM setups determined that SiG had the greatest photopeak amplitude, with tapes showing 2.1%-14.8% reduction in photopeak amplitude with respect to SiG. Energy resolution changed by less than 4% on a relative basis between tapes and SiG with PMT measurements, however for the SiPM array measurements the energy resolution improved from 15.6%  ±  2.7% full-width at half-maximum to 11.4%  ±  1.2% for SiG and 1 mm GPA respectively. Data acquired with dual-layer offset LYSO arrays (light sharing detector designs) demonstrated that a detector coupled with 1 mm thick GPA tape produced equivalent detector flood histograms to those from a design coupled with SiG and a 1 mm thick glass lightguide. No significant degradation in photopeak amplitude and energy resolution was observed over five months of measurements, indicating the tapes maintain their coupling integrity over several months. Though minimal photopeak amplitude

  19. Performance and Characterization of a Modular Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detector System for Space-to-Earth Optical Communications Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Brian E.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Nappier, Jennifer M.

    2018-01-01

    Space-to-ground photon-counting optical communication links supporting high data rates over large distances require enhanced ground receiver sensitivity in order to reduce the mass and power burden on the spacecraft transmitter. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) have been demonstrated to offer superior performance in detection efficiency, timing resolution, and count rates over semiconductor photodetectors, and are a suitable technology for high photon efficiency links. Recently photon detectors based on superconducting nanowires have become commercially available, and we have assessed the characteristics and performance of one such commercial system as a candidate for potential utilization in ground receiver designs. The SNSPD system features independent channels which can be added modularly, and we analyze the scalability of the system to support different data rates, as well as consider coupling concepts and issues as the number of channels increases.

  20. Multiplexing 32,000 spectra onto 8 detectors: the HARMONI field splitting, image slicing, and wavelength selecting optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Freeman, David; Kosmalski, Johan

    2012-09-01

    HARMONI, the High Angular Resolution Monolithic Optical & Near-infrared Integral field spectrograph is one of two first-light instruments for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Over a 256x128 pixel field-of-view HARMONI will simultaneously measure approximately 32,000 spectra. Each spectrum is about 4000 spectral pixels long, and covers a selectable part of the 0.47-2.45 μm wavelength range at resolving powers of either R≍4000, 10000, or 20000. All 32,000 spectra are imaged onto eight HAWAII4RG detectors using a multiplexing scheme that divides the input field into four sub-fields, each imaged onto one image slicer that in turn re-arranges a single sub-field into two long exit slits feeding one spectrograph each. In total we require eight spectrographs, each with one HAWAII4RG detector. A system of articulated and exchangeable fold-mirrors and VPH gratings allows one to select different spectral resolving powers and wavelength ranges of interest while keeping a fixed geometry between the spectrograph collimator and camera avoiding the need for an articulated grating and camera. In this paper we describe both the field splitting and image slicing optics as well as the optics that will be used to select both spectral resolving power and wavelength range.

  1. Detector Sampling of Optical/IR Spectra: How Many Pixels per FWHM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. Gordon

    2017-08-01

    Most optical and IR spectra are now acquired using detectors with finite-width pixels in a square array. Each pixel records the received intensity integrated over its own area, and pixels are separated by the array pitch. This paper examines the effects of such pixellation, using computed simulations to illustrate the effects which most concern the astronomer end-user. It is shown that coarse sampling increases the random noise errors in wavelength by typically 10-20 % at 2 pixels per Full Width at Half Maximum, but with wide variation depending on the functional form of the instrumental Line Spread Function (i.e. the instrumental response to a monochromatic input) and on the pixel phase. If line widths are determined, they are even more strongly affected at low sampling frequencies. However, the noise in fitted peak amplitudes is minimally affected by pixellation, with increases less than about 5%. Pixellation has a substantial but complex effect on the ability to see a relative minimum between two closely spaced peaks (or relative maximum between two absorption lines). The consistent scale of resolving power presented by Robertson to overcome the inadequacy of the Full Width at Half Maximum as a resolution measure is here extended to cover pixellated spectra. The systematic bias errors in wavelength introduced by pixellation, independent of signal/noise ratio, are examined. While they may be negligible for smooth well-sampled symmetric Line Spread Functions, they are very sensitive to asymmetry and high spatial frequency sub-structure. The Modulation Transfer Function for sampled data is shown to give a useful indication of the extent of improperly sampled signal in an Line Spread Function. The common maxim that 2 pixels per Full Width at Half Maximum is the Nyquist limit is incorrect and most Line Spread Functions will exhibit some aliasing at this sample frequency. While 2 pixels per Full Width at Half Maximum is nevertheless often an acceptable minimum for

  2. Surface plasmon resonance sensing: from purified biomolecules to intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Wen; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-12

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a well-recognized label-free technique for measuring the binding kinetics between biomolecules since the invention of the first SPR-based immunosensor in 1980s. The most popular and traditional format for SPR analysis is to monitor the real-time optical signals when a solution containing ligand molecules is flowing over a sensor substrate functionalized with purified receptor molecules. In recent years, rapid development of several kinds of SPR imaging techniques have allowed for mapping the dynamic distribution of local mass density within single living cells with high spatial and temporal resolutions and reliable sensitivity. Such capability immediately enabled one to investigate the interaction between important biomolecules and intact cells in a label-free, quantitative, and single cell manner, leading to an exciting new trend of cell-based SPR bioanalysis. In this Trend Article, we first describe the principle and technical features of two types of SPR imaging techniques based on prism and objective, respectively. Then we survey the intact cell-based applications in both fundamental cell biology and drug discovery. We conclude the article with comments and perspectives on the future developments. Graphical abstract Recent developments in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging techniques allow for label-free mapping the mass-distribution within single living cells, leading to great expansions in biomolecular interactions studies from homogeneous substrates functionalized with purified biomolecules to heterogeneous substrates containing individual living cells.

  3. Triggered optical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-10-02

    An optical biosensor is provided for the detection of a multivalent target biomolecule, the biosensor including a substrate having a bilayer membrane thereon, a recognition molecule situated at the surface, the recognition molecule capable of binding with the multivalent target biomolecule, the recognition molecule further characterized as including a fluorescence label thereon and as being movable at the surface and a device for measuring a fluorescence change in response to binding between the recognition molecule and the multivalent target biomolecule.

  4. Non-Linear Optical Phenomena in Detecting Materials as a Possibility for Fast Timing in Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Korjik, M. V.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A. A.; Emelianchik, I.; Griesmayer, E.; Mechinsky, V.; Nargelas, S.; Sidletskiy, O.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tikhomirov, S. N.; Vaitkevicius, A.

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of the detectors currently in use is limited by 50-70 ps due to the spontaneous processes involved in the development of the response signal, which forms after the relaxation of carriers generated during the interaction. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of exploiting sub-picosecond phenomena occurring after the interaction of scintillator material with ionizing radiation by probing the material with ultra-short laser pulses. One of the phenomena is the elastic polarization due to the local lattice distortion caused by the displacement of electrons and holes generated by ionization. The key feature of the elastic polarization is its short response time, which makes it prospective for using as an optically detectable time mark. The nonlinear optical absorption of femtosecond light pulses of appropriate wavelength is demonstrated to be a prospective tool to form the mark. This study was aimed at searching for inorganic crystalline media combining scintillation properties and non-...

  5. Analysis of nanoparticle biomolecule complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Stefán B; Bernfur, Katja; Mikkelsen, Anders; Cedervall, Tommy

    2018-03-01

    Nanoparticles exposed to biological fluids adsorb biomolecules on their surface forming a biomolecular corona. This corona determines, on a molecular level, the interactions and impact the newly formed complex has on cells and organisms. The corona formation as well as the physiological and toxicological relevance are commonly investigated. However, an acknowledged but rarely addressed problem in many fields of nanobiotechnology is aggregation and broadened size distribution of nanoparticles following their interactions with the molecules of biological fluids. In blood serum, TiO 2 nanoparticles form complexes with a size distribution from 30 nm to more than 500 nm. In this study we have separated these complexes, with good resolution, using preparative centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. Two main apparent size populations were obtained, a fast sedimenting population of complexes that formed a pellet in the preparative centrifugation tube, and a slow sedimenting complex population still suspended in the gradient after centrifugation. Concentration and surface area dependent differences are found in the biomolecular corona between the slow and fast sedimenting fractions. There are more immunoglobulins, lipid binding proteins, and lipid-rich complexes at higher serum concentrations. Sedimentation rate and the biomolecular corona are important factors for evaluating any experiment including nanoparticle exposure. Our results show that traditional description of nanoparticles in biological fluids is an oversimplification and that more thorough characterisations are needed.

  6. Magnetic GMI sensor for detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiriac, Horia; Tibu, Mihai; Moga, Anca-Eugenia; Herea, Dumitru D.

    2005-01-01

    A magnetic sensor based on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect for the detection of biomolecules was made with a CoFeSiB amorphous magnetic microwire as sensing element. Using soft ferromagnetic cobalt microparticles and field sensitivities of the impedance of about 2.5%/A m -1 in the very low field region (less than 200 A m -1 ) at frequencies close to 10 MHz, a highly sensitive response was measured, appropriate for the detection of low biomolecule concentrations

  7. Development of wide-band, time and energy resolving, optical photon detectors with application to imaging astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.J.; Cabrera, B.; Romani, R.W.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Nam, S.W.; Clarke, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting transition edge sensors (TESs) are showing promise for the wide-band spectroscopy of individual photons from the mid-infrared (IR), through the optical, and into the near ultraviolet (UV). Our TES sensors are ∼20 μm square, 40 nm thick tungsten (W) films with a transition temperature of about 80 mK. We typically attain an energy resolution of 0.15 eV FWHM over the optical range with relative timing resolution of 100 ns. Single photon events with sub-microsecond risetimes and few microsecond falltimes have been achieved allowing count rates in excess of 30 kHz per pixel. Additionally, tungsten is approximately 50% absorptive in the optical (dropping to 10% in the IR) giving these devices an intrinsically high quantum efficiency. These combined traits make our detectors attractive for fast spectrophotometers and photon-starved applications such as wide-band, time and energy resolved astronomical observations. We present recent results from our work toward the fabrication and testing of the first TES optical photon imaging arrays

  8. Evaluation and selection of optical feedback preamplifiers first cooled state for silicon-lithium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, A.; Cabal Rodriguez, A.E.; Suarez Canner, E.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes the principal characteristics of field-effect transistors and light-emitter diodes that allow to obtain a good energy resolution in Si Li detectors for X ray fluorescence manufactured at CEADEN. There exhibited transconductance values dl/dV and gate current for 16 researched field-effect transistor as well as the measurement circuits

  9. A microfabricated, low dark current a-Se detector for measurement of microplasma optical emission in the UV for possible use on-site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Karim, Karim S.; Karanassios, Vassili

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, samples are collected on-site (i.e., in the field) and are shipped to a lab for chemical analysis. An alternative is offered by using portable chemical analysis instruments that can be used on-site (i.e., in the field). Many analytical measurements by optical emission spectrometry require use of light-sources and of spectral lines that are in the Ultra-Violet (UV, ~200 nm - 400 nm wavelength) region of the spectrum. For such measurements, a portable, battery-operated, fiber-optic spectrometer equipped with an un-cooled, linear, solid-state detector may be used. To take full advantage of the advanced measurement capabilities offered by state-of-the-art solid-state detectors, cooling of the detector is required. But cooling and other thermal management hamper portability and use on-site because they add size and weight and they increase electrical power requirements. To address these considerations, an alternative was implemented, as described here. Specifically, a microfabricated solid-state detector for measurement of UV photons will be described. Unlike solid-state detectors developed on crystalline Silicon, this miniaturized and low-cost detector utilizes amorphous Selenium (a-Se) as its photosensitive material. Due to its low dark current, this detector does not require cooling, thus it is better suited for portable use and for chemical measurements on-site. In this paper, a microplasma will be used as a light-source of UV photons for the a-Se detector. For example, spectra acquired using a microplasma as a light-source will be compared with those obtained with a portable, fiber-optic spectrometer equipped with a Si-based 2080-element detector. And, analytical performance obtained by introducing ng-amounts of analytes into the microplasma will be described.

  10. Immobilization of biomolecules onto surfaces according to ultraviolet light diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di; Neves Petersen, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a method for immobilization of biomolecules onto thiol functionalized surfaces according to UV diffraction patterns. UV light-assisted molecular immobilization proceeds through the formation of free, reactive thiol groups that can bind covalently to thiol reactive surfaces. We demons......, with a fine structured interference pattern superimposed. (C) 2010 Optical Society of America...

  11. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Gregory L.; Ghosh, Ruby N.; Osborn, D.J. III

    2004-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the 3 O 2 quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films

  12. Detector of Optical Vortices as the Main Element of the System of Data Transfer: Principles of Operation, Numerical Model, and Influence of Noise and Atmospheric Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Aksenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The method is proposed of optical vortex topological charge detection along with a design of a corresponding detector. The developed technique is based on measurements of light field intensity. Mathematical model simulating performance of the detector is described in the paper, and results of numerical experiments are presented which illustrate recognition of a vortex in a turbulent medium and in the presence of amplitude and phase noise in the registered radiation. Influence of shifts of the system optical axis on precision of registration is also considered in the paper.

  13. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field of...

  14. High-Resolution Detector for At-Wavelength Metrology of X-Ray Optics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since the launch of the first X-ray focusing telescope in 1963, the development of grazing incidence X-ray optics has been crucial to the development of the field of...

  15. Superconducting Nanowire Single Photon Detectors for High-Data-Rate Deep-Space Optical Communication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High data rate deep space optical communication (DSOC) links for manned and unmanned space exploration have been identified by NASA as a critical future capability,...

  16. A 3-stage gated UV-photon gaseous detector with optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Sauvage, D.

    1989-03-01

    UV-photons are detected by a low pressure photosensitive multistep gaseous detector. Photoelectrons are multiplied in two charge amplification stages. A third, light amplification stage operating in a scintillation mode, provides light yields >5.10 7 visible photons per single photoelectron avalanche, in Argon-C 2 H 6 -TMAE gas mixture. We present results on absolute photon yields in various TMAE gas mixtures, at low gas pressure and at low charge gains. We describe the operation mechanism and some basic properties of the gated 3-stage detectors, such as stability of operation at high background rates and localization resolutions particularly at large TMAE concentration and high temperature operation conditions. Further applications are discussed. (authors)

  17. Laue optics for nuclear astrophysics: New detector requirements for focused gamma-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriere, N. [INAF - IASF Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: nicolas.barriere@iasf-roma.inaf.it; Ballmoos, P. von [CESR - UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse (France); Abrosimov, N.V. [IKZ, Max Born-Str. 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bastie, P. [LSP UMR 5588, 140 Av. de la physique, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Camus, T. [CESR - UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse (France); Courtois, P.; Jentschel, M. [ILL, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Knoedlseder, J. [CESR - UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse (France); Natalucci, L. [INAF - IASF Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Roudil, G.; Rousselle, J. [CESR - UMR 5187, 9 Av. du Colonel Roche, 31028 Toulouse (France); Wunderer, C.B. [SSL, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94708 (United States); Kurlov, V.N. [Institute of Solid State Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-21

    Nuclear astrophysics presents an extraordinary scientific potential for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. But in order to take full advantage of this potential, telescopes should be at least an order of magnitude more sensitive than present technologies. Today, Laue lenses have demonstrated their capability of focusing gamma-rays in the 100 keV-1 MeV domain, enabling the possibility of building a new generation of instruments for which sensitive area is decoupled from collecting area. Thus we have now the opportunity of dramatically increase the signal/background ratio and hence improve significantly the sensitivity. With a lens, the best detector is no longer the largest possible within a mission envelope. The point spread function of a Laue lens measures a few centimeters in diameter, but the field of view is limited by the detector size. Requirements for a focal plane instrument are presented in the context of the Gamma-Ray Imager mission (proposed to European Space Agency, ESA in the framework of the first Cosmic Vision AO): a 15-20 cm a side finely pixellated detector capable of Compton events reconstruction seems to be optimal, giving polarization and background rejection capabilities and 30 arcsec of angular resolution within a field of view of 5 arc min.

  18. Biomolecule-coated metal nanoparticles on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Stephen L; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-07

    Immobilizations of nanoparticles and biomolecules on biocompatible substrates such as titanium are two promising approaches to bringing new functionalities to Ti-based biomaterials. Herein, we used a variety of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to study and better understand metal-thiolate interactions in biofunctionalized metal nanoparticle systems supported on Ti substrates. Using a facile one-step procedure, a series of Au nanoparticle samples with varied biomolecule coatings ((2-mercatopropionyl)glycine (MPG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and biomolecule concentrations are prepared. Ag and Pd systems are also studied to observe change with varying metal composition. The structure and properties of these biomolecule-coated nanoparticles are investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element-specific X-ray techniques, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (Au L(3)-edge), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (Au L(3), Ag L(3), Pd L(3), and S K-edge), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Au 4f, Ag 3d, Pd 3d, and S 2p core level). It was found that, by comparison of SEM and X-ray spectroscopy results, the coating of metal nanoparticles with varying model biomolecule systems can have a significant effect on both surface coverage and organization. This work offers a facile chemical method for bio- and nanofunctionalization of Ti substrates as well as provides a physical picture of the structure and bonding of biocoated metal nanoparticles, which may lead to useful applications in orthopedics and biomedicine.

  19. Thermodynamic stability of biomolecules and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ashim K

    2017-08-01

    The thermodynamic stability of biomolecules in the perspective of evolution is a complex issue and needs discussion. Intra molecular bonds maintain the structure and the state of internal energy (E) of a biomolecule at "local minima". In this communication, possibility of loss in internal energy level of a biomolecule through the changes in the bonds has been discussed, that might earn more thermodynamic stability for the molecule. In the process variations in structure and functions of the molecule could occur. Thus, E of a biomolecule is likely to have energy stature for minimization. Such change in energy status is an intrinsic factor for evolving biomolecules buying more stability and generating variations in the structure and function of DNA molecules undergoing natural selection. Thus, the variations might very well contribute towards the process of evolution. A brief discussion on conserved sequence in the light of proposition in this communication has been made at the end. Extension of the idea may resolve certain standing problems in evolution, such as maintenance of conserved sequences in genome of diverse species, pre- versus post adaptive mutations, 'orthogenesis', etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomolecules for Removal of Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namita Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Patents reveal that heavy metals are natural constituents of the earth's crust, but some heavy metals like cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic etc. are injurious to living organisms at higher concentration. Nowadays, anthropogenic activities have altered geochemical cycles and biochemical balance of heavy metals. Biomolecules are used nowadays for removal of heavy metals compared to other synthetic biosorbents due to their environmental friendly nature and cost effectiveness. The goal of this work is to identify the role of biomolecules like polysaccharides, polypeptides, natural compounds containing aromatic acid etc. for heavy metal removal by bio sorption. It has been observed that efficiency of biomolecules can be increased by functionalization e.g. cellulose functionalization with EDTA, chitosan with sulphur groups, alginate with carboxyl/ hydroxyl group etc. It was found that the porous structure of aerogel beads improves both sorption and kinetic properties of the material. Out of polypeptides metallothionein has been widely used for removal of heavy metal up to 88% from seawater after a single centrifugation. These cost effective functionalized biomolecules are significantly used for remediation of heavy metals by immobilizing these biomolecules onto materials. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. 3m Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectrometer with Optical Multichannel Detector; Espectrometro de ultravioleta de vacio de 3m provisto de sistema de deteccion optical multicanal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P; Peraza, C; Blanco, F; Campos, J

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of a normal incidence vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer, for the 300-2400 A spectral range. It is provided with a multichannel detection system. The monochromator is original design and it has been built at CIEMAT. It is equipped with a 3 m concave holographic grating with 2400 grooves/mm. The multichannel detector consists of a windowless double microchannel plate / phosphor screen image intensifier, coupled by fiber optic to a 1024 elements self-scanning linear photodiode array. The output from the array is digitized by a 12-bit analog to digital converter and stored in a computer, for its later analysis. The necessary software to store and display data has been developed. (Author) 18 refs.

  2. Study of the optical properties and the carbonaceous clusters in thermally-annealed CR-39 and Makrofol-E polymer-based solid-state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazaly, M.

    2012-01-01

    The induced modifications in the optical properties of CR-39 and Makrofol-E polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors were investigated after thermal annealing at a temperature of 200 .deg. C for different durations. The optical properties were studied using an UV-visible spectrophotometer. From the UV-visible spectra, the direct and the indirect optical band gaps, Urbach's energies, and the number of carbon atoms in a cluster were determined. The absorbance of CR-39 plastic detector was found to decrease with increasing annealing time while the absorbance of Makrofol-E decreased with increasing annealing time. The width of the tail of localized states in the band gap ΔE was evaluated with the Urbach method. The optical energy band gaps were obtained from the direct and the indirect allowed transitions in K-space. Both of the direct and the indirect band gaps of the annealed CR-39 detector decrease with increasing annealing time while in Makrofol-E, they decreased after an annealing time of 15 minute and then showed no remarkable changes for a prolonged annealing times. Urbach's energy decreased significantly for both CR-39 and Makrofol-E with increasing annealing time. The number of carbon atoms in a cluster increased in the CR-39 detector with increasing annealing time while it decreased with increasing annealing time for Makrofol-E. We may conclude that the CR-39 detector undergoes greater modifications than the Makrofol-E detector upon thermal annealing at 200 .deg. C. In conclusion, the induced modifications in the optical properties of CR-39 and Makrofol-E are correlated with the temperature and the duration of annealing.

  3. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Avino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable.

  4. Dose response of commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector, Al2O3:C for megavoltage photons and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dong Oh; Yoon, Myonggeun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang Yeob; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the dose response of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) to megavoltage photon and electron beams. A nanoDot™ dosemeter was used to measure the dose response of the OSLD. Photons of 6-15 MV and electrons of 9-20 MeV were delivered by a Varian 21iX machine (Varian Medical System, Inc. Milpitas, CA, USA). The energy dependency was dose was linear until 200 cGy. The superficial dose measurements revealed photon irradiation to have an angular dependency. The nanoDot™ dosemeter has potential use as an in vivo dosimetric tool that is independent of the energy, has dose linearity and a rapid response compared with normal in vivo dosimetric tools, such as thermoluminescence detectors. However, the OSLD must be treated very carefully due to the high angular dependency of the photon beam.

  5. Global Lightning Climatology from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Buechler, Dennis E.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) has been collecting observations of total lightning in the global tropics and subtropics (roughly 38 deg S - 38 deg N) since December 1997. A similar instrument, the Optical Transient Detector, operated from 1995-2000 on another low earth orbit satellite that also saw high latitudes. Lightning data from these instruments have been used to create gridded climatologies and time series of lightning flash rate. These include a 0.5 deg resolution global annual climatology, and lower resolution products describing the annual cycle and the diurnal cycle. These products are updated annually. Results from the update through 2013 will be shown at the conference. The gridded products are publicly available for download. Descriptions of how each product can be used will be discussed, including strengths, weaknesses, and caveats about the smoothing and sampling used in various products.

  6. Cryogenic Q-factor measurement of optical substrates for optimization of gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietzsche, S [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Nawrodt, R [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Zimmer, A [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Schnabel, R [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Universitaet Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Vodel, W [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Seidel, P [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Helmholtzweg 5, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Future generations of gravitational wave interferometers are likely to be operated at cryogenic temperatures because one of the sensitivity limiting factors of the present generation is the thermal noise of end mirrors and beam splitters that occurs in the optical substrates as well as in the dielectric coatings. A possible method for minimizing thermal noise is cooling to cryogenic temperatures, maximizing the mechanical quality factor Q, and maximizing the eigenfrequencies of the substrate. We present experimental details of a new cryogenic apparatus that is suitable for the measurement of the temperature-dependent Q-factor of reflective, transmissive as well as nano-structured grating optics down to 5 K. In particular, the SQUID-based and the optical interferometric approaches to the measurement of the amplitude of vibrating test bodies are compared and the method of ring-down recording is described.

  7. On the thermodynamics of biomolecule surface transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Stefania; Oliviero, Giulio; Maiolo, Daniele; Depero, Laura E; Colombo, Italo; Bergese, Paolo

    2012-06-01

    Biological surface science is receiving great and renewed attention owing the rising interest in applications of nanoscience and nanotechnology to biological systems, with horizons that range from nanomedicine and biomimetic photosynthesis to the unexpected effects of nanomaterials on health and environment. Biomolecule surface transformations are among the fundamental aspects of the field that remain elusive so far and urgently need to be understood to further the field. Our recent findings indicate that surface thermodynamics can give a substantial contribution toward this challenging goal. In the first part of the article, we show that biomolecule surface transformations can be framed by a general and simple thermodynamic model. Then, we explore its effectiveness by addressing some typical cases, including ligand-receptor surface binding, protein thin film machines, nanomechanical aspects of the biomolecule-nanoparticle interface and nanomechanical biosensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Polyvalent Display of Biomolecules on Live Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Zhao, Nan; Lai, Jinping; Coyne, James; Gaddes, Erin R; Wang, Yong

    2018-06-04

    Surface display of biomolecules on live cells offers new opportunities to treat human diseases and perform basic studies. Existing methods are primarily focused on monovalent functionalization, that is, the display of single biomolecules across the cell surface. Here we show that the surface of live cells can be functionalized to display polyvalent biomolecular structures through two-step reactions under physiological conditions. This polyvalent functionalization enables the cell surface to recognize the microenvironment one order of magnitude more effectively than with monovalent functionalization. Thus, polyvalent display of biomolecules on live cells holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Optical CT imaging of solid radiochromic dosimeters in mismatched refractive index solutions using a scanning laser and large area detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kurtis H; Battista, Jerry J; Jordan, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    The practical use of the PRESAGE® solid plastic dosimeter is limited by the inconvenience of immersing it in high-viscosity oils to achieve refractive index matching for optical computed tomography (CT) scanning. The oils are slow to mix and difficult to clean from surfaces, and the dosimeter rotation can generate dynamic Schlieren inhomogeneity patterns in the reference liquid, limiting the rotational and overall scan speed. Therefore, it would be beneficial if lower-viscosity, water-based solutions with slightly unmatched refractive index could be used instead. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of allowing mismatched conditions when using a scanning laser system with a large acceptance angle detector. A fiducial-based ray path measurement technique is combined with an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct images. A water based surrounding liquid with a low viscosity was selected for imaging PRESAGE® solid dosimeters. Liquid selection was optimized to achieve as high a refractive index as possible while avoiding rotation-induced Schlieren effects. This led to a refractive index mismatch of 6% between liquid and dosimeters. Optical CT scans were performed with a fan-beam scanning-laser optical CT system with a large area detector to capture most of the refracted rays. A fiducial marker placed on the wall of a cylindrical sample occludes a given light ray twice. With knowledge of the rotation angle and the radius of the cylindrical object, the actual internal path of each ray through the dosimeter can be calculated. Scans were performed with 1024 projections of 512 data samples each, and rays were rebinned to form 512 parallel-beam projections. Reconstructions were performed on a 512 × 512 grid using 100 iterations of the SIRT iterative CT algorithm. Proof of concept was demonstrated with a uniformly attenuating solution phantom. PRESAGE® dosimeters (11 cm diameter) were irradiated with Cobalt-60 irradiator to achieve

  10. Discrimination of optical coherent states using a photon number resolving detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittmann, C.; Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Leuchs, G.

    2010-01-01

    The discrimination of non-orthogonal quantum states with reduced or without errors is a fundamental task in quantum measurement theory. In this work, we investigate a quantum measurement strategy capable of discriminating two coherent states probabilistically with significantly smaller error...... probabilities than can be obtained using non-probabilistic state discrimination. We find that appropriate postselection of the measurement data of a photon number resolving detector can be used to discriminate two coherent states with small error probability. We compare our new receiver to an optimal...

  11. Evolved Minimal Frustration in Multifunctional Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röder, Konstantin; Wales, David J

    2018-05-25

    Protein folding is often viewed in terms of a funnelled potential or free energy landscape. A variety of experiments now indicate the existence of multifunnel landscapes, associated with multifunctional biomolecules. Here, we present evidence that these systems have evolved to exhibit the minimal number of funnels required to fulfil their cellular functions, suggesting an extension to the principle of minimum frustration. We find that minimal disruptive mutations result in additional funnels, and the associated structural ensembles become more diverse. The same trends are observed in an atomic cluster. These observations suggest guidelines for rational design of engineered multifunctional biomolecules.

  12. Microorganisms and biomolecules in space hard environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Microorganisms and biomolecules exposed to space vacuum and to different intensities of selected wavelengths of solar ultraviolet radiation is studied. The influence of these factors, applied singly or simultaneously, on the integrity of microbial systems and biomolecules is measured. Specifically, this experiment will study in Bacillus subtilis spores (1) disturbances in subsequent germination, outgrowth, and colony formation; (2) photochemical reactions of the DNA and protein in vivo and in vitro and their role in biological injury; and (3) the efficiency of repair processes in these events.

  13. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. ScintSim1: a new Monte Carlo simulation code for transport of optical photons in 2D arrays of scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Karbasi, Sareh; Zarrini-Monfared, Zinat; Zamani, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) arrays of thick segmented scintillators are of interest as X-ray detectors for both 2D and 3D image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Their detection process involves ionizing radiation energy deposition followed by production and transport of optical photons. Only a very limited number of optical Monte Carlo simulation models exist, which has limited the number of modeling studies that have considered both stages of the detection process. We present ScintSim1, an in-house optical Monte Carlo simulation code for 2D arrays of scintillation crystals, developed in the MATLAB programming environment. The code was rewritten and revised based on an existing program for single-element detectors, with the additional capability to model 2D arrays of elements with configurable dimensions, material, etc., The code generates and follows each optical photon history through the detector element (and, in case of cross-talk, the surrounding ones) until it reaches a configurable receptor, or is attenuated. The new model was verified by testing against relevant theoretically known behaviors or quantities and the results of a validated single-element model. For both sets of comparisons, the discrepancies in the calculated quantities were all <1%. The results validate the accuracy of the new code, which is a useful tool in scintillation detector optimization. (author)

  15. On Special Optical Modes and Thermal Issues in Advanced Gravitational Wave Interferometric Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinet Jean-Yves

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of present ground-based gravitational wave antennas is too low to detect many events per year. It has, therefore, been planned for years to build advanced detectors allowing actual astrophysical observations and investigations. In such advanced detectors, one major issue is to increase the laser power in order to reduce shot noise. However, this is useless if the thermal noise remains at the current level in the 100 Hz spectral region, where mirrors are the main contributors. Moreover, increasing the laser power gives rise to various spurious thermal effects in the same mirrors. The main goal of the present study is to discuss these issues versus the transverse structure of the readout beam, in order to allow comparison. A number of theoretical studies and experiments have been carried out, regarding thermal noise and thermal effects. We do not discuss experimental problems, but rather focus on some theoretical results in this context about arbitrary order Laguerre–Gauss beams, and other “exotic” beams.

  16. Low-Cost, Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Gas Detector Using Guided-Wave, Surface-Plasmon Resonance in Chemochromic Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.; Haberman, D.P.; Hishmeh, G.A.; Ciszek, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-cost, hydrogen-gas-leak detectors are needed for many hydrogen applications, such as hydrogen-fueled vehicles where several detectors may be required in different locations on each vehicle. A fiber-optic leak detector could be inherently safer than conventional detectors, because it would remove all detector electronics from the vicinity of potential leaks. It would also provide freedom from electromagnetic interference, a serious problem in fuel-cell-powered electric vehicles. This paper describes the design of a fiber-optic, surface-plasmon-resonance hydrogen detector, and efforts to make it more sensitive, selective, and durable. Chemochromic materials, such as tungsten oxide and certain Lanthanide hydrides, can reversibly react with hydrogen in air while exhibiting significant changes in their optical properties. Thin films of these materials applied to a sensor at the end of an optical fiber have been used to detect low concentrations of hydrogen gas in air. The coatings include a thin silver layer in which the surface plasmon is generated, a thin film of the chemochromic material, and a catalytic layer of palladium that facilitates the reaction with hydrogen. The film thickness is chosen to produce a guided-surface plasmon wave along the interface between the silver and the chemochromic material. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the reflected spectrum into a portion near the resonance and a portion away from the resonance, and directs these two portions to two separate photodiodes. The electronic ratio of these two signals cancels most of the fiber transmission noise and provides a stable hydrogen signal

  17. Fibre optics cabling design for LHC detectors upgrade using variable radiation induced attenuation model

    CERN Document Server

    Shoaie, Mohammad Amin; Machado, Simao; Ricci, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Foreseen upgrades over the next decades enable LHC to operate at a higher luminosity (HL-LHC). Accordingly, the optical links designed to transmit particle collision data need to be hardened against increased radiation level, allowing for a reliable communication. In this paper we study the fibre cabling design of a link between the transceiver optical front-end and the data control room. The radiation penalty calculation takes temperature drop down to ‒30°C into account. The proposed solution concatenates radiation-resistance and conventional fibres using multi-fibre interconnections. The end-to-end link loss during HL-LHC lifetime is estimated strictly less than 3.5 dB complying with predefined margin.

  18. Fiber-optic annular detector array for large depth of field photoacoustic macroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Bauer-Marschallinger

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a novel imaging system for large depth of field photoacoustic scanning macroscopy. Instead of commonly used piezoelectric transducers, fiber-optic based ultrasound detection is applied. The optical fibers are shaped into rings and mainly receive ultrasonic signals stemming from the ring symmetry axes. Four concentric fiber-optic rings with varying diameters are used in order to increase the image quality. Imaging artifacts, originating from the off-axis sensitivity of the rings, are reduced by coherence weighting. We discuss the working principle of the system and present experimental results on tissue mimicking phantoms. The lateral resolution is estimated to be below 200 μm at a depth of 1.5 cm and below 230 μm at a depth of 4.5 cm. The minimum detectable pressure is in the order of 3 Pa. The introduced method has the potential to provide larger imaging depths than acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy and an imaging resolution similar to that of photoacoustic computed tomography.

  19. Fiber-optic annular detector array for large depth of field photoacoustic macroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Höllinger, Astrid; Jakoby, Bernhard; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We report on a novel imaging system for large depth of field photoacoustic scanning macroscopy. Instead of commonly used piezoelectric transducers, fiber-optic based ultrasound detection is applied. The optical fibers are shaped into rings and mainly receive ultrasonic signals stemming from the ring symmetry axes. Four concentric fiber-optic rings with varying diameters are used in order to increase the image quality. Imaging artifacts, originating from the off-axis sensitivity of the rings, are reduced by coherence weighting. We discuss the working principle of the system and present experimental results on tissue mimicking phantoms. The lateral resolution is estimated to be below 200 μm at a depth of 1.5 cm and below 230 μm at a depth of 4.5 cm. The minimum detectable pressure is in the order of 3 Pa. The introduced method has the potential to provide larger imaging depths than acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy and an imaging resolution similar to that of photoacoustic computed tomography.

