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Sample records for optic nerve injury

  1. Ultrastructural changes in the optic nerve and capillary vessels during early stages of optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehong Ju; Xiuyun Li; Xiaoshuang Li; Hongtao Tang; Hongguo Liu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Capillaries are the only blood supply for optic nerves, which makes the system more vulnerable to impaired blood circulation. OBJECTIVE: To observe the ultrastructural changes in the optic nerves and capillaries in rabbits following intracanalicular segment injury to the optic nerve. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Comparative, observational, pathological morphology was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Weifang Medical College from September to November 2007. MATERIALS: Models of intracanalicular segment injury to the optic nerve were induced in the right eye of thirty healthy, adult rabbits by a flee-falling metal cylinder. The H-7500 transmission electron microscope was provided by Hitachi, Japan. METHODS: All rabbits were randomly assigned into experimental (n = 25) and control (n = 5) groups. Optic nerve specimens were obtained from the experimental group at 0.5, 6, 12, 48, and 96 hours, respectively, following injury. Uitrastructural changes to the optic nerves and their capillaries were observed by electron microscopy. Optic nerve injury was not established in the control group, but optic nerve specimens were collected similarly to the experimental group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ultrastructural changes in the injured optic nerves and their capillaries. RESULTS: Thirty rabbits were included in the final analysis. In the control group, cross-sections of the optic nerves exhibited varied thicknesses with regularly arranged fibers. The axons appeared to be smooth with condensed myelin sheaths and oval mitochondria. The microtubules and mierofilaments were clearly seen. The lumens of the capillaries were regular with densely arranged endothelial cells and visible mitochondria. In the experimental group, 30 minutes after injury to the optic nerves, swollen axons, sparse myelin sheath, disordered microtubules and microfilaments, swollen mitochondria, and a decreased number of pinocytosis vesicles and microfilaments in endothelial cells of the capillaries

  2. Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway after optic nerve injury.

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    Yuyi You

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate anterograde degenerative changes along the visual pathway in a rat model of optic nerve axotomy. METHODS: Optic nerve transection was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed at regular time intervals and tissues harvested. Immunoblotting followed by densitometric analysis was used to determine the phosphorylation profile of Akt in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN and the primary visual cortex (V1. The neuronal cell size and cell density were measured in the dLGN and the V1 using Nissl staining. The prevalence of apoptosis was characterized by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL histochemistry. Caspase-3 antibodies were also used to identify apoptotic cells. Neurons and astrocytes were detected using NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, respectively. RESULTS: An early and sustained loss of Akt phosphorylation was observed after optic nerve transection in both dLGN and V1. At week one, a decrease in the neuronal cell size (50.5±4.9 vs 60.3±5.0 µm(2, P = 0.042 and an increase of TUNEL positive cells (7.9±0.6 vs 1.4±0.5 ×10(2 cells/mm(2, P<0.001 were evident in the dLGN but not in V1. A significant decline in neuronal cell number (14.5±0.1 vs 17.4±1.3 ×10(2 cells/mm(2, P = 0.048, cell size (42.5±4.3 vs 62.1±4.7 µm(2, P = 0.001 and an increase in apoptotic cells (5.6±0.5 vs 2.0±0.4 ×10(2 cells/mm(2, P<0.001 appeared in V1 initially at one month post-transection. The changes in the visual pathway continued through two months. Both neuronal cells and GFAP-positive glial cells were affected in this anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway takes place in target relay (LGN and visual cortex following the optic nerve injury. Apoptosis was observed in both neural and adjacent glial cells. Reduction of Akt phosphorylation preceded cellular and apoptotic

  3. Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway after optic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Graham, Stuart L; Klistorner, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To investigate anterograde degenerative changes along the visual pathway in a rat model of optic nerve axotomy. Optic nerve transection was performed in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were sacrificed at regular time intervals and tissues harvested. Immunoblotting followed by densitometric analysis was used to determine the phosphorylation profile of Akt in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) and the primary visual cortex (V1). The neuronal cell size and cell density were measured in the dLGN and the V1 using Nissl staining. The prevalence of apoptosis was characterized by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) histochemistry. Caspase-3 antibodies were also used to identify apoptotic cells. Neurons and astrocytes were detected using NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. An early and sustained loss of Akt phosphorylation was observed after optic nerve transection in both dLGN and V1. At week one, a decrease in the neuronal cell size (50.5±4.9 vs 60.3±5.0 µm(2), P = 0.042) and an increase of TUNEL positive cells (7.9±0.6 vs 1.4±0.5 ×10(2) cells/mm(2), P<0.001) were evident in the dLGN but not in V1. A significant decline in neuronal cell number (14.5±0.1 vs 17.4±1.3 ×10(2) cells/mm(2), P = 0.048), cell size (42.5±4.3 vs 62.1±4.7 µm(2), P = 0.001) and an increase in apoptotic cells (5.6±0.5 vs 2.0±0.4 ×10(2) cells/mm(2), P<0.001) appeared in V1 initially at one month post-transection. The changes in the visual pathway continued through two months. Both neuronal cells and GFAP-positive glial cells were affected in this anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway. Anterograde degeneration along the visual pathway takes place in target relay (LGN) and visual cortex following the optic nerve injury. Apoptosis was observed in both neural and adjacent glial cells. Reduction of Akt phosphorylation preceded cellular and apoptotic changes.

  4. Optic Nerve Injury in a Patient with Chronic Allergic Conjunctivitis

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    Ribhi Hazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision.

  5. Cell proliferation and apoptosis in optic nerve and brain integration centers of adult troutOncorhynchus mykiss after optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evgeniya V Pushchina; Sachin Shukla; Anatoly A Varaksin; Dmitry K Obukhov

    2016-01-01

    Fishes have remarkable ability to effectively rebuild the structure of nerve cells and nerve ifbers after central nervous system injury. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In order to address this issue, we investigated the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in contralateral and ipsilateral optic nerves, after stab wound injury to the eye of an adult troutOncorhynchus mykiss. Heterogenous population of proliferating cells was investigated at 1 week after injury. TUNEL labeling gave a qualitative and quantita-tive assessment of apoptosis in the cells of optic nerve of trout 2 days after injury. After optic nerve injury, apoptotic response was investigated, and mass patterns of cell migration were found. The maximal con-centration of apoptotic bodies was detected in the areas of mass clumps of cells. It is probably indicative of massive cell death in the area of high phagocytic activity of macrophages/microglia. At 1 week after optic nerve injury, we observed nerve cell proliferation in the trout brain integration centers: the cerebellum and the optic tectum. In the optic tectum, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive radial glia-like cells were identified. Proliferative activity of nerve cells was detected in the dorsal proliferative (matrix) area of the cerebellum and in parenchymal cells of the molecular and granular layers whereas local clusters of undifferentiated cells which formed neurogenic niches were observed in both the optic tectum and cerebellum after optic nerve injury.In vitro analysis of brain cells of trout showed that suspension cells compared with monolayer cells retain higher proliferative activity, as evidenced by PCNA immunolabeling. Phase contrast observation showed mitosis in individual cells and the formation of neurospheres which gradually increased during 1–4 days of culture. The present ifndings suggest that trout can be used as a novel model for studying neuronal regeneration.

  6. Indirect optic nerve injury in two-wheeler riders in northeast India

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    Bhattacharjee Harsha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the association of posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy and superior temporal orbital rim injury in two-wheeler riders and documentation of the clinical profile of such cases. Design: Retrospective observational study. Materials and Methods: Records of all patients reporting with cranio-orbital injury and vision loss following road traffic accidents between October 1994 and April 2006 were reviewed and from them cases with vision loss solely from indirect optic nerve injury were taken up for study. The prognostic significance of different presenting features, role of intravenous methyl prednisolone (IVMP and relative risk of superior orbital rim injury to posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (at 95% confidence interval was calculated. Results: Out of 129 consecutive cases of cranio-orbital injury, 35 had posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy with minor ipsilateral superior temporal orbital rim trauma and none used any protective headwear. Presenting clinical features like relative afferent pupillary defect ( P = 0.365, optic disc status ( P = 0.518 and visual evoked potential (VEP ( P = 0.366 were disproportionate to visual loss. Only VEP had prognostic significance. The IVMP did not provide any added therapeutic benefit. The remaining 94 cases sustained direct blinding ocular trauma and 28 of them had associated intracranial pathology. The relative risk of superior temporal orbital rim injury to posterior indirect optic nerve trauma was 2.25. Conclusion: Superior temporal orbital rim injury, even when minor, carries a potential risk for development of blindness from indirect posterior indirect traumatic optic neuropathy in two-wheeler drivers. Presenting signs do not correlate with visual status. Only VEP has prognostic significance and the condition is untreatable.

  7. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

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    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  8. Effect of SIRT1 regulating cholesterol synthesis in repairing retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in rats

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    Yan Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the repair mechanism associated with cholesterol synthesis regulated by silent information regulator 1(SIRT1in rat model of optic nerve damage. METHODS: Preparation of optic nerve damage in 70 rats was randomly divided into normal group(10 rats, resveratrol treatment group(experimental group 30 ratsand PBS buffer control group(30 rats. The experimental group and control group was further divided into 3 subgroups(each group 10 rats, respectively. After 7, 14, 21d injected resveratrol or PBS, optic nerve injury were observed, then the rats were sacrificed. Retina was segregated; the surviving retinal ganglion cell(RGCswas counted. Dissection of optic nerve, cholesterol content of them were tested; RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of SIRT1, SREBP2 and HMGCR; Western blot assay was used to test the protein expression levels of SIRT1, cholesterol regulatory element binding protein 2(SREBP2and HMGCR. RESULTS: The numbers of RGCs and cholesterol levels of rat model with optic nerve injury decreased significantly(PPPPCONCLUSION: Up-regulating the expression of SIRT1, SREBP2 and down-regulating HMGCR by resveratrol could repair the injury of optic nerve through promoting the synthesis of cholesterol in neurons and retinal ganglion cells in the repair process. SIRT1 may be as a promising new target for treatment on optic nerve damage.

  9. Visual evoked potentials in optic nerve injury--does it merit to be mentioned?

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    Mahapatra A

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The value of Visual Evoked Potentials (VEP in the management of indirect optic nerve injury was prospectively studied in 78 patients. The initial VEPs were normal in 10, abnormal in 29 and absent in 39 patients. All 10 patients with normal VEP showed visual recovery. Amongst 29 patients with abnormal VEP, 26 (86.6% showed improvement. In 39 patients initial VEPs showed no wave, however, subsequent VEP recordings demonstrated wave formation. Thus in 31 patients repeated VEP recordings failed to demonstrate wave formation, and none of them improved. This study, thus brings out the high predictive value of both positive and negative VEPs.

  10. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury:a biomechanical evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong-jun Zhang; Ya-jun Li; Xiao-guang Liu; Feng-xiao Huang; Tie-jun Liu; Dong-mei Jiang; Xue-man Lv; Min Luo

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, max-imum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neu-rotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These ifndings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, im-prove biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury.

  11. Inflammatory stimulation preserves physiological properties of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury

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    Henrike eStutzki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Axonal injury in the optic nerve is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration and irreversible loss of vision. However, inflammatory stimulation (IS by intravitreal injection of Pam3Cys transforms RGCs into an active regenerative state enabling these neurons to survive injury and to regenerate axons into the injured optic nerve. Although morphological changes have been well studied, the functional correlates of RGCs transformed either into a de- or regenerating state at a sub-cellular level remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the signal propagation in single intraretinal axons as well as characteristic activity features of RGCs in a naive, a degenerative or a regenerative state in ex vivo retinae one week after either optic nerve cut alone (ONC or additional inflammatory stimulation (ONC+IS. Recordings of single RGCs using high-density microelectrode arrays demonstrate that the mean intraretinal axonal conduction velocity significantly decreased within the first week after ONC. In contrast, when ONC was accompanied by regenerative Pam3Cys treatment the mean intraretinal velocity was undistinguishable from control RGCs, indicating a protective effect on the proximal axon. Spontaneous RGC activity decreased for the two most numerous RGC types (ON- and OFF-sustained cells within one post-operative week, but did not significantly increase in RGCs after inflammatory stimulation. The analysis of light-induced activity revealed that RGCs in ONC animals respond on average later and with fewer spikes than control RGCs. IS significantly improved the responsiveness of the two studied RGC types.These results show that the transformation into a regenerative state by IS preserves, at least transiently, the physiological functional properties of injured RGCs.

  12. Neuronal apoptosis and neurofilament protein expression in the lateral geniculate body of cats following acute optic nerve injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The visual pathway have 6 parts, involving optic nerve, optic chiasm, optic tract, lateral geniculate body, optic radiation and cortical striatum area. Corresponding changes may be found in these 6 parts following optic nerve injury. At present, studies mainly focus on optic nerve and retina, but studies on lateral geniculate body are few.OBJECTIVE: To prepare models of acute optic nerve injury for observing the changes of neurons in lateral geniculate body, expression of neurofilament protein at different time after injury and cell apoptosis under the optical microscope, and for investigating the changes of neurons in lateral geniculate body following acute optic nerve injury.DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping design, controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-eight adult healthy cats of either gender and common grade, weighing from 2.0 to 3.5 kg, were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Fudan University. The involved cats were divided into 2 groups according to table of random digit: normal control group (n =3) and model group (n =25). Injury 6 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days five time points were set in model group for later observation, 5 cats at each time point. TUNEL kit (Bohringer-Mannheim company)and NF200& Mr 68 000 mouse monoclonal antibody (NeoMarkers Company) were used in this experiment.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Department of Neurosurgery, General Hospital of Ji'nan Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between June 2004 and June 2005. ① The cats of model group were developed into cat models of acute intracranial optic nerve injury as follows: The anesthetized cats were placed in lateral position. By imitating operation to human, pterion approach was used. An incision was made at the joint line between outer canthus and tragus, and deepened along cranial base until white optic nerve via optic nerve pore

  13. Ischemic injury leads to extracellular matrix alterations in retina and optic nerve

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    Reinhard, Jacqueline; Renner, Marina; Wiemann, Susanne; Shakoor, Daniel A.; Stute, Gesa; Dick, H. Burkhard; Faissner, Andreas; Joachim, Stephanie C.

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia occurs in a variety of eye diseases. Restrained blood flow induces retinal damage, which leads to progressive optic nerve degeneration and vision loss. Previous studies indicate that extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents play an important role in complex tissues, such as retina and optic nerve. They have great impact on de- and regeneration processes and represent major candidates of central nervous system glial scar formation. Nevertheless, the importance of the ECM during ischemic retina and optic nerve neurodegeneration is not fully understood yet. In this study, we analyzed remodeling of the extracellular glycoproteins fibronectin, laminin, tenascin-C and tenascin-R and the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) aggrecan, brevican and phosphacan/RPTPβ/ζ in retinae and optic nerves of an ischemia/reperfusion rat model via quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. A variety of ECM constituents were dysregulated in the retina and optic nerve after ischemia. Regarding fibronectin, significantly elevated mRNA and protein levels were observed in the retina following ischemia, while laminin and tenascin-C showed enhanced immunoreactivity in the optic nerve after ischemia. Interestingly, CSPGs displayed significantly increased expression levels in the optic nerve. Our study demonstrates a dynamic expression of ECM molecules following retinal ischemia, which strengthens their regulatory role during neurodegeneration. PMID:28262779

  14. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  15. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch;

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  16. Oxidative injury to blood vessels and glia of the pre-laminar optic nerve head in human glaucoma.

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    Feilchenfeld, Zac; Yücel, Yeni H; Gupta, Neeru

    2008-11-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible world blindness. Oxidative damage and vascular injury have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. The purpose of this study was to determine in human primary open angle glaucoma whether oxidative injury occurs in pre-laminar optic nerve blood vessels and glial cells. Following IRB approval, sections from post-mortem primary open angle glaucoma eyes (n=5) with mean age of 77 +/- 9 yrs (+/-SD) were compared to normal control eyes (n=4) with mean age 70 +/- 9 yrs (Eye Bank of Canada). Immunostaining with nitrotyrosine, a footprint for peroxynitrite-mediated injury, was performed and sections were double-labeled with markers for vascular endothelial cells, perivascular smooth muscle cells, and astrocytes with CD34, smooth muscle actin (SMA), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively. Immunostaining was captured in a masked fashion using confocal microscopy, and defined regions of interest for blood vessels and glial tissue. Intensity measurements of supra-threshold area in pixels as percent of the total number of pixels were calculated using ImageJ (NIH) and compared using two-tailed Mann-Whitney nonparametric tests between glaucoma and control groups. Colocalization coefficients with cell-specific markers were determined and compared with random coefficients of correlation. Increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity was observed in pre-laminar optic nerve head blood vessels of primary open angle glaucoma eyes compared to controls and this difference was statistically significant (1.35 +/- 1.11% [+/-SD] vs. 0.01 +/- 0.01%, P=0.016). NT-immunoreactivity was also increased in the glial tissue surrounding the pre-laminar optic nerve head in the glaucoma group and compared to controls, and this difference was statistically significant (18.37 +/-12.80% vs. 0.08 +/- 0.04%, P=0.016). Colocalization studies demonstrated nitrotyrosine staining in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, in addition to

  17. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

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    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system.

  18. Optic nerve oxygen tension

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    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  19. Dock3 overexpression and p38 MAPK inhibition synergistically stimulate neuroprotection and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury.

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    Semba, Kentaro; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Atsuko; Harada, Chikako; Katome, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Harada, Takayuki

    2014-10-03

    The dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (Dock3) is an atypical guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is predominantly expressed in the CNS. Dock3 exerts neuroprotective effects and stimulates optic nerve regeneration. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase acts downstream of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) signaling and plays an important role in neural cell death. We assessed a therapeutic efficacy of Dock3 stimulation and p38 inhibition in retinal degeneration induced by optic nerve injury (ONI). In vivo retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography revealed that ONI-induced retinal degeneration was ameliorated in SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor)-treated WT mice and PBS-treated Dock3 overexpressing (Dock3 Tg) mice, and SB203580 further stimulated retinal protection in Dock3 Tg mice. In addition, SB203580 increased the number of regenerating axons after ONI in both WT and Dock3 Tg mice. ONI-induced phosphorylation of ASK1, p38 and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 2B subunit were suppressed in the retina of Dock3 Tg mice. Inhibition of the ASK1 pathway in Dock3 Tg mice suggests that Dock3 may have an antioxidant-like property. These results indicate that overexpression of Dock3 and pharmacological interruption of p38 have synergistic effects for both neuroprotection and axon regeneration, thus combined application may be beneficial for the treatment of ONI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Possible Role of Neuroglobin in the Retina After Optic Nerve Injury: A Comparative Study of Zebrafish and Mouse Retina.

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    Sugitani, Kayo; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Wakasugi, Keisuke; Kato, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is a new member of the family of heme proteins and is specifically expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems in all vertebrates. In particular, the retina has a 100-fold higher concentration of Ngb than do other nervous tissues. The role of Ngb in the retina is yet to be clarified. Therefore, to understand the functional role of Ngb in the retina after optic nerve injury (ONI), we used two types of retina, from zebrafish and mice, which have permissible and non-permissible capacity for nerve regeneration after ONI, respectively. After ONI, the Ngb protein in zebrafish was upregulated in the amacrine cells within 3 days, whereas in the mouse retina, Ngb was downregulated in the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) within 3 days. Zebrafish Ngb (z-Ngb) significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in retinal explant culture. According to these results, we designed an overexpression experiment with the mouse Ngb (m-Ngb) gene in RGC-5 cells (retinal precursor cells). The excess of m-Ngb actually rescued RGC-5 cells under hypoxic conditions and significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth in cell culture. These data suggest that mammalian Ngb has positive neuroprotective and neuritogenic effects that induce nerve regeneration after ONI.

  1. Comparison of ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) versus direct measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) in traumatic brain injury patients

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Aim. To compare ultrasonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) with direct measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) and evaluate the correlation between them in traumatic brain injury patients. Patients and methods. Twenty traumatic brain injury patients were enrolled in the study. Patients had a median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 5. All patients underwent noninvasive measurement of ICP by ultrasonographic measurement of ONSD and invasive ICP measurement using ...

  2. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  3. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  4. Optic nerve hypoplasia

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    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  5. Visual outcome in optic nerve injury patients without initial light perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Ajay

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the prognosis for recovery of vision in patients with blindness due to head injury, and to analyse the predictive value of visual evoked potential (VEP. Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with unilateral/ bilateral blindness as a result of minor head injury were studied with regard to their visual status, CT scan, MRI scan and serial VEPs. Steroids were given to those presenting within one month of injury, 5 patients among them received methyl prednisolone. Transethmoidal decompression was done in 6 patients. Results: Visual improvement was recorded in 23 patients. Initial VEP failed to reveal any wave in 29 patients and was abnormal in 71. All the 14 patients in whom VEPs were repeatedly normal, irrespective of initial VEP status, showed varying degrees of visual improvement and none of the 15 patients with persistently negative VEPs showed visual improvement. Conclusion: Recovery of VEP from no response to abnormal wave or abnormal wave to normal VEP were indicators of relatively good visual prognosis. Overall, 23 patients showed visual improvement, but did not return to normal. Mode of injury, CT findings and timing of surgery did not influence the outcome.

  6. Optic nerve decompression for orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takumi; Sato, Kaneshige; Otsuka, Takaharu; Kawamura, Noriyoshi; Shimazu, Motohiko; Izumiyama, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2002-08-01

    Orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia often involves the bony orbit and the optic canal. Although fibrous dysplasia reportedly produces compression of the optic nerve leading to visual distrubances, optic nerve decompression in patients without clinical signs of optic neuropathy is still controversial. We describe two patients with orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia without signs of visual disturbance and one patient with McCune-Albright syndrome and progressive visual impairment. Optic nerve decompression was performed prophylactically for two patients and therapeutically for one patient through the transcranial extradural route. Dystopias and craniofacial deformities induced by fibrous dysplasia also were corrected. The micropressure suction-irrigation system was especially effective for decreasing heat transfer and thereby preventing thermal injury of the optic nerve. The orbitofrontal area was reconstructed from cranial bone, iliac bone, and ribs. Postoperative follow-up revealed no disturbances in visual function and no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid leakage. These findings suggest that optic nerve decompression may be effective in preventing visual disturbances with minimal risk of other neurological sequelae. Subsequent orbital reconstruction yielded satisfactory cosmetic results.

  7. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  8. 甲钴胺局部治疗视神经损伤的疗效%Clinical observation of Mecobalamin for the treatment of optic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敬才; 朱永唯; 吴同娟

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of Mecobalamin for the treatment of the patients with optic nerve injury.METHODS: Thirty-eight (38 eyes) patients randomly received either Mecobalamin treatment 21 cases or Tolazoline treatment 17 cases. Patients were treated with Mecobalamin injection 500μg or Tolazoline 12. 5mg by hemisphere injection respectively. The change of vision and visual field for the treatment of optic nerve injury was compared.RESULTS: The effect rate was 80% in the group treated with Mecobalamin and 44% in the controlled group with tolazoline: there was a statistical significant difference between them (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:Mecobalamin is an effective and security medicine for the treatment of optic nerve injury.%目的:观察甲钴胺对视神经损伤的疗效.方法:将38例38眼视神经损伤患者随机分为两组,分别用甲钴胺注射液500μg或妥拉苏林12.5mg半球后注射,比较两组间视力和视野的变化.结果:甲钴胺治疗组有效率为80%,妥拉苏林组有效率为44%,两组比较具有显著性意义(P<0.05).结论:甲钴胺是治疗视神经损伤的一种安全有效药物.

  9. Optic nerve atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. The optic ...

  10. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  11. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... tumor-specific histologic features are given. Finally, treatment modalities and prognosis are discussed....

  12. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S Crowe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits.

  13. Acupuncture Treatment for Optic Nerve Contusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Optic nerve contusion is a commonly-seen eye injury, which is mostly caused by traffic accident, collision, and falling. Early diagnosis and timely emergency treatment can make such patients restore vision to a certain extent. Otherwise, there may appear optic atrophy or loss of vision. At present, in the treatment of this disease, cortical hormone, dehydrating agent, vasodilator, vitamin, energy mixture and neurotrophic agent, or surgical operation can all give certain therapeutic effect. In the recent 5 years, the Department of Ophthalmology of the Hospital Affiliated to Hubei College of Traditional Chinese Medicine has adopted acupuncture for treatment of optic nerve contusion, and obtained quite good therapeutic results. Some typical cases are reported in the following.

  14. Etiological factors of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eser Filiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic injury of peripheral nerves is a worldwide problem and can result in significant disability. Management of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs requires accurate localization and the assessment of severity of the lesion. Aim: The purpose of this study is to analyze the data of patients with PNIs referred for electromyography to a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of clinical and electromyographic data of patients with PNIs seen over a period of eight-years (1999-2007 in a tertiary hospital. The data collected included: Demographic data, cause, type of lesion, anatomical location of the lesion, and the mechanism of lesion. Results: During the study period 938 patients were seen with nerve injuries and the distribution of nerve injuries was: PNIs: 1,165; brachial plexus lesions: 76; and lumbar plexus lesions: 7. The mean age was 31.8 years (range 2-81 years and the male to female ratio was 2.4:1. The most frequent nerve injuries were ulnar nerve in the upper extremity and sciatic nerve in the lower extremity. The most common cause of nerve injury was motor vehicle accidents. Two-thirds of the PNIs were partial. Conclusion: This study can serve as a guide to determine the epidemiology and classification of traumatic peripheral and plexus injuries.

  15. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  16. Low intensity laser treatment of nerve injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Luo, Qing-Ming

    2007-05-01

    The neural regeneration and functional recovery after nerve injuries has long been an important field in neuroscience. Low intensity laser (LIL) irradiation is a novel and useful tool for the treatment of many injuries and disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LIL irradiation in the treatment of peripheral and central nerve injuries. Some animal experiments and clinical investigations have shown beneficial effects of LIL irradiation on neural tissues, but its therapeutic value and efficacy are controversial. Reviewing the data of experimental and clinical studies by using the biological information model of photobiomodulation, we conclude that LIL irradiation in specific parameters can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral and central nerves and LIL therapy is a safe and valuable treatment for superficial peripheral nerve injuries and spinal cord injury. The biological effects of LIL treatment depend largely on laser wavelength, power and dose per site and effective irradiation doses are location-specific.

  17. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the histopathological characteristics associated with the invasion of the optic nerve of uveal melanoma and to evaluate the association between invasion of the optic nerve and survival. In order to achieve this, all uveal melanomas with optic nerve invasion...... in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve......; and 4) in one case a tumor spread along the inner limiting membrane to the optic nerve through the lamina cribrosa. Invasion of the optic nerve had no impact on all-cause mortality or melanoma-related mortality in multivariate analyses. The majority of melanomas invading the optic nerve are large...

  18. Blunt Facial Trauma Causing Isolated Optic Nerve Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Parab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic optic neuropathy is an uncommon, yet serious, result of facial trauma. The authors present a novel case of a 59-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated blunt traumatic left optic nerve hematoma causing vision loss. There were no other injuries or fractures to report. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of this rare injury and reviews the current literature and management of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  19. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... There are many other signs of nerve injury: muscles that get smaller, color ... The symptoms of numbness in the hand, pain in the hand, pain in the wrist, ...

  20. Optic Nerve Decompression for Orbitofrontal Fibrous Dysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Takumi; Sato, Kaneshige; Otsuka, Takaharu; Kawamura, Noriyoshi; Shimazu, Motohiko; Izumiyama, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    Orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia often involves the bony orbit and the optic canal. Although fibrous dysplasia reportedly produces compression of the optic nerve leading to visual distrubances, optic nerve decompression in patients without clinical signs of optic neuropathy is still controversial. We describe two patients with orbitofrontal fibrous dysplasia without signs of visual disturbance and one patient with McCune-Albright syndrome and progressive visual impairment. Optic nerve decompre...

  1. 轻型间接视神经损伤的临床诊断分析%CLINICALANALYSIS OF SLIGHTLY INDIRECT OPTIC NERVE INJURY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴红云; 刘维峰; 胡长青

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To analyze and summarize the clinical characteristics of slightly indirect optic nerve injury. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the clinical characteristics of 11 cases of light indirect optic nerve injury from January 2009 to April 2012 was done, including the patients’ chief complaints, injury characteristics, eye signs (visual acuity, pupil, fundus changes), and laboratory examinations (vision, visual-evoked potential) and the therapeutic effects was summarized. Results:The clinical features of the 11 cases are as follow, patients having direct injuries of the ipsilateral temporal and orbitofrontal area;slight vision loss;relative afferent pupillary defect, RAPD positive of the injured eye;visual field:universal light sensitivity decline and center or pericentral scotoma or visual field defects; visual-evoked potential (VEP) shows decreased or slightly decreased amplitude or time delay;orbital CT or brain CT is negative. After drug treatment, reexamination of the 11 cases showed recovery of vision and visual evoked potential, or even better than before, including 8 cases full recovery and 3 cases visual acuity significantly improved. Conclusion:It is effective to diagnose the mild optic nerve injury by analyzing the characteristics of patients’ chief complaints, pupil abnormalities, vision and visual-evoked potential, early diagnosis will be beneficial to vision recovery.%  目的对轻型间接视神经损伤的临床特点进行分析。方法回顾性分析我院2009年1月~2012年4月的11例轻型间接视神经损伤临床特点,包括患者的主诉、受伤特点、眼部体征(视力、瞳孔、眼底变化)及辅助检查(视野、视觉诱发电位)并对治疗效果进行总结。结果11例病例的临床特点:患者有患侧颞部及眶区的直接损伤史的受伤特点;视力下降轻;患眼相对传入性瞳孔阻滞(relative afferent pupillary defect,RAPD)阳性;视野:检查有普遍光敏感度下降现象

  2. Traumatic globe luxation with optic nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Mandeep S.; Kedar, Sachin; Sethi, Anita; Gupta, Vishal

    2000-09-01

    Luxation of the globe is a rare event that results from severe trauma to the orbit, often causing orbital rim and wall fractures. Though associated globe rupture often necessitates enucleation, repositioning of the globe can be attempted in these cases if the globe is intact. We report a case of globe luxation and optic nerve transection with its surgical management. A 17-year-old male presented with anterior luxation of the right globe and optic nerve transection following blunt trauma to the orbit. Computerized tomography revealed an anteriorly subluxated globe with complete transection of the optic nerve and multiple fractures of the orbital walls. The orbit was explored and the globe repositioned in the orbit with reattachment of the muscles. Postoperatively, the globe was in normal position with moderate motility and excellent overall cosmesis. Though the visual prognosis in these cases is usually extremely poor and depends on the extent and duration of injury, preservation of the globe not only helps the patient recover psychologically from the trauma but also allows better cosmesis.

  3. Effect of PACAP in Central and Peripheral Nerve Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Buki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a bioactive peptide with diverse effects in the nervous system. In addition to its more classic role as a neuromodulator, PACAP functions as a neurotrophic factor. Several neurotrophic factors have been shown to play an important role in the endogenous response following both cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury and to be effective when given exogenously. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different models of ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases and retinal degeneration. The aim of this review is to summarize the findings on the neuroprotective potential of PACAP in models of different traumatic nerve injuries. Expression of endogenous PACAP and its specific PAC1 receptor is elevated in different parts of the central and peripheral nervous system after traumatic injuries. Some experiments demonstrate the protective effect of exogenous PACAP treatment in different traumatic brain injury models, in facial nerve and optic nerve trauma. The upregulation of endogenous PACAP and its receptors and the protective effect of exogenous PACAP after different central and peripheral nerve injuries show the important function of PACAP in neuronal regeneration indicating that PACAP may also be a promising therapeutic agent in injuries of the nervous system.

  4. Effect of PACAP in Central and Peripheral Nerve Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Farkas, Orsolya; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Pal, Jozsef; Povlishock, John T.; Schwarcz, Attila; Czeiter, Endre; Szanto, Zalan; Doczi, Tamas; Buki, Andras; Bukovics, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a bioactive peptide with diverse effects in the nervous system. In addition to its more classic role as a neuromodulator, PACAP functions as a neurotrophic factor. Several neurotrophic factors have been shown to play an important role in the endogenous response following both cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury and to be effective when given exogenously. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different models of ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases and retinal degeneration. The aim of this review is to summarize the findings on the neuroprotective potential of PACAP in models of different traumatic nerve injuries. Expression of endogenous PACAP and its specific PAC1 receptor is elevated in different parts of the central and peripheral nervous system after traumatic injuries. Some experiments demonstrate the protective effect of exogenous PACAP treatment in different traumatic brain injury models, in facial nerve and optic nerve trauma. The upregulation of endogenous PACAP and its receptors and the protective effect of exogenous PACAP after different central and peripheral nerve injuries show the important function of PACAP in neuronal regeneration indicating that PACAP may also be a promising therapeutic agent in injuries of the nervous system. PMID:22942712

  5. Anatomical considerations to prevent facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roostaeian, Jason; Rohrich, Rod J; Stuzin, James M

    2015-05-01

    Injury to the facial nerve during a face lift is a relatively rare but serious complication. A large body of literature has been dedicated toward bettering the understanding of the anatomical course of the facial nerve and the relative danger zones. Most of these prior reports, however, have focused on identifying the location of facial nerve branches based on their trajectory mostly in two dimensions and rarely in three dimensions. Unfortunately, the exact location of the facial nerve relative to palpable or visible facial landmarks is quite variable. Although the precise location of facial nerve branches is variable, its relationship to soft-tissue planes is relatively constant. The focus of this report is to improve understanding of facial soft-tissue anatomy so that safe planes of dissection during surgical undermining may be identified for each branch of the facial nerve. Certain anatomical locations more prone to injury and high-risk patient parameters are further emphasized to help minimize the risk of facial nerve injury during rhytidectomy.

  6. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome from Thermal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay A. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to anatomical proximity to bone, the radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve of the upper extremity, frequently secondary to fractures (Li et al. (2013. We describe an incidence when a branch of the radial nerve is injured as a result of a thermal injury. Observation. Radial nerve injury can occur anywhere along the anatomical course with varied etiologies, but commonly related to trauma. The most frequent site is in the proximal forearm involving the posterior interosseous branch. However, problems can occur at the junction of the middle and proximal thirds of the humerus and wrist radially. When the radial nerve is injured by a burn, a new rehabilitation dynamic arises. Not only does one agonize about the return of nerve function but also fret about the skin grafts that replaced the devitalized tissue housing that compartment. Discussion. Although posterior interosseous nerve syndrome has been described in the context of many different etiologies, it has not previously been discussed in relation to burn injuries. In this case, not only did the patient’s rehabilitation involve aggressive therapy for return of sensation and function of the arm, but also prevention of contracture normally seen in replacement of full thickness burns.

  7. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome from Thermal Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijay A.; Michael, Rami E.; Dinh, Duy-Bao P.; Bloom, Scott; Cooper, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background. Due to anatomical proximity to bone, the radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve of the upper extremity, frequently secondary to fractures (Li et al. (2013)). We describe an incidence when a branch of the radial nerve is injured as a result of a thermal injury. Observation. Radial nerve injury can occur anywhere along the anatomical course with varied etiologies, but commonly related to trauma. The most frequent site is in the proximal forearm involving the posterior interosseous branch. However, problems can occur at the junction of the middle and proximal thirds of the humerus and wrist radially. When the radial nerve is injured by a burn, a new rehabilitation dynamic arises. Not only does one agonize about the return of nerve function but also fret about the skin grafts that replaced the devitalized tissue housing that compartment. Discussion. Although posterior interosseous nerve syndrome has been described in the context of many different etiologies, it has not previously been discussed in relation to burn injuries. In this case, not only did the patient's rehabilitation involve aggressive therapy for return of sensation and function of the arm, but also prevention of contracture normally seen in replacement of full thickness burns. PMID:24707432

  8. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  9. Prevention and Management of Nerve Injuries in Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auchincloss, Hugh G; Donahue, Dean M

    2015-11-01

    Nerve injuries can cause substantial morbidity after thoracic surgical procedures. These injuries are preventable, provided that the surgeon has a thorough understanding of the anatomy and follows important surgical principles. When nerve injuries occur, it is important to recognize the options available in the immediate and postoperative settings, including expectant management, immediate nerve reconstruction, or auxiliary procedures. This article covers the basic anatomy and physiology of nerves and nerve injuries, an overview of techniques in nerve reconstruction, and a guide to the nerves most commonly involved in thoracic operative procedures.

  10. Nerve injuries about the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariri, Sanaz; McAdams, Timothy R

    2010-10-01

    The ulnar, radial, median, medial antebrachial cutaneous, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves are subject to traction and compression in athletes who place forceful, repetitive stresses across their elbow joint. Throwing athletes are at greatest risk, and cubital tunnel syndrome (involving the ulnar nerve) is clearly the most common neuropathy about the elbow. The anatomy and innervation pattern of the nerve involved determines the characteristic of the neuropathy syndrome. The most important parts of the work-up are the history and physical examination as electrodiagnostic testing and imaging are often not reliable. In general, active rest is the first line of treatment. Tailoring the surgery and rehabilitation protocol according to the functional requirements of that athlete's sport(s) can help optimize the operative outcomes for recalcitrant cases.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foram Gala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies.

  12. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  13. 大鼠外伤性视神经损伤模型建立的研究进展%Recent research progress of traumatic optic nerve injury in rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱夏茹; 陈晓明

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic optic nerve injury ( TON) is caused by direct or indirect optic nerve trauma, which is one of a serious complication of craniocerebral trauma. lts prognosis poor and usually bring permanent vision damage. At present, optic nerve injury and regeneration is hot in neurobiology research. To build an ideal experimental animal model is extremely important in research and development in the treatment of optic nerve injury. ln this article, we review the methods of making rat models of traumatic optic neuropathy, clinical similarities, advantages and disadvantages of among these models, to provide reference for more experimental study.%外伤性视神经损伤是由外伤直接或间接导致的视神经损伤,也是颅脑外伤严重的并发症之一,其预后不良,常遗留永久性视力损害。目前视神经的损伤及再生是神经生物学方面的研究热点,因此建立理想的实验动物模型是开发视神经损伤治疗的重要方面。本文就各种大鼠的外伤性视神经损伤模型的造模方法、模型的临床相似性及其利弊进行综述,为进一步的实验研究提供参考。

  14. Routine exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery can prevent nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenling Shen; Mingliang Xiang; Hao Wu; Yan Ma; Li Chen; Lan Cheng

    2013-01-01

    To determine the value of dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery with respect to preventing recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 5 344 patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Among these cases, 548 underwent dissection of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, while 4 796 did not. There were 12 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury following recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection (injury rate of 2.2%) and 512 cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury in those not undergoing nerve dissection (injury rate of 10.7%). This difference remained statistically significant between the two groups in terms of type of thyroid disease, type of surgery, and number of surgeries. Among the 548 cases undergoing recurrent laryngeal nerve dissection, 128 developed anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (incidence rate of 23.4%), but no recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was found. In addition, the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury was significantly lower in patients with the inferior parathyroid gland and middle thyroid veins used as landmarks for locating the recurrent laryngeal nerve compared with those with the entry of the recurrent laryngeal nerve into the larynx as a landmark. These findings indicate that anatomical variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve are common, and that dissecting the recurrent laryngeal nerve during thyroid surgery is an effective means of preventing nerve injury.

  15. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective, non-randomised, descriptive study is to characterise the neurosensory deficit and associated neurogenic discomfort in 52 patients with iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). All patients were examined and followed up according to a protocol assess...

  16. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    : feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...

  17. CROSSING ANASTOMOSIS OF NERVE BUNDLES NEAR INNERVATED ORGANS TO TREAT IRREPARABLE NERVE INJURIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the therapeutical effects of crossing anastomosis of nerve on the peripheral and central nerve injuries.Methods Twelve kinds of central and peripheral nerve disorders and their complications were treated with 11 kinds of crossing anastomosis of nerve bundles near the innervated organs. After nerve injury and repair, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) retrograde tracing studies were used to investigate the rabbit's nerve function and morphology.Results The ulcers of all patients healed. Sensation, voluntary movement, and joint function recovered. Four weeks after the anastomosis of distal stump of radialis superficialis nerve and median nerve, pain sensation regained and SEPs appeared. HRP retrograde tracing studies demonstrated sensory nerve ending of medial nerve formed new connection with the body of neuron.Conclusion Crossing anastomosis of nerve is an effective method to treat peripheral and central nerve injuries.

  18. Characterization of Optic Nerve Regeneration using transgenic Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike eDiekmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS, fish are able to functionally regenerate severed axons upon injury. Although the zebrafish is a well-established model vertebrate for genetic and developmental studies, its use for anatomical studies of axon regeneration has been hampered by the paucity of appropriate tools to visualize re-growing axons in the adult CNS. On this account, we used transgenic zebrafish that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP under the control of a GAP-43 promoter. In adult, naïve retinae, GFP was restricted to young retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and their axons. Within the optic nerve, these fluorescent axons congregated in a distinct strand at the nerve periphery, indicating age-related order. Upon optic nerve crush, GFP expression was markedly induced in RGC somata and intra-retinal axons at 4 to at least 14 days post injury. Moreover, individual axons were visualized in their natural environment of the optic nerve using wholemount tissue clearing and confocal microscopy. With this novel approach, regenerating axons were clearly detectable beyond the injury site as early as 2 days after injury and grew past the optic chiasm by 4 days. Regenerating axons in the entire optic nerve were labelled from 6 to at least 14 days after injury, thereby allowing detailed visualization of the complete regeneration process. Therefore, this new approach could now be used in combination with expression knockdown or pharmacological manipulations to analyze the relevance of specific proteins and signaling cascades for axonal regeneration in vivo. In addition, the RGC-specific GFP expression facilitated accurate evaluation of neurite growth in dissociated retinal cultures. This fast in vitro assay now enables the screening of compound and expression libraries. Overall, the presented methodologies provide exciting possibilities to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying successful CNS regeneration in

  19. Retrobulbar diameter of optic nerve in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The ultrasound diagnostics of the optic nerve includes the analysis of the optic nerve disc (PNO and measuring of its retrobulbar diameter. With B-scan, by Schraeder's method, it is possible to measure very precisely the optic nerve, the pial diameter, the normal values for the pial diameter being 2.8-4.1 mm. In glaucoma, the disease that is most frequently associated with higher intraocular pressure, there comes the destruction of nerve fibres, which can be visualized as the excavation of the optic nerve disc. Objective. In this paper, we were interested in finding whether in glaucoma, and in what phase of the disease, the optic nerve starts growing thinner. Aware of many forms of this very complex disease, we were interested in knowing if the visualization of excavation on the optic nerve disc is related to diminishing of the pial diameter of the retrobulbar nerve part. Methods. There were treated the patients who had already had the diagnosis of glaucoma and the visualized excavation of the optic disc of various dimensions. Echographically, there was measured the thickness of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve and the finding compared in relation to the excavation of the optic disc. Results. In all eyes with glaucoma, a normal size of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve was measured, ranging from 3.01 to 3.91 mm with the median of 3.36 mm. Also, by testing the correlation between the thickness of the optic nerve and the excavation of the PNO, by Pearson test, we found that there was no correlation between these two parameters (r=0.109; p>0.05. Conclusion. In the patients with glaucoma, the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve is not thinner (it has normal values, even not in the cases with a totally excavated optic disc. There is no connection between the size of the PNO excavation and the thickness of the retrobulbar part of the optic nerve.

  20. The impact of optic nerve movement on optic nerve magnetic resonance diffusion parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Moodley

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Optic nerve diffusion imaging is a useful investigational tool of optic nerve microstructure, but is limited by eye-movement-induced optic nerve movement and artifacts from surrounding cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone and air. Attempts at improving patient cooperation, thus voluntarily limiting eye movement during a standard diffusion imagingsequence, are usually futile. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of optic nerve movement on clinical diffusion parameters of the optic nerve.Method: Twenty-nine healthy volunteers with intact vision and intact conjugate gaze were recruited and subjected to magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI of the optic nerves. Twenty right eyes had nerve tracking done using single-shot echo-planar imaging at 20 time points over 3 minutes. Optic nerve movement measurements were correlated with diffusion parameters of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, mean diffusivity (MD, fractional anisotropy (FA and anisotropic index(AI using Spearman’s rank correlation.Results: No significant correlations were noted between optic nerve movement parameters and ADC in the axial plane and MD of the optic nerve. Low to moderate negative correlations were noted between optic nerve movement parameters and AI and FA and positive correlation with ADC in the radial plane.Conclusion: Optic nerve movement documented during the timespan of standard diffusion sequences (DWI and DTI has a negative effect on the anisotropic diffusion parameters of the optic nerve. With greater eye movement, optic nerve diffusion appears less anisotropic owing to greater radial diffusion.

  1. [Neurosurgical position causes peripheral nerve injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Enríquez, Pedro; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Manrique-Carmona, Luisa

    2016-12-16

    Positioning during neurosurgical procedures is a challenge for surgical teams even if precautions are taken, the mechanisms underlying peripheral nerve injury (elongation, compression or ischaemia) are latent and it is important to know the frequency of occurrence in our environment. To analyze the frequency of peripheral nerve injury secondary to surgical positioning. Prospective study including 163 patients scheduled for neurosurgical procedures. Four groups: supine, lateral, ventral and park bench were analyzed by neurological exploration in order to detect injury and relate with risk factors already described. In this study 112 patients were included, two patients who were under park bench position experienced paresthesias in ulnar region of less than 24 hours' duration; statistically significant correlation with body weight greater than 85kg. The incidence of peripheral nerve injury is low, understanding the mechanisms that may originate it helps towards prevention and early detection of complications. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. The optic nerve sheath on MRI in acute optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, S.J. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Neuroinflammation, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Moorfields Eye Hospital, Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Miszkiel, K.A. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Plant, G.T. [Moorfields Eye Hospital, Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Miller, D.H. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Neuroinflammation, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath dilatation or gadolinium-enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging in acute optic neuritis have been previously reported but have been thought to be rare occurrences. This study recruited 33 patients with acute unilateral optic neuritis. All had their optic nerves imaged with fat-saturated fast spin-echo (FSE) imaging, and 28 had imaging before and after triple-dose gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T{sub 1}-weighted imaging. Follow-up imaging was performed on 20 patients (15 following gadolinium). A dilated subarachnoid space at the anterior end of the symptomatic optic nerve on FSE imaging was seen in 15/33 cases. In three of these cases, dilatation was visible on short-term follow-up. Optic nerve sheath enhancement was seen in 21/28 cases acutely: seven at the anterior end of the lesion only, five at the posterior end only and nine at both ends. Optic sheath enhancement was seen in 13 patients on follow-up. This study suggests that optic nerve sheath dilatation on FSE images and optic nerve sheath enhancement on triple-dose gadolinium-enhanced images are common findings in acute optic neuritis. Optic nerve sheath dilatation may be due to inflammation of the optic nerve, with its associated swelling, interrupting the communication between the subarachnoid space of the diseased optic nerve and the chiasmal cistern. Optic nerve sheath enhancement suggests that meningeal inflammation occurs in optic neuritis, in agreement with pathological studies of both optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis. (orig.)

  3. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant.

  4. Unilateral optic nerve aplasia associated with microphthalmos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković-Babić Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraduction. Optic nerve aplasia is a rare developmental anomaly characterised by the congenital absence of the optic nerve, central retinal vessels and retinal ganglion cells that is seen most often in a unilaterally malformed eye. Case report. We reported a girl with a very rare anomaly of the eye, unilateral aplasia of the optic nerve and microphthalmia. We carried out a complete ophthalmological examination, A- and Bscan ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the orbit and brain, pediatrician, neurological examinations and karyotype determination. The examined child was a third child from the third regular pregnancy, born at term (39 GS, BM 3100 g. Family ocular history was negative. The right corneal diameter was 7.5 mm and left 10 mm. On dilated fundus examination, the right eye showed the absence of optic nerve and central retinal vessels. B-scan echography showed a small right globe (axial length 13.80 mm, normal size left globe (axial length 18.30 mm and the absence of optic nerve on the right eye. Physical and neurological findings and karyotype was normal. MRI of the orbits and brain marked asymmetry of globe size and unilateral absence of the optic nerve. The patient is under the control of a competent ophthalmologist and prosthetic. Conclusion. Further aesthetic and functional development of a young person is the primary goal in tracking this rare congenital optic nerve anomalies in the malformed eye.

  5. Clavicle fractures - incidence of supraclavicular nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Jose Labronici

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze retrospectively 309 fractures in the clavicle and the relation with injury of the supraclavicular nerve after trauma. METHODS: It was analyzed 309 patients with 312 clavicle fractures. The Edinburgh classification was used. Four patients had fractures in the medial aspect of the clavicle, 33 in the lateral aspect and 272 in the diaphyseal aspect and three bilateral fractures. RESULTS: 255 patients were analyzed and five had paresthesia in the anterior aspect of the thorax. Four patients had type 2 B2 fracture and one type 2 B1 fracture. All patients showed spontaneous improvement, in the mean average of 3 months after the trauma. CONCLUSION: Clavicle fractures and/ or shoulder surgeries can injure the lateral, intermediary or medial branches of the supraclavicular nerve and cause alteration of sensibility in the anterior aspect of the thorax. Knowledge of the anatomy of the nerve branches helps avoid problems in this region.

