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Sample records for opioid-addicted women buprenorphine

  1. Gender issues in the pharmacotherapy of opioid-addicted women: buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Annemarie; Jung, Erika; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Fischer, Gabriele

    2010-04-01

    Gender, a biological determinant of mental health and illness, plays a critical role in determining patients' susceptibility, exposure to mental health risks, and related outcomes. Regarding sex differences in the epidemiology of opioid dependence, one third of the patients are women of childbearing age. Women have an earlier age of initiation of substance use and a more rapid progression to drug involvement and dependence than men. Generally few studies exist which focus on the special needs of women in opioid maintenance therapy. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of treatment options for opioid-dependent women, with a special focus on buprenorphine, and to look at recent findings related to other factors that should be taken into consideration in optimizing the treatment of opioid-dependent women. Issues addressed include the role of gender in the choice of medication assisted treatment, sex differences in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine drug interactions, cardiac interactions, induction of buprenorphine in pregnant patients, the neonatal abstinence syndrome and breastfeeding. This paper aims to heighten the awareness for the need to take gender into consideration when making treatment decisions in an effort to optimize services and enhance the quality of life of women suffering from substance abuse.

  2. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction: opportunities, challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Shorter, Daryl; Kosten, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Buprenorphine follows the success of methadone as another milestone in the history of treatment for opioid addiction. Buprenorphine can be used in an office-based setting where it is clearly effective, highly accepted by patients and has a favorable safety profile and less abuse potential. However, the adoption of buprenorphine treatment has been slow in the USA. This article first reviews the history of medication-assisted opioid addiction treatment and the current epidemic opioid addiction, followed by a review of the efficacy, pharmacology and clinical prescription of buprenorphine in office-based care. We then explore the possible barriers in using buprenorphine and the ways to overcome these barriers, including new formulations, educational programs and policy regulations that strike a balance between accessibility and reducing diversion. Buprenorphine can align addiction treatment with treatments for other chronic medical illnesses. However, preventing diversion will require graduate and continuing medical education and integrated care models for delivery of buprenorphine to those in need.

  3. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction.

  4. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poloméni P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pierre Poloméni,1 Raymund Schwan2,3 1Department of Addictology, Paris Seine Saint Denis University Hospital, AP-HP, Site René Muret Sevran, France; 2Care Center for the Treatment and Prevention of Addictions (CSAPA, Nancy University Hospital, 3General Psychiatric Division for the Greater Nancy Urban Community, Psychotherapeutic Center of Nancy, Laxou, France Abstract: The way in which opioid addiction is managed in France is unique, as it is based on the prescription of buprenorphine by general practitioners and is dispensed by retail pharmacies. This policy has had a direct, positive impact on the number of deaths caused by heroin overdose, which was reduced by four-fifths between 1994 and 2002. In addition, certain associated comorbidities, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, have also been reduced; the incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in intravenous drug users fell from 25% in the mid-1990s to 6% in 2010. Since the implementation of this French model of opioid management, major scientific progress has been made, leading to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of addiction and of the management modalities required for its treatment. However, despite notable advances in scientific knowledge and in the implementation of devices, opioid addiction remains a major public health care issue in France, with 275,000–360,000 "problem drug users" being reported in 2011. The situation is still particularly worrying due to psychoactive substance use and misuse of opioid substitution treatments. Since 2003, there has been a persistent increase in the number of deaths and comorbidities related to opioid addiction, principally hepatitis C virus infection, which affects up to 40% of intravenous drug users. In France, the direct involvement of general practitioners in the management of opioid addiction is indisputable. Nevertheless, management could be optimized through better understanding of the

  5. Buprenorphine implants in medical treatment of opioid addiction.

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    Chavoustie, Steven; Frost, Michael; Snyder, Ole; Owen, Joel; Darwish, Mona; Dammerman, Ryan; Sanjurjo, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease that encompasses use of both prescription opioids and heroin and is associated with a high annual rate of overdose deaths. Medical treatment has proven more successful than placebo treatment or psychosocial intervention, and the partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and κ-opioid receptor antagonist buprenorphine is similar in efficacy to methadone while offering lower risk of respiratory depression. However, frequent dosing requirements and potential for misuse and drug diversion contribute to significant complications with treatment adherence for available formulations. Areas covered: This review describes the development of and preliminary data from clinical trials of an implantable buprenorphine formulation. Efficacy and safety data from comparative studies with other administrations of buprenorphine, including tablets and sublingual film, will be described. Key premises of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy program for safely administering buprenorphine implants, which all prescribing physicians must complete, are also discussed. Expert commentary: Long-acting implantable drug formulations that offer consistent drug delivery and lower risk of misuse, diversion, or accidental pediatric exposure over traditional formulations represent a promising development for the effective treatment of opioid use disorder.

  6. Extended vs Short-term Buprenorphine-Naloxone for Treatment of Opioid-Addicted Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E.; Poole, Sabrina A.; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G.; Fudala, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Context The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Design, Setting, and Patients Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Interventions Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Main Outcome Measure Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Results The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 ( χ22 = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; χ12 = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use ( χ12 = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting ( χ12 = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment ( χ12 = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use

  7. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

  8. New developments in managing opioid addiction: impact of a subdermal buprenorphine implant.

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    Itzoe, MariaLisa; Guarnieri, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Opioid addiction to prescription and illicit drugs is a serious and growing problem. In the US alone, >2.4 million people suffer from opioid use disorder. Government and pharmaceutical agencies have begun to address this crisis with recently released and revised task forces and medication-assisted therapies (MAT). For decades, oral or intravenous (IV) MATs have helped patients in their recovery by administration of opioid agonists (methadone, buprenorphine, oxycodone), antagonists (naltrexone, naloxone), and combinations of the two (buprenorphine/naloxone). While shown to be successful, particularly when combined with psychological counseling, oral and IV forms of treatment come with constraints and challenges. Patients can become addicted to the agonists themselves, and there is increased risk for diversion, abuse, or missed dosages. Consequently, long-acting implants have begun to be developed as a potentially preferable method of agonist delivery. To date, the newest implant approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (May 2016) is Probuphine ® , which delivers steady-state levels of buprenorphine over the course of 6 months. Numerous studies have demonstrated its efficacy and safety. Yet, implants come with their own risks such as surgical site irritation, possible movement, and protrusion of implant out of skin. This review introduces the opioid abuse epidemic, examines existing medications used for therapy, and highlights Probuphine as a new treatment option. Costs associated with MATs are also discussed.

  9. New developments in managing opioid addiction: impact of a subdermal buprenorphine implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzoe M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MariaLisa Itzoe, Michael Guarnieri Department of Neurological Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Opioid addiction to prescription and illicit drugs is a serious and growing problem. In the US alone, >2.4 million people suffer from opioid use disorder. Government and pharmaceutical agencies have begun to address this crisis with recently released and revised task forces and medication-assisted therapies (MAT. For decades, oral or intravenous (IV MATs have helped patients in their recovery by administration of opioid agonists (methadone, buprenorphine, oxycodone, antagonists (naltrexone, naloxone, and combinations of the two (buprenorphine/naloxone. While shown to be successful, particularly when combined with psychological counseling, oral and IV forms of treatment come with constraints and challenges. Patients can become addicted to the agonists themselves, and there is increased risk for diversion, abuse, or missed dosages. Consequently, long-acting implants have begun to be developed as a potentially preferable method of agonist delivery. To date, the newest implant approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (May 2016 is Probuphine®, which delivers steady-state levels of buprenorphine over the course of 6 months. Numerous studies have demonstrated its efficacy and safety. Yet, implants come with their own risks such as surgical site irritation, possible movement, and protrusion of implant out of skin. This review introduces the opioid abuse epidemic, examines existing medications used for therapy, and highlights Probuphine as a new treatment option. Costs associated with MATs are also discussed. Keywords: addiction, opioids, medication-assisted therapy, long-acting implant, buprenorphine, Probuphine®

  10. Extended vs short-term buprenorphine-naloxone for treatment of opioid-addicted youth: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E; Poole, Sabrina A; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G; Fudala, Paul

    2008-11-05

    The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 (chi(2)(2) = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; chi(2)(1) = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use (chi(2)(1) = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting (chi(2)(1) = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment (chi(2)(1) = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use occurred in both groups at follow-up. Four of 83 patients who tested

  11. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

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    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  12. Buprenorphine

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    ... Updated: 05/31/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  13. Medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Betty; Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The “Medication-Assisted Therapy for Opioid Addiction” session was chaired by Dr. Betty Tai and had three presenters. The presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Andrew J. Saxon (Methadone and Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction and HIV Risk Reduction), Dr. Walter Ling (Opioid Antagonist Treatment for Opioid Addiction), and Dr. Betty Tai (Chronic Care Model for Substance Use Disorder).

  14. Genetics Home Reference: opioid addiction

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    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Opioid addiction Opioid addiction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Opioid addiction is a long-lasting (chronic) disease that can ...

  15. Long-term course of opioid addiction.

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    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine; Ling, Walter; Anglin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with excess mortality, morbidities, and other adverse conditions. Guided by a life-course framework, we review the literature on the long-term course of opioid addiction in terms of use trajectories, transitions, and turning points, as well as other factors that facilitate recovery from addiction. Most long-term follow-up studies are based on heroin addicts recruited from treatment settings (mostly methadone maintenance treatment), many of whom are referred by the criminal justice system. Cumulative evidence indicates that opioid addiction is a chronic disorder with frequent relapses. Longer treatment retention is associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence, whereas incarceration is negatively related to subsequent abstinence. Over the long term, the mortality rate of opioid addicts (overdose being the most common cause) is about 6 to 20 times greater than that of the general population; among those who remain alive, the prevalence of stable abstinence from opioid use is low (less than 30% after 10-30 years of observation), and many continue to use alcohol and other drugs after ceasing to use opioids. Histories of sexual or physical abuse and comorbid mental disorders are associated with the persistence of opioid use, whereas family and social support, as well as employment, facilitates recovery. Maintaining opioid abstinence for at least five years substantially increases the likelihood of future stable abstinence. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment options (buprenorphine and naltrexone) include depot formulations offering longer duration of medication; their impact on the long-term course of opioid addiction remains to be assessed.

  16. Reducing the health consequences of opioid addiction in primary care.

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    Bowman, Sarah; Eiserman, Julie; Beletsky, Leo; Stancliff, Sharon; Bruce, R Douglas

    2013-07-01

    Addiction to prescription opioids is prevalent in primary care settings. Increasing prescription opioid use is largely responsible for a parallel increase in overdose nationally. Many patients most at risk for addiction and overdose come into regular contact with primary care providers. Lack of routine addiction screening results in missed treatment opportunities in this setting. We reviewed the literature on screening and brief interventions for addictive disorders in primary care settings, focusing on opioid addiction. Screening and brief interventions can improve health outcomes for chronic illnesses including diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. Similarly, through the use of screening and brief interventions, patients with addiction can achieve improved health outcome. A spectrum of low-threshold care options can reduce the negative health consequences among individuals with opioid addiction. Screening in primary care coupled with short interventions, including motivational interviewing, syringe distribution, naloxone prescription for overdose prevention, and buprenorphine treatment are effective ways to manage addiction and its associated risks and improve health outcomes for individuals with opioid addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Co-morbid pain and opioid addiction: long term effect of opioid maintenance on acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence alters the pain experience. This study will evaluate changes pain sensitivity and tolerance with opioid treatments; and duration of this effect after treatment cessation. 120 Individuals with chronic pain were recruited in 4 groups (N = 30): 1-methadone for opioid addiction; 2-buprenorphine for opioid addiction; 3-history of opioid maintenance treatment for opioid addiction but with prolonged abstinence (M = 121 weeks; SD = 23.3); and 4-opioid naïve controls. Participants completed a psychological assessment and a cold water task including, time to first pain (sensitivity) and time to stopping the pain task (tolerance). Data analysis used survival analyses. A Kaplan-Meier-Cox survival analysis showed group differences for both pain sensitivity (log rank = 15.50; p opioid maintenance resulted in differing pain sensitivity compared to opioid naïve (p's opioid maintenance compared to active methadone patients (p opioid naïve control group participants (p's opioid abstinence increased (R = .37; p opioid maintenance, there appears to be long-term differences in pain sensitivity that do not resolve with discontinuation of opioid maintenance. Although pain sensitivity does not change, pain tolerance does improve after opioid maintenance cessation. Implications for treating co-morbid opioid addiction and pain (acute and chronic) are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Consumer attitudes about opioid addiction treatment: a focus group study in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohler, Nancy L; Weiss, Linda; Egan, James E; López, Carolina M; Favaro, Jamie; Cordero, Robert; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2013-01-01

    To develop effective programs for people who are opioid dependent and to impact the opioid epidemic in New York City, it is crucial to monitor attitudes about opioid addiction treatments among opioid users who have experienced barriers to engagement and retention in addiction treatment. The authors conducted a qualitative study using focus groups. Six focus groups in three needle exchanges in New York City were audio recorded, transcribed, and systematically coded. The authors report on the main themes related to the study objectives. Participants of each needle exchange who were opioid dependent and had some knowledge of both methadone and buprenorphine were eligible. There were four main findings. Participants felt the following: 1) buprenorphine is an appropriate option for those heroin users who are motivated to stop using, 2) they have less control over their addiction treatment with methadone than they would have with buprenorphine, 3) buprenorphine treatment is not accessible to many New York City residents who would benefit from this treatment, and 4) lack of access to buprenorphine treatment is a cause of treatment-related diversion. Both methadone maintenance and buprenorphine treatment opportunities are necessary to address the diverse treatment needs of opioid-dependent people in New York City. However, the current medical model of buprenorphine treatment may be too restrictive for some opioid-dependent people and may be contributing to the use of illicit buprenorphine. New models to deliver buprenorphine treatment may address these problems.