  20. A simulation of the optical attenuation of TPB coated light-guide detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B J P

    2013-01-01

    This note is provided as a supplementary section to accompany the paper [1] which has been included in these proceedings. It describes some simple simulations which were performed in order to understand the attenuation behaviors of acrylic light-guides operated in air and argon, which were characterized in [2]. Whilst these simulations are only at the level of sophistication of a toy model, they illustrate interesting non-exponential light attenuation effects and the differences between operating light-guide based detectors in argon and air environments. We investigate the effects of surface absorption, surface roughness and wavelength dependence, and use a model tuned on the light-guide attenuation curve measured in air to make a prediction of the light-guide attenuation curve in argon. This curve is compared with data from a liquid argon test stand, and an improvement over a simple exponential model is observed

  1. Nanofluidic technology for biomolecule applications: a critical review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napoli, M.; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Pennathur, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we present nanofluidic phenomena, particularly as they relate to applications involving analysis of biomolecules within nanofabricated devices. The relevant length scales and physical phenomena that govern biomolecule transport and manipulation within nanofabricated nanofluidic

  2. A Multidisciplinary, Open Access Platform for Research on Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürg Bähler

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available I am pleased to introduce Biomolecules, a new journal to report on all aspects of science that focuses on biologically derived substances, from small molecules to complex polymers. Some examples are lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, amino acids, nucleotides, peptides, RNA and polysaccharides, but this list is far from exhaustive. Research on biomolecules encompasses multiple fascinating questions. How are biomolecules synthesized and modified? What are their structures and interactions with other biomolecules? How do biomolecules function in biological processes, at the level of organelles, cells, organs, organisms, or even ecosystems? How do biomolecules affect either the organism that produces them or other organisms of the same or different species? How are biomolecules shaped by evolution, and how in turn do they affect cellular phenotypes? What is the systems-level contribution of biomolecules to biological function?

  3. A Multidisciplinary, Open Access Platform for Research on Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähler, Jürg

    2011-08-22

    I am pleased to introduce Biomolecules, a new journal to report on all aspects of science that focuses on biologically derived substances, from small molecules to complex polymers. Some examples are lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, amino acids, nucleotides, peptides, RNA and polysaccharides, but this list is far from exhaustive. Research on biomolecules encompasses multiple fascinating questions. How are biomolecules synthesized and modified? What are their structures and interactions with other biomolecules? How do biomolecules function in biological processes, at the level of organelles, cells, organs, organisms, or even ecosystems? How do biomolecules affect either the organism that produces them or other organisms of the same or different species? How are biomolecules shaped by evolution, and how in turn do they affect cellular phenotypes? What is the systems-level contribution of biomolecules to biological function? [...].

  4. Immobilizing Biomolecules Near the Diffraction Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsen, Esben; Petersen, Maria Teresa Neves; Gennaro, Ane Kold Di

    2009-01-01

    Our group has previously shown that biomolecules containing disulfide bridges in close proximity to aromatic residues can be immobilized, through covalent bonds, onto thiol derivatized surfaces upon UV excitation of the aromatic residue(s). We have also previously shown that our new technology ca...

  5. Tuneable graphene nanopores for single biomolecule detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Mohammed, Mahmood A; Hossain, Md Sharafat; Hossain, Faruque M; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-05-21

    Solid-state nanopores are promising candidates for next generation DNA and protein sequencing. However, once fabricated, such devices lack tuneability, which greatly restricts their biosensing capabilities. Here we propose a new class of solid-state graphene-based nanopore devices that exhibit a unique capability of self-tuneability, which is used to control their conductance, tuning it to levels comparable to the changes caused by the translocation of a single biomolecule, and hence, enabling high detection sensitivities. Our presented quantum simulation results suggest that the smallest amino acid, glycine, when present in water and in an aqueous saline solution can be detected with high sensitivity, up to a 90% change in conductance. Our results also suggest that passivating the device with nitrogen, making it an n-type device, greatly enhances its sensitivity, and makes it highly sensitive to not only the translocation of a single biomolecule, but more interestingly to intramolecular electrostatics within the biomolecule. Sensitive detection of the carboxyl group within the glycine molecule, which carries a charge equivalent to a single electron, is achieved with a conductance change that reaches as high as 99% when present in an aqueous saline solution. The presented findings suggest that tuneable graphene nanopores, with their capability of probing intramolecular electrostatics, could pave the way towards a new generation of single biomolecule detection devices.

  6. Biomolecule-Responsive Hydrogels in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifzadeh, Ghorbanali; Hosseinkhani, Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, namely, glucose-responsive hydrogels, protein-responsive hydrogels, and nucleic-acid-responsive hydrogels are highlighted. However, achieving the ultimate purpose of using biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in preclinical and clinical areas is still at the very early stage and calls for more novel designing concepts and advance ideas. On the way toward the real/clinical application of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels, plenty of factors should be extensively studied and examined under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. For example, biocompatibility, biointegration, and toxicity of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels should be carefully evaluated. From the living body's point of view, biocompatibility is seriously depended on the interactions at the tissue/polymer interface. These interactions are influenced by physical nature, chemical structure, surface properties, and degradation of the materials. In addition, the developments of advanced hydrogels with tunable biological and mechanical properties which cause no/low side effects are of great importance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as carriers for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Dynan, William S; Wicks, George; Serkiz, Steven

    2013-09-17

    The present invention includes compositions of porous-wall hollow glass microspheres and one or more biomolecules, wherein the one or more biomolecules are positioned within a void location within the hollow glass microsphere, and the use of such compositions for the diagnostic and/or therapeutic delivery of biomolecules.

  8. Plasma rotation measurement in small tokamaks using an optical spectrometer and a single photomultiplier as detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, J H F; Nascimento, I C; Kuznetov, Yu K; Tsypin, V S; Galvão, R M O; Tendler, M

    2007-04-01

    The method for plasma rotation measurement in the tokamak TCABR is reported in this article. During a discharge, an optical spectrometer is used to scan sequentially spectral lines of plasma impurities and spectral lines of a calibration lamp. Knowing the scanning velocity of the diffraction grating of the spectrometer with adequate precision, the Doppler shifts of impurity lines are determined. The photomultiplier output voltage signals are recorded with adequate sampling rate. With this method the residual poloidal and toroidal plasma rotation velocities were determined, assuming that they are the same as those of the impurity ions. The results show reasonable agreement with the neoclassical theory and with results from similar tokamaks.

  9. Modifications in the optical and thermal properties of a CR-39 polymeric detector induced by high doses of γ-radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, A. F.; Ibraheim, Mona H.; Nwara, Aya M.; Kandil, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    Effects of γ-radiation on the optical and thermal properties of a poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC), a form of CR-39, polymer have been investigated. CR-39 detectors were exposed to γ-rays at very high doses ranging from 5.0 × 105 to 3.0 × 106 Gy. The induced changes were analyzed using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) in absorbance mode, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The UV-visible spectra of the virgin and γ-irradiated CR-39 polymer detectors displayed a significant decreasing trend in their optical energy band gaps for indirect transitions, whereas for the direct ones showed a little change. This drop in the energy band gap with increasing dose is discussed on the basis of the gamma irradiation induced modifications in the CR-39 polymeric detector. The TGA thermograms show that the weight loss rate increased with increase in dose, which may be due to the disordered system via scission followed by crosslinking in the irradiated polymer detector. The TGA thermograms also indicated that the CR-39 detector decomposed in three/four stages for the virgin and irradiated samples. The activation energy for thermal decomposition was determined using a type of Arrhenius equation based on the TGA experimental results. These experimental results so obtained can be well used in radiation dosimetry.

  10. Liquid chromatography automatic system with optical activity laser detector and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajer, V.; Naranjo, S.; Fernandez, H.; Mora, W.; Cepero, T.; Arista, E.; Mesa, G.; Cossio, G.; Arreche, J.; Fonfria, C.; Rodriguez, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    A new liquid chromatographic system with polarimetric detection and a computer program allowing the output of chromatograms to a display on line and electronic data storing was designed, built and put to work. The chromatographic system includes the laser polarimetric detector, having a measuring interval of one second, the chromatographic columns, the continuous flux polarimeter tubes of 50 and 100 mm, the programs for data acquisition, processing and storing, and the technical know-how for its most efficiently application. Thirty minutes is all the time needed to obtain a chromatogram by this method which is reasonably shorter than the time required for any other known comparable technique, and offering, besides, lower operation cost. The combination of molecular exclusion liquid chromatography and laser polarimetric detection has turned into a carbohydrate separation and quantification system of basic importance for the evaluation of plants fluids of industrial interest (sugarcane, agave, vegetable extracts, etc.). It is described here the application of this system as an early or complementary indicator of leaf scald -disease that affects sugarcane plants-. Another application on algae extracts gave good results in the separation and identification of biologically active components. The introduction of this system in several research centers in Cuba and abroad has resulted in practical information for the industry. (Author)

  11. MODELING TIME DISPERSION DUE TO OPTICAL PATH LENGTH DIFFERENCES IN SCINTILLATION DETECTORS*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, W.W.; Choong, W.-S.; Derenzo, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the nature of the time dispersion in scintillation detectors caused by path length differences of the scintillation photons as they travel from their generation point to the photodetector. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we find that the initial portion of the distribution (which is the only portion that affects the timing resolution) can usually be modeled by an exponential decay. The peak amplitude and decay time depend both on the geometry of the crystal, the position within the crystal that the scintillation light originates from, and the surface finish. In a rectangular parallelpiped LSO crystal with 3 mm × 3 mm cross section and polished surfaces, the decay time ranges from 10 ps (for interactions 1 mm from the photodetector) up to 80 ps (for interactions 50 mm from the photodetector). Over that same range of distances, the peak amplitude ranges from 100% (defined as the peak amplitude for interactions 1 mm from the photodetector) down to 4% for interactions 50 mm from the photodetector. Higher values for the decay time are obtained for rough surfaces, but the exact value depends on the simulation details. Estimates for the decay time and peak amplitude can be made for different cross section sizes via simple scaling arguments. PMID:25729464

  12. Optically Immersed Bolometer IR Detectors Based on V2O5 Thin Films with Polyimide Thermal Impedance Control Layer for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumesh, M. A.; Thomas, Beno; Vijesh, T. V.; Mohan Rao, G.; Viswanathan, M.; Karanth, S. P.

    2018-01-01

    Optically immersed bolometer IR detectors were fabricated using electron beam evaporated vanadium oxide as the sensing material. Spin-coated polyimide was used as medium to optically immerse the sensing element to the flat surface of a hemispherical germanium lens. This optical immersion layer also serves as the thermal impedance control layer and decides the performance of the devices in terms of responsivity and noise parameters. The devices were packaged in suitable electro-optical packages and the detector parameters were studied in detail. Thermal time constant varies from 0.57 to 6.0 ms and responsivity from 75 to 757 V W-1 corresponding to polyimide thickness in the range 2 to 70 μm for a detector bias of 9 V in the wavelength region of 14-16 μm. Highest D* obtained was 1.2×108 cmHz1/2 W-1. Noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 20 mK was achieved for devices with polyimide thickness more than 32 μm. The figure of merit, NETD × τ product which describes trade-off between thermal time constant and sensitivity is also extensively studied for devices having different thickness of thermal impedance layers.

  13. Biomolecule delivery to engineer the cellular microenvironment for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Corey J; Kim, Jayoung; Green, Jordan J

    2014-07-01

    To realize the potential of regenerative medicine, controlling the delivery of biomolecules in the cellular microenvironment is important as these factors control cell fate. Controlled delivery for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine often requires bioengineered materials and cells capable of spatiotemporal modulation of biomolecule release and presentation. This review discusses biomolecule delivery from the outside of the cell inwards through the delivery of soluble and insoluble biomolecules as well as from the inside of the cell outwards through gene transfer. Ex vivo and in vivo therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as combination delivery of biomolecules, scaffolds, and cells. Various applications in regenerative medicine are highlighted including bone tissue engineering and wound healing.

  14. Optical CT imaging of solid radiochromic dosimeters in mismatched refractive index solutions using a scanning laser and large area detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekker, Kurtis H., E-mail: kdekker2@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Battista, Jerry J.; Jordan, Kevin J. [Departments of Medical Biophysics and Oncology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1, Canada and Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The practical use of the PRESAGE® solid plastic dosimeter is limited by the inconvenience of immersing it in high-viscosity oils to achieve refractive index matching for optical computed tomography (CT) scanning. The oils are slow to mix and difficult to clean from surfaces, and the dosimeter rotation can generate dynamic Schlieren inhomogeneity patterns in the reference liquid, limiting the rotational and overall scan speed. Therefore, it would be beneficial if lower-viscosity, water-based solutions with slightly unmatched refractive index could be used instead. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of allowing mismatched conditions when using a scanning laser system with a large acceptance angle detector. A fiducial-based ray path measurement technique is combined with an iterative CT reconstruction algorithm to reconstruct images. Methods: A water based surrounding liquid with a low viscosity was selected for imaging PRESAGE® solid dosimeters. Liquid selection was optimized to achieve as high a refractive index as possible while avoiding rotation-induced Schlieren effects. This led to a refractive index mismatch of 6% between liquid and dosimeters. Optical CT scans were performed with a fan-beam scanning-laser optical CT system with a large area detector to capture most of the refracted rays. A fiducial marker placed on the wall of a cylindrical sample occludes a given light ray twice. With knowledge of the rotation angle and the radius of the cylindrical object, the actual internal path of each ray through the dosimeter can be calculated. Scans were performed with 1024 projections of 512 data samples each, and rays were rebinned to form 512 parallel-beam projections. Reconstructions were performed on a 512 × 512 grid using 100 iterations of the SIRT iterative CT algorithm. Proof of concept was demonstrated with a uniformly attenuating solution phantom. PRESAGE® dosimeters (11 cm diameter) were irradiated with Cobalt-60

  15. A microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Hoiby, Poul E.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers.......We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers....

  16. Monitoring the synthesis of biomolecules using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Masaru; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-10-28

    The controlled and selective synthesis/clearance of biomolecules is critical for most cellular processes. In most high-throughput 'omics' studies, we measure the static quantities of only one class of biomolecules (e.g. DNA, mRNA, proteins or metabolites). It is, however, important to recognize that biological systems are highly dynamic in which biomolecules are continuously renewed and different classes of biomolecules interact and affect each other's production/clearance. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the turnover of diverse classes of biomolecules to understand the dynamic nature of biological systems. Herein, we explain why the kinetic analysis of a diverse range of biomolecules is important and how such an analysis can be done. We argue that heavy water ((2)H2O) could be a universal tracer for monitoring the synthesis of biomolecules on a global scale.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Natural Antioxidants: Fascinating or Mythical Biomolecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Van Staden

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the use, properties, characteristics and sources of antioxidants especially phenolic compounds, flavonoids, vitamins, synthetic chemicals and some micronutrients began in the late 18th century. Since then antioxidant research has received considerable attention and over a hundred thousand papers have been published on the subject. This has led to a rampant use of antioxidants in order to try to obtain and preserve optimal health. A number of nutraceuticals and food supplements are frequently fortified with synthetic or natural antioxidants. However, some research outcomes have led to the belief that antioxidants exist as mythical biomolecules. This review provides a critical evaluation of some common in vitro antioxidant capacity methods, and a discussion on the role and controversies surrounding non-enzymatic biomolecules, in particular phenolic compounds and non-phenolic compounds, in oxidative processes in an attempt of stemming the tidal wave that is threatening to swamp the concept of natural antioxidants.

  18. Design study of the precision optical calibration module for the PINGU detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenkamp, Joost; Krings, Kai [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department, Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade (PINGU) will measure atmospheric neutrinos with a threshold of a few GeV. The primary goal for this extension is to determine the Neutrino mass hierarchy. A new level of precision is needed in order to reach this. The calibration of the DOM's is an important aspect in raising the precision to the needed level. A better calibration system will enable a better understanding of the ice and will therefore significantly reduce systematic effects. We present the Precision Optical Calibration Module (POCAM). By keeping the outer topology identical to that of the DOM, cost effective construction and deployment is ensured. The design of the POCAM is based on the principle of the integrating sphere. An appropriately placed LED in combination with a diffusive layer on the inside of the sphere results in an isotropic light emission from the apertures in the spherical housing. The output of the LED is controllable and known to high precision, it therefore ensures control over the output from the apertures. We report on the first investigations.

  19. A fully integrated optical detector with a-Si:H based color photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watty, Krystian; Merfort, Christian; Seibel, Konstantin; Schoeler, Lars; Boehm, Markus [Institute for Microsystem Technologies (IMT), University of Siegen, Hoelderlinstr. 3, 57076 Siegen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The fabrication of an electrophoresis separation microchip with monolithic integrated excitation light source and variospectral photodiodes for absorption detection is presented in this paper. Microchip based separation techniques are essential elements in the development of fully integrated micro-total analysis systems ({mu}-TAS). An integrated microfluidic device, like an application specific lab-on-microchip (ALM) (Seibel et al., in: MRS Spring Meeting, San Francisco, USA, 2005 1), includes all components, necessary to perform a chemical analysis on chip and it can be used as a stand-alone unit directly at the point of sampling. Variospectral diodes based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) technology allow for advanced optical detection schemes, because the spectral sensitivity of the devices can be tailored to fit the emission of specific fluorescent markers. Important features of a-Si:H variospectral photodiodes are a high dynamic range, a bias-tunable spectral sensitivity and a very good linearity for the separation of mixed color signals. Principle of ALM device. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. ALDF Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from in Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions and solutions for the plane (i.e.. no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated data sets and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data on the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA's Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging System (LIS). We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated data sets and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 degrees.

  1. WE-DE-201-07: Measurement of Real-Time Dose for Tandem and Ovoid Brachytherapy Procedures Using a High Precision Optical Fiber Radiation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belley, MD [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Current Address Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States); Faught, A; Subashi, E; Chino, JP; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Moore, B; Langloss, B; Therien, MJ [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Yoshizumi, TT [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Development of a novel on-line dosimetry tool is needed to move toward patient-specific quality assurance measurements for Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy to verify accurate dose delivery to the intended location. This work describes the development and use of a nano-crystalline yttrium oxide inorganic scintillator based optical-fiber detector capable of acquiring real-time high-precision dose measurements during tandem and ovoid (T&O) gynecological (GYN) applicator Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy procedures. Methods: An optical-fiber detector was calibrated by acquiring light output measurements in liquid water at 3, 5, 7, and 9cm radial source-detector-distances from an Ir-192 HDR source. A regression model was fit to the data to describe the relative light output per unit dose (TG-43 derived) as a function of source-detector-distance. Next, the optical-fiber detector was attached to a vaginal balloon fixed to a Varian Fletcher-Suit-Delclos-style applicator (to mimic clinical setup), and localized by acquiring high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images. To compare the physical point dose to the TPS calculated values (TG-43 and Acuros-BV), a phantom measurement was performed, by submerging the T&O applicator in a liquid water bath and delivering a treatment template representative of a clinical T&O procedure. The fiber detector collected scintillation signal as a function of time, and the calibration data was applied to calculate both real-time dose rate, and cumulative dose. Results: Fiber cumulative dose values were 100.0cGy, 94.3cGy, and 348.9cGy from the tandem, left ovoid, and right ovoid dwells, respectively (total of 443.2cGy). A plot of real time dose rate during the treatment was also acquired. The TPS values at the fiber location were 458.4cGy using TG-43, and 437.6cGy using Acuros-BV calculated as Dm,m (per TG-186). Conclusion: The fiber measured dose value agreement was 3% vs TG-43 and −1% vs Acuros-BV. This fiber detector opens up new possibilities

  2. Effect of neutron irradiation on etching, optical and structural properties of microscopic glass slide used as a solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Surinder; Kaur Sandhu, Amanpreet; Prasher, Sangeeta; Prakash Pandey, Om

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic glass slides are soda-lime glasses which are readily available and are easy to manufacture with low production cost. The application of these glasses as nuclear track detector will help us to make use of these glasses as solid-state nuclear track detector. The present paper describes the variation in the etching, optical and structural properties of the soda-lime microscopic glass slides due to neutron irradiation of different fluences. The color transformation and an increase in the optical absorption with neutron irradiation are observed. Both the bulk and track etch rates are found to increase with neutron fluence, thus showing a similar dependence on neutron fluence, but the sensitivity remains almost constant

  3. Study of gamma irradiation effects on the etching and optical properties of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector and its application to uranium assay in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amol Mhatre; Kalsi, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The gamma irradiation effects in the dose range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad on the etching and optical characteristics of CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) have been studied by using etching and UV-Visible spectroscopic techniques. From the measured bulk etch rates at different temperatures, the activation energies for bulk etching at different doses have also been determined. It is seen that the bulk etch rates increase and the activation energies for bulk etching decrease with the increase in gamma dose. The optical band gaps of the unirradiated and the gamma -irradiated detectors determined from the UV-Visible spectra were found to decrease with the increase in gamma dose. These results have been explained on the basis of scission of the detector due to gamma irradiation. The present studies can be used for the estimation of gamma dose in the range of 2.5-43.0 Mrad and can also be used for estimating track registration efficiency in the presence of gamma dose. The CR-39 detector has also been applied for the assay of uranium in some soil samples of Jammu city. (author)

  4. Nanocoating for biomolecule delivery using layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, M; Jiang, X Y; Yamane, M; Lee, M; Goodman, S; Yang, F

    2015-11-07

    Since its introduction in the early 1990s, layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of films has been widely used in the fields of nanoelectronics, optics, sensors, surface coatings, and controlled drug delivery. The growth of this industry is propelled by the ease of film manufacture, low cost, mild assembly conditions, precise control of coating thickness, and versatility of coating materials. Despite the wealth of research on LbL for biomolecule delivery, clinical translation has been limited and slow. This review provides an overview of methods and mechanisms of loading biomolecules within LbL films and achieving controlled release. In particular, this review highlights recent advances in the development of LbL coatings for the delivery of different types of biomolecules including proteins, polypeptides, DNA, particles and viruses. To address the need for co-delivery of multiple types of biomolecules at different timing, we also review recent advances in incorporating compartmentalization into LbL assembly. Existing obstacles to clinical translation of LbL technologies and enabling technologies for future directions are also discussed.

  5. High sensitivity detection of desorbed biomolecules by photoionization with tunable VUV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.F.; Calaway, W.F.; Veryovkin, I.V.; Pellin, M.J.; Lewellen, J.W.; Li, Y.; Milton, S.V.; King, B.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The spectral region from 7 to 11eV has two attributes that make it attractive for biomolecule photoionization: 1. high photoionization cross sections, leading to high detection efficiency, and 2. overlap with nearly all first ionization energies of biomolecules, allowing possible control over fragmentation by accessing different final states via tuning. The lack of available tunable lasers in this energy range has generally hindered exploitation of these features thus far. A free-electron laser in operation at Argonne National Laboratory provides high pulse energy, widely tunable VUV pulses of 300 fs duration. Coupled with a novel time-of-flight mass spectrometer, this laser is able to photoionize and detect biomolecules, including peptides and nucleosides. Either laser desorption or primary ion beams are used to desorb sample material, followed by photoionization with a VUV laser. The instrument uses novel ion optics to extract photoions from a large volume while maintaining high mass resolution. This approach is capable of yielding dramatically improved detection limits over more conventional methods such as MALDI and SIMS. In the case of the common peptide substance P, for example, a substantial improvement over the MALDI signal was observed using VUV photoionization with very little observed fragmentation of the molecule. Nucleosides and cisplatin were also measured with typically order of magnitude improvements in signal. These and other examples show clearly the benefits that can be obtained in high sensitivity mass spectrometry of biomolecules with the increasing availability of VUV laser sources

  6. Growth and characterization of materials for infrared detectors and nonlinear optical switches; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 2, 3, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longshore, Randolph E.; Baars, Jan W.

    Papers included in these proceedings are grouped under the topics of infrared material growth and characterization, infrared detector physics, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to interface demarcation in Bridgman-Stockbarger crystal growth of II-VI compounds, growth of CdTe-CdMnTe heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy, and a photoconductivity decay method for determining the minority carrier lifetime of p-type HgCdTe. Consideration is also given to anodic oxides on HgZnTe, the characterization of anodic fluoride films on Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, optical response in high-temperature superconducting thin films, and pyroelectric linear array IR detectors with CCD multiplexer. Other papers are on structural and optical properties of melt-processed calcium aluminate fibers, the preparation and characterization of a new thermistor material for thermistor bolometer, and photoemission from quantum-confined structure of nonlinear optical materials. (For individual items see A93-26893 to A93-26895)

  7. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Dexing; Desai, Amit V.; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Reichert, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. Methods: The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both 64 Cu and 68 Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Results: Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with 64 Cu/ 68 Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. Conclusions: A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions.

  8. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D; Kenis, Paul J A; Reichert, David E

    2013-01-01

    A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both ⁶⁴Cu and ⁶⁸Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with ⁶⁴Cu/⁶⁸Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins. PMID:20887859

  10. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (...

  11. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  12. Reaction between protein radicals and other biomolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østdal, H.; Davies, M.J.; Andersen, Henrik Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates the reactivity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) radicals towards different biomolecules (urate, linoleic acid, and a polypeptide, poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr)). The BSA radical was formed at room temperature through a direct protein-to-protein radical transfer from H(2)O(2....... Subsequent analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of urate upon reaction with the BSA radical, while the BSA radical in the presence of poly(Glu-Ala-Tyr) resulted in increased formation of the characteristic protein oxidation product, dityrosine. Reaction between the BSA radical and a linoleic acid...

  13. Two possible improvements for mass spectrometry analysis of intact biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznikov, Valeriy V; Zelenov, Vladislav V; Aparina, Elena V; Pikhtelev, Alexander R; Sulimenkov, Ilia V; Raznikova, Marina O

    2017-08-01

    The goals of our study were to investigate abilities of two approaches to eliminate possible errors in electrospray mass spectrometry measurements of biomolecules. Passing of a relatively dense supersonic gas jet through ionization region followed by its hitting the spray of the analyzed solution in low vacuum may be effective to keep an initial biomolecule structure in solution. Provided that retention of charge carriers for some sites in the biomolecule cannot be changed noticeably in electrospray ion source, decomposition and separation of charge-state distributions of electrosprayed ions may give additional information about native structure of biomolecules in solution.

  14. Frontier detectors for frontier physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervelli, F.; Scribano, A.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named meeting. These concern developments of radiation detectors and counting techniques in high energy physics. Especially considered are tracking detectors, calorimeters, time projection chambers, detectors for rare events, solid state detectors, particle identification, and optical readout systems. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  15. GPU-based optical propagation simulator of a laser-processed crystal block for the X'tal cube PET detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuma; Ohnishi, Takashi; Moriya, Takahiro; Inadama, Naoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The X'tal cube is a next-generation DOI detector for PET that we are developing to offer higher resolution and higher sensitivity than is available with present detectors. It is constructed from a cubic monolithic scintillation crystal and silicon photomultipliers which are coupled on various positions of the six surfaces of the cube. A laser-processing technique is applied to produce 3D optical boundaries composed of micro-cracks inside the monolithic scintillator crystal. The current configuration is based on an empirical trial of a laser-processed boundary. There is room to improve the spatial resolution by optimizing the setting of the laser-processed boundary. In fact, the laser-processing technique has high freedom in setting the parameters of the boundary such as size, pitch, and angle. Computer simulation can effectively optimize such parameters. In this study, to design optical characteristics properly for the laser-processed crystal, we developed a Monte Carlo simulator which can model arbitrary arrangements of laser-processed optical boundaries (LPBs). The optical characteristics of the LPBs were measured by use of a setup with a laser and a photo-diode, and then modeled in the simulator. The accuracy of the simulator was confirmed by comparison of position histograms obtained from the simulation and from experiments with a prototype detector composed of a cubic LYSO monolithic crystal with 6 × 6 × 6 segments and multi-pixel photon counters. Furthermore, the simulator was accelerated by parallel computing with general-purpose computing on a graphics processing unit. The calculation speed was about 400 times faster than that with a CPU.

  16. Microstructure, electrical, and optical properties of evaporated PtSi/p-Si(100) Schottky barriers as high quantum efficient infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jihhuah; Chang Rongsen; Horng Gwoji

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the microstructure and the electrical and optical properties on the formation at highly efficient infrared PtSi Schottky barrier detectors (SBD) have been studied in detail. Two- to twelve-nanometer-thick PtSi films were grown by evaporation at temperature ranging from 350 to 550 deg. C. The electron diffraction patterns indicate the existence of both the (11-bar0) and (12-bar1) orientations when PtSi films formed at 350 deg. C. However, the diffraction patterns show only the (12-bar1) orientation when the PtSi films are formed at 450 deg. C or above. The electrical barrier height of the Schottky barrier detector that formed at 350 deg. C was about 20 meV higher than that formed at 450 deg. C or above. The grain size and the film thickness had a negligible effect on the electrical barrier height. However, the optical performance was strongly dependent on the film thickness and the growth conditions. The 350 deg. C PtSi film showed increased quantum efficiency as the film thickness decreased. The optimal thickness that provided the highest responsivity was 2 nm. On the other hand, the optimal thickness shifted to 8 nm for PtSi film formed at 450 deg. C or above. These results indicate that the quantum efficiency of a detector can be improved if the PtSi film has an orientation at (12-bar1), a larger grain size, and an optimal film thickness

  17. Efficient optimization of electrostatic interactions between biomolecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, J. P.; Altman, M. D.; White, J. K.; Tidor, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; MIT

    2007-01-01

    We present a PDE-constrained approach to optimizing the electrostatic interactions between two biomolecules. These interactions play important roles in the determination of binding affinity and specificity, and are therefore of significant interest when designing a ligand molecule to bind tightly to a receptor. Using a popular continuum model and physically reasonable assumptions, the electrostatic component of the binding free energy is a convex, quadratic function of the ligand charge distribution. Traditional optimization methods require exhaustive pre-computation, and the expense has precluded a full exploration of the promise of electrostatic optimization in biomolecule analysis and design. In this paper we describe an approach in which the electrostatic simulations and optimization problem are solved simultaneously; unlike many PDE- constrained optimization frameworks, the proposed method does not incorporate the PDE as a set of equality constraints. This co-optimization approach can be used by itself to solve unconstrained problems or those with linear equality constraints, or in conjunction with primal-dual interior point methods to solve problems with inequality constraints. Model problems demonstrate that the co-optimization method is computationally efficient and can be used to solve realistic problems.

  18. Thermally modulated biomolecule transport through nanoconfined channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a nanofluidic device containing both a feed cell and a permeation cell linked by nanopore arrays has been fabricated, which is employed to investigate thermally controlled biomolecular transporting properties through confined nanochannels. The ionic currents modulated by the translocations of goat antibody to human immunoglobulin G (IgG) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) are recorded and analyzed. The results suggest that the modulation effect decreases with the electrolyte concentration increasing, while the effects generated by IgG translocation are more significant than that generated by BSA translocation. More importantly, there is a maximum decreasing value in each modulated current curve with biomolecule concentration increasing for thermally induced intermolecular collision. Furthermore, the turning point for the maximum shifts to lower biomolecule concentrations with the system temperature rising (from 4°C to 45°C), and it is mainly determined by the temperature in the feed cell if the temperature difference exists in the two separated cells. These findings are expected to be valuable for the future design of novel sensing device based on nanopore and/or nanopore arrays.

  19. SPM for functional identification of individual biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Robert; Schwesinger, Falk; Padeste, Celestino; Plueckthun, Andreas; Anselmetti, Dario; Guentherodt, Hans-Joachim; Tiefenauer, Louis

    1999-06-01

    The identification of specific binding molecules is of increasing interest in the context of drug development based on combinatorial libraries. Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is the method of choice to image and probe individual biomolecules on a surface. Functional identification of biomolecules is a first step towards screening on a single molecule level. As a model system we use recombinant single- chain Fv fragment (scFv) antibody molecules directed against the antigen fluorescein. The scFv's are covalently immobilized on a flat gold surface via the C-terminal cysteine, resulting in a high accessibility of the binding site. The antigen is immobilized covalently via a long hydrophilic spacer to the silicon nitride SPM-tip. This arrangement allows a direct measurement of binding forces. Thus, closely related antibody molecules differing in only one amino acid at their binding site could be distinguished. A novel SPM-software has been developed which combines imaging, force spectroscopic modes, and online analysis. This is a major prerequisite for future screening methods.

  20. Studies of metal-biomolecule systems in liquids with beta-detected NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Michal

    2017-01-01

    My internship took place within a small research team funded via the European Research Council (ERC Starting Grant: Beta-Drop NMR) at ISOLDE. It was devoted to laser spin-polarization and beta-detected NMR techniques and their future applications in chemistry and biology. I was involved in the design and tests of the beta-NMR spectrometer which will be used in the upcoming experiments. In this way I have been exposed to many topics in physics (atomic and nuclear physics), experimental techniques (vacuum technology, lasers, beta detectors, electronics, DAQ software), as well as chemistry and biology (NMR on metal ions, metal ion binding to biomolecules, quantum chemistry calculations).

  1. Fiber optically coupled radioluminescence detectors: A short review of key strengths and weaknesses of BCF-60 and Al2O3:C scintillating-material based systems in radiotherapy dosimetry applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buranurak, Siritorn; Andersen, Claus E.

    2017-01-01

    the years, developments and research of the fiber detector systems have undergone in several groups worldwide. In this article, the in-house developed fiber detector systems based on two luminescence phosphors of (i) BCF-60 polystyrene-based organic plastic scintillator and (ii) carbon-doped aluminum oxide...... in the new hybrid MRI LINAC/cobalt systems, and (iii) in vivo measurements due to safety-issues related to the high operating voltage. Fiber optically coupled luminescence detectors provide a promising supplement to ionization chambers by offering the capability of real-time in vivo dose monitoring with high...... time resolution. In particular, the all-optical nature of these detectors is an advantage for in vivo measurements due to the absence of high voltage supply or electrical wire that could cause harm to the patient or disturb the treatment. Basically, fiber-coupled luminescence detector systems function...

  2. Shaped detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detector or detector array which has a non-constant spatial response, is disclosed individually and in combination with a tomographic scanner. The detector has a first dimension which is oriented parallel to the plane of the scan circle in the scanner. Along the first dimension, the detector is most responsive to radiation received along a centered segment of the dimension and less responsive to radiation received along edge segments. This non-constant spatial response can be achieved in a detector comprised of a scintillation crystal and a photoelectric transducer. The scintillation crystal in one embodiment is composed of three crystals arranged in layers, with the center crystal having the greatest light conversion efficiency. In another embodiment, the crystal is covered with a reflective substance around the center segment and a less reflective substance around the remainder. In another embodiment, an optical coupling which transmits light from adjacent the center segment with the greatest intensity couples the scintillation crystal and the photoelectric transducer. In yet another embodiment, the photoelectric transducer comprises three photodiodes, one receiving light produced adjacent the central segment and the other two receiving light produced adjacent the edge segments. The outputs of the three photodiodes are combined with a differential amplifier

  3. Possibility of single biomolecule imaging with coherent amplification of weak scattering x-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2008-10-01

    The number of photons produced by coherent x-ray scattering from a single biomolecule is very small because of its extremely small elastic-scattering cross section and low damage threshold. Even with a high x-ray flux of 3 x 10;{12} photons per 100-nm -diameter spot and an ultrashort pulse of 10 fs driven by a future x-ray free electron laser (x-ray FEL), it has been predicted that only a few 100 photons will be produced from the scattering of a single lysozyme molecule. In observations of scattered x rays on a detector, the transfer of energy from wave to matter is accompanied by the quantization of the photon energy. Unfortunately, x rays have a high photon energy of 12 keV at wavelengths of 1A , which is required for atomic resolution imaging. Therefore, the number of photoionization events is small, which limits the resolution of imaging of a single biomolecule. In this paper, I propose a method: instead of directly observing the photons scattered from the sample, we amplify the scattered waves by superimposing an intense coherent reference pump wave on it and record the resulting interference pattern on a planar x-ray detector. Using a nanosized gold particle as a reference pump wave source, we can collect 10;{4}-10;{5} photons in single shot imaging where the signal from a single biomolecule is amplified and recorded as two-dimensional diffraction intensity data. An iterative phase retrieval technique can be used to recover the phase information and reconstruct the image of the single biomolecule and the gold particle at the same time. In order to precisely reconstruct a faint image of the single biomolecule in Angstrom resolution, whose intensity is much lower than that of the bright gold particle, I propose a technique that combines iterative phase retrieval on the reference pump wave and the digital Fourier transform holography on the sample. By using a large number of holography data, the three-dimensional electron density map can be assembled.