  6. [Peripheral nerve injuries complicating extracranial vascular surgery (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobe, T; Raithel, D

    1978-10-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries may complicate extracranial vascular surgery. Pareses of the recurrent and hypoglossal nerves are clinically important. The nervus laryngeus superior, the ramus marginalis mandibulae of the facial nerve and the brachial plexus may be involved. Horner's syndrom indicating damage of sympathetic fibers may also appear. Lesions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and phrenic nerves are rather seldom.

  7. Autologous nerve anastomosis versus human amniotic membrane anastomosis A rheological comparison following simulated sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangyao Liu; Qiao Zhang; Yan Jin; Zhongli Gao

    2011-01-01

    The sciatic nerve is biological viscoelastic solid, with stress relaxation and creep characteristics. In this study, a comparative analysis of the stress relaxation and creep characteristics of the sciatic nerve was conducted after simulating sciatic nerve injury and anastomosing with autologous nerve or human amniotic membrane. The results demonstrate that, at the 7 200-second time point, both stress reduction and strain increase in the human amniotic membrane anastomosis group were significantly greater than in the autologous nerve anastomosis group. Our findings indicate that human amniotic membrane anastomosis for sciatic nerve injury has excellent rheological characteristics and is conducive to regeneration of the injured nerve.

  8. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  9. Optic Nerve Avulsion after Blunt Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Halil Karabulut

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve avulsion is an uncommon presentation of ocular trauma with a poor prognosis. It can be seen as complete or partial form due to the form of trauma. We assessed the complete optic nerve avulsion in a 16-year-old female patient complaining of loss of vision in her left eye after a traffic accident. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 249-51

  10. Optical coherence tomographic findings in optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daruchi Moon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated a case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT. Optical coherence tomography was done on both eyes using 5-line Raster scan for the fovea to analyze the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, inner retinal layer thickness, outer retinal layer thickness, and optic disc cube scan for the disc. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, inner retinal layer thickness, and outer retinal layer thickness were manually measured at 21-points of each five lines, and results were compared between both eyes. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and inner retinal layer thickness of optic nerve hypoplasia were significantly thinner than the opposite eye, but there was no significant difference in the thickness of the outer retinal layer between both eyes.

  11. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and b...

  12. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ... Fundamentals Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders Hormonal and Metabolic Disorders Immune Disorders Infections Injuries and Poisoning Kidney and ...

  13. The optic nerve head in hereditary optic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Evelyn C; Mackey, David A; Connell, Paul P; Hewitt, Alex W; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; Crowston, Jonathan G

    2009-05-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a prominent cause of blindness in both children and adults. The disorders in this group share many overlapping clinical characteristics, including morphological changes that occur at the optic nerve head. Accurate and prompt clinical diagnosis, supplemented with imaging when indicated, is essential for optimum management of the relevant optic neuropathy and appropriate counseling of the patient on its natural history. Patient history, visual field assessment, optic disc findings and imaging are the cornerstones of a correct diagnosis. This Review highlights the characteristic optic nerve head features that are common to the various hereditary optic neuropathies, and describes the features that enable the conditions to be differentiated.

  14. Skeletal muscle cell apoptosis following motornerve injury versus sensory nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhao; Ruisheng Xu; Shenyang Jiang; Guangming Lü; Zhiqiang Yan; Junming Sun; Ling Wang; Ye Xue; Donglin Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy inevitably occurs in denervated skeletal muscle, and cell apoptosis plays an important role in skeletal muscle atrophy and degeneration. The present study established rat models of simple nerve injury by transecting the ventral or dorsal spinal nerve root and observed rat skeletal muscle cell apoptosis following simple motor nerve injury versus simple sensory nerve injury. Following skeletal muscle denervation for 10 weeks, cell apoptosis was detected in skeletal muscle, which was accompanied by obvious changes in rat behavior and electrophysiological responses. In addition, changes in cross-sectional area and average gray-scale of motor endplates of the gastrocnemius muscle were analyzed following sciatic nerve injury and motor nerve injury.Cell nuclei in denervated skeletal muscle tissue were more densely arranged than in normal skeletal muscle tissue. Cell nuclei were most dense in the sciatic nerve injury group, followed by the motor nerve injury group and the sensory nerve injury group. Fas/Fast expression and the number of apoptotic cells increased in denervated skeletal muscle, and apoptosis-related changes were observed. These findings suggested that motor and sensory nerves provided trophic actions following skeletal muscle and motor nerve injury, resulting in a greater influence on skeletal muscle atrophy than sensory nerve injury. Therefore, reconstruction of motor nerves should be preferentially considered for treating denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

  15. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries associated with mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, Salwan Yousif Hanna; Ismael, Waleed Khaleel; Al-Assaf, Dhuha A; Omer, Saad Salem

    2012-11-01

    The study evaluates the incidence of inferior alveolar nerve injuries in mandibular fractures, the duration of their recovery, and the factors associated with them. Fifty-two patients with mandibular fractures involving the ramus, angle, and body regions were included in this study; the inferior alveolar nerve was examined for neurological deficit posttraumatically using sharp/blunt differentiation method, and during the follow-up period the progression of neural recovery was assessed. The incidence of neural injury of the inferior alveolar nerve was 42.3%, comminuted and displaced linear fractures were associated with higher incidence of inferior alveolar nerve injury and prolonged recovery time, and recovery of inferior alveolar nerve function occurred in 91%.Fractures of the mandible involving the ramus, angle, and body regions, and comminuted and displaced linear fractures are factors that increase the incidence of inferior alveolar nerve injuries. Missile injuries can be considered as another risk factor.

  16. Intrinsic determinants of optic nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Rui-lin; CHO Kin-Sang; GUO Chen-ying; CHEW Justin; CHEN Dong-feng; YANG Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the functions of these intracellular signals in their regulation of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axon regeneration.Data sources Relevant articles published in English or Chinese from 1970 to present were selected from PubMed.Searches were made using the terms "intrinsic determinants,axon regeneration,RGC,optic nerve regeneration,and central nervous system axon regeneration."Study selection Articles studying the mechanisms controlling RGC and central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration were reviewed.Articles focusing on the intrinsic determinants of axon regeneration were selected.Results Like other CNS neurons of mammals,RGCs undergo a developmental loss in their ability to grow axons as they mature,which is a critical contributing factor to the failure of nerve regeneration and repair after injury.This growth failure can be attributed,at least in part,by the induction of molecular programs preventing cellular overgrowth and termination of axonal growth upon maturation.Key intracellular signals and transcription factors,including B cell lymphoma/leukemia 2,cyclic adenine monophosphate,mammalian target of rapamycin,and Krüppel-like transcription factors,have been identified to play central roles in this process.Conclusions Intense effort and substantial progress have been made to identify the various intrinsic growth pathways that regulate RGC axon regeneration.More work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms of and the interrelationship between the actions of these factors and to successfully achieve regeneration and repair of the severed RGC axons.

  17. High-resolution CT of lesions of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyster, R.G.; Hoover, E.D.; Hershey, B.L.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-05-01

    The optic nerves are well demonstrated by high-resolution computed tomography. Involvement of the optic nerve by optic gliomas and optic nerve sheath meningiomas is well known. However, nonneoplastic processes such as increased intracranial pressure, optic neuritis, Grave ophthalmopathy, and orbital pseudotumor may also alter the appearance of the optic nerve/sheath on computed tomography. Certain clinical and computed tomographic features permit distinction of these nonneoplastic tumefactions from tumors.

  18. Anatomy of the optic nerve head and glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of axon damage in eyes with glaucomatous optic neuropathy remains undefined. Interestingly, it has been observed that, although the entire nerve cross-section may be involved by the nerve damage, in many instances, the superior and inferior axon bundles are preferentially affected by the pressure insult. Thus, recent studies by many investigators have stressed a re-examination of the optic nerve head anatomy, including the nerve head microcirculation, the glial and connective tissue elements within the nerve head, and the morphology of the axons themselves. Any correlation between regional differences in this anatomy and the preferential involvement by specific axon bundles within the nerve head by the pressure insult may suggest some further insight into the mechanisms underlying the pressure-induced axon loss in glaucomatous eyes.

  19. Intermediate filaments of zebrafish retinal and optic nerve astrocytes and Müller glia: differential distribution of cytokeratin and GFAP

    OpenAIRE

    Mosier Amanda L; Koke Joseph R; García Dana M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Optic nerve regeneration (ONR) following injury is a model for central nervous system regeneration. In zebrafish, ONR is rapid - neurites cross the lesion and enter the optic tectum within 7 days; in mammals regeneration does not take place unless astrocytic reactivity is suppressed. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is used as a marker for retinal and optic nerve astrocytes in both fish and mammals, even though it has long been known that astrocytes of optic nerves i...

  20. Neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells induced by sciatic nerve and optic nerve conditioned medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Chan; YANG De-mei; ZHANG Pei-xun; DENG Lei; JIANG Bao-guo

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous work has shown that optic nerve and sciatic nerve conditional medium had neurotrophic activity on neurons. In order to find if the optic nerve conditioned media (CM) had a similar activity to make PC12 cells differentiate as sciatic nerve CM did, we explored the neurotrophic activity in optic nerve CM in the same in vitro system and compared the neurotrophin expression levels in optic and sciatic nerves under both conditions.Methods PC12 cells were used to examine the effects of neurotrophins secreted by the sciatic nerve and optic nerve. RT-PCR and real-time QPCR showed that the sciatic nerve and optic nerve produced a range of neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3).Results The effects of sciatic nerve and optic nerve CM on neurite outgrowth were tested against a range of neurotrophins, and they had different neuritogenic activities. Only NGF and sciatic nerve CM had obvious neuritogenic activities, although the concentration of NGF in the sciatic nerve CM was very low.Conclusions Our experiment showed that sciatic nerve CM had a higher neurotrophic activity on PC12 cells than optic nerve CM. These results suggested that peripheral nervous system (PNS) and central nervous system (CNS) had different expression levels of neurotrophin, which may in part explain the lack of ability to regenerate the CNS.

  1. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  2. The optic nerve head in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert RA Bourne

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available ll types of glaucoma involve glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The key to detection and management of glaucoma is understanding how to examine the optic nerve head (ONH. This pictorial glossary addresses the following issues: how to examine the ONH; normal characteristics of the ONH; characteristics of a glaucomatous ONH; how to tell if the glaucomatous optic neuropathy is getting worse;‘pitfalls and pearls’.

  3. 大鼠视神经夹伤后CNTF CNTFR及OMgpmRNA表达的研究%The detection of CNTF CNTFR and OMgpmRNA after the optic nerve injury of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉; 苑秀华; 杨希明; 陈蕾; 王运杰; 张世刚

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察大鼠视神经夹伤后对闪光视觉诱发电位(F-VEP)的影响及睫状神经营养因子(ciliary neurotrophic factor,CNTF)、睫状神经营养因子受体(ciliary neurotrophic factor recepter,CNTFR)、少突胶质细胞髓鞘糖蛋白(oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein,OMgp)在视网膜中的表达变化.方法 采用夹持视神经方法建立大鼠视神经不完全损伤模型,在夹伤后1、3、7、14和28d剥离视网膜,提取总RNA用半定量逆转录聚合酶反应(rt-PCR)方法测定视网膜中CNTF,CNTFR,OMgp mRNA的表达,同时观测术后1、7、14和28dF-VEP波形改变.结果 大鼠视神经损伤后视网膜中CNTF,CNTFR,OMgp mRNA有所增加,正常大鼠视网膜中CNTF,CNTFR,OMgp少量表达.视神经损伤后F-VEP潜伏期延长,波幅降低,波形低而宽,14d后有所恢复.结论 大鼠视神经损伤后,CNTF,CNTFR,OMgp表达均增加,而CNTFR的增加可为外源性CNTF治疗视神经损伤提供依据.F-VEP的振幅,潜时伤后变化与时间相关,伤后14d变化最明显,以后有恢复迹象.%Objective To investigate the effect of the optic injury to F-VEP and the change of CNTF CNTFR and OMgpmRNA.Mthod establish model of inadequate injury of rats'optic nerve and use rt-PCR technique to measure the expression of CNTF CNTFR and OMgpmRNA at the time of 1, 3,7,14,28 day after the injury.We also analyse the change of rats'F-VEP.Result the 7d's expressions of CNTF, CNTFR,OMgp mRNA were more than the 2w'expessions.And mRNA of CNTF, CNTFR, OMgp were expressed in normal PEGs.Compared with that of the normal rats, the latency of F-VEP in optic nerve crushed rats increased and the wave of F-VEP became lower and wider.And recovery response was observed after 14 days.Conclusions After the optic nerve injury, levels of CNTF CNTFR and OMgpmRNA increased. CNTF CNTFR mRNA are likely to protect the degeneration of nerve cells by optic nerve injury, So exogenous CNTF might provide a supportive emviroment for axonal regeneration. F

  4. The Protective Role of Mecobalamin Following Optic Nerve Crush in Adult Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangmei Kong; Xinghuai Sun; Jinjun Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for Mecobalamin as a neuroprotective agent in optic nerve crush injury.Methods: Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups.One group acted as normal controls, while in the other three groups the right eye was subjected to optic nerve crush injury. Of the three crush injury groups one group received no treatment, while the other two groups received intramuscular injections of VitaminB12 or Mecobalamin (10μg) immediately after crush injury and then every two days. All the rats were sacrificed one month post-treatment, and the eyes attached with optic nerves were removed for histology. The morphological changes of optic nerve axons and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were assessed under light microscope (LM) and transmission electromicroscope (TEM). The numbers of axons and RGCs were counted.Results: In this study we demonstrate the potential for Mecobalamin as a neuroprotective agent following optic nerve crush injury. We show here that the axons of optic nerves were loose in structure or destroyed. The mitochondria of the RGCs was swollen, and the Nissel body was less evident after the crush injury. Moreover, the number of axons and RGCs was significantly reduced (P < 0.001). However, these changes were less dramatic after the Mecobalamin-treatment. More axons and RGCs were remained in the group than those in the untreated injury group (P = 0.010 and 0.003 respectively), and those in the VitaminB12-treated group (P=0.037 and 0.035 respectively). More significantly, there were newly formed axons found in the Mecobalamin-treated group.Conclusions: Optic nerve crush injury in rats causes the loss of the axons and RGCs but this may be ameliorated by treatment with Mecobalamin.

  5. Bacterial melanin promotes recovery after sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga V Gevorkyan; Irina B Meliksetyan; Tigran R Petrosyan; Anichka S Hovsepyan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial melanin, obtained from the mutant strain ofBacillus Thuringiensis, has been shown to promote recovery after central nervous system injury. It is hypothesized, in this study, that bacterial melanin can promote structural and functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. Rats subjected to sciatic nerve transection were intramuscularly administered bacterial melanin. The sciatic nerve transected rats that did not receive intramuscular administration of bacterial melanin served as controls. Behavior tests showed that compared to control rats, the time taken for instrumental conditioned relfex recovery was signiifcantly shorter and the ability to keep the balance on the rotating bar was signiifcantly better in bacterial melanin-treated rats. Histomor-phological tests showed that bacterial melanin promoted axon regeneration after sciatic nerve injury. These ifndings suggest that bacterial melanin exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve, contributes to limb motor function recovery, and therefore can be used for rehabil-itation treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  6. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  7. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue.

  8. Piriformis syndrome surgery causing severe sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Phillip E; Katirji, Bashar; Preston, David C; Grossman, Gerald E

    2012-09-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a controversial entrapment neuropathy in which the sciatic nerve is thought to be compressed by the piriformis muscle. Two patients developed severe left sciatic neuropathy after piriformis muscle release. One had a total sciatic nerve lesion, whereas the second had a predominantly high common peroneal nerve lesion. Follow-up studies showed reinnervation of the hamstrings only. We conclude that piriformis muscle surgery may be hazardous and result in devastating sciatic nerve injury.

  9. Dynamic regulation of Schwann cell enhancers after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Holly A; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-03-13

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-fei Li; Yi-ru Wang; Hui-ping Huo; Yue-xiang Wang; Jie Tang

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for g...

  11. Experimental optic neuritis induced by the microinjection of lipopolysaccharide into the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Marcos L; Dorfman, Damián; Sande, Pablo H; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is a condition involving primary inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury in the optic nerve which leads to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss, and visual dysfunction. We investigated the ability of a single microinjection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly into the optic nerve to induce functional and structural alterations compatible with ON. For this purpose, optic nerves from male Wistar rats remained intact or were injected with vehicle or LPS. The effect of LPS was evaluated at several time points post-injection in terms of: i) visual pathway and retinal function (visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and electroretinograms, (ERGs), respectively), ii) anterograde transport from the retina to its projection areas, iii) consensual pupil light reflex (PLR), iv) optic nerve histology, v) microglia/macrophage reactivity (by Iba-1- and ED1-immunostaining), vi) astrocyte reactivity (by glial fibrillary acid protein-immunostaining), vii) axon number (by toluidine blue staining), vii) demyelination (by myelin basic protein immunoreactivity and luxol fast blue staining), viii) optic nerve ultrastructure, and ix) RGC number (by Brn3a immunoreactivity). LPS induced a significant and persistent decrease in VEP amplitude and PLR, without changes in the ERG. In addition, LPS induced a deficit in anterograde transport, and an early inflammatory response consisting in an increased cellularity, and Iba-1 and ED1-immunoreactivity in the optic nerve, which were followed by changes in axonal density, astrocytosis, demyelination, and axon and RGC loss. These results suggest that the microinjection of LPS into the optic nerve may serve as a new experimental model of primary ON.

  12. Optical Feedback Control and Electrical-Optical Costimulation of Peripheral Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Sahil K; Richner, Thomas J; Brodnick, Sarah K; Williams, Justin C; Poore, Samuel O

    2016-09-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology that enables the expression of light-activated ion channels in mammalian cells. Neurons expressing light-activated ion channels can be depolarized using the appropriate wavelength of light. Optical stimulation of neurons could have important implications for further understanding and managing peripheral nerve deficits leading to paresis or paralysis. This study examines the utility of this technology in a feedback-controlled system and the advantages of coupling this technology with conventional electrical stimulation. The sciatic nerves of transgenic mice expressing blue light-activated ion channels (channelrhodopsin-2) were optically manipulated to generate electromyographic responses in the gastrocnemius muscle and to develop two potential applications of this technology: feedback-controlled optical stimulation using a proportional-integral controller, and simultaneous electrical-optical stimulation. The authors observed repeatable and predictable behavior of the optical controller in over 200 trials and a statistically significant decreased error when using optical feedback control as opposed to non-feedback controlled stimulation (n = 6 limbs). A second application of this technology was the amplification of electrically generated peripheral nerve signals using an optical source. Amplification of electrical activity was observed even when subthreshold electrical stimulation was used. Optical feedback control and optical amplification of subthreshold activity extend the versatility of optogenetics in peripheral nerve applications. Optical feedback control is a new application of an approach originally developed for functional electrical stimulation. Optical amplification of subthreshold electrical stimulation motivates future investigations into the optical amplification of endogenous subthreshold peripheral nerve activity (e.g., following spinal cord injury).

  13. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  14. The maximum tolerated dose of gamma radiation to the optic nerve during γ knife radiosurgery in an animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xingli; Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Ruen; Yi, Meiying; Lei, Deqiang; Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Hongyang

    2013-01-01

    The safety of gamma knife radiosurgery should be considered when treating pituitary adenomas. To determine the maximum tolerated dose of radiation delivered by gamma knife radiosurgery to optic nerves. An animal model designed to establish prolonged balloon compression of the optic chiasm and parasellar region was developed to mimic the optic nerve compression caused by pituitary adenomas. Twenty cats underwent surgery to place a balloon for compression effect and 20 cats in a sham operation group received microsurgery without any treatment. The effects of gamma knife irradiation at 10-13 Gy on normal (sham operation group) and compressed (optic nerve compression group) optic nerves were investigated by pattern visual evoked potential examination and histopathology. Gamma knife radiosurgery at 10 Gy had almost no effect. At 11 Gy, P100 latency was significantly prolonged and P100 amplitude was significantly decreased in compressed optic nerves, but there was little change in the normal optic nerves. Doses of 11 Gy and higher induced significant electrophysiological variations and degeneration of the myelin sheath and axons in both normal and compressed optic nerves. Compressed optic nerves are more sensitive to gamma knife radiosurgery than normal optic nerves. The minimum dose of gamma knife radiosurgery that causes radiation injury in normal optic nerves is 12 Gy; however, the minimum dose is 11 Gy in compressed optic nerves. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Neuronal plasticity of trigeminal ganglia in mice following nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynds, Randi; Lyu, Chuang; Lyu, Gong-Wei; Shi, Xie-Qi; Rosén, Annika; Mustafa, Kamal; Shi, Tie-Jun Sten

    2017-01-01

    Background Nerve injury may induce neuropathic pain. In studying the mechanisms of orofacial neuropathic pain, attention has been paid to the plastic changes that occur in the trigeminal ganglia (TGs) and nucleus in response to an injury of the trigeminal nerve branches. Previous studies have explored the impact of sciatic nerve injury on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and it has shown dramatic changes in the expression of multiple biomarkers. In large, the changes in biomarker expression in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury are similar to that in DRGs after sciatic nerve injury. However, important differences exist. Therefore, there is a need to study the plasticity of biomarkers in TGs after nerve injury in the context of the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviors. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of biomarkers associated with chronic persistent pain in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury. Materials and methods To mimic the chronic nature of the disorder, we used an intraoral procedure to access the infraorbital nerve (ION) and induced a nerve injury in mice. Immunohistochemistry and quantification were used for revealing the expression level of each biomarker in TGs after nerve injury. Results Two weeks after partial ION injury, immunohistochemistry results showed strongly upregulated expressions of activating transcription factor 3 and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the ipsilateral TGs. Microglial cells were also activated after nerve injury. In regard to positive neuronal profile counting, however, no significant difference in expression was observed in galanin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, phosphorylated AKT, or P2X3 in ipsilateral TGs when compared to contralateral TGs. Conclusion In this study, the expression and regulation of biomarkers in TGs have been observed in response to trigeminal nerve injury. Our results suggest that NPY and Iba1 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of

  16. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Bai; Yan-ni Han; Wen-tao Zhang; Wei Huang; Hong-lei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Pa-tients received oral vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin. We examined ifnal follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, ifve with superifcial peroneal nerve injury, and ifve with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no signiifcant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory func-tion in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months.

  17. Natural history of sensory nerve recovery after cutaneous nerve injury following foot and ankle surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous nerve injury is the most common complication following foot and ankle surgery. However, clinical studies including long-term follow-up data after cutaneous nerve injury of the foot and ankle are lacking. In the current retrospective study, we analyzed the clinical data of 279 patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery. Subjects who suffered from apparent paresthesia in the cutaneous sensory nerve area after surgery were included in the study. Patients received oral vitamin B 12 and methylcobalamin. We examined final follow-up data of 17 patients, including seven with sural nerve injury, five with superficial peroneal nerve injury, and five with plantar medial cutaneous nerve injury. We assessed nerve sensory function using the Medical Research Council Scale. Follow-up immediately, at 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 9 months, and 1 year after surgery demonstrated that sensory function was gradually restored in most patients within 6 months. However, recovery was slow at 9 months. There was no significant difference in sensory function between 9 months and 1 year after surgery. Painful neuromas occurred in four patients at 9 months to 1 year. The results demonstrated that the recovery of sensory function in patients with various cutaneous nerve injuries after foot and ankle surgery required at least 6 months

  18. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

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    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  19. Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury in colorectal surgery. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colsa Gutiérrez, Pablo; Viadero Cervera, Raquel; Morales-García, Dieter; Ingelmo Setién, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative peripheral nerve injury during colorectal surgery procedures is a potentially serious complication that is often underestimated. The Trendelenburg position, use of inappropriately padded armboards and excessive shoulder abduction may encourage the development of brachial plexopathy during laparoscopic procedures. In open colorectal surgery, nerve injuries are less common. It usually involves the femoral plexus associated with lithotomy position and self-retaining retractor systems. Although in most cases the recovery is mostly complete, treatment consists of physical therapy to prevent muscular atrophy, protection of hypoesthesic skin areas and analgesics for neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study is to review the incidence, prevention and management of intraoperative peripheral nerve injury.

  20. Upregulation of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF during the early stage of optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish.

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    Kazuhiro Ogai

    Full Text Available Fish retinal ganglion cells (RGCs can regenerate their axons after optic nerve injury, whereas mammalian RGCs normally fail to do so. Interleukin 6 (IL-6-type cytokines are involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, survival, and axon regrowth; thus, they may play a role in the regeneration of zebrafish RGCs after injury. In this study, we assessed the expression of IL-6-type cytokines and found that one of them, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, is upregulated in zebrafish RGCs at 3 days post-injury (dpi. We then demonstrated the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a downstream target of LIF, at 3-5 dpi. To determine the function of LIF, we performed a LIF knockdown experiment using LIF-specific antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (LIF MOs. LIF MOs, which were introduced into zebrafish RGCs via a severed optic nerve, reduced the expression of LIF and abrogated the activation of STAT3 in RGCs after injury. These results suggest that upregulated LIF drives Janus kinase (Jak/STAT3 signaling in zebrafish RGCs after nerve injury. In addition, the LIF knockdown impaired axon sprouting in retinal explant culture in vitro; reduced the expression of a regeneration-associated molecule, growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43; and delayed functional recovery after optic nerve injury in vivo. In this study, we comprehensively demonstrate the beneficial role of LIF in optic nerve regeneration and functional recovery in adult zebrafish.

  1. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  2. Analysis of proximal radial nerve injury in the arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duz Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve in the upper extremity. Proximal part of the radial nerve involvement can result from a humerus fracture, direct nerve trauma, compression and rarely from tumors. Objectives: The aim of the study is to determine the clinical characteristics and electrodiagnostic findings in patients with proximal radial nerve injuries, and also the outcome of surgical treatment. Materials and Methods: The study subjects included 46 patients with radial nerve injuries seen between June 2000 and June 2008 at our hospital. The analysis included demographics, clinical features, etiology, pre-and postoperative EMNG (Electromyoneurography findings. Results: Surgical decompression resulted in neurological improvement in patients with radial entrapment neuropathies. Good neurological recovery was observed from decompression of callus of old humeral fracture. The worst results were observed in the direct missile injuries of the radial nerve. Conclusions: A detailed clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation is of importance in patients with radial nerve injury to ensure an appropriate treatment. The choice of treatment, conservative or surgical, depends on the clinical presentation and the type of injury.

  3. Hip and pelvic fractures and sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋电明; 余学东; 安洪; 梁勇; 梁安霖

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of hip and pelvic fracture, especially acetabular fracture complicated by sciatic nerve injury on clinical features and prognosis of sciatic nerve injury. Methods: From January 1987 to January 2000, 17 patients (14 male and 3 female) who had hip and pelvic fractures complicated by sciatic nerve injury were treated with operative reduction and internal fixation and followed up from 10 months to 5 years. The average age was 38 years (ranging 23-56 years). The left extremities were involved in 11 patients and the right in 6. Twelve patients underwent primary exploration and neurolysis and 5 patients underwent secondary operation. Results: Preoperatively, 8 patients were treated with large doses of oral narcotics to control their severe sciatic pain. Three of the 8 patients underwent patient-controlled analgesia and epidural analgesia. After operation, excellent and good rates of reduction and functional recovery of sciatic nerve were 94.1% and 88% respectively. Four patients still had sciatic pain and 2 patients failed to recover. Sciatic nerve function improved within 3-6 months after surgery in 11 patients. Conclusions: Hip and pelvic fractures can result in sciatic nerve injury, especially common peroneal nerve injury and prognosis is poor. Open reduction and internal fixation combined with nerve exploration and neurolysis should be used as early as possible for severe sciatic pain.

  4. ELECTRODIAGNOSTIC ASSESSMENT OF PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURIES IN KICK-BOXERS

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    M.R EMAD

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducti0n. Peripheral nerve injuries are one of the common traumas in various sport fields. Nowadays, thera are a growing tendency to Martial arts among young people. Insufficient knowlodage about the biomechanics and true skills in these sports can expose the athletes to many neuromusculoskeletal injuries including peripheral nerve injuries. The aim of this study was assessment of peripheral nerve injuries among Kick-boxers. Methods. The research was done on 30 male kick-boxers Aged between 17-28 years. Ulnar, tibial and median nerves were studied for the presence of unlar nerve entrapment on elbow, trasal tunnel syndrom and carpal tunnel syndrom. Results. Ulnar neuropathy was observed in 12 cases. Tibial entrapment was detected in 13 cases. No median nerve intrapment of CTS was detected. There was a significant correlation between the age of the participants and nerve entrapment. Discussion. Peripheral nerve injuries should be considered in athletes and should be trained to apply preventive and thrapeutic procedures.

  5. Changes in the blood-nerve barrier after sciatic nerve cold injury: indications supporting early treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe edema in the endoneurium can occur after non-freezing cold injury to the peripheral nerve, which suggests damage to the blood-nerve barrier. To determine the effects of cold injury on the blood-nerve barrier, the sciatic nerve on one side of Wistar rats was treated with low temperatures (3-5°C for 2 hours. The contralateral sciatic nerve was used as a control. We assessed changes in the nerves using Evans blue as a fluid tracer and morphological methods. Excess fluid was found in the endoneurium 1 day after cold injury, though the tight junctions between cells remained closed. From 3 to 5 days after the cold injury, the fluid was still present, but the tight junctions were open. Less tracer leakage was found from 3 to 5 days after the cold injury compared with 1 day after injury. The cold injury resulted in a breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier function, which caused endoneurial edema. However, during the early period, the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier did not include the opening of tight junctions, but was due to other factors. Excessive fluid volume produced a large increase in the endoneurial fluid pressure, prevented liquid penetration into the endoneurium from the microvasculature. These results suggest that drug treatment to patients with cold injuries should be administered during the early period after injury because it may be more difficult for the drug to reach the injury site through the microcirculation after the tissue fluid pressure becomes elevated.

  6. A study of degeneration, scar formation and regeneration after section of the optic nerve in the frog, Rana pipiens.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, T. M.; Foote, J

    1981-01-01

    Degeneration, scar formation and regeneration have been studied after section of the optic nerve in the frog. In the normal optic nerve two types of macroglial cell were identified: astrocytes and oligodendroglia. Degeneration after injury proceeded rapidly in comparison with mammals but did not lead to the production of a dense scar. Before much scarring had developed, regenerating axons penetrated the lesioned area.

  7. 间接视神经损伤患者视力预后的影响因素%Research of influence factors of visual prognosis for patients with indirect injury of optic nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹娜; 胡卫群

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the influence factors of visual prognosis for patients with indirect injury of optic nerve (ON) and provide the scientific basis of improvements of curative effects and visual prognosis.Methods 127 patients with indi‐rect injury of optic nerve treated from January 2011 to January 2014 were selected.According to the clinical data ,the multiple influence factors of visual prognosis were analyzed and the independent risk factors were observed.Results According to the e‐valuation standards of visual improvements ,the total effective rate of visual improvements was 37.9% ;based on the single fac‐tor analysis ,the eyesight ,fractures of ON ,swelling of ON and the stressful locations had a significant impact on the visual im‐provements (P0.05);based on the multiple‐factor analysis and Logistic regression analysis ,the eyesight and fracture of ON had the signifi‐cant impact on the visual prognosis(P<0.05).Conclusion The research indicates that the visual prognosis for patients with in‐direct injury of optic nerve has a close correlation with the injury scales of optic nerve and fracture of ON.%目的:分析间接视神经损伤患者视力预后的影响因素。方法入选2011‐01—2014‐01于我院就诊的间接视神经损伤患者127例,回顾性分析患者的临床资料,对影响视力预后的多项因素进行分析,探讨其独立危险因素。结果根据视力改善评价标准,本组患者视力改善总有效率为37.9%;经单因素分析显示,视力分级、视神经管骨折、视神经肿胀和受力部位对患者视力改善有显著影响(P<0.05);而性别、年龄、手术情况和视力改变时间均与视力预后无显著关系(P>0.05);选取单因素分析中有统计学意义的因素,经 Logistic回归分析显示,视力分级和视神经管骨折与视力预后有显著相关性( P<0.05)。结论间接性视神经损伤患者视力预后与视神经损伤分级

  8. Morphological differences in skeletal muscle atrophy of rats with motor nerve and/or sensory nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhao; Guangming Lv; Shengyang Jiang; Zhiqiang Yan; Junming Sun; Ling Wang; Donglin Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs after denervation. The present study dissected the rat left ventral root and dorsal root at L4-6 or the sciatic nerve to establish a model of simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury. Results showed that with prolonged denervation time, rats with simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury exhibited abnormal behavior, reduced wet weight of the left gastrocnemius muscle, decreased diameter and cross-sectional area and altered ultrastructure of muscle cells, as well as decreased cross-sectional area and increased gray scale of the gastrocnemius muscle motor end plate. Moreover, at the same time point, the pathological changes were most severe in mixed nerve injury, followed by simple motor nerve injury, and the changes in simple sensory nerve injury were the mildest. These findings indicate that normal skeletal muscle morphology is maintained by intact innervation. Motor nerve injury resulted in larger damage to skeletal muscle and more severe atrophy than sensory nerve injury. Thus, reconstruction of motor nerves should be considered first in the clinical treatment of skeletal muscle atrophy caused by denervation.

  9. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

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    Song, Kyoung Doo, E-mail: kdsong0308@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Hong, E-mail: rtombow@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye, E-mail: jhkate.kim@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, So-Young, E-mail: sy1131.yoo@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Tae Yeon, E-mail: hathor97.jeon@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  10. The neuronal EGF-related gene Nell2 interacts with Macf1 and supports survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Munemasa

    Full Text Available Nell2 is a neuron-specific protein containing six epidermal growth factor-like domains. We have identified Nell2 as a retinal ganglion cell (RGC-expressed gene by comparing mRNA profiles of control and RGC-deficient rat retinas. The aim of this study was to analyze Nell2 expression in wild-type and optic nerve axotomized retinas and evaluate its potential role in RGCs. Nell2-positive in situ and immunohistochemical signals were localized to irregularly shaped cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL and colocalized with retrogradely-labeled RGCs. No Nell2-positive cells were detected in 2 weeks optic nerve transected (ONT retinas characterized with approximately 90% RGC loss. RT-PCR analysis showed a dramatic decrease in the Nell2 mRNA level after ONT compared to the controls. Immunoblot analysis of the Nell2 expression in the retina revealed the presence of two proteins with approximate MW of 140 and 90 kDa representing glycosylated and non-glycosylated Nell2, respectively. Both products were almost undetectable in retinal protein extracts two weeks after ONT. Proteome analysis of Nell2-interacting proteins carried out with MALDI-TOF MS (MS identified microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1 (Macf1, known to be critical in CNS development. Strong Macf1 expression was observed in the inner plexiform layer and GCL where it was colocalizied with Thy-1 staining. Since Nell2 has been reported to increase neuronal survival of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, we evaluated the effect of Nell2 overexpression on RGC survival. RGCs in the nasal retina were consistently more efficiently transfected than in other areas (49% vs. 13%; n = 5, p<0.05. In non-transfected or pEGFP-transfected ONT retinas, the loss of RGCs was approximately 90% compared to the untreated control. In the nasal region, Nell2 transfection led to the preservation of approximately 58% more cells damaged by axotomy compared to non-transfected (n = 5, p<0.01 or pEGFP-transfected controls

  11. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Fei; Wang, Yi-Ru; Huo, Hui-Ping; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Tang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU) is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  13. Nerve transfers and neurotization in peripheral nerve injury, from surgery to rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korus, Lisa; Ross, Douglas C; Doherty, Christopher D; Miller, Thomas A

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) and recent advances in nerve reconstruction (such as neurotization with nerve transfers) have improved outcomes for patients suffering peripheral nerve trauma. The purpose of this paper is to bridge the gap between the electromyographer/clinical neurophysiologist and the peripheral nerve surgeon. Whereas the preceding literature focuses on either the basic science behind nerve injury and reconstruction, or the surgical options and algorithms, this paper demonstrates how electromyography is not just a 'decision tool' when deciding whether to operate but is also essential to all phases of PNI management including surgery and rehabilitation. The recent advances in the reconstruction and rehabilitation of PNI is demonstrated using case examples to assist the electromyographer to understand modern surgical techniques and the unique demands they ask from electrodiagnostic testing.

  14. Optic Nerve Hemangioblastoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Zywicke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are World Health Organization (WHO grade I tumors of uncertain histologic origin. These central nervous system tumors are most often found in the posterior fossa, brainstem, and spinal cord. There are fewer than 20 reported cases of optic nerve hemangioblastomas in the literature. We present a patient with visual decline found to have a mass arising from within the posterior orbital canal that grossly involved the optic nerve sheath. Neuropathologic evaluation showed hemangioblastoma. Although not a common tumor in this location, consideration of hemangioblastoma in the differential diagnosis is important as they can have a more aggressive course than other tumors of this region and have a detrimental effect on visual prognosis.

  15. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixin Sun; Zuopei Wu; Xinhong Wang; Xiaoxiao Tan; Yudong Gu

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are trans-ferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachi-al plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury.

  16. [Isolated traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve. Radial nerve transfer in four cases and literatura review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; Socolovsky, Mariano; Di Masi, Gilda; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2012-11-01

    To analyze the results of an initial series of four cases of traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve, treated by a nerve transfer from the triceps long branch of the radial nerve. An extensive analysis of the literature has also been made. Four patients aged between 21 and 42 years old presenting an isolated traumatic palsy of the axillary nerve were operated between January 2007 and June 2010. All cases were treated by nerve transfer six to eight months after the trauma. The results of these cases are analyzed, the same as the axillary nerve injuries series presented in the literature from 1982. One year after the surgery, all patients improved their abduction a mean of 70° (range 30 to 120°), showing a M4 in the British Medical Council Scale. No patient complained of triceps weakness after the procedure. These results are similar to those published employing primary grafting for the axillary nerve. Isolated injuries of the axillary nerve should be treated with surgery when spontaneous recovery is not verified 6 months after the trauma. Primary repair with grafts is the most popular surgical technique, with a rate of success of approximately 90%. The preliminary results of a nerve transfer employing the long triceps branch are similar, and a definite comparison of both techniques with a bigger number of cases should be done in the future. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Outcome following nerve repair of high isolated clean sharp injuries of the ulnar nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Post

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The detailed outcome of surgical repair of high isolated clean sharp (HICS ulnar nerve lesions has become relevant in view of the recent development of distal nerve transfer. Our goal was to determine the outcome of HICS ulnar nerve repair in order to create a basis for the optimal management of these lesions. METHODS: High ulnar nerve lesions are defined as localized in the area ranging from the proximal forearm to the axilla just distal to the branching of the medial cord of the brachial plexus. A meta-analysis of the literature concerning high ulnar nerve injuries was performed. Additionally, a retrospective study of the outcome of nerve repair of HICS ulnar nerve injuries at our institution was performed. The Rotterdam Intrinsic Hand Myometer and the Rosén-Lundborg protocol were used. RESULTS: The literature review identified 46 papers. Many articles presented outcomes of mixed lesion groups consisting of combined ulnar and median nerves, or the outcome of high and low level injuries was pooled. In addition, outcome was expressed using different scoring systems. 40 patients with HICS ulnar nerve lesions were found with sufficient data for further analysis. In our institution, 15 patients had nerve repair with a median interval between trauma and reconstruction of 17 days (range 0-516. The mean score of the motor and sensory domain of the Rosen's Scale instrument was 58% and 38% of the unaffected arm, respectively. Two-point discrimination never reached less then 12 mm. CONCLUSION: From the literature, it was not possible to draw a definitive conclusion on outcome of surgical repair of HICS ulnar nerve lesions. Detailed neurological function assessment of our own patients showed that some ulnar nerve function returned. Intrinsic muscle strength recovery was generally poor. Based on this study, one might cautiously argue that repair strategies of HICS ulnar nerve lesions need to be improved.

  18. A simple model of radial nerve injury in the rhesus monkey to evaluate peripheral nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Qingtang Zhu; Xijun Huang; Guo Fu; Liqiang Gu; Xiaolin Liu; Honggang Wang; Jun Hu; Jianhua Yi; Xiaofeng Niu

    2014-01-01

    Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripher-al nerve defects in rodents. In this study, we established a standardized experimental model of radial nerve defects in primates and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. We repaired 2.5-cm lesions in the radial nerve of rhesus monkeys by transplantation of autografts, acellular allografts, or acellular allografts seeded with autologous bone marrow stem cells. Five months after surgery, regenerated nerve tissue was assessed for function, electrophysiology, and histomorphometry. Postoperative functional recovery was evaluated by the wrist-extension test. Compared with the simple autografts, the acellular allografts and allografts seeded with bone marrow stem cells facilitated remarkable recovery of the wrist-extension functions in the rhesus monkeys. This functional improvement was coupled with radial nerve distal axon growth, a higher percentage of neuron survival, increased nerve fiber density and diameter, increased myelin sheath thickness, and increased nerve conduction velocities and peak amplitudes of compound motor action potentials. Furthermore, the quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts group was comparable to that achieved with autografts. The wrist-extension test is a simple behavioral method for objective quantification of peripheral nerve regeneration.

  19. Optic nerve diffusion tensor imaging after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Anneke; Kolbe, Scott C; Wang, Yejun E; Klistorner, Alexander; Shuey, Neil; Ahmadi, Gelareh; Paine, Mark; Marriott, Mark; Mitchell, Peter; Egan, Gary F; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kilpatrick, Trevor J

    2013-01-01

    Early markers of axonal and clinical outcomes are required for early phase testing of putative neuroprotective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS). To assess whether early measurement of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters (axial and radial diffusivity) within the optic nerve during and after acute demyelinating optic neuritis (ON) could predict axonal (retinal nerve fibre layer thinning and multi-focal visual evoked potential amplitude reduction) or clinical (visual acuity and visual field loss) outcomes at 6 or 12 months. Thirty-seven patients presenting with acute, unilateral ON were studied at baseline, one, three, six and 12 months using optic nerve DTI, clinical and paraclinical markers of axonal injury and clinical visual dysfunction. Affected nerve axial diffusivity (AD) was reduced at baseline, 1 and 3 months. Reduced 1-month AD correlated with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thinning at 6 (R=0.38, p=0.04) and 12 months (R=0.437, p=0.008) and VEP amplitude loss at 6 (R=0.414, p=0.019) and 12 months (R=0.484, p=0.003). AD reduction at three months correlated with high contrast visual acuity at 6 (ρ = -0.519, p = 0.001) and 12 months (ρ = -0.414, p=0.011). The time-course for AD reduction for each patient was modelled using a quadratic regression. AD normalised after a median of 18 weeks and longer normalisation times were associated with more pronounced RNFL thinning and mfVEP amplitude loss at 12 months. Affected nerve radial diffusivity (RD) was unchanged until three months, after which time it remained elevated. These results demonstrate that AD reduces during acute ON. One month AD reduction correlates with the extent of axonal loss and persistent AD reduction at 3 months predicts poorer visual outcomes. This suggests that acute ON therapies that normalise optic nerve AD by 3 months could also promote axon survival and improve visual outcomes.

  20. CT-diagnosis of optic nerve lesions. Differential diagnostic criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomograms of 166 optic nerve lesions were analyzed: 97 were mainly orbital and 69 mainly intracranial. The criteria were clinical course, size, density and delineation of the optic nerve shadow, orbital and cerebral soft tissue abnormalities, and bony changes in the optic canal. Characteristic CT features are described of individual disease entities such as optic gliomas, optic nerve sheath meningiomas, neoplastic and inflammatory infiltrations. The differential diagnostic importance of individual CT criteria is evaluated and discussed. Simultaneous visualization of orbital and intracranial soft tissue changes as well as bony changes in the optic canal allow the location and identification of the majority of optic nerve lesions based on the criteria mentioned above, and optic nerve tumors can be differentiated. In 9 patients with optic neuritis due to clinically proven encephalitis and in 17 patients with total optic atrophy, no changes in the size of the optic nerve could be found. CT evaluation of the intraorbital portion of the optic nerve requires special examination techniques. Oblique computer reformations through the optic canal provide excellent visualization of bony changes in the optic canal. The exclusion of intracranial causes of optic nerve lesions requires intravenous injection of contrast material.

  1. Nerve injury and neuropathic pain — A question of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Maria; McKelvey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve injury on somatosensory processing and pain are highly dependent upon the age at which the damage occurs. Adult nerve injury rapidly triggers neuropathic pain, but this is not so if the same nerve injury is performed in animals below postnatal day (P) 28, consistent with observations in paediatric patients. However, longitudinal studies show that pain hypersensitivity emerges later in life, when the animal reaches adolescence, an observation that could be of clinical importance. Here we discuss the evidence that the central consequences of nerve damage are critically determined by the status of neuroimmune regulation at different ages. In the first postnatal weeks, when spinal somatosensory circuits are undergoing synaptic reorganisation, the ‘default’ neuroimmune response is skewed in an anti-inflammatory direction, suppressing the excitation of dorsal horn neurons and preventing the onset of neuropathic pain. As animals grow up and the central nervous system matures, the neuroimmune profile shifts in a pro-inflammatory direction, unmasking a ‘latent’ pain response to an earlier nerve injury. The data predicts that nerve injury in infancy and childhood could go unnoticed at the time, but emerge as clinically ‘unexplained’ or ‘functional’ pain in adolescence. PMID:26220898

  2. Nerve injury and neuropathic pain - A question of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Maria; McKelvey, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The effects of peripheral nerve injury on somatosensory processing and pain are highly dependent upon the age at which the damage occurs. Adult nerve injury rapidly triggers neuropathic pain, but this is not so if the same nerve injury is performed in animals below postnatal day (P) 28, consistent with observations in paediatric patients. However, longitudinal studies show that pain hypersensitivity emerges later in life, when the animal reaches adolescence, an observation that could be of clinical importance. Here we discuss the evidence that the central consequences of nerve damage are critically determined by the status of neuroimmune regulation at different ages. In the first postnatal weeks, when spinal somatosensory circuits are undergoing synaptic reorganisation, the 'default' neuroimmune response is skewed in an anti-inflammatory direction, suppressing the excitation of dorsal horn neurons and preventing the onset of neuropathic pain. As animals grow up and the central nervous system matures, the neuroimmune profile shifts in a pro-inflammatory direction, unmasking a 'latent' pain response to an earlier nerve injury. The data predicts that nerve injury in infancy and childhood could go unnoticed at the time, but emerge as clinically 'unexplained' or 'functional' pain in adolescence.

  3. Dark rearing maintains tyrosine hydroxylase expression in retinal amacrine cells following optic nerve transection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wan; Zhenghai Liu; Xiaosheng Wang; Xuegang Luo

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined changes in retinal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in rats having undergone optic nerve transection and housed under a normal day/night cycle or in the dark. The aim was to investigate the effects of amacrine cells on axonal regeneration in retinal ganglion cells and on the synapses that transmit visual signals. The results revealed that retinal TH expression gradually decreased following optic nerve transection in rats housed under a normal day/night cycle, reaching a minimum at 5 days. In contrast, retinal TH expression decreased to a minimum at 1 day following optic nerve transection in dark reared rats, gradually increasing afterward and reaching a normal level at 5-7 days. The number of TH-positive synaptic particles correlated with the TH levels, indicating that dark rearing can help maintain TH expression during the synaptic degeneration stage (5-7 days after optic nerve injury) in retinal amacrine cells.

  4. Application of tissue clearing and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to assess optic nerve regeneration in unsectioned tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xueting; Yungher, Benjamin; Park, Kevin K

    2014-01-01

    Optic nerve crush injury, as a model to study central nervous system (CNS) injury, is widely used to assess potential therapeutic strategies, aimed at promoting axon regeneration and neuronal survival. Traditional methods to evaluate optic nerve regeneration rely on histological sectioning. However, tissue sectioning results in inevitable loss of three-dimensional (3D) information, such as axonal trajectories and terminations. Here we describe a protocol for whole-tissue assessment of optic nerve regeneration in adult mice without the need for histological sectioning.

  5. Hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina nerve injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina nerve injuries are very uncommon. Since 19 96, we have received and treated 4 patients with hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina injuries. This report gives a detail description. Four patients with hydraulic spinal cord and cauda equina nerve injuries, male: 3, female: 1, aging 13-56 years have been treated in our hospital since 1996. E xtradural blocking injury was in 1 patient, extradural anaesthesia injury in 1 p atient and intraspinal canal myelography injury in 2 patients; the segments of i ntraspinal canal were L2-3 and L3-4. One patient was accompanied b y femoral fracture, 2 patients by intraspinal tumor and 1 patient had operat ion because of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc.