  19. Changing patterns in opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Beth; Brands, Bruna; Li, Selina; Catz-Biro, Laura

    2009-01-01

    pathways leading to prescription opioid addiction is required in order to develop effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:19155373

  20. The Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study: What have we learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Rao, Vinod

    2017-04-01

    The multi-site Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS), conducted by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, was the largest clinical trial yet conducted with patients dependent upon prescription opioids (N=653). In addition to main trial results, the study yielded numerous secondary analyses, and included a 3.5-year follow-up study, the first of its kind with this population. This paper reviews key findings from POATS and its follow-up study. The paper summarizes the POATS design, main outcomes, predictors of outcome, subgroup analyses, the predictive power of early treatment response, and the long-term follow-up study. POATS examined combinations of buprenorphine-naloxone of varying duration and counseling of varying intensity. The primary outcome analysis showed no overall benefit to adding drug counseling to buprenorphine-naloxone and weekly medical management. Only 7% of patients achieved a successful outcome (abstinence or near-abstinence from opioids) during a 4-week taper and 8-week follow-up; by comparison, 49% of patients achieved success while subsequently stabilized on buprenorphine-naloxone. Long-term follow-up results were more encouraging, with higher abstinence rates than in the main trial. Patients receiving opioid agonist treatment at the time of follow-up were more likely to have better outcomes, though a sizeable number of patients succeeded without agonist treatment. Some patients initiated risky use patterns, including heroin use and drug injection. A limitation of the long-term follow-up study was the low follow-up rate. POATS was the first large-scale study of the treatment of prescription opioid dependence; its findings can influence both treatment guidelines and future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Challenges and Opportunities for the Use of Medications to Treat Opioid Addiction in the United States and Other Nations of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrino, Mark W; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Samuels, Paul N; Maremmani, Icro

    2015-01-01

    There has been a well documented increase in the use and abuse of prescription opioids and heroin in the United States and other parts of the world. There has also been an increasing focus to increase access to the use of medications (methadone, buprenorphine, Naltrexone/Vivitrol) for opioid addicted individuals under legal supervision. As policymakers engage in strategic initiatives to better prevent and effectively treat chronic opioid addiction, both in the United States and other countries, there are a number of unintended consequences, complicating how best to increase access to effective treatment.

  3. Buprenorphine and addiction: challenges for the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatwright, Deborah E

    2002-01-01

    To present an analysis of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA) and its impact on the practice of pharmacy. Statutes, codes, regulations, newspaper articles, journal articles; search of articles posted on MEDLINE identified using the search terms methadone, buprenorphine, treatment, opioid abuse, and opioid addiction. Not applicable. Not applicable. DATA and Food and Drug Administration approval of sublingual tablets of buprenorphine and buprenorphine with naloxone (Reckitt and Benckiser) will dramatically expand opioid addicts' access to treatment and increase the number of opioid addicts receiving prescriptions for buprenorphine and buprenorphine with naloxone. The availability of buprenorphine will pose unique challenges to pharmacists and suggests the need for education on addiction and greater awareness of the unique needs of patients recovering from addiction. The stage is being set to expand access to treatment and reach more untreated opioid addicts in the United States. Professional organizations such as the American Pharmaceutical Association should work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and its Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to develop training materials, curricula, and guidelines for pharmacists on substance abuse with a special focus on outpatient opioid treatment. Such materials could be used in continuing education programs and materials and in pharmacy schools.

  4. A Systematic Review on the Use of Psychosocial Interventions in Conjunction With Medications for the Treatment of Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugosh, Karen; Abraham, Amanda; Seymour, Brittany; McLoyd, Keli; Chalk, Mady; Festinger, David

    2016-01-01

    Opioid use and overdose rates have risen to epidemic levels in the United States during the past decade. Fortunately, there are effective medications (ie, methadone, buprenorphine, and oral and injectable naltrexone) available for the treatment of opioid addiction. Each of these medications is approved for use in conjunction with psychosocial treatment; however, there is a dearth of empirical research on the optimal psychosocial interventions to use with these medications. In this systematic review, we outline and discuss the findings of 3 prominent prior reviews and 27 recent publications of empirical studies on this topic. The most widely studied psychosocial interventions examined in conjunction with medications for opioid addiction were contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy, with the majority focusing on methadone treatment. The results generally support the efficacy of providing psychosocial interventions in combination with medications to treat opioid addictions, although the incremental utility varied across studies, outcomes, medications, and interventions. The review highlights significant gaps in the literature and provides areas for future research. Given the enormity of the current opioid problem in the United States, it is critical to gain a better understanding of the most effective ways to deliver psychosocial treatments in conjunction with these medications to improve the health and well-being of individuals suffering from opioid addiction.

  5. QT-interval effects of methadone, levomethadyl, and buprenorphine in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedam, Erich F; Bigelow, George E; Johnson, Rolley E; Nuzzo, Paul A; Haigney, Mark C P

    2007-12-10

    Levomethadyl acetate, methadone hydrochloride, and buprenorphine hydrochloride are equally effective treatments for opioid dependence. Each blocks the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-associated channel in vitro and represents a risk for QT prolongation. To compare the effects of 3 known hERG-associated channel blockers on the corrected QT (QTc), we conducted a randomized, controlled trial of opioid-addicted subjects. We analyzed 12-lead electrocardiograms collected at baseline and every 4 weeks from 165 opioid-addicted participants in a 17-week randomized double-blind clinical trial of equally effective doses of levomethadyl, methadone, and buprenorphine at a major referral center. Analyses were limited to the 154 patients with a normal baseline QTc = (QT/ radical R-R) who had at least 1 subsequent in-treatment electrocardiogram. Patients were randomized to receive treatment with levomethadyl, methadone, or buprenorphine (hereinafter, levomethadyl, methadone, and buprenorphine groups, respectively). The prespecified end points were a QTc greater than 470 milliseconds in men (or >490 milliseconds in women), or an increase from baseline in QTc greater than 60 milliseconds. Baseline QTc was similar in the 3 groups. The levomethadyl and methadone groups were significantly more likely to manifest a QTc greater than 470 or 490 milliseconds (28% for the levomethadyl group vs 23% for the methadone group vs 0% for the buprenorphine group; P methadone group [odds ratio, 8.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-36.4]) compared with the buprenorphine group (2% of subjects; P methadone remained fixed over at least 8 weeks, the QTc continued to increase progressively over time (P = .08 for the levomethadyl group, P = .01 for the methadone group). Buprenorphine is associated with less QTc prolongation than levomethadyl or methadone and may be a safe alternative.

  6. Urinary Excretion of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine-Glucuronide, and Norbuprenorphine-Glucuronide in Pregnant Women Receiving Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacinko, Sherri L.; Jones, Hendree E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin E.; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Buprenorphine (BUP) is under investigation as a medication therapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women. We investigated BUP and metabolite disposition in urine from women maintained on BUP during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and postpartum. METHODS We measured BUP, norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine glucuronide (BUP-Gluc), and NBUP-Gluc concentrations in 515 urine specimens collected thrice weekly from 9 women during pregnancy and postpartum. Specimens were analyzed using a fully validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method with limits of quantification of 5 µg/L for BUP and BUP-Gluc and 25 µg/L for NBUP and its conjugated metabolite. We examined ratios of metabolites across trimesters and postpartum to identify possible changes in metabolism during pregnancy. RESULTS NBUP-Gluc was the primary metabolite identified in urine and exceeded BUP-Gluc concentrations in 99% of specimens. Whereas BUP-Gluc was identified in more specimens than NBUP, NBUP exceeded BUP-Gluc concentrations in 77.9% of specimens that contained both analytes. Among all participants, the mean BUP-Gluc:NBUP-Gluc ratio was significantly higher in the second trimester compared to the third trimester, and there were significant intrasubject differences between trimesters in 71% of participants. In 3 women, the percent daily dose excreted was higher during pregnancy than postpregnancy, consistent with other data indicating increased renal elimination of drugs during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS These data are the first to evaluate urinary disposition of BUP and metabolites in a cohort of pregnant women. Variable BUP excretion during pregnancy may indicate metabolic changes requiring dose adjustment during later stages of gestation. PMID:19325013

  7. Volatility and change in chronic pain severity predict outcomes of treatment for prescription opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) can be used to manage prescription opioid addiction among persons with chronic pain, but post-treatment relapse is common and difficult to predict. This study estimated whether changes in pain over time and pain volatility during BUP-NLX maintenance would predict opioid use during the taper BUP-NLX taper. Secondary analysis of a multi-site clinical trial for prescription opioid addiction, using data obtained during a 12-week BUP-NLX stabilization and 4-week BUP-NLX taper. Community clinics affiliated with a national clinical trials network in 10 US cities. Subjects with chronic pain who entered the BUP-NLX taper phase (n = 125) with enrollment occurring from June 2006 to July 2009 (52% male, 88% Caucasian, 31% married). Outcomes were weekly biologically verified and self-reported opioid use from the 4-week taper phase. Predictors were estimates of baseline severity, rate of change and volatility in pain from weekly self-reports during the 12-week maintenance phase. Controlling for baseline pain and treatment condition, increased pain [odds ratio (OR) = 2.38, P = 0.02] and greater pain volatility (OR = 2.43, P = 0.04) predicted greater odds of positive opioid urine screen during BUP-NLX taper. Increased pain (IRR = 1.40, P = 0.04) and greater pain volatility [incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 1.66, P = 0.009] also predicted greater frequency of self-reported opioid use. Adults with chronic pain receiving out-patient treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) for prescription opioid addiction have an elevated risk for opioid use when tapering off maintenance treatment. Those with relative persistence in pain over time and greater volatility in pain during treatment are less likely to sustain abstinence during BUP-NLX taper. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. A Multi-site, Two-Phase, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS): Rationale, Design, and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D.; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Provost, Scott E.; Huang, Zhen; Jacobs, Petra; Hasson, Albert; Lindblad, Robert; Connery, Hilary Smith; Prather, Kristi; Ling, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network launched the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) in response to rising rates of prescription opioid dependence and gaps in understanding the optimal course of treatment for this population. POATS employed a multi-site, two-phase adaptive, sequential treatment design to approximate clinical practice. The study took place at 10 community treatment programs around the United States. Participants included men and women age ≥18 who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Edition criteria for dependence upon prescription opioids, with physiologic features; those with a prominent history of heroin use (according to pre-specified criteria) were excluded. All participants received buprenorphine/naloxone (bup/nx). Phase 1 consisted of 4 weeks of bup/nx treatment, including a 14-day dose taper, with 8 weeks of follow-up. Phase 1 participants were monitored for treatment response during these 12 weeks. Those who relapsed to opioid use, as defined by pre-specified criteria, were invited to enter Phase 2; Phase 2 consisted of 12 weeks of bup/nx stabilization treatment, followed by a 4-week taper and 8 weeks of post-treatment follow-up. Participants were randomized at the beginning of Phase 1 to receive bup/nx, paired with either Standard Medical Management (SMM) or Enhanced Medical Management (EMM; defined as SMM plus individual drug counseling). Eligible participants entering Phase 2 were re-randomized to either EMM or SMM. POATS was developed to determine what benefit, if any, EMM offers over SMM in short-term and longer-term treatment paradigm. This paper describes the rationale and design of the study. PMID:20116457

  9. Methadone, Buprenorphine, and Naltrexone for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tran H; Griffin, Brooke L; Stone, Rebecca H; Vest, Kathleen M; Todd, Timothy J

    2017-07-01

    Pregnant women with opioid use disorder can be treated with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone to reduce opioid use and improve retention to treatment. In this review, we compare the pregnancy outcomes of methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone in clinical trials and discuss the potential behavioral and developmental effects of these agents seen in offspring in animal studies. Important clinical considerations in the management of opioid use disorder in pregnant women and their infants are also discussed. Outside of pregnancy, buprenorphine is used in combination with naloxone to reduce opioid abuse and diversion. During pregnancy, however, the use of buprenorphine as a single agent is preferred to prevent prenatal naloxone exposure. Both methadone and buprenorphine are widely used to treat opioid use disorder; however, compared with methadone, buprenorphine is associated with shorter treatment duration, less medication needed to treat neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) symptoms, and shorter hospitalizations for neonates. Despite being the standard of care, medication-assisted treatment with methadone or buprenorphine is still underused, making it apparent that more options are necessary. Naltrexone is not a first-line treatment primarily because both detoxification and an opioid-free period are required. More research is needed to determine naltrexone safety and benefits in pregnant women. Animal studies suggest that changes in pain sensitivity, developmental processes, and behavioral responses may occur in children born to mothers receiving methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone and is an area that warrants future studies. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  10. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Dinarvand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction.  Methods: 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR whose products were then sequenced.  Results: Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T>C and 877G>A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G>C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant.  Discussion: It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T>C, 877G>A and 1043G>C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population.