  4. 123I and 13I purification for biomolecules labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catanoso, Marcela Forli

    2011-01-01

    The 123 I and 131 I are iodine radioisotopes widely used in Nuclear Medicine. The radioisotope 123 I is used in diagnosis through the SPECT technique and is routinely produced at IPEN in cyclotron through the reaction: '1 24 Xe (p, 2n) '1 23 Cs -> 123 Xe -> 123 I. The radioisotope 131 I is used both in diagnosis and therapy due to its physical characteristics of decay by β - and its γ-ray emissions that are softened with the use of specific collimators for diagnosis. It is routinely produced at IPEN using the nuclear reactor through the indirect reaction: 130 Te (n, γ) -> 131 Te -> 131 I, irradiating compounds containing Te. The radiopharmaceuticals prepared with these radioisotopes go through rigorous quality control tests and the chemical purity of the primary radioisotopes 123 I and 131 I are within the permissible limits currently defined. However, the presence of some chemical contaminants can prejudice the biomolecules labeling (monoclonal antibodies and peptides), that will produce radiopharmaceuticals of first generation to the oncology area. The aim of this work was to obtain a new purification method of these radioisotopes, allowing the labeling of biomolecules and also to established a process control on those radioisotopes. The methodology was separated on 3 steps: Evaluation of '1 23 I e 131 I radionuclidic purity using a hyper pure germanium detector, chemical purity using ICP-OES and the retention and elution study of 131 I in several absorbers to choose the most appropriate for the purification tests analyzing the behavior of the possible contaminants. The radionuclidic analyses showed the presence of Te and Co on 131 I samples and Te, Tc e Co on 123 I samples. The chemical purity analyses showed the presence of Al and Mo in 123 I, coming from the window material of the target holder and the presence of Al and Te in 131 I samples, coming from the target holder and the target, respectively. The retention and elution study selected the most

  5. MO-A-BRD-01: An Investigation of the Dynamic Response of a Novel Acousto-Optic Liquid Crystal Detector for Full-Field Transmission Ultrasound Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfield, J.R.; La Riviere, P.J.; Sandhu, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the dynamic response of a novel acousto-optic (AO) liquid crystal detector for high-resolution transmission ultrasound breast imaging. Transient and steady-state lesion contrast were investigated to identify optimal transducer settings for our prototype imaging system consistent with the FDA limits of 1 W/cm 2 and 50 J/cm 2 on the incident acoustic intensity and the transmitted acoustic energy flux density. Methods: We have developed a full-field transmission ultrasound breast imaging system that uses monochromatic plane-wave illumination to acquire projection images of the compressed breast. The acoustic intensity transmitted through the breast is converted into a visual image by a proprietary liquid crystal detector operating on the basis of the AO effect. The dynamic response of the AO detector in the absence of an imaged breast was recorded by a CCD camera as a function of the acoustic field intensity and the detector exposure time. Additionally, a stereotactic needle biopsy breast phantom was used to investigate the change in opaque lesion contrast with increasing exposure time for a range of incident acoustic field intensities. Results: Using transducer voltages between 0.3 V and 0.8 V and exposure times of 3 minutes, a unique one-to-one mapping of incident acoustic intensity to steady-state optical brightness in the AO detector was observed. A transfer curve mapping acoustic intensity to steady-state optical brightness shows a high-contrast region analogous to the linear portion of the Hurter-Driffield curves of radiography. Using transducer voltages between 1 V and 1.75 V and exposure times of 90 s, the lesion contrast study demonstrated increasing lesion contrast with increasing breast exposure time and acoustic field intensity. Lesion-to-background contrast on the order of 0.80 was observed. Conclusion: Maximal lesion contrast in our prototype system can be obtained using the highest acoustic field intensity and the longest breast

  6. Synthesizing biomolecule-based Boolean logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2013-02-15

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, and hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications.

  7. Synthesizing Biomolecule-based Boolean Logic Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Takafumi; Razavi, Shiva; DeRose, Robert; Inoue, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    One fascinating recent avenue of study in the field of synthetic biology is the creation of biomolecule-based computers. The main components of a computing device consist of an arithmetic logic unit, the control unit, memory, and the input and output devices. Boolean logic gates are at the core of the operational machinery of these parts, hence to make biocomputers a reality, biomolecular logic gates become a necessity. Indeed, with the advent of more sophisticated biological tools, both nucleic acid- and protein-based logic systems have been generated. These devices function in the context of either test tubes or living cells and yield highly specific outputs given a set of inputs. In this review, we discuss various types of biomolecular logic gates that have been synthesized, with particular emphasis on recent developments that promise increased complexity of logic gate circuitry, improved computational speed, and potential clinical applications. PMID:23526588

  8. Optical sensing system based on wireless paired emitter detector diode device and ionogels for lab-on-a-disc water quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czugala, Monika; Gorkin, Robert; Phelan, Thomas; Gaughran, Jennifer; Curto, Vincenzo Fabio; Ducrée, Jens; Diamond, Dermot; Benito-Lopez, Fernando

    2012-12-07

    This work describes the first use of a wireless paired emitter detector diode device (PEDD) as an optical sensor for water quality monitoring in a lab-on-a-disc device. The microfluidic platform, based on an ionogel sensing area combined with a low-cost optical sensor, is applied for quantitative pH and qualitative turbidity monitoring of water samples at point-of-need. The autonomous capabilities of the PEDD system, combined with the portability and wireless communication of the full device, provide the flexibility needed for on-site water testing. Water samples from local fresh and brackish sources were successfully analysed using the device, showing very good correlation with standard bench-top systems.

  9. Re-evaluation of differential phase contrast (DPC) in a scanning laser microscope using a split detector as an alternative to differential interference contrast (DIC) optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, W B; Reichelt, S; Cattermole, D M; Laufer, J

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, differential phase imaging (DPC) with transmitted light is implemented by adding a suitable detection system to a standard commercially available scanning confocal microscope. DPC, a long-established method in scanning optical microscopy, depends on detecting the intensity difference between opposite halves or quadrants of a split photodiode detector placed in an aperture plane. Here, DPC is compared with scanned differential interference contrast (DIC) using a variety of biological specimens and objective lenses of high numerical aperture. While DPC and DIC images are generally similar, DPC seems to have a greater depth of field. DPC has several advantages over DIC. These include low cost (no polarizing or strain-free optics are required), absence of a double scanning spot, electronically variable direction of shading and the ability to image specimens in plastic dishes where birefringence prevents the use of DIC. DPC is also here found to need 20 times less laser power at the specimen than DIC.

  10. Graphene-edge dielectrophoretic tweezers for trapping of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Avijit; Zhang, Yao; Grassi, Roberto; Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; Edel, Joshua B; Low, Tony; Koester, Steven J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2017-11-30

    The many unique properties of graphene, such as the tunable optical, electrical, and plasmonic response make it ideally suited for applications such as biosensing. As with other surface-based biosensors, however, the performance is limited by the diffusive transport of target molecules to the surface. Here we show that atomically sharp edges of monolayer graphene can generate singular electrical field gradients for trapping biomolecules via dielectrophoresis. Graphene-edge dielectrophoresis pushes the physical limit of gradient-force-based trapping by creating atomically sharp tweezers. We have fabricated locally backgated devices with an 8-nm-thick HfO 2 dielectric layer and chemical-vapor-deposited graphene to generate 10× higher gradient forces as compared to metal electrodes. We further demonstrate near-100% position-controlled particle trapping at voltages as low as 0.45 V with nanodiamonds, nanobeads, and DNA from bulk solution within seconds. This trapping scheme can be seamlessly integrated with sensors utilizing graphene as well as other two-dimensional materials.

  11. Elemental labelling combined with liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantification of biomolecules: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschy, Daniela; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Survey of bio-analytical approaches utilizing biomolecule labelling. ► Detailed discussion of methodology and chemistry of elemental labelling. ► Biomedical and bio-analytical applications of elemental labelling. ► FI-ICP-MS and LC–ICP-MS for quantification of elemental labelled biomolecules. ► Review of selected applications. - Abstract: This article reviews novel quantification concepts where elemental labelling is combined with flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS) or liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC–ICP-MS), and employed for quantification of biomolecules such as proteins, peptides and related molecules in challenging sample matrices. In the first sections an overview on general aspects of biomolecule quantification, as well as of labelling will be presented emphasizing the potential, which lies in such methodological approaches. In this context, ICP-MS as detector provides high sensitivity, selectivity and robustness in biological samples and offers the capability for multiplexing and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Fundamental methodology of elemental labelling will be highlighted and analytical, as well as biomedical applications will be presented. A special focus will lie on established applications underlining benefits and bottlenecks of such approaches for the implementation in real life analysis. Key research made in this field will be summarized and a perspective for future developments including sophisticated and innovative applications will given.

  12. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, J. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Sosnick, T. R. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Freed, K. F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); James Franck Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  13. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other

  14. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of a Single NV Nanodiamond Attached to an Individual Biomolecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeling-Smith, Richelle M; Jung, Young Woo; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Cardellino, Jeremy; Rampersaud, Isaac; North, Justin A; Šimon, Marek; Bhallamudi, Vidya P; Rampersaud, Arfaan; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Poirier, Michael G; Hammel, P Chris

    2016-05-10

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), an established and powerful methodology for studying atomic-scale biomolecular structure and dynamics, typically requires in excess of 10(12) labeled biomolecules. Single-molecule measurements provide improved insights into heterogeneous behaviors that can be masked in ensemble measurements and are often essential for illuminating the molecular mechanisms behind the function of a biomolecule. Here, we report EPR measurements of a single labeled biomolecule. We selectively label an individual double-stranded DNA molecule with a single nanodiamond containing nitrogen-vacancy centers, and optically detect the paramagnetic resonance of nitrogen-vacancy spins in the nanodiamond probe. Analysis of the spectrum reveals that the nanodiamond probe has complete rotational freedom and that the characteristic timescale for reorientation of the nanodiamond probe is slow compared with the transverse spin relaxation time. This demonstration of EPR spectroscopy of a single nanodiamond-labeled DNA provides the foundation for the development of single-molecule magnetic resonance studies of complex biomolecular systems. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Raman Microscopy: A Noninvasive Method to Visualize the Localizations of Biomolecules in the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Yuichi; Akiyama, Toshihiro; Segawa, Hiroki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2017-11-01

    In vivo and in situ visualization of biomolecules without pretreatment will be important for diagnosis and treatment of ocular disorders in the future. Recently, multiphoton microscopy, based on the nonlinear interactions between molecules and photons, has been applied to reveal the localizations of various molecules in tissues. We aimed to use multimodal multiphoton microscopy to visualize the localizations of specific biomolecules in rat corneas. Multiphoton images of the corneas were obtained from nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, third-order sum frequency generation, and second-harmonic generation. The localizations of the adhesion complex-containing basement membrane and Bowman layer were clearly visible in the third-order sum frequency generation images. The fine structure of type I collagen was observed in the corneal stroma in the second-harmonic generation images. The localizations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) was obtained in the coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images. Imaging technologies have progressed significantly and been applied in medical fields. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy are widely used but do not provide information on the molecular structure of the cornea. By contrast, multiphoton microscopy provides information on the molecular structure of living tissues. Using this technique, we successfully visualized the localizations of various biomolecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in the cornea. We speculate that multiphoton microscopy will provide essential information on the physiological and pathological conditions of the cornea, as well as molecular localizations in tissues without pretreatment.

  16. Effect of capping agents on optical and antibacterial properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    unique optical properties resulting from quantum con- finement ... them suitable in application such as biomedical label- ling,4 solar ... All optical measurements were carried out at ..... QDs with biomolecules and to use them as biosensors,.

  17. Interactions of heavy ions with biomolecules: a dynamical microscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fengshou; Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing; National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou

    2006-01-01

    The status of studying biology system therapy with X-rays, γ-rays, neutron, proton, and heavy ions is reviewed. The depth dose profile, called Bragg profile, makes heavy ion an ideal tool for radiotherapy. The physical process of therapy with heavy ions is analyzed and a 3-step interaction processes of heavy ions with biomolecules is proposed, that is, nuclear fragmentation in nuclear interaction, electron excitation in Coulomb interaction, and the biomolecules relaxation in surroundings, finally leads to a new structure of biomolecule. Since this physical process is the base of the following chemical process and biological process, a dynamical microscopic approach is strongly demanded to be built. (authors)

  18. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  19. Radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This sixth chapter presents the operational principles of the radiation detectors; detection using photographic emulsions; thermoluminescent detectors; gas detectors; scintillation detectors; liquid scintillation detectors; detectors using semiconductor materials; calibration of detectors; Bragg-Gray theory; measurement chain and uncertainties associated to measurements

  20. Computational simulation of biomolecules transport with multi-physics near microchannel surface for development of biomolecules-detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuma; Shimizu, Tetsuhide; Yang, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative evaluation of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics in nano/micro scale is demanded in order to optimize the design of microfluidics device for the biomolecules detection with high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis. This paper aimed to investigate the effectivity of the computational simulation using the numerical model of the biomolecules transport with multi-physics near a microchannel surface on the development of biomolecules-detection devices. The biomolecules transport with fluid drag force, electric double layer (EDL) force, and van der Waals force was modeled by Newtonian Equation of motion. The model validity was verified in the influence of ion strength and flow velocity on biomolecules distribution near the surface compared with experimental results of previous studies. The influence of acting forces on its distribution near the surface was investigated by the simulation. The trend of its distribution to ion strength and flow velocity was agreement with the experimental result by the combination of all acting forces. Furthermore, EDL force dominantly influenced its distribution near its surface compared with fluid drag force except for the case of high velocity and low ion strength. The knowledges from the simulation might be useful for the design of biomolecules-detection devices and the simulation can be expected to be applied on its development as the design tool for high detection sensitivity and rapid diagnosis in the future.

  1. Biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of silver bismuth sulfide with nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaowphong, Sulawan

    2012-01-01

    Silver bismuth sulfide (AgBiS 2 ) nanostructures were successfully prepared via a simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal synthesis at 200 °C for 12–72 h. Silver nitrate, bismuth nitrate and L-cysteine were used as starting materials. Here, the biomolecule, L-cysteine, was served as the sulfide source and a complexing agent. The products, characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were cubic AgBiS 2 nanoparticles with a diameter range of about 20–75 nm. It was found that their crystallinity and particle size increased with increasing reaction time. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometry (ICP-OES) analyses were used to confirm the stoichiometry of AgBiS 2 . The optical band gap of the AgBiS 2 nanoparticles, calculated from UV–vis spectra, was 3.0 eV which indicated a strong blue shift because of the quantum confinement effect. A possible formation mechanism of the AgBiS 2 nanoparticles was also discussed. - Graphical abstract: The optical band gap of the as-prepared AgBiS 2 nanoparticles displays a strong blue shift comparing to the 2.46 eV of bulk AgBiS 2 caused by the quantum confinement effects. Highlights: ► A simple biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method is developed to prepare AgBiS 2 . ► L-Cysteine is served as the sulfide source and a complexing agent. ► Increase in band gap of the AgBiS 2 nanoparticles attributes to the quantum confinement effects.

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  3. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  4. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian O; Ma, Peter X

    2010-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix) delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell–material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine. PMID:27877317

  5. Role of Carbamylated Biomolecules in Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Asim; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2018-04-01

    Carbamylation (or carbamoylation) is a non-enzymatic modification of biomolecules mediated by cyanate, a dissociation product of urea. Proteins are more sensitive to carbamylation. Two major sites of carbamylation reaction are: N α -amino moiety of a protein N-terminus and the N ɛ -amino moiety of proteins' lysine residues. In kidney diseases, urea accumulates and the burden of carbamylation increases. This may lead to alteration in the structure and function of many important proteins relevant in maintenance of homeostasis. Carbamylated proteins namely, carbamylated-haemoglobin and carbamylated-low density lipoprotein (LDL) have been implicated in hypoxia and atherosclerosis, respectively. Furthermore, carbamylation of insulin, oxytocin, and erythropoietin have caused changes in the action of these hormones vis-à-vis the metabolic pathways they control. In this short review, authors have compiled the data on role of carbamylated proteins, enzymes, hormones, LDL, and so on, in human diseases. © 2018 IUBMB Life, 70(4):267-275, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements. PMID:25071950

  7. Cellular content of biomolecules in sub-seafloor microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Becker, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    the lifetime of their microbial sources. Here we provide for the first time measurements of the cellular content of biomolecules in sedimentary microbial cells. We separated intact cells from sediment matrices in samples from surficial, deeply buried, organic-rich, and organic-lean marine sediments by density...... content. We find that the cellular content of biomolecules in the marine subsurface is up to four times lower than previous estimates. Our approach will facilitate and improve the use of biomolecules as proxies for microbial abundance in environmental samples and ultimately provide better global estimates......Microbial biomolecules, typically from the cell envelope, can provide crucial information about distribution, activity, and adaptations of sub-seafloor microbial communities. However, when cells die these molecules can be preserved in the sediment on timescales that are likely longer than...

  8. Fullerene-biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinlin; Ebrahimi, Ali; Li, Jie; Cui, Quanjun

    2014-01-01

    Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene-biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene-biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene-biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.

  9. Diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz-Ozturk, Ece; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-09-01

    Biomicrofluidics is an emerging field at the cross roads of microfluidics and life sciences which requires intensive research efforts in terms of introducing appropriate designs, production techniques, and analysis. The ultimate goal is to deliver innovative and cost-effective microfluidic devices to biotech, biomedical, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, creating an in-depth understanding of the transport phenomena of cells and biomolecules becomes vital and concurrently poses significant challenges. The present article outlines the recent advancements in diffusion phenomena of cells and biomolecules by highlighting transport principles from an engineering perspective, cell responses in microfluidic devices with emphases on diffusion- and flow-based microfluidic gradient platforms, macroscopic and microscopic approaches for investigating the diffusion phenomena of biomolecules, microfluidic platforms for the delivery of these molecules, as well as the state of the art in biological applications of mammalian cell responses and diffusion of biomolecules.

  10. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of curcumin against oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Sai Krishna; Mahendra, Jaideep; Gurumurthy, Prema; Jayamathi; Iqbal, Shabeer S; Mahendra, Little

    2014-10-01

    Among various reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radicals have the strongest chemical activity, which can damage a wide range of essential biomolecules such as lipids, proteins, and DNA. The objective of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of curcumin on prevention of oxidative damage of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals generated in in vitro by a Fenton like reaction. We have incubated the serum, plasma and whole blood with H2O2/Cu2+/ Ascorbic acid system for 4 hours at 37 0C and observed the oxidation of biomolecules like albumin, lipids, proteins and DNA. Curcumin at the concentrations of 50,100 and 200 μmoles, prevented the formation of ischemia modified albumin, MDA, protein carbonyls, oxidized DNA and increased the total antioxidant levels and GSH significantly. These observations suggest the hydroxyl radical scavenging potentials of curcumin and protective actions to prevent the oxidation of biomolecules by hydroxyl radicals.

  12. On the mobility of biomolecules : a fluorescence microscopy approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaart, Geert van den

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and application of a number of fluorescence spectroscopy related techniques (FCS, FRAP, DCFBA) to measure diffusion of biomolecules in cells, in membranes and through membrane pores.

  13. Search for GRB related prompt optical emission and other fast varying objects with ``Pi of the Sky'' detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Małek, K.; Mankiewicz, L.; Mrowca-Ciułacz, J.; Nawrocki, K.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Sitek, P.; Sokołowski, M.; Wrochna, G.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2007-06-01

    Experiment “Pi of the Sky” is designed to search for prompt optical emission from GRB sources. 32 CCD cameras covering 2 steradians will monitor the sky continuously. The data will be analysed on-line in search for optical flashes. The prototype with 2 cameras operated at Las Campanas (Chile) since 2004 has recognised several outbursts of flaring stars and has given limits for a few GRB.

  14. Liposome Disruption Assay to Examine Lytic Properties of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimah, John R; Schlesinger, Paul H; Tolia, Niraj H

    2017-08-05

    Proteins may have three dimensional structural or amino acid features that suggest a role in targeting and disrupting lipids within cell membranes. It is often necessary to experimentally investigate if these proteins and biomolecules are able to disrupt membranes in order to conclusively characterize the function of these biomolecules. Here, we describe an in vitro assay to evaluate the membrane lytic properties of proteins and biomolecules. Large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes) containing carboxyfluorescein at fluorescence-quenching concentrations are treated with the biomolecule of interest. A resulting increase in fluorescence due to leakage of the dye from liposomes and subsequent dilution in the buffer demonstrates that the biomolecule is sufficient for disrupting liposomes and membranes. Additionally, since liposome disruption may occur via pore-formation or via general solubilization of lipids similar to detergents, we provide a method to distinguish between these two mechanisms. Pore-formation can be identified and evaluated by examining the blockade of carboxyfluorescein release with dextran molecules that fit the pore. The methods described here were used to determine that the malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS and proapoptotic Bax disrupt liposomes by pore formation (Saito et al. , 2000; Jimah et al. , 2016). Since membrane lipid binding by a biomolecule precedes membrane disruption, we recommend the companion protocol: Jimah et al. , 2017.

  15. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  16. An integrated platform for biomolecule interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Chia-Ming; Tsai, Pei-I.; Chou, Shin-Ting; Lee, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2013-02-01

    We developed a new metrology platform which can detect real-time changes in both a phase-interrogation mode and intensity mode of a SPR (surface plasmon resonance). We integrated a SPR and ellipsometer to a biosensor chip platform to create a new biomolecular interaction measurement mechanism. We adopted a conductive ITO (indium-tinoxide) film to the bio-sensor platform chip to expand the dynamic range and improve measurement accuracy. The thickness of the conductive film and the suitable voltage constants were found to enhance performance. A circularly polarized ellipsometry configuration was incorporated into the newly developed platform to measure the label-free interactions of recombinant human C-reactive protein (CRP) with immobilized biomolecule target monoclonal human CRP antibody at various concentrations. CRP was chosen as it is a cardiovascular risk biomarker and is an acute phase reactant as well as a specific prognostic indicator for inflammation. We found that the sensitivity of a phaseinterrogation SPR is predominantly dependent on the optimization of the sample incidence angle. The effect of the ITO layer effective index under DC and AC effects as well as an optimal modulation were experimentally performed and discussed. Our experimental results showed that the modulated dynamic range for phase detection was 10E-2 RIU based on a current effect and 10E-4 RIU based on a potential effect of which a 0.55 (°/RIU) measurement was found by angular-interrogation. The performance of our newly developed metrology platform was characterized to have a higher sensitivity and less dynamic range when compared to a traditional full-field measurement system.

  17. Multi-state modeling of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie I Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-state modeling of biomolecules refers to a series of techniques used to represent and compute the behavior of biological molecules or complexes that can adopt a large number of possible functional states. Biological signaling systems often rely on complexes of biological macromolecules that can undergo several functionally significant modifications that are mutually compatible. Thus, they can exist in a very large number of functionally different states. Modeling such multi-state systems poses two problems: the problem of how to describe and specify a multi-state system (the "specification problem" and the problem of how to use a computer to simulate the progress of the system over time (the "computation problem". To address the specification problem, modelers have in recent years moved away from explicit specification of all possible states and towards rule-based formalisms that allow for implicit model specification, including the κ-calculus, BioNetGen, the Allosteric Network Compiler, and others. To tackle the computation problem, they have turned to particle-based methods that have in many cases proved more computationally efficient than population-based methods based on ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, or the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Given current computing technology, particle-based methods are sometimes the only possible option. Particle-based simulators fall into two further categories: nonspatial simulators, such as StochSim, DYNSTOC, RuleMonkey, and the Network-Free Stochastic Simulator (NFSim, and spatial simulators, including Meredys, SRSim, and MCell. Modelers can thus choose from a variety of tools, the best choice depending on the particular problem. Development of faster and more powerful methods is ongoing, promising the ability to simulate ever more complex signaling processes in the future.

  18. Miniature Laboratory for Detecting Sparse Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Yu, Nan

    2005-01-01

    A miniature laboratory system has been proposed for use in the field to detect sparsely distributed biomolecules. By emphasizing concentration and sorting of specimens prior to detection, the underlying system concept would make it possible to attain high detection sensitivities without the need to develop ever more sensitive biosensors. The original purpose of the proposal is to aid the search for signs of life on a remote planet by enabling the detection of specimens as sparse as a few molecules or microbes in a large amount of soil, dust, rocks, water/ice, or other raw sample material. Some version of the system could prove useful on Earth for remote sensing of biological contamination, including agents of biological warfare. Processing in this system would begin with dissolution of the raw sample material in a sample-separation vessel. The solution in the vessel would contain floating microscopic magnetic beads coated with substances that could engage in chemical reactions with various target functional groups that are parts of target molecules. The chemical reactions would cause the targeted molecules to be captured on the surfaces of the beads. By use of a controlled magnetic field, the beads would be concentrated in a specified location in the vessel. Once the beads were thus concentrated, the rest of the solution would be discarded. This procedure would obviate the filtration steps and thereby also eliminate the filter-clogging difficulties of typical prior sample-concentration schemes. For ferrous dust/soil samples, the dissolution would be done first in a separate vessel before the solution is transferred to the microbead-containing vessel.

  19. Active immobilization of biomolecules on a hybrid three-dimensional nanoelectrode by dielectrophoresis for single-biomolecule study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Fujii, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a method of active immobilization for biomolecules on a three-dimensional nanometre-scale electrode (3D nanoelectrode) using dielectrophoresis to immobilize the biomolecules at predetermined locations for single-biomolecule study. We have developed a novel two-step fabrication process for obtaining a 3D nanoelectrode having a sharp top, which is necessary for immobilizing a single biomolecule at a single point. The first step is to fabricate the backbone structure, which is rigid and defines the shape of the 3D nanoelectrode. It was fabricated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) obtained using focused ion beam assisted chemical vapour deposition followed by post-plasma etching, which reshapes the DLC structure. The second step coats the DLC structure with a thin layer of aluminium, which supplies electrical conductivity to the DLC structure. By applying a high frequency (of the order of megahertz) and high intensity (greater than or equal to a few megavolts per metre) electric field using the 3D nanoelectrodes, the generated dielectrophoresis attracted and then immobilized target biomolecules onto the tops of 3D nanoelectrodes, as a demonstration of active immobilization of biomolecules

  20. Dynamic defectoscopy with flat panel and CdTe Timepix X-ray detectors combined with an optical camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jandejsek, Ivan; Jakůbek, J.; Tureček, D.; Zwerger, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, April (2013), C04009 ISSN 1748-0221. [International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /14./. Figueira da Foz, Coimbra, 01.07.2012-05.07.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : X-ray digital radiography * fracture mechanics * crack path * X-ray defectoscopy Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/8/04/C04009/

  1. The use of optical microscope equipped with multispectral detector to distinguish different types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronichev, A. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Tupitsyn, N. N.; Frenkel, M. A.; Mozhenkova, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the use of a computer optical microscopy with multispectral camera to characterize the texture of blasts bone marrow of patients with different variants of acute lymphoblastic leukemia: B- and T- types. Specific characteristics of the chromatin of the nuclei of blasts for different types of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were obtained.

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  3. Biomolecule-embedded metal-organic frameworks as an innovative sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempahanumakkagari, Sureshkumar; Kumar, Vanish; Samaddar, Pallabi; Kumar, Pawan; Ramakrishnappa, Thippeswamy; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    Technological advancements combined with materials research have led to the generation of enormous types of novel substrates and materials for use in various biological/medical, energy, and environmental applications. Lately, the embedding of biomolecules in novel and/or advanced materials (e.g., metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), nanoparticles, hydrogels, graphene, and their hybrid composites) has become a vital research area in the construction of an innovative platform for various applications including sensors (or biosensors), biofuel cells, and bioelectronic devices. Due to the intriguing properties of MOFs (e.g., framework architecture, topology, and optical properties), they have contributed considerably to recent progresses in enzymatic catalysis, antibody-antigen interactions, or many other related approaches. Here, we aim to describe the different strategies for the design and synthesis of diverse biomolecule-embedded MOFs for various sensing (e.g., optical, electrochemical, biological, and miscellaneous) techniques. Additionally, the benefits and future prospective of MOFs-based biomolecular immobilization as an innovative sensing platform are discussed along with the evaluation on their performance to seek for further development in this emerging research area. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Temperature-responsive chromatography for the separation of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Hideko; Okano, Teruo

    2011-12-09

    Temperature-responsive chromatography for the separation of biomolecules utilizing poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and its copolymer-modified stationary phase is performed with an aqueous mobile phase without using organic solvent. The surface properties and function of the stationary phase are controlled by external temperature changes without changing the mobile-phase composition. This analytical system is based on nonspecific adsorption by the reversible transition of a hydrophilic-hydrophobic PNIPAAm-grafted surface. The driving force for retention is hydrophobic interaction between the solute molecules and the hydrophobized polymer chains on the stationary phase surface. The separation of the biomolecules, such as nucleotides and proteins was achieved by a dual temperature- and pH-responsive chromatography system. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions could be modulated simultaneously with the temperature in an aqueous mobile phase, thus the separation system would have potential applications in the separation of biomolecules. Additionally, chromatographic matrices prepared by a surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) exhibit a strong interaction with analytes, because the polymerization procedure forms a densely packed polymer, called a polymer brush, on the surfaces. The copolymer brush grafted surfaces prepared by ATRP was an effective tool for separating basic biomolecules by modulating the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Applications of thermally responsive columns for the separations of biomolecules are reviewed here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved radioiodination of biomolecules using exhaustive Chloramine-T oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana M.; Balter, Henia S.; Oliver, Patricia; Welling, Mick M.; Pauwels, Ernest K.J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve standardization in analytical reagents we investigated Chloramine-T radioiodination ( 125 I) of several biomolecules based on the use of a single amount of the oxidizing agent Chloramine-T as the limiting reagent being exhausted during the course of the reaction. Whenever the labeling yield resulted in less than one atom 125 I/molecule, a second amount of the oxidizing agent was added. Thereafter, the integrity of the various biomolecules was assessed using radioimmunoassays, radioreceptor binding assays, or radioimmunometric assays. Purification yields were done by gel permeation (56%±19%, n=230) or by precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (59%±19%, n=230). Specific activity (117±61 MBq/nmol) and the degree of iodine incorporation (1.4±0.8 atoms of 125 I/molecule) were achieved after 300 sec of incubation. A second addition of Chloramine-T resulted in an increased labeling yield of all biomolecules tested by a mean factor of 1.8±0.9. After the second addition of Chloramine-T, we observed for some biomolecules a significant (p<0.001) decreased effect in biological performance. In conclusion, the use of Chloramine-T as a limiting reagent resulted in molecules with appropriate immunological and biological performance. In general, tracers were minimally damaged and assessment of the shelf life as well as storing conditions showed the usefulness of the standardization of biomolecule labeling

  6. Tools and procedures for visualization of proteins and other biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lurong; Aller, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Protein, peptides, and nucleic acids are biomolecules that drive biological processes in living organisms. An enormous amount of structural data for a large number of these biomolecules has been described with atomic precision in the form of structural "snapshots" that are freely available in public repositories. These snapshots can help explain how the biomolecules function, the nature of interactions between multi-molecular complexes, and even how small-molecule drugs can modulate the biomolecules for clinical benefits. Furthermore, these structural snapshots serve as inputs for sophisticated computer simulations to turn the biomolecules into moving, "breathing" molecular machines for understanding their dynamic properties in real-time computer simulations. In order for the researcher to take advantage of such a wealth of structural data, it is necessary to gain competency in the use of computer molecular visualization tools for exploring the structures and visualizing three-dimensional spatial representations. Here, we present protocols for using two common visualization tools--the Web-based Jmol and the stand-alone PyMOL package--as well as a few examples of other popular tools. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Laser frequency stabilization and control of optical cavities with suspended mirrors for the VIRGO interferometric detector of gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsuglia, Matteo

    1999-01-01

    The VIRGO detector is an interferometer with 3 km Fabry-Perot cavities in the arms. It is aimed at the detection of gravitational radiation emitted by astrophysical sources. This thesis comprises two independent parts. The first part is devoted to the laser frequency stabilization. In the second one we present a study of a suspended cavity. We determine the impact of laser frequency fluctuations on the overall VIRGO sensitivity. We study the frequency stabilization of the interferometer considered as an ultra-stable standard and we evaluate the noise pertaining to different signals taken into consideration. A strategy of control is discussed. We then study the VIRGO mode-cleaner prototype, a 30 m suspended triangular cavity, for which we have developed a control in order to keep it locked. Finally, we characterize this cavity in terms of mode spectra, finesse and mechanical transfer functions. (author)

  8. A differential weak measurement system based on Sagnac interferometer for self-referencing biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Guan, Tian; He, Yonghong; He, Qinghua; Zhang, Yilong; Wang, Xiangnan; Shen, Zhiyuan; Yang, Yuxuan; Qiao, Zhen; Ji, Yanhong

    2017-12-01

    A differential weak measurement system was presented, exhibiting the self-referencing function for biomolecule real time detection as a label-free optical biosensor. We built a Sagnac interferometer, which limited horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarization to propagating along the common path but in opposite directions to realize weak measurements with two measuring channels installed in two corners of this Sagnac interferometer. By introducing two half wave plates into the system alternately with the two channels to convert between H and V polarization, we obtained a differential measurement for phase delay, which could quantitatively characterize the refractive index change corresponding to the concentration of samples in the channels. With this system, a real time monitor of molecule concentration in the dialysis process was accomplished, demonstrating the function of self-referencing, which is important for optical label-free molecule detection in a complex biological sample solution.