  6. A case of amblyopia with contralateral optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Kelly A; Pang, Yi

    2013-09-01

    We describe an unusual case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) in a patient with contralateral anisometropic/strabismic amblyopia. A seven-year-old boy presented with visual acuities of 6/12 R and 6/18 L and eccentric fixation in the left eye. Cycloplegic retinoscopy was R +1.50/-0.50 × 180 and L +5.25 DS. Funduscopy revealed optic nerve hypoplasia of the right eye. The patient fixated with his better-seeing right eye, despite the optic nerve hypoplasia. His reduced vision may be attributed to optic nerve hypoplasia in the right eye and amblyopia in the left. Although optic nerve hypoplasia can occur with ipsilateral amblyopia, we believe this is the first reported case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia in the fellow eye of an amblyopic patient.

  7. Optic Nerve Lymphoma. Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jennifer L.; Mendoza, Pia; Rashid, Alia; Hayek, Brent; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphoma may involve the optic nerve as isolated optic nerve lymphoma or in association with CNS or systemic lymphoma. We present two biopsy-proven non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the optic nerve and compare our findings with previously reported cases. We discuss the mechanism of metastasis, classification of optic nerve involvement, clinical features, radiologic findings, optic nerve biopsy indications and techniques, histologic features, and treatments. We propose a classification system of optic nerve lymphoma: isolated optic nerve involvement, optic nerve involvement with CNS disease, optic nerve involvement with systemic disease, and optic nerve involvement with primary intraocular lymphoma. Although it is an uncommon cause of infiltrative optic neuropathy, optic nerve metastasis should be considered in patients with a history of lymphoma. The recommended approach to a patient with presumed optic nerve lymphoma includes neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid evaluation as part of the initial work-up, then judicious use of optic nerve biopsy, depending on the clinical situation. PMID:25595061

  8. Sericin protects against diabetes-induced injuries in sciatic nerve and related nerve cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjun Song; Zhenjun Yang; Meirong Zhong; Zhihong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Sericin from discarded silkworm cocoons of silk reeling has been used in different fields, such as cosmetology, skin care, nutrition, and oncology. The present study established a rat model of type 2 diabetes by consecutive intraperitoneal injections of low-dose (25 mg/kg) streptozotocin. After intragastrical perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly declined, and the expression of neurofilament protein in the sciatic nerve and nerve growth factor in L4–6 spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells significantly increased. However, the expression of neuropeptide Y in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells significantly decreased in model rats. These findings indicate that sericin protected the sciatic nerve and related nerve cells against injury in a rat type 2 diabetic model by upregulating the expression of neurofilament protein in the sciatic nerve and nerve growth factor in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells, and downregulating the expression of neuropeptide Y in spinal ganglion and anterior horn cells.

  9. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury:electrophysiological characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Liu; Xun-cheng Xu; Yi Zou; Su-rong Li; Bin Zhang; Yue Wang

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we per-formed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduc-tion function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regener-ated potentials ifrst appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘ex-cellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The func-tional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  10. An unusual radiological presentation of optic nerve sheath meningiom

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    Chameen Samarawickrama

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Our report describes an unusual radiological presentation of optic nerve sheath meningioma. The classic radiological appearance of optic nerve thickening with enhancement and calcification within the tumor was not seen; instead, an elongating gadolinium enhancing band-like area adjacent to the superomedial aspect of the left optic nerve sheath was identified. The diagnosis was confirmed on histopathology. Our report adds to the spectrum of presentations of this relatively common clinical entity.

  11. Ginsenoside Rg1 promotes peripheral nerve regeneration in rat model of nerve crush injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junxiong; Li, Wenxian; Tian, Ruifeng; Lei, Wei

    2010-07-05

    Searching for effective drugs which are capable of promoting nerve regeneration after nerve injuries has gained extensive attention. Ginsenoside Rg1 (GRg1) is one of the bioactive compounds extracted from ginseng. GRg1 has been shown to be neuroprotective in many in vitro studies, which raises the possibility of using GRg1 as a neuroprotective agent after nerve injuries. However, such a possibility has never been tested in in vivo studies. The present study was designed to investigate the efficacy of GRg1 in promoting nerve regeneration after nerve crush injury in rats. All rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=8 in each group) after crush injury and were intraperitoneally administrated daily for 4 weeks with 1mg/kg, or 5mg/kg GRg1 (low or high dose GRg1 groups), or 100mug/kg mecobalamin or normal saline, respectively. The axonal regeneration was investigated by retrograde labeling and morphometric analysis. The motor functional recovery was evaluated by electrophysiological studies, behavioral tests and histological appearance of the target muscles. Our data showed that high dose GRg1 achieved better axonal regeneration and functional recovery than those achieved by low dose GRg1 and mecobalamin. The final outcome of low dose GRg1 and mecobalamin was similar in both morphological and functional items, which was significantly better than that in saline group. These findings show that GRg1 is capable of promoting nerve regeneration after nerve injuries, suggesting the possibility of developing GRg1 a neuroprotective drug for peripheral nerve repair applications.

  12. Hemangioblastoma of the optic nerve--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Tetsuhiro; Sakata, Katsumi; Kanno, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Takashi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Isao

    2007-05-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with a rare sporadic hemangioblastoma arising in the left optic nerve manifesting as left visual disturbance gradually progressive over 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-enhanced mass in the left optic nerve. Partial resection of the tumor was performed via the frontoorbital approach. The histological diagnosis was optic nerve hemangioblastoma. Hemangioblastoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis of optic nerve tumors even in the absence of other lesions associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  13. Peripheral nerves injury of electrophysiology and pathology in MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li runjin; Qian zhimin; Chen ping

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We report the EMG and pathological features of sural nerve biopsy of 12 patients with MS. The pathological of thesel 1 patients demonstrated demyelination injury of peripheral nerves.METHODS Twelve cases abnomaly are screened with EMG from60 cases MS. Sural nerve biopsy were analyzed by HE AND loyez, and electron microscopy. RESULTS EMG showed slow of MCV in 9 patients and SCV in 7 patients. Myelinated fibers was the presence in 8 sural nerve biopsy patients and most striking demyelinating fibers, regeneration of myelinated fibers. CONCLUSION Ms is characterized by demyelinating disorder limited to the CNS.There are,howeve ,the results of this study sugee that combine with PNS demyelinating injury in MS may be more frequent than is generally assumed.

  14. Expression changes of nerve cell adhesion molecules L1 and semaphorin 3A after peripheral nerve injury

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    Qian-ru He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 in the neuronal growth cone of the central nervous system is strongly associated with the direction of growth of the axon, but its role in the regeneration of the peripheral nerve is still unknown. This study explored the problem in a femoral nerve section model in rats. L1 and semaphorin 3A mRNA and protein expressions were measured over the 4-week recovery period. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 expression was higher in the sensory nerves than in motor nerves at 2 weeks after injury, but vice versa for the expression of semaphorin 3A. Western blot assay results demonstrated that nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 expression was higher in motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at the proximal end after injury, but its expression was greater in the sensory nerves at 2 weeks. Semaphorin 3A expression was higher in the motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at 3 days and 1 week after injury. Nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 and semaphorin 3A expressions at the distal end were higher in the motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at 3 days, 1 and 2 weeks. Immunohistochemical staining results showed that nerve cell adhesion molecule L1 expression at the proximal end was greater in the sensory nerves than in the motor nerves; semaphorin 3A expression was higher in the motor nerves than in the sensory nerves at 2 weeks after injury. Taken together, these results indicated that nerve cell adhesion molecules L1 and semaphorin 3A exhibited different expression patterns at the proximal and distal ends of sensory and motor nerves, and play a coordinating role in neural chemotaxis regeneration.

  15. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghui; Zhang, Yongguang; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the potential of brief electrical stimulation (ES; 3 V, 20 Hz, 20 min) in improving functional recovery in delayed nerve injury repair (DNIR). The sciatic nerve of Sprague Dawley rats was transected, and the repair of nerve injury was delayed for different time durations (2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks). Brief depolarizing ES was applied to the proximal nerve stump when the transected nerve stumps were bridged with a hollow nerve conduit (5 mm in length) after delayed periods. We found that the diameter and number of regenerated axons, the thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the number of Fluoro-Gold retrograde-labeled motoneurons and sensory neurons were significantly increased by ES, suggesting that brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration in DNIR with different delayed durations, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. In addition, the amplitude of compound muscle action potential (gastrocnemius muscle) and nerve conduction velocity were also enhanced, and gastrocnemius muscle atrophy was partially reversed by brief ES, indicating that brief ES to proximal nerve stump was able to improve functional recovery in DNIR. Furthermore, brief ES was capable of increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the spinal cord in DNIR, suggesting that BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. In conclusion, the present findings indicate the potential of using brief ES as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Intraorbital neuromuscular choristoma adjacent to the optic nerve

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    Arie Perry, M.D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuromuscular choristoma is a rare tumor that incorporates mature skeletal muscle within fascicles of peripheral nerve. The etiology is poorly understood, yet most present in large nerves of children, with a tight link to post-operative fibromatosis recently appreciated. Herein, we report an exceptional intra-orbital example in a 53-year-old man with optic nerve compression.

  17. Involvement of NO in Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of neuropathic pain has been made because of development of several suitable animal models. Neuronal sensitization is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury.There is much evidence that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the development and maintenance of pain following peripheral nerve injury. The main focus of this article will be on the recent development in understanding the importance of NO acting as a mediator or messenger in the nociceptive signal processing of neuropathic pain. This information suggests a specific avenue for development of more effective clinical medication for neuropathic pain following nerve injury.

  18. Spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury: a case report

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    Erkol Gokhan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal myoclonus is a rare disorder characterized by myoclonic movements in muscles that originate from several segments of the spinal cord and usually associated with laminectomy, spinal cord injury, post-operative, lumbosacral radiculopathy, spinal extradural block, myelopathy due to demyelination, cervical spondylosis and many other diseases. On rare occasions, it can originate from the peripheral nerve lesions and be mistaken for peripheral myoclonus. Careful history taking and electrophysiological evaluation is important in differential diagnosis. The aim of this report is to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics and treatment results of a case with spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury without any structural lesion.

  19. Morphometry of Axons in Optic Nerves of Siamese's Twins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinzu Gu; Zhenping Zhang; Qi Lin; Jiongji Liang; Wenyu Lu; Xiulan Ye; A A Sadun

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the development of optic nerve, we examined four optic nerves from Siameses Twins by absolute counts of axons.Methods: Mean axon diameter, mean axon density, totally axonal population and optic nerve area were noted for each optic nerve. The mean axon diameter and the mean axon density were compared between paraxial (inner sectors)and cortical (outer sectors)areas of the nerves.Results: More myelinated axons were seen in the inner sectors as compared to the outer sectors(average 11 axons/1 000 μm2 in inner sectors and 34 axons/l 000 μm2 in outer sectors( P=0. 036) . The myelinated fibers were also smaller(63 microns) in the outer sectors as compared to the inner sectors(72 microns) ( P = 0. 001 ). The average cross sectors area for the four 40 week stage optical nerves of Siamese Twins was 3.32 × 103 as compared to 1 million axons for 32-week-old normals.Conclusion: Our finding of fewer axonal number and small myelinated fibers in the Siamese Twins suggests hypoplasia. Myelination was more abnormal in the paraxial optic nerve than that in the peripheral sectors, suggesting anomalous development of optic nerve peripherally and delayed developnent centrally. Axonal density is higher in inner sectors than that in outer sectors, suggesting delayed development of the outer nerve sector.

  20. Jak/Stat Signaling Stimulates Zebrafish Optic Nerve Regeneration and Overcomes the Inhibitory Actions of Socs3 and Sfpq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaeidi, Fairouz; Bemben, Michael A.; Zhao, Xiao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative failure of mammalian optic axons is partly mediated by Socs3-dependent inhibition of Jak/Stat signaling (Smith et al., 2009, 2011). Whether Jak/Stat signaling is part of the normal regenerative response observed in animals that exhibit an intrinsic capacity for optic nerve regeneration, such as zebrafish, remains unknown. Nor is it known whether the repression of regenerative inhibitors, such as Socs3, contributes to the robust regenerative response of zebrafish to optic nerve damage. Here we report that Jak/Stat signaling stimulates optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish. We found that IL-6 family cytokines, acting via Gp130-coupled receptors, stimulate Jak/Stat3 signaling in retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury. Among these cytokines, we found that CNTF, IL-11, and Clcf1/Crlf1a can stimulate optic axon regrowth. Surprisingly, optic nerve injury stimulated the expression of Socs3 and Sfpq (splicing factor, proline/glutamine rich) that attenuate optic nerve regeneration. These proteins were induced in a Jak/Stat-dependent manner, stimulated each other's expression and suppressed the expression of regeneration-associated genes. In vivo, the injury-dependent induction of Socs3 and Sfpq inhibits optic nerve regeneration but does not block it. We identified a robust induction of multiple cytokine genes in zebrafish retinal ganglion cells that may contribute to their ability to overcome these inhibitory factors. These studies not only identified mechanisms underlying optic nerve regeneration in fish but also suggest new molecular targets for enhancing optic nerve regeneration in mammals. PMID:24523552

  1. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

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    Somen Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus.

  2. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

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    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  3. Optical coherence tomography of the prostate nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitchian, Shahab

    Preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. These microscopic nerves course along the surface of the prostate within a few millimeters of the prostate capsule, and they vary in size and location from one patient to another, making preservation of the nerves difficult during dissection and removal of a cancerous prostate gland. These observations may explain in part the wide variability in reported sexual potency rates (9--86%) following prostate cancer surgery. Any technology capable of providing improved identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery would be of great assistance in improving sexual function after surgery, and result in direct patient benefit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique capable of performing high-resolution cross-sectional in vivo and in situ imaging of microstructures in biological tissues. OCT imaging of the cavernous nerves in the rat and human prostate has recently been demonstrated. However, improvements in the OCT system and the quality of the images for identification of the cavernous nerves is necessary before clinical use. The following chapters describe complementary approaches to improving identification and imaging of the cavernous nerves during OCT of the prostate gland. After the introduction to OCT imaging of the prostate gland, the optimal wavelength for deep imaging of the prostate is studied in Chapter 2. An oblique-incidence single point measurement technique using a normal-detector scanning system was implemented to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, mua and m's , of fresh canine prostate tissue, ex vivo, from the diffuse reflectance profile of near-IR light as a function of source-detector distance. The effective attenuation coefficient, mueff, and the Optical Penetration Depth (OPD) were

  4. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-08

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury.

  5. ECHOGRAPHIC PICTURE OF OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA IN NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE-1

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    Biljana Kuzmanović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Authors want to present echographic picture of orbital part of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma involving the optic nerve and/or chiasm and optic tract (optic pathway glioma or visual pathway glioma.Methods. 4 children with neurofibromatosis type-1 complicated with optic pathway glioma diagnosed earlier with magnetic resonance were examined by ultrasound. Standardised A-scan technique was used for optic nerve width measurement. The 30° test and B-scan (axial, transverse and longitudinal sections of both eyes and orbits were performed as well.Results. The optic nerve diameter in our cases ranged from 4.48 to 8.5 mm. Two children had the left side optic pathway glioma, one boy had the right side optic pathway glioma and in one tumour was bilateral. The transversal section of the nerve revealed dark oval and in more perpendicular sections round void of the nerve. As the beam is swept towards the orbital apex void becomes more fusiform. The nerve and its sheaths are markedly widened. An abnormal increase in reflectivity and irregularity of the spike’s pattern is exhibited as well. No calcification along the sheaths is noticed. The transverse section of the tumour demonstrated an »inverse doughnut« sign. The outer whiter outline of the widened sheaths surrounds an inner darker circle. The longitudinal section revealed the optic nerve head continuing into the widened optic nerve. The 30° test was negative. The differential diagnosis of meningeoma, optic neuritis and orbital cysticercosis should be considered.Conclusions. Ultrasound as a cheap, safe, easily repeatable imaging method should become a method of choice for screening optic nerve tumours in neurofibromatosis type-1, especially in children, as well as for follow-up after treatment.

  6. Unilateral Optic Nerve Hypoplasia with Contralateral Optic Pathway Hypoplasia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Tomo; Yukawa, Eiichi; Taoka, Toshiaki; Ogata, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia is diagnosed by the ophthalmoscopic appearance of the fundus of the eye and by standard magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The ability to study eyes with optic nerve hypoplasia by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging has improved the evaluation of the optic pathways. The authors report a case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia with hypoplasia of the contralateral optic pathway. The entire visual pathway of this patient was examined by magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging. The images show a decrease of the volume of the optic radiation contralateral to the optic nerve abnormality and also pre- and post-chiasmal abnormalities.

  7. MRI of optic nerve lesion in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Koichi; Uehara, Masako; Ashikaga, Ryuuichirou; Inoue, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu; Nakao, Yuzou; Miyakoshi, Keizou (Kinki Univ., Osakasayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    We evaluated the ability of MRI using short TI inversion recovery (STIR) to detect optic nerve lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Eleven patients with MS were studied with MRI at 0.5 T. STIR images revealed high signal lesions in all of 14 nerves in 11 patients with previous and recurrent attack of optic neuritis. In addition, two of seven asymptomatic nerves also showed high intensity on STIR images. The high signal lesions on STIR images seemed to reflect demyelination in the nerves with some attacks and to show occult lesions in the nerves without any attack. STIR method was concluded to be a potentially useful procedure in detection of optic nerve lesions in MS. (author).

  8. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use.

  9. Nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries: a 5-year bibliometric analysis

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    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in biomedical methods, tissue-engineered materials have developed rapidly as an alternative to nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. However, the materials selected for use in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, in particular multiple injuries and large-gap defects, must be chosen carefully. Various methods and materials for protecting the healthy tissue and repairing peripheral nerve injuries have been described, and each method or material has advantages and disadvantages. Recently, a large amount of research has been focused on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. Using the keywords "pe-ripheral nerve injury", "autotransplant", "nerve graft", and "biomaterial", we retrieved publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries appearing in the Web of Science from 2010 to 2014. The country with the most total publications was the USA. The institutions that were the most productive in this field include Hannover Medical School (Germany, Washington University (USA, and Nantong University (China. The total number of publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries grad-ually increased over time, as did the number of Chinese publications, suggesting that China has made many scientific contributions to this field of research.

  10. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

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    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author).

  12. Combined common peroneal and tibial nerve injury after knee dislocation: one injury or two? An MRI-clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Chandan G; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    OBJECT Knee dislocations are often accompanied by stretch injuries to the common peroneal nerve (CPN). A small subset of these injuries also affect the tibial nerve. The mechanism of this combined pattern could be a single longitudinal stretch injury of the CPN extending to the sciatic bifurcation (and tibial division) or separate injuries of both the CPN and tibial nerve, either at the level of the tibiofemoral joint or distally at the soleal sling and fibular neck. The authors reviewed cases involving patients with knee dislocations with CPN and tibial nerve injuries to determine the localization of the combined injury and correlation between degree of MRI appearance and clinical severity of nerve injury. METHODS Three groups of cases were reviewed. Group 1 consisted of knee dislocations with clinical evidence of nerve injury (n = 28, including 19 cases of complete CPN injury); Group 2 consisted of knee dislocations without clinical evidence of nerve injury (n = 19); and Group 3 consisted of cases of minor knee trauma but without knee dislocation (n = 14). All patients had an MRI study of the knee performed within 3 months of injury. MRI appearance of tibial and common peroneal nerve injury was scored by 2 independent radiologists in 3 zones (Zone I, sciatic bifurcation; Zone II, knee joint; and Zone III, soleal sling and fibular neck) on a severity scale of 1-4. Injury signal was scored as diffuse or focal for each nerve in each of the 3 zones. A clinical score was also calculated based on Medical Research Council scores for strength in the tibial and peroneal nerve distributions, combined with electrophysiological data, when available, and correlated with the MRI injury score. RESULTS Nearly all of the nerve segments visualized in Groups 1 and 2 demonstrated some degree of injury on MRI (95%), compared with 12% of nerve segments in Group 3. MRI nerve injury scores were significantly more severe in Group 1 relative to Group 2 (2.06 vs 1.24, p knee dislocations

  13. [Who is responsible for the postoperative nerve injury? Anesthesia? Orthopedics? Trauma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsaka, Ebru; Güldoğuş, Fuat; Erdoğan, Murat; Zengin, Eyüp Cağatay

    2014-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of peripheral nerve injury, mechanical as well as vascular pressure, and chemical reasons play a role. In the applications of peripheral nerve block, there can be mechanical injury due to the type of needle and intrafascicular injections. In humerus fractures, nerve injury can be seen due to the surgical retractions and close proximity of the nerves with the bone. In addition, trauma may be the reason for posttraumatic nerve injury. In this presentation, we discussed the causes of postoperative nerve damage, which is seen after the operation of the distal humerus fracture.

  14. Endoscopic optic nerve decompression for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathy

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    Cheng-long REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the preliminary experience with endoscopic optic nerve decompression (EOND for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathies (NCONs. Methods The clinical data of 10 patients, male 5 and female 5, with a mean age of 44.3±5.1 years, who underwent EOND for visual loss (n=5 or visual deterioration (n=5 due to tumor compression in General Hospital of Armed Police Forces of China in the period from April 2013 to April 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Preoperative and 6-month-postoperative clinical and imaging data of these patients were reviewed and analyzed. Results Among 5 patients who lost light perception (including 2 patients with bilateral optic nerve compression before operation, 4 of them showed visual improvement to different degrees on the 7th day after operation (with improvement of bilateral visual acuity. The other 5 patients with visual impairment before operation recovered their visual acuity to different extent after the operation. All of the patients had no obvious post-operative complications. Conclusion EOND is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical technique affording recovery of visual function to NCON patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.11.12

  15. Some questions of the treatment of injuries of extremities peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Виктор Александрович Вишневский

    2015-11-01

    ,4 %, and in area of radial bone head resection. In the forearm lower one-third were often injured ulnar and median nerves – 7 cases (10,0 %, on the lower extremities – peroneal nerve – 9 cases (12,9 %.According to our analysis from 70 patients 52 (74,3 % were operated, 18 (25,7 % underwent conservative treatment.Special attention must be paid to the choice of surgical technique especially concerning nerves of combined structure. To detect injuries of fascicles within trunk it is recommended to use electro-optic equipment on surgical table. According to the author the most favorable period for surgical treatment is 3 month from the moment of trauma or during 2–3 weeks from the wound healing. The method of so-called “legitimate expectations” of operation on the nerve trunks in 4-6 month was not proved its value. Author did not notice the significant improvement of the nerve motor function over time.Conclusion: an analysis allows us to offer differentiated approach to treatment of injuries of extremities peripheral nerves and make the next conclusions:1. Patients with EPN (extremities peripheral nerves trauma must be sent in specialized department or clinic when the neurosurgical intervention on nerves is more reasonable. The main requirement to surgical access is a possibility of sufficient vision of nerve at the injury level in proximal and distal directions. It gives a possibility to manipulate on the nerve trunk, to assess the character and size of injury and to carry out an intervention sufficient by volume.2. At squeeze of the nerve trunk it is necessary to use neurolysis and in its anatomical pause – neurography with application of epineural and epiperineural stitch and in several cases to use fascicular stitch. At impossibility to match the ends of injured nerve at its mobilization to carry out autoplasty taking into account the fascicular nerve structure with monothread 7/0, best of all with synthetic one 0/00.3. All patients underwent the course of

  16. Optic nerve diffusion tensor imaging after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke van der Walt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early markers of axonal and clinical outcomes are required for early phase testing of putative neuroprotective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether early measurement of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI parameters (axial and radial diffusivity within the optic nerve during and after acute demyelinating optic neuritis (ON could predict axonal (retinal nerve fibre layer thinning and multi-focal visual evoked potential amplitude reduction or clinical (visual acuity and visual field loss outcomes at 6 or 12 months. METHODS: Thirty-seven patients presenting with acute, unilateral ON were studied at baseline, one, three, six and 12 months using optic nerve DTI, clinical and paraclinical markers of axonal injury and clinical visual dysfunction. RESULTS: Affected nerve axial diffusivity (AD was reduced at baseline, 1 and 3 months. Reduced 1-month AD correlated with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thinning at 6 (R=0.38, p=0.04 and 12 months (R=0.437, p=0.008 and VEP amplitude loss at 6 (R=0.414, p=0.019 and 12 months (R=0.484, p=0.003. AD reduction at three months correlated with high contrast visual acuity at 6 (ρ = -0.519, p = 0.001 and 12 months (ρ = -0.414, p=0.011. The time-course for AD reduction for each patient was modelled using a quadratic regression. AD normalised after a median of 18 weeks and longer normalisation times were associated with more pronounced RNFL thinning and mfVEP amplitude loss at 12 months. Affected nerve radial diffusivity (RD was unchanged until three months, after which time it remained elevated. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that AD reduces during acute ON. One month AD reduction correlates with the extent of axonal loss and persistent AD reduction at 3 months predicts poorer visual outcomes. This suggests that acute ON therapies that normalise optic nerve AD by 3 months could also promote axon survival and improve visual outcomes.

  17. Syrian war shrapnel injury: cubital nerve defect grafting during humanitarian surgical mission. Clinical case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argentina Vidrașcu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim of this clinical case presentation is to reveal the importance of early nerve injury diagnosis and surgical treatment in war wounded patients. Methods. The author treated patients in Amman Charity Hospital were among different plastic surgery cases where limb nerve injuries with nerve grafting indication. The presented case was treated with autologus sural nerve graft. Results were evaluated at 3 months after the surgery and revealed detectable nerve conductibility at the Electromiography test. In conclusion, in cases with delayed nerve repair surgical treatment in war wounded patients, the vascularised nerve graft can be a better solution for nerve defect surgical treatment.

  18. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bohan Li; Hun-Jong Jung; Soung-Min Kim; Myung-Jin Kim; Jeong Won Jahng; Jong-Ho Lee

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was sig-nificantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after in-jection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury.

  19. Immune reactions and nerve repair in mice with sciatic nerve injury 14 days after intraperitoneal injection of Brazil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Cao; Zhongping Niu; Yongan Wang; Yiwen Jiang; Haoyu Liu; Binfeng Wang; Weitian Yin; Lisen Li

    2012-01-01

    BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10, 5 or 2.5 mg/kg Brazil for 14 days after sciatic nerve injury. Results demonstrate that the spleen T/B lymphocyte stimulation index and serum circulating immune complex concentration were significantly reduced, and the morphology of the soleus muscle was restored in mice with sciatic nerve injury. These effects of Brazil were dose-dependent. Our experimental findings indicate that Brazil can regulate immune responses after nerve injury and promote sciatic nerve repair.

  20. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury

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    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury. CASE REPORT: A male patient, aged 42 years, sought medical care after falling from a skateboard. The patient related pain and limitation of movement in the right elbow and difficulty to extend the fingers of the right hand. During physical examination, thumb and fingers extension deficit was observed. The wrist extension showed a slight radial deviation. After imaging, it became evident that the patient had a fracture of the radial head that was classified as grade III in the Mason classification. The patient underwent fracture fixation; at the first postoperative day, thumb and fingers extension was observed. Although rare, posterior interosseous nerve branch injury may be associated with radial head fractures. In the present case, the authors believe that neuropraxia occurred as a result of the fracture hematoma and edema.

  1. Hippocampal plasticity after a vagus nerve injury in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia Ronchi; Vitaly Ryu; ong ling; Krzysztof Czaja

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve has been previously reported to promote neural plasticity and neurogenesis in the brain. Several studies also revealed plastic changes in the spinal cord after injuries to somatosensory nerves originating from both the brachial and lumbo-sacral plexuses. However, the neurogenic responses of the brain to the injury of the viscerosensory innervation are not as yet well understood. In the present study, we investigated whether cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus respond to a chemical and physical damage to the vagus nerve in the adult rat. Intraperitoneal capsaicin administration was used to damage non-myelinated vagal afferents while subdiaphragmatic vagotomy was used to damage both the myelinated and non-myelinated vagal afferents. The 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation together with cell-specific markers was used to study neural proliferation in subgranular zone, granule cell layer, molecular layer and hilus of the dentate gyrus. Microglia activation was determined by quantifying changes in the intensity of fluorescent staining with a primary antibody against ionizing calcium adapter-binding molecule 1. Results revealed that vagotomy decreased BrdU incorporation in the hilus 15 days after injury compared to the capsaicin group. Capsaicin administration decreased BrdU incorporation in the granular cell layer 60 days after the treatment. Capsaicin decreased the number of doublecortin-expressing cells in the dentate gyrus, whereas vagotomy did not alter the expression of doublecortin in the hippocampus. Both the capsaicin- and the vagotomy-induced damage to the vagus nerve decreased microglia activation in the hippocampus at 15 days after the injury. At 30 days post injury, capsaicin-treated and vagotomized rats revealed significantly more activated microglia. Our findings show that damage to the subdiaphragmatic vagus in adult rats is followed by microglia activation and long-lasting changes in the dentate gyrus

  2. Evaluation of the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Monica; Dubey, Suneeta

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy leading to changes in the intrapaillary and parapaillary regions of the optic disk. Despite technological advances, clinical identification of optic nerve head characteristics remains the first step in diagnosis. Careful examination of the disk parameters including size, shape, neuroretinal rim shape and pallor; size of the optic cup in relation to the area of the disk; configuration and depth of the optic cup; ratios of cup-to-disk diameter and cup-to-disk area; presence and location of splinter-shaped hemorrhages; occurrence, size, configuration, and location of parapapillary chorioretinal atrophy; and visibility of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) is important to differentiate between the glaucomatous and nonglaucomatous optic neuropathy. How to cite this article: Gandhi M, Dubey S. Evaluation of the Optic Nerve Head in Glaucoma. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(3):106-114.

  3. Relationship Between Optic Nerve Appearance and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness as Explored with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Huang, Jiayan; Garrity, Sean T.; Carter, Stuart B.; Aleman, Wendy D.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Tamhankar, Madhura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the relationship between the appearance of the optic nerve and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Records from patients with spectral domain-OCT imaging in a neuro-ophthalmology practice were reviewed. Eyes with glaucoma/glaucoma suspicion, macular/optic nerve edema, pseudophakia, and with refractive errors > 6D were excluded. Optic nerve appearance by slit lamp biomicroscopy was related to the RNFL thickness by spectral domain-OCT and to visual field results. Results Ninety-one patients (176 eyes; mean age: 49 ± 15 years) were included. Eighty-three eyes (47%) showed optic nerve pallor; 89 eyes (50.6%) showed RNFL thinning (sectoral or average peripapillary). Average peripapillary RNFL thickness in eyes with pallor (mean ± SD = 76 ± 17 μm) was thinner compared to eyes without pallor (91 ± 14 μm, P < 0.001). Optic nerve pallor predicted RNFL thinning with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 75%. Optic nerve appearance predicted RNFL thinning (with a sensitivity and specificity of 81%) when RNFL had thinned by ∼ 40%. Most patients with pallor had RNFL thinning with (66%) or without (25%) visual field loss; the remainder had normal RNFL and fields (5%) or with visual field abnormalities (4%). Conclusions Optic nerve pallor as a predictor of RNFL thinning showed fair sensitivity and specificity, although it is optimally sensitive/specific only when substantial RNFL loss has occurred. Translational Relevance Finding an acceptable relationship between the optic nerve appearance by ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-OCT RNFL measures will help the clinician's interpretation of the information provided by this technology, which is gaining momentum in neuro-ophthalmic research. PMID:25374773

  4. Synaptic ultrastructure changes in trigeminocervical complex posttrigeminal nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, John; Trinh, Van Nancy; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Li, Kang-Wu; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z David

    2016-02-01

    Trigeminal nerves collecting sensory information from the orofacial area synapse on second-order neurons in the dorsal horn of subnucleus caudalis and cervical C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2, or trigeminocervical complex), which is critical for sensory information processing. Injury to the trigeminal nerves may cause maladaptive changes in synaptic connectivity that plays an important role in chronic pain development. Here we examined whether injury to the infraorbital nerve, a branch of the trigeminal nerves, led to synaptic ultrastructural changes when the injured animals have developed neuropathic pain states. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine synaptic profiles in Vc/C2 at 3 weeks postinjury, corresponding to the time of peak behavioral hypersensitivity following chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Using established criteria, synaptic profiles were classified as associated with excitatory (R-), inhibitory (F-), and primary afferent (C-) terminals. Each type was counted within the superficial dorsal horn of the Vc/C2 and the means from each rat were compared between sham and injured animals; synaptic contact length was also measured. The overall analysis indicates that rats with orofacial pain states had increased numbers and decreased mean synaptic length of R-profiles within the Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn (lamina I) 3 weeks post-CCI-ION. Increases in the number of excitatory synapses in the superficial dorsal horn of Vc/C2 could lead to enhanced activation of nociceptive pathways, contributing to the development of orofacial pain states. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. SUR1-Associated Mechanisms Are Not Involved in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy 1 Day Post-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, James D; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury after central nervous system (CNS) injury presents a major health care challenge with few promising treatments. Recently, it has become possible to reduce edema after CNS injury by antagonizing a sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) regulated ion channel expressed after injury. SUR1 upregulation after injury is a necessary precondition for the formation of this channel, and has been implicated in white matter injury after clinical spinal cord trauma. Glibenclamide, an SUR1 antagonist, appears to have neuroprotective effect against cerebral stroke in an open-label small clinical trial and great effectiveness in reducing damage after varied experimental CNS injury models. Despite its importance in CNS injuries, SUR1 upregulation appears to play no part in rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) injury as tested by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining of rAION-injured rat optic nerve (ON). Furthermore, the SUR1 antagonist glibenclamide administered immediately after rAION injury provided no protection to proximal ON microvasculature 1 day post-injury but may reduce optic nerve head edema in a manner unrelated to ON SUR1 expression. Our results suggest that there may be fundamental differences between rAION optic nerve ischemia and other CNS white matter injuries where SUR1 appears to play a role.

  6. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Wang; Zhi-Yuan Guo; Xun Sun; Shi-bi Lu; Wen-Jing Xu; Qing Zhao; Jiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptom...

  7. Missed ulnar nerve injury and closed forearm fracture in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Batra

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Ulnar nerve injury in closed fracture of forearm in children is uncommon. Commonly, neurapraxia is the reason for this palsy but other severe injuries or nerve entrapment has been reported in some cases. The impor-tance of diagnosis concerning the types of the nerve injury lies in the fact that they have totally different management. We present a case of ulnar nerve deficit in a child following a closed fracture of the forearm bones. It is imperative to diagnose exact cause of palsy as it forms the basis for treatment. MRI scan can help diagnosis and accordingly guide the management. Simple nerve contusion should be treated conservatively, and exploration with fixation of the fracture should be done in lacerations and entrapments of the nerve. Surgery is not the treatment of choice in cases that could be managed conservatively. Key words: Ulnar nerve; Peripheral nerve injuries; Forearm injuries; Child

  8. Ethical considerations in elective amputation after traumatic peripheral nerve injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Keith P.; Holloway, Robert G.; Landau, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries often complicate extremity trauma, and may cause substantial functional deficits. We have encountered patients who request amputation of such injured extremities, with the goal of prosthetic replacement as a means to restore function. Data on long-term outcomes of limb salvage vs amputation are limited and somewhat contradictory, leaving how to respond to such requests in the hands of the treating physician. We present example cases, drawn from our experience with wounded soldiers in a peripheral nerve injury clinic, in order to facilitate discussion of the ways in which these patients stress the system of medical decision-making while identifying ethical questions central to responding to these requests. PMID:25279253

  9. Bridging long gap peripheral nerve injury using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsuro Tamaki

    2014-01-01

    Long gap peripheral nerve injuries usually reulting in life-changing problems for patients. Skeletal muscle derived-multipotent stem cells (Sk-MSCs) can differentiate into Schwann and perineurial/endoneurial cells, vascular relating pericytes, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells in the damaged peripheral nerve niche. Application of the Sk-MSCs in the bridging conduit for repairing long nerve gap injury resulted favorable axonal regeneration, which showing supe-rior effects than gold standard therapy--healthy nerve autograft. This means that it does not need to sacriifce of healthy nerves or loss of related functions for repairing peripheral nerve injury.

  10. Neutrophils express oncomodulin and promote optic nerve regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kurimoto, Takuji; Yin, Yuqin; Habboub, Ghaith; Gilbert, Hui-Ya; Li, Yiqing; Nakao, Shintaro; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Benowitz, Larry I

    2013-01-01

    .... In a widely studied instance of this phenomenon, proinflammatory agents have been shown to cause retinal ganglion cells, the projection neurons of the eye, to regenerate lengthy axons through the injured optic nerve...

  11. Bruxism elicited by inferior alveolar nerve injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Marcello; Coiana, Carlo; Secci, Simona

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this case report is to describe the history of a patient who received an injury to the right inferior alveolar nerve after placement of a dental implant, with bruxism noted afterward. The symptoms were managed by the use of an occlusal appliance worn at night and occasionally during the day, associated with increased awareness of parafunction during the day to reduce muscle pain and fatigue. Paresthesia of the teeth, gingiva, and lower lip persisted but were reduced during appliance use.

  12. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintaras Juodzbalys

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement.Material and Methods: Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies.Results: In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement.Conclusions: The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management.

  13. Side-to-side nerve bridges reduce muscle atrophy after peripheral nerve injury in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Jill E; Garlick, Jared W; Salama, Mohamed E; Mendenhall, Shaun D; Moran, Linh A; Agarwal, Jayant P

    2014-03-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can result in muscle atrophy and long-term disability. We hypothesize that creating a side-to-side bridge to link an injured nerve with a healthy nerve will reduce muscle atrophy and improve muscle function. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups (n = 7 per group). Group 1: transection only--a 10-mm gap was created in the proximal tibial nerve; group 2: transected plus repaired--the transected tibial nerve was repaired; group 3: transected plus repaired plus nerve bridge--transected nerve repaired with a distal nerve bridge between the tibial and peroneal nerves via epineurial windows; and group 4: transected plus nerve bridge--transected tibial nerve left unrepaired and distal bridge added. Gait was assessed every 2 wk. At 90 d the following measures were determined: gastrocnemius mass, muscle and nerve nuclear density, and axonal infiltration into the nerve bridge. Groups 3 and 4 had greater improvements in walking track recovery than groups 1 and 2. Group 3's gastrocnemius muscles exhibited the least amount of atrophy. Groups 1, 2, and 4 exhibited greater histologic appearance of muscle breakdown compared with group 3 and control muscle. Finally, most bridges in groups 3 and 4 had neuronal sprouting via the epineurial windows. Our study demonstrated reduced muscle atrophy with a side-to-side nerve bridge in the setting of peripheral nerve injury. These results support the application of novel side-to-side bridges in combination with traditional end-to-end neurorrhaphy to preserve muscle viability after peripheral nerve injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analytic methods in assessment of optic nerve cupping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindra, L F; Kuběna, T; Gaudino, R N

    2014-06-01

    The intent of this paper is to provide a systems-based analysis of the methods used to evaluate optic nerve cupping, identify potential flaws in these systems, and propose alternatives better to assess this anatomic quantity. Estimation of optic nerve cupping requires an analytic understanding of both the psychophysical as well as the mathematical bases inherent in this measure. When the (decimal-based) cup-to-disc ratio is used to quantitate optic nerve cupping, a one-dimensional, linear estimate is produced, which in turn is derived from two- or three-dimensional, non-linear physical quantities of area or volume, respectively. When extrapolating from volume, to area, to linear measures, due to the psychophysical constraints which limit this task, such a data-compressed estimate of optic nerve cupping may neither accurately reflect, nor correctly represent, the true amount of cupping actually present in the optic nerve head. This type of one-dimensional metric (when comparing calculations from two- or three-dimensional measures over a range of optic nerve cupping), appears to introduce errors which, while most pronounced earlier on in the disease progression, often overestimate the amount of relative cupping (percent cupping) present in a pathological process like glaucoma. The same systemic errors can also lead to overestimation of the progression in cupping, especially in optic nerves with low cup-to disc values. To provide clinically meaningful estimates of optic nerve cupping, the practitioner needs to be aware of psychophysical and mathematical limitations inherent in using a linear cup-to-disc ratio to estimate the amount of cupping observed in a physical structure like the optic disc. The resultant flaws introduced by observer extrapolation from three, to two, to one dimensions (volume, area, and linear); transposition from non-linear to linear quantities; and optical illusions, caused by factors like disc topology, morphology, and ametropia, can all

  15. In vivo MRI monitoring nerve regeneration of acute peripheral nerve traction injury following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Xiao-Hui, E-mail: duanxiaohui-128@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Cheng, Li-Na, E-mail: kobe10716@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Fang, E-mail: xinxin110007@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Liu, Jun, E-mail: docliujun@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Guo, Ruo-Mi, E-mail: guoruomi-521@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Zhong, Xiao-Mei, E-mail: enough300@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Wen, Xue-Hua, E-mail: xuehuasuqian@126.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China); Shen, Jun, E-mail: junshenjun@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, No. 107 Yanjiang Road West, Guangzhou 510120, Guangdong (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess the continuous process of nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation using MRI. Materials and methods: 1 week after acute nerve traction injury was established in the sciatic nerve of 48 New Zealand white rabbits, 5 × 10{sup 5} MSCs and vehicle alone were grafted to the acutely distracted sciatic nerves each in 24 animals. Serial MRI and T1 and T2 measurements of the injured nerves were performed with a 1.5-T scanner and functional recovery was recorded over a 10-week follow-up period, with histological assessments performed at regular intervals. Results: Compared with vehicle control, nerves grafted with MSCs had better functional recovery and showed improved nerve regeneration, with a sustained increase of T1 and T2 values during the phase of regeneration. Conclusion: MRI could be used to monitor the enhanced nerve regeneration in acute peripheral nerve traction injury treated with MSC transplantation, reflected by a prolonged increase in T1 and T2 values of the injured nerves.

  16. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  17. Lingual and inferior alveolar nerve injuries after third molar removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoff, R Bruce; Fagin, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal nerve injury is a rare, but serious complication of a common procedure, which results in a clinically relevant problem that deserves attention. The emergence of microsurgical repair of trigeminal injury has provided clinicians with treatment options for patients who experience persistent neurosensory deficits. The area of microsurgical repair of trigeminal nerves is now in its adolescence. While great strides have been made in the field since its conception, it is certain that a new generation of oral and maxillofacial surgeons wil bring further progress to the field. In the future, better quantitative sensory testing methods, more accurate imaging modalities, and advances in surgical technique will certainly improve the management of patients with impacted third molars. As clinicians, every day we are confronted with the management of impacted third molars. It is important to evaluate each patient individually with an appropriate clinical and radiographic exam. Every patient should be informed of the relative risks and benefits of third molar removal and a joint decision should be reached between the clinician and patient regarding ideal treatment. However, even with ideal management, complications will occur. If a patient does present with signs of a nerve injury the clinician should carefully document the neurosensory deficit and monitor the patient over time. If the patient exhibits a significant sensory deficit for more than one month a referral for evaluation to a tertiary care center capable of surgical repair of the injury is recommended. The occurrence of a "trigger" or Tinel's like sign is improtant as an indication for surgery but may not occur for a month after injury.

  18. Morphometric analysis of the fascicular organisation of the optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radunović Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The optic nerve is anatomically observed in four segments: intrabulbar, orbital, canalicular, and cranial. According to the literature, the surface of the transversal cut of the nerve is different through it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fascicular organisation of the optic nerve, throughout its three segments from the eye. Methods. Five pairs of optic nerves, obtained from the autopsies were examined. Using Heidenhain's (azan staining, the cuts were prepared for microscopy. Morphometric analysis was performed using the stereological methods for morphometric cytology - the Weible’s testing system M42. The following measures were established: the surface of the transverse cut of the nerve, the entire surface of fasciculi, the entire surface of connective tissue and blood vessels, the number of fasciculi, the surface of a single fasciculus. Results. The surface of the transverse cut of the nerve was found to grow from the orbital to the cranial segment, as well as the entire surface of fasciculi. While their number is significantly lower in the cranial segment, the number of fasciculi varied slightly between the orbital and the canalicular segment. The surface of a single fasciculus grows from the bulb to the chiasma. There is probable a cause to believe that this may be due to fusion of the “small” fasciculi in the orbitocranial direction. Conclusion. There are significant differences among the examined parameters of the different parts of the optic nerve.

  19. Sera from patients with seropositive neuromyelitis optica spectral disorders caused the degeneration of rodent optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiko; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Nakamura, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Ichiro; Negi, Akira

    2014-02-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune inflammatory, neurodestructive disease primarily targeting the optic nerve and spinal cord. An autoantibody against water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4), which is expressed at endofeet of astrocytes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NMO. We evaluated the impact of sera of seropositive patients with NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) on the rodent optic nerve and retina. Serum was obtained either from patients with seropositive NMOSD (AQP4+), seronegative patient with idiopathic optic neuritis (AQP4-), and healthy volunteers (control). Anti-AQP4 antibody in a serum was measured by a previously established cell-based assay. The patients' sera were applied on the optic nerve after de-sheathed. Immunohistochemistry showed that at 7 days after the treatment, the area of the optic nerve exposed to the AQP4+ sera lost expression of both AQP4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Also, Human-IgG immunoreactivity and marked invasion of inflammation cells were observed in the optic nerve treated with AQP4+ serum. Immnoreactivity of neurofilament was reduced at 14 days after the treatment, not 7 days. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed the reduced gene expression of neurofilament in retina from the eye that was exposed to the AQP4+ sera at 14 days. Retrograde fluorogold-labeling on the retinal flatmount disclosed the significantly reduced number of retinal ganglion cells when the AQP4+ sera were applied. The present model has demonstrated that the sera from patients with seropositive NMOSDs led to the regional astrocytic degeneration and inflammatory cell invasion in the optic nerve, resulting in the ultimate loss of RGCs and their axons at areas beyond the injury site.

  20. Peripheral nerve grafts support regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Amin, Arthi A; Tom, Veronica J; Houle, John D

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic insults to the spinal cord induce both immediate mechanical damage and subsequent tissue degeneration leading to a substantial physiological, biochemical, and functional reorganization of the spinal cord. Various spinal cord injury (SCI) models have shown the adaptive potential of the spinal cord and its limitations in the case of total or partial absence of supraspinal influence. Meaningful recovery of function after SCI will most likely result from a combination of therapeutic strategies, including neural tissue transplants, exogenous neurotrophic factors, elimination of inhibitory molecules, functional sensorimotor training, and/or electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles or spinal circuits. Peripheral nerve grafts provide a growth-permissive substratum and local neurotrophic factors to enhance the regenerative effort of axotomized neurons when grafted into the site of injury. Regenerating axons can be directed via the peripheral nerve graft toward an appropriate target, but they fail to extend beyond the distal graft-host interface because of the deposition of growth inhibitors at the site of SCI. One method to facilitate the emergence of axons from a graft into the spinal cord is to digest the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are associated with a glial scar. Importantly, regenerating axons that do exit the graft are capable of forming functional synaptic contacts. These results have been demonstrated in acute injury models in rats and cats and after a chronic injury in rats and have important implications for our continuing efforts to promote structural and functional repair after SCI.

  1. Coronectomy - A viable alternative to prevent inferior alveolar nerve injury

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    Alok Sagtani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Coronectomy is a relatively new method to prevent the risk of Inferior Alveolar Nerve (IAN injury during removal of lower third molars with limited scientific literature among Nepalese patients. Thus, a study was designed to evaluate coronectomy regarding its use, outcomes and complications.Materials and Methods: A descriptive study was conducted from December 2012 to December 2013 among patients attending Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dental Sciences, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal for removal of mandibular third molars. After reviewing the radiograph for proximity of third molar to the IAN, coronectomy was advised. A written informed consent was obtained from the patients and coronectomy was performed. Patients were recalled after one week. The outcome measures in the follow-up visit were primary healing, pain, infection, dry socket, root exposure and IAN injury. The prevalence of IAN proximity of lower third molars and incidence of complications were calculated.Results: A total 300 mandibular third molars were extracted in 278 patients during the study period. Out of 300 impacted mandibular third molar, 41 (13.7% showed close proximity to inferior alveolar nerve . The incidence of complications and failed procedure was 7.4% among the patients who underwent coronectomy. During the follow up visit, persistent pain and root exposure was reported while other complications like inferior alveolar nerve injury, dry socket and infection was not experienced by the study patients.Conclusion: With a success rate of 92.6% among the 41 patients, coronectomy is a viable alternative to conventional total extraction for mandibular third molars who have a higher risk for damage to the inferior alveolar nerve.JCMS Nepal. 2015;11(3:1-5.