  11. Investigating expectation and reward in human opioid addiction with [(11) C]raclopride PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ben J; Taylor, Lindsay G; Reid, Alastair G; Wilson, Sue J; Stokes, Paul R; Brooks, David J; Myers, James F; Turkheimer, Federico E; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2014-11-01

    The rewarding properties of some abused drugs are thought to reside in their ability to increase striatal dopamine levels. Similar increases have been shown in response to expectation of a positive drug effect. The actions of opioid drugs on striatal dopamine release are less well characterized. We examined whether heroin and the expectation of heroin reward increases striatal dopamine levels in human opioid addiction. Ten opioid-dependent participants maintained on either methadone or buprenorphine underwent [(11) C]raclopride positron emission tomography imaging. Opioid-dependent participants were scanned three times, receiving reward from 50-mg intravenous heroin (diamorphine; pharmaceutical heroin) during the first scan to generate expectation of the same reward at the second scan, during which they only received 0.1-mg intravenous heroin. There was no heroin injection during the third scan. Intravenous 50-mg heroin during the first scan induced pronounced effects leading to high levels of expectation at the second scan. There was no detectable increase in striatal dopamine levels to either heroin reward or expectation of reward. We believe this is the first human study to examine whether expectation of heroin reward increases striatal dopamine levels in opioid addiction. The absence of detectable increased dopamine levels to both the expectation and delivery of a heroin-related reward may have been due to the impact of substitute medication. It does however contrast with the changes seen in abstinent stimulant users, suggesting that striatal dopamine release alone may not play such a pivotal role in opioid-maintained individuals. © 2013 The Authors. Addiction Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Healthy Adult Male Facial Skin Surface Lipid Pheromone p.o. to Treat Opioid Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Opioid Addiction; Opioid Abuse, Continuous Use; Opioid Use; Opioid-Related Disorders; Paternal Pheromone Deficiency; Opioid Dependence; Opioid Abuse; Opioid-use Disorder; Opioid Intoxication; Opioid Abuse, Episodic

  13. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Ralf

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT – first low because of strict admission criteria – increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP, who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. Results The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65 % to 85 % in the first years, up to 50 % after more than seven years and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10 % of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. Conclusion In Germany, a

  14. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Ingo Ilja; Stöver, Heino; Gerlach, Ralf

    2007-02-02

    After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT--first low because of strict admission criteria--increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP), who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65% to 85% in the first years, up to 50% after more than seven years) and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10% of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. In Germany, a history of substitution treatment spanning 20 years has meanwhile

  15. The impact of chronic pain on opioid addiction treatment: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brittany B; Bawor, Monica; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillaume; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2015-04-16

    outcomes for a sub-population of opioid addiction patients and provide an opportunity to distinguish the best quality guidelines for OST. If chronic pain truly does result in negative consequences for opioid addiction patients, it is important we identify which OSTs are most appropriate for chronic pain patients as well as ensure the treatment guidelines incorporate this information. PROSPERO CRD42014014015 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42014014015#.VS1Qw1wkKGM.

  16. Learning and generalization from reward and punishment in opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Catherine E; Rego, Janice; Haber, Paul; Morley, Kirsten; Beck, Kevin D; Hogarth, Lee; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2017-01-15

    This study adapts a widely-used acquired equivalence paradigm to investigate how opioid-addicted individuals learn from positive and negative feedback, and how they generalize this learning. The opioid-addicted group consisted of 33 participants with a history of heroin dependency currently in a methadone maintenance program; the control group consisted of 32 healthy participants without a history of drug addiction. All participants performed a novel variant of the acquired equivalence task, where they learned to map some stimuli to correct outcomes in order to obtain reward, and to map other stimuli to correct outcomes in order to avoid punishment; some stimuli were implicitly "equivalent" in the sense of being paired with the same outcome. On the initial training phase, both groups performed similarly on learning to obtain reward, but as memory load grew, the control group outperformed the addicted group on learning to avoid punishment. On a subsequent testing phase, the addicted and control groups performed similarly on retention trials involving previously-trained stimulus-outcome pairs, as well as on generalization trials to assess acquired equivalence. Since prior work with acquired equivalence tasks has associated stimulus-outcome learning with the nigrostriatal dopamine system, and generalization with the hippocampal region, the current results are consistent with basal ganglia dysfunction in the opioid-addicted patients. Further, a selective deficit in learning from punishment could contribute to processes by which addicted individuals continue to pursue drug use even at the cost of negative consequences such as loss of income and the opportunity to engage in other life activities. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Chronic Pain, Chronic Opioid Addiction: a Complex Nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsitz, Edwin A

    2016-03-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a significant increase in the prescribing of opioids, with associated increases in opioid addiction and overdose deaths. This article reviews the evidence for the effectiveness and risk of developing an opioid use disorder (OUD) in those patients treated with chronic opioid therapy (COT) for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP). Rates of development of OUD range from 0-50 %, and aberrant drug related behaviors (ADRBs) are reported to be 20 %. Health care providers must properly assess, screen, and carefully monitor patients on COT utilizing evidence-based tools.

  18. Buprenorphine vs methadone treatment: A review of evidence in both developed and developing worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Whelan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heroin dependence is a major health and social problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality that adversely affects social circumstances, productivity, and healthcare and law enforcement costs. In the UK and many other Western countries, both methadone and buprenorphine are recommended by the relevant agencies for detoxification from heroin and for opioid maintenance therapy. However, despite obvious benefits due to its unique pharmacotherapy (eg, greatly reduced risk of overdose, buprenorphine has largely failed to overtake methadone in managing opioid addiction. The experience from the developing world (based on data from India is similar. In this article we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the use methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction from both a developed and developing world perspective; and explore some of the reasons why buprenorphine has not fulfilled the expectations predicted by many in the addictions field.

  19. Common and specific liability to addiction: approaches to association studies of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, David A; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2012-06-01

    Opioid addiction, whether to opiates such as heroin and morphine, and/or to non-medical use of opioids, is a major problem worldwide. Although drug-induced and environmental factors are essential for the liability to develop opioid addiction, the genetic background of an individual is now known also to play a substantial role. The overall goal of this article is to address the common and specific liabilities to addiction in the context of approaches to studies of one addiction, opioid addiction. Literature on identifying genetic variants that may play a role in the development of opioid addiction was reviewed. A substantial number of genetic variants have been reported to be associated with opioid addiction. No single variant has been found in any of the reported GWAS studies with a substantial effect size on the liability to develop heroin addiction. It appears that there is a complex interaction of a large number of variants, some rare, some common, which interact with the environment and in response to specific drugs of abuse to increase the liability of developing opioid addiction. In spite of the inherent difficulties in obtaining large well-phenotyped cohorts for genetic studies, new findings have been reported that are being used to develop testable hypotheses into the biological basis of opioid addiction. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Psychotropic drugs in opioid addicts on methadone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, G N

    1976-07-01

    Psychotropic drug treatment of persons on methadone maintenance is discussed. Patients with clear target symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, or psychosis responded just as non-opioid addicts would to the major psychotropic agents. The minor tranquilizers are felt to be of doubtful value, and subject to abuse. Sleep disturbances cannot be treated by the usual means, as the drugs needed again are abused. However, chlorpromazine shows some promise here. Methods of drug delivery and goals of treatment must be adapted to the realities of this patient-group's characteristics, particularly anti-social traits, poor motivation and unreliability. Psychotropic drugs are unlikely to be of aid in multiple drug abusers, personality and character disorders, and opioid withdrawal. Four case histories are presented.

  1. Fast Effects of Cognitive Restructuring Training on Neurocognitive Functions in Opioid Addicts

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Tavakolian; Abbas Abolghasemi

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study This study intended to investigate the effect of cognitive restructuring training on prefrontal related neurocognitive functions in opioid addicts and its relationship with relapse prevention. Subject or material and methods Thirty opioid addicts who completed a 21-day detoxification program were randomly placed in experimental and control groups. Before and after the training, the subjects underwent urinalysis, Addiction-Stroop test, Iowa Gambling Task, Wisconsin C...

  2. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest.

  3. Herbal medicines for the management of opioid addiction: safe and effective alternatives to conventional pharmacotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeanine; Rosenbaum, Christopher; Hernon, Christina; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2011-12-01

    Striking increases in the abuse of opioids have expanded the need for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. The obstacles that confront effective treatment of opioid addiction - shortage of treatment professionals, stigma associated with treatment and the ability to maintain abstinence - have led to increased interest in alternative treatment strategies among both treatment providers and patients alike. Herbal products for opioid addiction and withdrawal, such as kratom and specific Chinese herbal medications such as WeiniCom, can complement existing treatments. Unfortunately, herbal treatments, while offering some advantages over existing evidence-based pharmacotherapies, have poorly described pharmacokinetics, a lack of supportive data derived from well controlled clinical trials, and severe toxicity, the cause for which remains poorly defined. Herbal products, therefore, require greater additional testing in rigorous clinical trials before they can expect widespread acceptance in the management of opioid addiction.