  9. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    An ionization detector having an array of detectors has, for example, grounding pads positioned in the spaces between some detectors (data detectors) and other detectors (reference detectors). The grounding pads are kept at zero electric potential, i.e. grounded. The grounding serves to drain away electrons and thereby prevent an unwanted accumulation of charge in the spaces, and cause the electric field lines to be more perpendicular to the detectors in regions near the grounding pads. Alternatively, no empty space is provided there being additional, grounded, detectors provided between the data and reference detectors. (author)

  10. Printing technologies for biomolecule and cell-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Petri; Määttänen, Anni; Sandler, Niklas

    2015-10-30

    Biomolecules, such as enzymes, proteins and other biomacromolecules (polynucleotides, polypeptides, polysaccharides and DNA) that are immobilized on solid surfaces are relevant to many areas of science and technology. These functionalized surfaces have applications in biosensors, chromatography, diagnostic immunoassays, cell culturing, DNA microarrays and other analytical techniques. Printing technologies offer opportunities in this context. The main interests in printing biomolecules are in immobilizing them on surfaces for sensors and catalysts or for controlled delivery of protein-based drugs. Recently, there have been significant developments in the use of inkjet printing for dispensing of proteins, biomacromolecules and cells. This review discusses the use of roll-to-roll and inkjet printing technologies in manufacturing of biomolecule and cell-based applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Constraint methods that accelerate free-energy simulations of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alberto; MacCallum, Justin L; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Dill, Ken A

    2015-12-28

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecules are critical for generating narratives about biological mechanisms. The power of atomistic simulations is that these are physics-based methods that satisfy Boltzmann's law, so they can be used to compute populations, dynamics, and mechanisms. But physical simulations are computationally intensive and do not scale well to the sizes of many important biomolecules. One way to speed up physical simulations is by coarse-graining the potential function. Another way is to harness structural knowledge, often by imposing spring-like restraints. But harnessing external knowledge in physical simulations is problematic because knowledge, data, or hunches have errors, noise, and combinatoric uncertainties. Here, we review recent principled methods for imposing restraints to speed up physics-based molecular simulations that promise to scale to larger biomolecules and motions.

  12. Magnetic behavior of iron oxide nanoparticle-biomolecule assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyun; Reis, Lynn; Rajan, Krishna; Shima, Mutsuhiro

    2005-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of 8-20 nm in size were investigated as an assembly with biomolecules synthesized in an aqueous solution. The magnetic behavior of the biomolecule-nanoparticles assembly depends sensitively on the morphology and hence the distribution of the nanoparticles, where the dipole coupling between the nanoparticles governs the overall magnetic behavior. In assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles with trypsin, we observe a formation of unusual self-alignment of nanoparticles within trypsin molecules. In such an assembly structure, the magnetic particles tend to exhibit a lower spin-glass transition temperature than as-synthesized bare iron oxide nanoparticles probably due to reduced interparticle couplings within the molecular matrix. The observed self-alignment of nanoparticles in biomolecules may be a useful approach for directed nanoparticles assembly

  13. Understanding small biomolecule-biomaterial interactions: a review of fundamental theoretical and experimental approaches for biomolecule interactions with inorganic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Dominique; Garrain, Pierre-Alain; Baaden, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Interactions between biomolecules and inorganic surfaces play an important role in natural environments and in industry, including a wide variety of conditions: marine environment, ship hulls (fouling), water treatment, heat exchange, membrane separation, soils, mineral particles at the earth's surface, hospitals (hygiene), art and buildings (degradation and biocorrosion), paper industry (fouling) and more. To better control the first steps leading to adsorption of a biomolecule on an inorganic surface, it is mandatory to understand the adsorption mechanisms of biomolecules of several sizes at the atomic scale, that is, the nature of the chemical interaction between the biomolecule and the surface and the resulting biomolecule conformations once adsorbed at the surface. This remains a challenging and unsolved problem. Here, we review the state of art in experimental and theoretical approaches. We focus on metallic biomaterial surfaces such as TiO(2) and stainless steel, mentioning some remarkable results on hydroxyapatite. Experimental techniques include atomic force microscopy, surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, sum frequency generation and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Theoretical models range from detailed quantum mechanical representations to classical forcefield-based approaches. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  15. A relationship between solvent viscosity and biomolecule picosecond thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornicchi, E.; De Francesco, A.; Marconi, M.; Onori, G.; Paciaroni, A.

    2008-01-01

    Through elastic neutron scattering measurements, we investigated the picosecond dynamics of DNA in the hydrated powder state or embedded in glycerol glassy matrix from 20 K to 300 K. We calculated the relaxational contribution of the mean square displacements (MSD) of DNA hydrogen atoms. We found the existence of a linear relationship between the inverse of the biomolecule relaxational MSD and the logarithm of the bulk viscosity of the surrounding environment. From the comparison with the case of lysozyme in the same environments, for which the validity of the relationship was already verified, possible differences and analogies concerning the biomolecule-to-solvent dynamical coupling can be stressed

  16. Development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave device for the characterization of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Florian; Tsortos, Achilleas; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra; Roach, Paul; Newton, Michael I; McHale, Glen

    2009-01-01

    It is known that acoustic sensor devices, if operated in liquid phase, are sensitive not just to the mass of the analyte but also to various other parameters, such as size, shape, charge and elastic constants of the analyte as well as bound and viscously entrained water. This can be used to extract valuable information about a biomolecule, particularly if the acoustic device is combined with another sensor element which is sensitive to the mass or amount of analyte only. The latter is true in good approximation for various optical sensor techniques. This work reports on the development of a combined surface plasmon resonance/surface acoustic wave sensor system which is designed for the investigation of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA. Results for the deposition of neutravidin and DNA are reported

  17. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Luchowski, Rafal; Laursen, Bo W

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes. (paper)

  18. Azadioxatriangulenium: a long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just Sørensen, Thomas; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-06-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy has great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation, as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is on the order of 20-200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatic dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecule assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red-emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immunoglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time of more than 75%, and an increase in the steady-state anisotropy of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay to detect binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with most other red-emitting organic dyes.

  19. Azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA+): A long fluorescence lifetime fluorophore for large biomolecule binding assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Thyrhaug, Erling; Szabelski, Mariusz; Luchowski, Rafal; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Laursen, Bo W.

    2013-01-01

    Of the many optical bioassays available, sensing by fluorescence anisotropy have great advantages as it provides a sensitive, instrumentally simple, ratiometric method of detection. However, it is hampered by a severe limitation as the emission lifetime of the label needs to be comparable to the correlation lifetime (tumbling time) of the biomolecule which is labelled. For proteins of moderate size this is in the order of 20–200 ns, which due to practical issues currently limits the choice of labels to the dansyl-type dyes and certain aromatics dyes. These have the significant drawback of UV/blue absorption and emission as well as an often significant solvent sensitivity. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new fluorescent label for high molecular weight biomolecules assay based on the azadioxatriangulenium motif. The NHS ester of the long fluorescence lifetime, red emitting fluorophore: azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA-NHS) was conjugated to anti-rabbit Immunoglobulin G (antiIgG). The long fluorescence lifetime was exploited to determine the correlation time of the high molecular weight antibody and its complex with rabbit Immuniglobulin G (IgG) with steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and time-resolved methods: solution phase immuno-assay was performed following either steady-state or time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. By performing a variable temperature experiment it was determined that the binding of the ligand resulted in an increase in correlation time by more than 75 %, and a change in the steady-state anisotropy increase of 18%. The results show that the triangulenium class of dyes can be used in anisotropy assay for detecting binding events involving biomolecules of far larger size than what is possible with the other red emitting organic dyes. PMID:24058730

  20. A SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-PROBE DETECTION LABEL-FREE OPTICAL-RESOLUTION PHOTOACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE BASED ON MICROCAVITY TRANSDUCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGBO WU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous multi-probe detection for an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM system. OR-PAM has elicited the attention of biomedical imaging researchers because of its optical absorption contrast and high spatial resolution with great imaging depth. OR-PAM allows label-free and noninvasive imaging by maximizing the optical absorption of endogenous biomolecules. However, given the inadequate absorption of some biomolecules, detection sensitivity at the same incident intensity requires improvement. In this study, a modulated continuous wave with power density less than 3 mW/cm2 (1/4 of the ANSI safety limit excited the weak photoacoustic (PA signals of biological cells. A microcavity transducer is developed based on the bulk modulus of gas five orders of magnitude lower than that of solid; air pressure variation is inversely proportional to cavity volume at the same temperature increase. Considering that a PA wave expands in various directions, detecting PA signals from different positions and adding them together can increase detection sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we employ four detectors to acquire tiny PA signals simultaneously. Experimental results show that the developed OR-PAM system allows the label-free imaging of cells with weak optical absorption.

  1. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S.; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Kim, T.

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO 3 ) 4 ⋅ 5H 2 O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories

  2. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A.; Ha, S.; Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V.; Bak, M. S.; Kim, T.

    2015-06-01

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO3)4 ṡ 5H2O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  3. Note: Real time optical sensing of alpha-radiation emitting radioactive aerosols based on solid state nuclear track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, A.; Bak, M. S., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, S. [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Joshirao, P.; Manchanda, V. [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T., E-mail: tkim@skku.edu, E-mail: moonsoo@skku.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); SKKU Advanced Institute of Nano Technology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    A sensitive radioactive aerosols sensor has been designed and developed. Its design guidance is based on the need for a low operational cost and reliable measurements to provide daily aerosol monitoring. The exposure of diethylene-glycol bis (allylcarbonate) to radiation causes modification of its physico-chemical properties like surface roughness and reflectance. In the present study, optical sensor based on the reflectance measurement has been developed with an aim to monitor real time presence of alpha radioactive aerosols emitted from thorium nitrate hydrate. The results shows that the fabricated sensor can detect 0.0157 kBq to 0.1572 kBq of radio activity by radioactive aerosols generated from (Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} ⋅ 5H{sub 2}O) at 0.1 ml/min flow rate. The proposed instrument will be helpful to monitor radioactive aerosols in/around a nuclear facility, building construction sites, mines, and granite polishing factories.

  4. High efficiency scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a scintillation detector, usually a crystal scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube which converts photons to electrical pulses is described. The photomultiplier pulses are measured to provide information on impinging radiation. In inorganic crystal scintillation detectors to achieve maximum density, optical transparency and uniform activation, it has been necessary heretofore to prepare the scintillator as a single crystal. Crystal pieces fail to give a single composite response. Means are provided herein for obtaining such a response with crystal pieces, such means comprising the combination of crystal pieces and liquid or solid organic scintillator matrices having a cyclic molecular structure favorable to fluorescence. 8 claims, 6 drawing figures

  5. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, R.K.; Monteillet, H.J.M.; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery
    of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments,

  6. One-step mild biorefinery of functional biomolecules from microalgae extracts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desai, Rupali K.; Monteillet, Hélène; Li, Xiaohua; Schuur, Boelo; Kleijn, J. Mieke; Leermakers, Frans A.M.; Wijffels, Rene H.; Eppink, Michel H.M.

    2018-01-01

    Fractionation of complex matrices such as biomass into diverse functional biomolecules without disrupting the biomolecule functionalities is a real challenge. Known separation processes are designed for the recovery of single products such as hydrophilic proteins or hydrophobic pigments, discarding

  7. Biomolecule detection using a silicon nanoribbon: accumulation mode versus inversion mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfstroem, Niklas; Linnros, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanoribbons were fabricated using standard optical lithography from silicon on insulator material with top silicon layer thicknesses of 100, 60 and 45 nm. Electrically these work as Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors and, depending on the substrate voltage, electron or hole injection is possible. The current through the nanoribbon is extremely sensitive to charge changes at the oxidized top surface and can be used for biomolecule detection in a liquid. We show that for detection of streptavidin molecules the response is larger in the accumulation mode than in the inversion mode, although not leading to higher detection sensitivity due to increased noise. The effect is attributed to the location in depth of the conducting channel, which for holes is closer to the screened surface charges of the biomolecules. Furthermore, the response increases for decreasing silicon thickness in both the accumulation mode and the inversion mode. The results are verified qualitatively and quantitatively through a two-dimensional simulation model on a cross section along the nanoribbon device

  8. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  9. Artificial tongue based on metal-biomolecule coordination polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-02-25

    We construct an array-based recognition system (the so-called artificial tongue) through the self-assembly of nucleotides, dyes and lanthanide ions. Metal ions are selected as model analytes for verifying its discrimination ability. The work provides valuable insights into the application and development of biomolecule-based materials.

  10. Silica biomineralization via the self-assembly of helical biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Cao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zhehao; Duan, Yingying; Che, Shunai

    2015-01-21

    The biomimetic synthesis of relevant silica materials using biological macromolecules as templates via silica biomineralization processes attract rapidly rising attention toward natural and artificial materials. Biomimetic synthesis studies are useful for improving the understanding of the formation mechanism of the hierarchical structures found in living organisms (such as diatoms and sponges) and for promoting significant developments in the biotechnology, nanotechnology and materials chemistry fields. Chirality is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and is an inherent feature of biomolecular components in organisms. Helical biomolecules, one of the most important types of chiral macromolecules, can self-assemble into multiple liquid-crystal structures and be used as biotemplates for silica biomineralization, which renders them particularly useful for fabricating complex silica materials under ambient conditions. Over the past two decades, many new silica materials with hierarchical structures and complex morphologies have been created using helical biomolecules. In this review, the developments in this field are described and the recent progress in silica biomineralization templating using several classes of helical biomolecules, including DNA, polypeptides, cellulose and rod-like viruses is summarized. Particular focus is placed on the formation mechanism of biomolecule-silica materials (BSMs) with hierarchical structures. Finally, current research challenges and future developments are discussed in the conclusion. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Recovery of biomolecules from food wastes--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiano, Antonietta

    2014-09-17

    Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial), the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  12. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates and their biomedicinal applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xinlin Yang,1 Ali Ebrahimi,1 Jie Li,1,2 Quanjun Cui11Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2School of Materials Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Fullerenes are among the strongest antioxidants and are characterized as "radical sponges." The research on biomedicinal applications of fullerenes has achieved significant progress since the landmark publication by Friedman et al in 1993. Fullerene–biomolecule conjugates have become an important area of research during the past 2 decades. By a thorough literature search, we attempt to update the information about the synthesis of different types of fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, including fullerene-containing amino acids and peptides, oligonucleotides, sugars, and esters. Moreover, we also discuss in this review recently reported data on the biological and pharmaceutical utilities of these compounds and some other fullerene derivatives of biomedical importance. While within the fullerene–biomolecule conjugates, in which fullerene may act as both an antioxidant and a carrier, specific targeting biomolecules conjugated to fullerene will undoubtedly strengthen the delivery of functional fullerenes to sites of clinical interest.Keywords: fullerene, amino acid, peptide, oligonucleotide, sugar, ester

  13. Recovery of Biomolecules from Food Wastes — A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Baiano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Food wastes are produced by a variety of sources, ranging from agricultural operations to household consumption. About 38% occurs during food processing. At present, the European Union legislation encourages the exploitation of co-products. This valorisation can be achieved through the extraction of high-value components such as proteins, polysaccharides, fibres, flavour compounds, and phytochemicals, which can be re-used as nutritionally and pharmacologically functional ingredients. Extraction can proceed according to solid-liquid extraction, Soxhlet extraction, pressurized fluid extraction, supercritical fluid extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, pulsed electric field extraction, and enzyme-assisted extraction. Nevertheless, these techniques cannot be used indiscriminately and their choice depends on the type of biomolecules and matrix, the scale processing (laboratory or industrial, the ratio between production costs and economic values of the compounds to be extracted. The vegetable wastes include trimmings, peelings, stems, seeds, shells, bran, residues remaining after extraction of oil, starch, sugar, and juice. The animal-derived wastes include wastes from bred animals, wastes from seafood, wastes from dairy processing. The recovered biomolecules and by-products can be used to produce functional foods or as adjuvants in food processing or in medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. This work is an overview of the type and amounts of food wastes; food waste legislation; conventional and novel techniques suitable for extracting biomolecules; food, medicinal and pharmaceutical uses of the recovered biomolecules and by-products, and future trends in these areas.

  14. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sok Oh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  15. Preliminary results from a novel CVD diamond detector system for molecular imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, A.R.

    1996-01-01

    A novel biomolecular imaging system incorporating a Chemical Vapour Deposition diamond detector is in development. The synthetic diamond is used as a UV detector to image nucleic acids in electrophoresis gels. The microstrip diamond detector currently has a spatial resolution of 30 μm. Preliminary results are presented which include: QE measurements of diamond detectors, detector time response, detector UV response and current detection limits of biomolecules in gel. The potential applications of the technology, and its significant advantages in speed and sensitivity over the current systems are discussed

  16. High Dynamics and Precision Optical Measurement Using a Position Sensitive Detector (PSD in Reflection-Mode: Application to 2D Object Tracking over a Smart Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Alexandru Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available When related to a single and good contrast object or a laser spot, position sensing, or sensitive, detectors (PSDs have a series of advantages over the classical camera sensors, including a good positioning accuracy for a fast response time and very simple signal conditioning circuits. To test the performance of this kind of sensor for microrobotics, we have made a comparative analysis between a precise but slow video camera and a custom-made fast PSD system applied to the tracking of a diffuse-reflectivity object transported by a pneumatic microconveyor called Smart-Surface. Until now, the fast system dynamics prevented the full control of the smart surface by visual servoing, unless using a very expensive high frame rate camera. We have built and tested a custom and low cost PSD-based embedded circuit, optically connected with a camera to a single objective by means of a beam splitter. A stroboscopic light source enhanced the resolution. The obtained results showed a good linearity and a fast (over 500 frames per second response time which will enable future closed-loop control by using PSD.

  17. Optical Detectors for Astronomy II : State-of-the-art at the Turn of the Millennium : 4th ESO CCD Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Beletic, James

    2000-01-01

    th The 4 ESO CCO Workshop, Optical Detectors for Astronomy, was held during September 13-16, 1999 at its usual location, the headquarters of the European Southern Observatory in Garching, Germany. We prefer to remember this workshop as a "meeting of friends", who came to Garching to visit ESO and to present their work, rather than a formal meeting. Based on our experience with the 1996 ESO CCO workshop, we deliberately put emphasis on creating an environment that encouraged the participants to stay together and informally exchange ideas. These informal events began with a tour of the BWM auto factory and continued with a reception at "SchloB Beletic", the conference dinner at a real SchloB of the Bavarian International School (where the participants enjoyed basket, baseball, table soccer, rock climbing and eventually dancing) and concluded with a tour of the Paulaner Brewery and dinner at the Seehaus in the Englisher Garten. The lunch "Biergarten", adjacent to the poster session area, was a daily meeting poin...

  18. Structure, dynamics, and function of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.; Berendzen, J.R.; Garcia, A.; Gupta, G.; Olah, G.A.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Trewhella, J.; Wood, C.C.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors enhanced Los Alamos' core competency in Bioscience and Biotechnology by building on present strengths in experimental techniques, theory, high-performance computing, modeling, and simulation applied to biomolecular structure, dynamics, and function. Specifically, the authors strengthened their capabilities in neutron/x-ray scattering, x-ray crystallography, NMR, laser, and optical spectroscopies. Initially they focused on supporting the Los alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the design and implementation of new neutron scattering instrumentation, they developed new methods for analysis of scattering data, and they developed new projects to study the structures of biomolecular complexes. The authors have also worked to strengthen interactions between theory and experiment, and between the biological and physical sciences. They sponsored regular meetings of members from all interested LANL technical divisions, and supported two lecture series: ''Biology for Physicists'' and ''Issues in Modern Biology''. They also supported the formation of interdisciplinary/inter-divisional teams to develop projects in science-based bioremediation and an integrated structural biology resource. Finally, they successfully worked with a multidisciplinary team to put forward the Laboratory's Genome and Beyond tactical goal

  19. Design of a Modular DNA Triangular-Prism Sensor Enabling Ratiometric and Multiplexed Biomolecule Detection on a Single Microbead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Qiaoshu; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Guo, Qiuping; Li, Li; Liu, Wei; Wang, Kemin

    2017-03-21

    DNA nanostructures have emerged as powerful and versatile building blocks for the construction of programmable nanoscale structures and functional sensors for biomarker detection, disease diagnostics, and therapy. Here we integrated multiple sensing modules into a single DNA three-dimensional (3D) nanoarchitecture with a triangular-prism (TP) structure for ratiometric and multiplexed biomolecule detection on a single microbead. In our design, the complementary hybridization of three clip sequences formed TP nanoassemblies in which the six single-strand regions in the top and bottom faces act as binding sites for different sensing modules, including an anchor module, reference sequence module, and capture sequence module. The multifunctional modular TP nanostructures were thus exploited for ratiometric and multiplexed biomolecule detection on microbeads. Microbead imaging demonstrated that, after ratiometric self-calibration analysis, the imaging deviations resulting from uneven fluorescence intensity distribution and differing probe concentrations were greatly reduced. The rigid nanostructure also conferred the TP as a framework for geometric positioning of different capture sequences. The inclusion of multiple targets led to the formation of sandwich hybridization structures that gave a readily detectable optical response at different fluorescence channels and distinct fingerprint-like pattern arrays. This approach allowed us to discriminate multiplexed biomolecule targets in a simple and efficient fashion. In this module-designed strategy, the diversity of the controlled DNA assembly coupled with the geometrically well-defined rigid nanostructures of the TP assembly provides a flexible and reliable biosensing approach that shows great promise for biomedical applications.

  20. Transmutation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viererbl, L., E-mail: vie@ujv.c [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Lahodova, Z. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Klupak, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Sus, F. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic); Kucera, J. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Kus, P.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd. (Czech Republic); Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (Czech Republic)

    2011-03-11

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  1. Transmutation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Klupak, V.; Sus, F.; Kucera, J.; Kus, P.; Marek, M.

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a new type of detectors, called transmutation detectors, which can be used primarily for neutron fluence measurement. The transmutation detector method differs from the commonly used activation detector method in evaluation of detector response after irradiation. Instead of radionuclide activity measurement using radiometric methods, the concentration of stable non-gaseous nuclides generated by transmutation in the detector is measured using analytical methods like mass spectrometry. Prospective elements and nuclear reactions for transmutation detectors are listed and initial experimental results are given. The transmutation detector method could be used primarily for long-term measurement of neutron fluence in fission nuclear reactors, but in principle it could be used for any type of radiation that can cause transmutation of nuclides in detectors. This method could also be used for measurement in accelerators or fusion reactors.

  2. Superconducting Single Photon Detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbos, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of a detector for single photons, particles of light. New techniques are being developed that require high performance single photon detection, such as quantum cryptography, single molecule detection, optical radar, ballistic imaging, circuit testing and

  3. Fabrication of Biomolecule Microarrays for Cell Immobilization Using Automated Microcontact Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foncy, Julie; Estève, Aurore; Degache, Amélie; Colin, Camille; Cau, Jean Christophe; Malaquin, Laurent; Vieu, Christophe; Trévisiol, Emmanuelle

    2018-01-01

    Biomolecule microarrays are generally produced by conventional microarrayer, i.e., by contact or inkjet printing. Microcontact printing represents an alternative way of deposition of biomolecules on solid supports but even if various biomolecules have been successfully microcontact printed, the production of biomolecule microarrays in routine by microcontact printing remains a challenging task and needs an effective, fast, robust, and low-cost automation process. Here, we describe the production of biomolecule microarrays composed of extracellular matrix protein for the fabrication of cell microarrays by using an automated microcontact printing device. Large scale cell microarrays can be reproducibly obtained by this method.

  4. Dielectric Spectroscopy of Biomolecules up to 110 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Ermilova, Elena; Pannwitz, Daniel; Gibbons, Jessica; Hölzel, Ralph; Bier, Frank F.

    2018-03-01

    Radio-frequency fields in the GHz range are increasingly applied in biotechnology and medicine. In order to fully exploit both their potential and their risks detailed information about the dielectric properties of biological material is needed. For this purpose a measuring system is presented that allows the acquisition of complex dielectric spectra over 4 frequency decade up to 110 GHz. Routines for calibration and for data evaluation according to physicochemical interaction models have been developed. The frequency dependent permittivity and dielectric loss of some proteins and nucleic acids, the main classes of biomolecules, and of their sub-units have been determined. Dielectric spectra are presented for the amino acid alanine, the proteins lysozyme and haemoglobin, the nucleotides AMP and ATP, and for the plasmid pET-21, which has been produced by bacterial culture. Characterisation of a variety of biomolecules is envisaged, as is the application to studies on protein structure and function.

  5. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy Zorzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions.

  6. Surface Treatment of Polymeric Materials Controlling the Adhesion of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne; Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Mozetic, Miran; Coudreuse, Arnaud; Legeay, Gilbert; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy

    2012-01-01

    This review describes different strategies of surface elaboration for a better control of biomolecule adsorption. After a brief description of the fundamental interactions between surfaces and biomolecules, various routes of surface elaboration are presented dealing with the attachment of functional groups mostly thanks to plasma techniques, with the grafting to and from methods, and with the adsorption of surfactants. The grafting of stimuli-responsive polymers is also pointed out. Then, the discussion is focused on the protein adsorption phenomena showing how their interactions with solid surfaces are complex. The adsorption mechanism is proved to be dependent on the solid surface physicochemical properties as well as on the surface and conformation properties of the proteins. Different behaviors are also reported for complex multiple protein solutions. PMID:24955631

  7. Electronic sputtering of biomolecules and its application in mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, P.; Sundqvist, B.U.R.

    1989-01-01

    In 1974 Macfarlane discovered that fast heavy ions from a 252-Cf source can desorb and ionize molecules from a solid surface. The mass of the molecules was determined by time-of-flight technique. It has been shown that the desorption mechanism is associated with the electron part of the stopping power of the primary ion and the name 'electron sputtering' has been adopted for the phenomenon to distinguish it from the well-known sputtering process with ions of KeV energy. A review of electronic sputtering of biomolecules will be given as well as recent measurements on Langmuir-Blodgett films. One important application of electronic sputtering is in the field of mass spectrometry. With this technique large and nonvolatile molecules can be studied. Particularly adsorption of biomolecules to a nitrocellulose backing has proven to be very useful. Examples will be given of mass spectra from peptides with a molecular weight above 20,000 u. (author)

  8. Hierarchically Ordered Nanopatterns for Spatial Control of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The development and study of a benchtop, high-throughput, and inexpensive fabrication strategy to obtain hierarchical patterns of biomolecules with sub-50 nm resolution is presented. A diblock copolymer of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide), PS-b-PEO, is synthesized with biotin capping the PEO block and 4-bromostyrene copolymerized within the polystyrene block at 5 wt %. These two handles allow thin films of the block copolymer to be postfunctionalized with biotinylated biomolecules of interest and to obtain micropatterns of nanoscale-ordered films via photolithography. The design of this single polymer further allows access to two distinct superficial nanopatterns (lines and dots), where the PEO cylinders are oriented parallel or perpendicular to the substrate. Moreover, we present a strategy to obtain hierarchical mixed morphologies: a thin-film coating of cylinders both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate can be obtained by tuning the solvent annealing and irradiation conditions. PMID:25363506

  9. Universal scaling for biomolecule desorption induced by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szenes, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thermal activation mechanism is proposed for the desorption of biomolecules. Good agreement is found with the experiments in a broad range of the electronic stopping power. The activation energies of desorption U are 0.33, 1.57 and 5.35 eV for positive, negative and neutral leucine molecules, respectively, and 2.05 eV for positive ergosterol molecules. The desorption of valine clusters is analyzed. The magnitude of the specific heat shows that the internal degrees of freedom are not excited up to the moment of desorption. The effect of irradiation temperature and of ion velocity on the desorption yield is discussed on the basis of the author's model. The scaling function derived in the model for the desorption of biomolecules is applied also to the sputtering of SiO 2 and U = 0.42 eV is obtained

  10. How nanoparticles encapsulating fluorophores allow a double detection of biomolecules by localized surface plasmon resonance and luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbillon, G; Faure, A C; Kork, N El; Moretti, P; Roux, S; Tillement, O; Ou, M G; Descamps, A; Perriat, P; Vial, A; Bijeon, J-L; Marquette, C A; Jacquier, B

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows how polysiloxane particles encapsulating fluorophores can be successfully used to detect biotin-streptavidin binding by two types of technique. After functionalization of the particles by streptavidin, the fixation of the biomolecule can indeed be detected by a shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the biotinylated gold dots used as substrate and by the luminescence of the fluorophores evidenced by scanning near-field optical microscopy. The development of particles allowing such a double detection opens a route for increasing the reliability of biological detection and for multi-labelling strategies crossing both detection principles

  11. How nanoparticles encapsulating fluorophores allow a double detection of biomolecules by localized surface plasmon resonance and luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbillon, G; Faure, A C; Kork, N El; Moretti, P [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bat Kastler, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Roux, S; Tillement, O [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bat Kastler, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ou, M G; Descamps, A; Perriat, P [Materiaux, Ingenierie et Sciences (MATEIS), CNRS UMR 5510, Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, 7 avenue Jean Capelle 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Vial, A; Bijeon, J-L [Institut Charles Delaunay, CNRS FRE 2848, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique (LNIO), Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie BP 2060 10010 Troyes Cedex (France); Marquette, C A [Laboratoire de Genie Enzymatique et Biomoleculaire, UMR 5246 CNRS-ICBMS, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Jacquier, B [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5620, Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux Luminescents (LPCML), Domaine Scientifique de La Doua, Bat Kastler, 10 rue Andre Marie Ampere 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2008-01-23

    The paper shows how polysiloxane particles encapsulating fluorophores can be successfully used to detect biotin-streptavidin binding by two types of technique. After functionalization of the particles by streptavidin, the fixation of the biomolecule can indeed be detected by a shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance of the biotinylated gold dots used as substrate and by the luminescence of the fluorophores evidenced by scanning near-field optical microscopy. The development of particles allowing such a double detection opens a route for increasing the reliability of biological detection and for multi-labelling strategies crossing both detection principles.

  12. From clusters to biomolecules: electric dipole, structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyer, M; Antoine, R; Compagnon, I; Rayane, D; Dugourd, P

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, it is demonstrated that the electric dipole of complex molecules or clusters can be measured by beam deviation in an inhomogeneous electric field. This measurement, associated to appropriate theoretical calculations and simulations, allows us to determine the geometry of these systems and their dynamical behaviour as a function of temperature. Selected examples for mixed clusters (metal-fullerene, metal-benzene, salt) and biomolecules (hydrogen bound amino acids and glycine based polypeptides) are discussed

  13. Thermo-responsive hydrogels for intravitreal injection and biomolecule release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapala, Pawel

    In this dissertation, we develop an injectable polymer system to enable localized and prolonged release of therapeutic biomolecules for improved treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Thermo-responsive hydrogels derived from N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and cross-linked with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) poly(L-Lactic acid) (PLLA) copolymer were synthesized via free-radical polymerization. These materials were investigated for (a) phase change behavior, (b) in-vitro degradation, (c) capacity for controlled drug delivery, and (d) biocompatibility. The volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the PNIPAAm- co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels was adjusted using hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties so that it is ca. 33°C. These hydrogels did not initially show evidence of degradation at 37°C due to physical cross-links of collapsed PNIPAAm. Only after addition of glutathione chain transfer agents (CTA)s to the precursor did the collapsed hydrogels become fully soluble at 37°C. CTAs significantly affected the release kinetics of biomolecules; addition of 1.0 mg/mL glutathione to 3 mM cross-linker accelerated hydrogel degradation, resulting in 100% release in less than 2 days. This work also explored the effect of PEGylation in order to tether biomolecules to the polymer matrix. It was demonstrated that non-site-specific PEGylation can postpone the burst release of solutes (up to 10 days in hydrogels with 0.5 mg/mL glutathione). Cell viability assays showed that at least two 20-minute buffer extraction steps were needed to remove cytotoxic elements from the hydrogels. Clinically-used therapeutic biomolecules LucentisRTM and AvastinRTM were demonstrated to be both stable and bioactive after release form PNIPAAm-co-PEG-b-PLLA hydrogels. The thermo-responsive hydrogels presented here offer a promising platform for the localized delivery of proteins such as recombinant antibodies.

  14. Transition-Metal-Free Biomolecule-Based Flexible Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Wang, Hua; Hao, Rui; Guo, Lin

    2016-09-01

    A transition-metal-free asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is successfully fabricated based on an earth-abundant biomass derived redox-active biomolecule, named lawsone. Such an ASC exhibits comparable or even higher energy densities than most of the recently reported transition-metal-based ASCs, and this green ASC generation from renewable resources is promising for addressing current issues of electronic hazard processing, high cost, and unsustainability. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Renewable-Biomolecule-Based Full Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pengfei; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yun; Yang, Jie; Lin, Jie; Guo, Lin

    2016-05-01

    A renewable-biomolecule-based full lithium-ion battery is successfully fabricated for the first time. Naturally derivable emodin and humic acid based electrodes are used as cathode and anode, respectively. The as-assembled batteries exhibit superb specific capacity and substantial operating voltage capable of powering a wearable electronic watch, suggesting the great potential for practical applications with the significant merits of sustainability and biocompatibility. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. In situ hybridization of superparamagnetic iron-biomolecule nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Donkor, Apraku David; Mohapatra, Mamata; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Su, Zhengding; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Leung, Kam Tong

    2014-07-23

    The increase in interest in the integration of organic-inorganic nanostructures in recent years has promoted the use of hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) in medicine, energy conversion, and other applications. Conventional hybridization methods are, however, often long, complicated, and multistepped, and they involve biomolecules and discrete nanostructures as separate entities, all of which hinder the practical use of the resulting HNPs. Here, we present a novel, in situ approach to synthesizing size-specific HNPs using Fe-biomolecule complexes as the building blocks. We choose an anticancer peptide (p53p, MW 1.8 kDa) and an enzyme (GOx, MW 160 kDa) as model molecules to demonstrate the versatility of the method toward different types of molecules over a large size range. We show that electrostatic interaction for complex formation of metal hydroxide ion with the partially charged side of biomolecule in the solution is the key to hybridization of metal-biomolecule materials. Electrochemical deposition is then used to produce hybrid NPs from these complexes. These HNPs with controllable sizes ranging from 30 nm to 3.5 μm are found to exhibit superparamagnetic behavior, which is a big challenge for particles in this size regime. As an example of greatly improved properties and functionality of the new hybrid material, in vitro toxicity assessment of Fe-GOx HNPs shows no adverse effect, and the Fe-p53p HNPs are found to selectively bind to cancer cells. The superparamagnetic nature of these HNPs (superparamagnetic even above the size regime of 15-20 nm!), their biocompatibility, and the direct integration approach are fundamentally important to biomineralization and general synthesis strategy for bioinspired functional materials.