  2. Retinal glutamate transporter changes in experimental glaucoma and after optic nerve transection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R G; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Quigley, Harry A

    2002-07-01

    High levels of glutamate can be toxic to retinal ganglion cells. Effective buffering of extracellular glutamate by retinal glutamate transporters is therefore important. This study was conducted to investigate whether glutamate transporter changes occur with two models of optic nerve injury in the rat. Glaucoma was induced in one eye of 35 adult Wistar rats by translimbal diode laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork. Twenty-five more rats underwent unilateral optic nerve transection. Two glutamate transporters, GLAST (EAAT-1) and GLT-1 (EAAT-2), were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Western blot analysis. Treated and control eyes were compared 3 days and 1, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Optic nerve damage was assessed semiquantitatively in epoxy-embedded optic nerve cross sections. Trabecular laser treatment resulted in moderate intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in all animals. After 1 to 6 weeks of experimental glaucoma, all treated eyes had significant optic nerve damage. Glutamate transporter changes were not detected by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis demonstrated significantly reduced GLT-1 in glaucomatous eyes compared with control eyes at 3 days (29.3% +/- 6.7%, P = 0.01), 1 week (55.5% +/- 13.6%, P = 0.02), 4 weeks (27.2% +/- 10.1%, P = 0.05), and 6 weeks (38.1% +/- 7.9%, P = 0.01; mean reduction +/- SEM, paired t-tests, n = 5 animals per group, four duplicate Western blot analyses per eye). The magnitude of the reduction in GLT-1 correlated significantly with mean IOP in the glaucomatous eye (r(2) = 0.31, P = 0.01, linear regression). GLAST was significantly reduced (33.8% +/- 8.1%, mean +/- SEM) after 4 weeks of elevated IOP (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 5 animals per group). In contrast to glaucoma, optic nerve transection resulted in an increase in GLT-1 compared with the control eye (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 15 animals). There was no significant change in GLAST after transection. GLT-1 and GLAST were significantly

  3. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

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    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin, E-mail: chengleiyx@126.com

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  4. Biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging method for peripheral nerve injury: regeneration law of nerve fibers in the conduit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-xun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical effects of 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of the biological conduit to repair peripheral nerve injury are better than in the traditional epineurium suture, so it is possible to replace the epineurium suture in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. This study sought to identify the regeneration law of nerve fibers in the biological conduit. A nerve regeneration chamber was constructed in models of sciatic nerve injury using 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of a biodegradable biological conduit. The results showed that the biological conduit had good histocompatibility. Tissue and cell apoptosis in the conduit apparently lessened, and regenerating nerve fibers were common. The degeneration regeneration law of Schwann cells and axons in the conduit was quite different from that in traditional epineurium suture. During the prime period for nerve fiber regeneration (2-8 weeks, the number of Schwann cells and nerve fibers was higher in both proximal and distal ends, and the effects of the small gap sleeve bridging method were better than those of the traditional epineurium suture. The above results provide an objective and reliable theoretical basis for the clinical application of the biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging method to repair peripheral nerve injury.

  5. Regenerating nerve fiber innervation of extraocular muscles and motor functional changes following oculomotor nerve injuries at different sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenchuan Zhang; Massimiliano Visocchi; Eduardo Fernandez; Xuhui Wang; Xinyuan Li; Shiting Li

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, the oculomotor nerves were sectioned at the proximal (subtentorial) and distal (superior orbital fissure) ends and repaired. After 24 weeks, vestibulo-ocular reflex evaluation confirmed that the regenerating nerve fibers following oculomotor nerve injury in the superior orbital fissure had a high level of specificity for innervating extraocular muscles. The level of functional recovery of extraocular muscles in rats in the superior orbital fissure injury group was remarkably superior over that in rats undergoing oculomotor nerve injuries at the proximal end (subtentorium). Horseradish peroxidase retrograde tracing through the right superior rectus muscle showed that the distribution of neurons in the nucleus of the oculomotor nerve was directly associated with the injury site, and that crude fibers were badly damaged. The closer the site of injury of the oculomotor nerve was to the extraocular muscle, the better the recovery of neurological function was. The mechanism may be associated with the aberrant number of regenerated nerve fibers passing through the injury site.

  6. Gait analysis in rats with peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P; Matloub, H S; Sanger, J R; Narini, P

    2001-02-01

    Rats are commonly used to study peripheral nerve repair and grafting. The traditional footprint method to assess functional recovery is messy, indirect, and not useful when contractures develop in the animal model. The aim of the present study was to establish an accurate, reproducible, but simple, method to assess dynamic limb function. The basic quantitative aspects of a normal gait were characterized from 59 recorded walks in 23 rats. The video was digitized and analyzed frame by frame on a personal computer. Seven parameters of the gait were assessed: (1) walking speed; (2) stance phase, swing phase and right to left stance/swing ratio; (3) step length and step length ratio; (4) ankle angles at terminal stance and midswing; (5) tail height; (6) midline deviation; and (7) tail deviation. These gait parameters were then applied to groups of animals with sciatic (group S), tibial (group T), and peroneal (group P) nerve injuries. A discriminant analysis was performed to analyze each parameter and to compute a functional score. We found that the video gait analysis was superior to the footprint method and believe it will be very useful in future studies on peripheral nerve injury.

  7. Vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 levels after peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Idiris Altun; Ergl Belge Kuruta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 were altered after crush-induced peripheral nerve injury in an experimental rat model. A total of 80 male Wistar rats were randomized into one control (n = 8) and six study groups (1, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3, and 7 days after experimental nerve injury;n = 12 for each group). Crush-induced peripheral nerve injury was per-formed on the sciatic nerves of rats in six study groups. Tissue samples from the sites of peripheral nerve injury were obtained at 1, 6, 12, 24 hours, 3 and 7 days after experimental nerve injury. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 in the injured sciatic nerve were signiifcantly greater at 1 and 12 hours after experimental nerve injury, while they were signiifcantly lower at 7 days than in control group. Tissue level of vitamin B12 in the injured sciatic nerve was signiifcantly lower at 1, 6, 12 and 24 hours than in the control group. These results suggest that tissue levels of vitamin B complex and vitamin B12 vary with progression of crush-induced peripheral nerve injury, and supplementation of these vitamins in the acute period may be beneficial for acceleration of nerve regeneration.

  8. Use of nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair A Web of Science-based literature analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinniang Nan; Xuguang Hu; Hongxiu Li; Xiaonong Zhang; Renjing Piao

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify global research trends in the use of nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair.SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: peer-reviewed published articles on nerve conduits for peripheral nerve injury repair, indexed in the Web of Science; original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, editorial material, and news items. Exclusion criteria: articles requiring manual searching or telephone access; documents not published in the public domain; and several corrected papers.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (a) Annual publication output; (b) publication type; (c) publication by research field; (d) publication by journal; (e) publication by funding agency; (f) publication by author; (g) publication by country and institution; (h) publications by institution in China; (i) most-cited papers.CONCLUSION: Nerve conduits have been studied extensively for peripheral nerve regeneration; however, many problems remain in this field, which are difficult for researchers to reach a consensus.

  9. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gintaras Juodzbalys; Hom-Lay Wang; Gintautas Sabalys

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement. Material and Methods Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveo...

  10. [Up to date methods of optic nerve evaluation in patients with optic neuropathy of various etiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, N L; Ronzina, I A; Galoian, N S; Kazarian, E E

    2011-01-01

    132 patients (188 eyes) with proven optic neuropathy of non-glaucomatous origin were examined using static perimetry, visual evoked potential (flash and pattern types), optic coherent tomography of papilla and thickness of peripapillary nerve fiber layer. Sensitivity/ specificity of methods for identification of optic nerve diseases in acute stage were 92/75%, 92/84%, 90/92% respectively. Combination of these three methods let us identify optic neuropathy in 100% of cases, including latent forms.

  11. Glaucoma severity affects diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters of the optic nerve and optic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidek, S. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Medical Imaging Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selangor (Malaysia); Ramli, N. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Rahmat, K., E-mail: katt_xr2000@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia); Ramli, N.M.; Abdulrahman, F. [Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Tan, L.K. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya, Research Imaging Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya (Malaysia)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To evaluate whether MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the optic nerve and optic radiation in glaucoma patients provides parameters to discriminate between mild and severe glaucoma and to determine whether DTI derived indices correlate with retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness. Methods: 3-Tesla DTI was performed on 90 subjects (30 normal, 30 mild glaucoma and 30 severe glaucoma subjects) and the FA and MD of the optic nerve and optic radiation were measured. The categorisation into mild and severe glaucoma was done using the Hodapp–Parrish–Anderson (HPA) classification. RNFL thickness was also assessed on all subjects using OCT. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and Spearman's correlation coefficient was carried out. Results: FA and MD values in the optic nerve and optic radiation decreased and increased respectively as the disease progressed. FA at the optic nerve had the highest sensitivity (87%) and specificity (80%). FA values displayed the strongest correlation with RNFL thickness in the optic nerve (r = 0.684, p ≤ 0.001) while MD at the optic radiation showed the weakest correlation with RNFL thickness (r = −0.360, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusions: The high sensitivity and specificity of DTI-derived FA values in the optic nerve and the strong correlation between DTI-FA and RNFL thickness suggest that these parameters could serve as indicators of disease severity.

  12. Application of a venous conduit as a stent for repairing rabbit facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Recently,many investigators have tried to use natural biomaterials,such as,artery,vein,decalcified bone,etc.,as conduits for nerve repair.However,immunological rejection of conduits made of natural biomaterials limits their application.Therefore,it is essential to identify more suitable types of biomaterials.OBJECTIVE:To observe the characteristics of a bioengineering processing method using venous conduit as a stent for repairing facial nerve injury.DESIGN:A controlled observational experiment.SETTING:Animal Laboratories of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and the 157 Hospital.MATERIALS:Thirty-three male New Zealand rabbits of pure breed,weighing 1.5 to 2.0 kg,were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Room of Sun Yat-sen University.The protocol was carried out in accordance with animal ethics guidelines for the use and care of animals.Venous conduits and autogenous nerves were transplanted into the left and right cheeks,respectively.Eleven animals were chosen for anatomical observations at 5,10 and 15 weeks after surgery.METHODS:This experiment was carried out in the Animal Laboratories of the Third Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and the 157 Hospital between May and November 2006.After animals were anesthetized,15 mm of retromandibular vein was harvested for preparing a venous conduit.Approximately 3 cm of low buccal branch of facial nerve was exposed.A segment of 1.2 cm nerve was resected from the middle,and a gap of 1.5 cm formed due to bilateral retraction.The prepared venous conduit of 1.5 cm was sutured to the outer membrane of the severed ends of the nerve.Muscle and skin were sutured layer by layer.Using the same above-mentioned method,the low buccal branch of right autogenous facial nerve was resected,and the left facial nerve segment from the same animal was transplanted using end-to-end neurorrhaphy for control.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Post-operatively,food intake,vibrissae activity and wound healing of

  13. Robust Optic Nerve Segmentation on Clinically Acquired CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J; Delisi, Michael P; Mawn, Louise A; Galloway, Robert L; Landman, Bennett A

    2014-03-21

    The optic nerve is a sensitive central nervous system structure, which plays a critical role in many devastating pathological conditions. Several methods have been proposed in recent years to segment the optic nerve automatically, but progress toward full automation has been limited. Multi-atlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. Herein we evaluate a framework for robust and fully automated segmentation of the optic nerves, eye globes and muscles. We employ a robust registration procedure for accurate registrations, variable voxel resolution and image field-of-view. We demonstrate the efficacy of an optimal combination of SyN registration and a recently proposed label fusion algorithm (Non-local Spatial STAPLE) that accounts for small-scale errors in registration correspondence. On a dataset containing 30 highly varying computed tomography (CT) images of the human brain, the optimal registration and label fusion pipeline resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.77, symmetric mean surface distance error of 0.55 mm, symmetric Hausdorff distance error of 3.33 mm for the optic nerves. Simultaneously, we demonstrate the robustness of the optimal algorithm by segmenting the optic nerve structure in 316 CT scans obtained from 182 subjects from a thyroid eye disease (TED) patient population.

  14. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Educating Preschool Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia and Septo-Optic Nerve Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; McCann, Mary Ellen; Mendiola, Rosalinda; Slott, Gayle

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the observations and experiences of a multidisciplinary team at the Blind Childrens Center in Los Angeles, which works specifically with children from birth to 5 years of age who have been diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia and may have septo-optic displasia. Strategies for educational interventions are explained.…

  15. Long echo time STIR sequence MRI of optic nerves in optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrj, M. [Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of Chieti, Ospedale ex-Pediatrico (Italy); Tartaro, A. [Dept. of Radiology, State Univ. of Chieti (Italy); Thomas, A. [Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of Chieti, Ospedale ex-Pediatrico (Italy); Gambi, D. [Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of Chieti, Ospedale ex-Pediatrico (Italy); Fulgente, T. [Dept. of Neurology, State Univ. of Chieti, Ospedale ex-Pediatrico (Italy); Delli Pizzi, C. [Dept. of Radiology, State Univ. of Chieti (Italy); Bonomo, L. [Dept. of Radiology, State Univ. of Chieti (Italy)

    1996-01-01

    MRI of the optic nerves was obtained in 13 patients with acute optic neuritis and 13 with a previous optic neuritis (ON), assessed by clinical features, visual fields and visual evoked potentials. Results of the conventional short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence obtained with a short echo time (STE-STIR; 22 ms) were compared with those of a long echo time (LTE-STIR: 80 ms) sequence. The conventional STE-STIR sequence revealed lesions in the optic nerves in 78.5% of acute and 58.8% of previous ON. The LTE-STIR sequence showed abnormalities in 92.8% of acutely symptomatic nerves and 94.1% of nerves with previous ON. The optic nerve lesions appeared significantly longer with the LTE-STIR sequence than with the conventional STE-STIR sequences, in both acute and previous ON. (orig.)

  16. Suprascapular nerve injury: A cause to consider in shoulder pain and dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kaihan; Yew, Wei Ping

    2016-05-13

    Suprascapular nerve injury is increasingly being recognized as an important cause of shoulder dysfunction. The non-specific clinical features of suprascapular nerve injury can make diagnosis difficult. However, it is essential for clinicians to consider it as part of the differential diagnoses in patients with vague pain or sensory disturbances over the posterosuperior part of their shoulder or have unexplained atrophy and weakness of their supraspinatus or infraspinatus muscle. Electrodiagnostic studies are useful in confirming and localising the nerve injury, while MRIs can be employed to determine the cause of nerve injury and assess the integrity of the rotator cuff muscles. Isolated suprascapular nerve injury can be managed with a trial of conservative management for at least 6 months. Subsequently, decompression of the nerve through open or arthroscopic techniques can be considered - both are associated with high rates of pain relief and functional improvement.

  17. Network analysis of human glaucomatous optic nerve head astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Sanjoy K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Astrocyte activation is a characteristic response to injury in the central nervous system, and can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective, while the regulation of both roles remains elusive. Methods To decipher the regulatory elements controlling astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity in glaucoma, we conducted a systems-level functional analysis of gene expression, proteomic and genetic data associated with reactive optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHAs. Results Our reconstruction of the molecular interactions affected by glaucoma revealed multi-domain biological networks controlling activation of ONHAs at the level of intercellular stimuli, intracellular signaling and core effectors. The analysis revealed that synergistic action of the transcription factors AP-1, vitamin D receptor and Nuclear Factor-kappaB in cross-activation of multiple pathways, including inflammatory cytokines, complement, clusterin, ephrins, and multiple metabolic pathways. We found that the products of over two thirds of genes linked to glaucoma by genetic analysis can be functionally interconnected into one epistatic network via experimentally-validated interactions. Finally, we built and analyzed an integrative disease pathology network from a combined set of genes revealed in genetic studies, genes differentially expressed in glaucoma and closely connected genes/proteins in the interactome. Conclusion Our results suggest several key biological network modules that are involved in regulating neurotoxicity of reactive astrocytes in glaucoma, and comprise potential targets for cell-based therapy.

  18. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Messina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN. They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible.

  19. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Chuang, Ying; Burnett, Arthur L.; Su, Li-Ming

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative potency. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of real-time, high-resolution, cross-sectional, in vivo tissue imaging. The rat prostate serves as an excellent model for studying the use of OCT for imaging the cavernous nerves, as the rat cavernous nerve is a large, visible, and distinct bundle allowing for easy identification with OCT in addition to histologic confirmation. Imaging was performed with the Niris OCT system and a handheld 8 Fr probe, capable of acquiring real-time images with 11-μm axial and 25-μm lateral resolution in tissue. Open surgical exposure of the prostate was performed on a total of 6 male rats, and OCT images of the prostate, cavernous nerve, pelvic plexus ganglion, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, and periprostatic fat were acquired. Cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with simultaneous intracorporeal pressure measurements was performed to confirm proper identification of the cavernous nerves. The prostate and cavernous nerves were also processed for histologic analysis and further confirmation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal OCT images of the cavernous nerves were acquired and compared with histologic sections. The cavernous nerve and ganglion could be differentiated from the surrounding prostate gland, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, bladder, and fatty tissue. We report preliminary results of OCT images of the rat cavernous nerves with histologic correlation and erectile stimulation measurements, thus providing interpretation of prostate structures as they appear in OCT images.

  20. A3 Adenosine receptors mediate oligodendrocyte death and ischemic damage to optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Estíbaliz; Sánchez-Gómez, María Victoria; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Arellano, Rogelio O; Matute, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Adenosine receptor activation is involved in myelination and in apoptotic pathways linked to neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor activation in the viability of oligodendrocytes of the rat optic nerve. Selective activation of A3 receptors in pure cultures of oligodendrocytes caused concentration-dependent apoptotic and necrotic death which was preceded by oxidative stress and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Oligodendrocyte apoptosis induced by A3 receptor activation was caspase-dependent and caspase-independent. In addition to dissociated cultures, incubation of optic nerves ex vivo with adenosine and the A3 receptor agonist 2-CI-IB-MECA(1-[2-Chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-b-D-ribofuranuronamide)-induced caspase-3 activation, oligodendrocyte damage, and myelin loss, effects which were prevented by the presence of caffeine and the A3 receptor antagonist MRS 1220 (N-[9-Chloro-2-(2-furanyl)[1,2,4]-triazolo [1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl]benzene acetamide). Finally, ischemia-induced injury and functional loss to the optic nerve was attenuated by blocking A3 receptors. Together, these results indicate that adenosine may trigger oligodendrocyte death via activation of A3 receptors and suggest that this mechanism contributes to optic nerve and white matter ischemic damage.

  1. Clinical study on intravitreal injection of cannabinoid HU-211 for optic nerve damage in glaucoma rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Feng Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the protective effects of intravitreal injection of cannabinoid HU-211 for optic nerve in glaucoma rats, providing the experimental evidence in the treatment of glaucoma optic nerve injury.METHODS: Glaucoma rats(18 eyeswere modeled by electric coagulation sclera surface vein and randomized into 3 groups, group A received intravitreal injection of 1mg/0.1mL cannabinoid HU-211 every other day respectively; group B was given intravitreal injection of 0.1mL water every other day, group C was high intraocular pressure(IOPgroup, 6 eyes were randomly selected for blank control group(group D. IOP was observed every day. The rats were sacrificed after treatment 4wk, froze retina section, HE stain. The density fluctuation of retinal ganglion cell(RGCneurons assessment the optic nerve of rat model with chronic high IOP glaucoma were measured.RESULTS: The apoptosis and damage degree of RGC in group B was obviously higher than that in group A, with statistically significant difference(PP >0.05.CONCLUSION: Intravitreal injection of cannabinoid HU-211 shows obvious protective effect on optic nerve in glaucom rat models.

  2. Pain relief from preganglionic injury to the brachial plexus by late intercostal nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, J; Anand, P; Chen, L; Taggart, M; Birch, R

    1996-09-01

    We performed intercostal nerve transfer in 19 patients to relieve pain from preganglionic injury to the brachial plexus. The procedure was successful in 16 patients at a mean of 28.6 months (12 to 68) after the injury.

  3. Dorsal clitoral nerve injury following transobturator midurethral sling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss CF

    2016-09-01

    demonstrates that the dorsal nerve of the clitoris is vulnerable to injury directly and/or indirectly. Assimilation of a time-honored pain management construct for the evaluation and management of patients’ pain may improve outcomes while obviating the need for invasive surgery. Keywords: postoperative pain, complication, clitoral pain, nerve entrapment

  4. Quantitative contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.H. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Rubinstein, D. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Brown, M. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Yuh, W. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Birch-Iensen, M. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Szumowski, J. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States); Stears, J. [Depts. of Radiology, Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    During the acute stages of optic neuritis damage to the blood-optic nerve barrier can be detected using i.v. paramagnetic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. Quantification of the enhancement pattern of the optic nerve, intraorbital fat and muscle was determined in 15 normal subjects using 3 fat-suppression MR imaging methods: T1-weighted spin-echo and spoiled gradient-echo sequences preceded by a flat-frequency selective pulse (FATSAT+SE and FATSAT+SPGR, respectively) and a pulse sequence combining CHOPPER fat suppression with a fat-frequency selective preparation pulse (HYBRID). Pre- and postcontrast-enhanced studies were acquired for FATSAT+SE and FATSAT+SPGR. There was no significant enhancement of the optic nerve by either method (mean increase of 0.96% and 5.3%, respectively), while there was significant enhancement in muscle (mean 118.2% and 108.2%, respectively; p<0.005) and fat (mean increase of 13% and 37%, respectively; p<0.05). Postcontrast optic nerve/muscle signal intensity ratios (mean, SD) were 0.51 (0.07), 0.58 (0.05) and 0.75 (0.05) for FATSAT+SE, FATSAT+SPGR and HYBRID, respectively. These results suggest a practical methodology and range of values for normal signal intensity increases and ratios of tissue signal that can be used as objective measures of optic neuritis for natural history studies and treatment trials. (orig.).

  5. Assessment of vascularization and myelination following peripheral nerve repair using angiographic and polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ahhyun S.; Chico-Calero, Isabel; Easow, Jeena M.; Villiger, Martin; Welt, Jonathan; Winograd, Jonathan M.; Randolph, Mark A.; Redmond, Robert W.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2017-02-01

    A severe traumatic injury to a peripheral nerve often requires surgical graft repair. However, functional recovery after these surgical repairs is often unsatisfactory. To improve interventional procedures, it is important to understand the regeneration of the nerve grafts. The rodent sciatic nerve is commonly used to investigate these parameters. However, the ability to longitudinally assess the reinnervation of injured nerves are limited, and to our knowledge, no methods currently exist to investigate the timing of the revascularization in functional recovery. In this work, we describe the development and use of angiographic and polarization-sensitive (PS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) to visualize the vascularization, demyelination and remyelination of peripheral nerve healing after crush and transection injuries, and across a variety of graft repair methods. A microscope was customized to provide 3.6 cm fields of view along the nerve axis with a capability to track the nerve height to maintain the nerve within the focal plane. Motion artifact rejection was implemented in the angiography algorithm to reduce degradation by bulk respiratory motion in the hindlimb site. Vectorial birefringence imaging methods were developed to significantly enhance the accuracy of myelination measurements and to discriminate birefringent contributions from the myelin and epineurium. These results demonstrate that the OCT platform has the potential to reveal new insights in preclinical studies and may ultimately provide a means for clinical intra-surgical assessment of peripheral nerve function.

  6. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  7. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen on the regeneration of experimental crush injuries of nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuma Jr. Paulo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen has been successfully used on treatment of acute ischemic injuries involving soft tissues and chronic injuries. In nerve crush injuries, the mechanisms involved are very similar to those found in ischemic injuries. Consequently, it is logical to hypothesize that hyperbaric oxygen should improve nerve repair, which is a critical step on functional recovery. In the present study, we created standard nerve crush injuries on sciatic nerves of rats, which underwent treatment with hyperbaric oxygen. Results were assessed by functional evaluation using walking-track analysis. The functional recovery indexes observed did not differ from control group. We concluded that hyperbaric oxygen therapy, in the schedule used, had no influence on functional recovery after nerve crush injuries.

  8. The Effect of 810 nm Low Level Semiconductor Laser on the Expression of Brain Derive Neurotrophic Factor in the Retina after Optic Nerve Injury%低强度810nm半导体激光照射对大鼠视神经损伤后视网膜脑源性神经营养因子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周方倩; 苑秀华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether or not 810 nm low power Ga-Al-As Laser treatment can stimulate the regeneration of damaged optic nerves by measuring the expression of brain derive neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Methods Forty-four Wistar rats weighing 180-220 g were randomly divided into the laser therapy group, injury group and normal group, which consist of 20, 16 and 8 rats respectively. Each group was subdivided into the 1st, 3rd, 6th and 9th week subgroups. Standardized crushing of optic nerves was applied to make the model. Then the rats in the laser therapy group were given 60 mW laser of a spot diameter of 5mm on the injured optic nerve for 3 minutes every day. The injury and normal groups received the same treatment with no laser output. The expression of BDNFmRNA was detected with RT-PCR respectively after 1, 3, 6 and 9 weeks of treatment. Results After the optic nerve was injured, the expression of BDNFmRNA reached the peak one week after the injury and then dropped. At the 1 st, 3rd, 6th and 9th week after the injury, the expression of BDNFmRNA in the laser therapy group was significantly higher than that in the injury group. Conclusions 810 nm low power Ga-Al-As laser can promote the BDNFmRNA expression of rats with optic nerve injury and repair ax-onal regeneration of neural.%目的 观察低强度810 nm半导体激光照射对大鼠视神经钳夹伤后视神经再生的影响.方法 健康成年Wistar大鼠44只,体重180~220g,分成激光治疗组20只、单纯损伤组16只、正常对照组8只,每组按治疗时间又分成1、3、6和9周4个时间点.标准的视神经钳夹伤模型制备成功后,激光治疗组行激光照射,照射参数:光斑直径5mm,照射功率60 mW,时间3min,经皮至视神经损伤处,每日照射1次.单纯损伤组及正常对照组在进行激光照射时,激光器无功率输出.激光治疗1、3、6和9周后测量视网膜中脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)mRNA的含量.结果 激光治

  9. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  10. Initial Pattern of Optic Nerve Enhancement in Korean Patients with Unilateral Optic Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dae Yong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Seok, Su Sie; Lee, Ju-Yeun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to demonstrate whether the pattern of optic nerve enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can help to differentiate between idiopathic optic neuritis (ON), neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and multiple sclerosis (MS) in unilateral ON. Methods An MRI of the brain and orbits was obtained in patients with acute unilateral ON. Patients with ON were divided into three groups: NMO, MS, and idiopathic ON. The length and location of the abnormal optic nerve enhancement were compared for ON eyes with and without NMO or MS. The correlation between the pattern of optic nerve enhancement and the outcome of visual function was analyzed. Results Of the 36 patients with ON who underwent an MRI within 2 weeks of the onset, 19 were diagnosed with idiopathic ON, 9 with NMO, and 8 with MS. Enhancement of the optic nerve occurred in 21 patients (58.3%) and was limited to the orbital segment in 12 patients. Neither the length nor the location of the optic nerve enhancement was significantly correlated with visual functions other than contrast sensitivity or the diagnosis of idiopathic ON, MS, or NMO. Patients with greater extent of optic nerve sheath enhancement and more posterior segment involvement showed higher contrast sensitivity. Conclusions Our data revealed that the pattern of optic nerve enhancement was not associated with diagnosis of idiopathic ON, NMO, or MS in Korean patients with unilateral ON. We believe further studies that include different ethnic groups will lead to a more definitive answer on this subject. PMID:28243026

  11. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  12. Optic nerve pH and PO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella B; Stefánsson, Einar; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) increase optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. We hypothesized that the mechanism of this effect was either a CO(2) increase or a pH decrease in tissue and blood. To test this hypothesis we investigated and compared...... how optic nerve pH (ONpH) and ONPO(2) are affected by: (1) carbonic anhydrase inhibition; (2) respiratory acidosis, and (3) metabolic acidosis. We measured ONpH with a glass pH electrode and ONPO(2) with a polarographic oxygen electrode. One of the electrodes was placed in the vitreous cavity 0.5 mm...

  13. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1988-01-01

    of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient......Optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3...... an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions...

  14. Risk of marginal mandibular nerve injury in neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and permanent frequency of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) after neck dissection has only scarcely been addressed in the medical literature. We investigated the risk of injury in 159 consecutive patients after neck dissection for various reasons...... in level I B and level II A, respectively. In 95 patients with oral cancer 13 (14%) of the cases had malfunction of the lower lip domain 2 weeks after neck dissection in level I B indicating paresis to the MMN. Follow-up analyses 1-2 years after the operation showed permanent paralysis in 4 to 7......% of the cases in whom two of them had the nerve sacrificed for oncologic reasons during the operation. In 18 patients with parotic cancer the corresponding permanent frequency of MMN paralysis was 11.1%. In 46 patients with neck dissection in level II A but not in level I B, no paresis of the MMN was registered...

  15. Low-Level Laser Irradiation Improves Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Sciatic Nerve Crush Rat Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm2 and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm2. Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm2 had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm2. Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm2. Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm2 and 8 J/cm2) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  16. Lipofilling may induce nerve regeneration after previous traumatic injury : a clinical case with remarkable outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nanninga, Geraldine L.; Nijhuis, Tim H.; Schols, Rutger M.; Paulusma, Sjoerd B.; Coert, J. Henk; Jaquet, Jean Bart

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fast amount of techniques, which promote nerve regeneration, the outcomes of high ulnar nerve injuries are still poor. This case report illuminates the usability of lipofilling in peripheral nerve regeneration. In the case described, we encountered a successful regeneration with return o

  17. Semi-skeletonized Internal Mammary Grafts and Phrenic Nerve Injury: Cause-and-effect analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yongzhi; SUN Zongquan; MA Jie; Hugh S PATERSON

    2006-01-01

    Phrenic nerve injury after cardiac surgery increases postoperative pulmonary complications. The purpose of this study was to analyze the causes and effects of phrenic nerve injury after cardiac surgery. Prospectively collected data on 2084 consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery from Jan. 1995 to Feb. 2002 were analyzed. Twenty-eight preoperative and operation related variables were subjected to logistic analysis with the end point being phrenic nerve injury. Then phrenic nerve injury and 6 perioperative morbidities were included in the analysis as variables to determine their independent predictive value for perioperative pulmonary morbidity. An identical approach was used to identify the independent risk factors for perioperative mortality. There were 53 phrenic nerve injuries (2.5 %). There was no phrenic nerve injury in non-coronary surgery or coronary surgery using conduits other than the internal mammary artery. The independent risk factors for phrenic nerve injury were the use of internal mammary artery (Odds ratio (OR)=14.5) and the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR=2.9). Phrenic nerve injury was an independent risk factor (OR=8.1) for perioperative pulmonary morbidities but not for perioperative mortality. Use of semi-skeletonized internal mammary artery harvesting technique and drawing attention to possible vascular or mechanical causes of phrenic nerve injury may reduce its occurrence. Unilateral phrenic nerve injury, although rarely life-threatening, is an independent risk factor for postoperative respiratory complications. When harvesting internal mammary arteries, it should be kept in mind avoiding stretching, compromising, or inadvertently dissecting phrenic nerve is as important as avoiding damage of internal mammary artery itself.

  18. Determining degree of optic nerve edema from color fundus photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agne, Jason; Wang, Jui-Kai; Kardon, Randy H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2015-03-01

    Swelling of the optic nerve head (ONH) is subjectively assessed by clinicians using the Frisén scale. It is believed that a direct measurement of the ONH volume would serve as a better representation of the swelling. However, a direct measurement requires optic nerve imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and 3D segmentation of the resulting images, which is not always available during clinical evaluation. Furthermore, telemedical imaging of the eye at remote locations is more feasible with non-mydriatic fundus cameras which are less costly than OCT imagers. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop a more quantitative analysis of optic nerve swelling on a continuous scale, similar to SD-OCT. Here, we select features from more commonly available 2D fundus images and use them to predict ONH volume. Twenty-six features were extracted from each of 48 color fundus images. The features include attributes of the blood vessels, optic nerve head, and peripapillary retina areas. These features were used in a regression analysis to predict ONH volume, as computed by a segmentation of the SD-OCT image. The results of the regression analysis yielded a mean square error of 2.43 mm3 and a correlation coefficient between computed and predicted volumes of R = 0:771, which suggests that ONH volume may be predicted from fundus features alone.

  19. Electrical stimulation does not enhance nerve regeneration if delayed after sciatic nerve injury: the role of fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate and enhance nerve regeneration in sensory and motor neurons after injury, but there is little evidence that focuses on the varying degrees of fibrosis in the delayed repair of peripheral nerve tissue. In this study, a rat model of sciatic nerve transection injury was repaired with a biodegradable conduit at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 2 months after injury, when the rats were divided into two subgroups. In the experimental group, rats were treated with electrical stimuli of frequency of 20 Hz, pulse width 100 ms and direct current voltage of 3 V; while rats in the control group received no electrical stimulation after the conduit operation. Histological results showed that stained collagen fibers comprised less than 20% of the total operated area in the two groups after delayed repair at both 1 day and 1 week but after longer delays, the collagen fiber area increased with the time after injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression level of transforming growth factor β (an indicator of tissue fibrosis decreased at both 1 day and 1 week after delayed repair but increased at both 1 and 2 months after delayed repair. These findings indicate that if the biodegradable conduit repair combined with electrical stimulation is delayed, it results in a poor outcome following sciatic nerve injury. One month after injury, tissue degeneration and distal fibrosis are apparent and are probably the main reason why electrical stimulation fails to promote nerve regeneration after delayed repair.

  20. Median and ulnar nerve injuries: prognosis and predictors for clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B. Jaquet (Jean)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn chapter 1 the author provide a general introduction on median and ulnar nerve injuries. Furthermore the aims for this thesis, entitled median and ulnar nerve injuries: prognosis and predictors for clinical outcome, are defi ned. Chapter 2 comprises an investigation into the overall fu

  1. Treatment for Injury of Superior Clunial Nerves by Triple Puncture Needling with Massage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万顺; 李静

    2002-01-01

    @@ Superior clunial nerve injury occupies a high percentage in lumbocluneal tissue injuries. It is commonly seen in winter and in athletic competition and training. The authors have treated 67 cases of pain of the superior clunial nerves by triple puncture needling combined with massage and obtained satisfactory therapeutic result. A report follows.

  2. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC, even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration.

  3. Time-Dependent Nerve Growth Factor Signaling Changes in the Rat Retina During Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Degeneration of Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A.; De Nicolò, Sara; Rosso, Pamela; De Vitis, Luigi A.; Castoldi, Valerio; Leocani, Letizia; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.; Tirassa, Paola; Rama, Paolo; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is suggested to be neuroprotective after nerve injury; however, retinal ganglion cells (RGC) degenerate following optic-nerve crush (ONC), even in the presence of increased levels of endogenous NGF. To further investigate this apparently paradoxical condition, a time-course study was performed to evaluate the effects of unilateral ONC on NGF expression and signaling in the adult retina. Visually evoked potential and immunofluorescence staining were used to assess axonal damage and RGC loss. The levels of NGF, proNGF, p75NTR, TrkA and GFAP and the activation of several intracellular pathways were analyzed at 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after crush (dac) by ELISA/Western Blot and PathScan intracellular signaling array. The progressive RGC loss and nerve impairment featured an early and sustained activation of apoptotic pathways; and GFAP and p75NTR enhancement. In contrast, ONC-induced reduction of TrkA, and increased proNGF were observed only at 7 and 14 dac. We propose that proNGF and p75NTR contribute to exacerbate retinal degeneration by further stimulating apoptosis during the second week after injury, and thus hamper the neuroprotective effect of the endogenous NGF. These findings might aid in identifying effective treatment windows for NGF-based strategies to counteract retinal and/or optic-nerve degeneration. PMID:28067793

  4. Debates to personal conclusion in peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction: A 30-year experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chwei-Chin Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been achieved in the science and management of peripheral nerve injuries over the past 40 years. Yet there are many questions and few answers. The author, with 30 years of experience in treating them at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, addresses debates on various issues with personal conclusions. These include: (1 Degree of peripheral nerve injury, (2 Timing of nerve repair, (3Technique of nerve repair, (4 Level of brachial plexus injury,(5 Level of radial nerve injury,(6 Traction avulsion amputation of major limb, (7 Proximal Vs distal nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries and (8 Post paralysis facial synkinesis.

  5. Nerve Injuries in Aesthetic Breast Surgery: Systematic Review and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducic, Ivica; Zakaria, Hesham M; Felder, John M; Fantus, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    The risk of nerve injuries in aesthetic breast surgery has not been well explored. The authors conducted a systematic review to provide evidence-based information on the incidence and treatment of nerve injuries resulting from aesthetic breast surgery. A broad literature search of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken to identify studies in which nerve injury occurred after breast augmentation or mastopexy. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were established before the search was performed. The initial 4806 citations were narrowed by topic, title, and abstract to 53 articles. After full-text review, 36 studies were included. The risk of any nerve injury after breast augmentation ranged from 13.57% to 15.44%. Specific nerve injury rates were calculated for the intercostal cutaneous nerves, branches to the nipple-areola complex, intercostobrachial nerve, long thoracic nerve, and brachial plexus. Also calculated were the total estimated risks of chronic pain, hyperesthesia, hypoesthesia, and numbness. The meta-analysis showed no associations between the rates of breast nerve injury or sensation change and implant size, incision type, or implant position in patients who underwent breast augmentation. The data were insufficient to determine rates of nerve injury in mastopexy. The possibility of nerve injury, sensation change, or chronic pain with breast augmentation is real, and estimating the incidences of these conditions is useful to both patients and surgeons. Optimizing patient outcomes requires timely treatment by a multidisciplinary team and may include peripheral nerve surgery. 3. © 2014 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc.

  6. Optic nerve histopathology in a case of Wolfram Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Pan, Billy X; Silva, Ruwan A

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is controversial and optic neuropathy, a cardinal clinical manifestation, is poorly characterized. We here describe the histopathological features in postmortem retinas and optic nerves (ONs) from one patient with WS, testing the hypothesis...... that mitochondrial dysfunction underlies the pathology. Eyes and retrobulbar ONs were obtained at autopsy from a WS patient, and compared with those of a Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patient and one healthy control. Retinas were stained with hematoxylin & eosin for general morphology and ONs were...... of axonal degeneration, involving primarily the papillomacular bundle, closely resembled LHON and other mitochondrial optic neuropathies, supporting that mitochondrial dysfunction underlies its pathogenesis....

  7. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury in Trauma-Induced Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Andrew Ban Guan; Lai, Juen Bin; Lye, Kok Weng; Wong, Wai Yee; Nadkarni, Nivedita V; Li, Wenyun; Bautista, Dianne

    2015-07-01

    This prospective observational cohort study sought to determine the prevalence of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury after mandibular fractures before and after treatment and to elucidate factors associated with the incidence of post-treatment IAN injury and time to normalization of sensation. Consenting patients with mandibular fractures (excluding dentoalveolar, pathologic, previous fractures, or mandibular surgery) were prospectively evaluated for subjective neurosensory disturbance (NSD) and underwent neurosensory testing before treatment and then 1 week, 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Eighty patients (men, 83.8%; mean age, 30.0 yr; standard deviation, 12.6 yr) with 123 mandibular sides (43 bilateral) were studied. Injury etiology included assault (33.8%), falls (31.3%), motor vehicle accidents (25.0%), and sports injuries (6.3%). Half the fractures (49.6%) involved the IAN-bearing posterior mandible; all condylar fractures (13.0%) had no NSD. Treatment included open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF; 74.8%), closed reduction and fixation (22.0%), or no treatment (3.3%). Overall prevalence of IAN injury was 33.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.8-42.6) before treatment and 53.8% (95% CI, 46.0-61.6) after treatment. In the IAN-bearing mandible, the prevalence was 56.2% (95% CI, 43.2-69.2) before treatment and 72.9% (95% CI, 63.0-82.7) after treatment. In contrast, this prevalence in the non-IAN-bearing mandible was 12.6% (95% CI, 4.1-21.1) before treatment and 31.6% (95% CI, 20.0-43.3) after treatment. Factors associated with the development of post-treatment IAN injury included fracture site and gap distance (a 1-mm increase was associated with a 27% increase in odds of post-treatment sensory alteration). Time to normalization after treatment was associated with type of treatment (ORIF inhibited normalization) and fracture site (IAN-bearing sites took longer to normalize). IAN injury was 4 times more likely in IAN-bearing posterior mandibular

  8. Protection by an oral disubstituted hydroxylamine derivative against loss of retinal ganglion cell differentiation following optic nerve crush.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Lindsey

    Full Text Available Thy-1 is a cell surface protein that is expressed during the differentiation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Optic nerve injury induces progressive loss in the number of RGCs expressing Thy-1. The rate of this loss is fastest during the first week after optic nerve injury and slower in subsequent weeks. This study was undertaken to determine whether oral treatment with a water-soluble N-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine derivative (OT-440 protects against loss of Thy-1 promoter activation following optic nerve crush and whether this effect targets the earlier quick phase or the later slow phase. The retina of mice expressing cyan fluorescent protein under control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-CFP mice was imaged using a blue-light confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (bCSLO. These mice then received oral OT-440 prepared in cream cheese or dissolved in water, or plain vehicle, for two weeks and were imaged again prior to unilateral optic nerve crush. Treatments and weekly imaging continued for four more weeks. Fluorescent neurons were counted in the same defined retinal areas imaged at each time point in a masked fashion. When the counts at each time point were directly compared, the numbers of fluorescent cells at each time point were greater in the animals that received OT-440 in cream cheese by 8%, 27%, 52% and 60% than in corresponding control animals at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after optic nerve crush. Similar results were obtained when the vehicle was water. Rate analysis indicated the protective effect of OT-440 was greatest during the first two weeks and was maintained in the second two weeks after crush for both the cream cheese vehicle study and water vehicle study. Because most of the fluorescent cells detected by bCSLO are RGCs, these findings suggest that oral OT-440 can either protect against or delay early degenerative responses occurring in RGCs following optic nerve injury.

  9. Beneficial Effect of Metformin on Nerve Regeneration and Functional Recovery After Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junxiong; Liu, Jun; Yu, Hailong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2016-05-01

    Neuroprotective effects of metformin have been increasingly recognized in both diabetic and non-diabetic conditions. Thus far, no information has been available on the potential beneficial effects of metformin on peripheral nerve regeneration in diabetes mellitus. The present study was designed to investigate such a possibility. Diabetes was established by a single injection of streptozotocin at 50 mg/kg in rats. After sciatic nerve crush injury, the diabetic rats were intraperitoneally administrated daily for 4 weeks with metformin (30, 200 and 500 mg/kg), or normal saline, respectively. The axonal regeneration was investigated by morphometric analysis and retrograde labeling. The functional recovery was evaluated by electrophysiological studies and behavioral analysis. It was found that metformin significantly enhanced axonal regeneration and functional recovery compared to saline after sciatic nerve injury in diabetic rats. In addition, metformin at 200 and 500 mg/kg showed better performance than that at 30 mg/kg. Taken together, metformin is capable of promoting nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve injuries in diabetes mellitus, highlighting its therapeutic values for peripheral nerve injury repair in diabetes mellitus.

  10. Spontaneous resolution of optic nerve coloboma-associated retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Michelle S; Fuller, Jeff; Young, Joshua; Marcus, Dennis M

    2004-01-01

    We report a congenital neurosensory retinal detachment associated with an optic nerve coloboma with subsequent spontaneous reattachment. This represents the earliest reported case of such a clinical situation. An observation period is recommended for infants with this clinical course to allow for the opportunity of spontaneous reattachment.

  11. Bilateral iris, choroid, optic nerve colobomas and retinal detachment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2013-12-05

    Dec 5, 2013 ... low posterior hair line, partial left simian crease, and short fingers. MRI brain shows ... The patient has mild mental retardation, now she can walk, dress, and feed ... and acoustic evidence of optic nerve head coloboma. B-scan.

  12. Optic nerve pH and PO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Daniella B; Stefánsson, Einar; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke;

    2006-01-01

    how optic nerve pH (ONpH) and ONPO(2) are affected by: (1) carbonic anhydrase inhibition; (2) respiratory acidosis, and (3) metabolic acidosis. We measured ONpH with a glass pH electrode and ONPO(2) with a polarographic oxygen electrode. One of the electrodes was placed in the vitreous cavity 0.5 mm...

  13. Effects of intraneural and perineural injection and concentration of Ropivacaine on nerve injury during peripheral nerve block in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilvana Hasanbegovic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Injury during peripheral nerve blocks is relatively uncommon, but potentially devastating complication. Recent studies emphasized that location of needle insertion in relationship to the fascicles may be the predominant factor that determines the risk for neurologic complications. However, it is wellestablished that concentration of local anesthetic is also associated with the risk for injury. In this study, we examined the effect of location of injection and concentration of Ropivacaine on risk for neurologic complications. Our hypothesis is that location of the injection is more prognostic for occurrence of nerve injury than the concentration of Ropivacaine.Methods: In experimental design of the study fi fty Wistar rats were used and sciatic nerves were randomized to receive: Ropivacaine or 0.9% NaCl, either intraneurally or perineurally. Pressure data during application was acquired by using a manometer and was analyzed using software package BioBench. Neurologic examination was performed thought the following seven days, there after the rats were sacrificed while sciatic nerves were extracted for histological examination.Results: Independently of tested solution intraneural injections in most of cases resulted with high injection pressure, followed by obvious neurologic defi cit and microscopic destruction of peripheral nerves. Also, low injection pressure, applied either in perineural or intraneural extrafascicular area, resulted with transitory neurologic defi cit and without destruction of the nerve normal histological structure.Conclusions: The main mechanism which leads to neurologic injury combined with peripheral nerve blockade is intrafascicular injection. Higher concentrations of Ropivacaine during intrafascicular applications magnify nerve injury.

  14. Ulnar Nerve Injury as a Result of Galeazzi Fracture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettges, Paul; Turker, Tolga

    2017-09-01

    Sparse documentation of Galeazzi fracture with associated nerve injury exists in the medical literature. The purpose of this report is to review the available literature in regard to incidence, nerve injury type, treatment strategies, and expected outcomes. We present a classic Galeazzi fracture dislocation with associated complete ulnar nerve transection injury at the level of the wrist. After rigid internal bony stabilization, allograft nerve repair was performed. The patient's presentation, operative management, recovery, and a thorough literature review are discussed. Fracture union was attained with near full wrist and elbow range of motion. Despite lack of ulnar nerve function return, the patient was able to resume manual labor occupation. Despite its close proximity to the dislocating distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), thorough review reveals rare associated ulnar nerve palsy. If there is suspicion for nerve injury in the setting of open DRUJ dislocation, the nerve should be explored to identify possible entrapment or transection. Literature supports likely return of nerve function in cases of intact nerve; however, management of nerve transection remains debatable.

  15. Changes in microtubule-associated protein tau during peripheral nerve injury and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Guang-Bin; Shen, Mi; Gu, Xiao-Song; Yi, Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Tau, a primary component of microtubule-associated protein, promotes microtubule assembly and/or disassembly and maintains the stability of the microtubule structure. Although the importance of tau in neurodegenerative diseases has been well demonstrated, whether tau is involved in peripheral nerve regeneration remains unknown. In the current study, we obtained sciatic nerve tissue from adult rats 0, 1, 4, 7, and 14 days after sciatic nerve crush and examined tau mRNA and protein expression levels and the location of tau in the sciatic nerve following peripheral nerve injury. The results from our quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that compared with the uninjured control sciatic nerve, mRNA expression levels for both tau and tau tubulin kinase 1, a serine/threonine kinase that regulates tau phosphorylation, were decreased following peripheral nerve injury. Our western blot assay results suggested that the protein expression levels of tau and phosphorylated tau initially decreased 1 day post nerve injury but then gradually increased. The results of our immunohistochemical labeling showed that the location of tau protein was not altered by nerve injury. Thus, these results showed that the expression of tau was changed following sciatic nerve crush, suggesting that tau may be involved in peripheral nerve repair and regeneration.

  16. The pattern of peripheral nerve injuries among Pakistani soldiers in the war against terror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razaq, Sarah; Yasmeen, Rehana; Butt, Aamir Waheed; Akhtar, Noreen; Mansoor, Sahibzada Nasir

    2015-05-01

    To determine the pattern of peripheral nerve injuries in Pakistani soldiers in the War against terror. Case series. Department of Electrodiagnosis at Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from June 2008 to June 2011. All new cases of war wounded soldiers with peripheral nerve injuries were consecutively enrolled. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic study was carried out by experienced physiatrists. Data was entered in pretested especially designed questionnaire which was analysed using SPSS version 17.0. Seddon's classification system was used to assess the severity of injury. There were 418 cases of peripheral nerve injuries with 504 different nerve segments. Mean age was 29.41 ±8 years. Blast was the main cause of nerve injury in 244 (48.5%) cases followed by gunshot in 215 (42.7%) and 45 (8.9%) cases had nerve injuries secondary to fall, burial under debris and motor vehicle accidents. Eighty six (17%) cases had multiple nerve injuries. Most commonly injured nerve was ulnar (20.6%) followed by sciatic (16.7%), median (16.5%), radial (16.3%), peroneal (8.7%), brachial plexus (8.5%), axillary (4.8%), tibial (2%), femoral (1.8%), long thoracic (0.4%) and others (3.8%). Axonotmesis was seen in 459 (91.1%) cases, 44 (8.7%) cases revealed neurotmesis and 1 (0.2%) case had neuropraxia. Peripheral nerve injuries are a major component of war related injuries mainly involving the upper limbs. Electrodiagnostic studies help in assessing severity and determining prognosis. Precise documentation of severity of nerve injuries is important to estimate the burden on our resources and to extend rehabilitation services.