  4. Long-term outcomes from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Griffin, Margaret L; Provost, Scott E; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; McDermott, Katherine A; Srisarajivakul, Emily N; Dodd, Dorian R; Dreifuss, Jessica A; McHugh, R Kathryn; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2015-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence of prescription opioid dependence, longitudinal studies have not examined long-term treatment response. The current study examined outcomes over 42 months in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS). POATS was a multi-site clinical trial lasting up to 9 months, examining different durations of buprenorphine-naloxone plus standard medical management for prescription opioid dependence, with participants randomized to receive or not receive additional opioid drug counseling. A subset of participants (N=375 of 653) enrolled in a follow-up study. Telephone interviews were administered approximately 18, 30, and 42 months after main-trial enrollment. Comparison of baseline characteristics by follow-up participation suggested few differences. At Month 42, much improvement was seen: 31.7% were abstinent from opioids and not on agonist therapy; 29.4% were receiving opioid agonist therapy, but met no symptom criteria for current opioid dependence; 7.5% were using illicit opioids while on agonist therapy; and the remaining 31.4% were using opioids without agonist therapy. Participants reporting a lifetime history of heroin use at baseline were more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence at Month 42 (OR=4.56, 95% CI=1.29-16.04, popioid abstinence. Eight percent (n=27/338) used heroin for the first time during follow-up; 10.1% reported first-time injection heroin use. Long-term outcomes for those dependent on prescription opioids demonstrated clear improvement from baseline. However, a subset exhibited a worsening course, by initiating heroin use and/or injection opioid use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Constipation and other common symptoms reported by women and men in methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Paul S; Elsayed, Mahmoud; Espinoza, David; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Veillard, Anne-Sophie; Hallinan, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Opioid substitution treatment (OST) is often continued long-term and, therefore, opioid-associated symptoms are of interest. Symptoms associated with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in men are well described, but there are fewer reports concerning symptoms associated with buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and very few reports among women. Recipients of BMT (n=113) and MMT (n=184), non-opioid users (n=105) and opioid users not receiving OST (n=87) completed the Patient Assessment of Constipation (PAC-SYM) and a general symptom checklist. Multivariate analysis included other potential moderators of opioid-associated symptoms. Opioid users reported a higher frequency and severity of symptoms than non-opioid users. Constipation, dry mouth, decreased appetite, sweating and fatigue were highly prevalent in the previous 30days (51-80%). Nausea, itchy skin, trouble urinating, menstrual problems, lightheadedness, blurred vision, heart racing were also common (30-50%). Non-OST opioid users had significantly higher frequency and severity than OST recipients of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, decreased appetite, sweating and itchy skin. Sweating was significantly more common in MMT than BMT. Constipation scores were higher in women, otherwise most sex differences were small. Higher PAC-SYM scores were associated with vomiting (OR=1.04) and sweating (OR=1.06). Cannabis use was associated with vomiting (OR=2.19). Constipation (OR=1.07), insomnia (OR=2.5) and depression (OR=2.82) were associated with fatigue. Men and women receiving OST report similarly high rates of somatic symptoms, though less than opioid users not receiving OST. There were few differences between BMT and MMT. Buprenorphine might be preferred where sweating is problematic. Several modifiable factors were identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Contingency management for tobacco smoking during opioid addiction treatment: a randomised pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscough, Tom Stephen; Brose, Leonie S; Strang, John; McNeill, Ann

    2017-09-01

    Smoking rates among individuals in treatment for opioid addiction are close to five times that of the general public. Moreover, drug-addicted smokers have a premature mortality rate four times greater than drug-addicted non-smokers. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether contingency management (CM) can be successfully added to evidence-based stop smoking treatment in individuals undergoing treatment for opioid addiction and assess preliminary evidence for its impact. Forty tobacco smokers currently undergoing treatment for opioid addiction. Escalating with reset CM as an adjunct to standard smoking cessation treatment. Financial incentives will be administered over a 5-week period for either biochemically verified abstinence from smoking or attendance at the clinic. Participants will be randomised to conditions stratified on current levels of smoking (high or low). To assess whether a CM intervention can be successfully added to standard stop smoking services treatment, in patients undergoing outpatient treatment for opioid addiction. This will be measured as the number of people completing the 5 weeks of the intervention. Ethics approval for the study was granted on the 16 June 2016 by the London-city and east (reference 16/LO/0990) ethics committee. The pilot study was retrospectively registered on clincaltrials.gov in January 2017 (ID: NCT03015597). A SPIRIT checklist and figure are available for this protocol. It is planned that the results of this study will be published in an academic journal. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. "Demografic characteristics of opioid addiction in patients undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi M.H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to some previous reports prevalence of addiction estimated to be 3٪ in Iran. One of the most important key points about addiction is the identification of predisposing factors for starting substance use. False general believes can play important roles in this regard. This study evaluated the demographic characteristics of opioids addiction and the visions of them about the effect of opioids on their cardiac diseases. Methods: This cross-sectional analytical study intended to evaluate situation of opiate dependency among 1329 CABG patients in Yazd Afshar hospital based on criteria of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, Fourth edition (DSM-IV.Data were collected from each subject by a self report questionnaire and structured interview and was analyzed using chi-square and ANOVA and MC nemar test. P<0.05 was determined significant. Results: The data were gathered from 1329 CABG patients (945 men and 384 women. In addition 131 patients (9.9% containing 127 men (98.9% and 4 women (1.1% were opium dependent based on DSM-IV criteria. Mean age of opium dependent group was significantly higher than non-dependent patients (58.5 ± 10.08 VS 50.7 ± 10.15 (P= 0.000. Opium was the most common used substance (96.9% and inhalation was the preferred pattern of use (52.7%. Majority of addicted patients were simple workers (44%. Based on educational levels, 57.2% of opium dependents have had primary education (under high school. Eighty two (62.5% of addicted groups believed that after starting opium, their cardiovascular function and chest pain had been improved. Although before starting opium use 58 (44.6% of them have had this belief Conclusion: The prevalence of opium addiction in CABG patients is relatively high, and the majority of addicted patients are on this belief that opiates have positive effects on improvement of their chest pain and cardiovascular function. Because the effects of opioids on chest pain are

  8. Usefulness of the Brief Pain Inventory in Patients with Opioid Addiction Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brittany B; Roshanov, Pavel S; Bawor, Monica; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillame; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is implicated as a risk factor for illicit opioid use among patients with opioid addiction treated with methadone. However, there exists conflicting evidence that supports and refutes this claim. These discrepancies may stem from the large variability in pain measurement reported across studies. We aim to determine the clinical and demographic characteristics of patients reporting pain and evaluate the prognostic value of different pain classification measures in a sample of opioid addiction patients. Multi-center prospective cohort study. Methadone maintenance treatment facilities for managing patients with opioid addiction. This study includes participants from the Genetics of Opioid Addiction (GENOA) prospective cohort study. We assessed the prognostic value of different pain measures for predicting opioid relapse. Pain measures include the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and patients' response to a direct pain question all study participants were asked from the GENOA case report form (CRF) "are you currently experiencing or have been diagnosed with chronic pain?" Performance characteristics of the GENOA CRF pain measure was estimated with sensitivity and specificity using the BPI as the gold standard reference. Prognostic value was assessed using pain classification as the primary independent variable in an adjusted analysis using 1) the percentage of positive opioid urine screens and 2) high-risk opioid use (= 50% positive opioid urine screens) as the dependent variables in a linear and logistic regression analyses, respectively. Among participants eligible for inclusion (n = 444) the BPI was found to be highly sensitive, classifying a large number of GENOA participants with pain (n = 281 of the 297 classified with pain, 94.6%) in comparison to the GENOA CRF (n = 154 of 297 classified with pain, 51.8%). Participants concordantly classified as having pain according to the GENOA CRF and BPI were found to have an estimated 7.79% increase in positive

  9. Efficacy of Acupuncture for Psychological Symptoms Associated with Opioid Addiction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Boyuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review systematically assessed the clinical evidence for and against acupuncture as a treatment for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. The database was accessed from MEDLINE and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. We included all randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English regardless of their controls. Meta-analysis was performed using the RevMan software, version 5.2. We conducted a literature search of 16 databases from their inception to January 2014. Four studies from Western countries did not report any clinical gains in the treatment of psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. 10 of 12 studies from China have reported positive findings regarding the use of acupuncture to treat the psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. The methodological quality of the included studies was poor. The meta-analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between the treatment group and the control group for anxiety and depression associated with opioid addiction, although groups did not differ on opioid craving. This review and meta-analysis could not confirm that acupuncture was an effective treatment for psychological symptoms associated with opioid addiction. However, considering the potential of acupuncture demonstrated in the included studies, further rigorous randomized controlled trials with long followup are warranted.

  10. Safety and tolerability of the switch from buprenorphine to buprenorphine/naloxone in an Italian addiction treatment centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimolo, Clementina; Favero, Valentina Del; Zecchinato, Giancarlo; Buson, Roberto; Cusin, Davide; Pellachin, Patrizia; Simonetto, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Abuse and misuse of pharmacological therapies represent major challenges in the healthcare system, particularly in patients receiving long-acting opioid drugs for the treatment of heroin or opioid addiction. The partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine is used to treat opioid dependence, but diversion and misuse may occur. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is associated with a reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for the treatment of opioid dependence. This observational study assessed the safety and efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy in patients with opioid dependence after therapeutic switch from buprenorphine monotherapy. A total of 94 patients being treated with buprenorphine monotherapy (average dose 8 mg/day; mean duration of therapy 840 days) were switched to buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy. Patients were asked to rate their level of satisfaction with buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment with respect to the management of withdrawal symptoms, and urinary toxicology tests were carried out before and 14 days after switching to combination therapy. Within 3 months, 75/94 patients (80%) previously treated with buprenorphine monotherapy had switched to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment (average dose buprenorphine 8 mg). Among patients receiving combination treatment for >3 months, 83% were receiving medication either weekly or fortnightly, based on the results of toxicological testing. A reduction in positive urinary toxicology tests was observed in patients within two weeks after being switched to combination treatment (before switch: 28, 9 and 2 positive tests for heroin, cocaine and heroin + cocaine, respectively vs 11, 3 and 1 after switch) and a total of 64 patients of the 75 who switched to combination therapy (85%) were satisfied with the management of

  11. Medication-assisted recovery from opioid addiction: historical and contemporary perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, William L

    2012-01-01

    Recovery is being used as a conceptual fulcrum for the redesign of addiction treatment and related support services in the United States. Efforts by policy, research, and clinical leaders to define recovery and calls for assertive models of long-term recovery management raise critical questions about how transformation efforts of recovery-focused systems will affect the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of opioid addiction and the status of patients participating in such treatment. This article highlights recent work advocating a recovery-oriented approach to medication-assisted treatment.

  12. Neurophysiological mechanisms in acceptance and commitment therapy in opioid-addicted patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Rachel F; Potter, Jennifer S; Robin, Donald A

    2016-04-30

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been effectively utilized to treat both chronic pain and substance use disorder independently. Given these results and the vital need to treat the comorbidity of the two disorders, a pilot ACT treatment was implemented in individuals with comorbid chronic pain and opioid addiction. This pilot study supported using neurophysiology to characterize treatment effects and revealed that, following ACT, participants with this comorbidity exhibited reductions in brain activation due to painful stimulus and in connectivity at rest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cancer pain in the opioid-addicted patient: can we treat it right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto-Lowe, Vania; Girard, Lisa; Chaplin, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer elicits an array of physical and emotional symptoms, pain is often identified as the most distressing. Cancer pain may result from the primary tumor, metastasis, surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or medical comorbidities. Although treatment with opioid analgesics is accepted as appropriate therapy for cancer-related pain, under treatment may persist among certain patients. Opioid-addicted individuals represent a challenging and heterogeneous population to treat. Addiction is linked to psychopathology and antisocial behaviors (eg, lying) which often complicate evaluation. Chronic exposure to opioids may lead to physiologic dependence and its correlates, tolerance and hyperalgesia. Given the variability and subjectivity of the cancer pain experience, there are no objective measures which capture the adequacy of pain control. Thus, when faced with complaints of uncontrolled pain, clinicians must consider a differential diagnosis of tolerance, disease progression, addiction, pseudoaddiction, chemical coping, or even criminal behavior. This article explores the cognitive, behavioral, and physiological correlates of opioid addiction that may impact cancer pain management. It also discusses risk reduction strategies for opioid misuse and research directions that may lead to improved clinical outcomes in these patients.

  14. Spiritual Well-Being and Associated Factors with Relapse in Opioid Addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Nikfarjam, Masoud; Deris, Fatemeh; Parvin, Neda

    2017-03-01

    Opioid dependence relapse is a complex and multidimensional problem, and lack of spiritual well-being is a major concern in opioid addicts. This study was conducted to determine spiritual well-being and factors associated with relapse among opioid addicts. This cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2015 to September 2015. According to purposive sampling, 312 eligible addicted patients were enrolled in the study. The patients had at least an attempt of detoxification in the past six months and referred to an outpatient detoxification clinic in Shahrekord (Southwest, Iran). They completed Paloutzian and Ellison's Spiritual Well-being Scale. A researcher-developed questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics and 20 questions about associated factors with relapse was administered. Data were analysed by version 16.0 (SPSS Inc.,Chicago, IL) using one-way ANOVA, Pearson's correlation test, chi-square, Friedman test, and student's t-test. The most important factors associated with opioid dependence relapse consist of relation with an addict friend, unemployment, living expenses, family conflicts, and somatic pain. In the present study, 157 patients had never experienced relapse while the mean of relapse in the rest participants was (3.25±1.53) times. Furthermore, the addicted patients with relapse had significantly lower scores of spiritual well-being and its subscales compared with non-relapse patients (pspiritual well-being, family and economical, personal, and occupational factors as crucial factors in opiate addiction relapse.