  17. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, H.; Verdera, S.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this project is the labelling and quality control of biomolecules with radionuclides beta emitters with high purity and stability. Techniques and methodology for labelling with 188 Re, 153 Sm, and 125 I as well as quality controls were done according the recommendations of the first research coordination meeting of this CRP. Also some useful chelators reported in the literature were synthesized in our laboratory

  18. Low energy electron-driven damage in biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanche, L.

    2005-01-01

    The damage induced by the impact of low energy electrons (LEE) on biomolecules is reviewed from a radiobiological perspective with emphasis on transient anion formation. The major type of experiments, which measure the yields of fragments produced as a function of incident electron energy (0.1 - 30 eV), are briefly described. Theoretical advances are also summarized. Several examples are presented from the results of recent experiments performed in the gas-phase and on bio-molecular films bombarded with LEE under ultra-high vacuum conditions. These include the results obtained from DNA films and those obtained from the fragmentation of elementary components of the DNA molecule (i.e., the bases, sugar and phosphate group analogs and oligonucleotides) and of proteins (e.g. amino acids). By comparing the results from different experiments and theory, it is possible to determine fundamental mechanisms that are involved in the dissociation of the biomolecules and the production of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. Below 15 eV, electron resonances (i.e., the formation of transient anions) play a dominant role in the fragmentation of all biomolecules investigated. These transient anions fragment molecules by decaying into dissociative electronically excited states or by dissociating into a stable anion and a neutral radical. These fragments can initiate further reactions within large biomolecules or with nearby molecules and thus cause more complex chemical damage. Dissociation of a transient anion within DNA may occur by direct electron attachment at the location of dissociation or by electron transfer from another subunit. Damage to DNA is dependent on the molecular environment, topology, type of counter ion, sequence context and chemical modifications. (author)

  19. Models and algorithms for biomolecules and molecular networks

    CERN Document Server

    DasGupta, Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    By providing expositions to modeling principles, theories, computational solutions, and open problems, this reference presents a full scope on relevant biological phenomena, modeling frameworks, technical challenges, and algorithms. * Up-to-date developments of structures of biomolecules, systems biology, advanced models, and algorithms * Sampling techniques for estimating evolutionary rates and generating molecular structures * Accurate computation of probability landscape of stochastic networks, solving discrete chemical master equations * End-of-chapter exercises

  20. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic studies of iron-containing biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takehiro; Seto, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we report recent nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic (NRVS) studies of iron-containing biomolecules and their model complexes. The NRVS is synchrotron-based element-specific vibrational spectroscopic methods. Unlike Raman and infrared spectroscopy, the NRVS can investigate all iron motions without selection rules, which provide atomic level insights into the structure/reactivity correlation of biologically relevant iron complexes. (author)

  1. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  2. Immobilization of biomolecules to plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Luis; Menges, Bernhard; Borros, Salvador; Förch, Renate

    2010-10-11

    Thin films of plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (pp-PFM) offer highly reactive ester groups throughout the structure of the film that allow for subsequent reactions with different aminated reagents and biological molecules. The present paper follows on from previous work on the plasma deposition of pentafluorophenyl methacrylate (PFM) for optimum functional group retention (Francesch, L.; Borros, S.; Knoll, W.; Foerch, R. Langmuir 2007, 23, 3927) and reactivity in aqueous solution (Duque, L.; Queralto, N.; Francesch, L.; Bumbu, G. G.; Borros, S.; Berger, R.; Förch, R. Plasma Process. Polym. 2010, accepted for publication) to investigate the binding of a biologically active peptide known to induce cellular adhesion (IKVAV) and of biochemically active proteins such as BSA and fibrinogen. Analyses of the films and of the immobilization of the biomolecules were carried out using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The attachment of the biomolecules on pulsed plasma polymerized pentafluorophenyl methacrylate was monitored using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR). SPR analysis confirmed the presence of immobilized biomolecules on the plasma polymer and was used to determine the mass coverage of the peptide and proteins adsorbed onto the films. The combined analysis of the surfaces suggests the covalent binding of the peptide and proteins to the surface of the pp-PFM.

  3. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Biomolecule Interactions Influence Oral Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Mi-Rae; Yu, Jin; Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Min; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2016-11-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in various industrial fields, such as electronics, packaging, food, and cosmetics. Accordingly, concerns about the potential toxicity of TiO₂ NPs have increased. In order to comprehend their in vivo behavior and potential toxicity, we must evaluate the interactions between TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, which can alter the physicochemical properties and the fate of NPs under physiological conditions. In the present study, in vivo solubility, oral absorption, tissue distribution, and excretion kinetics of food grade TiO₂ (f-TiO₂) NPs were evaluated following a single-dose oral administration to rats and were compared to those of general grade TiO₂ (g-TiO₂) NPs. The effect of the interactions between the TiO₂ NPs and biomolecules, such as glucose and albumin, on oral absorption was also investigated, with the aim of determining the surface interactions between them. The intestinal transport pathway was also assessed using 3-dimensional culture systems. The results demonstrate that slightly higher oral absorption of f-TiO₂ NPs compared to g-TiO₂ NPs could be related to their intestinal transport mechanism by microfold (M) cells, however, most of the NPs were eliminated through the feces. Moreover, the biokinetics of f-TiO₂ NPs was highly dependent on their interaction with biomolecules, and the dispersibility was affected by modified surface chemistry.

  4. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  5. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Ishiyama, Y.; Penmatsa, V.; Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m

  6. Applications of polymers for biomolecule immobilization in electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teles, F.R.R.; Fonseca, L.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polymers are becoming inseparable from biomolecule immobilization strategies and biosensor platforms. Their original role as electrical insulators has been progressively substituted by their electrical conductive abilities, which opens a new and broad scope of applications. In addition, recent advances in diagnostic chips and microfluidic systems, together with the requirements of mass-production technologies, have raised the need to replace glass by polymeric materials, which are more suitable for production through simple manufacturing processes. Conducting polymers (CPs), in particular, are especially amenable for electrochemical biosensor development for providing biomolecule immobilization and for rapid electron transfer. It is expected that the combination of known polymer substrates, but also new transducing and biocompatible interfaces, with nanobiotechnological structures, like nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanoengineered 'smart' polymers, may generate composites with new and interesting properties, providing higher sensitivity and stability of the immobilized molecules, thus constituting the basis for new and improved analytical devices for biomedical and other applications. This review covers the state-of-the-art and main novelties about the use of polymers for immobilization of biomolecules in electrochemical biosensor platforms

  7. Effect of water and ionic liquids on biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Debasis; Mukherjee, Arnab

    2018-02-08

    The remarkable progress in the field of ionic liquids (ILs) in the last two decades has involved investigations on different aspects of ILs in various conditions. The nontoxic and biocompatible nature of ILs makes them a suitable substance for the storage and application of biomolecules. In this regard, the aqueous IL solutions have attracted a large number of studies to comprehend the role of water in modulating various properties of biomolecules. Here, we review some of the recent studies on aqueous ILs that concern the role of water in altering the behavior of ILs in general and in case of biomolecules solvated in ILs. The different structural and dynamic effects caused by water have been highlighted. We discuss the different modes of IL interaction that are responsible for stabilization and destabilization of proteins and enzymes followed by examples of water effect on this. The role of water in the case of nucleic acid storage in ILs, an area which has mostly been underrated, also has been emphasized. Our discussions highlight the fact that the effects of water on IL behavior are not general and are highly dependent on the nature of the IL under consideration. Overall, we aim to draw attention to the significance of water dynamics in the aqueous IL solutions, a better understanding of which can help in developing superior storage materials for application purposes.

  8. Functionalization of titanium dioxide nanotubes with biomolecules for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Weslley F; Arruda, Isabel R S; Silva, Germana M M; Machado, Giovanna; Coelho, Luana C B B; Correia, Maria T S

    2017-12-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are extensively used in the manufacture of implants because they have biocompatibility. The production of a nanostructured surface can be achieved by means of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) which can have dimensions equivalent to the nanometric components of human bone, in addition to increasing the efficiency of such implants. The search is ongoing for ways to improve the performance of these TNTs in terms of their functionalization through coating these nanotubular matrices with biomolecules. The biocompatibility of the functionalized TNTs can be improved by promoting rapid osseointegration, by preventing the adhesion of bacteria on such surfaces and/or by promoting a more sustained local release of drugs that are loaded into such TNTs. In addition to the implants, these nanotubular matrices have been used in the manufacture of high-performance biosensors capable of immobilizing principally enzymes on their surfaces, which has possible use in disease diagnosis. The objective of this review is to show the main techniques of immobilization of biomolecules in TNTs, evidencing the most recent applications of bioactive molecules that have been functionalized in the nanotubular matrices for use in implants and biosensors. This surveillance also proposes a new class of biomolecules that can be used to functionalize these nanostructured surfaces, lectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides: versatile biomolecules for generating functional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2018-02-21

    The incorporation of biomolecules into nanomaterials generates functional nanosystems with novel and advanced properties, presenting great potential for applications in various fields. Nucleobases, nucleosides and nucleotides, as building blocks of nucleic acids and biological coenzymes, constitute necessary components of the foundation of life. In recent years, as versatile biomolecules for the construction or regulation of functional nanomaterials, they have stimulated interest in researchers, due to their unique properties such as structural diversity, multiplex binding sites, self-assembly ability, stability, biocompatibility, and chirality. In this review, strategies for the synthesis of nanomaterials and the regulation of their morphologies and functions using nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides as building blocks, templates or modulators are summarized alongside selected applications. The diverse applications range from sensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery to mimicking light-harvesting antenna, the construction of logic gates, and beyond. Furthermore, some perspectives and challenges in this emerging field are proposed. This review is directed toward the broader scientific community interested in biomolecule-based functional nanomaterials.

  10. Detector unit for X-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svobodova, B.; Hamouz, J.; Pavlicek, Z.; Jursova, L.; Pohanka, J.

    1983-01-01

    The detector unit is applied in the medical and industrial X-ray diagnosis and analysis. It controls the X-ray dosing by exposure and brightness automation. The detector field is generated from a carrier, in which detector elements with light quides are situated, tapped on optical detectors with level converters outside the detector field. The detector field and the optical detectors with level converters are located in a light-resistent shell. This arrangement of the detector unit allows to use the impulse skiascopy instead of permanent X-ray examinations or the skiagraphy with multienergy levels which considerably improves the diagnostic value of the exposures and the working conditions. 1 cl., 1 fig

  11. Nanopillar Optical Antenna Avalanche Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-30

    Saleh et al .14 With this information we calculate the probability density functions of the random distance of ionization for electrons and holes. A...taken from Albota et . al16) b) Probability of single photon detection vs. receiver noise threshold plotted for different values of keff12 18 6 A...Langmuir 2004, 20, 4813-4815. 33. Liu, Y.; Blair, S. Opt. Lett. 2003, 28, 507-509. 34. Tang, L.; Latif , S.; Miller, D. A. B. Elec. Lett. 2009, 45

  12. GANIL beam profile detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tribouillard, C.

    1997-01-01

    In the design phase of GANIL which started in 1977, one of the priorities of the project management was equipping the beamlines with a fast and efficient system for visualizing the beam position, thus making possible adjustment of the beam transport lines optics and facilitating beam control. The implantation of some thirty detectors was foreseen in the initial design. The assembly of installed detectors (around 190) proves the advantages of these detectors for displaying all the beams extracted from GANIL: transfer and transport lines, beam extracted from SISSI, very high intensity beam, secondary ion beams from the production target of the LISE and SPEG spectrometers, different SPIRAL project lines. All of these detectors are based on standard characteristics: - standard flange diameter (DN 160) with a standard booster for all the sensors; - identical analog electronics for all the detectors, with networking; - unique display system. The new micro-channel plate non-interceptive detectors (beam profile and ion packet lengths) make possible in-line control of the beam quality and accelerator stability. (author)

  13. The Importance of Phytoplankton Biomolecule Availability for Secondary Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina T. Peltomaa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth and reproduction of animals is affected by their access to resources. In aquatic ecosystems, the availability of essential biomolecules for filter-feeding zooplankton depends greatly on phytoplankton. Here, we analyzed the biochemical composition, i.e., the fatty acid, sterol and amino acid profiles and concentrations as well as protein, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus content of 17 phytoplankton monocultures representing the seven most abundant phytoplankton classes in boreal and sub-arctic lakes. To examine how the differences in the biochemical composition between phytoplankton classes affect their nutritional quality for consumers, we assessed the performance of Daphnia, on these diets. Furthermore, we defined the most important biomolecules regulating the somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia, expecting that higher concentrations of certain biomolecules are needed for reproduction than for growth. Finally, we combined these results with phytoplankton field data from over 900 boreal and sub-arctic lakes in order to estimate whether the somatic growth of Daphnia is sterol-limited when the natural phytoplankton communities are cyanobacteria-dominated. Our analysis shows that Daphnia grows best with phytoplankton rich in sterols, ω-3 fatty acids, protein, and amino acids. Their reproduction follows food sterol and ω-3 concentration as well as C:P-ratio being two times higher in Daphnia feeding on cryptophytes than any other diet. Interestingly, we found that a high dietary ω-6 fatty acid concentration decreases both somatic growth and reproduction of Daphnia. When combined with phytoplankton community composition field data, our results indicate that zooplankton is constantly limited by sterols in lakes dominated by cyanobacteria (≥40% of total phytoplankton biomass, and that the absence of cryptophytes can severely hinder zooplankton production in nature.

  14. Elemental labelling combined with liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantification of biomolecules: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschy, Daniela; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews novel quantification concepts where elemental labelling is combined with flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS) or liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC–ICP-MS), and employed for quantification of biomolecules such as proteins, peptides and related molecules in challenging sample matrices. In the first sections an overview on general aspects of biomolecule quantification, as well as of labelling will be presented emphasizing the potential, which lies in such methodological approaches. In this context, ICP-MS as detector provides high sensitivity, selectivity and robustness in biological samples and offers the capability for multiplexing and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Fundamental methodology of elemental labelling will be highlighted and analytical, as well as biomedical applications will be presented. A special focus will lie on established applications underlining benefits and bottlenecks of such approaches for the implementation in real life analysis. Key research made in this field will be summarized and a perspective for future developments including sophisticated and innovative applications will given. PMID:23062431

  15. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubala, Vladimir; Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O’Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad; Daniels, Stephen; Williams, David E.; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. ► Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. ► It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. ► The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. ► Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor ® ) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor ® substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor ® , and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and neutral, hydrogel-like film with polyethylene glycol (PEG) characteristics. This simple analytical approach adds to the fundamental understanding of the interaction forces in real

  16. Development of radioactively labelled cancer seeking biomolecules for targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvarigou, A.D.; Archimandritis, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Within the framework of the above project we are studying the labelling of biomolecules, peptides and antibodies, with radionuclides emitting β - and γ radiation. More specifically, for the time being, we have investigated the labelling of peptides with Re-188 and of antibodies with Sm-153 and Re-188. The radiolabelled derivatives are further evaluated in vivo for possible application in Oncology. For these radiobiological studies we are trying to apply ectopic and orthotopic tumour animal models and to develop, in collaboration with other national and foreign institutes, proper imaging devices for small animal imaging

  17. Structure analysis of biomolecules using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gekko, Kunihiko; Matsuo, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    We constructed the vacuum-ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectrophotometer, which is capable of measuring circular dichroism spectra to 140 nm for aqueous solutions at temperature from -30 to 70degC, using a small-scale SR source at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center (HiSOR). This spectrophotometer was used for structural analyses of amino acids, saccharides, and proteins in water. The obtained results demonstrate that a synchrotron radiation VUVCD spectroscopy provides more detailed and new information on the structures of biomolecules, based on the high energy transitions of chromophores such as hydroxyl, acetal, and peptide groups. (author)

  18. Simple approach to study biomolecule adsorption in polymeric microfluidic channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubala, Vladimir, E-mail: V.Gubala@kent.ac.uk [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Medway School of Pharmacy, University of Kent, Central Avenue, Anson 120, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB (United Kingdom); Siegrist, Jonathan; Monaghan, Ruairi; O' Reilly, Brian; Gandhiraman, Ram Prasad [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Daniels, Stephen [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology (NCPST), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Williams, David E. [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Ducree, Jens [Biomedical Diagnostics Institute (BDI), National Centre for Sensor Research (NCSR), Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2013-01-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple tool to assess biomolecule adsorption onto the surfaces of microchannels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development for dilution by surface-adsorption based depletion of protein samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can easily be done using a readily available apparatus like a spin-coater. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assessment tool is facile and quantitative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Straightforward comparison of different surface chemistries. - Abstract: Herein a simple analytical method is presented for the characterization of biomolecule adsorption on cyclo olefin polymer (COP, trade name: Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }) substrates which are widely used in microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. These Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign} substrates do not possess native functional groups for specific reactions with biomolecules. Therefore, depending on the application, such substrates must be functionalized by surface chemistry methods to either enhance or suppress biomolecular adsorption. This work demonstrates a microfluidic method for evaluating the adsorption of antibodies and oligonucleotides surfaces. The method uses centrifugal microfluidic flow-through chips and can easily be implemented using common equipment such as a spin coater. The working principle is very simple. The user adds 40 L of the solution containing the sample to the starting side of a microfluidic channel, where it is moved through by centrifugal force. Some molecules are adsorbed in the channel. The sample is then collected at the other end in a small reservoir and the biomolecule concentration is measured. As a pilot application, we characterized the adsorption of goat anti-human IgG and a 20-mer DNA on Zeonor{sup Registered-Sign }, and on three types of functionalized Zeonor: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modified surface with mainly positive charge, negatively charged surface with immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA), and

  19. Linkage of biomolecules to solid phases for immunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Topics covered by this lecture include a brief review of the principal methods of linkage of biomolecules to solid phase matrices. Copies of the key self explanatory slides are presented as figures together with reprints of two publications by the author dealing with a preferred chemistry for the covalent linkage of antibodies to hydroxyl and amino functional groups and the effects of changes in solid phase matrix and antibody coupling chemistry on the performance of a typical excess reagent immunoassay for thyroid stimulating hormone

  20. Biomolecule-Functionalized Smart Polydiacetylene for Biomedical and Environmental Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2018-01-04

    Polydiacetylene (PDA) has attracted interest for use as a sensing platform in biomedical, environmental, and chemical engineering applications owing to its capacity for colorimetric and fluorescent transition in response to external stimuli. Many researchers have attempted to develop a tailor-made PDA sensor via conjugation of chemical or biological substances to PDA. Here, we review smart bio-conjugates of PDA with various biomolecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. In addition, materialization and signal amplification strategies to improve handling and sensitivity are described.

  1. Low-energy electron scattering from molecules, biomolecules and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Carsky, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Since the turn of the 21st century, the field of electron molecule collisions has undergone a renaissance. The importance of such collisions in applications from radiation chemistry to astrochemistry has flowered, and their role in industrial processes such as plasma technology and lighting are vital to the advancement of next generation devices. Furthermore, the development of the scanning tunneling microscope highlights the role of such collisions in the condensed phase, in surface processing, and in the development of nanotechnology.Low-Energy Electron Scattering from Molecules, Biomolecule

  2. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I.; Jorge-Villar, S. E.; van Wesemael, B.; Lázaro, R.

    2017-01-01

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). ;Species; was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed.

  3. Solid state detector module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    A solid state detector in which each scintillator is optimally configured and coupled with its associated sensing diode in a way which exploits light piping effects to enhance efficiency, and at the same time provide a detector which is modular in nature. To achieve light piping, the scintillator crystal is oriented such that its sides conform with the crystal cleavage plane, and the sides are highly polished. An array of tungsten collimator plates define the individual channels. Multi-channel scintillator/diode modules are mounted behind and in registry with the plurality of collimator plates. A plurality of scintillators are bonded together after coating the surfaces thereof to minimize optical crosstalk. After lapping the face of the scintillator module, it is then bonded to a diode module with individual scintillators in registration with individual diodes. The module is then positioned in the detector array with collimator plates at the junctions between the scintillators

  4. Superlattice electroabsorption radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, B.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper provides a preliminary investigation of a new class of superlattice electroabsorption radiation detectors that employ direct optical modulation for high-speed, two-dimensional (2-D), high-resolution imaging. Applications for the detector include nuclear radiation measurements, tactical guidance and detection (laser radar), inertial fusion plasma studies, and satellite-based sensors. Initial calculations discussed in this paper indicate that a 1.5-μm (GaAlAs) multi-quantum-well (MQW) Fabry-Perot detector can respond directly to radiation of energies 1 eV to 10 KeV, and indirectly (with scattering targets) up through gamma, with 2-D sample rates on the order of 20 ps

  5. Active and Dynamic Nanomaterials Based on Active Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven J.; Rivera, Susan B.; Boal, Andrew K.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Bauer, Joseph M.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Liu, Jun; Bunker, Bruce C.; Bachand, George D.

    2004-03-01

    Living organisms have evolved dynamic and adaptable materials that fundamentally differ from synthetic materials. These biomaterials use chemical energy to drive non-equilibrium assembly processes, and to reconfigure in response to external stimuli or life cycle changes. Two striking examples are the diatom's active assembly of silica into a patterned cytoskeleton, and the chameleon's active transport of pigment particles to rapidly change skin color. Advances in molecular biology and nanoscale materials synthesis now present the opportunity for integrating biomolecules with synthetic components to produce new types of materials with novel assembly and adaptation capabilities. Our group has begun utilizing kinesin motor proteins and microtubules (MTs) to explore the construction of biomimetic materials. Initial work has focused on characterizing and engineering the properties of the biomolecules for robust performance in artificial systems. We have characterized the biochemical and biophysical properties of a kinesin motor protein from a thermostable fungus, and have evaluated strategies for stabilizing and functionalizing the MTs. We also have developed strategies for directed transport of MT shuttles, and for controlling the loading and unloading of nanoscale cargo.

  6. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Danyelle Khadydja F; Rufino, Raquel D; Luna, Juliana M; Santos, Valdemir A; Sarubbo, Leonie A

    2016-03-18

    In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and "green" products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  7. Polymeric Nanomaterials as Nanomembrane Entities for Biomolecule and Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisa, Airama; Espanol, Laura; Prieto, Martin; Sebastian, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Bio-nanomaterials assembled into nanomembrane entities are actively studied to circumvent the uncontrollable list of shortcomings of conventional delivery systems: low water solubility, unfavorable stability, short circulation time in plasma, rapid clearance from the human body, poor bioavailability, non-specific toxicity against normal tissue and cells, low cellular uptake and susceptibility to enzyme degradation. Basically, these nanoentities enable to exploit the therapeutic value of many promising biomolecules and drugs (B&D), controlling the mass transport of B&D at a certain rate or even on demand if a stimulus is applied. The large surface-to-volume ratio of bio-nanomaterials as well as their tunable properties enable to increase the biocompatibility, bioavailability, solubility and permeability of many unique B&D which are otherwise difficult to deliver. This review paper will focus on the last advances of bio-nanomaterials applied as nanomembranes in biomolecule and drug delivery, as well as their more remarkable properties and applications in biomedicine. New advances have been drastically established in the production of smart nanomembranes that alter their own structure and function in response to the environment. These new insights have been used for the production of smart drug delivery nanomembranes. These nanomembranes entities have the potential to revolutionize the biomedicine but there are still some shortcomings to address in order to translate the laboratory production to the clinic. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. The nanoparticle biomolecule corona: lessons learned - challenge accepted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docter, D; Westmeier, D; Markiewicz, M; Stolte, S; Knauer, S K; Stauber, R H

    2015-10-07

    Besides the wide use of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) in technical products, their applications are not only increasing in biotechnology and biomedicine, but also in the environmental field. While the physico-chemical properties and behaviour of NMs can be characterized accurately under idealized conditions, this is no longer the case in complex physiological or natural environments. Herein, proteins and other biomolecules rapidly bind to NMs, forming a protein/biomolecule corona that critically affects the NMs' (patho)biological and technical identities. As the corona impacts the in vitro and/or in vivo NM applications in humans and ecosystems, a mechanistic understanding of its relevance and of the biophysical forces regulating corona formation is mandatory. Based on recent insights, we here critically review and present an updated concept of corona formation and evolution. We comment on how corona signatures may be linked to effects at the nano-bio interface in physiological and environmental systems. In order to comprehensively analyse corona profiles and to mechanistically understand the coronas' biological/ecological impact, we present a tiered multidisciplinary approach. To stimulate progress in this field, we introduce the potential impact of the corona for NM-microbiome-(human)host interactions and the novel concept of 'nanologicals', i.e., the nanomaterial-specific targeting of molecular machines. We conclude by discussing the relevant challenges that still need to be resolved in this field.

  9. Autonomous Magnetic Microrobots by Navigating Gates for Multiple Biomolecules Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xinghao; Lim, Byeonghwa; Torati, Sri Ramulu; Ding, Junjia; Novosad, Valentine; Im, Mi-Young; Reddy, Venu; Kim, Kunwoo; Jung, Eunjoo; Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Kim, Eunjoo; Kim, CheolGi

    2018-05-08

    The precise delivery of biofunctionalized matters is of great interest from the fundamental and applied viewpoints. In spite of significant progress achieved during the last decade, a parallel and automated isolation and manipulation of rare analyte, and their simultaneous on-chip separation and trapping, still remain challenging. Here, a universal micromagnet junction for self-navigating gates of microrobotic particles to deliver the biomolecules to specific sites using a remote magnetic field is described. In the proposed concept, the nonmagnetic gap between the lithographically defined donor and acceptor micromagnets creates a crucial energy barrier to restrict particle gating. It is shown that by carefully designing the geometry of the junctions, it becomes possible to deliver multiple protein-functionalized carriers in high resolution, as well as MCF-7 and THP-1 cells from the mixture, with high fidelity and trap them in individual apartments. Integration of such junctions with magnetophoretic circuitry elements could lead to novel platforms without retrieving for the synchronous digital manipulation of particles/biomolecules in microfluidic multiplex arrays for next-generation biochips. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Biosurfactants: Multifunctional Biomolecules of the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyelle Khadydja F. Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the era of global industrialisation, the exploration of natural resources has served as a source of experimentation for science and advanced technologies, giving rise to the manufacturing of products with high aggregate value in the world market, such as biosurfactants. Biosurfactants are amphiphilic microbial molecules with hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties that partition at liquid/liquid, liquid/gas or liquid/solid interfaces. Such characteristics allow these biomolecules to play a key role in emulsification, foam formation, detergency and dispersal, which are desirable qualities in different industries. Biosurfactant production is considered one of the key technologies for development in the 21st century. Besides exerting a strong positive impact on the main global problems, biosurfactant production has considerable importance to the implantation of sustainable industrial processes, such as the use of renewable resources and “green” products. Biodegradability and low toxicity have led to the intensification of scientific studies on a wide range of industrial applications for biosurfactants in the field of bioremediation as well as the petroleum, food processing, health, chemical, agricultural and cosmetic industries. In this paper, we offer an extensive review regarding knowledge accumulated over the years and advances achieved in the incorporation of biomolecules in different industries.

  11. Novel in Vitro Efficiency of Chitosan Biomolecule Against Trichomonas Gallinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Pourseyed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of new natural agents for parasitic diseases treatment has unexpectedly increased to overcome effectively against emergence and re-emergence of parasitic diseases, the appearance of drug resistant organisms and toxic side effects of current agents. The aim of the study was to evaluate antiprotozoal activities of chitosan biomolecule on trophozoites of Trichomonas gallinae.Methods: The antitrichomonal activity of various low molecular weight chitosan concentrations including 125, 250, 500 and 1250 μg ml-1 against T. gallinae trophozoites cultured in trypticase-yeast extract-maltose medium supplemented with heat-inactivated cold horse serum was evaluated in vitro. Samples containing medium without chitosan were also assayed as controls.Results: The mortality rates at 0, 3 and 6 h post treatment with all concentrations were significantly different from control group (P<0.05. Treated trophozoites showed more susceptibility to the highest concentration reaching mortality rate of 100% at 3h post inoculation. However, at this time, results for 125, 250 and 500 μg ml-1 were 93%, 95% and 96.7%, respectively.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that the application of chitosan biomolecule is a promising option for treatment of trichomoniasis in pigeons.

  12. Sequestration of carbon dioxide and production of biomolecules using cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upendar, Ganta; Singh, Sunita; Chakrabarty, Jitamanyu; Chandra Ghanta, Kartik; Dutta, Susmita; Dutta, Abhishek

    2018-07-15

    A cyanobacterial strain, Synechococcus sp. NIT18, has been applied to sequester CO 2 using sodium carbonate as inorganic carbon source due to its efficiency of CO 2 bioconversion and high biomass production. The biomass obtained is used for the extraction of biomolecules - protein, carbohydrate and lipid. The main objective of the study is to maximize the biomass and biomolecules production with CO 2 sequestration using cyanobacterial strain cultivated under different concentrations of CO 2 (5-20%), pH (7-11) and inoculum size (5-12.5%) within a statistical framework. Maximum sequestration of CO 2 and maximum productivities of protein, carbohydrate and lipid are 71.02%, 4.9 mg/L/day, 6.7 mg/L/day and 1.6 mg/L/day respectively, at initial CO 2 concentration: 10%, pH: 9 and inoculum size: 12.5%. Since flue gas contains 10-15% CO 2 and the present strain is able to sequester CO 2 in this range, the strain could be considered as a useful tool for CO 2 mitigation for greener world. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Cherenkov correlated timing detector: materials, geometry and timing constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronstein, D.; Bergfeld, T.; Horton, D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thayer, G.; Boyer, V.; Honscheid, K.; Kichimi, H.; Sugaya, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kanda, S.; Olsen, S.; Ueno, K.; Tamura, N.; Yoshimura, K.; Lu, C.; Marlow, D.; Mindas, C.; Prebys, E.; Pomianowski, P.

    1996-01-01

    The key parameters of Cherenkov correlated timing (CCT) detectors are discussed. Measurements of radiator geometry, optical properties of radiator and coupling materials, and photon detector timing performance are presented. (orig.)

  14. Solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros, J.A.; Carvalho, M.L.C.P. de

    1992-12-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are dielectric materials, crystalline or vitreous, which registers tracks of charged nuclear particles, like alpha particles or fission fragments. Chemical etching of the detectors origin tracks that are visible at the optical microscope: track etching rate is higher along the latent track, where damage due to the charged particle increase the chemical potential, and etching rate giving rise to holes, the etched tracks. Fundamental principles are presented as well as some ideas of main applications. (author)

  15. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-08-21

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of "inorganic molecular wrapping" of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as "armour-plated" enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  16. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of ``inorganic molecular wrapping'' of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as ``armour-plated'' enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  17. Electromagnetic study of surface enhanced Raman scattering of plasmonic-biomolecule: An interaction between nanodimer and single biomolecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gyanendra Krishna; Pathak, Nilesh Kumar; Uma, R.; Sharma, R. P.

    2017-04-01

    In this article we have investigated the electromagnetic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of single biomolecule adsorbed at the surface of spherical nanodimer. The SERS mechanism has been studied using first principle approach for spherical nanodimer geometry. The coupling of plasmonic concept to biomolecule results the broadband tunable enhancement in Raman gain factor. In this observation the enhancement factor was observed around ≈ 1015. The plasmonic properties of metal nanodimer are analysed in terms of surface plasmon resonances, extinction efficiency and polarisability that have been derived under quasistatic approximation. In this paper, various facets like interdipole separation, molecule distance and size of the plasmonic nanogeometry are taken into account to analyse the Raman gain factor. We also observe that the frequency range expands sufficiently which increases the broad detectability range of the molecule which generates signal even in the outside of Raman range i.e. in between IR to UV region. Lastly, the extinction spectra and electric field profile have been evaluated at resonance wavelength 364 nm. The comparison between electrostatic approach and numerical approach (using DDA) has also been done in terms of extinction spectra.

  18. Cryogenic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehnder, A.

    1987-01-01

    Presently the development of new large scale detector systems, used in very high energy physics experiments, is very active. In the low energy range, the introduction of charge coupled devices allows improved spacial and energy resolution. In the keV region, high resolution can only be achieved via the well established diffraction spectrometers with the well-known disadvantage of a small throughput. There exist no efficient detectors for non-ionizing radiation such as coherent nuclear scattering of weakly interacting particles. The development of high resolution solid state detectors in the keV-region with the possibility of nuclear recoil detection is therefore highly desired. Such detectors applied in astro and particle physics would thus allow one to obtain new information not achievable otherwise. Three types of cryogenic detectors exist: Calorimeters/Bolometers. This type is sensitive to the produced excess phonons and measures the deposited energy by detecting the heat pulses. Excess charge carriers should be used to produce phonons. Tunneling junctions. This type is sensitive to excess charge produced by the Cooper pair breakup. Excess phonons should be used to break up Cooper pairs. Superheated superconducting granules (SSG). An SSG detector consists of granules, the metastability of which is disturbed by radiation. The Meissner effect then causes a change in the field distribution of the applied external field, which can be detected. The present paper discusses the basic principle of calorimetric and tunneling junction detectors and some of their applications. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  19. Solid state radiation detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A solid state radiation flux detector system utilizes a detector element, consisting of a bar of semiconductor having electrical conductance of magnitude dependent upon the magnitude of photon and charged particle flux impinging thereon, and negative feedback circuitry for adjusting the current flow through a light emitting diode to facilitate the addition of optical flux, having a magnitude decreasing in proportion to any increase in the magnitude of radiation (e.g. x-ray) flux incident upon the detector element, whereby the conductance of the detector element is maintained essentially constant. The light emitting diode also illuminates a photodiode to generate a detector output having a stable, highly linear response with time and incident radiation flux changes

  20. Biomolecule-nanoparticle interactions: Elucidation of the thermodynamics by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Lau, Boris L T

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are often exposed to a broad range of biomolecules of different abundances. Biomolecule sorption driven by various interfacial forces determines the surface structure and composition of NMs, subsequently governs their functionality and the reactivity of the adsorbed biomolecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a nondestructive technique that quantifies thermodynamic parameters through in-situ measurement of the heat absorption or release associated with an interaction. This review highlights the recent applications of ITC in understanding the thermodynamics of interactions between various nanoparticles (NPs) and biomolecules. Different aspects of a typical ITC experiment that are crucial for obtaining accurate and meaningful data, as well as the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of ITC applications to NP research were discussed. ITC reveals the driving forces behind biomolecule-NP interactions and the effects of the physicochemical properties of both NPs and biomolecules by quantifying the crucial thermodynamics parameters (e.g., binding stoichiometry, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG). Complimentary techniques would strengthen the interpretation of ITC results for a more holistic understanding of biomolecule-NP interactions. The thermodynamic information revealed by ITC and its complimentary characterizations is important for understanding biomolecule-NP interactions that are fundamental to the biomedical and environmental applications of NMs and their toxicological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Stereoselective assembly of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Tian, Chunyong; Zhang, Yufei; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Songping; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2015-04-14

    A series of amino acid-based metal-biomolecule nanofibers are fabricated through a coordination-directed assembly process. The chirality and carbon chain length of the amino acids exert a pronounced influence on the assembly process. This study may be extended to design diverse kinds of 1-D metal-biomolecule frameworks (MBioFs).

  2. Detectors - Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregeault, J.; Gabriel, J.L.; Hierle, G.; Lebotlan, P.; Leconte, A.; Lelandais, J.; Mosrin, P.; Munsch, P.; Saur, H.; Tillier, J.