  17. Nerve transfer for treatment of brachial plexus injury: comparison study between the transfer of partial median and ulnar nerves and that of phrenic and spinal accessary nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯之启; 徐中和

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of using partial median and ulnar nerves for treatment of C5-6 or C5-7 avulsion of the brachial plexus with that of using phrenic and spinal accessary nerves.Methods: The patients were divided into 2 groups randomly according to different surgical procedures. Twelve cases were involved in the first group. The phrenic nerve was transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve or through a sural nerve graft, and the spinal accessary nerve was to the suprascapular nerve. Eleven cases were classified into the second group. A part of the fascicles of median nerve was transferred to be coapted with the motor fascicle of musculocutaneous nerve and a part of fascicles of ulnar nerve was transferred to the axillary nerve. The cases were followed up from 1 to 3 years and the clinical outcome was compared between the two groups. Results: There were 2 cases (16.6%) who got the recovery of M4 strength of biceps muscle in the first group but 7 cases (63.6%) in the second group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.025). However, it was not statistically different in the recovery of shoulder function between the two groups. Conclusions: Partial median and ulnar nerve transfer, phrenic and spinal accessary nerve transfer were all effective for the reconstruction of elbow or shoulder function in brachial plexus injury, but the neurotization using a part of median nerve could obtain more powerful biceps muscle strength than that of phrenic nerve transfer procedure.

  18. Positive effects of bFGF modified rat amniotic epithelial cells transplantation on transected rat optic nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Xin Xie

    Full Text Available Effective therapy for visual loss caused by optic nerve injury or diseases has not been achieved even though the optic nerve has the regeneration potential after injury. This study was designed to modify amniotic epithelial cells (AECs with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF gene, preliminarily investigating its effect on transected optic nerve.A human bFGF gene segment was delivered into rat AECs (AECs/hbFGF by lentiviral vector, and the gene expression was examined by RT-PCR and ELISA. The AECs/hbFGF and untransfected rat AECs were transplanted into the transected site of the rat optic nerve. At 28 days post transplantation, the survival and migration of the transplanted cells was observed by tracking labeled cells; meanwhile retinal ganglion cells (RGCs were observed and counted by employing biotin dextran amine (BDA and Nissl staining. Furthermore, the expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43 within the injury site was examined with immunohistochemical staining.The AECs/hbFGF was proven to express bFGF gene and secrete bFGF peptide. Both AECs/hbFGF and AECs could survive and migrate after transplantation. RGCs counting implicated that RGCs numbers of the cell transplantation groups were significantly higher than that of the control group, and the AECs/hbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the AECs group. Moreover GAP-43 integral optical density value in the control group was significantly lower than that of the cell transplantation groups, and the value in the AECs/hbFGF group was significantly higher than that of the AECs group.AECs modified with bFGF could reduce RGCs loss and promote expression of GAP-43 in the rat optic nerve transected model, facilitating the process of neural restoration following injury.

  19. Early cyclosporin A treatment retards axonal degeneration in an experimental peripheral nerve injection injury model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim Erkutlu; Mehmet Alptekin; Sirma Geyik; Abidin Murat Geyik; Inan Gezgin; Abdulvahap Gk

    2015-01-01

    Injury to peripheral nerves during injections of therapeutic agents such as penicillin G potas-sium is common in developing countries. It has been shown that cyclosporin A, a powerful immunosuppressive agent, can retard Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve crush injury. However, few studies are reported on the effects of cyclosporin A on peripheral nerve drug in-jection injury. This study aimed to assess the time-dependent efifcacy of cyclosporine-A as an immunosuppressant therapy in an experimental rat nerve injection injury model established by penicillin G potassium injection. The rats were randomly divided into three groups based on the length of time after nerve injury induced by cyclosporine-A administration (30 minutes, 8 or 24 hours). The compound muscle action potentials were recorded pre-injury, early post-injury (within 1 hour) and 4 weeks after injury and compared statistically. Tissue samples were taken from each animal for histological analysis. Compared to the control group, a significant im-provement of the compound muscle action potential amplitude value was observed only when cyclosporine-A was administered within 30 minutes of the injection injury (P < 0.05); at 8 or 24 hours after cyclosporine-A administration, compound muscle action potential amplitude was not changed compared with the control group. Thus, early immunosuppressant drug therapy may be a good alternative neuroprotective therapy option in experimental nerve injection injury induced by penicillin G potassium injection.

  20. Early cyclosporin A treatment retards axonal degeneration in an experimental peripheral nerve injection injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Erkutlu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to peripheral nerves during injections of therapeutic agents such as penicillin G potassium is common in developing countries. It has been shown that cyclosporin A, a powerful immunosuppressive agent, can retard Wallerian degeneration after peripheral nerve crush injury. However, few studies are reported on the effects of cyclosporin A on peripheral nerve drug injection injury. This study aimed to assess the time-dependent efficacy of cyclosporine-A as an immunosuppressant therapy in an experimental rat nerve injection injury model established by penicillin G potassium injection. The rats were randomly divided into three groups based on the length of time after nerve injury induced by penicillin G potassium administration (30 minutes, 8 or 24 hours. The compound muscle action potentials were recorded pre-injury, early post-injury (within 1 hour and 4 weeks after injury and compared statistically. Tissue samples were taken from each animal for histological analysis. Compared to the control group, a significant improvement of the compound muscle action potential amplitude value was observed only when cyclosporine-A was administered within 30 minutes of the injection injury (P < 0.05; at 8 or 24 hours after cyclosporine-A administration, compound muscle action potential amplitude was not changed compared with the control group. Thus, early immunosuppressant drug therapy may be a good alternative neuroprotective therapy option in experimental nerve injection injury induced by penicillin G potassium injection.

  1. Anatomical basis of the risk of injury to the right laryngeal recurrent nerve during thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benouaich, Vincent; Porterie, Jean; Bouali, Ourdia; Moscovici, Jacques; Lopez, Raphaël

    2012-08-01

    Despite the intrathoracic part being short, the right laryngeal recurrent nerve is often injured during thoracic surgery. The aim of this cadaver study was to understand the mechanisms of right laryngeal recurrent nerve injuries during thoracic surgery and to describe anatomical landmarks for its preservation. Dissections were performed on 10 fresh human cadavers. A right anterolateral thoracic wall segment was removed, preserving the first rib. Dissections were carried out to identify the following structures: first rib, esophagus, trachea, right main bronchus, right brachiocephalic and subclavian vessels, azygos vein, phrenic nerve, vagus nerve, and right laryngeal recurrent nerve. The distance between the origin of the right laryngeal recurrent nerve and its adjacent structures was assessed. Moderate traction of the thoracic part of the vagus nerve resulted in a downward translation of the right laryngeal recurrent nerve's origin. In such conditions, the right laryngeal recurrent nerve's origin was distant of 14.8 mm (±2.89 mm) from the subclavian artery. Intraoperative incidence of right laryngeal recurrent nerve direct injury could be decreased by understanding the detailed course of its intrathoracic part. Moreover, traction on the intrathoracic part of the right vagus nerve may result in indirect lesions of the right laryngeal recurrent nerve: stretch induced lesions and nerve vasculature's lesions.

  2. Missed ulnar nerve injury and closed forearm fracture in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Batra Amit; Devgan Ashish; Verma Vinit; Singh Raj; Batra Shivani; Magu Narender; Singla Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Ulnar nerve injury in closed fracture of forearm in children is uncommon.Commonly,neurapraxia is the reason for this palsy but other severe injuries or nerve entrapment has been reported in some cases.The importance of diagnosis concerning the types of the nerve injury lies in the fact that they have totally different management.We present a case of ulnar nerve deficit in a child following a closed fracture of the forearm bones.It is imperative to diagnose exact cause of palsy as it forms the basis for treatment.MRI scan can help diagnosis and accordingly guide the management.Simple nerve contusion should be treated conservatively,and exploration with fixation of the fracture should be done in lacerations and entrapments of the nerve.Surgery is not the treatment of choice in cases that could be managed conservatively.

  3. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes, and the optic nerve blood barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, R; Mompeó, B; Castaño, I

    2016-04-01

    To study the features of the endoneurial micro-vessels of the optic nerve in streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. Optic nerves from control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. Patency was determined by indirect immunofluorescence albumin detection. The expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules was performed by direct immunofluorescence. The endoneurial vessels were counted, and the endothelial cell, the basement membrane, and the surface of the transverse section of the nerve were measured. Vessels of diabetic rats showed vessel wall thickening, preservation of pericytes, an increase in endothelial cell transcytosis, and an increased number of perivascular macrophage cells. It may be concluded that the effects of hyperglycaemia on the inner vessels of the optic nerve are more similar to the cerebral diabetic vessels than to the retinal vessels in diabetic animals. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Restraints and peripheral nerve injuries in adult victims of motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; Spinner, Robert J

    2014-06-15

    The pattern of injuries in restrained victims of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) remains an issue of debate. We investigated the association of peripheral nerve injuries with the use of protective devices (seat belt and air bag) during MVCs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 384,539 adult MVC victims who were registered in the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) between 2009 and 2011. Regression techniques were used to investigate the association of restraint use with the risk of peripheral nerve injury in patients hospitalized after an MVC. Of the study patients, 271,099 were using restraints and 113,440 were not. Overall, there were a total of 3086 peripheral nerve injuries. Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated an association of protective device use with decreased risk of peripheral nerve injury (odds ratio [OR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.96; absolute risk reduction, 10.68%). This corresponds to 16 patients who needed to be restrained to prevent one nerve injury. The location of the patient in the vehicle did not seem to affect the risk of peripheral nerve injury, with drivers demonstrating no association with nerve injuries (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.87-1.02) in comparison with non-drivers. On the contrary, alcohol consumption was associated with increased incidence of peripheral nerve injuries (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.20). In summary, restraint use was associated with decreased risk of peripheral nerve injury in MVC victims, after controlling for confounders.

  5. Intermediate filaments of zebrafish retinal and optic nerve astrocytes and Müller glia: differential distribution of cytokeratin and GFAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosier Amanda L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optic nerve regeneration (ONR following injury is a model for central nervous system regeneration. In zebrafish, ONR is rapid - neurites cross the lesion and enter the optic tectum within 7 days; in mammals regeneration does not take place unless astrocytic reactivity is suppressed. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP is used as a marker for retinal and optic nerve astrocytes in both fish and mammals, even though it has long been known that astrocytes of optic nerves in many fish, including zebrafish, express cytokeratins and not GFAP. We used immunofluorescence to localize GFAP and cytokeratin in wild-type zebrafish and transgenic zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under control of a GFAP promoter to determine the pattern of expression of intermediate filaments in retina and optic nerve. Findings GFAP labeling and GFAP gene expression as indicated by GFP fluorescence was found only in the Müller glial cells of the retina. Within Müller cells, GFP fluorescence filled the entire cell while GFAP labelling was more restricted in distribution. No GFAP expression was observed in optic nerves. Cytokeratin labeling of astrocytes was observed throughout the optic nerve and less intensely in cells in the retinal inner plexiform layer. The retinal inner limiting membrane was strongly labeled by anti-cytokeratin. Conclusions Studies of astrocyte function during ONR in zebrafish cannot solely rely on GFAP as an astrocyte marker or indicator of reactivity. Future studies of ONR in zebrafish should include evaluation of changes in cytokeratin expression and localization in the optic nerve.

  6. Peripheral nerve injury grading simplified on MR neurography: As referenced to Seddon and Sunderland classifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avneesh Chhabra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Seddon and Sunderland classifications have been used by physicians for peripheral nerve injury grading and treatment. While Seddon classification is simpler to follow and more relevant to electrophysiologists, the Sunderland grading is more often used by surgeons to decide when and how to intervene. With increasing availability of high-resolution and high soft-tissue contrast imaging provided by MR neurography, the surgical treatment can be guided following the above-described grading systems. The article discusses peripheral nerve anatomy, pathophysiology of nerve injury, traditional grading systems for classifying the severity of nerve injury, and the role of MR neurography in this domain, with respective clinical and surgical correlations, as one follows the anatomic paths of various nerve injury grading systems.

  7. Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction after Injury: A Review of Clinical and Experimental Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Grinsell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other tissues in the body, peripheral nerve regeneration is slow and usually incomplete. Less than half of patients who undergo nerve repair after injury regain good to excellent motor or sensory function and current surgical techniques are similar to those described by Sunderland more than 60 years ago. Our increasing knowledge about nerve physiology and regeneration far outweighs our surgical abilities to reconstruct damaged nerves and successfully regenerate motor and sensory function. It is technically possible to reconstruct nerves at the fascicular level but not at the level of individual axons. Recent surgical options including nerve transfers demonstrate promise in improving outcomes for proximal nerve injuries and experimental molecular and bioengineering strategies are being developed to overcome biological roadblocks limiting patient recovery.

  8. Differential gene expression in proximal and distal nerve segments of rats with sciatic nerve injury during Wallerian degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Jiang; Huaiqin Li; Yi Sun; Dexin Yin; Qin Zhao; Shusen Cui; Dengbing Yao

    2014-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription factor activation, immune response, myelin cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. Although gene expression responses in the distal segment of the sciatic nerve after peripheral nerve injury are known, differences in gene expression between the proximal and distal segments remain unclear. In the present study in rats, we used microarrays to analyze changes in gene expression, biological processes and signaling pathways in the proximal and distal segments of sciatic nerves under-going Wallerian degeneration. More than 6,000 genes were differentially expressed and 20 types of expression tendencies were identiifed, mainly between proximal and distal segments at 7-14 days after injury. The differentially expressed genes were those involved in cell differentiation, cytokinesis, neuron differentiation, nerve development and axon regeneration. Furthermore, 11 biological processes were represented, related to responses to stimuli, cell apoptosis, inlfammato-ry response, immune response, signal transduction, protein kinase activity, and cell proliferation. Using real-time quantitative PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, microarray data were veriifed for four genes: aquaporin-4, interleukin 1 receptor-like 1, matrix metallopro-teinase-12 and periaxin. Our study identiifes differential gene expression in the proximal and distal segments of a nerve during Wallerian degeneration, analyzes dynamic biological changes of these genes, and provides a useful platform for the detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration.

  9. Peripheral nerve injury induces adult brain neurogenesis and remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanescu, Gabriel; Mao, Jianren

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral peripheral nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) has been widely used as a research model of human neuropathic pain. Recently, CCI has been shown to induce spinal cord adult neurogenesis, which may contribute to the chronic increase in nociceptive sensitivity. Here, we show that CCI also induces rapid and profound asymmetrical anatomical rearrangements in the adult rodent cerebellum and pons. This remodelling occurs throughout the hindbrain, and in addition to regions involved in pain processing, also affects other sensory modalities. We demonstrate that these anatomical changes, partially reversible in the long term, result from adult neurogenesis. Neurogenic markers Mash1, Ngn2, doublecortin and Notch3 are widely expressed in the rodent cerebellum and pons, both under normal and injured conditions. CCI-induced hindbrain structural plasticity is absent in Notch3 knockout mice, a strain with impaired neuronal differentiation, demonstrating its dependence on adult neurogenesis. Grey matter and white matter structural changes in human brain, as a result of pain, injury or learned behaviours have been previously detected using non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. Because neurogenesis-mediated structural plasticity is thought to be restricted to the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, such anatomical rearrangements in other parts of the brain have been thought to result from neuronal plasticity or glial hypertrophy. Our findings suggest the presence of extensive neurogenesis-based structural plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, which may maintain a memory of basal sensory levels, and act as an adaptive mechanism to changes in sensory inputs.

  10. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  11. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahir Kzlay; Haydar Ali Erken; Nesibe Kahraman etin; Serdar Akta; Burin rem Abas; Ali Ylmaz

    2016-01-01

    hTe aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I) , and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI atfer injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA.In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were signiifcantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were signiifcantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was signiifcantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was signiifcantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. hTe results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg atfer sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  12. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızılay, Zahir; Erken, Haydar Ali; Çetin, Nesibe Kahraman; Aktaş, Serdar; Abas, Burçin İrem; Yılmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7): control (C), boric acid (BA), sciatic nerve injury (I), and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI). Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours) but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions. PMID:27904499

  13. Neuroprotective Activity of Thioctic Acid in Central Nervous System Lesions Consequent to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Tomassoni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+- and (−-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/−-, (+-, or (−-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+-thioctic acid being more active than (+/−- or (−-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies.

  14. Genetic factors for nerve susceptibility to injuries-lessons from PMP22 deifciency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors may be learnt from families with gene mutations that render nerve-injury sus-ceptibility even to ordinary physical activities. A typical example is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). HNPP is caused by a heterozygous deletion of PMP22 gene. PMP22 deficiency disrupts myelin junctions (such as tight junction and adherens junctions), leading to abnormally increased myelin permeability that explains the nerve susceptibility to injury. This ifnding should motivate investigators to identify additional genetic factors contribut-ing to nerve vulnerability of injury.

  15. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  16. Primary Gliosarcoma of the Optic Nerve: A Unique Adult Optic Pathway Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Patrick J; Sychev, Yevgeniy V; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F; Mudumbai, Raghu C; Keene, C Dirk

    2016-10-11

    A 90-year-old woman presented with 1-year history of right-sided progressive proptosis, neovascular glaucoma, blindness, and worsening ocular pain. No funduscopic examination was possible because of a corneal opacity. Head CT scan without contrast demonstrated a heterogeneous 4.1 cm (anterior-posterior) by 1.7 cm (transverse) cylindrical mass arising in the right optic nerve and extending from the retrobulbar globe to the optic canal. She underwent palliative enucleation with subtotal resection of the orbital optic nerve and tumor. Pathological examination showed effacement of the optic nerve by an infiltrative high-grade glial neoplasm with biphasic sarcomeric differentiation. Invasion into the uvea and retina was present. The neoplasm was negative for melan-A, HMB45, tyrosinase, synaptophysin, smooth muscle actin, and epithelial membrane antigen. The glioma had strongly intense, but patchy immunopositivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein. Multiple foci of neoplastic cells had pericellular reticulin staining. The overall features were diagnostic of a gliosarcoma (World Health Organization grade IV) of the optic nerve. Postoperative MRI demonstrated postsurgical changes and residual gliosarcoma with extension into the optic chiasm. The patient died 2 and a half months after her enucleation surgery at her nursing home. Autopsy was unavailable due to the caregiver wishes, making a definitive cause of death unknown. Gliosarcoma is a rare variant of glioblastoma, and this is the first documented case presenting as a primary neoplasm of the optic nerve.

  17. Ulnar nerve injuries of the hand producing intrinsic muscle denervation of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberie, J.E.; Connell, D.G.; Munk, P.L.; Janzen, D.L. [Vancouver General Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, (Canada). Department of Radiology

    1999-08-01

    Muscle and nerve injuries in the hand may be difficult to detect and diagnose clinically. Two cases are reported in which magnetic resonance imaging showed ulnar nerve injury and intrinsic hand muscle denervation. The clinical, anatomical and radiological features of injury to the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve and associated muscle denervation are discussed and illustrated. Compression of the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve is a rare cause of hand dysfunction. This condition produces a clinical syndrome characterized by weakness of the muscles innervated by the deep branch of the ulnar nerve, with normal sensation in the hand. Denervation of the intrinsic hand muscles is variable, depending on the site and severity of the nerve injury. The anatomy of the ulnar nerve is complex and ulnar nerve compression syndrome is difficult to detect and localize clinically. Multiple causes exist, including ganglions; repeated trauma, typically occupationally related; calcification adjacent to the pisiform and the pisotriquetral joint; anomalous muscle bellies; fractures or dislocations affecting the ulnar side of the wrist; vascular anomalies of the ulnar artery; and oedema of the hand, requiring differing surgical treatments. We report two patients who presented with ulnar nerve compression syndrome secondary to post-traumatic neuromas as a result of blunt trauma to the palm. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 12 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Reconstruction of posterior interosseous nerve injury following biceps tendon repair: case report and cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtee, David B; Brown, Justin M; Mackinnon, Susan E; Tung, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the terminal branches of the posterior interosseous nerve that makes this reconstruction possible. Finally, we advocate consideration for identification of the posterior interosseous nerve prior to reattachment of the biceps tendon to the radial tuberosity.

  19. Localized and Sustained Delivery of Erythropoietin from PLGA Microspheres Promotes Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Zhang; Yuan Gao; Yan Zhou; Jianheng Liu; Licheng Zhang; Anhua Long; Lihai Zhang; Peifu Tang

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays sh...

  20. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-09-04

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (PEEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands.

  1. Optic nerve head biomechanics in aging and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, J Crawford

    2015-04-01

    This nontechnical review is focused upon educating the reader on optic nerve head biomechanics in both aging and disease along two main themes: what is known about how mechanical forces and the resulting deformations are distributed in the posterior pole and ONH (biomechanics) and what is known about how the living system responds to those deformations (mechanobiology). We focus on how ONH responds to IOP elevations as a structural system, insofar as the acute mechanical response of the lamina cribrosa is confounded with the responses of the peripapillary sclera, prelaminar neural tissues, and retrolaminar optic nerve. We discuss the biomechanical basis for IOP-driven changes in connective tissues, blood flow, and cellular responses. We use glaucoma as the primary framework to present the important aspects of ONH biomechanics in aging and disease, as ONH biomechanics, aging, and the posterior pole extracellular matrix (ECM) are thought to be centrally involved in glaucoma susceptibility, onset and progression.

  2. Probabilistic Modeling of Intracranial Pressure Effects on Optic Nerve Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, Andrew J.; Raykin, Julia; Myers, Jerry G.; Nelson, Emily S.; Samuels, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Altered intracranial pressure (ICP) is involved/implicated in several ocular conditions: papilledema, glaucoma and Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome. The biomechanical effects of altered ICP on optic nerve head (ONH) tissues in these conditions are uncertain but likely important. We have quantified ICP-induced deformations of ONH tissues, using finite element (FE) and probabilistic modeling (Latin Hypercube Simulations (LHS)) to consider a range of tissue properties and relevant pressures.

  3. Optic nerve infiltration by acute lymphoblastic leukemia: MRI contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Maria de Fatima; Braga, Flavio Tulio [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Paulista School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, Antonio Jose da [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Federal University of Sao Paulo, Division of Diagnostic Imaging in Pediatrics, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2005-08-01

    We describe the clinical presentation and imaging features of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that was complicated by optic nerve infiltration. The clinical and diagnostic characteristics of this complication must be recognized so that optimal therapy can be started to prevent blindness. MR imaging is useful in early detection and should be performed in any leukemic patient with ocular complaints, even during remission. (orig.)

  4. Optic nerve and chiasm enlargement in a case of infantile Krabbe disease: quantitative comparison with 26 age-matched controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Bhairav; Gimi, Barjor [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Vachha, Behroze [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Developmental Disabilities, Dallas, TX (United States); Agadi, Satish [Children' s Medical Center Dallas, Department of Neurology, Dallas, TX (United States); Koral, Korgun [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Children' s Medical Center Dallas, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Hypertrophy of the optic nerves and optic chiasm is described in a 5-month-old boy with infantile Krabbe disease. Optic nerve and optic chiasm hypertrophy is a rarely described feature of Krabbe disease. The areas of the prechiasmatic optic nerves and optic chiasm were measured and compared with those of 26 age-matched controls. The areas of the prechiasmatic optic nerves and optic chiasm were 132% and 53% greater than normal, respectively. (orig.)

  5. 人脐血干细胞移植对大鼠外伤性视神经损伤后神经节细胞的保护作用%Protection of retinal ganglion cells from optic nerve injury by human umbilical cord blood stem cells transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云琴; 肖丽波; 康剑书; 张洁莹; 周圆; 邹悦

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察人脐血干细胞(hUCBSC)移植对视神经部分受损大鼠视网膜神经节细胞(RGC)的保护作用.方法 雄性Sprague-Dawley大鼠48只,随机分为A、B组,每组均为24只.大鼠暴露左眼视神经,在球后2 mm处用40 g力微型视神经夹垂直于视神经水平轴的视神经钳夹30 s建立部分视神经损伤模型.右眼为对照眼.建模后7d,A组大鼠左眼球周注射0.1 ml磷酸盐缓冲液;B组大鼠左眼球周注射0.1 ml hUCBSC悬液.处死大鼠前7d,双上丘注射5%荧光金(FG)逆行标记双眼RGC.FG逆行标记后7、14、21、28 d,两组分别随机选取6只大鼠行视网膜铺片,计数RGC并计算RGC标识率;作视网膜切片进行苏木精-伊红(HE)染色,观察视神经损伤后视网膜形态学变化.结果 随注射时间延长,A、B组大鼠RGC计数均呈下降趋势,B组大鼠损伤眼RGC计数下降幅度明显较A组平缓.A、B组大鼠损伤眼RGC计数均低于对照眼,差异有统计学意义(t=3.24、3.15,P<0.05).FG逆行标记后7、14、21、28 d,A、B组大鼠损伤眼RGC计数比较,差异均有统计学意义(t=4.78、4.70、3.98、3.27,P<0.05).FG逆行标记后7、14、21、28 d,A、B组组内大鼠RGC标识率比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);B组大鼠标识率较A组明显提高,差异均有统计学意义(t=4.39、4.21、4.36、5.07,P<0.05).光学显微镜观察发现,大鼠对照眼视网膜组织结构清晰,RGC层细胞排列规整.A、B组大鼠损伤眼视网膜各层变薄,RGC层核固缩、空泡样变性、细胞排列紊乱,RGC数量减少;损伤处视神经肿胀、出血,胶质细胞排列紊乱,空泡样变性,随损伤时间延长而加重.A组较B组病理改变更严重.结论 球周注射hUCBSC可减缓视神经损伤大鼠RGC凋亡,对RGC具有一定的保护作用.%Objective To observe the protective effect of human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSC) transplantation on retinal ganglion cells (RGC) after optic nerve injury.Method 48 adult

  6. Antioxidative mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes repair and regeneration following cavernous nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-kui Zhao; Hong-lian Yu; Bo Liu; Hui Wang; Qiong Luo; Xie-gang Ding

    2016-01-01

    Polysaccharides extracted from Lycium barbarum exhibit antioxidant properties. We hypothesized that these polysaccharides resist oxida-tive stress-induced neuronal damage following cavernous nerve injury. In this study, rat models were intragastrically administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides for 2 weeks at 1, 7, and 14 days after cavernous nerve injury. Serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities signiifcantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks post-injury. Serum malondialdehyde levels decreased at 2 and 4 weeks. At 12 weeks, peak intracavernous pressure, the number of myelinated axons and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase-pos-itive nerve ifbers, levels of phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein and 3-nitrotyrosine were higher in rats administered at 1 day post-injury compared with rats administered at 7 and 14 days post-injury. These ifndings suggest that application of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides following cavernous nerve crush injury effectively promotes nerve regeneration and erectile functional recovery. This neu-roregenerative effect was most effective in rats orally administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides at 1 day after cavernous nerve crush injury.

  7. The clinical diagnosis of cranial nerve injuries at operations on the carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokin, Al An; Kuklin, A V; Belskaia, G N; Kuznetsova, M Iu; Alekhin, D I; Zotov, S P; Vardugin, I V; Sundukova, Ye I

    2003-01-01

    Operation on the carotid arteries (CA) prevent strokes in patients with occlusions and stenoses of these arteries. We have worked out the measures for preventing perioperative strokes. During interventions on the CA, iatrogenic injuries to the cranial nerves (CN) are paid little attention. 1186 patients underwent 1362 operations. There were 26 lethal outcomes and 38 strokes. 146 (0.7%) cases of CN injuries were documented. Of these, there were 2 (0.1%) injuries to the accessory nerve, 14 (1%) to the glossopharyngeal nerve, 28 (2%) to the hypoglossal nerve, 46 (3.4%) injuries to vagal nerve branches, and 56 (4.2%) to facial nerve branches. In 42 patients, neuropathies acquired the 'permanent' character. We describe the symptomatology of injuries to different CN pairs consequent on carotid operations and the algorithm of their diagnosis. CN injuries deteriorate the results of operations and decrease quality of life of the patients. Early diagnosis and correction of the sequelae of iatrogenic injuries to the CN is a reserve for the refinement of the results of operations on the CA.

  8. Bilateral Traumatic Globe Luxation with Optic Nerve Transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Tok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document clinical findings and management of a patient with bilateral globe luxation and optic nerve transection. Materials and Methods: A 25-year-old female patient was admitted to the emergency department with bilateral traumatic globe luxation following a motor vehicle accident. Results: Visual acuity testing showed no light perception. The right pupil was dilated and bilaterally did not react to light. The globes were bilaterally intact. A computed tomography scan revealed Le Fort type II fractures, bilateral optic nerve transection and disruption of all extraocular muscles. The globes of the patient were bilaterally reduced into the orbit. However, the patient developed phthisis bulbi in the right eye at month 3. Conclusion: Globe luxation presents a dramatic clinical picture, and may lead to the development of severe complications due to the concomitance of complete optic nerve dissection and multiple traumas. Even if the luxated globe is repositioned into the orbit, there is still an increased risk of the development of phthisis due to ischemia.

  9. 7, 8-dihydroxycoumarin improves neurological function in a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianshi Du; Qing Zhao; Yingli Zhang; Yu Wang; Ming Ma

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury was treated with intraperitoneal injection of 7, 8-dihydroxycoumarin (10, 5, or 2.5 mg/kg per day). Western blot and real-time PCR results showed that growth associated protein 43 expression was significantly increased in the L4-6 segments of the spinal cord. The amplitude and velocity of motor nerve conduction in the sciatic nerve were significantly increased in model mice. In addition, the appearance of the myelin sheath in the injured sciatic nerve was regular, with an even thickness and clear outline, and the surrounding fibroplasia was not obvious. Our results indicate that 7, 8-dihydroxycoumarin can promote the repair of injured nerve by upregulating growth associated protein 43 expression in the corresponding spinal cord segments of mice with sciatic nerve injury.

  10. Protective effects of cerebrolysin in a rat model of optic nerve crush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sun-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Kung-Hung; Sheu, Min-Muh; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of cerebrolysin (Cbl) on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model of ON crush. Rats received intravitreal injection of Cbl (n = 20), intra-ON injection of Cbl (n = 20), intraperitoneal injection (IPI) of Cbl (n = 20), or phosphate buffered saline (PBS; n = 20) every day for 2 weeks after ON crush injury. At 3 weeks post-trauma, RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold and visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials. Activities of microglia after insults were quantified by immunohistochemical analysis of the presence of ED1 in the optic nerve. At 3 weeks postcrush, the densities of RGCs in the Cbl-IVI group (1125 ± 166/mm(2)) and in the Cbl-IPI treatment group (1328 ± 119/mm(2)) were significantly higher than those in the PBS group (641 ± 214/mm(2)). The flash visual-evoked potential measurements showed that latency of the P1 wave was significantly shorter in the Cbl-IVI- and Cbl-IPI-treated groups (105 ± 4 ms and 118 ± 26 ms, respectively) than in the PBS-treated group (170 ± 20 ms). However, only Cbl IPI treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the number of ED1-positive cells at the lesion sites of the ON (5 ± 2 cells/vs. 30 ± 4 cells/high-power field in control eyes). Treatment with intra-ON injection of Cbl was harmful to the optic nerve in the crush model. Systemic administration of Cbl had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and visual function in the optic nerve crush model.

  11. Protective effects of cerebrolysin in a rat model of optic nerve crush

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Lun Huang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of cerebrolysin (Cbl on optic nerves (ON and retinal ganglion cells (RGC in a rat model of ON crush. Rats received intravitreal injection of Cbl (n = 20, intra-ON injection of Cbl (n = 20, intraperitoneal injection (IPI of Cbl (n = 20, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS; n = 20 every day for 2 weeks after ON crush injury. At 3 weeks post-trauma, RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold and visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials. Activities of microglia after insults were quantified by immunohistochemical analysis of the presence of ED1 in the optic nerve. At 3 weeks postcrush, the densities of RGCs in the Cbl-IVI group (1125 ± 166/mm2 and in the Cbl-IPI treatment group (1328 ± 119/mm2 were significantly higher than those in the PBS group (641 ± 214/mm2. The flash visual-evoked potential measurements showed that latency of the P1 wave was significantly shorter in the Cbl-IVI- and Cbl-IPI-treated groups (105 ± 4 ms and 118 ± 26 ms, respectively than in the PBS-treated group (170 ± 20 ms. However, only Cbl IPI treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the number of ED1-positive cells at the lesion sites of the ON (5 ± 2 cells/vs. 30 ± 4 cells/high-power field in control eyes. Treatment with intra-ON injection of Cbl was harmful to the optic nerve in the crush model. Systemic administration of Cbl had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and visual function in the optic nerve crush model.

  12. Detection of optic nerve lesions in optic neuritis using frequency-selective fat-saturation sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.H. (NMR Research Unit, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)); MacManus, D.G. (NMR Research Unit, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)); Bartlett, P.A. (St. Mary' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Kapoor, R. (NMR Research Unit, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)); Morrissey, S.P. (NMR Research Unit, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)); Moseley, I.F. (NMR Research Unit, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-02-01

    MRI was performed on seven patients with acute optic neuritis, using two sequences which suppress the signal from orbital fat: frequency-selective fat-saturation and inversion recovery with a short inversion time. Lesions were seen on both sequences in all the symptomatic optic nerves studied. (orig.)

  13. Remyelination of optic nerve lesions: spatial and temporal factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klistorner, Alexandr; Arvind, Hemamalini; Garrick, Raymond; Yiannikas, Con; Paine, Mark; Graham, Stuart L

    2010-07-01

    Optic neuritis provides an in vivo model to study demyelination. The effects of myelin loss and recovery can be measured by the latency of the multifocal visual evoked potentials. We investigated whether the extent of initial inflammatory demyelination in optic neuritis correlates with the remyelinating capacity of the optic nerve. Forty subjects with acute unilateral optic neuritis and good visual recovery underwent multifocal visual evoked potentials testing at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Average latency changes were analyzed. Extensive latency delay at baseline significantly improved over time with rate of recovery slowed down after 6 months. Magnitude of latency recovery was independent of initial latency delay. Latency recovery ranged from 7 to 17 ms across the whole patient cohort (average = 11.3 (3.1) ms) despite the fact that in a number of cases the baseline latency delay was more than 35-40 ms. Optic nerve lesions tend to remyelinate at a particular rate irrespective of the size of the initial demyelinated zone with smaller lesions accomplishing recovery more completely. The extent of the initial inflammatory demyelination is probably the single most important factor determining completeness of remyelination. The time period favorable to remyelination is likely to be within the first 6 months after the attack.

  14. Reconstruction of Posterior Interosseous Nerve Injury Following Biceps Tendon Repair: Case Report and Cadaveric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtee, David B.; Brown, Justin M.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Tung, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Surgical repair of distal biceps tendon rupture is a technically challenging procedure that has the potential for devastating and permanently disabling complications. We report two cases of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) injury following successful biceps tendon repair utilizing both the single-incision and two-incision approaches. We also describe our technique of posterior interosseous nerve repair using a medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve graft (MABC) and a new approach to the termin...

  15. Convergent nociceptive input to spinal dorsal horn neurons after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terayama, Ryuji; Kishimoto, Noriko; Yamamoto, Yuya; Maruhama, Kotaro; Tsuchiya, Hiroki; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-03-01

    The number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the spinal dorsal horn evoked by noxious stimulation was previously shown to be increased following peripheral nerve injury, and this increase was proposed to reflect the neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anomalous convergent primary afferent input to spinal dorsal horn neurons contributed to nerve injury-induced c-Fos hyperinducibility. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input from different branches of the sciatic nerve after injury to the tibial nerve. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by noxious heat stimulation of the hindpaw and also by electrical stimulation (ES) of the injured tibial nerve, respectively. The number of c-Fos-IR neurons was significantly decreased 3 days after the injury. However, the number of c-Fos-IR neurons returned to the control level 14 days after the injury. P-ERK immunoreactive (p-ERK-IR) neurons were induced in the central terminal field of the tibial nerve by ES of the tibial nerve. The topographic distribution pattern and number of such p-ERK-IR neurons remained unchanged after the nerve injury. The time course of changes in the number of double-labeled neurons, that presumably received convergent primary afferent input, showed a pattern similar to that of c-Fos-IR neurons after the injury. These results indicate that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves may contribute to c-Fos hyperinducibility in the spinal dorsal horn.

  16. LHON and other optic nerve atrophies: the mitochondrial connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) are reviewed. The etiology of LHON is complex, but the primary risk factor is a mutation in one of the seven mitochondrial genes that encode subunits of respiratory chain complex I. The pathogenesis of LHON is not yet understood, but one plausible model is that increased or altered mitochondrial ROS production renders the retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to apoptotic cell death. In addition to LHON, there are a large number of other optic nerve degenerative disorders including autosomal dominant optic atrophy, the toxic/nutritional optic neuropathies and glaucoma. A review of the recent scientific literature suggests that these disorders also involve mitochondrial dysfunction or altered mitochondrial signaling pathways in their pathogenesis. This mitochondrial link provides new avenues of experimental investigation to these major causes of loss of vision.

  17. Effect of low-frequency pulse percutaneous electric stimulation on peripheral nerve injuries at different sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinwu Wang; Liye Chen; Qi Li; Weifeng Ni; Min Zhang; Shangchun Guo; Bingfang Zeng

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postoperative recovery of nerve function in patients with peripheral nerve injury is always an important problem to solve after treatment. The electric stimulation induced electromagnetic field can nourish nerve, postpone muscular atrophy, and help the postoperative neuromuscular function.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of low-frequency pulse percutaneous electric stimulation on the functional recovery of postoperative patients with peripheral nerve injury, and quantitatively evaluate the results of electromyogram (EMG) examination before and after treatment.DESIGN: A retrospective case analysis.SETTING: The Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University.PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen postoperative inpatients with peripheral nerve injury were selected from the Department of Orthopaedics, the Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University from June 2005 to January 2006, including 13 males and 6 females aged 24-62 years with an average of 36 years old.There were 3 cases of brachial plexus nerve injury, 3 of median nerve injury, 7 of radial nerve injury, 3 of ulnar nerve injury and 3 of common peroneal nerve injury, and all the patients received probing nerve fiber restoration. Their main preoperative manifestations were dennervation, pain in limbs, motor and sensory disturbances. All the 19 patients were informed with the therapeutic program and items for evaluation.METHODS : ① Low-frequency pulse percutaneous electric stimulation apparatus: The patients were given electric stimulation with the TERESA cantata instrument (TERESA-0, Shanghai Teresa Health Technology, Co.,Ltd.). The patients were stimulated with symmetric square waves of 1-111 Hz, and the intensity was 1.2-5.0 mA, and it was gradually adjusted according to the recovered conditions of neural regeneration following the principle that the intensity was strong enough and the patients felt no obvious upset. They were treated for 4-24 weeks, 10-30 minutes

  18. Iatrogenic facial nerve injuries during chronic otitis media surgery: a multicentre retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, T; Mulazimoglu, S; El Hadi, T; Darrouzet, V; Ayache, D; Somers, T; Schmerber, S; Vincent, C; Mondain, M; Lescanne, E; Bonnard, D

    2017-06-01

    To give an insight into why, when and where iatrogenic facial nerve (FN) injuries may occur and to explain how to deal with them in an emergency setting. Multicentre retrospective study in eight tertiary referral hospitals over 17 years. Twenty patients with partial or total FN injury during surgery for chronic otitis media (COM) were revised. Indication and type of surgery, experience of the surgeon, intra- and postoperative findings, value of CT scanning, patient management and final FN outcome were recorded. In 12 cases, the nerve was completely transected, but the surgeon was unaware in 11 cases. A minority of cases occurred in academic teaching hospitals. Tympanic segment, second genu and proximal mastoid segments were the sites involved during injury. The FN was not deliberately identified in 18 patients at the time of injury, and nerve monitoring was only applied in one patient. Before revision surgery, CT scanning correctly identified the lesion site in 11 of 12 cases and depicted additional lesions such as damage to the lateral semicircular canal. A greater auricular nerve graft was interposed in 10 cases of total transection and in one partially lesioned nerve: seven of them resulted in an HB III functional outcome. In two of the transected nerves, rerouting and direct end-to-end anastomosis was applied. A simple FN decompression was used in four cases of superficially traumatised nerves. We suggest checklists for preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management to prevent and treat iatrogenic FN injury during COM surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. More nerve root injuries occur with minimally invasive lumbar surgery: Let′s tell someone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The incidence of nerve root injuries following any of the multiple MIS lumbar surgical techniques (TLIF/PLIF/ALIF/XLIF resulted in more nerve root injuries when compared with open conventional lumbar surgical techniques. Considering the majority of these procedures are unnecessarily being performed for degenerative disc disease alone, spine surgeons should be increasingly asked why they are offering these operations to their patients?

  20. Normal Distribution of VGLUT1 Synapses on Spinal Motoneuron Dendrites and Their Reorganization after Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rotterman, Travis M.; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C.; Alvarez, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury induces permanent alterations in spinal cord circuitries that are not reversed by regeneration. Nerve injury provokes the loss of many proprioceptive IA afferent synapses (VGLUT1-IR boutons) from motoneurons, the reduction of IA EPSPs in motoneurons, and the disappearance of stretch reflexes. After motor and sensory axons successfully reinnervate muscle, lost IA VGLUT1 synapses are not re-established and the stretch reflex does not recover; however, electrically evoked...

  1. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Following Implant Placement - Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment: a Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ilana Shavit; Gintaras Juodzbalys

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this article is to systematically review diagnostic procedures and risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement, to identify the time interval between inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis after surgical dental implant placement and compare between outcomes of early and delayed diagnosis and treatment given based on case series recorded throughout a period of 10 years. Material and Methods We performed li...

  2. Treatment of Combined Injuries of the Axillary and Suprascapular Nerves with Scapulothoracic Dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Kazufumi; Ozeki, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    A 20-year-old man suffered the combined axillary and suprascapular nerve palsies associated with scapulothoracic dissociation by motorcycle accident. The dislocated shoulder girdle was reduced and stabilized with osteosynthesis of the fractured clavicle and reattachment of the trapezius avulsed from the scapular spine for removal of continuous traction force to these damaged nerves. Because of no evidence of recovery on manual muscle test and electromyogram, exploration for these nerves was administered 6 weeks after injury. Although neurolysis of both nerves revealed neural continuity, excessive tension still existed on the suprascapular nerve. It was thought that previous operation in which the shoulder girdle had been reduced and stabilized as much as possible could not achieve complete anatomical reduction of the scapula. As an additional treatment, medial walls of the suprascapular and spinoglenoid notches were shaven to relax the suprascapular nerve. After a year, complete recovery of both the axillary and suprascapular nerve was identified. Although scapulothoracic dissociation is commonly recognized as massive injury of the shoulder girdle with poor prognosis because of existence of accompanied severe neurovascular injuries, there are more than a few cases in which partial damage on the infraclavicular brachial plexus is only accompanied. In case of them, there is the possibility of lesions in continuity of the nerves in which good prognosis might be expected with surgical intervention including early reduction of the shoulder girdle for removal of excessive tension to the damaged nerve.

  3. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-06-02

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD.

  4. Clinical application of axonal repair technique for treatment of peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亮; 顾玉东; 徐雷

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of axonal repair technique for treatment of peripheral nerve injury clinically.Methods: In 1998, the authors applied axonal repair technique to treat peripheral nerve injuries in 12 patients with 13 nerves. It consists of four steps, ie, stumps of the nerve being soaked in a modified Collins fluid, freezed,trimmed, and coapted with glue, making the injured nerve repaired at the axonal level.Results: The patients were followed up for an average of 13 months. Results showed that in 4 cases of first-stage contraiateral C7 transfer, regenerating axons reached to the sternoclavicular joint or axilla at 4 to 7 months, offering the timing for performing the second-stage contralateral C7 transfer. In 5 cases of accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve, the abduction of the shoulder was 40° on average. In the other 3 patients with four different nerves repaired, results were also satisfactory.Conclusions: This technique is promising in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acute crush injury of rabbit sciatic nerve: correlation with histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X. [Dept. of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou (China)], E-mail: xinchunli@163.com; Shen, J.; Chen, J.; Wang, X.; Liu, Q.; Liang, B. [Dept. of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Guangzhou (China)

    2008-06-15

    To investigate the relation between the quantitative assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the correlation with histology and functional recovery by using the rabbit sciatic nerve crush model. In New Zealand, 32 rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups (group A and B); all rabbits underwent crushing injury of their left sciatic nerve. In group A (n = 16), the sciatic nerves were crushed by using microvessel clamps with a strength of 3.61 kg. In group B (n = 16), the sciatic nerves were crushed with a strength of 10.50 kg. Right sciatic nerves were served as controls. Serial MRI of both hind limbs in each rabbit was performed before and at the time point of 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after crushed injury. The MRI protocol included T1-weighted spin-echo (T1WI), 3 dimension turbo spin-echo T2-weighted (3DT2WI), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images with spectral presaturation with inversion recovery (T2WI/SPIR), balanced fast-field echo (B-FFE) and short-time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. The coronal image of the sciatic nerve was obtained. The nerve and muscle signal ratio (SIR) on each sequence was measured. The function recovery was observed and pathological examination was performed at each time point. A signal intensity increase of the distal segment of crushed sciatic nerves was found on 3DT2WI, T2WI/SP1R, B-FFE, and STIR, but not on T,WI images. Of 32 crushed nerves, 30 nerves showed high signal intensity. The correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% with false negative-positive of 6.25%. The SIR of the crushed sciatic nerve at distal portion was higher than those of the control nerves; there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). The SIR of the distal portion of crushed nerves was higher than that of the proximal nerve portion; there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). Whereas, the SIR at proximal nerve portions of crushed nerve was similar to control nerves (P > 0.05). The SIR between group A and group B

  6. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  7. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  8. Chemical shift selective magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve in patients with acute optic neuritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, H.B.W.; Thomsen, C.; Frederiksen, J.; Henriksen, O.; Olesen, J.

    Optic neuritis is often the first manifestion of multiple sclerosis (MS). Sixteen patients with acute optic neuritis and one patient with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging, using a chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence. In 3 of the 16 patients, abnormalities were seen. In one patient with bilateral symptoms, signal hyperintensity and swelling of the right side of the chiasm were found. In another patient the optic nerve was found diffusely enlarged with only a marginally increased signal in the second echo. In the third patient an area of signal hyperintensity and swelling was seen in the left optic nerve. In the patient with BIH the subarachnoid space which surrounds the optic nerves was enlarged. Even using this refined pulse sequence, avoiding the major artefact in imaging the optic nerve, the chemical shift artefact, lesions were only shown in 3/16 (19%) of the patients with optic neuritis. Nevertheless, the presented chemical shift selective double spin echo sequence may be of great value for detection of retrobulbar lesions.

  9. Reactive species and oxidative stress in optic nerve vulnerable to secondary degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Bartlett, Carole A; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Lam, Magdalena; Archer, Michael; Stocker, Roland; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2014-11-01

    Secondary degeneration contributes substantially to structural and functional deficits following traumatic injury to the CNS. While it has been proposed that oxidative stress is a feature of secondary degeneration, contributing reactive species and resultant oxidized products have not been clearly identified in vivo. The study is designed to identify contributors to, and consequences of, oxidative stress in a white matter tract vulnerable to secondary degeneration. Partial dorsal transection of the optic nerve (ON) was used to model secondary degeneration in ventral nerve unaffected by the primary injury. Reactive species were assessed using fluorescent labelling and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectroscopy (LC/MS/MS). Antioxidant enzymes and oxidized products were semi-quantified immunohistochemically. Mitophagy was assessed by electron microscopy. Fluorescent indicators of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species increased at 1, 3 and 7days after injury, in ventral ON. LC/MS/MS confirmed increases in reactive species linked to infiltrating microglia/macrophages in dorsal ON. Similarly, immunoreactivity for glutathione peroxidase and haem oxygenase-1 increased in ventral ON at 3 and 7days after injury, respectively. Despite increased antioxidant immunoreactivity, DNA oxidation was evident from 1day, lipid oxidation at 3days, and protein nitration at 7days after injury. Nitrosative and oxidative damage was particularly evident in CC1-positive oligodendrocytes, at times after injury at which structural abnormalities of the Node of Ranvier/paranode complex have been reported. The incidence of mitochondrial autophagic profiles was also significantly increased from 3days. Despite modest increases in antioxidant enzymes, increased reactive species are accompanied by oxidative and nitrosative damage to DNA, lipid and protein, associated with increasing abnormal mitochondria, which together may contribute to the deficits of secondary degeneration.