  15. Opioid Addiction in Pregnancy: Does Depression Negatively Impact Adherence With Prenatal Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Lauren; Sulo, Suela; Kozmic, Sarah; Parilla, Barbara V

    We aimed to evaluate whether depression in pregnancy in women with opioid dependency negatively impacts adherence with prenatal care. This was a retrospective chart analysis of opioid-dependent pregnant women over a 6-year period at 2 large referral and tertiary care centers. The primary outcome was adherence with prenatal care based on the concurrent diagnosis of depression. Adherence was assessed by looking at the number of observed versus expected prenatal visits. Secondary outcomes included neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay, and incidence and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). A total of 74 patient charts were reviewed. 45/74 (60.8%) of the opioid-dependent pregnant patients were either diagnosed with depression (n = 41), anxiety (n = 2), or scored >10 on the Edinburgh Prenatal Depression Scale (n = 1). Patients with a diagnosis of depression were significantly less adherent with prenatal care; 80% adherent (73% vs 93%; P = 0.03), 90% adherent (62% vs 93%; P = 0.003). A higher number of patients in the depression group had an infant treated for withdrawal (62% vs 38%; P = 0.041), and had longer NICU stays (27% vs 21%; P = 0.018). Analysis of the whole cohort of opioid dependent gravidas revealed Buprenorphine maintenance therapy had the lowest mean NAS score 6.5 ± 4.4, compared with methadone maintenance 10.6 ± 3.6, and no maintenance therapy 9.4 ± 4.0 (P = 0.008). Depression negatively impacts adherence with prenatal care and was significantly associated with a higher incidence of neonatal withdrawal and longer NICU stays. Buprenorphine therapy had the lowest incidence and severity of NAS when compared with methadone and no maintenance therapy.

  16. Medication-Assisted Treatment For Opioid Addiction in Opioid Treatment Programs. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Emily; Vallejos Bartlett, Catalina; Brooks, Margaret; Gilbert, Johnatnan Max; Henderson, Randi; Shuman, Deborah, J.

    2005-01-01

    TIP 43 provides best-practice guidelines for medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction in opioid treatment programs (OTPs). The primary intended audience for this volume is substance abuse treatment providers and administrators who work in OTPs. Recommendations in the TIP are based on both an analysis of current research and determinations…

  17. Opioid Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing rate nausea, vomiting constipation physical agitation poor decision making abandoning responsibilities slurred speech sleeping more or less than normal mood swings euphoria (feeling high) irritability depression lowered motivation anxiety attacks. Symptoms of opioid overdose An overdose ...

  18. Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: Possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Garmabi, Behzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed that in addition to psychostimulants, CART is critically involved in the different stages of opioid addiction. Here we have evaluated the fluctuations in the level of CART peptide in plasma and CSF in different phases of opioid addiction to find out whether CART can serve as a suitable marker in opioid addiction studies. Male rats were randomly distributed in groups of control, acute low-dose (10mg/kg) morphine, acute high-dose morphine (80mg/kg), chronic escalating doses of morphine, withdrawal syndrome precipitated by administration of naloxone (1mg/kg), and abstinent after long-term drug-free maintenance of addicted animals. The level of CART peptide in CSF and plasma samples was measured by enzyme immunoassay. CART peptide concentration in the CSF and plasma was significantly elevated in acute high-dose morphine and withdrawal state animals and down-regulated in addicted rats. In abstinent group, CART peptide level was up-regulated in plasma but not in CSF samples. As the observed results are in agreement with data regarding the CART mRNA and protein expression in the brain reward pathway in opioid addiction phases, it may be suggested that evaluation of CART peptide level in CSF or plasma could be a suitable marker which reflects the rises and falls of the peptide concentration in brain in the development of opioid addiction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacotherapy of Opioid Addiction: "Putting a Real Face on a False Demon".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsitz, E; Wiegand, T

    2016-03-01

    Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT), a pharmacological treatment for opioid use disorder for the past 50 years, continues to remain controversial. Despite consistent and overwhelming evidence confirming the effectiveness and safety of MMT, misconceptions and myths persist regarding its legitimacy as a treatment for opioid addiction. This often results in the underutilization and limited availability of this treatment modality. Despite successful outcomes, the controversial nature of MMT, and the stigma experienced by the patients on methadone, has been a particularly difficult obstacle to overcome. We present the history of MMT, review the evidence for its efficacy in the treatment of opioid dependence, and explore the origins of the stigma and misconceptions related to MMT.

  20. Managing Opioid Addiction Risk in Plastic Surgery during the Perioperative Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demsey, Daniel; Carr, Nicholas J; Clarke, Hance; Vipler, Sharon

    2017-10-01

    Opioid addiction is a public health crisis that affects all areas of medicine. Large numbers of the population across all racial and economic demographics misuse prescription opioids and use illicit opioids. The current understanding is that opioid misuse is a disease that requires treatment, and is not an issue of choice or character. Use of opioid medication is a necessary part of postoperative analgesia, but many physicians are unsure of how to do this safely given the risk of patients developing an opioid misuse disorder. This review gives an update of the current state of the opioid crisis, explains how current surgeons' prescribing practices are contributing to it, and gives recommendations on how to use opioid medication safely in the perioperative period.

  1. Acute detoxification of opioid-addicted patients with naloxone during propofol or methohexital anesthesia: a comparison of withdrawal symptoms, neuroendocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienbaum, P.; Scherbaum, N.; Thürauf, N.; Michel, M. C.; Gastpar, M.; Peters, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mu-Opioid receptor blockade during general anesthesia is a new treatment for detoxification of opioid addicted patients. We assessed catecholamine plasma concentrations, oxygen consumption, cardiovascular variables, and withdrawal symptoms after naloxone and tested the hypothesis that

  2. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L; Greene, Marion S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university-affiliated integrated mental health-addiction treatment clinic. Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long-acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. There were no group differences post-injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol-only patients. Post-first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p opioid prescriptions (p Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP-measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol-only patients. This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557-564). © 2016 The Authors. The American Journal on Addictions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP).

  3. Depression-like effect of prenatal buprenorphine exposure in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jen Hung

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior.

  4. First Dutch national guidelines--pharmacological care for detained opioid addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, M T; De Haan, H A; Van 't Hoff, G I C M

    2009-01-01

    Heterogenic care of addicted detainees in the various prisons in The Netherlands triggered the National Agency of Correctional Institutions of the Ministry of Justice, to order the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement (CBO) to formulate the first national guideline titled 'Pharmacological care for detained addicts'. This article presents the content of this guideline, which mainly focuses on opioid-dependent addicts. In The Netherlands, approximately 50% of the detainees are problematic substance abusers, while again half of this group suffers from psychiatric co-morbidity. In addition, somatic co-morbidity, especially infectious diseases, is also common. Due to the moderate outcome seen with voluntary drug counselling regimes in prison, there is a policy shift to extent utilization of legally enforced approaches. Continuity of care is of great importance. In case of opioid addicts this, in general, means continuation of methadone maintenance treatment. Aftercare immediately after detention and optimalization of medical information transfer is crucial. This guideline aims to realize optimal and uniform management of addiction disorders in the Dutch prison system.

  5. Correlations of Maternal Buprenorphine Dose, Buprenorphine, and Metabolite Concentrations in Meconium with Neonatal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacinko, SL; Jones, HE; Johnson, RE; Choo, RE; Huestis, MA

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, relationships among maternal buprenorphine dose, meconium buprenorphine and metabolite concentrations, and neonatal outcomes are reported. Free and total buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, nicotine, opiates, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and metabolites were quantified in meconium from 10 infants born to women who had received buprenorphine during pregnancy. Neither cumulative nor total third-trimester maternal buprenorphine dose predicted meconium concentrations or neonatal outcomes. Total buprenorphine meconium concentrations and buprenorphine/norbuprenorphine ratios were significantly related to neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS ) scores >4. As free buprenorphine concentration and percentage free buprenorphine increased, head circumference decreased. Thrice-weekly urine tests for opiates, cocaine, and benzodiazepines and self-reported smoking data from the mother were compared with data from analysis of the meconium to estimate in utero exposure. Time of last drug use and frequency of use during the third trimester were important factors associated with drug-positive meconium specimens. The results suggest that buprenorphine and metabolite concentrations in the meconium may predict the onset and frequency of NAS. PMID:18701886

  6. Maternal Buprenorphine Dose, Placenta Buprenorphine and Metabolite Concentrations and Neonatal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheiro, Marta; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Buprenorphine is approved as pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence in non-pregnant patients in multiple countries, and is currently under investigation for pregnant women in the US and Europe. This research evaluates the disposition of buprenorphine, opiates, cocaine, and metabolites in 5 term placentas from a US cohort. Placenta and matched meconium concentrations were compared, and relationships between maternal buprenorphine dose, placenta concentrations, and neonatal outcomes following controlled administration during gestation were investigated. Buprenorphine and/or metabolites were detected in all placenta specimens and were uniformly distributed across this tissue (CV<27.5%, 4 locations), except for buprenorphine in 3 placentas. In 2 of these, buprenorphine was not detected in some locations and, in the 3rd placenta, was totally absent. Median (range) concentrations were buprenorphine 1.6ng/g (not detected to 3.2), norbuprenorphine 14.9ng/g (6.2 to 24.2), buprenorphine-glucuronide 3ng/g (1.3 to 5.0) and norbuprenorphine-glucuronide 14.7ng/g (11.4 to 25.8). Placenta is a potential alternative matrix for detecting in utero buprenorphine exposure, but at lower concentrations (15–70 fold) than in meconium. Statistically significant correlations were observed for mean maternal daily dose from enrollment to delivery and placenta buprenorphine-glucuronide concentration, and for norbuprenorphine-glucuronide concentrations and time to neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) onset and duration, and for norbuprenorphine/norbuprenorphine-glucuronide ratio and maximum NAS score, and newborn length. Analysis of buprenorphine and metabolites in this alternative matrix, an abundant waste product available at the time of delivery, may be valuable for prediction of neonatal outcomes for clinicians treating newborns of buprenorphine-exposed women. PMID:20216119

  7. The ABCB1, rs9282564, AG and TT Genotypes and the COMT, rs4680, AA Genotype are Less Frequent in Deceased Patients with Opioid Addiction than in Living Patients with Opioid Addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Dorte J; Damkier, Per; Feddersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Sudden death due to acute intoxication occurs frequently in patients with opioid addiction (OA). In order to examine if certain genotypes were associated with this, we examined the frequencies of 29 SNPs located in candidate genes related to opioid pharmacology: ABCB1, OPRM1, UGT2B7, CYP3A5, CYP2B6...... and fatal poisoning in OA is confirmed, then it may be possible at least in theory to personalize prevention of sudden death in this patient group. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  8. Time-dependent regional brain distribution of methadone and naltrexone in the treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teklezgi, Belin G; Pamreddy, Annapurna; Baijnath, Sooraj; Kruger, Hendrik G; Naicker, Tricia; Gopal, Nirmala D; Govender, Thavendran

    2018-02-14

    Opioid addiction is a serious public health concern with severe health and social implications; therefore, extensive therapeutic efforts are required to keep users drug free. The two main pharmacological interventions, in the treatment of addiction, involve management with methadone an mu (μ)-opioid agonist and treatment with naltrexone, μ-opioid, kappa (κ)-opioid and delta (δ)-opioid antagonist. MET and NAL are believed to help individuals to derive maximum benefit from treatment and undergo a full recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the localization and distribution of MET and NAL, over a 24-hour period in rodent brain, in order to investigate the differences in their respective regional brain distributions. This would provide a better understanding of the role of each individual drug in the treatment of addiction, especially NAL, whose efficacy is controversial. Tissue distribution was determined by using mass spectrometric imaging (MSI), in combination with quantification via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. MSI image analysis showed that MET was highly localized in the striatal and hippocampal regions, including the nucleus caudate, putamen and the upper cortex. NAL was distributed with high intensities in the mesocorticolimbic system including areas of the cortex, caudate putamen and ventral pallidum regions. Our results demonstrate that MET and NAL are highly localized in the brain regions with a high density of μ-receptors, the primary sites of heroin binding. These areas are strongly implicated in the development of addiction and are the major pathways that mediate brain stimulation during reward. © 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Frequency of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV Infections in Cannabis and Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran KARABULUT

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are very few data about the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and HIV infections in drug addicts in Turkey, whereas several countries have a developed surveillance systems to monitor the spread of HBV, HCV and HIV infections in drug users. In this study, HBV, HCV and HIV prevalence in cannabis and opioid addicts were investigated. Materials and Methods: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and anti-HIV tests were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cannabis and opioid metabolites in urine samples of drug addicts were analyzed by cloned enzyme donor immunoassay. Results: This retrospective study was conducted on 276 individuals with a mean age of 28.89±10.49 years. HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HCV prevalence in drug addicts was found to be 4%, 52.3% and 7.9%, respectively. In all the drug addicts, anti-HIV test was negative. Whereas the rate of HBsAg among cannabis users (8.8% was higher than opioid (4.1% and both cannabis and opioid users (1.4%, the difference was not statistically significant. Although anti-HCV positivity among cannabis users was not detected, 6.4% of opioid users and 15.9% of both cannabis and opioid users were anti-HCV positive (p=0.009. Conclusion: This study showed that HCV infection among especially opioid users and both cannabis and opioid users was a problem. Understanding of local status in HBV, HCV and HIV infections is crucial for developing prevention and geographical strategies for these infections.