    1998-01-01

    The reports presents the main results obtained in the fields of radiation detectors and associated electronics. In the domain of X-ray gas detectors for the keV range efforts were undertaken to rise the detector efficiency. Multiple gap parallel plate chambers of different types as well as different types of X → e - converters were tested to improve the efficiency (values of 2.4% at 60 KeV were reached). In the field of scintillators a study of new crystals has been carried out (among which Lutetium orthosilicate). CdTe diode strips for obtaining X-ray imaging were studied. The complete study of a linear array of 8 CdTe pixels has been performed and certified. The results are encouraging and point to this method as a satisfying solution. Also, a large dimension programmable chamber was used to study the influence of temperature on the inorganic scintillators in an interval from -40 deg. C to +150 deg. C. Temperature effects on other detectors and electronic circuits were also investigated. In the report mentioned is also the work carried out for the realization of the DEMON neutron multidetector. For neutron halo experiments different large area Si detectors associated with solid and gas position detectors were realized. In the frame of a contract with COGEMA a systematic study of Li doped glasses was undertaken aiming at replacing with a neutron probe the 3 He counters presently utilized in pollution monitoring. An industrial prototype has been realised. Other studies were related to integrated analog chains, materials for Cherenkov detectors, scintillation probes for experiments on fundamental processes, gas position sensitive detectors, etc. In the field of associated electronics there are mentioned the works related to the multidetector INDRA, data acquisition, software gamma spectrometry, automatic gas pressure regulation in detectors, etc

  3. Soft x-ray circular dichroism of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Tanaka, Makoto; Agui, Akane

    2005-01-01

    We succeeded to observe natural circular dichroism NCD for biomolecules in soft X-ray region for the first time. Evaporated films of amino acids, phenylalanine (phe) and serine (ser) were prepared in vacuum with the thickness of about 300 nm. Measurement was carried out at the soft X-ray undulator beamline BL23SU of the Spring-8, where left- and right-circularly polarized light (LCPL and RCPL) was available from an APPLE-2 undulator. Difference spectra DA(hν) was plotted as a function of photon energy hν of soft X-ray to be the difference between absorption coefficient A L for LCPL and absorption coefficient A R for RCPL, namely, DA(hν) ≡ A L (hν) - A R (hν). Values of A L and A R were determined by means of the photoelectric drain current measurement. In the DA(hν) spectra for L-phe films, negative peak was observed at 407 eV. On the contrary, for D-phe films, positive peak was observed at 407 eV with the same magnitude but opposite sign. Moreover, no signal was observed for racemic phenylalanine (DL-phe). In the wavelength region of visible to ultraviolet, there is well-known general law in which NCD signals for D- and L-enantiomers are the same magnitude but opposite sign and racemic compound does not show NCD spectra. Characteristic features in DA(hν) spectra of the L-phe, D-phe and DL-phe were of good agreement with this well-known general law. Based on this good agreement, we concluded that peaks at 407 eV in the DA(hν) spectra are true NCD peaks. For ser films, we assigned peaks at 540 eV and 548 eV to be NCD peaks in the same manner. We hope that our first observation of NCD for biomolecules at soft X-ray region will open new science and technologies such as basic science including elucidation of fundamental mechanism of NCD and application to manipulate biomolecules using circularly polarized soft X-ray beams. (author)

  4. Fibre optic microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt, David R

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review describes how fibre optic microarrays can be used to create a variety of sensing and measurement systems. This review covers the basics of optical fibres and arrays, the different microarray architectures, and describes a multitude of applications. Such arrays enable multiplexed sensing for a variety of analytes including nucleic acids, vapours, and biomolecules. Polymer-coated fibre arrays can be used for measuring microscopic chemical phenomena, such as corrosion and localized release of biochemicals from cells. In addition, these microarrays can serve as a substrate for fundamental studies of single molecules and single cells. The review covers topics of interest to chemists, biologists, materials scientists, and engineers.

  5. Detector Plans for LS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nessi, M [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    All experiments plan an effective usage of the LS1 shutdown period. After three years of running they will go through a consolidation phase, mostly to fix problems that have emerged over time, like single points of failure in the infrastructure, failures of low voltage power supplies and optical links. Upgrades of some detector components will start, mainly related to the beam pipe, the innermost tracker elements and the trigger system. Detector components, which had to be staged for cost reasons in 2003, will then enter into the detector setup. The goal is to be fully ready for the new energy regime at nominal luminosity.

  6. Applications of nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medveczky, L.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a scientific research-work are summarized. Nuclear track detectors were used for new applications or in unusual ways. Photographic films, nuclear emulsions and dielectric track detectors were investigated. The tracks were detected by optical microscopy. Empirical formulation has been derived for the neutron sensitivity of certain dielectric materials. Methods were developed for leak testing of closed alpha emitting sources. New procedures were found for the application and evaluation of track detector materials. The results were applied in the education, personnel dosimetry, radon dosimetry etc. (R.J.)

  7. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  8. Sustained delivery of biomolecules from gelatin carriers for applications in bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiankang; Leeuwenburgh, Sander Cg

    2014-08-01

    Local delivery of therapeutic biomolecules to stimulate bone regeneration has matured considerably during the past decades, but control over the release of these biomolecules still remains a major challenge. To this end, suitable carriers that allow for tunable spatial and temporal delivery of biomolecules need to be developed. Gelatin is one of the most widely used natural polymers for the controlled and sustained delivery of biomolecules because of its biodegradability, biocompatibility, biosafety and cost-effectiveness. The current study reviews the applications of gelatin as carriers in form of bulk hydrogels, microspheres, nanospheres, colloidal gels and composites for the programmed delivery of commonly used biomolecules for applications in bone regeneration with a specific focus on the relationship between carrier properties and delivery characteristics.

  9. Determination of the three-dimensional structure for weakly aligned biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahkhatuni, Astghik A; Shahkhatuni, Aleksan G

    2002-01-01

    The key achievements and the potential of NMR spectroscopy for weakly aligned biomolecules are considered. Due to weak alignment, it becomes possible to determine a number of NMR parameters dependent on the orientation of biomolecules, which are averaged to zero in usual isotropic media. The addition of new orientational constraints to standard procedures of 3D structure determination markedly increases the achievable accuracy. The possibility of structure determination for biomolecules using only orientation-dependent parameters without invoking other NMR data is discussed. The methods of orientation, experimental techniques, and calculation methods are systematised. The main results obtained and the prospects of using NMR spectroscopy of weakly aligned systems to study different classes of biomolecules and to solve various problems of molecular biology are analysed. Examples of biomolecules whose structures have been determined using orientation-dependent parameters are given. The bibliography includes 508 references.

  10. Evaluation and selection of the first cascade of the preamplifier of optic feedback for silicon-lithium detector manufactured at CEADEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Garcia, A.; Cabal Rodriguez, A. E.; Suarez Caner, E.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the main characteristics of field-effect transistors (Fet) and light-emitter diodes (Led) that allow to obtain a good energy resolution in Sili detectors for X ray fluorescence. There are exhibited transconductance values (dl/d V) and gate current (Igss) for 16 researched Fets, as well as the measurement circuits. (author) [es

  11. A printed electronic platform for the specific detection of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumbia, A.; Webb, M.; Turner, M. L.; Behrendt, J. M.; Wilson, R.

    2017-08-01

    The rapid detection of disease specific biomarkers in a clinically relevant range using a low-cost sensor can facilitate the development of individual treatment plans for a given patient, known as precision, personalized or genomic medicine. In the recent decade Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field Effect Transistors (EGOFETs), a subtype of OFETs where the dielectric is replaced by an electrolyte, have attracted a great deal of attention for sensing applications. This is due to their capacity to operate at low voltage (market are not yet achieved. In this contribution, we describe the development of a stable and reproducible EGOFET sensor that is able to detect biomolecules selectively in real-time. Facile and scalable techniques are used to prepare arrays of these devices. The selectivity of individual EGOFETs is investigated by immobilization of specific ligands to the target molecule of interest on the gate electrode within a microfluidic flow cell.

  12. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston Chen, C. H.; Sammartano, L. J.; Isola, N. R.; Allman, S. L.

    2001-08-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications.

  13. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detection and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winston Chen, C.H.; Allman, S.L.; Sammartano, L.J.; Isola, N.R.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, we developed and used laser desorption mass spectrometry for biomolecule detections. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was successfully used to detect DNA fragments with the size larger than 3000 base pairs. It was also successfully used to sequence DNA with both enzymatic and chemical degradation methods to produce DNA ladders. We also developed MALDI with fragmentation for direct DNA sequencing for short DNA probes. Since laser desorption mass spectrometry for DNA detection has the advantages of fast speed and no need of labeling, it has a great potential for molecular diagnosis for disease and person identification by DNA fingerprinting. We applied laser desorption mass spectrometry to succeed in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis and several other nerve degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. We also succeeded in demonstrating DNA typing for forensic applications

  14. Integrated nanoparticle-biomolecule systems for biosensing and bioelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Itamar; Baron, Ronan; Willner, Bilha

    2007-04-15

    The similar dimensions of biomolecules such as enzymes, antibodies or DNA, and metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) enable the synthesis of biomolecule-NP hybrid systems where the unique electronic, photonic and catalytic properties of NPs are combined with the specific recognition and biocatalytic properties of biomolecules. The unique functions of biomolecule-NP hybrid systems are discussed with several examples: (i) the electrical contacting of redox enzymes with electrodes is the basis for the development of enzymatic electrodes for amperometric biosensors or biofuel cell elements. The reconstitution of the apo-glucose oxidase or apo-glucose dehydrogenase on flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-functionalized Au NPs (1.4 nm) associated with electrodes, or on pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-functionalized Au NPs (1.4 nm) associated with electrodes, respectively, yields electrically contacted enzyme electrodes. The aligned, reconstituted enzymes on the electrode surfaces reveal effective electrical contacting, and the glucose oxidase and glucose dehydrogenase reveal turnover rates of 5000 and 11,800 s(-1), respectively. (ii) The photoexcitation of semiconductor nanoparticles yields fluorescence with a wavelength controlled by the size of the NPs. The fluorescence functions of semiconductor NPs are used to develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay for nucleic acids, and specifically, for analyzing telomerase activity in cancer cells. CdSe-ZnS NPs are functionalized by a primer recognized by telomerase, and this is elongated by telomerase extracted from HeLa cancer cells in the presence of dNTPs and Texas-red-functionalized dUTP. The dye integrated into the telomers allows the FRET process that is intensified as telomerization proceeds. Also, the photoexcited electron-hole pair generated in semiconductor NPs is used to generate photocurrents in a CdS-DNA hybrid system associated with an electrode. A redox-active intercalator, methylene blue

  15. Electrophoretic transport of biomolecules across liquid-liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Thomas; Hardt, Steffen [Center of Smart Interfaces, TU Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Muenchow, Goetz, E-mail: hardt@csi.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 18-20, D-55129 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-05-11

    The mass transfer resistance of a liquid-liquid interface in an aqueous two-phase system composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran is investigated. Different types of proteins and DNA stained with fluorescent dyes serve as probes to study the transport processes close to the interface. A microfluidic device is employed to enable the electrophoretic transport of biomolecules from one phase to another. The results obtained for proteins can be explained solely via the different electrophoretic mobilities and different affinities of the molecules to the two phases, without any indications of a significant mass transfer resistance of the liquid-liquid interface. By contrast, DNA molecules adsorb to the interface and only desorb under an increased electric field strength. The desorption process carries the signature of a thermally activated escape from a metastable state, as reflected in the exponential decay of the fluorescence intensity at the interface as a function of time.

  16. Manipulation of Biomolecule-Modified Liquid-Metal Blobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Miyako, Eijiro

    2017-10-23

    Soft and deformable liquid metals (LMs) are building components in various systems related to uncertain and dynamic task environments. Herein we describe the development of a biomolecule-triggered external-manipulation method involving LM conjugates for the construction of future innovative soft robotics operating in physiological environments. Functional soft hybrids composed of a liquid-metal droplet, a thiolated ligand, and proteins were synthesized for the expression of diverse macroscopic commands, such as attachment to cells, binary fusion, and self-propelled movement through molecular recognition and enzymatic reactions. Our technology could be used to create new state-of-the-art soft robots for chemical and biomedical engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Modification of biomolecules and combined actions by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, J. W.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, J. I.; Song, B. S.; Kim, J. K.; Park, J. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Ryu, S. H.; Sung, N. Y.; Cha, M. K.; Nam, J. Y.; Park, J. Y.; Cho, E. R.; Ryu, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Advanced Radiation Technology Institute is a government-supported institute for radiation research and application. It has focused on development of fundamentals for radiation applications based on the existing radiation technology, and on enhancement of biological effectiveness of radiation through theoretical approach to the combined actions of radiation with another factor. Application of radiation technology together with the existing technologies to enhance the physical, chemical, biological characteristics through modification of biomolecules resulted in creation of de novo materials of scientific and industrial values. A theoretical model for combined action of radiation with another physico-chemical factor has been established. Conclusively the results of this study can provide scientific bases for maximizing the efficacy of ionizing radiation in relation to industrial applications

  18. Water Dynamics in the Hydration Shells of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structure and function of biomolecules are strongly influenced by their hydration shells. Structural fluctuations and molecular excitations of hydrating water molecules cover a broad range in space and time, from individual water molecules to larger pools and from femtosecond to microsecond time scales. Recent progress in theory and molecular dynamics simulations as well as in ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy has led to new and detailed insight into fluctuations of water structure, elementary water motions, electric fields at hydrated biointerfaces, and processes of vibrational relaxation and energy dissipation. Here, we review recent advances in both theory and experiment, focusing on hydrated DNA, proteins, and phospholipids, and compare dynamics in the hydration shells to bulk water. PMID:28248491

  19. Interactions of model biomolecules. Benchmark CC calculations within MOLCAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Miroslav [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Institute of Materials Science, Bottova 25, SK-917 24 Trnava, Slovakia and Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Scie (Slovakia); Pitoňák, Michal; Neogrády, Pavel; Dedíková, Pavlína [Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Hobza, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Complex Molecular Systems and biomolecules, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-22

    We present results using the OVOS approach (Optimized Virtual Orbitals Space) aimed at enhancing the effectiveness of the Coupled Cluster calculations. This approach allows to reduce the total computer time required for large-scale CCSD(T) calculations about ten times when the original full virtual space is reduced to about 50% of its original size without affecting the accuracy. The method is implemented in the MOLCAS computer program. When combined with the Cholesky decomposition of the two-electron integrals and suitable parallelization it allows calculations which were formerly prohibitively too demanding. We focused ourselves to accurate calculations of the hydrogen bonded and the stacking interactions of the model biomolecules. Interaction energies of the formaldehyde, formamide, benzene, and uracil dimers and the three-body contributions in the cytosine – guanine tetramer are presented. Other applications, as the electron affinity of the uracil affected by solvation are also shortly mentioned.

  20. DUMAND detector

    CERN Multimedia

    This object is one of the 256 other detectors of the DUMAND (Deep Underwater Muon And Neutrino Detection) experiment. The goal of the experiment was the construction of the first deep ocean high energy neutrino detector, to be placed at 4800 m depth in the Pacific Ocean off Keahole Point on the Big Island of Hawaii. A few years ago, a European conference with Cosmic experiments was organized at CERN as they were projects like DUMAND in Hawaii. Along with the conference, a temporary exhibition was organised as well. It was a collaboration of institutions from Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the U.S.A. CERN had borrowed equipment and objects from different institutes around the world, including this detector of the DUMAND experiment. Most of the equipment were sent back to the institutes, however this detector sphere was offered to a CERN member of the personnel.

  1. Detector applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehl, R.H.

    1977-10-01

    Semiconductor detectors are now applied to a very wide range of problems. The combination of relatively low cost, excellent energy resolution, and simultaneous broad energy-spectrum analysis is uniquely suited to many applications in both basic and applied physics. Alternative techniques, such as magnetic spectrometers for charged-particle spectroscopy, while offering better energy resolution, are bulky, expensive, and usually far more difficult to use. Furthermore, they do not directly provide the broad energy-spectrum measurements easily accomplished using semiconductor detectors. Scintillation detectors, which are approximately equivalent to semiconductor detectors in convenience and cost, exhibit 10 to 100 times worse energy resolution. However, their high efficiency and large potential size recommend their use in some measurements

  2. Platinum(II) complexes as spectroscopic probes for biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratilla, E.

    1990-09-21

    The use of platinum(II) complexes as tags and probes for biomolecules is indeed advantageous for their reactivities can be selective for certain purposes through an interplay of mild reaction conditions and of the ligands bound to the platinum. The use of {sup 195}Pt NMR as a method of detecting platinum and its interactions with biomolecules was carried out with the simplest model of platinum(II) tagging to proteins. Variable-temperature {sup 195}Pt NMR spectroscopy proved useful in studying the stereodynamics of complex thioethers like methionine. The complex, Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}, with its chromophore has a greater potential for probing proteins. It is a noninvasive and selective tag for histidine and cysteine residues on the surface of cytochrome c at pH 5. The protein derivatives obtained are separable, and the tags are easily quantitated and differentiated through the metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands which are sensitive to the environment of the tag. Increasing the pH to 7.0 led to the modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +}of Arg 91 in cytochrome c. Further studies with guanidine-containing ligands as models for arginine modification by Pt(trpy)Cl{sup +} showed that guanidine can act as a terminal ligand and as a bridging ligand. Owing to the potential utility of Pt(trpy)L{sup n+} as electron dense probes of nucleic acid structure, interactions of this bis-Pt(trpy){sup 2+} complex with nucleic acids was evaluated. Indeed, the complex interacts non-covalently with nucleic acids. Its interactions with DNA are not exactly the same as those of its precedents. Most striking is its ability to form highly immobile bands of DNA upon gel electrophoresis. 232 refs.

  3. Characterization of nanoDot optically stimulated luminescence detectors and high-sensitivity MCP-N thermoluminescent detectors in the 40-300 kVp energy range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Yannick; Kuznetsova, Svetlana; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    To investigate empirically the energy dependence of the detector response of two in vivo luminescence detectors, LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) high-sensitivity TLDs and Al 2 O 3 :C OSLDs, in the 40-300-kVp energy range in the context of in vivo surface dose measurement. As these detectors become more prevalent in clinical and preclinical in vivo measurements, knowledge of the variation in the empirical dependence of the measured response of these detectors across a wide spectrum of beam qualities is important. We characterized a large range of beam qualities of three different kilovoltage x-ray units: an Xstrahl 300 Orthovoltage unit, a Precision x-Ray X-RAD 320ix biological irradiator, and a Varian On-Board Imaging x-ray unit. The dose to water was measured in air according to the AAPM's Task Group 61 protocol. The OSLDs and TLDs were irradiated under reference conditions on the surface of a water phantom to provide full backscatter conditions. To assess the change in sensitivity in the long term, we separated the in vivo dosimeters of each type into an experimental and a reference group. The experimental dosimeters were irradiated using the kilovoltage x-ray units at each beam quality used in this investigation, while the reference group received a constant 10 cGy irradiation at 6 MV from a Varian clinical linear accelerator. The individual calibration of each detector was verified in cycles where both groups received a 10 cGy irradiation at 6 MV. The nanoDot OSLDs were highly reproducible, with ±1.5% variation in response following >40 measurement cycles. The TLDs lost ~20% of their signal sensitivity over the course of the study. The relative light output per unit dose to water of the MCP-N TLDs did not vary with beam quality for beam qualities with effective energies <50 keV (~150 kVp/6 mm Al). At higher energies, they showed a reduced (~75-85%) light output per unit dose relative to 6 MV x rays. The nanoDot OSLDs exhibited a very strong (120

  4. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.; Howes, J.H.; Smout, D.W.S.

    1979-01-01

    A smoke detector is described which provides a smoke sensing detector and an indicating device and in which a radioactive substance is used in conjunction with two ionisation chambers. The system includes an outer electrode, a collector electrode and an inner electrode which is made of or supports the radioactive substance which, in this case, is 241 Am. The invention takes advantage of the fact that smoke particles can be allowed to enter freely the inner ionisation chamber. (U.K.)

  5. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, W.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation detector for measuring e.g. a neutron flux consists of a central emitter, an insulating shell arranged around it, and a tube-shaped collector enclosing both. The emitter itself is composed of a great number of stranded, spiral wires of small diameter giving a defined flexibility to the detector. For emitter material Pt, Rh, V, Co, Ce, Os or Ta may be used. (DG) [de

  6. Split detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederstrand, C.N.; Chism, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which provides a dual channel capability for the simultaneous determination of the presence and concentration of two gases in a stream of sample gas and which has a single infrared source, a single sample cell, two infrared bandpass filters, and two infrared detectors. A separator between the filters and detectors prevents interchange of radiation between the filters. The separator is positioned by fitting it in a slot

  7. Intracellular delivery of nanomaterials for sub-cellular imaging and tracking of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medepalli, Krishna Kiran

    Nanomaterials have many intriguing applications in biology and medicine. Unique properties such as enhanced electrical properties, increased chemical reactivity and resistance to degradation, novel optical properties and comparable size to that of biological systems have led to their use in various biomedical applications. The most important applications of nanomaterials for medicine are in drug delivery and imaging. This research focuses on utilizing the biocompatibility of single walled Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and optical properties colloidal quantum dots (QDs) for cellular drug delivery and imaging of biomolecules. The first part of this research deals with single walled carbon nanotubes which are excellent candidates for targeted drug delivery applications due their unique structural and functional properties. However, prior to their use in therapeutics, their biocompatibility needs to be thoroughly investigated. The objectives of this research were to establish the biocompatibility of SWCNTs and demonstrate their use as drug delivery carriers into cells. Blood, a living tissue, is chosen as the biological system as it contains various cells which can potentially interact with SWCNTs during the delivery mechanism. The interactions of these cells in the blood (specifically white blood cells or leukocytes) with the SWCNTs provide vital information regarding the immune response of the host to the nanotubes. This research investigates the immune response of white blood cells due to SWCNTs via (a) direct interaction---presence of nanotubes in the blood and, (b) indirect interaction---presentation of nanotubes by antigen-presenting-cells to white blood cells. These two interactions recreate the innate and adaptive immune responses occurring in the body to any foreign substance. SWCNTs are functionalized with single stranded DNA (ss-DNA), which serves as a dispersant of nanotubes as well as a backbone for further attachment of other biomolecules of interest

  8. In Situ Caging of Biomolecules in Graphene Hybrids for Light Modulated Bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Xiao-Hui; Hao, Si-Jie; Nisic, Merisa; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2018-01-31

    Remote and noninvasive modulation of protein activity is essential for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Optical control has emerged as the most attractive approach owing to its high spatial and temporal resolutions; however, it is challenging to engineer light responsive proteins. In this work, a near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive graphene-silica-trypsin (GST) nanoreactor is developed for modulating the bioactivity of trypsin molecules. Biomolecules are spatially confined and protected in the rationally designed compartment architecture, which not only reduces the possible interference but also boosts the bioreaction efficiency. Upon NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the GST nanoreactor enables the ultrafast in situ heating for remote activation and tuning of the bioactivity. We apply the GST nanoreactor for remote and ultrafast proteolysis of proteins, which remarkably enhances the proteolysis efficiency and reduces the bioreaction time from the overnight of using free trypsin to seconds. We envision that this work not only provides a promising tool of ultrafast and remotely controllable proteolysis for in vivo proteomics in study of tissue microenvironment and other biomedical applications but also paves the way for exploring smart artificial nanoreactors in biomolecular modulation to gain insight in dynamic biological transformation.

  9. Analysis of a photon number resolving detector based on fluorescence readout of an ion Coulomb crystal quantum memory inside an optical cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christoph; Sangouard, N.; Drewsen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to detect single photons with a high efficiency is a crucial requirement for various quantum information applications. By combining the storage process of a quantum memory for photons with fluorescence-based quantum state measurement, it is, in principle, possible to achieve high......-efficiency photon counting in large ensembles of atoms. The large number of atoms can, however, pose significant problems in terms of noise stemming from imperfect initial state preparation and off-resonant fluorescence. We identify and analyse a concrete implementation of a photon number resolving detector based...... larger than 93%. Moderate experimental parameters allow for repetition rates of about 3 kHz, limited by the time needed for fluorescence collection and re-cooling of the ions between trials. Our analysis may lead to the first implementation of a photon number resolving detector in atomic ensembles....

  10. Ultrafast, superhigh gain visible-blind UV detector and optical logic gates based on nonpolar a-axial GaN nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingfu; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Xinman; He, Miao; Liu, Chao; Yin, Yian; Zou, Xianshao; Li, Shuti

    2014-09-01

    Nonpolar a-axial GaN nanowire (NW) was first used to construct the MSM (metal-semiconductor-metal) symmetrical Schottky contact device for application as visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) detector. Without any surface or composition modifications, the fabricated device demonstrated a superior performance through a combination of its high sensitivity (up to 104 A W-1) and EQE value (up to 105), as well as ultrafast (memory storage.Nonpolar a-axial GaN nanowire (NW) was first used to construct the MSM (metal-semiconductor-metal) symmetrical Schottky contact device for application as visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) detector. Without any surface or composition modifications, the fabricated device demonstrated a superior performance through a combination of its high sensitivity (up to 104 A W-1) and EQE value (up to 105), as well as ultrafast (memory storage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the EDS and SAED data, supplementary results of the UV detector, and the discussion of the transport properties of the MSM Schottky contact devices. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03581j

  11. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Mitsunori, E-mail: honda.mitsunori@jaea.go.jp; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-04-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds.

  12. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  13. Biomolecule-recognition gating membrane using biomolecular cross-linking and polymer phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroki, Hidenori; Ito, Taichi; Ohashi, Hidenori; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2011-12-15

    We present for the first time a biomolecule-recognition gating system that responds to small signals of biomolecules by the cooperation of biorecognition cross-linking and polymer phase transition in nanosized pores. The biomolecule-recognition gating membrane immobilizes the stimuli-responsive polymer, including the biomolecule-recognition receptor, onto the pore surface of a porous membrane. The pore state (open/closed) of this gating membrane depends on the formation of specific biorecognition cross-linking in the pores: a specific biomolecule having multibinding sites can be recognized by several receptors and acts as the cross-linker of the grafted polymer, whereas a nonspecific molecule cannot. The pore state can be distinguished by a volume phase transition of the grafted polymer. In the present study, the principle of the proposed system is demonstrated using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as the stimuli-responsive polymer and avidin-biotin as a multibindable biomolecule-specific receptor. As a result of the selective response to the specific biomolecule, a clear permeability change of an order of magnitude was achieved. The principle is versatile and can be applied to many combinations of multibindable analyte-specific receptors, including antibody-antigen and lectin-sugar analogues. The new gating system can find wide application in the bioanalytical field and aid the design of novel biodevices.

  14. When biomolecules meet graphene: from molecular level interactions to material design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dapeng; Zhang, Wensi; Yu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Zhenping; Su, Zhiqiang; Wei, Gang

    2016-12-01

    Graphene-based materials have attracted increasing attention due to their atomically-thick two-dimensional structures, high conductivity, excellent mechanical properties, and large specific surface areas. The combination of biomolecules with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene-biomolecule hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biology, medicine, nanotechnology, and materials science. In this review, we focus on a summarization of the recent studies in functionalizing graphene-based materials using different biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, and viruses. The different interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level are demonstrated and discussed in detail. In addition, the potential applications of the created graphene-biomolecule nanohybrids in drug delivery, cancer treatment, tissue engineering, biosensors, bioimaging, energy materials, and other nanotechnological applications are presented. This review will be helpful to know the modification of graphene with biomolecules, understand the interactions between graphene and biomolecules at the molecular level, and design functional graphene-based nanomaterials with unique properties for various applications.

  15. Comprehensive spectroscopic studies on the interaction of biomolecules with surfactant detached multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of ten diverse biomolecules with surfactant detached Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) using multiple spectroscopic methods. Declining fluorescence intensity of biomolecules in combination with the hyperchromic effect in UV-Visible spectra confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation. Quenching mechanism remains static and non-fluorescent. 3D spectral data of biomolecules suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues arising out of CNTs interaction. Amide band Shifts corresponding to the secondary structure of biomolecules were observed in the of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. In addition, there exists an increased Raman intensity of tryptophan residues of biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Hence, the binding of the aromatic structures of CNTs with the aromatic amino acid residues, in a particular, tryptophan was evidenced. Far UV Circular spectra have showed the loss of alpha-helical contents in biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Near UV CD spectra confirmed the alterations in the tryptophan positions of the peptide backbone. Hence, our results have demonstrated that the interaction of biomolecules with OH-MWCNTs would involve binding cum structural changes and alteration to their aromatic micro-environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Novel Hyphenated Techniques of Atomic Spectrometry for Metal Species Interaction with Biomolecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yan, Xiu-ping

    2015-09-01

    Trace metals may be adopted by biological systems to assist in the syntheses and metabolic functions of genes (DNA and RNA) and proteins in the environment. These metals may be beneficial or may pose a risk to humans and other life forms. Novel hybrid techniques are required for studies on the interaction between different metal species and biomolecules, which is significant for biology, biochemistry, nutrition, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, and environmental science. In recent years, our group dwells on new hyphenated techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE), electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and their application for different metal species interaction with biomolecules such as DNA, HSA, and GSH. The CE-ETAAS assay and CE-ICP-MS assay allow sensitively probing the level of biomolecules such as DNA damage by different metal species and extracting the kinetic and thermodynamic information on the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules, provides direct evidences for the formation of different metal species--biomolecule adducts. In addition, the consequent structural information were extracted from circular dichroism (CD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The present works represent the most complete and extensive study to date on the interactions between different metal species with biomolecules, and also provide new evidences for and insights into the interactions of different metal species with biomolecules for further understanding of the toxicological effects of metal species.

  17. Comparative study of anti-angiogenic activities of luteolin, lectin and lupeol biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambasta, Rashmi K; Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Kumar, Dhiraj; Sharma, Renu; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Kumar, Pravir

    2015-09-18

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark feature in the initiation, progression and growth of tumour. There are various factors for promotion of angiogenesis on one hand and on the other hand, biomolecules have been reported to inhibit cancer through anti-angiogenesis mechanism. Biomolecules, for instance, luteolin, lectin and lupeol are known to suppress cancer. This study aims to compare and evaluate the biomolecule(s) like luteolin, lupeol and lectin on CAM assay and HT-29 cell culture to understand the efficacy of these drugs. The biomolecules have been administered on CAM assay, HT-29 cell culture, cell migration assay. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis of the identified targets of these biomolecules have been performed. Luteolin has been found to be better in inhibiting angiogenesis on CAM assay in comparison to lupeol and lectin. In line with this study when biomolecules was administered on cell migration assay via scratch assay method. We provided evidence that Luteolin was again found to be better in inhibiting HT-29 cell migration. In order to identify the target sites of luteolin for inhibition, we used software analysis for identifying the best molecular targets of luteolin. Using software analysis best target protein molecule of these biomolecules have been identified. VEGF was found to be one of the target of luteolin. Studies have found several critical point mutation in VEGF A, B and C. Hence docking analysis of all biomolecules with VEGFR have been performed. Multiple allignment result have shown that the receptors are conserved at the docking site. Therefore, it can be concluded that luteolin is not only comparatively better in inhibiting blood vessel in CAM assay, HT-29 cell proliferation and cell migration assay rather the domain of VEGFR is conserved to be targeted by luteolin, lupeol and lectin.

  18. Raman spectroscopy detection of biomolecules in biocrusts from differing environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, I; Jorge-Villar, S E; van Wesemael, B; Lázaro, R

    2017-01-15

    Lichens and cyanobacteria colonize inhospitable places covering a wide climate range due to their different survival strategies, such as the synthesis of protective biomolecules. The effect of ecological factors on the synthesis of biomolecules has not been widely analysed. This study aimed to assess the effects of four factors (species, microclimate, seasonality and hydration state) and their interactions on the biomolecule frequency detected by Raman Spectroscopy. We included cyanobacterial biocrusts, and the lichens Diploschistes diacapsis, Squamarina lentigera, and Lepraria isidiata; two contrasted microclimates (typical and marginal), two contrasted seasons (hot and dry vs cool and wet) and two hydration states (dry and wet). "Species" was the most influential factor in the identity and frequency of the main biomolecules. Microclimatic differences in the range of the local specific habitats only influenced the biomolecules in cyanobacteria. There was a quadruple interaction among the factors, the effects being different mainly depending on the species. At D. diacapsis, the production of their main biomolecules depended on microclimate, although it also depended on seasonality. Nevertheless, in L. isidiata and S. lentigera microclimatic differences did not significantly affect the production of biomolecules. In the lichen species, the microhabitats exposed to relatively larger incident radiation did not show significantly larger relative frequency of photoprotective biomolecules. No clear connection between higher production of oxalates and drier microhabitats was found, suggesting that the synthesis of oxalates is not related to water reserve strategy. The pros and cons of monitor biomolecules in biocrust by Raman spectrometry were also discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Shape-controlled synthesis and properties of manganese sulfide microcrystals via a biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Jinghui; Yu Runnan; Zhu Jianyu; Yi Ran; Qiu Guanzhou [School of Resources Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); He Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu Xiaohe, E-mail: liuxh@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Resources Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2009-06-15

    An effective biomolecule-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare {gamma}-manganese sulfide (MnS) microtubes under hydrothermal conditions. In the synthetic system, soluble hydrated manganese chloride was employed to supply Mn source and L-cysteine was used as precipitator and complexing reagent. Sea urchin-like {gamma}-MnS and octahedron-like {alpha}-MnS microcrystals could also be selectively obtained by adjusting the process parameters such as hydrothermal temperature and reaction time. The phase structures, morphologies and properties of the as-prepared products were investigated in detail by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), and photoluminescence spectra (PL). The photoluminescence studies exhibited the correlations between the morphology, size, and shape structure of MnS microcrystals and its optical properties. The formation mechanisms of manganese sulfide microcrystals were discussed based on the experimental results.

  20. Peptide aptamer-assisted immobilization of green fluorescent protein for creating biomolecule-complexed carbon nanotube device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nii, Daisuke; Nozawa, Yosuke; Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Tomo, Tatsuya; Shimada, Yuichiro

    2017-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a novel material for next-generation applications. In this study, we generated carbon nanotube and green fluorescent protein (GFP) conjugates using affinity binding peptides. The carbon nanotube-binding motif was introduced into the N-terminus of the GFP through molecular biology methods. Multiple GFPs were successfully aligned on a single-walled carbon nanotube via the molecular recognition function of the peptide aptamer, which was confirmed through transmission electron microscopy and optical analysis. Fluorescence spectral analysis results also suggested that the carbon nanotube-GFP complex was autonomously formed with orientation and without causing protein denaturation during immobilization. This simple process has a widespread potential for fabricating carbon nanotube-biomolecule hybrid devices.

  1. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    Since September, the muon alignment system shifted from a mode of hardware installation and commissioning to operation and data taking. All three optical subsystems (Barrel, Endcap and Link alignment) have recorded data before, during and after CRAFT, at different magnetic fields and during ramps of the magnet. This first data taking experience has several interesting goals: •    study detector deformations and movements under the influence of the huge magnetic forces; •    study the stability of detector structures and of the alignment system over long periods, •    study geometry reproducibility at equal fields (specially at 0T and 3.8T); •    reconstruct B=0T geometry and compare to nominal/survey geometries; •    reconstruct B=3.8T geometry and provide DT and CSC alignment records for CMSSW. However, the main goal is to recons...

  2. Television area detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, V.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of standard television camera tubes as X-ray detectors in X-ray diffraction studies. Standard tubes can be modified to detect X rays by depositing an external X-ray phosphor on the fibre optics face plate either of a highly sensitive television camera tube or of an image intensifier coupled to a camera tube. The author considers various X-ray phosphors and concludes that polycrystalline silver activated ZnS is most suitable for crystallographic applications. In the following sections various types of television camera tubes with adequate light sensitivity for use in an X-ray detection system are described, and also three types of image intensifiers. The digitization of the television output signals and their statistical precision are discussed and the electronic circuitry for the detector system is briefly described. (B.D.)