  10. Distribution of mesenchymal stem cells and effects on neuronal survival and axon regeneration after optic nerve crush and cell therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Alessandra Mesentier-Louro

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived cells have been used in different animal models of neurological diseases. We investigated the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC injected into the vitreous body in a model of optic nerve injury. Adult (3-5 months old Lister Hooded rats underwent unilateral optic nerve crush followed by injection of MSC or the vehicle into the vitreous body. Before they were injected, MSC were labeled with a fluorescent dye or with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which allowed us to track the cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Sixteen and 28 days after injury, the survival of retinal ganglion cells was evaluated by assessing the number of Tuj1- or Brn3a-positive cells in flat-mounted retinas, and optic nerve regeneration was investigated after anterograde labeling of the optic axons with cholera toxin B conjugated to Alexa 488. Transplanted MSC remained in the vitreous body and were found in the eye for several weeks. Cell therapy significantly increased the number of Tuj1- and Brn3a-positive cells in the retina and the number of axons distal to the crush site at 16 and 28 days after optic nerve crush, although the RGC number decreased over time. MSC therapy was associated with an increase in the FGF-2 expression in the retinal ganglion cells layer, suggesting a beneficial outcome mediated by trophic factors. Interleukin-1β expression was also increased by MSC transplantation. In summary, MSC protected RGC and stimulated axon regeneration after optic nerve crush. The long period when the transplanted cells remained in the eye may account for the effect observed. However, further studies are needed to overcome eventually undesirable consequences of MSC transplantation and to potentiate the beneficial ones in order to sustain the neuroprotective effect overtime.

  11. Early phase tendon transfers in radial and ulnar nerve injuries: internal splinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Markal Ertaş

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Internal splinting is defined as early tendon transfer performed during or just after nerve repair followingnerve injury and is a controversial issue. The objectivesof internal splinting are avoiding the use of long term external splinting, avoiding permanent hand deformities until the injured nerve is reinnervated and supporting sensorial recovery. In this paper we present our clinical cases of internal splinting and discuss the results in terms of indications, timing, advantages, and disadvantages of internal splinting.Materials and Methods: We applied internal splinting in 11 patients, 3 patients with radial nerve injury and 8 patients with ulnar nerve injury. Internal splinting was performed contemporarily with the nerve repair in 5 patients,in 2 weeks following nerve repair in 1 patient and in 4 weeks following nerve repair in 5 patients. Pronator teres was transferred to extensor carpi radialis brevis and flexor carpi radialis was transferred to extensor digitorum communis in radial nerve injuries. Omer’s superficial Y technique and its modification were used for ulnar nerve injuries.Results: Patients were followed up for at least 1 year with physical examination and electroneuromyelography and recovery of sensorial and motor functions were achieved in all of them.Conclusion: We concluded that internal splinting is usefulfor avoiding external splint usage and preventing the establishment of hand deformity until recovery of the nerve. The contribution of internal splinting to sensorial recovery was noteworthy as stated in the literature but the lack of control group and the small number of our cases was limited to come to a definite conclusion. We did not experience any disadvantage of internal splinting.

  12. A Romanian therapeutic approach to peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegrea, I; Chivu, Laura Ioana; Albu, Mădălina Georgiana; Zamfirescu, D; Chivu, R D; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Lascăr, I

    2012-01-01

    The study of nerve regeneration and functional recovery of the injured peripheral nerves represents a worldwide subject of clinical and scientific research. Our team aimed to obtain the first guide for nerve regeneration, bioartificial and biodegradable, using exclusively Romanian resources and having the advantages of price and quality, over the imported nerve conduits already used in clinical practice. First steps of this project consisted in obtaining the prototype of nerve guide conduit and its' testing in vitro and in vivo. Tests of physicochemical characterization, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectrometry, thermal analysis (differential calorimetry, thermo-gravimetry), electron microscopy, water absorption and enzymatic degradation of the obtained prototype were followed by in vivo testing. The first results, obtained on a group of Brown Norway rats who suffered experimental lesions of 1 cm at the level of left sciatic nerve, which have then been repaired using the Romanian conduit prototype, are favorable in terms of biocompatibility, biodegradable capacity and support of nerve regeneration.

  13. Upper and lower extremity nerve injuries in pediatric missile wounds: a selective approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoebner, Andrew A; Sachanandani, Neil S; Borschel, Gregory H

    2011-06-01

    Nerve injuries from missile and gunshot wounds often produce significant disability, and their management is controversial. The role of the surgeon in cases of missile wounds with neurologic deficits is not well defined. Enhancing the trauma team's ability to recognize treatable nerve injuries will lead to improved outcomes. Further, raising awareness of the time-sensitive nature of these injuries will also improve results in these cases. We reviewed a consecutive series of 17 pediatric patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by missile and gunshot wounds in a tertiary care children's hospital. We examined the indications for surgery, presence of associated injuries, mechanisms of injury, demographic characteristics and clinical outcomes. Urban victims were significantly more likely to have been intentionally assaulted than rural or suburban victims and they were also less likely to have completed follow-up care. High-energy weapons were more likely to require surgery compared with low-energy weapons. Patients presenting with tendon injuries were more likely to have a high-grade nerve injury requiring surgery. Patients presenting with tendon lacerations or high-energy mechanisms were significantly more likely to require surgery. Early exploration should be undertaken in cases where transection is likely to have occurred. Early decompression of common entrapment sites distal to repairs or injuries should be performed. Because follow-up is poor in this population, treatment should be prompt and thorough.

  14. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injury after Mandibular Third Molar Extraction: a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Sarikov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to systematically review the comprehensive overview of literature data about injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction to discover the prevalence of injury, the risk factors, recovery rates, and alternative methods of treatment. Material and Methods: Literature was selected through a search of PubMed electronic databases. Articles from January 2009 to June 2014 were searched. English language articles with a minimum of 6 months patient follow-up and injury analysis by patient’s reporting, radiographic, and neurosensory testing were selected. Results: In total, 84 literature sources were reviewed, and 14 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. Articles were analyzed on men and women. The influence of lower third molar extraction (especially impacted on the inferior alveolar nerve was clearly seen. Conclusions: The incidence of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve after lower third molar extraction was about 0.35 - 8.4%. The injury of the inferior alveolar nerve can be predicted by various radiological signs. There are few risk factors that may increase the risk of injury to the nerve such as patients over the age of 24 years old, with horizontal impactions, and extraction by trainee surgeons. Recovery is preferable and permanent injury is very rare.

  15. Electrical nerve stimulation to promote micturition in spinal cord injury patients: A review of current attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian; Chew, Daniel J; Biers, Suzanne; Thiruchelvam, Nikesh

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we focus on the current attempts of electrical nerve stimulation for micturition in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. A literature search was performed through PubMed using "spinal cord injury," "electrical nerve stimulation AND bladder," "sacral anterior root stimulation/stimulator" and "Brindley stimulator" from January 1975 to January 2014. Twenty studies were selected for this review. Electrical nerve stimulation is a clinical option for promoting micturition in SCI patients. Well-designed, randomized and controlled studies are essential for further investigation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Optic nerve atrophy and retinal nerve fibre layer thinning following optic neuritis: evidence that axonal loss is a substrate of MRI-detected atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, S Anand; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Jones, Stephen J; Li, Wai-Yung; Garway-Heath, David F; Thompson, Alan J; Plant, Gordon T; Miller, David H

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of brain atrophy are often considered to be a marker of axonal loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) but evidence is limited. Optic neuritis is a common manifestation of MS and results in optic nerve atrophy. Retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) imaging is a non-invasive way of detecting axonal loss following optic neuritis. We hypothesise that if the optic nerve atrophy that develops following optic neuritis is contributed to by axonal loss, it will correlate with thinning of the RNFL. Twenty-five patients were studied at least 1 year after a single unilateral attack of optic neuritis without recurrence, with a selection bias towards incomplete recovery. They had MR quantification of optic nerve cross-sectional area and optic nerve lesion length, as well as optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement of mean RNFL thickness and macular volume, quantitative visual testing, and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Fifteen controls were also studied. Significant optic nerve atrophy (mean decrease 30% versus controls), RNFL thinning (mean decrease 33% versus controls), and macular volume loss occurred in patients' affected eyes when compared with patients' unaffected eyes and healthy controls. The optic nerve atrophy was correlated with the RNFL thinning, macular volume loss, visual acuity, visual field mean deviation, and whole field VEP amplitude but not latency. These findings suggest that axonal loss contributes to optic nerve atrophy following a single attack of optic neuritis. By inference, axonal loss due to other post-inflammatory brain lesions is likely to contribute to the global MRI measure of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

  17. Effect of nerve growth factor on changes of myelin basic protein and functional repair of peripheral nerve following sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵阳; 马海涵; 伍亚民; 陈恒胜; 曾琳; 李民; 龙在云; 李应玉; 杨恒文

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of nerve growth factor ( NGF ) on changes of myelin basic protein (MBP) and functional repair of sensory and motor nerve following sciatic nerve injury. Methods: The sciatic nerves of rats were injured by sectioning with shaver, and divided into 3 groups: NGF group ( Group A ), group of normal saline solution ( Group B), untreated group (Group C). The time point of observation was at the 4th week after operation. Sensory evoked potential (SEP) and motor evoked potential (MEP) were detected by Model WD-4000 nerve potential working diagnosis system. Immunohistochemical analysis was used for identification of MBP. Results: The latency of SEP in the Group A at the 4th week after operation was shorter than that in the Group B ( P < 0.05). The MEP was elicited in 76 % of the Group A and was higher than that in the Group B. Results of immunohistochemistry showed that there were less MBP-positive cells in the Group A than in the Group B in one and four weeks respectively. Conclusions: NGF can improve the conductive function of injured peripheral nerve and facilitate regeneration of nerve.

  18. Pattern of Mas expression in acute and post-acute stage of nerve injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, Alex Dias; de Assis Araújo, Fernanda; Dos Santos, Robson Augusto Souza; Andrade, Silvia Passos; Zanon, Renata Graciele

    2017-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang [1-7]) and its receptor Mas are involved in a number of physiological processes, including control of arterial pressure and modulation of nervous system actions. However, the involvement of the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis in peripheral nerve injury has not been investigated. Using a model of sciatic nerve injury in mice, we demonstrated opposing changes in Mas receptor expression at days 2 and 14 post-injury. Mas receptor expression was more intense 2days after the nerve lesion, compared with the intensity of the intact nerve. At this time point, the sciatic nerve functional index was -20. At day 14 after the lesion, the intensity of the immunostaining labeling in longitudinal sections of the nerve was reduced (∼30%) and the functional index increased +36 (gait improvement). In the axotomized group treated with A779 (a Mas receptor antagonist), the functional recovery index decreased in relation to the untreated axotomized group. The Mas receptor inhibitor also altered the intensity of labeling of S-100, GAP43, and IBA-1 (morphological features compatible with delayed axon growth). This study demonstrated that Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis activity was differentially modulated in the acute and post-acute stages of nerve injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental study on the effect of electrostimulation on neural regeneration after oculomotor nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ningxi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Zhen; Meng, Youqiang; Feng, Baohui; Wang, Xuhui; Yang, Min; Wan, Liang; Ning, Bo; Li, Shiting

    2014-12-01

    The oculomotor nerve can regenerate anatomically and histologically after injury; however, the degree of functional recovery of extraocular muscles and the pupil sphincter muscle was not satisfactory. Electrostimulation was one potential intervention that was increasingly being studied for use in nerve injury settings. However, the effect of electrostimulation on regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve was still obscure. In this study, we studied the effects of electrostimulation on neural regeneration in terms of neurofunction, myoelectrophysiology, neuroanatomy, and neurohistology after oculomotor nerve injury and found that electrostimulation on the injured oculomotor nerve enhanced the speed and final level of its functional and electrophysiological recovery, promoted neural regeneration, and enhanced the selectivity and specificity of reinnervation of the regenerated neuron, the conformity among the electrophysiological and functional recovery of extraocular muscles, and neural regeneration, and that the function of extraocular muscles recovered slower than electrophysiology. Thus, we speculated that electrostimulation on the injured oculomotor nerve produced a marked effect on all phases of neural regeneration including neuronal survival, sprout formation, axonal elongation, target reconnection, and synaptogenesis. We think that neural electrostimulation can be used in oculomotor nerve injury.

  20. Combined radial and median nerve injury in diaphyseal fracture of humerus: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh Rohilla; Rohit Singla; Narender Kumar Magu; Roop Singh; Ashish Devgun; Reetadyuti Mukhopadhyay; Paritosh Gogna

    2013-01-01

    Radial nerve palsy is the most common neurological involvement in humeral shaft fractures.But combined radial and median nerve injury in a closed diaphyseal fracture of the humerus is rare.Combined injury to both radial and median nerve can cause significant disability.A detailed clinical examination is therefore necessary following humeral shaft fractures.We report a patient with closed diaphyseal humeral fracture (AO 12A-2.3) together with radial and median nerve palsy,its management and review of the literature.As the patient had two nerves involved,surgical exploration was planned.Fracture was reduced and fixed with a 4.5 mm narrow dynamic compression pla te.There was no external injury to both radial and median nerves on surgical exploration.Neurological recovery started at 3 weeks' follow-up.Complete recovery was seen at 12 weeks.Careful clinical examination is of the utmost importance in early diagnosis of combined nerve injuries,which allows better management and rehabilitation of the patient.

  1. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Gan; Minquan Qian; Keqin Shi; Gang Chen; Yanglin Gu; Wei Du; Guoxing Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administra-tion of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin signiifcantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve ifbers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Further-more, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4–6 dorsal root ganglia. Our ifndings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes.

  2. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yanglin; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-11-15

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphological examination, and quantitative real-time PCR showed that mecobalamin significantly improved functional recovery of the sciatic nerve, thickened the myelin sheath in myelinated nerve fibers, and increased the cross-sectional area of target muscle cells. Furthermore, mecobalamin upregulated mRNA expression of growth associated protein 43 in nerve tissue ipsilateral to the injury, and of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor, brain-derived nerve growth factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor) in the L4-6 dorsal root ganglia. Our findings indicate that the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of mecobalamin after sciatic nerve injury involves the upregulation of multiple neurotrophic factor genes.

  3. Substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in dorsal root ganglia in sciatic nerve injury rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changma Fu; Zongsheng Yin; Defu Yu; Zuhua Yang

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, have been shown to be involved in pain transmission and repair of sciatic nerve injury. A model of sciatic nerve defect was prepared by dissecting the sciatic nerve at the middle, left femur in female Sprague Dawley rats. The two ends of the nerve were encased in a silica gel tube. L5 dorsal root ganglia were harvested 7, 14 and 28 days post sciatic nerve injury for immunohistochemical staining. Results showed that substance P and cal-citonin gene-related peptide expression increased significantly in dorsal root ganglion of rats with sci-atic nerve injury. This increase peaked at 7 days, declined at 14 days, and reduced to normal levels by 28 days post injury. The findings indicate that the neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, mainly increased in the early stages after sciatic nerve injury.

  4. Iatrogenic injury to oral branches of the trigeminal nerve: records of 449 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, Søren

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were threefold: (1) to describe iatrogenic lesions to oral branches of the trigeminal nerve, signs and symptoms, and functional status, (2) to report on a simple neurosensory examination method, and (3) to discuss means of prevention of iatrogenic injury. The etiology...... and functional status of 449 injuries to oral branches collected over 18 years were retrospectively reviewed. A simple scheme of a clinical neurosensory examination was applied to enable a quantified rating of the perception. Injury to the lingual nerve (n = 261) is not only the most prevalent type of lesion...... was affected more frequently and severely than other oral branches of the trigeminal nerve. The female gender was overrepresented in incidence of injured nerves but no difference was found in the severity of affection between females and males. All grades of loss of neurosensory functions were found...

  5. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicta E. Beck-Broichsitter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P<0.0001 was significantly superior in the babysitter group compared to the control group at the end of the study. The histological evaluation revealed a significantly higher diameter of axons (P=0.0194, nerve fiber (P=0.0409, and nerve surface (P=0.0184 in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle’s weight and vitality.

  6. Free Functioning Gracilis Muscle Transfer versus Intercostal Nerve Transfer to Musculocutaneous Nerve for Restoration of Elbow Flexion after Traumatic Adult Brachial Pan-Plexus Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    After complete five-level root brachial plexus injury, free functional muscle transfer and intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve are two potential reconstructive options for elbow flexion. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of free functional muscle transfer versus intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfers with respect to strength. Sixty-two patients who underwent free functional muscle transfer reconstruction or intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion following a pan-plexus injury were included. The two groups were compared with respect to postoperative elbow flexion strength according to the British Medical Research Council grading system; preoperative and postoperative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores. In the free functional muscle transfer group, 67.7 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. In the intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer group, 41.9 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. The difference was statistically significant (p intercostal nerves used for the musculocutaneous nerve transfer did not correlate with better elbow flexion grade. Based on this study, gracilis free functional muscle transfer reconstruction achieves better elbow flexion strength than intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion after pan-plexus injury. The role of gracilis free functional muscle transfer should be carefully considered in acute reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  7. Treatment and Follow Up Outcomes of Patients with Peroneal Nerve Injury: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Dagistan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Trap neuropathy is characterized by compression of the peripheral nerve into fibro osseous channels in trespassing areas of body segments. Peroneal nerve is the most frequently injured nerve in traumatic injuries of the lower extremities. In the present study, we investigated functional results of surgical treatment of patients with peroneal nerve injury who delayed visiting our clinics after the damage; we also aimed to observe the effects of this delay on prognosis. We interpreted postoperative results of the patients with EMG and physical examination findings. Material and Method: Subjects with peroneal nerve damage who visited our clinics between 2012 and 2015 were included in the present study. EMG and muscle motor strength tests were conducted pre and postoperatively for clinical assessment. Results: Of the 16 patients in the study population, 7 were men and 9 were women. The median age of the subjects was 49.6 years (14-77 years. Admission time was 9 months after injury. Causes of the peroneal nerve damage were as follows: prosthesis surgery in 4 (25%, ankle damage in 2 (12.5%, excessive squatting by agriculture workers in 4 (25%, aggressive exercise in 2 (12.5%, bone fracture in 2 (12.5%, and unknown origin in 2 (12.5%. Discussion: Peroneal nerve injury usually occurs by compression of the nerve at the head or neck of the fibula. Results of decompression surgery are usually compromising in non-traumatic nerve palsies. Period of duration between injury and diagnosis and muscular atrophy are main factors associated with success of treatment.

  8. Cold-induced vasodilatation in cold-intolerant rats after nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.S.; Duraku, L.S.; Niehof, S.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Hovius, S.E.R.; Selles, R.W.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose: Cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) is a cyclic regulation of blood flow during prolonged cooling of protruding body parts. It is generally considered to be a protective mechanism against local cold injuries and cold intolerance after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study

  9. Intracranial Pressure Influences the Behavior of the Optic Nerve Head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yi; Tong, Junfei; Ghate, Deepta; Kedar, Sachin; Gu, Linxia

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the biomechanical responses of the optic nerve head (ONH) to acute elevations in intracranial pressure (ICP) were systematically investigated through numerical modeling. An orthogonal experimental design was developed to quantify the influence of ten input factors that govern the anatomy and material properties of the ONH on the peak maximum principal strain (MPS) in the lamina cribrosa (LC) and postlaminar neural tissue (PLNT). Results showed that the sensitivity of ONH responses to various input factors was region-specific. In the LC, the peak MPS was most strongly dependent on the sclera thickness, LC modulus, and scleral canal size, whereas in the PLNT, the peak MPS was more sensitive to the scleral canal size, neural tissue modulus, and pia mater modulus. The enforcement of clinically relevant ICP in the retro-orbital subarachnoid space influenced the sensitivity analysis. It also induced much larger strains in the PLNT than in the LC. Moreover, acute elevation of ICP leads to dramatic strain distribution changes in the PLNT, but had minimal impact on the LC. This work could help to better understand patient-specific responses, to provide guidance on biomechanical factors resulting in optic nerve diseases, such as glaucoma, papilledema, and ischemic optic neuropathy, and to illuminate the possibilities for exploiting their potential to treat and prevent ONH diseases.

  10. Hypothalamic dysfunction without hamartomas causing gelastic seizures in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Simon, Carrie Zaslow; Saper, Clifford

    2015-02-01

    This report describes gelastic seizures in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia and hypothalamic dysfunction without hypothalamic hamartoma. All participants (n = 4) from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles presenting with gelastic seizures were included. The clinical and pathology characteristics include hypothalamic dysgenesis and dysfunction, but no hamartomas. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells in a polycaprolactone conduit promote sciatic nerve regeneration and sensory neuron survival after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattini, Flávia; Lopes, Fatima Rosalina Pereira; Almeida, Fernanda Martins; Rodrigues, Rafaela Fintelman; Boldrini, Leonardo Cunha; Tomaz, Marcelo A; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes; Melo, Paulo A; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2012-10-01

    Despite the fact that the peripheral nervous system is able to regenerate after traumatic injury, the functional outcomes following damage are limited and poor. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that have been used in studies of peripheral nerve regeneration and have yielded promising results. The aim of this study was to evaluate sciatic nerve regeneration and neuronal survival in mice after nerve transection followed by MSC treatment into a polycaprolactone (PCL) nerve guide. The left sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 mice was transected and the nerve stumps were placed into a biodegradable PCL tube leaving a 3-mm gap between them; the tube was filled with MSCs obtained from GFP+ animals (MSC-treated group) or with a culture medium (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium group). Motor function was analyzed according to the sciatic functional index (SFI). After 6 weeks, animals were euthanized, and the regenerated sciatic nerve, the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), the spinal cord, and the gastrocnemius muscle were collected and processed for light and electron microscopy. A quantitative analysis of regenerated nerves showed a significant increase in the number of myelinated fibers in the group that received, within the nerve guide, stem cells. The number of neurons in the DRG was significantly higher in the MSC-treated group, while there was no difference in the number of motor neurons in the spinal cord. We also found higher values of trophic factors expression in MSC-treated groups, especially a nerve growth factor. The SFI revealed a significant improvement in the MSC-treated group. The gastrocnemius muscle showed an increase in weight and in the levels of creatine phosphokinase enzyme, suggesting an improvement of reinnervation and activity in animals that received MSCs. Immunohistochemistry documented that some GFP+ -transplanted cells assumed a Schwann-cell-like phenotype, as evidenced by their expression of the S-100 protein, a Schwann cell

  12. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun Zhao; Zhi-yue Li; Ze-peng Zhang; Zhou-yun Mo; Shi-jie Chen; Si-yu Xiang; Qing-shan Zhang; Min Xue

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neuro-trophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site;their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the micro-spheres at 300-µm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implanta-tion, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve ifbers were observed and dis-tributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  13. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  14. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  15. Technologies for repairing peripheral nerve injury Progress in domestic and foreign investigations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies on the repair of peripheral nerve injury have achieved great progresses in recent years.Clinical nerve repair prefers microsurgery, while fundamental researches focus on tissue engineering and gene therapy. Recently, microencapsulation technique rises up as a new treatment therapy. This article mainly summarized the repairing techniques referred above, in order to make the basis for further research.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about injury and repair of peripheral nerve published in English between January 1997 and May 2007 using the key words of "peripheral nerve, injury, repair". At the same time, Chinese relative articles were searched in China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) using the same key words in Chinese.STUDY SELECTION: The data were primarily checked, and the references after each literature were looked up, and the articles focused on the injury and repair of peripheral nerve were selected. Those published in kola-magazine in recent 5 years were in priority for the articles with similar contents. Repetitive studies or Meta analysis were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 144 articles were collected, and 30 literatures were selected as most relative reference literatures, and the other 114 articles were excluded due to old or repeated researches. Among the 30 selected articles, 6 focused on the surgical treatment for peripheral nerve injury, 10 on tissue engineering and Schwann cell, 3 on microencapsulation technology, 5 on gene therapy, 2 on immunosuppresant and 4 on neurotrophic factors.DATA SYNTHESIS: The technologies for repairing peripheral nerve injury are developing with time, also have been successfully combined with tissue engineering and gene therapy techniques which are advanced nowadays. As the researches go further, immunodepression factors have attracted more and more attentions,microencapsulation technology and gene therapy repair also go

  16. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  17. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  18. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A.; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo H.; Silva-Junior, Almir J.; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M.; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized. PMID:26649049

  19. Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for a patient with chronic sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang F

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Feng Zhang,1,2 Xiangzhi Meng,2 Fang Lu,2 Aixian Liu,2 Hongyun Huang1,2 1Cell Therapy Center, Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 2Neurorehabilitation Center, Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To observe the result of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC transplantation in a patient with chronic sciatic nerve injury. Case report: A 53-year-old male patient with chronic (1 year sciatic nerve injury on left side received OEC transplantation at the lesion site. He received follow-up assessment according to the American Spinal Injury Association standard at 10 days, 6 months, and 1 year after OEC therapy. The muscle strength of his left lower limb increased and numbness decreased during the early stage of cell therapy. His motor function improved with each evaluation. His limp walking gait recovered, and numbness sensation got nearly normal after 1 year of follow-up. There were no side effects. Conclusion: OEC transplantation may be an option for chronic peripheral (sciatic nerve injury. Keywords: olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation, sciatic nerve injury, peripheral nerve injury, function improvement, neurorestoration

  20. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  1. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size.

  2. ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF OPTIC NERVE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Saakyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive examination was made in 93 patients, including 18 children, with tumors of the optic nerve (ON. Duplex ultrasound scanning was performed in 39 patients, of them there were 11 patients with ON gliomas and 28 with ON meningiomas. The specific computed tomographic and echographic signs of ON glioma and meningiomas were detected. The studies have shown that duplex ultrasound scanning and structural computed tomography of orbital sockets are highly informative complementary imaging procedures for ON tumors, which permits one to make their correct diagnosis, to specify surgical volume, and to plan adequate treatment.

  3. The emergence of adolescent onset pain hypersensitivity following neonatal nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega-Avelaira David

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injuries can trigger neuropathic pain in adults but cause little or no pain when they are sustained in infancy or early childhood. This is confirmed in rodent models where neonatal nerve injury causes no pain behaviour. However, delayed pain can arise in man some considerable time after nerve damage and to examine this following early life nerve injury we have carried out a longer term follow up of rat pain behaviour into adolescence and adulthood. Results Spared nerve injury (SNI or sham surgery was performed on 10 day old (P10 rat pups and mechanical nociceptive reflex thresholds were analysed 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 38 and 44 days post surgery. While mechanical thresholds on the ipsilateral side are not significantly different from controls for the first 2–3 weeks post P10 surgery, after that time period, beginning at 21 days post surgery (P31, the SNI group developed following early life nerve injury significant hypersensitivity compared to the other groups. Ipsilateral mechanical nociceptive threshold was 2-fold below that of the contralateral and sham thresholds at 21 days post surgery (SNI-ipsilateral 28 (±5 g control groups 69 (±9 g, p Conclusions We report a novel consequence of early life nerve injury whereby mechanical hypersensitivity only emerges later in life. This delayed adolescent onset in mechanical pain thresholds is accompanied by neuroimmune activation and NMDA dependent central sensitization of spinal nociceptive circuits. This delayed onset in mechanical pain sensitivity may provide clues to understand the long term effects of early injury such as late onset phantom pain and the emergence of complex adolescent chronic pain syndromes.

  4. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is associated with lesion length in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, K; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Sander, B

    2010-01-01

    included 41 patients with unilateral optic neuritis and 19 healthy volunteers. All patients were evaluated and examined within 28 days of onset of symptoms. The peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), an objective quantitative measure of optic nerve head edema, was measured by optical...... coherence tomography and the length and location of the inflammatory optic nerve lesion were evaluated using MRI. RESULTS: Ophthalmoscopically, 34% of the patients had papillitis. The retinal nerve fiber layer in affected eyes (mean 123.1 microm) was higher during the acute phase than that of fellow eyes...... (mean 98.1 microm, p eyes (mean 97.1 microm, p

  5. Unexpected Effect of Calcium Channel Blockers on the Optic Nerve Compartment Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczka, K; Todorova, M G; Bojinova, R I; Binggeli, T; Chackathayil, T N; Flammer, J

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve compartment syndrome is a pathological condition in which cerebrospinal fluid of the subarachnoid space surrounding the optic nerve is partly or totally segregated from the cerebrospinal fluid of the intracranial subarachnoid space, leading - inter alia - to an increase in the diameter of the optic nerve sheath. The pathogenesis of this condition remains unclear. We have observed clinically that optic nerve compartment syndrome often occurs in normal tension glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome. To treat Flammer syndrome, some glaucoma patients received a low dose of a calcium channel blocker and we analysed whether this treatment also had an effect on the optic nerve compartment syndrome. We retrospectively analysed the data of 10 eyes of seven patients suffering from a combination of primary open angle glaucoma, optic nerve compartment syndrome, and Flammer syndrome. We included subjects who had eye socket echography before and after a few months of therapy with a calcium channel blocker. All patients received a low dose of a calcium channel blocker (nifedipine or amlodipine) to treat Flammer syndrome. As expected, the symptoms of Flammer syndrome were mitigated. To our surprise, the optic nerve compartment syndrome also improved in eight of the 10 eyes (80 %), but remained unchanged in the remainder. To some extent, the optic nerve compartment syndrome is related to the combination of primary open angle glaucoma and Flammer syndrome. On the basis of our results, we hypothesise that treatment of Flammer syndrome may also improve the optic nerve compartment syndrome. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  7. L-carnitine alleviates sciatic nerve crush injury in rats:functional and electron microscopy assessments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ümmü Zeynep Avsar; Umit Avsar; Ali Aydin; Muhammed Yayla; Berna Ozturkkaragoz; Harun Un; Murat Saritemur; Tolga Mercantepe

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. It is hypothesized that L-carnitine exhibits neuro-protective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats. Rat sciatic nerve was crush injured by a forceps and exhibited degenerative changes. After intragastric administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg L-carnitine for 30 days, axon area, myelin sheath area, axon diameter, myelin sheath diameter, and numerical density of the myelinated axons of injured sciatic nerve were similar to normal, and the function of injured sciatic nerve also improved signiifcantly. These ifndings suggest that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on sciatic nerve crush injury in rats.

  8. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is associated with lesion length in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, K; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Sander, B;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute optic neuritis occurs with and without papillitis. The presence of papillitis has previously been thought to imply an anterior location of the neuritis, but imaging studies seeking to test this hypothesis have been inconclusive. METHODS: This prospective observational cohort study...... included 41 patients with unilateral optic neuritis and 19 healthy volunteers. All patients were evaluated and examined within 28 days of onset of symptoms. The peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT), an objective quantitative measure of optic nerve head edema, was measured by optical...... in the development of optic nerve head edema in optic neuritis....

  9. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrilla, Marta; León-Lobera, Fernando; Lillo, Concepción; Arévalo, Rosario; Aijón, José; Lara, Juan Manuel; Velasco, Almudena

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP), as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes. PMID:27149509

  10. Sox10 Expression in Goldfish Retina and Optic Nerve Head in Controls and after the Application of Two Different Lesion Paradigms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Parrilla

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system (CNS is unable to regenerate. In contrast, the CNS of fish, including the visual system, is able to regenerate after damage. Moreover, the fish visual system grows continuously throughout the life of the animal, and it is therefore an excellent model to analyze processes of myelination and re-myelination after an injury. Here we analyze Sox10+ oligodendrocytes in the goldfish retina and optic nerve in controls and after two kinds of injuries: cryolesion of the peripheral growing zone and crushing of the optic nerve. We also analyze changes in a major component of myelin, myelin basic protein (MBP, as a marker for myelinated axons. Our results show that Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are located in the retinal nerve fiber layer and along the whole length of the optic nerve. MBP was found to occupy a similar location, although its loose appearance in the retina differed from the highly organized MBP+ axon bundles in the optic nerve. After optic nerve crushing, the number of Sox10+ cells decreased in the crushed area and in the optic nerve head. Consistent with this, myelination was highly reduced in both areas. In contrast, after cryolesion we did not find changes in the Sox10+ population, although we did detect some MBP- degenerating areas. We show that these modifications in Sox10+ oligodendrocytes are consistent with their role in oligodendrocyte identity, maintenance and survival, and we propose the optic nerve head as an excellent area for research aimed at better understanding of de- and remyelination processes.

  11. Spared nerve injury rats exhibit thermal hyperalgesia on an automated operant dynamic thermal escape Task

    OpenAIRE

    Chialvo Dante R; Calvo Oscar; Baliki Marwan; Apkarian A Vania

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Well-established methods are available to measure thermal and mechanical sensitivity in awake behaving rats. However, they require experimenter manipulations and tend to emphasize reflexive behaviors. Here we introduce a new behavioral test, with which we examine thermal sensitivity of rats with neuropathic injury. We contrast thermal hyperalgesia between spared nerve injury and chronic constriction injury rats. This device is a fully automated thermal sensitivity assessment tool des...

  12. Comparative study of phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Global brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) are devastating events frequently resulting in severe functional impairment. The widely used nerve transfer sources for elbow flexion in patients with global BPIs include intercostal and phrenic nerves. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global BPI. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion BPI was carried out. In the phrenic nerve transfer group, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the anterolateral bundle of the anterior division of the upper trunk (23 patients); in the intercostal nerve transfer group, three intercostal nerves were coapted to the anterolateral bundles of the musculocutaneous nerve. The British Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system, angle of elbow flexion, and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the recovery of elbow flexion at least 3 years postoperatively. The efficiency of motor function in the phrenic nerve transfer group was 83%, while it was 70% in the intercostal nerve transfer group. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of the MRC grade (p=0.646) and EMG results (p=0.646). The outstanding rates of angle of elbow flexion were 48% and 40% in the phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer groups, respectively. There was no significant difference of outstanding rates in the angle of elbow flexion between the two groups. Phrenic nerve transfer had a higher proportion of good prognosis for elbow flexion than intercostal nerve transfer, but the effective and outstanding rate had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation between the two groups according to MRC grading, angle of elbow flexion, and EMG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Parallel changes in structural and functional measures of optic nerve myelination after optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke van der Walt

    Full Text Available Visual evoked potential (VEP latency prolongation and optic nerve lesion length after acute optic neuritis (ON corresponds to the degree of demyelination, while subsequent recovery of latency may represent optic nerve remyelination. We aimed to investigate the relationship between multifocal VEP (mfVEP latency and optic nerve lesion length after acute ON.Thirty acute ON patients were studied at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months using mfVEP and at 1 and 12 months with optic nerve MRI. LogMAR and low contrast visual acuity were documented. By one month, the mfVEP amplitude had recovered sufficiently for latency to be measured in 23 (76.7% patients with seven patients having no recordable mfVEP in more than 66% of segments in at least one test. Only data from these 23 patients was analysed further.Both latency and lesion length showed significant recovery during the follow-up period. Lesion length and mfVEP latency were highly correlated at 1 (r = 0.94, p = <0.0001 and 12 months (r = 0.75, p < 0.001. Both measures demonstrated a similar trend of recovery. Speed of latency recovery was faster in the early follow-up period while lesion length shortening remained relatively constant. At 1 month, latency delay was worse by 1.76 ms for additional 1mm of lesion length while at 12 months, 1mm of lesion length accounted for 1.94 ms of latency delay.A strong association between two putative measures of demyelination in early and chronic ON was found. Parallel recovery of both measures could reflect optic nerve remyelination.

  14. Parallel changes in structural and functional measures of optic nerve myelination after optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Walt, Anneke; Kolbe, Scott; Mitchell, Peter; Wang, Yejun; Butzkueven, Helmut; Egan, Gary; Yiannikas, Con; Graham, Stuart; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Klistorner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) latency prolongation and optic nerve lesion length after acute optic neuritis (ON) corresponds to the degree of demyelination, while subsequent recovery of latency may represent optic nerve remyelination. We aimed to investigate the relationship between multifocal VEP (mfVEP) latency and optic nerve lesion length after acute ON. Thirty acute ON patients were studied at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months using mfVEP and at 1 and 12 months with optic nerve MRI. LogMAR and low contrast visual acuity were documented. By one month, the mfVEP amplitude had recovered sufficiently for latency to be measured in 23 (76.7%) patients with seven patients having no recordable mfVEP in more than 66% of segments in at least one test. Only data from these 23 patients was analysed further. Both latency and lesion length showed significant recovery during the follow-up period. Lesion length and mfVEP latency were highly correlated at 1 (r = 0.94, p = <0.0001) and 12 months (r = 0.75, p < 0.001). Both measures demonstrated a similar trend of recovery. Speed of latency recovery was faster in the early follow-up period while lesion length shortening remained relatively constant. At 1 month, latency delay was worse by 1.76 ms for additional 1mm of lesion length while at 12 months, 1mm of lesion length accounted for 1.94 ms of latency delay. A strong association between two putative measures of demyelination in early and chronic ON was found. Parallel recovery of both measures could reflect optic nerve remyelination.

  15. Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Update and Preliminary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K; Davidge, Kristen M; Novak, Christine B; Hoben, Gwendolyn; Kahn, Lorna C; Juknis, Neringa; Ruvinskaya, Rimma; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can result in profound loss of upper extremity function. Recent interest in the use of nerve transfers to restore volitional control is an exciting development in the care of these complex patients. In this article, the authors review preliminary results of nerve transfers in spinal cord injury. Review of the literature and the authors' cases series of 13 operations in nine spinal cord injury nerve transfer recipients was performed. Representative cases were reviewed to explore critical concepts and preliminary outcomes. The nerve transfers used expendable donors (e.g., teres minor, deltoid, supinator, and brachialis) innervated above the level of the spinal cord injury to restore volitional control of missing function such as elbow extension, wrist extension, and/or hand function (posterior interosseous nerve or anterior interosseous nerve/finger flexors reinnervated). Results from the literature and the authors' patients (after a mean postsurgical follow-up of 12 months) indicate gains in function as assessed by both manual muscle testing and patients' self-reported outcomes measures. Nerve transfers can provide an alternative and consistent means of reestablishing volitional control of upper extremity function in people with cervical level spinal cord injury. Early outcomes provide evidence of substantial improvements in self-reported function despite relatively subtle objective gains in isolated muscle strength. Further work to investigate the optimal timing and combination of nerve transfer operations, the combination of these with traditional treatments (tendon transfer and functional electrical stimulation), and measurement of outcomes is imperative for determining the precise role of these operations. Therapeutic, IV.

  16. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  17. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  18. Treatment of transected peripheral nerves with artemin improved motor neuron regeneration, but did not reduce nerve injury-induced pain behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widenfalk, Johan; Wu, Weiping; Hao, Jingxia; Person, Jonas K E; Wiesenfeldt-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Risling, Mårten

    2009-01-01

    Incomplete recovery of function and neuropathic pain are common problems after peripheral nerve injury. To develop new treatment strategies for peripheral nerve injuries we investigated whether the neurotrophic factor artemin could improve outcome after sciatic nerve injuries in rats. Artemin is a member of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family and exerts neuroprotective effects on sensory neurons as well as influencing behavioural thermal sensitivity. We additionally evaluated if fibrin sealant, which is sometimes used as a nerve glue, had any effects on neuropathic pain-related behaviour. After the sciatic nerve had been transected, 30 animals were randomised to one of three groups: treatment with a fibrin sealant that contained artemin in conjunction with sutures; fibrin sealant with no artemin (sham) in conjunction with sutures; or sutures alone (n=10 in each group). Motor function, sensory function, and autotomy were evaluated from 1 to 12 weeks after injury. Retrograde flourogold tracing 12 weeks after injury showed that the addition of artemin increased the number of regenerating motor neurons. However, it did not improve their performance, as measured by the Sciatic Function Index, compared with sham or suture alone. Animals treated with artemin had a non-significant increase in motor nerve conduction velocity compared with sham. However, artemin did not reverse nerve injury-induced pain behaviour such as cold or heat hypersensitivity. Fibrin sealant in itself did not ameliorate motor performance, or regeneration of motor neurons, or give rise to nerve injury-induced pain behaviour. The results indicate that artemin is of value as a treatment for peripheral nerve injuries, although the effects were limited. As the artemin high-affinity receptor GFRalpha-3 is present in Schwann cells and not in motor neurons, the effect on motor neuron axon regeneration may result from an indirect effect through Schwann cells in the injured nerve.

  19. [Optic nerve pits: clinical and therapeutic review of 21 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro, M; Bonnet, M

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study of optic nerve pits in patients referred to our clinic during the last 15 years was conducted. The study included 21 eyes in 19 patients. The optic pit was associated with a serous macular detachment (SMD) in 19 eyes (90%). Various treatments of the SMD were used depending on the time period. Systemic corticosteroids were used in five patients. The SMD did not respond to this treatment. Argon laser photocoagulation was applied to the temporal side of the optic disc in five patients. Intravitreal injection of pure gas was used as an adjunct to photocoagulation treatment in eleven eyes. Pure SF 6 was used in 8 eyes, and C 3 F 8 in 3 eyes. The follow-up after treatment was over 6 months in 10 patients who underwent photocoagulation or the combination of photocoagulation and gas injection. The SMD remained unchanged in two eyes which underwent photocoagulation treatment without gas injection. In the group of patients treated by photocoagulation in association with SF 6 injection, the SMD totally reattached in one eye, decreased in 2 eyes and remained unchanged in 2 eyes. Total resorption of subretinal fluid and permanent retinal reattachment occurred in the 3 eyes treated by intravitreal injection of pure C 3 F 8 as an adjunct to photocoagulation treatment. Further clinical investigations on large series of patients are required to determine whether prolonged retinal tamponade by C 3 F 8 gas in association with photocoagulation treatment is a valuable method in the management of SMD complicating optic nerve pits.

  20. Localized and Sustained Delivery of Erythropoietin from PLGA Microspheres Promotes Functional Recovery and Nerve Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays showed that the EPO-PLGA microspheres allowed sustained release of EPO within a period of two weeks. After administration of such EPO-PLGA microspheres, the peripheral nerve injured rats had significantly better recovery compared with those which received daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO, empty PLGA microspheres, or saline treatments. This was supported by the functional, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations of the recovery done at week 8 postoperatively. We conclude that sustained delivery of EPO could be achieved by using EPO-PLGA microspheres, and such delivery method could further enhance the recovery function of EPO in nerve injury recovery.

  1. Localized and sustained delivery of erythropoietin from PLGA microspheres promotes functional recovery and nerve regeneration in peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Jianheng; Zhang, Licheng; Long, Anhua; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) has been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects on peripheral nerve injury recovery. Though daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO during a long period of time was effective, it was a tedious procedure. In addition, only limited amount of EPO could reach the injury sites by general administration, and free EPO is easily degraded in vivo. In this study, we encapsulated EPO in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres. Both in vitro and in vivo release assays showed that the EPO-PLGA microspheres allowed sustained release of EPO within a period of two weeks. After administration of such EPO-PLGA microspheres, the peripheral nerve injured rats had significantly better recovery compared with those which received daily intraperitoneal injection of EPO, empty PLGA microspheres, or saline treatments. This was supported by the functional, electrophysiological, and histological evaluations of the recovery done at week 8 postoperatively. We conclude that sustained delivery of EPO could be achieved by using EPO-PLGA microspheres, and such delivery method could further enhance the recovery function of EPO in nerve injury recovery.

  2. Tissue plasminogen activator-mediated fibrinolysis protects against axonal degeneration and demyelination after sciatic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akassoglou, K; Kombrinck, K W; Degen, J L; Strickland, S

    2000-05-29

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts plasminogen to plasmin and can trigger the degradation of extracellular matrix proteins. In the nervous system, under noninflammatory conditions, tPA contributes to excitotoxic neuronal death, probably through degradation of laminin. To evaluate the contribution of extracellular proteolysis in inflammatory neuronal degeneration, we performed sciatic nerve injury in mice. Proteolytic activity was increased in the nerve after injury, and this activity was primarily because of Schwann cell-produced tPA. To identify whether tPA release after nerve damage played a beneficial or deleterious role, we crushed the sciatic nerve of mice deficient for tPA. Axonal demyelination was exacerbated in the absence of tPA or plasminogen, indicating that tPA has a protective role in nerve injury, and that this protective effect is due to its proteolytic action on plasminogen. Axonal damage was correlated with increased fibrin(ogen) deposition, suggesting that this protein might play a role in neuronal injury. Consistent with this idea, the increased axonal degeneration phenotype in tPA- or plasminogen-deficient mice was ameliorated by genetic or pharmacological depletion of fibrinogen, identifying fibrin as the plasmin substrate in the nervous system under inflammatory axonal damage. This study shows that fibrin deposition exacerbates axonal injury, and that induction of an extracellular proteolytic cascade is a beneficial response of the tissue to remove fibrin. tPA/plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis may be a widespread protective mechanism in neuroinflammatory pathologies.

  3. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Injuries Following Implant Placement - Importance of Early Diagnosis and Treatment: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana Shavit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this article is to systematically review diagnostic procedures and risk factors associated with inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement, to identify the time interval between inferior alveolar nerve injury and its diagnosis after surgical dental implant placement and compare between outcomes of early and delayed diagnosis and treatment given based on case series recorded throughout a period of 10 years. Material and Methods: We performed literature investigation through MEDLINE (PubMed electronic database and manual search through dental journals to find articles concerning inferior alveolar nerve injury following implant placement. The search was restricted to English language articles published during the last 10 years, from December 2004 to March 2014. Results: In total, we found 33 articles related to the topic, of which 27 were excluded due to incompatibility with established inclusion criteria. Six articles were eventually chosen to be suitable. The studies presented diagnostic methods of inferior alveolar nerve sensory deficit, and we carried out an assessment of the proportion of patients diagnosed within different time intervals from the time the injury occurred. Conclusions: Various diagnostic methods have been developed throughout the years for dealing with 1 quite frequent complication in the implantology field - inferior alveolar nerve injury. Concurrently, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment was proved repeatedly. According to the results of the data analysis, a relatively high percentage of the practitioners successfully accomplished this target and achieved good treatment outcomes.

  4. The thickness of the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve in Graves ophthalmopathy measured by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The clinical diagnostic of Graves ophthalmopathy is based on the association of ocular signs and the disease of the thyroid gland. The evolution of the disease involves the development of eye globe protrusion, extraocular muscle thickening pressuring the optic nerve, which can result in its thickness. Objective. The aim of the paper is to find whether the retrobulbar optic nerve thickened and if there was a correlation between its possible thickening and the thickness of the muscles in Graves ophthalmopathy. We also wished to test the theory of compressive aetiology of such thickening using a 30-degree test. Methods. We examined 28 patients with Graves ophthalmopathy. The thickness of the retrobulbar optic nerve was measured by ultrasound on a B-scan using the Schraeder's method and by the largest thickness of the internal muscle. Results. The thickness of the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve in the 52 analyzed eyes with signs of the disease ranged between 3.24 mm to 6.30 mm, with median of 5.13 mm, indicating that the majority of the patients had optic nerve thickening rating at this value. Forty-eight eyes had a marked retrobulbar optic nerve thickening, with the thickening over 4 mm, while in 4 eyes with signs of Graves ophthalmopathy the thickness of the optic nerve was within normal limits. We detected that 92.3% of the patients with muscular thickening also had a directly proportional thickening of the retrobulbar optic nerve. By using the 30-degree test we confirmed the diagnosis of compressive neuropathy. Conclusion. Patients with Graves ophthalmopathy and thickened muscles, also have a thickening of the retrobulbar optic nerve; the rate of the thickness directly depends on the degree of the muscular thickness. The word is of compressive neuropathy, i.e. the thickness of the optic nerve is the result of subarachnoid fluid stasis caused by the compression on the optic nerve.

  5. Visual Evoked Potential Recording in a Rat Model of Experimental Optic Nerve Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Chitranshi, Nitin; Reedman, Brittany; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2015-07-29

    The visual evoked potential (VEP) recording is widely used in clinical practice to assess the severity of optic neuritis in its acute phase, and to monitor the disease course in the follow-up period. Changes in the VEP parameters closely correlate with pathological damage in the optic nerve. This protocol provides a detailed description about the rodent model of optic nerve microinjection, in which a partial demyelination lesion is produced in the optic nerve. VEP recording techniques are also discussed. Using skull implanted electrodes, we are able to acquire reproducible intra-session and between-session VEP traces. VEPs can be recorded on individual animals over a period of time to assess the functional changes in the optic nerve longitudinally. The optic nerve demyelination model, in conjunction with the VEP recording protocol, provides a tool to investigate the disease processes associated with demyelination and remyelination, and can potentially be employed to evaluate the effects of new remyelinating drugs or neuroprotective therapies.