  10. Neuropsychological functioning in buprenorphine maintained patients versus abstinent heroin abusers on naltrexone hydrochloride therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinis, Lambros; Lyros, Epameinondas; Andrian, Virginia; Katsakiori, Paraskevi; Panagis, George; Georgiou, Vasileios; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-10-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are among the most widely employed pharmacological treatments currently available for opioid addiction. Cognitive effects of buprenorphine in abstinent heroin abusers are nevertheless far from being understood. Neuropsychological performance of 18 buprenorphine-maintained patients (BMP) was evaluated relative to that of 32 currently abstinent heroin abusers on naltrexone hydrochloride therapy (FHAN), and 34 non-drug dependent controls. The three groups were demographically balanced. Clinical groups reported histories of similar patterns of drug use and had increased periods of abstinence from any illicit substance use including heroin. The BMP group performed poorer than controls on the RAVLT (encoding and delayed recall of verbal information), CTT (conceptual flexibility, executive functions) and the RBANS figure copy (visual perception) and delayed recall of visual information. There were no significant differences in any of the cognitive measures between the BMP and FHAN groups or between the FHAN group and controls. Furthermore, the non-differing percentage of abnormal cases between the two patient groups led us to infer that treatment with either BPM or FHAN is not accompanied by qualitative differences in the cognitive profiles of these patients. Overall, results suggest that treatment with naltrexone in abstinent heroin abusers may result in less impairment of cognitive functions compared to treatment with buprenorphine. These findings are relevant for improved prognosis and treatment strategies in opioid dependence.

  11. Nonopioid substance use disorders and opioid dose predict therapeutic opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Kelly L; Shella, Elizabeth R; Sweis, Giries; Griffith, Sandra D; Scheman, Judith; Covington, Edward C

    2015-02-01

    Limited research examines the risk of therapeutic opioid addiction (TOA) in patients with chronic noncancer pain. This study examined TOA among 199 patients undergoing long-term opioid therapy at the time of admission to a pain rehabilitation program. It was hypothesized that nonopioid substance use disorders and opioid dosage would predict TOA. Daily mean opioid dose was 132.85 mg ± 175.39. Patients with nonopioid substance use disorders had 28 times the odds (odds ratio [OR] = 28.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 10.86, 75.27) of having TOA. Each 50-mg increase in opioid dose nearly doubled the odds of TOA (OR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.29, 2.32). A 100-mg increase was associated with a 3-fold increase in odds (OR = 3.00; 95% CI = 1.67, 5.41). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that opioid dose was a moderately accurate predictor (area under the curve = .75; 95% CI = .68, .82) of TOA. The sensitivity (.70) and specificity (.68) of opioid dose in predicting TOA was maximized at 76.10 mg; in addition, 46.00 mg yielded 80% sensitivity in identifying TOA. These results underscore the importance of obtaining a substance use history prior to prescribing and suggest a low screening threshold for TOA in patients who use opioids in the absence of improvement in pain or functional impairment. This article examines TOA in patients with chronic noncancer pain undergoing long-term opioid therapy. Results suggest that patients should be screened for nonopioid substance use disorders prior to prescribing. In the absence of improvement in pain or function, there is a low threshold (∼50 mg daily opioid dose) for addiction screening. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Can we predict addiction to opioid analgesics? A possible tool to estimate the risk of opioid addiction in patients with pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Katrin; Reichl, Lukas; Ilias, Wilfried; Likar, Rudolf; Grogl-Aringer, Gabriele; Wallner, Christina; Schlaff, Golda; Herrmann, Peter; Lesch, Otto; Walter, Henriette

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics in the treatment of chronic pain conditions has long been controversial. They have been reported to be relatively safe when prescribed with caution, but a brief and valid instrument to estimate a person's risk of addiction is still missing. The aim of this study was to investigate a self-rating questionnaire allowing an estimation of a person's risk of addiction to opioid analgesics. Retrospective review. Four Austrian hospitals. Seven hundred forty-one patients were interviewed. Of these, 634 patients were affected with chronic pain while 107 patients had a history of opioid addiction. Patients were interviewed about alcohol and nicotine consumption and family history of psychiatric disorders. Attitudes towards medication and the origin of pain were examined. We asked patients with an opioid addiction and patients suffering from chronic pain to complete a short questionnaire intended to help screen for addiction potential. Compared to the patients suffering from chronic pain, patients with an opioid addiction significantly more often had alcohol- and nicotine-related pathologies and psychiatric comorbidity. A family history of mental illness and developmental problems were significantly more frequent in this group. Compared to those not addicted, those with an opioid addiction had significantly higher expectations concerning the potential of medication to change one's mental state; they thought that psychological  factors might contribute to the pain they feel. The main limitation of this study is the use of a self-rating instrument which reduces objectivity and introduces the possibility of misreporting. Also, the 2 groups differ in number and are not homogenous. We found differences in questionnaire responses between patients with an opioid addiction and patients suffering from chronic pain to be dependent upon the prevalence of current or former addiction, psychiatric history, attitudes towards medication, and ideas about the

  13. Genetic influence on methadone treatment outcomes in patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment for opioid addiction: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan Z

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Zainab Samaan,1–4 Monica Bawor,3,4 Brittany B Dennis,2,3 Carolyn Plater,5 Michael Varenbut,5 Jeffrey Daiter,5 Andrew Worster,5,6 David C Marsh,5,7 Charlie Tan,8 Dipika Desai,3 Lehana Thabane,2,9,10 Guillaume Pare11 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 3Population Genomics Program, Chanchlani Research Centre, 4MiNDS Neuroscience Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 5Ontario Addiction Treatment Centres, Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada; 6Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 7Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada; 8Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, 9Biostatistics Unit, Centre for Evaluation of Medicine, 10System Linked Research Unit, 11Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada Introduction: Treatment of opioid addiction with methadone is effective; however, it is known to produce interindividual variability. This may be influenced in part by genetic variants, which can increase the initial risk of developing opioid addiction as well as explain differences in response to treatment. This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility of conducting a full-scale genetic analysis to identify genes that predict methadone treatment outcomes in this population. Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study of patients admitted to a methadone maintenance treatment program for opioid addiction. We obtained demographic and clinical characteristics in addition to blood and urine samples, for the assessment of treatment outcomes. Results: The recruitment process yielded 252 patients, representing a 20% recruitment rate. We conducted genetic testing based on a 99.6% rate of provision of DNA samples. The average retention in treatment was 3.4 years, and >50% of the participants reported psychiatric and

  14. Side effects and opioid addiction in radiation-induced mucositis pain control in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Atsuhito; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Mizuta, Masanobu; Morita, Mami; Iki, Takehiro; Kojima, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy in head and neck malignancy may trigger mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Having already reported early opioid efficacy in radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer, we discuss whether this resulted in severe side effects and opioid addiction. Of 11 persons (26.2%) with nausea, 3 could not tolerate opioid. Of 33 (78.6%) with constipation, all were controlled by purgatives. Seven had mild sleepiness. None had severe opioid side effects in radiation-induced mucositis pain treatment, but I showed opioid dependence after 128-days opioid administration. While opioid administration in radiation-induced mucositis pain may not cause addiction, lomg-term opioid use should be carefully monitored. (author)

  15. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheb G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ghoncheh Raheb,1,2 Esmat Khaleghi,1 Amir Moghanibashi-Mansourieh,1 Ali Farhoudian,2 Robab Teymouri3 1Department of Social Work, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Substance Abuse and Dependence Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran Purpose: This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. Patients and methods: This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group; the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30 and control (30 groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. Results: A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t-test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Conclusion: Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients’ self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning. Keywords: social work, intervention, systematic approach, general health, opioid addicts

  16. Sublingual Buprenorphine and Methadone Maintenance Treatment: A Three-Year Follow-Up of Quality of Life Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore M. Giacomuzzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to compare long-term outcome effects on the quality of life (QOL of oral methadone with sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment. The QOL status of opioid-dependent patients was assessed using the German version (“Berlin Quality of Life Profile” of the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. Physical symptoms were measured using the Opiate Withdrawal Scale (OWS. Urine tests were carried out randomly to detect additional consumption. In the first study period, 53 opioid-dependent subjects were enrolled and 25 could be reached after 3 years. The retention rate was 50% for methadone and 45% for buprenorphine (p = 0.786. Baseline values of the total sample (completers and noncompleters QOL and somatic complaints did not show significant differences between the two treatment groups. QOL characteristics at 6 months of treatment of the buprenorphine completer and noncompleter groups differed significantly regarding job (p = 0.013, family, and total score of physical symptoms (p = 0.002, in which the completer group showed the more favorable values. Concerning physical symptoms at 36 months, logistic regression revealed significantly less stomach cramps (p = 0.037 and fatigue and tiredness (p = 0.034 in buprenorphine compared to the methadone. Moreover, the buprenorphine-maintained group showed significantly less additional consumption of benzodiazepines (p = 0.015 compared with methadone participants. It is concluded that opioid addicts improved their QOL and health status when treated with methadone or buprenorphine. In summary, regarding QOL and health status, the present data indicate that buprenorphine is also a useful long-term alternative for maintenance treatment of opioid-dependent patients.

  17. Gene network analysis shows immune-signaling and ERK1/2 as novel genetic markers for multiple addiction phenotypes: alcohol, smoking and opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gibby, Cielito C; Yuan, Christine; Wang, Jian; Yeung, Sai-Ching J; Shete, Sanjay

    2015-06-05

    Addictions to alcohol and tobacco, known risk factors for cancer, are complex heritable disorders. Addictive behaviors have a bidirectional relationship with pain. We hypothesize that the associations between alcohol, smoking, and opioid addiction observed in cancer patients have a genetic basis. Therefore, using bioinformatics tools, we explored the underlying genetic basis and identified new candidate genes and common biological pathways for smoking, alcohol, and opioid addiction. Literature search showed 56 genes associated with alcohol, smoking and opioid addiction. Using Core Analysis function in Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software, we found that ERK1/2 was strongly interconnected across all three addiction networks. Genes involved in immune signaling pathways were shown across all three networks. Connect function from IPA My Pathway toolbox showed that DRD2 is the gene common to both the list of genetic variations associated with all three addiction phenotypes and the components of the brain neuronal signaling network involved in substance addiction. The top canonical pathways associated with the 56 genes were: 1) calcium signaling, 2) GPCR signaling, 3) cAMP-mediated signaling, 4) GABA receptor signaling, and 5) G-alpha i signaling. Cancer patients are often prescribed opioids for cancer pain thus increasing their risk for opioid abuse and addiction. Our findings provide candidate genes and biological pathways underlying addiction phenotypes, which may be future targets for treatment of addiction. Further study of the variations of the candidate genes could allow physicians to make more informed decisions when treating cancer pain with opioid analgesics.

  18. Training opioid addiction treatment providers to adopt contingency management: A prospective pilot trial of a comprehensive implementation science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sara J; Squires, Daniel D; Strong, David R; Barnett, Nancy P; Monti, Peter M; Petry, Nancy M

    2016-01-01

    Few prospective studies have evaluated theory-driven approaches to the implementation of evidence-based opioid treatment. This study compared the effectiveness of an implementation model (Science to Service Laboratory; SSL) to training as usual (TAU) in promoting the adoption of contingency management across a multisite opioid addiction treatment program. We also examined whether the SSL affected putative mediators of contingency management adoption (perceived innovation characteristics and organizational readiness to change). Sixty treatment providers (39 SSL, 21 TAU) from 15 geographically diverse satellite clinics (7 SSL, 8 TAU) participated in the 12-month study. Both conditions received didactic contingency management training and those in the predetermined experimental region received 9 months of SSL-enhanced training. Contingency management adoption was monitored biweekly, whereas putative mediators were measured at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Relative to providers in the TAU region, treatment providers in the SSL region had comparable likelihood of contingency management adoption in the first 20 weeks of the study, and then significantly higher likelihood of adoption (odds ratios = 2.4-13.5) for the remainder of the study. SSL providers also reported higher levels of one perceived innovation characteristic (Observability) and one aspect of organizational readiness to change (Adequacy of Training Resources), although there was no evidence that the SSL affected these putative mediators over time. Results of this study indicate that a fully powered randomized trial of the SSL is warranted. Considerations for a future evaluation are discussed.