  3. The LUCID detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lasagni Manghi, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Starting from 2015 LHC will perform a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely renewed, both on detector design and in the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics is presented, featuring a new read-out board (LUCROD), for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and the revisited LUMAT board for side A–side C combination. The contribution covers the new boards design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  4. Advances in the synthesis of nitroxide radicals for use in biomolecule spin labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugland, Marius M; Lovett, Janet E; Anderson, Edward A

    2018-02-05

    EPR spectroscopy is an increasingly useful analytical tool to probe biomolecule structure, dynamic behaviour, and interactions. Nitroxide radicals are the most commonly used radical probe in EPR experiments, and many methods have been developed for their synthesis, as well as incorporation into biomolecules using site-directed spin labelling. In this Tutorial Review, we discuss the most practical methods for the synthesis of nitroxides, focusing on the tunability of their structures, the manipulation of their sidechains into spin labelling handles, and their installation into biomolecules.

  5. 18 F-Labeling of Sensitive Biomolecules for Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hema S; Ma, Longle; Vasdev, Neil; Liang, Steven H

    2017-11-07

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study of fluorine-18 labeled biomolecules is an emerging and rapidly growing area for preclinical and clinical research. The present review focuses on recent advances in radiochemical methods for incorporating fluorine-18 into biomolecules via "direct" or "indirect" bioconjugation. Recently developed prosthetic groups and pre-targeting strategies, as well as representative examples in 18 F-labeling of biomolecules in PET imaging research studies are highlighted. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Wavelength Selection For Laser Raman Spectroscopy of Putative Martian Habitats and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn-Williams, D. D.; Newton, E. M. G.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    Pigments are key potential biomarkers for any former life on Mars because of the selective pressure of solar radiation on any biological system that could have evolved at its surface. We have found that the near -Infrared laser Raman spectrometer available to use was eminently suitable for diagnostic analysis of pigments because of their minimal autofluorescence at its 1064 nm excitation wav elength. However, we have now evaluated a diverse range of excitation wavelengths to confirm this choice, to ensure that we have the best technique to seek for pigments and their derivatives from any former surface life on Mars. The Raman is weak relative to fluorescence, which results in elevated baseline and concurrent swamping of Raman bands. We confirm the molecular information available from near-IR FT Raman spectra for two highly pigmented UV-tolerant epilithic Antarctic lichens (Acarospora chlorop hana and Caloplaca saxicola) from Victoria Land, a whole endolithic microbial community and endolithic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis from within translucent sandstone of the Trans -Antarctic Mountains, and the free- living cyanobacterium Nostoc commune from Alexander Island, Antarctic Peninsula region. We also show that much of the information we require on biomolecules is not evident from lasers of shorter wavelengths. A miniature 1064 nm Raman spectrometer with an In-Ga-As detector sensitive to IR is being developed by Montana State University (now existing as a prototype) as the prime instrument for a proposed UK-led Mars rover mission (Vanguard). Preliminary spectra from this system confirm the suitability of the near-IR laser.

  7. Radiation physics and chemistry of biomolecules. Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2016-11-01

    A chapter of the book ;Radiation chemistry. From basics to application in materials and life sciences (EDP Science, Paris, France, 2008); was devoted to the state-of-the-art in the research on ionizing radiation (IR) effects on biomolecules. An update, eight years later, seemed pertinent enough to the editors of this journal who accepted to dedicate a Special Issue to the latest developments in this area of high interest for cancer radiotherapy, nuclear workers' radioprotection and food radiosterilisation. We sincerely thank them and the authors who accepted to present reviews of their most recent work. Obviously, only a small part of the research in the fascinating domain of molecular radiobiology can be covered here. Some articles are presenting the contribution of biophysical models and computational techniques to the understanding of IR effects on molecules such as DNA and proteins, or on larger systems such as chromatin, chromosomes and even cells (Nikjoo et al., Štěpán & Davídková, Ballarini & Carante, and Nikitaki et al.). In these papers, as well as in many others, several qualities of IR are compared in order to explain the observed differences of effects. The damages induced by the low energy electrons and new techniques involved in their study are discussed in great detail (Sanche and Fromm & Boulanouar). The chemistry behind the IR induced damages (single or clustered), studied in many laboratories around the world is presented in several papers (Cadet & Wagner, Sevilla et al., Chatgilialoglu et al., and Greenberg). One of them addresses a very useful comparison between the effects of IR and UV exposure on DNA (Ravanat & Douki). The majority of the papers in this Special Issue is dealing with DNA and this reflects the real situation: damages of DNA are more studied than those of other biomolecules. This is due to the role of DNA as main support of hereditary information. Nevertheless, more and more studies are outlining the influence of epigenetic

  8. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ileri, N; Tringe, J; Letant, S; Palozoglu, A; Stroeve, P; Faller, R

    2008-06-13

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  9. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ileri, N.; Tringe, J.; Letant, S.; Palozoglu, A.; Stroeve, P.; Faller, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  10. Watching Conformations of Biomolecules: a Microwave Spectroscopy Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    The combination of laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets (LA-MB-FTMW) has made possible the gas-phase study of solid biomolecules with high melting points. In the experiment, solids are efficiently vaporized by a high-energy laser pulse, supersonically expanded into a evacuated Fabry-Perot cavity and characterised by their rotational spectra. Recent improvements such as the use of picosecond pulse lasers, new ablation nozzles and the extension of the range of the spectrometers to low frequecy have notably increased the sensitivity of our experimental setup. To date different α-, β- and γ-amino acids have been studied using this technique, making possible the characterization of their preferred conformations and gaining insight in the role of intramolecular interactions. Even in conformationally challenging systems the different rotamers of such biomolecules can be identified by rotational spectroscopy as can be illustrated by the assignment of six low-energy conformers in cysteine and aspartic acid, seven in serine and threonine,^a and nine in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). In all cases the low-energy conformers have been conclusive identified from their experimental rotational and 14N quadrupole coupling constants. The spectra of neurotransmitters and of the nucleic acid bases uracil, thymine, cytosine and guanine have also been studied and their preferred conformers or tautomeric forms determined. The complexes between amino acids and nucleic acid bases with water have also been investigated to obtain information on the possible changes induced in the conformational or tautomeric preferences by the addition of solvent molecules. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 617-627 (2009) and references therein M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 12, 3573-3578 (2010) S. Blanco, J. C. López, S. Mata and J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 9187

  11. Higher biomolecules yield in phytoplankton under copper exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jaqueline Carmo; Echeveste, Pedro; Lombardi, Ana Teresa

    2018-05-30

    Copper is an important metal for industry, and its toxic threshold in natural ecosystems has increased since the industrial revolution. As an essential nutrient, it is required in minute amounts, being toxic in slightly increased concentrations, causing great biochemical transformation in microalgae. This study aimed at investigating the physiology of Scenedesmus quadricauda, a cosmopolitan species, exposed to copper concentrations including those that trigger intracellular biochemical modifications. The Cu exposure concentrations tested ranged from 0.1 to 25 µM, thus including environmentally important levels. Microalgae cultures were kept under controlled environmental conditions and monitored daily for cell density, in vivo chlorophyll a, and photosynthetic quantum yield (Φ M ). After 24 h growth, free Cu 2+ ions were determined, and after 96 h, cellular Cu concentration, total carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and cell volume were determined. The results showed that both free Cu 2+ ions and cellular Cu increased with Cu increase in culture medium. Microalgae cell abundance and in vivo chlorophyll a were mostly affected at 2.5 µM Cu exposure (3.8 pg Cu cell -1 ) and above. Approximately 31% decrease of photosynthetic quantum yield was obtained at the highest Cu exposure concentration (25 µM; 25 pg Cu cell -1 ) in comparison with the control. However, at environmentally relevant copper concentrations (0.5 µM Cu; 0.4 pg Cu cell -1 ) cell volume increased in comparison with the control. Considering biomolecules accumulation per unit cell volume, the highest carbohydrates and proteins yield was obtained at 1.0 µM Cu (1.1 pg Cu cell -1 ), while for lipids higher Cu was necessary (2.5 µM Cu; 3.8 pg Cu cell -1 ). This study is a contribution to the understanding of the effects of environmentally significant copper concentrations in the physiology of S. quadricauda, as well as to biotechnological approach to increase biomolecule yield in

  12. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors; Etude des effets d`irradiations pulsees intenses sur des cibles de silicium considere en tant que materiau de base pour detecteurs optiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, O

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO{sub 2}/Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix.

  13. BES detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.Z.; Bian, Q.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, L.J.; Chen, S.N.; Chen, Y.Q.; Chen, Z.Q.; Chi, Y.K.; Cui, H.C.; Cui, X.Z.; Deng, S.S.; Deng, Y.W.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, B.Z.; Dong, X.S.; Du, X.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, C.; Feng, Z.; Fu, Z.S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gao, W.X.; Gao, Y.N.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Guan, Y.Z.; Guo, H.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Guo, Y.Y.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Hao, W.; He, J.; He, K.R.; He, M.J.; Hou, X.J.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, J.S.; Hu, J.W.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Ju, Q.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, D.S.; Li, F.; Li, H.; Li Jia; Li, J.T.; Li Jin; Li, L.L.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.M.; Li, R.B.; Li, S.Q.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, Z.X.; Liang, G.N.; Lin, F.C.; Lin, S.Z.; Lin, W.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Liu, Z.A.; Liu, Z.Y.; Lu, C.G.; Lu, W.D.; Lu, Z.Y.; Lu, J.G.; Ma, D.H.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Nie, Z.D.; Niu, W.P.; Pan, L.J.; Qi, N.D.; Qian, J.J.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Ruan, T.Z.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, J.; Sheng, H.Y.; Sheng, J.P.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, F.K.; Tang, S.Q.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.Y.; Wang, J.G.; Wang, J.Y.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, S.Q.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, X.W.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wang, Z.H.; Wang, Z.J.; Wei, C.L.; Wei, Z.Z.; Wu, J.W.; Wu, S.H.; Wu, S.Q.; Wu, W.M.; Wu, X.D.; Wu, Z.D.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xiao, J.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, X.X.; Xu, J.G.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xuan, B.C.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, S.P.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.Z.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, X.F.; Yang, X.R.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.D.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, C.Y.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.M.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, P.D.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhao, Z.Q.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, M.; Zheng, W.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhong, G.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, J.; Zhou Li; Zhou Lin; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Y.S.; Zhou, Y.H.; Zhu, G.S.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, S.G.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Beijing Spectrometer (BES) is a general purpose solenoidal detector at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). It is designed to study exclusive final states in e + e - annihilations at the center of mass energy from 3.0 to 5.6 GeV. This requires large solid angle coverage combined with good charged particle momentum resolution, good particle identification and high photon detection efficiency at low energies. In this paper we describe the construction and the performance of BES detector. (orig.)

  14. Acoustic cavity transducers for the manipulation of cells and biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Armando; Patel, Maulik; Lee, Abraham P.

    2010-02-01

    A novel fluidic actuator that is simple to fabricate, integrate, and operate is demonstrated for use within microfluidic systems. The actuator is designed around the use of trapped air bubbles in lateral cavities and the resultant acoustic streaming generated from an outside acoustic energy source. The orientation of the lateral cavities to the main microchannel is used to control the bulk fluid motion within the device. The first order flow generated by the oscillating bubble is used to develop a pumping platform that is capable of driving fluid within a chip. This pump is integrated into a recirculation immunoassay device for enhanced biomolecule binding through fluid flow for convection limited transport. The recirculation system showed an increase in binding site concentration when compared with traditional passive and flow-through methods. The acoustic cavity transducer has also been demonstrated for application in particle switching. Bursts of acoustic energy are used to generate a second order streaming pattern near the cavity interface to drive particles away or towards the cavity. The use of this switching mechanism is being extended to the application of sorting cells and other particles within a microfluidic system.

  15. Interfacial water thickness at inorganic nanoconstructs and biomolecules: Size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardellini, Annalisa; Fasano, Matteo; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro, E-mail: pietro.asinari@polito.it

    2016-04-29

    Water molecules in the proximity of solid nanostructures influence both the overall properties of liquid and the structure and functionality of solid particles. The study of water dynamics at solid–liquid interfaces has strong implications in energy, environmental and biomedical fields. This article focuses on the hydration layer properties in the proximity of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and biomolecules (proteins, polypeptides and amino acids). Here we show a quantitative relation between the solid surface extension and the characteristic length of water nanolayer (δ), which is confined at solid–liquid interfaces. Specifically, the size dependence is attributed to the limited superposition of nonbonded interactions in case of small molecules. These results may facilitate the design of novel energy or biomedical colloidal nanosuspensions, and a more fundamental understanding of biomolecular processes influenced by nanoscale water dynamics. - Highlights: • Properties of the water hydration layer are investigated. • New relation between extension of solid size and hydration layer established. • Possible impact on rational design of nanosuspensions.

  16. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Melendez A, L.

    2003-01-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  17. Comparison of biomolecules on the basis of Molecular Interaction Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jordi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Interaction Potentials (MIP are frequently used for the comparison of series of compounds displaying related biological behaviors. These potentials are interaction energies between the considered compounds and relevant probes. The interaction energies are computed in the nodes of grids defined around the compounds. There is a need of detailed and objective comparative analyses of MIP distributions in the framework of structure-activity studies. On the other hand, MIP-based studies do not have to be restricted to series of small ligands, since such studies present also interesting possibilities for the analysis and comparison of biological macromolecules. Such analyses can benefit from the application of new methods and computational approaches. The new software MIPSim (Molecular Interaction Potentials Similarity analysis has recently been introduced with the purpose of analyzing and comparing MIP distributions of series of biomolecules. This program is transparently integrated with other programs, like GAMESS or GRID, which can be used for the computation of the potentials to be analyzed or compared. MIPSim incorporates several definitions of similarity coefficients, and is capable of combining several similarity measures into a single one. On the other hand, MIPSim can perform automatic explorations of the maximum similarity alignments between pairs of molecules.

  18. Hybrid carbon nanomaterials for electrochemical detection of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurila, Tomi

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of different biomolecules in vivo is a promising path towards in situ monitoring of human body and its functions. However, there are several major obstacles, such as sensitivity, selectivity and biocompatiblity, which must be tackled in order to achieve reliably and safely operating sensor devices. Here we show that by utilizing hybrid carbon materials as electrodes to detect two types of neurotransmitters, dopamine and glutamate, several advantages over commonly used electrode materials can be achieved. In particular, we will demonstrate here that it is possible to combine the properties of different carbon allotropes to obtain hybrid materials with greatly improved electrochemical performance. Three following examples of the approach are given: (i) diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film electrodes with different layer thicknesses, (ii) multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on top of DLC and (iii) carbon nanofibres synthesized on top of DLC thin films. Detailed structural and electrochemical characterization is carried out to rationalize the reasons behind the observed behvior. In addition, results from the atomistic simulations are utilized to obtain more information about the properties of the amorphous carbon thin films. (paper)

  19. Natural Biomolecules and Protein Aggregation: Emerging Strategies against Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Sgarbossa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomolecular self-assembly is a fundamental process in all organisms. As primary components of the life molecular machinery, proteins have a vast array of resources available to them for self-assembly in a functional structure. Protein self-assembly, however, can also occur in an aberrant way, giving rise to non-native aggregated structures responsible for severe, progressive human diseases that have a serious social impact. Different neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and spongiform encephalopathy diseases, have in common the presence of insoluble protein aggregates, generally termed “amyloid,” that share several physicochemical features: a fibrillar morphology, a predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure, birefringence upon staining with the dye Congo red, insolubility in common solvents and detergents, and protease resistance. Conformational constrains, hydrophobic and stacking interactions can play a key role in the fibrillogenesis process and protein–protein and peptide–peptide interactions—resulting in self-assembly phenomena of peptides yielding fibrils—that can be modulated and influenced by natural biomolecules. Small organic molecules, which possess both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties able to bind to peptide/protein molecules through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic and aromatic interactions, are potential candidates against amyloidogenesis. In this review some significant case examples will be critically discussed.

  20. Quantification of specific bindings of biomolecules by magnetorelaxometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinhoff Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The binding reaction of the biomolecules streptavidin and anti-biotin antibody, both labelled by magnetic nanoparticles (MNP, to biotin coated on agarose beads, was quantified by magnetorelaxometry (MRX. Highly sensitive SQUID-based MRX revealed the immobilization of the MNP caused by the biotin-streptavidin coupling. We found that about 85% of streptavidin-functionalised MNP bound specifically to biotin-agarose beads. On the other hand only 20% of antibiotin-antibody functionalised MNP were specifically bound. Variation of the suspension medium revealed in comparison to phosphate buffer with 0.1% bovine serum albumin a slight change of the binding behaviour in human serum, probably due to the presence of functioning (non heated serum proteins. Furthermore, in human serum an additional non-specific binding occurs, being independent from the serum protein functionality. The presented homogeneous bead based assay is applicable in simple, uncoated vials and it enables the assessment of the binding kinetics in a volume without liquid flow. The estimated association rate constant for the MNP-labelled streptavidin is by about two orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported for free streptavidin. This is probably due to the relatively large size of the magnetic markers which reduces the diffusion of streptavidin. Furthermore, long time non-exponential kinetics were observed and interpreted as agglutination of the agarose beads.

  1. GroPBS: Fast Solver for Implicit Electrostatics of Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska eBertelshofer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the electrostatic potential on the surface of biomolecules or biomembranes under physiological conditions is an important step in the attempt to characterize the physico-chemical properties of these molecules and in particular also their interactions with each other. Additionally, knowledge about solution electrostatics may guide also the design of molecules with specified properties. However, explicit water models come at a high computational cost, rendering them unsuitable for large design studies or for docking purposes. Implicit models with the water phase treated as a continuum require the numerical solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann Equation (PBE. Here, we present a new flexible program for the numerical solution of the PBE, allowing for different geometries, and the explicit and implicit inclusion of membranes. It involves a discretization of space and the computation of the molecular surface. The PBE is solved using finite differences, the resulting set of equations is solved using a Gauss-Seidel method. It is shown for the example of the sucrose transporter ScrY that the implicit inclusion of a surrounding membrane has a strong effect also on the electrostatics within the pore region and thus need to be carefully considered e.g. in design studies on membrane proteins.

  2. Direct patterning of nanoparticles and biomolecules by liquid nanodispensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabié, Laure; Agostini, Pierre; Stopel, Martijn; Blum, Christian; Lassagne, Benjamin; Subramaniam, Vinod; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2015-03-14

    We report on the localized deposition of nanoparticles and proteins, nano-objects commonly used in many nanodevices, by the liquid nanodispensing (NADIS) technique which consists in depositing droplets of a solution through a nanochannel drilled at the apex of an AFM tip. We demonstrate that the size of spots can be adjusted from microns down to sub-50 nm by tuning the channel diameter, independently of the chemical nature of the solute. In the case of nanoparticles, we demonstrated the ultimate limit of the method and showed that large arrays of single (or pairs of) nanoparticles can be reproducibly deposited. We further explored the possibility to deposit different visible fluorescent proteins using NADIS without loss of protein function. The intrinsic fluorescence of these proteins is characteristic of their structural integrity; the retention of fluorescence after NADIS deposition demonstrates that the proteins are intact and functional. This study demonstrates that NADIS can be a viable alternative to other scanning probe lithography techniques since it combines high resolution direct writing of nanoparticles or biomolecules with the versatility of liquid lithography techniques.

  3. Polyacrylamide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S.; Gammon, Stuart A.

    2003-11-11

    A polyacryalmide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules. The polyacryalmide medium comprises high molecular weight polyacrylamides (PAAm) having a viscosity average molecular weight (M.sub.v) of about 675-725 kDa were synthesized by conventional red-ox polymerization technique. Using this separation medium, capillary electrophoresis of BigDye DNA sequencing standard was performed. A single base resolution of .about.725 bases was achieved in .about.60 minute in a non-covalently coated capillary of 50 .mu.m i.d., 40 cm effective length, and a filed of 160 V/cm at 40.degree. C. The resolution achieved with this formulation to separate DNA under identical conditions is much superior (725 bases vs. 625 bases) and faster (60 min. vs. 75 min.) to the commercially available PAAm, such as supplied by Amersham. The formulation method employed here to synthesize PAAm is straight-forward, simple and does not require cumbersome methods such as emulsion polymerizaiton in order to achieve very high molecular weights. Also, the formulation here does not require separation of PAAm from the reaction mixture prior to reconstituting the polymer to a final concentration. Furthermore, the formulation here is prepared from a single average mol. wt. PAAm as opposed to the mixture of two different average mo. wt. PAAm previously required to achieve high resolution.

  4. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  5. Vertex detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10 -13 s, among them the τ lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation

  6. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, E.

    1976-01-01

    A smoke detector is described consisting of a ventilated ionisation chamber having a number of electrodes and containing a radioactive source in the form of a foil supported on the surface of the electrodes. This electrode consists of a plastic material treated with graphite to render it electrically conductive. (U.K.)

  7. Semiconductor Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortina, E.

    2007-01-01

    Particle detectors based on semiconductor materials are among the few devices used for particle detection that are available to the public at large. In fact we are surrounded by them in our daily lives: they are used in photoelectric cells for opening doors, in digital photographic and video camera, and in bar code readers at supermarket cash registers. (Author)

  8. Capillary detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijn, J.; Winter, K.; Vilain, P.; Wilquet, G.; Fabre, J.P.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Goldberg, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Bay, A.; Currat, C.; Koppenburg, P.; Frekers, D.; Wolff, T.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Frenkel, A.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Penso, G.; Ekimov, A.; Golovkin, S.; Govorun, V.; Medvedkov, A.; Vasil'chenko, V.

    1998-01-01

    The option for a microvertex detector using glass capillary arrays filled with liquid scintillator is presented. The status of capillary layers development and possible read-out techniques for high rate environment are reported. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Feasibility of using cone penetrometer truck (CPT) to install time domain reflectometry (TDR) and fiber optic slope failure detectors in pavement structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    A new method of cable installation using a heavy-duty Cone Penetration Test : (CPT) truck was developed and practiced successfully in this study. The coaxial and fiber : optic cables were pushed along with the cone rods by the hydraulic system integr...

  10. Optical Filter Assembly for Interplanetary Optical Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijiang; Hemmati, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based, narrow-band, high throughput optical filters are required for optical links from deep space. We report on the development of a tunable filter assembly that operates at telecommunication window of 1550 nanometers. Low insertion loss of 0.5 decibels and bandwidth of 90 picometers over a 2000 nanometers operational range of detectors has been achieved.

  11. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  12. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  13. Single-Molecule Flow Platform for the Quantification of Biomolecules Attached to Single Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Han, Rui; Sun, Wei; Jiang, Yifei; Fujimoto, Bryant S; Yu, Jiangbo; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Rong, Yu; Zhou, Xing-Hua; Chiu, Daniel T

    2018-05-15

    We describe here a flow platform for quantifying the number of biomolecules on individual fluorescent nanoparticles. The platform combines line-confocal fluorescence detection with near nanoscale channels (1-2 μm in width and height) to achieve high single-molecule detection sensitivity and throughput. The number of biomolecules present on each nanoparticle was determined by deconvolving the fluorescence intensity distribution of single-nanoparticle-biomolecule complexes with the intensity distribution of single biomolecules. We demonstrate this approach by quantifying the number of streptavidins on individual semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots); streptavidin was rendered fluorescent using biotin-Alexa647. This flow platform has high-throughput (hundreds to thousands of nanoparticles detected per second) and requires minute amounts of sample (∼5 μL at a dilute concentration of 10 pM). This measurement method is an additional tool for characterizing synthetic or biological nanoparticles.

  14. Synthesis of vaterite and aragonite crystals using biomolecules of tomato and capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Wang-Hua; Zhao, Ying-Guo; Kang, Yan; Liu, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Yong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of biomolecules of two vegetables-tomato and capsicum is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to characterize the CaCO3 obtained. The biomolecules in the extracts of two vegetables are determined by UV-vis or FTIR. The results indicate that a mixture of calcite and vaterite spheres constructed from small particles is produced with the extract of tomato, while aragonite rods or ellipsoids are formed in the presence of extract of capsicum. The possible formation mechanism of the CaCO3 crystals with tomato biomolecules can be interpreted by particle-aggregation based non-classical crystallization laws. The proteins and/or other biomolecules in tomato and capsicum may control the formation of vaterite and aragonite crystals by adsorbing onto facets of them.

  15. Optics With Cold Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hau, Lene

    2004-01-01

    .... And to test the novel atom sensor, we have built a moving-molasses magneto-optical trap in a geometry tailor-suited to the nanotube detector geometry, involving construction of a highly stable laser...

  16. Inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering studies on soft matter and biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    Some characteristic features of soft matter and biomolecules in the inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (INS and QENS) studies are described. In order to clarify the current situation of the studies the research history on soft matter and biomolecules by INS and QENS are described. As examples of the studies of slow dynamics of soft matter, neutron spin echo studies on breathing mode of polymer micelle and static and dynamics fluctuations in polymer gels. (author)

  17. Enhancing Protease Activity Assay in Droplet-Based Microfluidics Using a Biomolecule Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hung; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Song, Yong-Ak; Miller, Miles A.; Kim, Sung Jae; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2011-01-01

    We introduce an integrated microfluidic device consisting of a biomolecule concentrator and a microdroplet generator, which enhances the limited sensitivity of low-abundance enzyme assays by concentrating biomolecules before encapsulating them into droplet microreactors. We used this platform to detect ultra low levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) from diluted cellular supernatant and showed that it significantly (∼10-fold) reduced the time required to complete the assay and the sample volume used. PMID:21671557

  18. LIAD-fs: A novel method for studies of ultrafast processes in gas phase neutral biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvert, C R; Kelly, O; Duffy, M J; Belshaw, L; King, R B; Williams, I D; Greenwood, J B

    2012-01-01

    A new experimental technique for femtosecond (fs) pulse studies of gas phase biomolecules is reported. Using Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) to produce a plume of neutral molecules, a time-delayed fs pulse is employed for ionisation/fragmentation, with subsequent products extracted and mass analysed electrostatically. By varying critical laser pulse parameters, this technique can be used to implement control over molecular fragmentation for a range of small biomolecules, with specific studies of amino acids demonstrated.

  19. Recent advances in exploiting ionic liquids for biomolecules: Solubility, stability and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapragasam, Magaret; Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Goto, Masahiro

    2016-08-01

    The technological utility of biomolecules (e.g. proteins, enzymes and DNA) can be significantly enhanced by combining them with ionic liquids (ILs) - potentially attractive "green" and "designer" solvents - rather than using in conventional organic solvents or water. In recent years, ILs have been used as solvents, cosolvents, and reagents for biocatalysis, biotransformation, protein preservation and stabilization, DNA solubilization and stabilization, and other biomolecule-based applications. Using ILs can dramatically enhance the structural and chemical stability of proteins, DNA, and enzymes. This article reviews the recent technological developments of ILs in protein-, enzyme-, and DNA-based applications. We discuss the different routes to increase biomolecule stability and activity in ILs, and the design of biomolecule-friendly ILs that can dissolve biomolecules with minimum alteration to their structure. This information will be helpful to design IL-based processes in biotechnology and the biological sciences that can serve as novel and selective processes for enzymatic reactions, protein and DNA stability, and other biomolecule-based applications. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue repair and regeneration in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Tam, Roger; Sefton, Michael V; Shoichet, Molly S

    2014-09-28

    Tissue engineering frequently involves cells and scaffolds to replace damaged or diseased tissue. It originated, in part, as a means of effecting the delivery of biomolecules such as insulin or neurotrophic factors, given that cells are constitutive producers of such therapeutic agents. Thus cell delivery is intrinsic to tissue engineering. Controlled release of biomolecules is also an important tool for enabling cell delivery since the biomolecules can enable cell engraftment, modulate inflammatory response or otherwise benefit the behavior of the delivered cells. We describe advances in cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration, with emphasis on the central nervous system (CNS). In the first section, the focus is on encapsulated cell therapy. In the second section, the focus is on biomolecule delivery in polymeric nano/microspheres and hydrogels for the nerve regeneration and endogenous cell stimulation. In the third section, the focus is on combination strategies of neural stem/progenitor cell or mesenchymal stem cell and biomolecule delivery for tissue regeneration and repair. In each section, the challenges and potential solutions associated with delivery to the CNS are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bio-NCs--the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-11-21

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  2. Generating multiplex gradients of biomolecules for controlling cellular adhesion in parallel microfluidic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2012-11-07

    Here we present a microfluidic platform to generate multiplex gradients of biomolecules within parallel microfluidic channels, in which a range of multiplex concentration gradients with different profile shapes are simultaneously produced. Nonlinear polynomial gradients were also generated using this device. The gradient generation principle is based on implementing parrallel channels with each providing a different hydrodynamic resistance. The generated biomolecule gradients were then covalently functionalized onto the microchannel surfaces. Surface gradients along the channel width were a result of covalent attachments of biomolecules to the surface, which remained functional under high shear stresses (50 dyn/cm(2)). An IgG antibody conjugated to three different fluorescence dyes (FITC, Cy5 and Cy3) was used to demonstrate the resulting multiplex concentration gradients of biomolecules. The device enabled generation of gradients with up to three different biomolecules in each channel with varying concentration profiles. We were also able to produce 2-dimensional gradients in which biomolecules were distributed along the length and width of the channel. To demonstrate the applicability of the developed design, three different multiplex concentration gradients of REDV and KRSR peptides were patterned along the width of three parallel channels and adhesion of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) in each channel was subsequently investigated using a single chip.

  3. Desalting by crystallization: detection of attomole biomolecules in picoliter buffers by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Xingchuang; Wang, Song; Li, Yanyan; Zhang, Sichun; Fang, Xiang; Zhang, Xinrong

    2015-10-06

    Sensitive detection of biomolecules in small-volume samples by mass spectrometry is, in many cases, challenging because of the use of buffers to maintain the biological activities of proteins and cells. Here, we report a highly effective desalting method for picoliter samples. It was based on the spontaneous separation of biomolecules from salts during crystallization of the salts. After desalting, the biomolecules were deposited in the tip of the quartz pipet because of the evaporation of the solvent. Subsequent detection of the separated biomolecules was achieved using solvent assisted electric field induced desorption/ionization (SAEFIDI) coupled with mass spectrometry. It allowed for direct desorption/ionization of the biomolecules in situ from the tip of the pipet. The organic component in the assistant solvent inhibited the desorption/ionization of salts, thus assured successful detection of biomolecules. Proteins and peptides down to 50 amol were successfully detected using our method even if there were 3 × 10(5) folds more amount of salts in the sample. The concentration and ion species of the salts had little influence on the detection results.

  4. Bio-NCs - the marriage of ultrasmall metal nanoclusters with biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nirmal; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Xie, Jianping

    2014-10-01

    Ultrasmall metal nanoclusters (NCs) have attracted increasing attention due to their fascinating physicochemical properties. Today, functional metal NCs are finding growing acceptance in biomedical applications. To achieve a better performance in biomedical applications, metal NCs can be interfaced with biomolecules, such as proteins, peptides, and DNA, to form a new class of biomolecule-NC composites (or bio-NCs in short), which typically show synergistic or novel physicochemical and physiological properties. This feature article focuses on the recent studies emerging at the interface of metal NCs and biomolecules, where the interactions could impart unique physicochemical properties to the metal NCs, as well as mutually regulate biological functions of the bio-NCs. In this article, we first provide a broad overview of key concepts and developments in the novel biomolecule-directed synthesis of metal NCs. A special focus is placed on the key roles of biomolecules in metal NC synthesis. In the second part, we describe how the encapsulated metal NCs affect the structure and function of biomolecules. Followed by that, we discuss several unique synergistic effects observed in the bio-NCs, and illustrate them with examples highlighting their potential biomedical applications. Continued interdisciplinary efforts are required to build up in-depth knowledge about the interfacial chemistry and biology of bio-NCs, which could further pave their ways toward biomedical applications.

  5. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System (SPD)

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, A; Antinori, Federico; Burns, M; Cali, I A; Campbell, M; Caselle, M; Ceresa, S; Dima, R; Elias, D; Fabris, D; Krivda, Marian; Librizzi, F; Manzari, Vito; Morel, M; Moretto, Sandra; Osmic, F; Pappalardo, G S; Pepato, Adriano; Pulvirenti, A; Riedler, P; Riggi, F; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Torcato De Matos, C; Turrisi, R; Tydesjo, H; Viesti, G; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE silicon pixel detector (SPD) comprises the two innermost layers of the ALICE inner tracker system. The SPD includes 120 detector modules (half-staves) each consisting of 10 ALICE pixel chips bump bonded to two silicon sensors and one multi-chip read-out module. Each pixel chip contains 8192 active cells, so that the total number of pixel cells in the SPD is ≈ 107. The on-detector read-out is based on a multi-chip-module containing 4 ASICs and an optical transceiver module. The constraints on material budget and detector module dimensions are very demanding.

  6. Neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Andrew C [Knoxville, TN; Jardret,; Vincent, D [Powell, TN

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  7. Ionization detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, E E

    1976-02-27

    This invention concerns a fire detection system making use of a beta source. The ionisation detector includes a first and second chamber respectively comprising a first and second electrode, preferably a plate, with a common electrode separating the first and second chamber. Communication is provided between these chambers through a set of orifices and each chamber also has a set of orifices for communication with the ambient atmosphere. One or both chambers can comprise a particle source, preferably beta. The detector also has an adjustable electrode housed in one of the chambers to regulate the voltage between the fixed electrode of this chamber and the common electrode located between the chambers. The electrodes of the structure are connected to a detection circuit that spots a change in the ionisation current when a fire alarm condition arises. The detection circuit of a new type includes a relaxation oscillator with a programmable unijunction transistor and a light emitting diode.

  8. MUST detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Auger, F.; Sauvestre, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The IPN-Orsay, in collaboration with the SPhN-Saclay and the DPTA Bruyeres, has built an array of 8 telescopes based on Si-strip technology for the study of direct reactions induced by radioactive beams. The detectors are described, along with the compact high density VXI electronics and the stand-alone data acquisition system developed in the laboratory. One telescope was tested using an 40 Ar beam and the measured performances are discussed. (authors)

  9. Radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yoji

    1968-10-30

    Herein disclosed is an ionization chamber the airtightness of which can be readily tested. The ionization chamber is characterized in that a small amount of helium gas is filled in the chamber in combination with other ionization gases such as argon gas, xenon gas and the like. Helium leakage from the chamber is measured by a known helium gas sensor in a vacuum vessel. Hence the long term drift of the radiation detector sensitivity may be determined.