  6. Preoperative evaluation of peripheral nerve injuries: What is the place for ultrasound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toia, Francesca; Gagliardo, Andrea; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Gagliardo, Cesare; Gagliardo, Giuseppe; Cordova, Adriana

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound in the preoperative workup of peripheral nerve lesions and illustrate how nerve ultrasonography can be integrated in routine clinical and neurophysiological evaluation and in the management of focal peripheral nerve injuries. The diagnostic role and therapeutic implications of ultrasonography for different neuropathies are described. METHODS The authors analyzed the use of ultrasound in 119 entrapment, tumoral, posttraumatic, or postsurgical nerve injuries of limbs evaluated in 108 patients during 2013 and 2014. All patients were candidates for surgery, and in all cases the evaluation included clinical examination, electrodiagnostic studies (nerve conduction study and electromyography), and ultrasound nerve study. Ultrasound was used to explore the nerve fascicular echotexture, continuity, and surrounding tissues. The maximum cross-sectional area (CSA) and the presence of epineurial hyperechogenicity or intraneural hyper- or hypoechogenicity, of anatomical anomalies, dynamic nerve dislocations, or compressions were recorded. The concordance rate of neurophysiological and ultrasonographic data was analyzed, classifying ultrasound findings as confirming, contributive, or nonconfirming with respect to electrodiagnostic data. The correlation between maximum nerve CSA and neurophysiological severity degree in entrapment syndromes was statistically analyzed. RESULTS Ultrasonography confirmed electrodiagnostic findings in 36.1% of cases and showed a contributive role in the diagnosis and surgical planning in 53.8% of all cases; the findings were negative ("nonconfirming") in only 10.1% of the patients. In 16% of cases, ultrasound was not only contributive, but had a key diagnostic role in the presence of doubtful electrodiagnostic findings. The contributive role differed according to etiology, being higher for tumors (100%) and for posttraumatic or postsurgical neuropathies (72.2%) than for

  7. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  8. Peak in matrix metaloproteinases-2 levels observed during recovery from olfactory nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Richard M; Perrino, Lisa A

    2008-02-12

    Matrix metalloproteineases are associated with extracellular remodeling that occurs in injury and repair processes in the central nervous system (CNS). We examined the role of MMP-2 in a model of olfactory nerve injury and found that MMP-2 levels increased several hours following injury, peaked at day 7 and then decreased rapidly. We previously reported a rapid increase in MMP-9, within 5 h after nerve injury, corresponding to neuronal degeneration and increased glial activity. In this study, we show that MMP-2 peaks later than MMP-9, at the onset of neuronal regeneration and repair. Using MMP-9 knockout mice, we determined that the MMP-2 increase is independent of MMP-9. Our data suggest that MMP-2 and MMP-9 may play different roles in the injury and repair processes.

  9. Avoiding injury to the inferior alveolar nerve by routine use of intraoperative radiographs during implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Jeffrey; Mastin, Chris; Le, Bach

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the inferior alveolar nerve during implant placement in the posterior atrophic mandible is a rare but serious complication. Although a preoperative computerized tomography scan can help determine the distance from the alveolar ridge to the nerve canal, variables such as magnification errors, ridge anatomy, and operator technique can increase the chance for complications. The routine use of intraoperative periapical radiographs during the drilling sequence is an inexpensive and reliable tool, allowing the operator to confidently adjust the direction and depth of the implant during placement. Most important, it helps avoid the risk of injury to the inferior alveolar nerve in cases in which there is limited vertical alveolar bone. Using this technique for 21 implants placed in the posterior atrophic mandible, with less than 10 mm of vertical bone to the inferior alveolar nerve canal, the authors observed no incidents of postoperative paresthesia.

  10. Guided regeneration with resorbable conduits in experimental peripheral nerve injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoli Aldini, N.; Fini, M; Rocca, M; Giavaresi, G.; Giardino, R.

    2000-01-01

    Guided tissue regeneration is a new approach in the reconstructive surgery of peripheral nerves. Artificial conduits can be constructed from biodegradable polymers. Lactic/caproic acid copolymers and polyphospazenes are biocompatible materials with a slow resorption rate. Conduits made from either poly-[l-lactide-co-6-caprolatone] or poly-[bis-(ethylalanate)-phosphazene] were assessed for use as guides for nerve regeneration in experimental animals. Under general anesthesia and by using a mic...

  11. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36 underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001, compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05. Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001, in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05 and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01. Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration.

  12. Restorative effect and mechanism of mecobalamin on sciatic nerve crush injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Lin; Qian, Minquan; Shi, Keqin; Chen, Gang; GU, YANGLIN; Du, Wei; Zhu, Guoxing

    2014-01-01

    Mecobalamin, a form of vitamin B12 containing a central metal element (cobalt), is one of the most important mediators of nervous system function. In the clinic, it is often used to accelerate recovery of peripheral nerves, but its molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we performed sciatic nerve crush injury in mice, followed by daily intraperitoneal administration of mecobalamin (65 μg/kg or 130 μg/kg) or saline (negative control). Walking track analysis, histomorphologi...

  13. Peripheral nerve injury sensitizes neonatal dorsal horn neurons to tumor necrosis factor-α

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Little is known about whether peripheral nerve injury during the early postnatal period modulates synaptic efficacy in the immature superficial dorsal horn (SDH) of the spinal cord, or whether the neonatal SDH network is sensitive to the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα under neuropathic conditions. Thus we examined the effects of TNFα on synaptic transmission and intrinsic membrane excitability in developing rat SDH neurons in the absence or presence of sciatic nerve damage....

  14. Sciatic nerve injury repair: a visualized analysis of research fronts and development trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangyao; Jiang, Rui; Jin, Yan

    2014-09-15

    A total of 3,446 publications regarding sciatic nerve injury repair and protection indexed by Web of Science during 2000-2004 were used for a detailed analysis of temporal-spatial distribution characteristics. Reference co-citation networks of the 100 top-cited publications as per the number of total citations were created using the Web of Science database and the information visualization tool, CiteSpaceIII. The key words that showed high frequency in these publications were included for analyzing the research fronts and development trends for sciatic nerve injury repair and protection. Through word frequency trend analysis, studies on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, and skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells combined with tissue-engineered scaffold material will become the forefronts in the field of sciatic nerve injury repair and protection in the near future.

  15. Prevalence of saphenous nerve injury after adductor-canal-blockade in patients receiving total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Maja; Jæger, Pia; Hilsted, K L;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adductor-canal-blockade is a new technique for pain relief after knee surgery. This block could cause nerve injury and the aim of this follow-up study was to determine the prevalence of saphenous nerve injury in patients receiving adductor-canal-blockade for pain treatment after total...... knee arthroplasty. METHODS: All patients included in two former studies of adductor-canal-blockade following total knee arthroplasty were invited to participate in this follow-up study 3-6 months after surgery. We examined the cutaneous area on the medial aspect of the lower leg (medial crural branch......, 76 patients could not discriminate between blunt and sharp stimulation with a needle, 81 patients could not discriminate between cold and warmth, and 82 patients displayed an altered sensation to light brush. CONCLUSION: We found no indications of saphenous nerve injury caused by the adductor-canal...

  16. Sciatic nerve injury repair:a visualized analysis of research fronts and development trends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangyao Liu; Rui Jiang; Yan Jin

    2014-01-01

    A total of 3,446 publications regarding sciatic nerve injury repair and protection indexed by Web of Science during 2000-2004 were used for a detailed analysis of temporal-spatial distribu-tion characteristics. Reference co-citation networks of the 100 top-cited publications as per the number of total citations were created using the Web of Science database and the information visualization tool, CiteSpaceIII. The key words that showed high frequency in these publications were included for analyzing the research fronts and development trends for sciatic nerve injury repair and protection. Through word frequency trend analysis, studies on bone marrow mesen-chymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, and skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells combined with tissue-engineered scaffold material will become the forefronts in the ifeld of sci-atic nerve injury repair and protection in the near future.

  17. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches.

  18. Malpractice claims related to recurrent laryngeal nerve injury: Forensic remarks regarding 15 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verzeletti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Malpractice claims concerning recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN injuries are often related to thyroid surgery, but they can also involve surgeons of different specialties. Our survey was made considering expert opinions on claims for medical malpractice evaluated at Brescia Institute of Forensic Medicine in Italy during the period 1992–2012. Fifteen cases concerned RLN injury. Malpractice was identified in 10 cases, according to the following conditions: low pre and intra-operative risk of nerve injury, no documentation showing that the nerve was isolated and preserved despite the existence of potential risk factors. An accurate, well written and complete surgical report is the main tool for the expert examination in malpractice claims.

  19. How the Build Up of Aqueous Humor Can Damage the Optic Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aqueous Humor Can Damage the Optic Nerve How the Build Up of Aqueous Humor Can Damage the Optic Nerve Most, but not all, forms of ... name. Phone (office) Sign Up Join us in the fight to end brain and eye disease 3 ...

  20. Surgical extraction of impacted inferior third molars at risk for inferior alveolar nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallesio, Cesare; Berrone, Mattia; Ruga, Emanuele; Boffano, Paolo

    2010-11-01

    The objective of the study was to prospectively assess the intraoperative findings and the radiographic signs of a study population of patients with impacted third molars at risk of inferior alveolar nerve injury. One hundred thirty-four patients with impacted mandibular third molars at risk for nerve injury were included in the study. Radiographic signs of possible close relationship between the 2 structures and intraoperative exposition or damage of the inferior alveolar nerve were recorded. The follow-up controls comprised clinical examinations and assessment for the sensation of the lower lip and chin. In 24 patients, a real contiguity was encountered between the third molars and nerve. Among these, intraoperative neural exposition was observed in 19 patients. Four patients complained of postoperative temporary hypoesthesia. No deficit of sensibility was found in cases with no exposition of the nerve. The accidental exposition of the inferior alveolar nerve is associated with an increased risk for neural injuries. At panoramic radiograph, the presence of signs of bifid and radiolucent apex, superimposition, and radiolucent root band should be considered at high risk for neural damage.

  1. Etiology of lingual nerve injuries in the third molar region: a cadaver and histologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M Anthony; Le, Hung

    2006-12-01

    It has been suggested that different etiologies of lingual nerve damage in the third molar area will produce a different clinical and histologic appearance in the nerve. If the clinical and histologic pictures were different, it could result in different treatments being recommended. Eight preserved cadavers (16 lingual nerves) were used for this study. As far as possible, the nerves were left in situ and damaged in a way that could be envisaged during third molar surgery. In each case, the damaged sections of nerve were photographed, resected, embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned in 5 mum sections, stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and examined histologically. The scalpel clinically produced a clean wound with sharply defined edges; this was confirmed histologically with minimal disruption to the fascicles. The 702 fissure bur produced a ragged stretch-type injury clinically, and histologically this was confirmed with an irregular-edged border to the lesion and stretching and internal damage to the fascicles immediately adjacent to the wound. The crush injury clinically caused considerable apparent damage to the nerve, which was confirmed histologically with crushing and disruption of the fascicles and reduction to approximately 25% of their preinjury thickness. The stretch injury clinically showed no damage, but histologically showed irregular internal disruption of the fascicles over the whole area subject to stretching movements. It does appear that different modalities in nerve injury produce a different type of injury both clinically and histologically. This information has implications for both natural clinical recovery and the indications for surgical intervention. Clinical recovery may occur best with close approximation of a sharp scalpel-type wound or excision of a crushed area of nerve with reapproximation of the nerve endings, but a ragged wound caused by a fissure bur may require excision back to healthy nerve with subsequent reapproximation, whereas

  2. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  3. Reliable MRI and MRN signs of nerve and muscle injury following trauma to the shoulder with EMG and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Ahmed Hassanien

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the role of MRN in diagnosis of suprascapular nerve injury and its relation with muscle injury after shoulder trauma in comparison with the EMG results. Patient & method: The study was carried on 30 patients following trauma to the shoulder, either direct trauma (80% or indirect trauma in 20% presented clinically with shoulder pain and limited movements and referred for MRI examination. The MRI results were correlated with EMG results for all cases. Results: Those 30 cases were divided into 13 cases with acute onset, 10 cases with subacute onset and 7 cases with chronic onset. In acute injuries, 5 cases (5/30 showed combined nerve and muscle injuries, 4 cases (4/30 showed nerve injury only and 5 cases (5/30 showed muscle injury only. In subacute injuries 5 cases (5/30 showed combined muscle and nerve injuries and 5 cases (5/30 showed muscle injury only, in chronic 7 cases (7/30 showed combined nerve and muscle injuries, where EMG showed sharp waves only in 7 cases which are all chronic. Conclusion: MRN is the best modality in diagnosis of nerve injuries and associated muscle injuries in one sitting with no obvious difficulties in the examination. MRN associating with the routine MRI elevated the sensitivity of diagnosis.

  4. Neurturin enhances the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Robert D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms responsible for the survival and preservation of function for adult parasympathetic ganglion neurons following injury remain incompletely understood. However, advances in the neurobiology of growth factors, neural development, and prevention of cell death have led to a surge of clinical interest for protective and regenerative neuromodulatory strategies, as surgical therapies for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers often result in neuronal axotomy and debilitating loss of sexual function or continence. In vitro studies have identified neurturin, a glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, as a neuromodulator for pelvic cholinergic neurons. We present the first in vivo report of the effects of neurturin upon the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat. Methods In these experiments, groups (n = 8 each consisted of uninjured controls and animals treated with injection of albumin (blinded crush control group, extended release neurotrophin-4 or neurturin to the site of cavernous nerve crush injury (100 μg per animal. After 5 weeks, recovery of erectile function (treatment effect was assessed by cavernous nerve electrostimulation and peak aortic pressures were measured. Investigators were unblinded to specific treatments after statistical analyses were completed. Results Erectile dysfunction was not observed in the sham group (mean maximal intracavernous pressure [ICP] increase of 117.5 ± 7.3 cmH2O, whereas nerve injury and albumin treatment (control produced a significant reduction in ICP elevation of 40.0 ± 6.3 cmH2O. Neurturin facilitated the preservation of erectile function, with an ICP increase of 55% at 62.0 ± 9.2 cmH2O (p Conclusion Treatment with neurturin at the site of cavernous nerve crush injury facilitates recovery of erectile function. Results support further investigation of neurturin as a neuroprotective and/or neuroregenerative

  5. Trigeminal nerve injury ErbB3/ErbB2 promotes mechanical hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Liping; Westlund, Karin N

    2012-08-01

    Chronic constriction injury of the trigeminal infraorbital nerve results in transient analgesia followed by whisker pad mechanical allodynia in rats. Neuregulin 1 expressed on axonal membranes binds receptor tyrosine kinase ErbB, promoting Schwann cell development and remyelination. This study investigated whether orofacial mechanical allodynia is signaled by ErbB3-ErbB2 heterodimers in injured nerves. Whisker pad mechanical allodynia (von Frey stimuli) was quantified in wild type rats and in transgenic rats with Sleeping Beauty transposon mutation for neuregulin 1 transgene. Pain-related behavior was retested after intraperitoneal injection of the ErbB2 inhibitor Lapatinib, an agent shown by others to reduce breast cancer pain. Infraorbital nerve injury was evaluated histologically with myelin and neuronal biomarkers. ErbB3 changes over time were measured with western blots. Whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity began in week 2 in wild type rats (3.11 ± 5.93 g vs. 18.72 ± 0.00 g after sham surgery, n = 9, P wild type rats was alleviated by Lapatinib (15 ± 3.89 g vs. 2.45 ± 1.13 g, n = 6, P wild type and transgenic rats (week 10) coincided with time points when mechanical hypersensitivity was present. The Neuregulin 1-ErbB3-ErbB2 complex is a causal mechanism in nerve injury-induced trigeminal neuropathic pain. Understanding peripheral glial mechanisms after nerve injury will improve neuropathic pain treatment.

  6. Early extraction: a silver bullet to avoid nerve injury in lower third molar removal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q-B; Zhang, Z-Q

    2012-10-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the effects of early extraction of immature lower third molar on preventing complications, particularly nerve injury following lower third molar removal. Patients were grouped according to age and radiographic results: group A (518 patients, ≤23 years, immature teeth with apical foramen not closed); group B (532 patients, >23 years, mature teeth with closed apical foramen). Group A included 230 males and 288 females (average age 17 years). In group A, 808 lower mandibular third molars were extracted bilaterally in 290 and unilaterally in 228 patients; the incidence of complications was 2.48% (20/808) (all were temporary), the incidence of nerve injury was 0%. Group B included 250 males and 282 females (average age 39 years). In group B, 810 lower third molars were extracted bilaterally in 278 and unilaterally in 254 patients; the incidence of complications was 10% (81/810), the incidence of nerve injury was 1.6% (13/810). All complications were temporary, except two removals of permanent inferior alveolar nerve numbness (>6 months). In this study, early removal of the lower third molar was effective in avoiding some postoperative complications, especially nerve injury. Early extraction of lower third molar in youngsters is recommended following a team consultation.

  7. Nerve Injury-Induced c-Jun Activation in Schwann Cells Is JNK Independent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotta Lindwall Blom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated (a if activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway was linked to the stress activated protein kinase (SAPK pathway and (b if JNK was required for activation of c-Jun in Schwann cells of rat sciatic nerve following injury. To this aim, ERK1/2 and the transcription factors c-Jun and ATF-3 were studied by immunohistochemistry in segments of transected nerves. We utilized pharmacological inhibitors of both signal transduction pathways in vitro to determine the effects on downstream signalling events, such as c-Jun activation, and on Schwann cell survival and proliferation. A transection induces c-Jun and ATF-3 transcription in Schwann cells. These events are followed by Schwann cell activation of c-Jun in the injured nerve. The MAPK inhibitor U0126 blocked ERK1/2 activation and reduced Schwann cell proliferation as well as induction of c-Jun transcription. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 reduced Schwann cell proliferation, but did not affect the expression of ERK1/2 or injury-induced increases in c-Jun or ATF-3 levels. Importantly, nerve injury induces Schwann cell activation of c-Jun by phosphorylation, which, in contrast to in sensory neurons, is JNK independent. MAP kinases, other than JNK, can potentially activate c-Jun in Schwann cells following injury; information that is crucial to create new nerve reconstruction strategies.

  8. Blockade of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 promotes regeneration after sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Ren; Hong Zhang; Chao Qi; Mei-ling Gao; Hong Wang; Xia-qing Li

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) provides the sensation of pain (nociception). However, it remains unknown whether TRPV1 is activated after peripheral nerve injury, or whether activation of TRPV1 affects neural regeneration. In the present study, we established rat models of unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury, with or without pretreatment with AMG517 (300 mg/kg), a TRPV1 antagonist, injected subcutaneously into the ipsilateral paw 60 minutes before injury. At 1 and 2 weeks after injury, we performed immuno-lfuorescence staining of the sciatic nerve at the center of injury, at 0.3 cm proximal and distal to the injury site, and in the dorsal root ganglia. Our results showed that Wallerian degeneration occurred distal to the injury site, and neurite outgrowth and Schwann cell regeneration occurred proximal to the injury. The number of regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve clus-ters was greater in the AMG517-pretreated rats than in the vehicle-treated group, most notably 2 weeks after injury. TRPV1 expression in the injured sciatic nerve and ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia was markedly greater than on the contralateral side. Pretreatment with AMG517 blocked this effect. These data indicate that TRPV1 is activated or overexpressed after sciatic nerve crush injury, and that blockade of TRPV1 may accelerate regeneration of the injured sciatic nerve.

  9. The effect of aloe vera on ischemia--Reperfusion injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Mustafa; Gölge, Umut Hatay; Aslan, Esra; Sehitoglu, Muserref Hilal; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Akman, Tarik; Cosar, Murat

    2016-04-01

    Aloe vera is compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of aloe vera treatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury. Twenty-eight male Wistar Albino rats were divided equally into 4 groups. Groups; Control group (no surgical procedure or medication), sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion group, sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion+aloe vera group and sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion+methylprednisolone group. Ischemia was performed by clamping the infrarenal abdominal aorta. 24 hours after ischemia, all animals were sacrificed. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically and biochemically. Ischemic fiber degeneration significantly decreased in the pre-treated with aloe vera and treated with methylprednisolone groups, especially in the pre-treated with aloe vera group, compared to the sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion group (paloe vera group was not statistically different compared to the MP group (p>0.05). Aloe vera is effective neuroprotective against sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Also aloe vera was found to be as effective as MP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Recovery of nerve injury-induced alexia for Braille using forearm anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkman, Anders; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-04-16

    Nerve injuries in the upper extremity may severely affect hand function. Cutaneous forearm anaesthesia has been shown to improve hand sensation in nerve-injured patients. A blind man who lost his Braille reading capability after an axillary plexus injury was treated with temporary cutaneous forearm anaesthesia. After treatment sensory functions of the hand improved and the patient regained his Braille reading capability. The mechanism behind the improvement is likely unmasking of inhibited or silent neurons, but after repeated treatment sessions at increasing intervals the improvement has remained at 1-year follow-up, implying a structural change in the somatosensory cortex.

  11. Rat Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury and Recovery Tracked by Plantar Test and Immunohistochemistry Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pavić, Roman; Pavić, Michele L.; Tvrdeić, Ante; Tot, Ozana K.; Heffer, Marija

    2011-01-01

    An experimental crush injury to the sciatic nerve, with a crush force of 49.2 N (pressure p=1.98x108 Pa), was inflicted in 30 male rats (Wistar). A control group (sham), with the same number of rats, was also operated upon exactly as the experimental group but without the crush injury. We tested the sensory and motor recovery of the sciatic nerve with Hargreaves method, using an apparatus from Ugo Basile, Italy. Testing was continued for both legs of each rat, injured and uninjured, starting ...

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors relieve morphine resistance in neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hitoshi; Matsushita, Yosuke; Araki, Kohei; Mukae, Takehiro; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is often insensitive to morphine. Our previous study has demonstrated that neuron-restrictive silencer factor represses mu opioid receptor (MOP) gene expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) via histone hypoacetylation-mediated mechanisms after peripheral nerve injury, thereby causing loss of peripheral morphine analgesia. Here, we showed that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as trichostatin A and valproic acid, restored peripheral and systemic morphine analgesia in neuropathic pain. Also, these agents blocked nerve injury-induced MOP down-regulation in the DRG. These results suggest that HDAC inhibitors could serve as adjuvant analgesics to morphine for the management of neuropathic pain.

  13. Treatment of optic nerve injury by transplanting hBDNF-GFP gene transfected neural stem cells%人脑源性神经营养因子基因转染神经干细胞治疗大鼠视神经损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 陈二涛; 冯东福; 潘栋超; 汪洋

    2009-01-01

    transfected by human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes and explore its impact on the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after transplanted into the retina of rats with optic nerve injury. Methods (1) Thirty SD rats with right optic nerve injury were transplanted with GFP-transfected NSCs (GFP-NSCs) or hBDNF- and GFP-transfected NSCs (hBDNF-GFP-NSCs) into vitreous cavity respectively, eight weeks after which the rats were sacrificed and the right eyes removed for frozen section. Then, Thy1. 1, GFAP, β-tubulin, rhodopsin antibody were used as markers to observe the migration and differentiation of the transplanted cells. (2) Thirty SD rats models with partial right optic nerve injury were randomly divided into three groups:injury group, GFP group and BDNF group. Injury group was injected with 5 μl normal saline into vitreous cavity, while the other two groups were transplanted with GFP-NSCs or hBDNF-GFP-NSCs into the vitreous cavity, with 5 × 104 cells per eye. Eight weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and the right eyes enucleated for Thyl. 1 immune staining to count the number of RGCs under fluorescence microscope. Results (1) After transplantation, the transplanted cells could live, migrate and differentiate in both groups. The cells could differentiate into glial cells and neurons. In hBDNF-GFP-NSCs group, small amount of cells could differentiate into RGCs-like cells (Thy1. 1 + ), but none in GFP-NSCs group. (2) Thy1. 1 immune staining showed (1 461 ± 154) RGCs/mm2 in the retina of hBDNF-GFP-NSCs group, which was significantly more than (1 244 ± i 87 ) RGCs/mm2 in GFP-NSCs group ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusions After transplantation, hBDNF-GFP-NSCs can differentiate into glial cells, neurons and even RGCs-like cells. As well, trans-plantation of hBDNF-GFP-NSCs can increase the survival number of RGCs and help repair of the injured optic nerve.

  14. Difficulty in Clinical Evaluation of Radial Nerve Injury due to Multiple Trauma to the Humerus, Wrist, and Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balik Mehmet Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve damage is frequently encountered in humeral fractures. The radial nerve is primarily damaged when the humerus gets fractured, while secondary damage maybe due to post-traumatic manipulations and surgical exploration. High impact traumatic nerve injury, serious neuropathic pain, lack of response to therapeutic interventions, and indifference to the Tinel test are indications for surgical intervention. Since most humeral fracture-induced low impact radial nerve injuries resolve spontaneously, conservative therapy is preferred. We present a patient with humeral fracture-associated radial nerve injury, accompanied with digital amputation and flexor tendon avulsion on the same arm. These injuries required immediate surgery, thus rendering the clinical evaluation of the radial nerve impossible. We would like to highlight and discuss the inherent difficulties associated with multiple trauma of the upper arm.

  15. The impact of motor axon misdirection and attrition on behavioral deficit following experimental nerve injuries.

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    Jacob Daniel de Villiers Alant

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve transection and neuroma-in-continuity injuries are associated with permanent functional deficits, often despite successful end-organ reinnervation. Axonal misdirection with non-specific reinnervation, frustrated regeneration and axonal attrition are believed to be among the anatomical substrates that underlie the poor functional recovery associated with these devastating injuries. Yet, functional deficits associated with axonal misdirection in experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries have not yet been studied. We hypothesized that experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries would result in motor axon misdirection and attrition with proportional persistent functional deficits. The femoral nerve misdirection model was exploited to assess major motor pathway misdirection and axonal attrition over a spectrum of experimental nerve injuries, with neuroma-in-continuity injuries simulated by the combination of compression and traction forces in 42 male rats. Sciatic nerve injuries were employed in an additional 42 rats, to evaluate the contribution of axonal misdirection to locomotor deficits by a ladder rung task up to 12 weeks. Retrograde motor neuron labeling techniques were utilized to determine the degree of axonal misdirection and attrition. Characteristic histological neuroma-in-continuity features were demonstrated in the neuroma-in-continuity groups and poor functional recovery was seen despite successful nerve regeneration and muscle reinnervation. Good positive and negative correlations were observed respectively between axonal misdirection (p<.0001, r(2=.67, motor neuron counts (attrition (p<.0001, r(2=.69 and final functional deficits. We demonstrate prominent motor axon misdirection and attrition in neuroma-in-continuity and transection injuries of mixed motor nerves that contribute to the long-term functional deficits. Although widely accepted in theory, to our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence to

  16. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Following Crush Injury to Rat Peroneal Nerve by Aqueous Extract of Medicinal Mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr) Pers. (Aphyllophoromycetideae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kah-Hui Wong; Murali Naidu; Pamela David; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla; Noorlidah Abdullah; Umah Rani Kuppusamy; Vikineswary Sabaratnam

    2011-01-01

    Nerve crush injury is a well-established axonotmetic model in experimental regeneration studies to investigate the impact of various pharmacological treatments. Hericium erinaceus is a temperate mushroom but is now being cultivated in tropical Malaysia. In this study, we investigated the activity of aqueous extract of H. erinaceus fresh fruiting bodies in promoting functional recovery following an axonotmetic peroneal nerve injury in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats by daily oral administrati...

  17. Optic nerve vascular compression in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Cezar José; Moscovici, Samuel; Dotan, Shlomo; Spektor, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Optic nerve vascular compression in patients with suprasellar tumor is a known entity but is rarely described in the literature. Case Description. We present a unique, well-documented case of optic nerve strangulation by the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient presented with pronounced progressive visual deterioration. Following surgery, there was immediate resolution of her visual deficit. Conclusion. Vascular strangulation of the optic nerve should be considered when facing progressive and/or severe visual field deterioration in patients with tumors proximal to the optic apparatus.

  18. Neurotrophic factor changes in the rat thick skin following chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peleshok Jennifer C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cutaneous peripheral neuropathies have been associated with changes of the sensory fiber innervation in the dermis and epidermis. These changes are mediated in part by the increase in local expression of trophic factors. Increase in target tissue nerve growth factor has been implicated in the promotion of peptidergic afferent and sympathetic efferent sprouting following nerve injury. The primary source of nerve growth factor is cells found in the target tissue, namely the skin. Recent evidence regarding the release and extracellular maturation of nerve growth factor indicate that it is produced in its precursor form and matured in the extracellular space. It is our hypothesis that the precursor form of nerve growth factor should be detectable in those cell types producing it. To date, limitations in available immunohistochemical tools have restricted efforts in obtaining an accurate distribution of nerve growth factor in the skin of naïve animals and those with neuropathic pain lesions. It is the objective of this study to delineate the distribution of the precursor form of nerve growth factor to those cell types expressing it, as well as to describe its distribution with respect to those nerve fibers responsive to it. Results We observed a decrease in peptidergic fiber innervation at 1 week after the application of a chronic constriction injury (CCI to the sciatic nerve, followed by a recovery, correlating with TrkA protein levels. ProNGF expression in CCI animals was significantly higher than in sham-operated controls from 1-4 weeks post-CCI. ProNGF immunoreactivity was increased in mast cells at 1 week post-CCI and, at later time points, in keratinocytes. P75 expression within the dermis and epidermis was significantly higher in CCI-operated animals than in controls and these changes were localized to neuronal and non-neuronal cell populations using specific markers for each. Conclusions We describe proNGF expression by

  19. Our experience with triceps nerve reconstruction in patients with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Barmpitsioti, Antonia

    2012-05-01

    Although elbow extension is facilitated by gravity, triceps muscle provides elbow joint stability; in patients with brachial plexus injuries stable elbow is necessary for obtaining useful hand function. This study presents the senior author's experience with triceps nerve reconstruction and the functional results in patients with brachial plexus injuries. Outcomes were analyzed in relation to denervation time, severity score, length of the interposition nerve graft and donor nerves used. One hundred and sixty two patients with brachial plexus injury had triceps nerve neurotization and elbow extension recovery between 1978 and 2006. The mean patient's age was 25.45 ± 9.90 years and the mean denervation time was 16.90 ± 26.95 months. Two hundred and thirty two motor donors were used in 156 patients; 6 patients underwent neurolysis; 86 intercostal nerves were transferred in 41 patients. Interposition nerve grafts were used in 130 patients. Results were good or excellent in 31.65% of patients. The age of patients and the severity of the brachial plexus lesion are among the factors that significantly influenced functional results. Intraplexus motor donors are always preferable achieving better functional outcomes than extraplexus donors. Intercostal nerves and the posterior division of contralateral C7 proved preferred donors for elbow extension restoration in multiple avulsions. Although it is difficult to restore strong elbow extension, triceps nerve reconstruction is suggested in brachial plexus management, since it provides elbow stability. Satisfactory elbow extension strength was restored in young patients with high severity score. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Permanent central synaptic disconnection of proprioceptors after nerve injury and regeneration. I. Loss of VGLUT1/IA synapses on motoneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Titus-Mitchell, Haley E.; Bullinger, Katie L.; Kraszpulski, Michal; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C.

    2011-01-01

    Motor and sensory proprioceptive axons reinnervate muscles after peripheral nerve transections followed by microsurgical reattachment; nevertheless, motor coordination remains abnormal and stretch reflexes absent. We analyzed the possibility that permanent losses of central IA afferent synapses, as a consequence of peripheral nerve injury, are responsible for this deficit. VGLUT1 was used as a marker of proprioceptive synapses on rat motoneurons. After nerve injuries synapses are stripped fro...

  1. Engrafted human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived anterior specified neural progenitors protect the rat crushed optic nerve.

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    Leila Satarian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs is a common occurrence in several eye diseases. This study examined the functional improvement and protection of host RGCs in addition to the survival, integration and neuronal differentiation capabilities of anterior specified neural progenitors (NPs following intravitreal transplantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NPs were produced under defined conditions from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs and transplanted into rats whose optic nerves have been crushed (ONC. hiPSCs were induced to differentiate into anterior specified NPs by the use of Noggin and retinoic acid. The hiPSC-NPs were labeled by green fluorescent protein or a fluorescent tracer 1,1' -dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI and injected two days after induction of ONC in hooded rats. Functional analysis according to visual evoked potential recordings showed significant amplitude recovery in animals transplanted with hiPSC-NPs. Retrograde labeling by an intra-collicular DiI injection showed significantly higher numbers of RGCs and spared axons in ONC rats treated with hiPSC-NPs or their conditioned medium (CM. The analysis of CM of hiPSC-NPs showed the secretion of ciliary neurotrophic factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor. Optic nerve of cell transplanted groups also had increased GAP43 immunoreactivity and myelin staining by FluoroMyelin™ which imply for protection of axons and myelin. At 60 days post-transplantation hiPSC-NPs were integrated into the ganglion cell layer of the retina and expressed neuronal markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The transplantation of anterior specified NPs may improve optic nerve injury through neuroprotection and differentiation into neuronal lineages. These NPs possibly provide a promising new therapeutic approach for traumatic optic nerve injuries and loss of RGCs caused by other diseases.

  2. Optic pathway glioma associated with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia in a child with neurofibromatosis-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikas, Ioannis; Theofanopoulou, Maria; Lampropoulou, Penelope; Hadjigeorgi, Christiana [Aghia Sophia Children' s Hospital, Imaging Department, Athens (Greece); Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Kosmidis, Helen [Children' s Hospital, A. Kyriakou, Department of Oncology, Athens (Greece)

    2006-11-15

    Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) is a multisystem disorder presenting with a variety of clinical and imaging manifestations. Neural and non-neural tumours, and unusual benign miscellaneous conditions, separately or combined, are encountered in variable locations. We present a 21/2-year-old boy with NF-1 who demonstrated coexisting optic pathway glioma with involvement of the chiasm and optic nerve, orbital alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia. (orig.)

  3. Locally Produced BDNF Promotes Sclerotic Change in Alveolar Bone after Nerve Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Yamada, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is released due to nerve injury, is known to promote the natural healing of injured nerves. It is often observed that damage of mandibular canal induces local sclerotic changes in alveolar bone. We reported that peripheral nerve injury promotes the local production of BDNF; therefore, it was possible to hypothesize that peripheral nerve injury affects sclerotic changes in the alveolar bone. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of BDNF on osteogenesis using in vitro osteoblast-lineage cell culture and an in vivo rat osteotomy model. MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured with BDNF and were examined for cell proliferative activity, chemotaxis and mRNA expression levels of osteoblast differentiation markers. For in vivo study, inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury experiments and mandibular cortical osteotomy were performed using a rat model. In the osteotomy model, exogenous BDNF was applied to bone surfaces after corticotomy of the mandible, and we morphologically analyzed the new bone formation. As a result, mRNA expression of osteoblast differentiation marker, osteocalcin, was significantly increased by BDNF, although cell proliferation and migration were not affected. In the in vivo study, osteopontin-positive new bone formation was significantly accelerated in the BDNF-grafted groups, and active bone remodeling, involving trkB-positive osteoblasts and osteocytes, continued after 28 days. In conclusion, BDNF stimulated the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells and it promoted new bone formation and maturation. These results suggested that local BDNF produced by peripheral nerve injury contributes to accelerating sclerotic changes in the alveolar bone. PMID:28072837

  4. Automated interpretation of optic nerve images: a data mining framework for glaucoma diagnostic support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Syed S R; Artes, Paul H; Yun, Sanjan; Yu, Jin

    2007-01-01

    Confocal Scanning Laser Tomography (CSLT) techniques capture high-quality images of the optic disc (the retinal region where the optic nerve exits the eye) that are used in the diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma. We present a hybrid framework, combining image processing and data mining methods, to support the interpretation of CSLT optic nerve images. Our framework features (a) Zernike moment methods to derive shape information from optic disc images; (b) classification of optic disc images, based on shape information, to distinguish between healthy and glaucomatous optic discs. We apply Multi Layer Perceptrons, Support Vector Machines and Bayesian Networks for feature sub-set selection and image classification; and (c) clustering of optic disc images, based on shape information, using Self-Organizing Maps to visualize sub-types of glaucomatous optic disc damage. Our framework offers an automated and objective analysis of optic nerve images that can potentially support both diagnosis and monitoring of glaucoma.

  5. Proximal tibial and fibular physeal fracture causing popliteal artery injury and peroneal nerve injury: A case report and review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uday Guled; Nirmal Raj Gopinathan; Vijay G.Goni; Arjun Rhh; Rakesh John; Prateek Behera

    2015-01-01

    Either proximal tibial or tibial physeal injuries are rare.The combination of both is even rarer,let alone causes a vascular injury.Early intervention is the key for management.We hereby present an interesting case of simultaneous proximal tibiofibular physeal injury with popliteal arterial occlusion and common peroneal nerve injury.The present case is important in two aspects:firstly it reports a very rare occurrence of simultaneous proximal tibiofibular physeal injury associated with vascular insult and common peroneal nerve injury;secondly it highlights that with timely intervention excellent results can be achieved in paediatric patients.

  6. Transcorneal electrical stimulation alters morphology and survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich-Noack, Petra; Voigt, Nadine; Prilloff, Sylvia; Fedorov, Anton; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-05-24

    Traumatic optic nerve injury leads to retrograde death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), but transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) can increase the cell survival rate. To understand the mechanisms and to further define the TES-induced effects we monitored in living animals RGC morphology and survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) in real time by using in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) of the retina. ONC was performed in rats and ICON was performed before crush and on post-lesion days 3, 7 and 15 which allowed us to repeatedly record RGC number and size. TES or sham-stimulation were performed immediately after the crush and on post-injury day 11. Three days after ONC we detected a higher percentage of surviving RGCs in the TES group as compared to sham-treated controls. However, the difference was below significance level on day 7 and disappeared completely by day 15. The death rate was more variable amongst the TES-treated rats than in the control group. Morphological analysis revealed that average cell size changed significantly in the control group but not in stimulated animals and the morphological alterations of surviving neurons were smaller in TES-treated compared to control cells. In conclusion, TES delays post-traumatic cell death significantly. Moreover, we found "responder animals" which also benefited in the long-term from the treatment. Our in vivo cellular imaging results provide evidence that TES reduces ONC-associated neuronal swelling and shrinkage especially in RGCs which survived long-term. Further studies are now needed to determine the differences of responders vs. non-responders.

  7. Systemic and ocular findings in 100 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M Lourdes; Ty, Edna B; Taban, Mehryar; David Rothner, A; Rogers, Douglas; Traboulsi, Elias I

    2006-11-01

    To describe associated ocular, neurologic, and systemic findings in a population of children with optic nerve hypoplasia, a retrospective chart review of 100 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia for the presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine abnormalities was performed. Neuroimaging and endocrine studies were obtained in 65 cases. Visual acuity and associated ocular, neurologic, endocrine, systemic, and structural brain abnormalities were recorded. Seventy-five percent had bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Conditions previously associated with optic nerve hypoplasia and present in our patients include premature birth in 21%, fetal alcohol syndrome in 9%, maternal diabetes in 6%, and endocrine abnormalities in 6%. Developmental delay was present in 32%, cerebral palsy in 13%, and seizures in 12%. Of those imaged, 60% had an abnormal study. Neuroimaging showed abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development in 29 patients, septo-optic dysplasia in 10, hydrocephalus in 10, and corpus callosum abnormalities in 8. There was an associated clinical neurologic abnormality in 57% of patients with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia and in 32% of patients with unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Patients with unilateral and bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia frequently have a wide range and common occurrence of concomitant neurologic, endocrine, and systemic abnormalities.

  8. Optic nerve magnetisation transfer ratio after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yejun; van der Walt, Anneke; Paine, Mark; Klistorner, Alexander; Butzkueven, Helmut; Egan, Gary F; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Kolbe, Scott C

    2012-01-01

    Magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) can reveal the degree of proton exchange between free water and macromolecules and was suggested to be pathological informative. We aimed to investigate changes in optic nerve MTR over 12 months following acute optic neuritis (ON) and to determine whether MTR measurements can predict clinical and paraclinical outcomes at 6 and 12 months. Thirty-seven patients with acute ON were studied within 2 weeks of presentation and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Assessments included optic nerve MTR, retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness, multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) amplitude and latency and high (100%) and low (2.5%) contrast letter acuity. Eleven healthy controls were scanned twice four weeks apart for comparison with patients. Patient unaffected optic nerve MTR did not significantly differ from controls at any time-point. Compared to the unaffected nerve, affected optic nerve MTR was significantly reduced at 3 months (mean percentage interocular difference = -9.24%, p = 0.01), 6 months (mean = -12.48%, p<0.0001) and 12 months (mean = -7.61%, p = 0.003). Greater reduction in MTR at 3 months in patients was associated with subsequent loss of high contrast letter acuity at 6 (ρ = 0.60, p = 0.0003) and 12 (ρ = 0.44, p = 0.009) months, low contrast letter acuity at 6 (ρ = 0.35, p = 0.047) months, and RNFL thinning at 12 (ρ = 0.35, p = 0.044) months. Stratification of individual patient MTR time courses based on flux over 12 months (stable, putative remyelination and putative degeneration) predicted RNFL thinning at 12 months (F(2,32) = 3.59, p = 0.02). In conclusion, these findings indicate that MTR flux after acute ON is predictive of axonal degeneration and visual disability outcomes.

  9. Optic nerve magnetisation transfer ratio after acute optic neuritis predicts axonal and visual outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejun Wang

    Full Text Available Magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR can reveal the degree of proton exchange between free water and macromolecules and was suggested to be pathological informative. We aimed to investigate changes in optic nerve MTR over 12 months following acute optic neuritis (ON and to determine whether MTR measurements can predict clinical and paraclinical outcomes at 6 and 12 months. Thirty-seven patients with acute ON were studied within 2 weeks of presentation and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. Assessments included optic nerve MTR, retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thickness, multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP amplitude and latency and high (100% and low (2.5% contrast letter acuity. Eleven healthy controls were scanned twice four weeks apart for comparison with patients. Patient unaffected optic nerve MTR did not significantly differ from controls at any time-point. Compared to the unaffected nerve, affected optic nerve MTR was significantly reduced at 3 months (mean percentage interocular difference = -9.24%, p = 0.01, 6 months (mean = -12.48%, p<0.0001 and 12 months (mean = -7.61%, p = 0.003. Greater reduction in MTR at 3 months in patients was associated with subsequent loss of high contrast letter acuity at 6 (ρ = 0.60, p = 0.0003 and 12 (ρ = 0.44, p = 0.009 months, low contrast letter acuity at 6 (ρ = 0.35, p = 0.047 months, and RNFL thinning at 12 (ρ = 0.35, p = 0.044 months. Stratification of individual patient MTR time courses based on flux over 12 months (stable, putative remyelination and putative degeneration predicted RNFL thinning at 12 months (F(2,32 = 3.59, p = 0.02. In conclusion, these findings indicate that MTR flux after acute ON is predictive of axonal degeneration and visual disability outcomes.

  10. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-chen Lu; Han-qiu Liu; Xu-yun Hua; Yun-dong Shen; Wen-dong Xu; Jian-guang Xu; Yu-dong Gu

    2016-01-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is dififcult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function.

  11. Cranial nerve injuries are associated with specific craniofacial fractures after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampshoff, Jesse L; Cogbill, Thomas H; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kallies, Kara J; Martin, Lynn T

    2010-11-01

    Identification of cranial nerve (CN) injuries after blunt trauma is often delayed due to concomitant life-threatening trauma, altered mental status, and associated bony or soft tissue injuries. We hypothesized that specific craniofacial fracture (FX) patterns are associated with CN injuries, permitting earlier diagnosis. The trauma registry at a single institution was queried for all CN injuries and craniofacial FXs. Associations were determined by Fisher's exact test. Ninety CN injuries were identified in 59 patients. CN injuries were diagnosed on the day of admission in 24 (41%) patients. The most frequently injured CNs were CN VII (22), CN I (16), and CN VI (14). Occipital FXs were associated with CN I injury (P = 0.001). Sphenoid and ethmoid FXs were correlated with CN III trauma (P = 0.019 and 0.04). Temporal bone FXs were associated with CN VII injuries (P = 0.025). Maxillary FXs were associated with CN V injuries (P = 0.041). Complete or partial recovery was documented after 17 per cent and 39 per cent of CN injuries, respectively. Diagnostic delay was documented in 59 per cent of patients. Specific craniofacial FXs were correlated with certain CN injuries. Partial or complete recovery of function occurred after 56 per cent of CN injuries.

  12. Impulse magnetic stimulation facilitates synaptic regeneration in rats following sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergey A. Zhivolupov; Miroslav M. Odinak; Nariman A. Rashidov; Ludmila S. Onischenko; Igor N. Samartsev; Anton A. Jurin

    2012-01-01

    The current studies describing magnetic stimulation for treatment of nervous system diseases mainly focus on transcranial magnetic stimulation and rarely focus on spinal cord magnetic stimula-tion. Spinal cord magnetic stimulation has been confirmed to promote neural plasticity after injuries of spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerve. To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia. Then, all animals un-derwent impulse magnetic stimulation of the lumbar portion of spinal crod and spinal nerve roots daily for 1 month. Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired. These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

  13. Reducing the risk of nerve injury during Bernese periacetabular osteotomy: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhor, M; Gharehdaghi, J; Schoeniger, R; Ganz, R

    2015-05-01

    The modified Smith-Petersen and Kocher-Langenbeck approaches were used to expose the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh and the femoral, obturator and sciatic nerves in order to study the risk of injury to these structures during the dissection, osteotomy, and acetabular reorientation stages of a Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. Injury of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh was less likely to occur if an osteotomy of the anterior superior iliac spine had been carried out before exposing the hip. The obturator nerve was likely to be injured during unprotected osteotomy of the pubis if the far cortex was penetrated by > 5 mm. This could be avoided by inclining the osteotome 45° medially and performing the osteotomy at least 2 cm medial to the iliopectineal eminence. The sciatic nerve could be injured during the first and last stages of the osteotomy if the osteotome perforated the lateral cortex of ischium and the ilio-ischial junction by > 10 mm. The femoral nerve could be stretched or entrapped during osteotomy of the pubis if there was significant rotational or linear displacement of the acetabulum. Anterior or medial displacement of Bernese peri-acetabular osteotomy. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. Intraoperative radial nerve injury during coronary artery surgery – report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsivgoulis Georgios

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerve injury and brachial plexopathy are known, though rare complications of coronary artery surgery. The ulnar nerve is most frequently affected, whereas radial nerve lesions are much less common accounting for only 3% of such intraoperative injuries. Case presentations Two 52- and 50-year-old men underwent coronary artery surgery. On the first postoperative day they both complained of wrist drop on the left. Neurological examination revealed a paresis of the wrist and finger extensor muscles (0/5, and the brachioradialis (4/5 with hypoaesthesia on the radial aspect of the dorsum of the left hand. Both biceps and triceps reflexes were normoactive, whereas the brachioradialis reflex was diminished on the left. Muscles innervated from the median and ulnar nerve, as well as all muscles above the elbow were unaffected. Electrophysiological studies were performed 3 weeks later, when muscle power of the affected muscles had already begun to improve. Nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography revealed a partial conduction block of the radial nerve along the spiral groove, motor axonal loss distal to the site of the lesion and moderate impairment in recruitment with fibrillation potentials in radial innervated muscles below the elbow and normal findings in triceps and deltoid. Electrophysiology data pointed towards a radial nerve injury in the spiral groove. We assume external compression as the causative factor. The only apparatus attached to the patients' left upper arm was the sternal retractor, used for dissection of the internal mammary artery. Both patients were overweight and lying on the operating table for a considerable time might have caused the compression of their left upper arm on the self retractor's supporting column which was fixed to the table rail 5 cm above the left elbow joint, in the site where the radial nerve is directly apposed to the humerus. Conclusion Although very uncommon, external

  15. Differentiating Mild Papilledema and Buried Optic Nerve Head Drusen Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Kaushal M.; Pasol, Joshua; Rosa, Potyra R.; Lam, Byron L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical utility of spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in differentiating mild papilledema from buried optic nerve head drusen (ONHD). Design Comparative case series. Participants 16 eyes of 9 patients with ultrasound-proven buried ONHD, 12 eyes of 6 patients with less than or equal to Frisén grade 2 papilledema due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension. 2 normal fellow eyes of patients with buried ONHD were included. Methods A raster scan on the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness analysis was performed on each eye using SD-OCT. Eight eyes underwent enhanced depth imaging SD-OCT. Images were assessed qualitatively and quantitatively to identify differentiating features between buried ONHD and papilledema. Five clinicians trained with a tutorial and masked to the underlying diagnosis reviewed the SD-OCT images of each eye independently to determine the diagnosis. Main outcome measures Differences in RNFL thickness in each quadrant between the two groups, and diagnostic accuracy of five independent clinicians based on the SD-OCT images alone. Results We found no statistically significant difference in RNFL thickness between buried ONHD and papilledema in any of the four quadrants. Diagnostic accuracy among the readers was low and ranged from 50–64%. The kappa coefficient of agreement among the readers was 0.35 (95% Confidence interval: 0.19, 0.54). Conclusions SD-OCT is not clinically reliable in differentiating buried ONHD and mild papilledema. PMID:24321144

  16. A PET activation study of brush-evoked allodynia in patients with nerve injury pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kupers, Ron; Svensson, Peter

    2006-01-01

    allodynia. Nine patients with peripheral nerve injury were scanned during rest, brush-evoked allodynia, and brushing of normal contralateral skin. PET data were analyzed for the whole group and for single subjects. Allodynic stimulation activated the contralateral orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11) in every...... computational demands of processing a mixed sensation of brush and pain....