  19. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheb, Ghoncheh; Khaleghi, Esmat; Moghanibashi-Mansourieh, Amir; Farhoudian, Ali; Teymouri, Robab

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group); the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30) and control (30) groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t -test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients' self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning.

  20. Drug-use pattern, comorbid psychosis and mortality in people with a history of opioid addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H J; Jepsen, P W; Haastrup, S

    2005-01-01

    . METHOD: In 1984, 188 persons (122 men and 66 women) with a history of intravenous narcotics addiction were interviewed about their drug-use pattern. A registry-based follow-up continued through 1999 and mortality was assessed. Three 1984-drug-use categories were formed. In category 1, cohort members had...... at lower risk of premature death than people with continued drug use. A residual observed excess mortality in people who had apparently achieved stable abstinence from drug use is consistent with the view of drug addiction as a chronic disease....

  1. Cognitive impairments in young people with opioid addiction and their correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lazarevna Chukhlovina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate cognitive functions and drug correction of identified impairments in heroin users. Patients and methods. Thirty-two patients (7 women and 25 men aged 18 to 45 years who had used heroin for 1—3 years were examined using the mini-mental state examination (MMSE, the techniques of «memorizing words» and «excluding words», the tests of «information-memory-concentration», quantitative assessment of clock drawing, and the frontal assessment battery. The detected cognitive impairments were corrected with the standardized Ginkgo Biloba extract (EGb 761 ®, Tanakan ®. Results. Cognitive impairments were found in all the patients: moderate cognitive disorders in 68.8% and mild dementia in 31.2%; thinking disorders were most noticeable; decreased attention, frontal lobe dysfunction, and visual spatial impairments were detectable. After a course of therapy with tanakan (120—240 g/day according to the degree of cognitive impairments for 3 months, there was a significant improvement in MMSE scores, thought, concentration, memory; however, they failed to achieve the scores in the control group consisting of 10 apparently healthy individuals of the same age and sex.

  2. Evaluation of clinical and inflammatory profile in opioid addiction patients with comorbid pain: results from a multicenter investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis BB

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Brittany B Dennis,1 M Constantine Samaan,2 Monica Bawor,3 James Paul,4 Carolyn Plater,5 Guillaume Pare,1 Andrew Worster,6 Michael Varenbut,5 Jeff Daiter,5 David C Marsh,5,7 Dipika Desai,8 Lehana Thabane,1,9,10 Zainab Samaan1,8,11 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, 3McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery and Study Program, 4Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, 5Ontario Addiction Treatment Centres, Richmond Hill, 6Department of Medicine, Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, 7Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, 8Population Genomics Program, Chanchlani Research Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, 9Centre for Evaluation of Medicine, 10System Linked Research Unit, Hamilton, 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Chronic pain is the most commonly reported comorbidity among patients with opioid addiction receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT, with an estimated prevalence ranging between 30% and 55%. Evidence suggests that patients with comorbid pain are at high risk for poor treatment response, including continued illicit substance use. Due to the important relationship between the presence of pain and illicit substance abuse within the MMT setting, it is imperative that we target our efforts toward understanding the characteristics of this patient population.Methods: The primary objective of this study was to explore the clinical and inflammatory profile of MMT patients reporting comorbid pain. This multicenter study enrolled patients (n=235 on MMT for the treatment of opioid dependence. Clinical history and blood and urine data were collected. Blood samples were obtained for estimating the serum levels of inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist [IL-1ra], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon [IFN]-γ and

  3. Assessment of the use of oral fluid as a matrix for drug monitoring in patients undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Frank; Fey, Elizabeth; Borg, Damon; Stripp, Richard; Getto, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Drug testing is an important clinical tool that is available to physicians who are assessing the effectiveness of drug treatment as well as patient compliance to the administered program. While urine has traditionally been the matrix of choice for drug monitoring, oral fluid, a filtrate of the blood, has shown great promise as an alternative matrix for such applications. Oral fluid collection can be accomplished without the need for highly trained medical staff through the use of a simple, noninvasive oral fluid collection device, which obtains an adequate sample in only a few minutes. There has been a significant amount of research performed on the use of oral fluid for forensic toxicology application; however, more studies assessing the use of oral fluid drug testing are required to validate its ability to achieve clinical drug monitoring goals. Testing for various drugs in oral fluid may yield a different result when compared to the same drugs in urine, requiring an assessment of the utility of oral fluid for such practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the application of oral fluid drug testing in patients undergoing buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. A retrospective analysis of drug testing results obtained from 6,928 patients (4,560 unobserved urine collections and 2,368 observed oral fluid collections) monitored for heroin metabolite, amphetamine, benzodiazepines, buprenorphine, tetrahydrocannabinol, cocaine, codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone was completed. Results of this statistical exercise indicated that patients undergoing observed oral fluid collection tested positive more frequently than those unobserved urine collections for several illicit drugs and prescription medications targeted. Oral fluid was shown to detect illicit drug use as well as noncompliance in this patient population under the studied conditions more often than the urine specimens.

  4. Opioid withdrawal, craving, and use during and after outpatient buprenorphine stabilization and taper: a discrete survival and growth mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Thomas F; Stotts, Angela L; Green, Charles; Potter, Jennifer S; Marino, Elise N; Walker, Robrina; Weiss, Roger D; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2015-02-01

    Most patients relapse to opioids within one month of opioid agonist detoxification, making the antecedents and parallel processes of first use critical for investigation. Craving and withdrawal are often studied in relationship to opioid outcomes, and a novel analytic strategy applied to these two phenomena may indicate targeted intervention strategies. Specifically, this secondary data analysis of the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study used a discrete-time mixture analysis with time-to-first opioid use (survival) simultaneously predicted by craving and withdrawal growth trajectories. This analysis characterized heterogeneity among prescription opioid-dependent individuals (N=653) into latent classes (i.e., latent class analysis [LCA]) during and after buprenorphine/naloxone stabilization and taper. A 4-latent class solution was selected for overall model fit and clinical parsimony. In order of shortest to longest time-to-first use, the 4 classes were characterized as 1) high craving and withdrawal, 2) intermediate craving and withdrawal, 3) high initial craving with low craving and withdrawal trajectories and 4) a low initial craving with low craving and withdrawal trajectories. Odds ratio calculations showed statistically significant differences in time-to-first use across classes. Generally, participants with lower baseline levels and greater decreases in craving and withdrawal during stabilization combined with slower craving and withdrawal rebound during buprenorphine taper remained opioid-free longer. This exploratory work expanded on the importance of monitoring craving and withdrawal during buprenorphine induction, stabilization, and taper. Future research may allow individually tailored and timely interventions to be developed to extend time-to-first opioid use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Impact of Saffron on Symptoms of Withdrawal Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Addiction in Sabzevar Parish in 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nemat Shahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Drug dependence is one of the serious problems around the world. Saffron is one of those beneficial medicinal plants which is embedded with a similar mechanism to methadone (e.g., inhibition of serotonin reuptake. Thus, it can be helpful in reducing the withdrawal symptoms. The aim of this study was to reduce the daily dose of methadone usage and reduce its side effects using saffron in the form of medicinal supplements. Methodology. This study was categorized as a clinical trial. Accordingly, 44 clients of addiction treatment centers in Sabzevar parish were randomly selected to participate in this study in 2016–2017. While the experimental group was treated with methadone syrup and self-made saffron capsules, the control group received methadone syrup and placebo capsules. Results. The results showed that the use of saffron and methadone alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome (p<0.001. Conclusion. Having reviewed the research participants, it was indicated that the introduction of saffron alleviated the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome in patients undergoing maintenance treatment for opioid addiction. Thus, it seems rational to make use of saffron in combination with methadone in order to alleviate the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome.

  6. Buprenorphine for managing opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Mbewe, Dalitso

    2017-02-21

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of substitution treatment. To assess the effects of buprenorphine versus tapered doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists, symptomatic medications or placebo, or different buprenorphine regimens for managing opioid withdrawal, in terms of the intensity of the withdrawal syndrome experienced, duration and completion of treatment, and adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2016), MEDLINE (1946 to December week 1, 2016), Embase (to 22 December 2016), PsycINFO (1806 to December week 3, 2016), and the Web of Science (to 22 December 2016) and handsearched the reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials of interventions using buprenorphine to modify the signs and symptoms of withdrawal in participants who were primarily opioid dependent. Comparison interventions involved reducing doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists (clonidine or lofexidine), symptomatic medications or placebo, and different buprenorphine-based regimens. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 27 studies involving 3048 participants. The main comparators were clonidine or lofexidine (14 studies). Six studies compared buprenorphine versus methadone, and seven compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction. We assessed 12 studies as being at high risk of bias in at least one of seven domains of methodological quality. Six of these studies compared buprenorphine with clonidine or lofexidine and two with methadone; the other four studies compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction.For the comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in tapered doses, meta-analysis was not possible for the outcomes of intensity of withdrawal or adverse effects. However, information reported by the individual studies was suggestive of buprenorphine and methadone having similar capacity to

  7. home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find physicians and treatment programs providing buprenorphine for opioid addiction (heroin or pain relievers). Find programs providing methadone for the treatment of opioid addiction (heroin or pain relievers). /locator/widget/220 SAMHSA ...

  8. Pain and Opioid Addiction: A Systematic Review and Evaluation of Pain Measurement in Patients with Opioid Dependence on Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, B B; Bawor, M; Paul, J; Plater, C; Pare, G; Worster, A; Varenbut, M; Daiter, J; Marsh, D C; Desai, D; Thabane, L; Samaan, Z

    2016-01-01

    While chronic pain has been said to impact patient's response to methadone maintenance treatment for opioid dependence, the reported findings are inconsistent. These discrepancies may be a direct result of variations in the measurement of chronic pain or definitions of response to methadone treatment. The goal of this study is to evaluate the association between pain and substance use behaviour to determine the real impact of comorbid pain in the methadone population. We also aim to examine sources of variation across the literature with a specific focus on the measurement of pain. We performed a systematic review using an electronic search strategy across CINAHL, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library including Cochrane Reviews and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases. Title, abstract, as well as full text screening and extraction were performed in duplicate. Studies evaluating the association between chronic pain and methadone maintenance treatment response were eligible for inclusion in this review. Using a sample of 297 methadone patients from the Genetics of Opioid Addiction (GENOA) research collaborative, we assessed the reliability of patient self-reported pain and the validated Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) assessment tool. After screening 826 articles we identified five studies eligible for full text extraction, of which three showed a significant relationship between the presence of pain and the increase in substance abuse among patients on methadone for the treatment of opioid dependence. Studies varied largely in the definitions and measurement of both pain and response to treatment. Results from our validation of pain measurement in the GENOA sample (n=297) showed the use of a simple self-reported pain question is highly correlated to the use of the BPI. Simply asking patients whether they have pain showed a 44.2% sensitivity, 88.8% specificity, 84.4% PPV and 53.6% NPV to the BPI. The area under the

  9. A randomized controlled trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine: prison outcomes and community treatment entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Schwartz, Robert P; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; Vocci, Frank J

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine is a promising treatment for heroin addiction. However, little is known regarding its provision to pre-release prisoners with heroin dependence histories who were not opioid-tolerant, the relative effectiveness of the post-release setting in which it is provided, and gender differences in treatment outcome in this population. This is the first randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine provided to male and female inmates in the US who were previously heroin-dependent prior to incarceration. A total of 211 participants with 3-9 months remaining in prison were randomized to one of four conditions formed by crossing In-Prison Treatment Condition (received buprenorphine vs. counseling only) and Post-release Service Setting (at an opioid treatment center vs. a community health center). Outcome measures were: entered prison treatment; completed prison treatment; and entered community treatment 10 days post-release. There was a significant main effect (p=.006) for entering prison treatment favoring the In-Prison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (99.0% vs. 80.4%). Regarding completing prison treatment, the only significant effect was Gender, with women significantly (pPrison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (47.5% vs. 33.7%). Buprenorphine appears feasible and acceptable to prisoners who were not opioid-tolerant and can facilitate community treatment entry. However, concerns remain with in-prison treatment termination due to attempted diversion of medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Methadone versus buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid abuse in pregnancy: science and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Amber M

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increase in rates of opioid abuse during pregnancy. This clinical challenge has been met with debate regarding whether or not illicit and prescription opioid-dependent individuals require different treatment approaches; whether detoxification is preferable to maintenance; and the efficacy of methadone versus buprenorphine as treatment options during pregnancy. The clinical recommendations resulting from these discussions are frequently influenced by the comparative stigma attached to heroin abuse and methadone maintenance versus prescription opioid abuse and maintenance treatment with buprenorphine. While some studies have suggested that a subset of individuals who abuse prescription opioids may have different characteristics than heroin users, there is currently no evidence to suggest that buprenorphine is better suited to treatment of prescription opioid abuse than methadone. Similarly, despite its perennial popularity, there is no evidence to recommend detoxification as an efficacious approach to treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. While increased access to treatment is important, particularly in rural areas, there are multiple medical and psychosocial reasons to recommend comprehensive substance abuse treatment for pregnant women suffering from substance use disorders rather than office-based provision of maintenance medication. Both methadone and buprenorphine are important treatment options for opioid abuse during pregnancy. Methadone may still remain the preferred treatment choice for some women who require higher doses for stabilization, have a higher risk of treatment discontinuation, or who have had unsuccessful treatment attempts with buprenorphine. As treatment providers, we should advocate to expand available treatment options for pregnant women in all States.