  10. An analytical method for computing atomic contact areas in biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Paul; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-15

    We propose a new analytical method for detecting and computing contacts between atoms in biomolecules. It is based on the alpha shape theory and proceeds in three steps. First, we compute the weighted Delaunay triangulation of the union of spheres representing the molecule. In the second step, the Delaunay complex is filtered to derive the dual complex. Finally, contacts between spheres are collected. In this approach, two atoms i and j are defined to be in contact if their centers are connected by an edge in the dual complex. The contact areas between atom i and its neighbors are computed based on the caps formed by these neighbors on the surface of i; the total area of all these caps is partitioned according to their spherical Laguerre Voronoi diagram on the surface of i. This method is analytical and its implementation in a new program BallContact is fast and robust. We have used BallContact to study contacts in a database of 1551 high resolution protein structures. We show that with this new definition of atomic contacts, we generate realistic representations of the environments of atoms and residues within a protein. In particular, we establish the importance of nonpolar contact areas that complement the information represented by the accessible surface areas. This new method bears similarity to the tessellation methods used to quantify atomic volumes and contacts, with the advantage that it does not require the presence of explicit solvent molecules if the surface of the protein is to be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Computed tomography apparatus with detector sensilivity correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltham, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    In a rotary fan beam computed tomography apparatus using recurrent relative displacement between the source and detectors (e.g. a deflected spot X-ray tube) for the recalibration of detectors in chain-like sequences across the detector array by successive pairwise common-path sensitivity comparisons starting from a terminal detector each sequence normally involves or more successive comparisons, and consistent but unpredictable errors are found to occur, leading to incorrect Houndsfield values in the computed image matrix. The improvement comprises locating at least one radiation transparent detector of high stability in front of the array at an intermediate point and using the output to further correct the chain-corrected detector sensitivity values. A detector comprising a plastics scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier is described, whose output pulses are counted during a rotational scan and compared with the mean corresponding measurement from detectors lying behind the detector, to form a sensitivity ratio. From a corresponding ratio and data derived during calibration, a measured sensitivity value for detectors is determined for each scan and is compared with the corresponding chain-corrected sensitivity value to generate a further sensitivity correction value which is then distributed among the detectors of the comparison sequence

  12. Nanostructured diamond layers enhance the infrared spectroscopy of biomolecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozak, Halyna; Babchenko, Oleg; Artemenko, Anna; Ukraintsev, Egor; Remeš, Zdeněk; Rezek, Bohuslav; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 8 (2014), s. 2054-2060 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI2/736; GA ČR GAP108/12/0996; GA ČR GPP205/12/P331; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * optical elements * nanostructured * FBS * GAR-FTIR * XPS Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 4.457, year: 2014

  13. Optical analog transmission device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, Shinji.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a device such as electro-optical conversion elements, optoelectric-electric elements and optical transmission channel, not undergoing deleterious effects on the efficiency of conversion and transmission due to temperature, and aging change. That is, a sine wave superposing means superposes, on a detector signal to be transmitted, a sine-wave signal having a predetermined amplitude and at a frequency lower than that of the detector signal. An optoelectric conversion means converts the electric signal as the signal of the sine-wave signal superposing means into an optical signal and outputs the same to an optical transmitting channel. The optoelectric conversion means converts the transmitted signal to an electric signal. A discriminating means discriminates the electric signal into a detector signal and a sine-wave signal. A calculating means calculates an optical transmitting efficiency of the transmitting channel based on the amplitude of the discriminated sine-wave signal. A processing means compensates an amplitude value of the detector signals discriminated by the discriminating means based on the optical transmission efficiency. As a result, an optical analog transmission device can be attained, which conducts optical transmission at a high accuracy without undergoing the defective effects of the optical transmission efficiency. (I.S.)

  14. High-Precision Dispensing of Nanoliter Biofluids on Glass Pedestal Arrays for Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yang; Xu, QianFeng; Zhu, Jing; Poget, Sébastien F; Lyons, Alan M

    2016-05-04

    Precise dispensing of nanoliter droplets is necessary for the development of sensitive and accurate assays, especially when the availability of the source solution is limited. Conventional approaches are limited by imprecise positioning, large shear forces, surface tension effects, and high costs. To address the need for precise and economical dispensing of nanoliter volumes, we developed a new approach where the dispensed volume is dependent on the size and shape of defined surface features, thus freeing the dispensing process from pumps and fine-gauge needles requiring accurate positioning. The surface we fabricated, called a nanoliter droplet virtual well microplate (nVWP), achieves high-precision dispensing (better than ±0.5 nL or ±1.6% at 32 nL) of 20-40 nL droplets using a small source drop (3-10 μL) on isolated hydrophilic glass pedestals (500 μm on a side) bonded to arrays of polydimethylsiloxane conical posts. The sharp 90° edge of the glass pedestal pins the solid-liquid-vapor triple contact line (TCL), averting the wetting of the glass sidewalls while the fluid is prevented from receding from the edge. This edge creates a sufficiently large energy barrier such that microliter water droplets can be poised on the glass pedestals, exhibiting contact angles greater >150°. This approach relieves the stringent mechanical alignment tolerances required for conventional dispensing techniques, shifting the control of dispensed volume to the area circumscribed by the glass edge. The effects of glass surface chemistry and dispense velocity on droplet volume were studied using optical microscopy and high-speed video. Functionalization of the glass pedestal surface enabled the selective adsorption of specific peptides and proteins from synthetic and natural biomolecule mixtures, such as venom. We further demonstrate how the nVWP dispensing platform can be used for a variety of assays, including sensitive detection of proteins and peptides by fluorescence

  15. Microcontact printing with aminosilanes: creating biomolecule micro- and nanoarrays for multiplexed microfluidic bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Shivani; Ricoult, Sébastien G; Toda-Peters, Kazumi; Shen, Amy Q

    2017-05-21

    Microfluidic systems integrated with protein and DNA micro- and nanoarrays have been the most sought-after technologies to satisfy the growing demand for high-throughput disease diagnostics. As the sensitivity of these systems relies on the bio-functionalities of the patterned recognition biomolecules, the primary concern has been to develop simple technologies that enable biomolecule immobilization within microfluidic devices whilst preserving bio-functionalities. To address this concern, we introduce a two-step patterning approach to create micro- and nanoarrays of biomolecules within microfluidic devices. First, we introduce a simple aqueous based microcontact printing (μCP) method to pattern arrays of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on glass substrates, with feature sizes ranging from a few hundred microns down to 200 nm (for the first time). Next, these substrates are integrated with microfluidic channels to then covalently couple DNA aptamers and antibodies with the micro- and nanopatterned APTES. As these biomolecules are covalently tethered to the device substrates, the resulting bonds enable them to withstand the high shear stresses originating from the flow in these devices. We further demonstrated the flexibility of this technique, by immobilizing multiple proteins onto these APTES-patterned substrates using liquid-dispensing robots to create multiple microarrays. Next, to validate the functionalities of these microfluidic biomolecule microarrays, we perform (i) aptamer-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human interleukin 6 (IL6); and (ii) antibody-based sandwich immunoassays to detect human c-reactive protein (hCRP) with the limit of detection at 5 nM, a level below the range required for clinical screening. Lastly, the shelf-life potential of these ready-to-use microfluidic microarray devices is validated by effectively functionalizing the patterns with biomolecules up to 3 months post-printing. In summary, with a single printing step, this

  16. Impact of implementing the Meyer-Neldel behavior of carrier emission pre-factors in solar cell and optical detector modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinelli, Francisco A.; Ramirez, Helena [INTEC, Conicet, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Güemes 3450, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2015-03-14

    The Meyer-Neldel behavior reported for the emission probabilities of electrons and holes was included in our code, replacing the gap state capture cross sections of the Shockley-Read-Hall formalisms with capture cross sections containing an exponential function of the trap energy depth. The Meyer-Neldel energies for electrons and holes are the slopes of these exponentials. Our results indicate that emission probabilities of neutral states no deeper than approximately 0.45 eV and 0.37 eV from the conduction and valence band edges, respectively, can show a Meyer-Neldel behavior only, while on the other hand, its implementation in deeper gap states makes the replication of experimental J-V curves of p-i-n solar cells and detectors impossible. The Meyer-Neldel behavior can be included in all neutral capture cross sections of acceptor-like tail states without affecting the J-V characteristics, while it cannot be included in all capture cross sections of neutral donor-like tail states and/or defect states without predicting device performances below the experimental figures, that become even lower when it is also included in charged capture cross sections. The implementation of the anti Meyer-Neldel behavior at tail states gives rise to slightly better and reasonable device performances.

  17. Selective chromogenic detection of thiol-containing biomolecules using carbonaceous nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles as carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Hai-Zhou; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2011-04-26

    Thiol-containing biomolecules show strong affinity with noble metal nanostructures and could not only stably protect them but also control the self-assembly process of these special nanostructures. A highly selective and sensitive chromogenic detection method has been designed for the low and high molecular weight thiol-containing biomolecules, including cysteine, glutathione, dithiothreitol, and bovine serum albumin, using a new type of carbonaceous nanospheres loaded with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as carrier. This strategy relies upon the place-exchange process between the reporter dyes on the surface of Ag NPs and the thiol groups of thiol-containing biomolecules. The concentration of biomolecules can be determined by monitoring with the fluorescence intensity of reporter dyes dispersed in solution. This new chromogenic assay method could selectively detect these biomolecules in the presence of various other amino acids and monosaccharides and even sensitively detect the thiol-containing biomolecules with different molecular weight, even including proteins.

  18. System for testing optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  19. Smoke detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    This describes a smoke detector comprising a self-luminous light source and a photosensitive device which is so arranged that the light source is changed by the presence of smoke in a detecting region. A gaseous tritium light source is used. This consists of a borosilicate glass bulb with an internal phosphor coating, filled with tritium gas. The tritium emits low energy beta particles which cause the phosphor to glow. This is a reliable light source which needs no external power source. The photosensitive device may be a phototransistor and may drive a warning device through a directly coupled transistor amplifier. (U.K.)

  20. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susanto, H.; Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D.; Ulbricht, M.

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the membranes before and after modification. ► We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. ► All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. ► All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  1. Formation of noble metal nanocrystals in the presence of biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Justin Lockheart

    One of the most promising, yet least studied routes for producing biocompatible nanostructures involves synthesis in the presence of biomolecules. I hypothesized that globular proteins could provide a suitable framework to regulate the formation of noble metal nanocrystals. As proof of concept, I designed two novel synthesis protocols utilizing bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein to regulate the formation of gold nanocrystals. In the first case, the standard protocol for polyol reduction was modified by replacing ethylene glycol with glycerin, replacing synthetic polymers with BSA as protecting agent, and decreasing the reaction temperature. In the second case, the Brust-Schiffrin two-phase reduction was modified by replacing alkylthiols with BSA as protecting agent, which facilitated a strictly aqueous phase synthesis. Due to superior product yield and rapid reduction at room temperature, the aqueous protocol became the foundation for subsequent studies. I extended this approach to produce well-dispersed ˜2nm silver, gold, and platinum nanocrystals. Having demonstrated the feasibility of BSA-functionalized nanocrystals, some potential uses were explored. BSA-functionalized silver nanocrystals were employed in a broader study on the interaction of silver nanocrystals with HIV. BSA-functionalized gold nanocrystals were utilized for in vivo dosage of a contrast enhancing agent to bacteria. BSA-functionalized platinum nanocrystals were studied as hydrogenation catalysts. Since many intriguing uses for protein-functionalized nanocrystals involve incorporation into biosystems, I sought to enhance biocompatibility by using ascorbic acid as reducing agent. Initial experiments revealed elongated and branched nanocrystals. Such structures were not observed in previous synthesis protocols with BSA, so I hypothesized ascorbic acid was driving their formation. To test my assertion, I reduced ionic gold in an aqueous solution of ascorbic acid, thereby discovering a new method

  2. Effect of membrane hydrophilization on ultrafiltration performance for biomolecules separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susanto, H., E-mail: heru.susanto@undip.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Diponegoro, Jl. Prof. Sudarto-Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia); Roihatin, A.; Aryanti, N.; Anggoro, D.D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Diponegoro, Jl. Prof. Sudarto-Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia); Ulbricht, M. [Lehrstuhl fuer Technische Chemie, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Germany, Universitaetstr. 5, Essen (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    fouling ultrafiltration (UF) membranes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterized the membranes before and after modification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined the unmodified and modified membranes for biomolecules filtration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the modifications changed the membrane characteristics and the membrane performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the modifications resulted in UF membranes having higher resistance towards fouling.

  3. Recent advances in on-line coupling of capillary electrophoresis to atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis and studies of metal-biomolecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan; Yin Xuebo; Yan Xiuping

    2008-01-01

    Speciation information is vital for the understanding of the toxicity, mobility and bioavailability of elements in environmental or biological samples. Hyphenating high resolving power of separation techniques and element-selective detectors provides powerful tools for studying speciation of trace elements in environmental and biological systems. During the last five years several novel hybrid techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) and atomic spectrometry have been developed for speciation analysis and metal-biomolecule interaction study in our laboratory. These techniques include CE on-line coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS), chip-CE on-line coupled with AFS, CE on-line coupled with flame heated quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (FHF-AAS), and CE on-line coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The necessity for the development of these techniques, their interface design, and applications in speciation analysis and metal-biomolecule interaction study are reviewed. The advantages and limitations of the developed hybrid techniques are critically discussed, and further development is also prospected

  4. Optical demodulation system for digitally encoded suspension array in fluoroimmunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qinghua; Li, Dongmei; He, Yonghong; Guan, Tian; Zhang, Yilong; Shen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xuejing; Liu, Siyu; Lu, Bangrong; Ji, Yanhong

    2017-09-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy-coupled optical system is reported to demodulate digitally encoded suspension array in fluoroimmunoassay. It takes advantage of the plasma emissions of assembled elemental materials to digitally decode the suspension array, providing a more stable and accurate recognition to target biomolecules. By separating the decoding procedure of suspension array and adsorption quantity calculation of biomolecules into two independent channels, the cross talk between decoding and label signals in traditional methods had been successfully avoided, which promoted the accuracy of both processes and realized more sensitive quantitative detection of target biomolecules. We carried a multiplexed detection of several types of anti-IgG to verify the quantitative analysis performance of the system. A limit of detection of 1.48×10-10 M was achieved, demonstrating the detection sensitivity of the optical demodulation system.

  5. Room temperature ionic liquids interacting with bio-molecules: an overview of experimental and computational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Ballone, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    We briefly review experimental and computational studies of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) interacting with important classes of biomolecules, including phospholipids, peptides and proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. Most of these studies have been driven by the interest for RTILs applications as solvents. Thus, available experimental data cover primarily thermodynamic properties such as the reciprocal solubility of RTILs and bio-molecules, as well as phase boundaries. Less extensive data are also available on transport properties such as diffusion and viscosity of homogeneous binary (RTILs/biomolecules) and ternary (RTIL/biomolecules/water) solutions. Most of the structural information at the atomistic level, of interest especially for biochemical, pharmaceutical and nanotechnology applications, has been made available by molecular dynamics simulations. Major exceptions to this statement are represented by the results from NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, by selected neutron and X-ray scattering data, and by recent neutron reflectometry measurements on lipid bilayers on surfaces, hydrated by water-RTIL solutions. A final section of our paper summarizes new developments in the field of RTILs based on amino acids, that combine in themselves the two main aspects of our discussion, i.e. ionic liquids and bio-molecules.

  6. Conditions to minimize soft single biomolecule deformation when imaging with atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godon, Christian; Teulon, Jean-Marie; Odorico, Michael; Basset, Christian; Meillan, Matthieu; Vellutini, Luc; Chen, Shu-Wen W; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    A recurrent interrogation when imaging soft biomolecules using atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the putative deformation of molecules leading to a bias in recording true topographical surfaces. Deformation of biomolecules comes from three sources: sample instability, adsorption to the imaging substrate, and crushing under tip pressure. To disentangle these causes, we measured the maximum height of a well-known biomolecule, the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), under eight different experimental conditions positing that the maximum height value is a specific indicator of sample deformations. Six basic AFM experimental factors were tested: imaging in air (AIR) versus in liquid (LIQ), imaging with flat minerals (MICA) versus flat organic surfaces (self-assembled monolayers, SAM), and imaging forces with oscillating tapping mode (TAP) versus PeakForce tapping (PFT). The results show that the most critical parameter in accurately measuring the height of TMV in air is the substrate. In a liquid environment, regardless of the substrate, the most critical parameter is the imaging mode. Most importantly, the expected TMV height values were obtained with both imaging with the PeakForce tapping mode either in liquid or in air at the condition of using self-assembled monolayers as substrate. This study unambiguously explains previous poor results of imaging biomolecules on mica in air and suggests alternative methodologies for depositing soft biomolecules on well organized self-assembled monolayers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of PAMAM-OH dendrimers against the fibrillation pathway of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Florance, Ida; Sivakumar, A; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2016-12-01

    The binding behavior of nanoparticle with proteins determines its biocompatibility. This study reports the interaction of ten different biomolecules (proteins-BSA, HSA, haemoglobin, gamma globulin, transferrin and enzymes-hog and bacillus amylase, lysozyme from chicken and human and laccases from Tramates versicolor) with a surface group hydroxylated Poly AMido AMide dendrimer (PAMAM) of generation 5. The study has utilized various spectroscopic methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence emission, Synchronous, 3-D spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism to detect the binding induced structural changes in biomolecules that occur upon interaction with mounting concentration of the dendrimers. Aggregation of proteins results in the formation of amyloid fibrils causing several human diseases. In this study, fibrillar samples of all ten biomolecules formed in the absence and the presence of dendrimers were investigated with Congo Red absorbance and ThT Assay to detect fibril formation, Trp Emission and 3-D scan to evaluate the effect of fibrillation on aromatic environment of biomolecules, and CD spectroscopy to measure the conformational changes in a quantitative manner. These assays have generated useful information on the role of dendrimers in amyloid fibril formation of biomolecules. The outcomes of the study remain valuable in evaluating the biological safety of PAMAM-OH dendrimers for their biomedical application in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Constructing Optimal Coarse-Grained Sites of Huge Biomolecules by Fluctuation Maximization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Zenghui; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-12

    Coarse-grained (CG) models are valuable tools for the study of functions of large biomolecules on large length and time scales. The definition of CG representations for huge biomolecules is always a formidable challenge. In this work, we propose a new method called fluctuation maximization coarse-graining (FM-CG) to construct the CG sites of biomolecules. The defined residual in FM-CG converges to a maximal value as the number of CG sites increases, allowing an optimal CG model to be rigorously defined on the basis of the maximum. More importantly, we developed a robust algorithm called stepwise local iterative optimization (SLIO) to accelerate the process of coarse-graining large biomolecules. By means of the efficient SLIO algorithm, the computational cost of coarse-graining large biomolecules is reduced to within the time scale of seconds, which is far lower than that of conventional simulated annealing. The coarse-graining of two huge systems, chaperonin GroEL and lengsin, indicates that our new methods can coarse-grain huge biomolecular systems with up to 10,000 residues within the time scale of minutes. The further parametrization of CG sites derived from FM-CG allows us to construct the corresponding CG models for studies of the functions of huge biomolecular systems.

  9. Immobilization of biomolecules on cysteamine-modified polyaniline film for highly sensitive biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qi; Xu, Baojian; Ye, Lin; Di, Zengfeng; Zhang, Jishen; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Xue, Jian; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-03-01

    We present a new cysteamine (CS)-modified polyaniline (PANI) film for highly efficient immobilization of biomolecules in biosensing technology. This electrochemical deposited PANI film treated with CS and glutaraldehyde could be employed as an excellent substrate for biomolecules immobilization. The parameters of PANI growth were optimized to obtain suitable surface morphology of films for biomolecules combination with the help of electron and atomic force microscopy. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was utilized to illustrate the different electrochemical activities of each modified electrode. Due to the existence of sulfydryl group and amino group in CS, surface modification with CS was proven to reduce oxidized units on PANI film remarkably, as evidenced by both ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy characterizations. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to investigate the immobilization efficiency of biomolecules on the PANI film, comparative study using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) showed that BSA immobilized on CS-modified PANI could be increased by at least 20% than that without CS-modified PANI in BSA solution with the concentration of 0.1-1mg/mL. The CS-modified PANI film would be significant for the immobilization and detection of biomolecules and especially promising in the application of immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Fabrication of biomolecules self-assembled on Au nanodot array for bioelectronic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek; Kumar, Ajay Yagati; Yoo, Si-Youl; Jung, Mi; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, an nano-platform composed of Au nanodot arrays on which biomolecules could be self-assembled was developed and investigated for a stable bioelectronic device platform. Au nanodot pattern was fabricated using a nanoporous alumina template. Two different biomolecules, a cytochrome c and a single strand DNA (ssDNA), were immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays. Cytochorme c and single stranded DNA could be immobilized on the Au nanodot using the chemical linker 11-MUA and thiol-modification by covalent bonding, respectively. The atomic structure of the fabricated nano-platform device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of biomolecules immobilized on the Au nanodot arrays was confirmed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). To investigate the activity of biomolecule-immobilized Au-nano dot array, the cyclic voltammetry was carried out. This proposed nano-platform device, which is composed of biomolecules, can be used for the construction of a novel bioelectronic device.

  11. A new algorithm for construction of coarse-grained sites of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhang, John Z H; Xia, Fei

    2016-04-05

    The development of coarse-grained (CG) models for large biomolecules remains a challenge in multiscale simulations, including a rigorous definition of CG representations for them. In this work, we proposed a new stepwise optimization imposed with the boundary-constraint (SOBC) algorithm to construct the CG sites of large biomolecules, based on the s cheme of essential dynamics CG. By means of SOBC, we can rigorously derive the CG representations of biomolecules with less computational cost. The SOBC is particularly efficient for the CG definition of large systems with thousands of residues. The resulted CG sites can be parameterized as a CG model using the normal mode analysis based fluctuation matching method. Through normal mode analysis, the obtained modes of CG model can accurately reflect the functionally related slow motions of biomolecules. The SOBC algorithm can be used for the construction of CG sites of large biomolecules such as F-actin and for the study of mechanical properties of biomaterials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Thermoelectric single-photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzanyan, A A; Petrosyan, V A; Kuzanyan, A S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to detect a single photon is the ultimate level of sensitivity in the measurement of optical radiation. Sensors capable of detecting single photons and determining their energy have many scientific and technological applications. Kondo-enhanced Seebeck effect cryogenic detectors are based on thermoelectric heat-to-voltage conversion and voltage readout. We evaluate the prospects of CeB 6 and (La,Ce)B 6 hexaboride crystals for their application as a sensitive element in this type of detectors. We conclude that such detectors can register a single UV photon, have a fast count rate (up to 45 MHz) and a high spectral resolution of 0.1 eV. We calculate the electric potential generated along the thermoelectric sensor upon registering a UV single photon.

  13. Detectors plans for LS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nessi, M.

    2012-01-01

    All experiments plan an effective usage of the LS1 shutdown period. After three years of running they will go through a consolidation phase, mostly to fix problems that have emerged over time, like single points of failure in the infrastructure, failures of low-voltage power supplies and optical links. Upgrades of some detector components will start, mainly related to the beam pipe, the innermost tracker elements and the trigger system. Detector components, which had to be staged for cost reasons in 2003, will then enter into the detector setup. The goal is to be fully ready for the new energy regime at nominal luminosity. This article reviews the planned maintenance and modification works for ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE experiments. (author)

  14. The ALICE detector data link

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, G; Csató, P; Dénes, E; Kiss, T; Meggyesi, Z; Sulyán, J; Vesztergombi, G; Eged, B; Gerencsér, I; Novák, I; Soós, C; Tarján, D; Telegdy, A; Tóth, N

    1999-01-01

    The ALICE detector data link has been designed to cover all the needs for data transfer between the detector and the data-acquisition system. It is a 1 Gbit/s, full-duplex, multi-purpose fibre optic link that can be used as a medium for the bi-directional transmission of data blocks between the front-end electronics and the data- acquisition system and also for the remote control and test of the front-end electronics, In this paper the concept, the protocol, the specific test tools, the prototypes of the detector data link and the read-out receiver card, their application in the ALICE-TPC test system and the integration with the DATE software are presented. The test results on the performance are also shown. (14 refs).

  15. Shipboard Smoke Detection with Optical Fiber Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitesel, Henry

    1994-01-01

    ...) and scattering across an air gap. Utilizing spectrographic techniques and dual detector designs potentially compensates for optical power changes, ambient light changes, dirt coatings, and water coatings...

  16. The ANTARES optical module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amram, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.E.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Azoulay, R.; Bailey, D.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Bellotti, R.; Benhammou, Y.; Bernard, F.; Berthier, R.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bland, R.W.; Blondeau, F.; Botton, N. de; Boulesteix, J.; Brooks, C.B.; Brunner, J.; Cafagna, F.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Cartwright, S.L.; Cassol, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; Compere, C.; Cooper, S.; Coyle, P.; Croquette, J.; Cuneo, S.; Danilov, M.; Dantzig, R. van; De Marzo, C.; DeVita, R.; Deck, P.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dispau, G.; Drougou, J.F.; Druillole, F.; Engelen, J.; Feinstein, F.; Festy, D.; Fopma, J.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Goret, P.; Gosset, L.; Gournay, J.-F.; Heijboer, A.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Herrouin, G.; Hubbard, J.R.; Jaquet, M.; Jong, M. de; Karolak, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H. E-mail: lafoux@cea.fr; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laubier, L.; Laugier, J.-P.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le Van Suu, A.; Lemoine, L.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Massol, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazeas, F.; Mazeau, B.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J.E.; Michel, J.L.; Migneco, E.; Millot, C.; Mols, P.; Montanet, F.; Montaruli, T.; Morel, J.P.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Nooren, G.J.; Oberski, J.; Olivetto, C.; Oppelt-Pohl, A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Papaleo, R.; Payre, P.; Perrin, P.; Petruccetti, M.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Poinsignon, J.; Potheau, R.; Queinec, Y.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Rethore, F.; Riccobene, G.; Ricol, J.-S.; Ripani, M.; Roca-Blay, V.; Rolin, J.F.; Rostovstev, A.; Russo, G.V.; Sacquin, Y.; Salusti, E.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schuster, W.; Soirat, J.-P.; Souvorova, O.; Spooner, N.J.C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stubert, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tao, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Thompson, L.F.

    2002-05-21

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a deep sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will cover a sensitive area of typically 0.1 km{sup 2} and will be equipped with about 1000 optical modules. Each of these optical modules consists of a large area photomultiplier and its associated electronics housed in a pressure resistant glass sphere. The design of the ANTARES optical module, which is a key element of the detector, has been finalized following extensive R and D studies and is reviewed here in detail.

  17. The ANTARES optical module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amram, P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.E.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Azoulay, R.; Bailey, D.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Bellotti, R.; Benhammou, Y.; Bernard, F.; Berthier, R.; Bertin, V.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; Bland, R.W.; Blondeau, F.; Botton, N. de; Boulesteix, J.; Brooks, C.B.; Brunner, J.; Cafagna, F.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carloganu, C.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Carton, P.-H.; Cartwright, S.L.; Cassol, F.; Cecchini, S.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; Compere, C.; Cooper, S.; Coyle, P.; Croquette, J.; Cuneo, S.; Danilov, M.; Dantzig, R. van; De Marzo, C.; DeVita, R.; Deck, P.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dispau, G.; Drougou, J.F.; Druillole, F.; Engelen, J.; Feinstein, F.; Festy, D.; Fopma, J.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Goret, P.; Gosset, L.; Gournay, J.-F.; Heijboer, A.; Hernandez-Rey, J.J.; Herrouin, G.; Hubbard, J.R.; Jaquet, M.; Jong, M. de; Karolak, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Lachartre, D.; Lafoux, H.; Lamare, P.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laubier, L.; Laugier, J.-P.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le Van Suu, A.; Lemoine, L.; Lo Nigro, L.; Lo Presti, D.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Magnier, P.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Massol, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazeas, F.; Mazeau, B.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J.E.; Michel, J.L.; Migneco, E.; Millot, C.; Mols, P.; Montanet, F.; Montaruli, T.; Morel, J.P.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Navas, S.; Nezri, E.; Nooren, G.J.; Oberski, J.; Olivetto, C.; Oppelt-Pohl, A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Papaleo, R.; Payre, P.; Perrin, P.; Petruccetti, M.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Poinsignon, J.; Potheau, R.; Queinec, Y.; Racca, C.; Raia, G.; Randazzo, N.; Rethore, F.; Riccobene, G.; Ricol, J.-S.; Ripani, M.; Roca-Blay, V.; Rolin, J.F.; Rostovstev, A.; Russo, G.V.; Sacquin, Y.; Salusti, E.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schuster, W.; Soirat, J.-P.; Souvorova, O.; Spooner, N.J.C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Stubert, D.; Taiuti, M.; Tao, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Thompson, L.F.; Tilav, S.; Triay, R.; Valente, V.; Varlamov, I.; Vaudaine, G.; Vernin, P.; Witt Huberts, P. de; Wolf, E. de; Zakharov, V.; Zavatarelli, S.; D Zornoza, J. de; Zuniga, J.

    2002-01-01

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a deep sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will cover a sensitive area of typically 0.1 km 2 and will be equipped with about 1000 optical modules. Each of these optical modules consists of a large area photomultiplier and its associated electronics housed in a pressure resistant glass sphere. The design of the ANTARES optical module, which is a key element of the detector, has been finalized following extensive R and D studies and is reviewed here in detail

  18. The ANTARES Optical Module

    CERN Document Server

    Amram, P; Anvar, S; Ardellier-Desages, F E; Aslanides, Elie; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Azoulay, R; Bailey, D; Basa, S; Battaglieri, M; Bellotti, R; Benhammou, Ya; Bernard, F; Berthier, R; Bertin, V; Billault, M; Blaes, R; Bland, R W; Blondeau, F; De Botton, N R; Boulesteix, J; Brooks, B; Brunner, J; Cafagna, F; Calzas, A; Capone, A; Caponetto, L; Cârloganu, C; Carmona, E; Carr, J; Carton, P H; Cartwright, S L; Cassol, F; Cecchini, S; Ciacio, F; Circella, M; Compere, C; Cooper, S; Coyle, P; Croquette, J; Cuneo, S; Danilov, M; Van Dantzig, R; De Marzo, C; De Vita, R; Deck, P; Destelle, J J; Dispau, G; Drougou, J F; Druillole, F; Engelen, J; Feinstein, F; Festy, D; Fopma, J; Gallone, J M; Giacomelli, G; Goret, P; Gosset, L G; Gournay, J F; Heijboer, A; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrouin, G; Hubbard, John R; Jacquet, M; De Jong, M; Karolak, M; Kooijman, P M; Kouchner, A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lachartre, D; Lafoux, H; Lamare, P; Languillat, J C; Laubier, L; Laugier, J P; Le Guen, Y; Le Provost, H; Le Van-Suu, A; Lemoine, L; Lo Nigro, L; Lo Presti, D; Loucatos, Sotirios S; Louis, F; Lyashuk, V I; Magnier, P; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Massol, A; Masullo, R; Mazéas, F; Mazeau, B; Mazure, A; McMillan, J E; Michel, J L; Migneco, E; Millot, C; Mols, P; Montanet, François; Montaruli, T; Morel, J P; Moscoso, L; Navas, S; Nezri, E; Nooren, G J L; Oberski, J; Olivetto, C; Oppelt-pohl, A; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Payre, P; Perrin, P; Petruccetti, M; Petta, P; Piattelli, P; Poinsignon, J; Popa, V; Potheau, R; Queinec, Y; Racca, C; Raia, G; Randazzo, N; Rethore, F; Riccobene, G; Ricol, J S; Ripani, M; Roca-Blay, V; Rolin, J F; Rostovtsev, A A; Russo, G V; Sacquin, Yu; Salusti, E; Schuller, J P; Schuster, W; Soirat, J P; Suvorova, O; Spooner, N J C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, T; Stubert, D; Taiuti, M; Tao, Charling; Tayalati, Y; Thompson, L F; Tilav, S; Triay, R; Valente, V; Varlamov, I; Vaudaine, G; Vernin, P; De Witt-Huberts, P K A; De Wolf, E; Zakharov, V; Zavatarelli, S; De Dios-Zornoza-Gomez, Juan; Zúñiga, J

    2002-01-01

    The ANTARES collaboration is building a deep sea neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. This detector will cover a sensitive area of typically 0.1 km-squared and will be equipped with about 1000 optical modules. Each of these optical modules consists of a large area photomultiplier and its associated electronics housed in a pressure resistant glass sphere. The design of the ANTARES optical module, which is a key element of the detector, has been finalized following extensive R & D studies and is reviewed here in detail.

  19. Optical and structural characterization of the pure and doped BaY2F8 with rare earths for application in radiation detectors and scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, Ana Carolina Santana de

    2008-01-01

    In this work Barium Yttrium Fluoride (BaY 2 F 8 -BaYF) doped with different concentrations of ions Tb 3+ , Er 3+ , Tm 3+ e Nd 3+ were characterized, aiming the application in radiation detection devices that use the scintillating properties. Two types of samples were produced in the CLA-IPEN-SP, polycrystalline samples, obtained via solid state reaction of BaF 2 and YF 3 under HF atmosphere, and single crystals, obtained via the zone melting method also in a HF atmosphere. The samples were characterized using the following experimental techniques: X-ray powder diffraction, Radioluminescence (RL), Optical Absorption and Dispersive X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (DXAS). The X-ray diffraction pattern showed the presence of the phase BaY 2 F 8 and a small amount of the phase Ba 4 Y 3 F 17 in the polycrystalline pure and Tb 3+ doped samples. The other samples showed only the desired BaY 2 F 8 phase. The radioluminescence measurements of the doped BaYF, when irradiated with X-rays, showed emission peaks in energies that are characteristics of the 4f-4f transitions of rare earths. The RL of the samples with 2 mol por cent and 3 mold of Tb 3+ showed quite intense peaks with a maximum emission peak at 545 nm. The Tm 3+ doped BYF showed that the scintillation efficiency is not directly proportional to the doping level, and the highest RL emission were obtained for the polycrystalline samples doped with 1 mol por cent, showing a maximum peak intensity at 456 nm (the blue region of the visible spectrum). All samples showed a phosphorescent decay time of the order of seconds. Single crystals of BaYF doped with 2 mol por cent of Er 3+ , in addition to one of the highest phosphorescence time, presents a quite strong Rl in the green region of the spectra. The radiation damage was evaluated by the optical absorption techniques and the results showed that the formation of the absorption bands can be connected to colors centers generated by radiation in the matrix. Measurements of

  20. Avalanche photodiodes for ISABELLE detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    At ISABELLE some requirements for detecting bursts of photons are not met by standard photomultiplier tubes. The characteristics of immunity to magnetic fields, small size (few mm), low power consumption (approx. 100 mW), insensitivity to optical overloads, and wide dynamic range (approx. 60 dB) are achieved with difficulty, if at all, with PMTs. These are characteristics of the solid state avalanche photodiode (APD), the preferred detector for light-wave communications. Successful field tests with APD detectors stimulated the design of standard optical-fiber communication systems to replace wire carriers by the early 1980's. In other characteristics, i.e., counting rate, pulse-height resolution, effective quantum efficiency, detection efficiency, and reliability, bare APDs are equivalent to standard PMTs. APDs with currently available amplifiers cannot resolve single photoelectrons but they could provide reasonable detection efficiencies and pulse-height resolution for packets of approx. > 100 photons. Commercially available APDs can cost up to 100 times as much as PMTs per active area, but they are potentially much cheaper. Six topics are discussed: (1) detectors for light-wave communication and detectors for particles, (2) avalanche photodiodes, (3) commercially available APDs, (4) dynamic response of PMTs and bare APDs, (5) photon counting with cold APDs, and (6) conclusions and recommendations