  17. Dorsal Horn Parvalbumin Neurons Are Gate-Keepers of Touch-Evoked Pain after Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Petitjean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease that results from nerve damage, persists long after the injury has subsided, and is characterized by spontaneous pain and mechanical hypersensitivity. Although loss of inhibitory tone in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is a major contributor to neuropathic pain, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this disinhibition are unclear. Here, we combined pharmacogenetic activation and selective ablation approaches in mice to define the contribution of spinal cord parvalbumin (PV-expressing inhibitory interneurons in naive and neuropathic pain conditions. Ablating PV neurons in naive mice produce neuropathic pain-like mechanical allodynia via disinhibition of PKCγ excitatory interneurons. Conversely, activating PV neurons in nerve-injured mice alleviates mechanical hypersensitivity. These findings indicate that PV interneurons are modality-specific filters that gate mechanical but not thermal inputs to the dorsal horn and that increasing PV interneuron activity can ameliorate the mechanical hypersensitivity that develops following nerve injury.

  18. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months.

  19. [Neuroanatomy of the optic, trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The intracranial and intraorbital course of the optic nerve is described concisely, the intracanicular one in full details. Apart from the wide and small sections of the optic canal, its axis opposite to the cranial planes, the coating of the canal and the adjacency to the paranasal sinuses and arteries are exactly described. 2. At the trigeminal nerve the trigeminal ganglion, its roots and also the mandibular nerve have great importance in the practical medicine considering thermo-coagulation or surgery of the trigeminal nerve. This segments and also the adjacency of the fifth nerve to the internal carotid artery and subarachinoid brain vessels are exactly, the nuclei areas and central tracts are briefly explained. 3. The nuclei of the facial nerve the intracerebral and intracisternal course and its development, the facial canal and its narrow passes are described. Also the position of the internal acoustic pore in the skull, the dimensions of the internal acoustic meatus and the relations between nerves and vessels are explained. In addition to the geniculate ganglion and the chorda tympani the communications of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone, the tympanic intumescentia (ganglion) and the nervus intermedius, also the petrosal nerves are included in the description. The sheaths of the segments of the seventh cranial nerve and also the fasciculation are exactly, the somatotopic organization is briefly described. 4. The extracranial course of the glossopharyngeal nerve is briefly, its intracranial sections are included exactly in the investigation. 5. The nuclei of the vagus nerve and the intra- und extracranial course are described. 6. The accessory nerve, its nucleus and the intra- and extracranial course are concisely explained. 7. The hypoglossal nerve, its nucleus, the emergence of the fibres and also the relations of nerves and vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are described. The hypoglossal canal and also the extracranial course are

  20. Size of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates at term-equivalent age at magnetic resonance imaging

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    Oyama, Jun; Mori, Kouichi [Tsuchiura Kyodo General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Imamura, Masatoshi [Tsuchiura Kyodo General Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Mizushima, Yukiko [Tsuchiura Kyodo General Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki (Japan); Tateishi, Ukihide [Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Departments of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    The expected MRI-based dimensions of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates are unknown. To evaluate the sizes of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates at term-equivalent age using MRI. We retrospectively analyzed brain MRI examinations in 62 infants (28 boys) without intracranial abnormalities. The images were obtained in infants at term-equivalent age with a 1.5-tesla MRI scanner. We measured the widths and heights of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract and calculated the cross-sectional areas using the formula for an ellipse. The means ± standard deviation of the width, height and cross-sectional area of the intracranial optic nerve were 2.7 ± 0.2 mm, 1.7 ± 0.2 mm and 3.5 ± 0.5 mm{sup 2}, respectively. The width, height and cross-sectional area of the optic tract were 1.5 ± 0.1 mm, 1.6 ± 0.1 mm and 2.0 ± 0.2 mm{sup 2}, respectively. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, we found that postmenstrual age showed independent intermediate positive correlations with the width (r = 0.48, P < 0.01) and cross-sectional area (r = 0.40, P < 0.01) of the intracranial optic nerve. The lower bounds of the 95% prediction intervals for the width and cross-sectional area of the intracranial optic nerve were 0.07 x (postmenstrual age in weeks) - 0.46 mm, and 0.17 x (postmenstrual age in weeks) - 4.0 mm{sup 2}, respectively. We identified the sizes of the intracranial optic nerve and optic tract in neonates at term-equivalent age. The postmenstrual age at MRI independently positively correlated with the sizes. (orig.)

  1. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃ improves myelination and recovery after nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Chabas

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated i that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i to assess which form - ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol - and which dose were the most efficient and ii to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle, and compared to unlesioned rats (Control. Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day, cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral

  2. Role of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fregnan, Federica; Muratori, Luisa; Simões, Anabel Rodriguez; Giacobini-Robecchi, Maria Giuseppina; Raimondo, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory events occurring in the distal part of an injured peripheral nerve have, nowadays, a great resonance. Investigating the timing of action of the several cytokines in the important stages of Wallerian degeneration helps to understand the regenerative process and design pharmacologic intervention that promotes and expedites recovery. The complex and synergistic action of inflammatory cytokines finally promotes axonal regeneration. Cytokines can be divided into pro- and anti-inflamma...

  3. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃) improves myelination and recovery after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabas, Jean-Francois; Stephan, Delphine; Marqueste, Tanguy; Garcia, Stephane; Lavaut, Marie-Noelle; Nguyen, Catherine; Legre, Regis; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Decherchi, Patrick; Feron, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated i) that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii) that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i) to assess which form - ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol - and which dose were the most efficient and ii) to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle), and compared to unlesioned rats (Control). Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day), cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i) the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii) the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii) neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral nerve or

  4. In Vivo Changes in Lamina Cribrosa Microarchitecture and Optic Nerve Head Structure in Early Experimental Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M Ivers

    Full Text Available The lamina cribrosa likely plays an important role in retinal ganglion cell axon injury in glaucoma. We sought to (1 better understand optic nerve head (ONH structure and anterior lamina cribrosa surface (ALCS microarchitecture between fellow eyes of living, normal non-human primates and (2 characterize the time-course of in vivo structural changes in the ONH, ALCS microarchitecture, and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT in non-human primate eyes with early experimental glaucoma (EG. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT images of the ONH were acquired cross-sectionally in six bilaterally normal rhesus monkeys, and before and approximately every two weeks after inducing unilateral EG in seven rhesus monkeys. ONH parameters and RNFLT were quantified from segmented SDOCT images. Mean ALCS pore area, elongation and nearest neighbor distance (NND were quantified globally, in sectors and regionally from adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope images. In bilaterally normal monkeys, ONH parameters were similar between fellow eyes with few inter-eye differences in ALCS pore parameters. In EG monkeys, an increase in mean ALCS Depth (ALCSD was the first structural change measured in 6 of 7 EG eyes. A decrease in mean minimum rim width (MRW simultaneously accompanied this early change in 4 of 6 EG eyes and was the first structural change in the 7th EG eye. Mean ALCS pore parameters were among the first or second changes measured in 4 EG eyes. Mean ALCS pore area and NND increased in superotemporal and temporal sectors and in central and peripheral regions at the first time-point of change in ALCS pore geometry. RNFLT and/or mean ALCS radius of curvature were typically the last parameters to initially change. Survival analyses found mean ALCSD was the only parameter to significantly show an initial change prior to the first measured loss in RNFLT across EG eyes.

  5. Lingual nerve injury in third molar surgery I. Observations on recovery of sensation with spontaneous healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Stoltze, Kaj

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the healing potential of damaged lingual nerves with some remaining function at least 3 months post injury. Forty-six patients were monitored at different time intervals after injury. A simple neurosensory examination included the perception of tactile...... severe injury. Patients should be monitored repeatedly for at least 3 months, and not operated on until neurosensory function no longer improves, and is less than what might be rendered by microsurgical repair. Through proper training and mastery of the surgical approach, every effort should be focused...

  6. Efficacy of nerve growth factor on the treatment of optic nerve contusion Evaluation with visual evoked potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pattern- visual evoked potential (PVEP) can reflect the functional status of retinal ganglial cells (RGC) and visual cortex, and is an objective examination for visual pathway function. It is a unique method for objectively examining the optic nerve function of optic ganglion cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) on PVEF in the treatment of optic nerve contusion, evaluate the clinical efficacy of NGF, and make an efficacy comparison with vitamin B12.DESIGN: A randomly grouping, controlled observation.SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, Tangshan Gongren Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Forty patients with optic nerve contusion caused by eye trauma, who received the treatment in the Tangshan Worker Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University between January 2006 and June 2007, were recruited in this study. The involved 40 patients, including 34 males and 6 females,were aged 14 - 59 years. They were confirmed to have optic nerve contusion by ophthalmologic consultation combined with history of disease and orbital CT examination. Informed consents of treatments and detected items were obtained from all the patients. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups with 20 in each:NGF group and vitamin B12 group.METHODS: Conservative treatment was used in the two groups. In addition, patients in the NGF group were intramuscularly injected with NGF solution 18 μg/time, once a day. Those in the vitamin B12 group were injected by the same method with common vitamin B12 of 500 μg combined with vitamin B1 of 100 mg, once a day.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: PVEP examination was conducted in all the patients before, one and two weeks after treatment, and latency and amplitude at P100 were detected.RESULTS: Forty patients with optic nerve contusion participated in the final analysis. Before treatment,significant differences in the latency and amplitude at P100 were not found in patients between two groups

  7. Rat sciatic nerve crush injury and recovery tracked by plantar test and immunohistochemistry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavić, Roman; Pavić, Michele L; Tvrdeić, Ante; Tot, Ozana K; Heffer, Marija

    2011-01-01

    An experimental crush injury to the sciatic nerve, with a crush force of 49.2 N (pressure p=1.98x10(8) Pa), was inflicted in 30 male rats (Wistar). A control group (sham), with the same number of rats, was also operated upon exactly as the experimental group but without the crush injury. We tested the sensory and motor recovery of the sciatic nerve with Hargreaves method, using an apparatus from Ugo Basile, Italy. Testing was continued for both legs of each rat, injured and uninjured, starting preoperatively (0 day), and then 1, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days postoperatively. The same experiment was run simultaneously with the sham group. The Plantar test showed recovery of the sensory and motor function of the sciatic nerve, though not complete recovery, by 28 days. An immunohistochemical experiment was run in parallel with the plantar test on L3-L6 segments of the spinal cord from where the sciatic nerve extends. We used antibodies for Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), and gangliosides GD1a and GT1b on the aforesaid part of the spinal cord. The immunohistochemical methods showed changes in sensory and motor axons in the spinal cord segment L3-L6 which suggest correspondence with the results of the Plantar test, in terms of recovery of the sensory and motor function after injury of the sciatic nerve. The immunohistochemical results also show ipsilateral and contralateral changes following injury. Results of the plantar test are suggestive that the rat shows compensation for an injury in its contralateral leg.

  8. Effect of Zofenopril on regeneration of sciatic nerve crush injury in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalender Ali

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zofenopril is an antioxidant agent which has been shown to have beneficial effects in hypertension and heart failure. The aim of this study was to test the effects of Zofenopril on nerve regeneration and scarring in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Methods Twenty-one adult Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a surgical procedure involving right sciatic nerve crush injury. 15 mg/kg Zofenopril was administered orally to seven rats in group Z for seven days. Seven rats in group S received saline orally for seven days. Seven rats in the control group C received no drug after crush injury. Fourteenth and 42nd days after injury, functional and electromyography assessments of nerves were performed. Functional recovery was analyzed using a walking track assessment, and quantified using the sciatic functional index (SFI. After these evaluations, all rats were sacrificed and microscopic evaluations were performed. Results The Sciatic functional Index (SFI in group Z on 14th day is different significantly from group S and group C (p = 0.037. But on 42nd day there was no difference between groups (p = 0.278. The statistical analyses of electromyelographic (EMG studies showed that the latency in group Z is significantly different from group S (p = 0.006 and group C (p = 0.045. But on 42nd day there was no difference between groups like SFI (p = 0.147. The amplitude was evaluated better in group Z than others (p Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Zofenopril promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve injuries in rat models.

  9. Case of acute optic nerve compression caused by tuberculum sellae meningioma with optic canal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Y

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Yuzhu Chai1, Hiroko Yamazaki1, Akihide Kondo2, Toshiyuki Oshitari3, Shuichi Yamamoto31Department of Ophthalmology, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Chiba, 2Department of Neurosurgery, Juntendo University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanAbstract: We present detailed ophthalmic findings in a case of tuberculum sellae meningioma with acute visual symptoms due to optic canal involvement. A 62-year-old Japanese woman reported a 1-week history of headaches and blurred vision in her left eye. Her visual acuity was 0.3 in the left eye with no ophthalmoscopic abnormalities. A relative afferent pupillary defect and inferior temporal field defect were found in the left eye. Pattern visual evoked potentials were undetectable in the left eye. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a 9 mm intracranial lesion around the left optic nerve anterior to the chiasm. She was diagnosed with granulomatous inflammation because of the increased cell counts and protein concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with steroid pulse therapy, and her visual acuity and visual field defect improved to normal in 3 weeks. However, 16 months after the onset, she suffered from headaches again and had a complete loss of vision in her left eye. There was no response to steroid pulse therapy. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the lesion had extended into the left optic canal, and emergency tumor removal surgery was carried out. The histopathological diagnosis was meningioma. One month after the surgery, her left visual acuity improved to 1.2, and her visual field was almost normal. Pattern visual evoked potentials were present but had a prolonged P100 latency of 170 ms. A thinning of the ganglion cell complex was detected by optical coherence tomography. Ophthalmologists should be aware that a small tuberculum

  10. Integrins in Trabecular Meshwork and Optic Nerve Head: Possible Association with the Pathogenesis of Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisheng Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins are a family of membrane-spanning proteins that are important receptors for cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. They also provide connections between the extracellular environment and intracellular cytoskeletons and are responsible for activation of many intracellular signaling pathways. In vitro and in vivo data strongly indicate that integrin-mediated signaling events can modulate the organization of the actin cytoskeleton in trabecular meshwork (TM cells and are associated with astrocyte migration and microglia activation of the optic nerve head in patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Consequently, increase in resistance in the TM outflow pathways and remodeling of the optic nerve head occur, which in turn increases intraocular pressure (IOP, adds additional mechanical stress and strain to optic nerve axons, and accelerates damage of axons initially caused by optic nerve head remodeling. Integrins appear to be ideal candidates for translating physical stress and strain into cellular responses known to occur in glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

  11. A model of the mammalian optic nerve fibre based on experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oozeer, M; Veraart, C; Legat, V; Delbeke, J

    2006-08-01

    Several experimental data about membrane dynamics and pharmacological sensitivities of optic nerve axons have been published. The present work summarizes these data and computer simulations have been used to develop a model of the mammalian optic nerve fibre. The ionic currents description were derived from existing membrane models and particularly from a model of the somatic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) impulse generation. However, original equations had to be modified to match experimental data, which suggests that in RGCs, axonal and somatic ion channel expression are different. The new model is consistent with recent experimental results about optic nerve axonal excitability.

  12. Pit-like changes of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R. L.; Maumenee, A. E.; Green, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Six patients with open-angle glaucoma and acquired pit-like changes in the optic nerve head are presented. In 1 patient evolution of the pit-like defect is documented. In all 6 patients progression of associated visual field deficits is described. It is suggested that such pit-like changes in selected patients with glaucoma may not represent congenital lesions but rather local, progressive nerve head disease, occurring particularly in response to raised intraocular pressure. The management of patients with optic nerve head pitting and the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy are discussed with respect to this observation. Images PMID:666988

  13. Effect of alpha lipoic acid on retinal ganglion cell survival in an optic nerve crush model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruixing; Wang, Yanling; Pu, Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether alpha lipoic acid (ALA) promotes the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury and to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of ALA in the retina in this ONC injury model. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (180–220 g) were subjected to ONC injury surgery. ALA (63 mg/kg) was injected intravenously 1 day before or after the ONC injury. Animals were euthanized after 10 days, and the number of ganglion cells positive for RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (Rbpms), which is an RGC marker, were counted on the whole mount retinas. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting were performed to examine the localization and levels of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) in the retinas in all experimental groups. To determine whether the EPO/EPOR signaling pathway was involved in the ALA antioxidant pathway, the rats were subjected to ruxolitinib (INCB018424, 0.25 mg/kg, bid, intraperitoneal, i.p.) treatment after the animals were injected intravenously with ALA 1 day before ONC injury. Results The average number of Rbpms-positive cells/mm2 in the control group (sham-operated group), the ONC group, the ALA-ONC group, and the ONC-ALA group retinas was 2219±28, 418±8, 848±22, and 613±18/mm2, respectively. The ALA-ONC and ONC-ALA groups showed a statistically significantly increased RGC survival rate compared to the ONC group. There were statistical differences in the RGC survival rates between the ALA-ONC (39%) and ONC-ALA groups (28%; p<0.05). Immunofluorescent labeling showed that EPOR and NT4/5 expression was significant in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL). At the same time, western blot analysis revealed that ALA induced upregulation of EPOR protein and NT4/5 protein expression in the retina after ONC injury. However, INCB018424 reversed the protective effects of ALA on the ONC retinas. Conclusions ALA has

  14. Nanostructured Guidance for Peripheral Nerve Injuries: A Review with a Perspective in the Oral and Maxillofacial Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sivolella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Injury to peripheral nerves can occur as a result of various surgical procedures, including oral and maxillofacial surgery. In the case of nerve transaction, the gold standard treatment is the end-to-end reconnection of the two nerve stumps. When it cannot be performed, the actual strategies consist of the positioning of a nerve graft between the two stumps. Guided nerve regeneration using nano-structured scaffolds is a promising strategy to promote axon regeneration. Biodegradable electrospun conduits composed of aligned nanofibers is a new class of devices used to improve neurite extension and axon outgrowth. Self assembled peptide nanofibrous scaffolds (SAPNSs demonstrated promising results in animal models for central nervous system injuries, and, more recently, for peripheral nerve injury. Aims of this work are (1 to review electrospun and self-assembled nanofibrous scaffolds use in vitro and in vivo for peripheral nerve regeneration; and (2 its application in peripheral nerve injuries treatment. The review focused on nanofibrous scaffolds with a diameter of less than approximately 250 nm. The conjugation in a nano scale of a natural bioactive factor with a resorbable synthetic or natural material may represent the best compromise providing both biological and mechanical cues for guided nerve regeneration. Injured peripheral nerves, such as trigeminal and facial, may benefit from these treatments.

  15. Sodium channel expression in the ventral posterolateral nucleus of the thalamus after peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman Stephen G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral nerve injury is known to up-regulate the expression of rapidly-repriming Nav1.3 sodium channel within first-order dorsal root ganglion neurons and second-order dorsal horn nociceptive neurons, but it is not known if pain-processing neurons higher along the neuraxis also undergo changes in sodium channel expression. In this study, we hypothesized that after peripheral nerve injury, third-order neurons in the ventral posterolateral (VPL nucleus of the thalamus undergo changes in expression of sodium channels. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve. Ten days after CCI, when allodynia and hyperalgesia were evident, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical analysis revealed up-regulation of Nav1.3 mRNA, but no changes in expression of Nav1.1, Nav1.2, or Nav1.6 in VPL neurons, and unit recordings demonstrated increased background firing, which persisted after spinal cord transection, and evoked hyperresponsiveness to peripheral stimuli. These results demonstrate that injury to the peripheral nervous system induces alterations in sodium channel expression within higher-order VPL neurons, and suggest that misexpression of the Nav1.3 sodium channel increases the excitability of VPL neurons injury, contributing to neuropathic pain.

  16. Assessment of Optic Nerve Impairment in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica by MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiye Chen

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI has been used for the evaluation of the white matter integrity. In this study, we evaluated optic nerve impairment in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO using DTI.Optic nerve DTI were performed on 28 NMO patients and 38 normal controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA values were measured in the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the intraorbital optic nerve segment. For the posterior intraorbital optic nerve, FA values of BI (0.20±0.07, MI (0.24±0.16, and NA (0.25±0.14 decreased significantly compared with that of NC (0.43±0.07 (P<0.05, and ROC analysis demonstrated that the area under the curve (AUC measurements for BI vs. NC, MI vs. NC, NA vs. NC, and NMO (including BI, MI, and NA vs. NC were 0.99, 0.93, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively. The corresponding diagnostic sensitivities of ROC analysis were 100%, 80%, 80%, and 91%; and the specificities were 93%, 97%, 91%, and 93%.Decreased FA value in the intraorbital optic nerve, especially in the posterior part of the nerve, was demonstrated as a characteristic MR feature for NMO-related optic nerve impairment.

  17. Expression of nerve growth factor precursor, mature nerve growth factor and their receptors during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoqian He; Jian Guo; Jiachuan Duan; Wenming Xu; Ning Chen; Hongxia Li; Li He

    2011-01-01

    We investigated nerve growth factor precursor (proNGF) and mature NGF expression in ischemic and non-ischemic cortices after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.In both ischemic and non-ischemic cortices, proNGF was found to be present in the extracellular space and cytoplasm.In addition, mature NGF was expressed in extracellular space, but with a very low signal.In ischemic cortex only, proNGF was significantly decreased, reaching a minimal level at 1 day.Mature NGF was increased at 4 hours, then reached a minimal level at 3 days.The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) was significantly decreased after ischemia, and increased at 3 days after ischemia.These results confirmed that proNGF was the predominant form of NGF during the pathological process of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.In addition, our findings suggest that ischemic injury may influence the conversion of proNGF to mature NGF, and that proNGF/p75NTR may be involved in reperfusion injury.

  18. Inhibition of α-crystallin on proliferation of rat retinal microglia following optic nerve injury%α晶体蛋白对LPS刺激及视神经损伤后大鼠视网膜小胶质细胞增殖及数量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴楠; 王艳华; 王晓芹; 刘东宁; 应希; 张莉; 王一

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究α晶体蛋白对大鼠视网膜小胶质细胞增殖能力及视神经损伤后小胶质细胞数量的影响.方法 脂多糖激活离体培养视网膜小胶质细胞,模拟视神经损伤,采用MTF分析α晶体蛋白对激活的小胶质细胞增殖能力的影响;建立大鼠视神经不全损伤模型,损伤后玻璃体腔注射α晶体蛋白,采用视网膜铺片及免疫荧光标记小胶质细胞并计数,比较不同组小胶质细胞的数量.结果 10-g/L~10-2 g/L浓度的脂多糖均可激活小胶质细胞(P<0.05),10-6g/L和10-4g/L浓度的α晶体蛋白可明显抑制10-6g/L浓度的脂多糖激活的小胶质细胞的增殖;视神经损伤1~3周,α晶体蛋白注射组小胶质细胞的数量明显少于损伤组(P<0.05).结论 α晶体蛋白可抑制视网膜上小胶质细胞的增殖和活化,减轻小胶质细胞对RGCs的过度吞噬和继发性损害,可能是视神经损伤后α晶体蛋白问接保护RGCs存活的另一机制.%Objective To investigate the effect of α-crystallin on the proliferation of rat retinal microglia after optic nerve injury. Methods The effect of α-crystallin on number and proliferation of microglia were analyzed by MTT assay.After the rat model with optic nerve injury was established,α-crystallin was iniected into vitreous cavity and the microglia cell number were counted and compared by retinal fiat counting and immunofluorescence labeling in different groups. Results The proliferation and activation of microglia cells could be stimulated by LPS at 10-6g/L to 10-2g/L.α-crystallin at 10-4g/L and 10-6g/L could inhibit proliferation and activation of microglia cells.Compared to BSA iniection group,α-crystallin could inhibit more significantly the number of microglia cells 1-3 weeks after injury (P<0.05). Conclusions α-crystallin can inhibit proliferation and activation of retinal microglia and alleviate overphagocytosis and secondary damage of retinal microglia to retinal ganglion cells

  19. Investigation of multiple optical and biometric properties of optic nerve head (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young-Joo; Chan, Aaron C.; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Makita, Shuichi; Miura, Masahiro; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases which results in optic nerve damage and vision loss. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely used to investigate geometric risk factor of glaucoma. However, material properties of ONH are also important to understand intra-ocular pressure related stress. We developed Jones-matrix based multifunctional posterior eye OCT (JM-OCT), which uses 1-μm band swept-source with a 100-kHz A-line rate. It provides three different optical properties, attenuation coefficient (AC), local birefringence (LB), and optical coherence angiography (OCA). We investigated the utility those properties for the investigation of normal ONH cases. 3 mm x 3 mm area around ONH was scanned for each eye, and biometric parameters were measured in hospital. Statistical analyses were performed with the mean values of above parameters at the regions of prelamina, lamina cribrosa, peripapillary sclera, and peripapillary nerve fiber layer, and biometric parameters of age, axial eye length, refractive error, and intraocular pressure. In qualitative observation, the lamina cribrosa generally shows more hyper signals in AC, LB, and OCA than prelamina. In t-test, AC, LB, and OCA showed significant difference (p eye length is positively correlated with LB and AC in lamina cribrosa. And these LB and AC are also negatively correlated with the refractive error. Age was found to be negatively correlated with OCA in lamina cribrosa.

  20. Anterior shoulder dislocation with axillary artery and nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razif, M A Mohamed; Rajasingam, V

    2002-12-01

    We report a rare case of left axillary artery injury associated with anterior dislocation of the left shoulder in a 25 yrs old male as a result of a road traffic accident. The shoulder dislocation was reduced. A left upper limb angiogram showed an obstructed left axillary artery. The obstructed segment was surgically reconstructed with a Dacron graft. Six months post operation in follow up, he was found to have good left shoulder function and no neurovascular deficit. This is an injury that could have been easily missed without a simple clinical examination.

  1. EFFECTS OF NERVE GROWTH FACTOR ON ENDOTHELIN AFTER SPINAL CORD INJURY IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective mechanisms of nerve growth factor (NGF) on spinal cord injury.Methods The spinal cord injury (SCI) of Wistar rats was performed by a 10g×2.5cm impact on the posterior T12 spinal cord.The experimental animals received NGF liquid by subarachnoid space tube.The radioimmunological techniques were applied to examine the level of endothelin.Results The level of endothelin was significantly increased after the injury as compared with that in control group(P<0.01).The level of endothelin in NGF group as obviously lowered as compared with that in normal saline group 4 h after injury (P<0.01).Conclusion NGF can protect spinal cord against injury in vivo.One of the mechanisms is that NGF could inhibit endothelin-induced vicious circle.

  2. Paranode Abnormalities and Oxidative Stress in Optic Nerve Vulnerable to Secondary Degeneration: Modulation by 670 nm Light Treatment.

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    Charis R Szymanski

    Full Text Available Secondary degeneration of nerve tissue adjacent to a traumatic injury results in further loss of neurons, glia and function, via mechanisms that may involve oxidative stress. However, changes in indicators of oxidative stress have not yet been demonstrated in oligodendrocytes vulnerable to secondary degeneration in vivo. We show increases in the oxidative stress indicator carboxymethyl lysine at days 1 and 3 after injury in oligodendrocytes vulnerable to secondary degeneration. Dihydroethidium staining for superoxide is reduced, indicating endogenous control of this particular reactive species after injury. Concurrently, node of Ranvier/paranode complexes are altered, with significant lengthening of the paranodal gap and paranode as well as paranode disorganisation. Therapeutic administration of 670 nm light is thought to improve oxidative metabolism via mechanisms that may include increased activity of cytochrome c oxidase. Here, we show that light at 670 nm, delivered for 30 minutes per day, results in in vivo increases in cytochrome c oxidase activity co-localised with oligodendrocytes. Short term (1 day 670 nm light treatment is associated with reductions in reactive species at the injury site. In optic nerve vulnerable to secondary degeneration superoxide in oligodendrocytes is reduced relative to handling controls, and is associated with reduced paranode abnormalities. Long term (3 month administration of 670 nm light preserves retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to secondary degeneration and maintains visual function, as assessed by the optokinetic nystagmus visual reflex. Light at a wavelength of 670 nm may serve as a therapeutic intervention for treatment of secondary degeneration following neurotrauma.

  3. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

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    Christian Witzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modified in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the influence of systemic ManNProp application using a specific in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal fluorescent proteins, we quantified the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow fluorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it until nerve harvest (5 days after transection. ManNProp significantly increased the mean distance of axonal regeneration (2.49 mm vs. 1.53 mm; P < 0.005 and the number of arborizing axons (21% vs. 16% P = 0.008 5 days after sciatic nerve grafting. ManNProp did not affect the number of regenerating axons or the number of branches per arborizing axon. The biochemical glycoengineering of the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid might be a promising approach for improving peripheral nerve regeneration.

  4. Rapid recovery of serratus anterior muscle function after microneurolysis of long thoracic nerve injury

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    Melcher Sonya E

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injury to the long thoracic nerve is a common cause of winging scapula. When the serratus anterior muscle is unable to function, patients often lose the ability to raise their arm overhead on the affected side. Methods Serratus anterior function was restored through decompression, neurolysis, and tetanic electrical stimulation of the long thoracic nerve. This included partial release of constricting middle scalene fibers and microneurolysis of epineurium and perineurium of the long thoracic nerve under magnification. Abduction angle was measured on the day before and the day following surgery. Results In this retrospective study of 13 neurolysis procedures of the long thoracic nerve, abduction is improved by 10% or greater within one day of surgery. The average improvement was 59° (p Conclusion In a notable number of cases, decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve leads to rapid improvements in winging scapula and the associated limitations on shoulder movement. The duration of the injury and the speed of improvement lead us to conclude that axonal channel defects can potentially exist that do not lead to Wallerian degeneration and yet cause a clear decrease in function.

  5. Long-term subjective and objective outcome after primary repair of traumatic facial nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijters, Erik; Hofer, Stefan O P; Mureau, Marc A M

    2008-08-01

    Although traumatic facial nerve paralysis is a severe handicap, there are no follow-up studies evaluating outcome after primary repair of traumatic facial nerve injuries. From May 1988 to August 2005, 27 patients (mean age, 27 years) were operated for traumatic facial nerve lesions (mean number of affected branches, 2.2). End-to-end facial nerve repair was always performed. All patients were invited to our outpatient clinic for standardized questionnaires (Facial Disability Index, Short Form-36 Health Survey), physical examination (Sunnybrook Facial Grading System), and clinical photographs. Sixteen patients participated in the follow-up study (mean, 9.2 years). Mean Facial Disability Index Physical and Social scores were 86 and 81, respectively, indicating good subjective facial functioning. The mean Sunnybrook Facial Grading System score was 74 indicating adequate facial functioning. Mean physical and mental health scores (Short Form-36 Health Survey) were comparable with normative data. Primary end-to-end repair of traumatic facial nerve injuries results in good long-term objective and subjective functional and emotional outcome.

  6. Comparison of current perception threshold electrical testing to clinical sensory testing for lingual nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziccardi, Vincent B; Dragoo, Joel; Eliav, Eli; Benoliel, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    We performed a retrospective study of lingual nerve injury assessment comparing the techniques of current perception threshold testing versus clinical sensory testing. We designed and implemented a cross-sectional study and enrolled a patient sample with lingual nerve injuries presenting for treatment to the principal investigator. The predictor variables were clinical sensory testing modalities (ie, temperature, nocioception, vibration, 2-point discrimination, brush stroke, and von Frey monofilament perception). The primary outcome variable was the electrical current perception thresholds of the tongue dorsum (neurometer measurements at 5, 250, and 2,000 Hz). Comparisons were established with the ipsilateral affected and contralateral unaffected lingual nerve distributions. The associations between the clinical sensory testing and current perception threshold measurements were assessed using correlation coefficients, with the level of statistical significance set at P thresholds at 2,000 Hz and the 2-point discrimination, reaction to brushing, reaction to vibration, and von Frey fiber thresholds, between the electrical stimulation thresholds at 250 Hz to the nociceptive and thermal thresholds, and between the electrical stimulation thresholds at 5 Hz to thermal stimuli. The significant correlations observed in the present study indicate that current perception threshold can be a complementary or alternative tool in the assessment and evaluation of lingual nerve injuries. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Schwann cells express erythropoietin receptor and represent a major target for Epo in peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqing; Gonias, Steven L; Campana, W Marie

    2005-09-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) expresses potent neuroprotective activity in the peripheral nervous system; however, the underlying mechanism remains incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate that Epo is upregulated in sciatic nerve after chronic constriction injury (CCI) and crush injury in rats, largely due to local Schwann cell production. In uninjured and injured nerves, Schwann cells also express Epo receptor (EpoR), and its expression is increased during Wallerian degeneration. CCI increased the number of Schwann cells at the injury site and the number was further increased by exogenously administered recombinant human Epo (rhEpo). To explore the activity of Epo in Schwann cells, primary cultures were established. These cells expressed cell-surface Epo receptors, with masses of 71 and 62 kDa, as determined by surface protein biotinylation and affinity precipitation. The 71-kDa species was rapidly but transiently tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to rhEpo. ERK/MAP kinase was also activated in rhEpo-treated Schwann cells; this response was blocked by pharmacologic antagonism of JAK-2. RhEpo promoted Schwann cell proliferation, as determined by BrdU incorporation. Cell proliferation was ERK/MAP kinase-dependent. These results support a model in which Schwann cells are a major target for Epo in injured peripheral nerves, perhaps within the context of an autocrine signaling pathway. EpoR-induced cell signaling and Schwann cell proliferation may protect injured peripheral nerves and promote regeneration.

  8. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruven, Carolin; Li, Wen; Li, Heng; Wong, Wai-Man; Wu, Wutian

    2017-02-27

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200-300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy.

  9. Transplantation of Embryonic Spinal Cord Derived Cells Helps to Prevent Muscle Atrophy after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Ruven

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Injuries to peripheral nerves are frequent in serious traumas and spinal cord injuries. In addition to surgical approaches, other interventions, such as cell transplantation, should be considered to keep the muscles in good condition until the axons regenerate. In this study, E14.5 rat embryonic spinal cord fetal cells and cultured neural progenitor cells from different spinal cord segments were injected into transected musculocutaneous nerve of 200–300 g female Sprague Dawley (SD rats, and atrophy in biceps brachii was assessed. Both kinds of cells were able to survive, extend their axons towards the muscle and form neuromuscular junctions that were functional in electromyographic studies. As a result, muscle endplates were preserved and atrophy was reduced. Furthermore, we observed that the fetal cells had a better effect in reducing the muscle atrophy compared to the pure neural progenitor cells, whereas lumbar cells were more beneficial compared to thoracic and cervical cells. In addition, fetal lumbar cells were used to supplement six weeks delayed surgical repair after the nerve transection. Cell transplantation helped to preserve the muscle endplates, which in turn lead to earlier functional recovery seen in behavioral test and electromyography. In conclusion, we were able to show that embryonic spinal cord derived cells, especially the lumbar fetal cells, are beneficial in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries due to their ability to prevent the muscle atrophy.

  10. Single session of brief electrical stimulation immediately following crush injury enhances functional recovery of rat facial nerve

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    Eileen M. Foecking, PhD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries lead to a variety of pathological conditions, including paresis or paralysis when the injury involves motor axons. We have been studying ways to enhance the regeneration of peripheral nerves using daily electrical stimulation (ES following a facial nerve crush injury. In our previous studies, ES was not initiated until 24 h after injury. The current experiment tested whether ES administered immediately following the crush injury would further decrease the time for complete recovery from facial paralysis. Rats received a unilateral facial nerve crush injury and an electrode was positioned on the nerve proximal to the crush site. Animals received daily 30 min sessions of ES for 1 d (day of injury only, 2 d, 4 d, 7 d, or daily until complete functional recovery. Untreated animals received no ES. Animals were observed daily for the return of facial function. Our findings demonstrated that one session of ES was as effective as daily stimulation at enhancing the recovery of most functional parameters. Therefore, the use of a single 30 min session of ES as a possible treatment strategy should be studied in human patients with paralysis as a result of acute nerve injuries.

  11. Method for optic nerve intensity characterization in mice from Mn2+ enhanced MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, D.; Ribic, J.; Butzkueven, H.; Fang, K.; Kilpatrick, T. J.; Egan, G. F.; Salvado, O.

    2009-02-01

    Investigating whether manganese transport is impaired in the optic nerve of small animal model is a new approach for evaluating optic neuritis. One needs to quantify signal intensity enhancement due to Mn2+ after intra-orbital injection, along the optic nerve from MR images. Quantification is very challenging as the optic nerve (ON) is not straight, its location does not correspond to standard slice orientation, the noise is substantial, and the signal is subject to inhomogeneity from the coil sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a semi-automatic method whereby 1) the retina point and the start of the chiasm in a mouse brain MR image are defined manually in a 3D visualization environment, 2) optic nerve in reformatted slices perpendicular to the optic nerve segment is semi-manually selected, 3) an automatic algorithm extracts the intensities along the optic nerve while correcting for intensity inhomogeneity, and 4) a model for the Mn2+ diffusion with a exponential decay function is fitted to the intensity profile. Results for the study of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are reported whereby statistically significant differences were found between the EAE and the control group.

  12. Nitrogen substituent polarity influences dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid oxidation, nerve copper accumulation, and myelin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Holly L; Viquez, Olga M; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N; Valentine, William M

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate's nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes that it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generated dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that were lipid- and water-soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord, and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities, and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined, and the quantity of protein carbonyls was measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provided evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid-soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative

  13. Role of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Federica Fregnan; Luisa Muratori; Anabel Rodriguez Sim(o)es; Maria Giuseppina Giacobini-Robecchi; Stefania Raimondo

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory events occurring in the distal part of an injured peripheral nerve have,nowadays,a great resonance.Investigating the timing of action of the several cytokines in the important stages of Wallerian degeneration helps to understand the regenerative process and design pharmacologic intervention that promotes and expedites recovery.The complex and synergistic action of inflammatory cytokines finally promotes axonal regeneration.Cytokines can be divided into pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines that upregutate and downregulate,respectively,the production of inflammatory mediators.While pro-inflammatory cytokines are expressed in the first phase of Wallerian degeneration and promote the recruitment of macrophages,anti-inflammatory cytokines are expressed after this recruitment and downregulate the production of all cytokines,thus determining the end of the process.In this review,we describe the major inflammatory cytokines involved in Wallerian degeneration and the early phases of nerve regeneration.In particular,we focus on interleukin-1,interleukin-2,interleukin-6,tumor necrosis factor-β,interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β.

  14. Practical Considerations for Optic Nerve Estimation in Telemedicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The projected increase in diabetes in the United States and worldwide has created a need for broad-based, inexpensive screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR), an eye disease which can lead to vision impairment. A telemedicine network with retina cameras and automated quality control, physiological feature location, and lesion / anomaly detection is a low-cost way of achieving broad-based screening. In this work we report on the effect of quality estimation on an optic nerve (ON) detection method with a confidence metric. We report on an improvement of the fusion technique using a data set from an ophthalmologists practice then show the results of the method as a function of image quality on a set of images from an on-line telemedicine network collected in Spring 2009 and another broad-based screening program. We show that the fusion method, combined with quality estimation processing, can improve detection performance and also provide a method for utilizing a physician-in-the-loop for images that may exceed the capabilities of automated processing.

  15. Peripheral nerve injuries in weight training: sites, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Keith R; Brahma, Barunashish; McGillicuddy, John E

    2005-07-01

    Direct trauma, compression caused by muscle hypertrophy or other soft tissue changes, or excessive stretching of a peripheral nerve in the upper extremity may lead to uncommon-but potentially serious-complications. Clinicians are seeing more of these injuries as weight training, power lifting, bodybuilding, cross-training, and general physical conditioning with weights become more popular. Symptoms of pain, weakness, paresthesia, or palsy; physical exam findings; electromyography; and nerve conduction studies are used to make the diagnosis. Most conditions respond well to conservative measures, such as rest from the offending exercise and correction of poor technique, but surgery may be required for complete clinical resolution in severe cases.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor from bone marrow-derived cells promotes post-injury repair of peripheral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Takemura

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF stimulates peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the origin of BNDF and its precise effect on nerve repair have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the role of BDNF from bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs in post-injury nerve repair. Control and heterozygote BDNF knockout mice (BDNF+/- received a left sciatic nerve crush using a cerebral blood clip. Especially, for the evaluation of BDNF from BMDCs, studies with bone marrow transplantation (BMT were performed before the injury. We evaluated nerve function using a rotarod test, sciatic function index (SFI, and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV simultaneously with histological nerve analyses by immunohistochemistry before and after the nerve injury until 8 weeks. BDNF production was examined by immunohistochemistry and mRNA analyses. After the nerve crush, the controls showed severe nerve dysfunction evaluated at 1 week. However, nerve function was gradually restored and reached normal levels by 8 weeks. By immunohistochemistry, BDNF expression was very faint before injury, but was dramatically increased after injury at 1 week in the distal segment from the crush site. BDNF expression was mainly co-localized with CD45 in BMDCs, which was further confirmed by the appearance of GFP-positive cells in the BMT study. Variant analysis of BDNF mRNA also confirmed this finding. BDNF+/- mice showed a loss of function with delayed histological recovery and BDNF+/+→BDNF+/- BMT mice showed complete recovery both functionally and histologically. These results suggested that the attenuated recovery of the BDNF+/- mice was rescued by the transplantation of BMCs and that BDNF from BMDCs has an essential role in nerve repair.

  17. Calpain inhibitor attenuated optic nerve damage in acute optic neuritis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arabinda; Guyton, M. Kelly; Smith, Amena; Wallace, Gerald; McDowell, Misty L.; Matzelle, Denise D.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2012-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON), which is an acute inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), often occurs in multiple sclerosis (MS). ON is an early diagnostic sign in most MS patients caused by damage to the optic nerve leading to visual dysfunction. Various features of both MS and ON can be studied following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, in Lewis rats. Inflammation and cell death in the optic nerve, with subsequent damage to the retinal ganglion cells in the retina, are thought to correlate with visual dysfunction. Thus, characterizing the pathophysiological changes that lead to visual dysfunction in EAE animals may help develop novel targets for therapeutic intervention. We treated EAE animals with and without the calpain inhibitor calpeptin (CP). Our studies demonstrated that the Ca2+-activated neutral protease calpain was upregulated in the optic nerve following induction of EAE at the onset of clinical signs (OCS) of the disease and these changes were attenuated following treatment with CP. These reductions correlated with decreases in inflammation (cytokines, iNOS, COX-2, NF-κB), and microgliosis (i.e. activated microglia). We observed that calpain inhibition reduced astrogliosis (reactive astroglia) and expression of aquaporin 4 (AQP4). The balance of Th1/Th2 cytokine production and also expression of the Th1-related CCR5 and CXCR3 chemokine receptors influence many pathological processes and play both causative and protective roles in neuron damage. Our data indicated that CP suppressed cytokine imbalances. Also, Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, production of tBid, PARP-1, expression and activities of calpain and caspases, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation were attenuated after treatment with CP. Our results demonstrated that CP decreased demyelination [loss of myelin basic protein (MBP)] and axonal damage [increase in dephosphorylated neurofilament protein (de-NFP), and also

  18. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labronici, Pedro José; Reder, Vitor Rodrigues; de Araujo Marins Filho, Guilherme Ferreira; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. Method 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. Results All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2) were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. Conclusion The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk. PMID:27069891

  19. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer.

  20. Sesame oil improves functional recovery by attenuating nerve oxidative stress in a mouse model of acute peripheral nerve injury: role of Nrf-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Che-Chia; Huang, Hui-Cheng; Wu, Po-Ting; Tai, Ta-Wei; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral nervous injury (PNI) is a common form of trauma in modern society, especially in sport players. Despite the advance of therapy for PNI, the recovery of function can never reach the preinjury level after treatments. Recently, inhibiting neural oxidative stress shows a beneficial effect in improving functional recovery after PNI. In addition, sesame oil has been reported to possess the excellent antioxidative properties. However, whether sesame oil can improve the functional recovery after PNI by its antioxidative effect has never been investigated. Thirty mice were randomly divided into five groups of six: group I mice received sham operation; group II mice received sciatic nerve crush; and groups III-V mice daily ingested 0.5, 1 and 2 ml/kg of sesame oil for 6 days, respectively, after sciatic nerve crush. Oxidative stress, GAP43 and nuclear Nrf2 levels as well as spinal somatosensory evoked potentials were assessed on day 6, while paw withdrawal latency and sciatic function index were assessed on days 0, 3, and 6. Sesame oil significantly decreased lipid peroxidation and increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and GAP43 expression in sciatic nerve. Furthermore, sesame oil improved electrophysiological and functional assessments in mice with sciatic nerve crush. In conclusion, sesame oil may improve nerve functional recovery by attenuating nerve oxidative stress in mouse acute peripheral nerve injury. Further, application of natural product sesame oil may be an alternative approach for improving nerve functional recovery in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries: epidemiological findings, neuropathic pain and quality of life in 158 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaramitaro, Palma; Mondelli, Mauro; Logullo, Francesco; Grimaldi, Serena; Battiston, Bruno; Sard, Arman; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Faccani, Giuliano; Cocito, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) epidemiological analysis of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries; (2) assessment of neuropathic pain and quality of life in patients affected by traumatic neuropathies. All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of traumatic neuropathies from four Italian centres were enrolled. Electromyography confirmed clinical level and site diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. All patients were evaluated by disability scales, pain screening tools, and quality of life tests. 158 consecutive patients for a total of 211 traumatic neuropathies were analysed. The brachial plexus was a frequent site of traumatic injury (36%) and the radial, ulnar, and peroneal were the most commonly involved nerves with 15% of iatrogenic injuries. Seventy-two percent of the traumatic neuropathies were painful. Pain was present in 66% and neuropathic pain in 50% of all patients. Patients had worse quality of life scores than did the healthy Italian population. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between the quality of life and the severity of the pain, particularly neuropathic pain (Short Form-36 [SF-36] p < 0.005; Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] p < 0.0001). Traumatic neuropathies were more frequent in young males after road accidents, mainly in the upper limbs. Severe neuropathic pain and not only disability contributed to worsening the quality of life in patients with traumatic neuropathies.

  2. Prenatal determinants of optic nerve hypoplasia: Review of suggested correlates and future focus

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Borchert, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), a congenital malformation characterized by an underdeveloped optic nerve, is a seemingly epidemic cause of childhood blindness and visual impairment with associated lifelong morbidity. While the prenatal determinants of ONH are unknown, early case reports have led to a longstanding speculation that risky health behaviors (e.g. recreational drugs, alcohol) are a likely culprit. There has yet to be a systematic review of the epidemiology of ONH to assess the common...

  3. Optic nerve oxygen tension in pigs and the effect of carbonic anhydrase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, E; Jensen, P K; Eysteinsson, T

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture.......To evaluate how the oxygen tension of the optic nerve (ONP(O)2) is affected by the administration of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitors dorzolamide and acetazolamide and by alterations in oxygen and carbon dioxide in the breathing mixture....

  4. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi [Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Peters, Christoph [Institute fuer Molekulare Medizin und Zellforshung, Albert-Ludwings-Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Uchiyama, Yasuo [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakan@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  5. Normal distribution of VGLUT1 synapses on spinal motoneuron dendrites and their reorganization after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotterman, Travis M; Nardelli, Paul; Cope, Timothy C; Alvarez, Francisco J

    2014-03-05

    Peripheral nerve injury induces permanent alterations in spinal cord circuitries that are not reversed by regeneration. Nerve injury provokes the loss of many proprioceptive IA afferent synapses (VGLUT1-IR boutons) from motoneurons, the reduction of IA EPSPs in motoneurons, and the disappearance of stretch reflexes. After motor and sensory axons successfully reinnervate muscle, lost IA VGLUT1 synapses are not re-established and the stretch reflex does not recover; however, electrically evoked EPSPs do recover. The reasons why remaining IA synapses can evoke EPSPs on motoneurons, but fail to transmit useful stretch signals are unknown. To better understand changes in the organization of VGLUT1 IA synapses that might influence their input strength, we analyzed their distribution over the entire dendritic arbor of motoneurons before and after nerve injury. Adult rats underwent complete tibial nerve transection followed by microsurgical reattachment and 1 year later motoneurons were intracellularly recorded and filled with neurobiotin to map the distribution of VGLUT1 synapses along their dendrites. We found in control motoneurons an average of 911 VGLUT1 synapses; ~62% of them were lost after injury. In controls, VGLUT1 synapses were focused to proximal dendrites where they were grouped in tight clusters. After injury, most synaptic loses occurred in the proximal dendrites and remaining synapses were declustered, smaller, and uniformly distributed throughout the dendritic arbor. We conclude that this los