  11. Benefits of using intrathecal buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiee, Seyed Mozaffar; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Rostami, Sara

    2014-01-01

    General anesthesia draws attention to the most commonly used modalities for post cesarean delivery pain relief in systemic administration of opioids, while the administration of small dose of intrathecal opioid during spinal anesthesia can be a possible alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of buprenorphine on cesarean section prescribed intrathecally. This double blind randomized clinical trial study was conducted in patients for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. Case group (208 patients) received 65-70 mg of 5% lidocaine plus 0.2 ml of buprenorphine while the same amount of 5% lidocaine diluted with 0.2 ml of normal saline was given to 234 cases in the control group. Hemodynamic changes and neonatal APGAR scores (Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, Respiration) were recorded. Pain score was recorded according to the visual analog scale. This study was registered in the Iranian Registry of clinical Trials; IRCT2013022112552N1. The mean age of case and control groups was 24.4±5.38 and 26.84±5.42 years, respectively. Systolic blood pressure was not significantly different until the 45th minute but diastolic blood pressure showed a significant difference at the 15th and the 60th minutes (P<0.001). Heart rate changes were significantly different between cases and controls at the initial 5th, 15th and after 60th minutes (P<0.001). Pain-free period was significantly different between two groups (1.25 h versus 18.73 h) (P<0.001). The results show that prescription of intratechal buprenorphine prolongs the duration of analgesia without any significant considerable side effects.

  12. Desipramine in opioid-dependent cocaine abusers maintained on buprenorphine vs methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveto, A H; Feingold, A; Schottenfeld, R; Jatlow, P; Kosten, T R

    1999-09-01

    Cocaine abuse occurs in 40% to 60% of patients entering opioid maintenance treatment, and effective pharmacotherapies are needed for this combined dependence. This 13-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of desipramine hydrochloride (0 or 150 mg/d) plus buprenorphine hydrochloride (12 mg/d) or methadone hydrochloride (65 mg/d) in 180 opioid-dependent cocaine abusers (124 men, 56 women). Supervised urine samples were obtained thrice weekly, and self-reported cocaine and heroin use was reported once weekly. Desipramine plasma levels were determined at weeks 4 and 10. In men, opioid abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine, whereas cocaine abstinence was increased more with buprenorphine than with methadone. In women, opioid abstinence was increased the least rapidly when treated with buprenorphine plus placebo, while cocaine abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine. Regardless of sex or opioid medication, desipramine increased opioid and cocaine abstinence more rapidly over time than placebo. Self-reported opioid use confirmed these findings. Desipramine plasma levels were higher in women than in men, particularly those on buprenorphine maintenance. Higher desipramine plasma levels were associated with greater opioid, but not cocaine, abstinence. Desipramine may be a useful adjunctive medication in facilitating opioid and cocaine abstinence in opioid-maintained patients. The efficacy of opioid medications to treat opioid or cocaine dependence may differ by sex. These findings highlight the importance of including sex as a factor when examining treatment outcome in these types of trials.

  13. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hwei-Hsien Chen,1,2,* Yao-Chang Chiang,3,4,* Zung Fan Yuan,5,6 Chung-Chih Kuo,5,6 Mei-Dan Lai,2 Tsai-Wei Hung,1 Ing-kang Ho,1,3,4 Shao-Tsu Chen2,7 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan; 2Master and PhD Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan; 3Center for Drug Abuse and Addiction, China Medical University Hospital, 4Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Master Program in Physiological and Anatomical Medicine, 6Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, 7Department of Psychiatry, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3–20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light–dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light–dark transition in both male and female

  15. Presence or Absence of QTc Prolongation in Buprenorphine-Naloxone Among Youth With Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Sabrina A; Pecoraro, Anna; Subramaniam, Geetha; Woody, George; Vetter, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate buprenorphine-naloxone effects on the QTc in youth with opioid dependence. Buprenorphine is a partial agonist that is an effective treatment for opioid dependence. Compared with methadone, it has a lower risk of QTc prolongation in adults, but is less studied in the youth. It may also reduce the risk of torsades de pointes (TdP)--an uncommon variant of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia--that can result in syncope, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Secondary analysis of the electrocardiogram data from 95 individuals who participated in a multisite trial for youth with opioid dependence. The participants were randomized to a 2-week (DETOX) or a 12-week course of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP). At baseline, 12-lead electrocardiograms were done at weeks 4 and 12, and QTc intervals were hand-measured and calculated using Bazett formula. Increases above 60 milliseconds were considered clinically significant, and readings above 450 milliseconds (in men) and 470 milliseconds (in women) indicated a prolonged QTc. Mean QTc intervals were higher for BUP than for DETOX participants at baseline, week 4, and week 12 (P = 0.045), and women had longer mean QTc intervals than men (P DETOX patients. Minimal changes in the QTc were seen at 4 and 12 weeks in a few patients in both groups. There was no evidence that buprenorphine-naloxone alone increased the QTc to a level that increased the risk for TdP.

  16. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Landucci, Gina; McTavish, Fiona; Kornfield, Rachel; Johnson, Roberta A; Mares, Marie-Louise; Westergaard, Ryan P; Quanbeck, Andrew; Alagoz, Esra; Pe-Romashko, Klaren; Thomas, Chantelle; Shah, Dhavan

    2016-12-12

    Opioid dependence has devastating and increasingly widespread consequences and costs, and the most common outcome of treatment is early relapse. People who inject opioids are also at disproportionate risk for contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study tests an approach that has been shown to improve recovery rates: medication along with other supportive services (medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) against MAT combined with a smartphone innovation called A-CHESS (MAT + A-CHESS). This unblinded study will randomly assign 440 patients to receive MAT + A-CHESS or MAT alone. Eligible patients will meet criteria for having an opioid use disorder of at least moderate severity and will be taking methadone, injectable naltrexone, or buprenorphine. Patients with A-CHESS will have smartphones for 16 months; all patients will be followed for 24 months. The primary outcome is the difference between patients in the two arms in percentage of days using illicit opioids during the 24-month intervention. Secondary outcomes are differences between patients receiving MAT + A-CHESS versus MAT in other substance use, quality of life, retention in treatment, health service use, and, related to HIV and HCV, screening and testing rates, medication adherence, risk behaviors, and links to care. We will also examine mediators and moderators of the effects of MAT + A-CHESS. We will measure variables at baseline and months 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. At each point, patients will respond to a 20- to 30-min phone survey; urine screens will be collected at baseline and up to twice a month thereafter. We will use mixed-effects to evaluate the primary and secondary outcomes, with baseline scores functioning as covariates, treatment condition as a between-subject factor, and the outcomes reflecting scores for a given assessment at the six time points. Separate analyses will be conducted for each outcome. A-CHESS has been shown to

  17. Recidivism with opiate addicted patients on buprenorphine substitution treatment: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crnić Katarina B.

    2017-01-01

    treatment goal have significantly allocated the place to 'harm reduction' programs, where the therapeutic goals are less demanding and defined as the harm-reduction of opiate dependence on the individual and the society. Treatment guidelines define the principles and types of treatment regimens with agonists and partial agonists of opiate receptors and most commonly used are methadone and buprenorphine. The high risk of relapses despite treatment is defined and a comprehensive approaches and inclusion of Cognitive Behavior Therapy /CBT/, family and social therapy are needed. Conclusion: Defining opioid addiction as severe, chronic and recurrent disease, with high prevalence and mortality rate, forces a therapeutic approach similar to the other chronic and widespread diseases in the population. First of all this implies changing treatment goals, in terms of controlling and reducing harm to individuals and society, and then increasing the availability of treatment at the level of primary care outside the hospital and psychiatric institutions. In addition to pharmacological approach maintenance programs, psychosocial programs are also needed to contribute to the better treatment outcome.

  18. A randomized clinical trial of buprenorphine for prisoners: Findings at 12-months post-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; Vocci, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether starting buprenorphine treatment prior to prison and after release from prison would be associated with better drug treatment outcomes and whether males and females responded differently to the combination of in-prison treatment and post-release service setting. Study design was a 2 (In-Prison Treatment: Condition: Buprenorphine Treatment: vs. Counseling Only)×2 [Post-Release Service Setting Condition: Opioid Treatment: Program (OTP) vs. Community Health Center (CHC)]×2 (Gender) factorial design. The trial was conducted between September 2008 and July 2012. Follow-up assessments were completed in 2014. Participants were recruited from two Baltimore pre-release prisons (one for men and one for women). Adult pre-release prisoners who were heroin-dependent during the year prior to incarceration were eligible. Post-release assessments were conducted at 1, 3, 6, and 12-month following prison release. Participants (N=211) in the in-prison treatment condition effect had a higher mean number of days of community buprenorphine treatment compared to the condition in which participants initiated medication after release (P=0.005). However, there were no statistically significant hypothesized effects for the in-prison treatment condition in terms of: days of heroin use and crime, and opioid and cocaine positive urine screening test results (all Ps>0.14) and no statistically significant hypothesized gender effects (all Ps>0.18). Although initiating buprenorphine treatment in prison compared to after-release was associated with more days receiving buprenorphine treatment in the designated community treatment program during the 12-months post-release assessment, it was not associated with superior outcomes in terms of heroin and cocaine use and criminal behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sublingual buprenorphine is effective in the treatment of chronic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinoff, Herbert L; Barkin, Robert L; Wilson, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Many patients with chronic pain have less than optimal therapeutic outcomes after prolonged treatment with opiate analgesics. Worsening of pain perception, functional capacity, and mood often result. Medical detoxification is often undertaken in this situation. Ninety-five consecutive patients (49 men and 46 women; age range, 26-84) with chronic noncancer pain (maldynia) were referred by local pain clinics for detoxification from long-term opiate analgesic (LTOA) therapy. All patients had failed treatment as manifest by increasing pain levels, worsening functional capacity, and, in 8%, the emergence of opiate addiction. Length of prior LTOA therapy ranged from 1.5 to 27 years (mean, 8.8 years). After a minimum of 12 hours of abstinence from all opiate analgesics, patients were given low doses of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone (Reckitt Benckiser). Maintenance dosing was individualized to treat chronic pain. Daily SL dose of buprenorphine ranged from 4 to 16 mg (mean, 8 mg) in divided doses. Mean duration of treatment is 8.8 months (range, 2.4-16.6 months). At clinic appointments, patients were assessed for pain reports, functional capacity, and mood inventory. Eighty-six percent of patients experienced moderate to substantial relief of pain accompanied by both improved mood and functioning. Patient and family satisfaction was robust. Only 6 patients discontinued therapy secondary to side effects and/or exacerbation of pain. In this open-label study, SL buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone were well tolerated and safe and appeared to be effective in the treatment of chronic pain patients refractory to LTOA.

  20. Detection and Quantization of the Expression of Two mu-Opioid Receptor Splice Variants mRNA (hMOR-1A and hMOR-1O in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Long-Term Abstinent Former Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Vousooghi, Pharm

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives

    The mu-Opioid receptor (MOR exerts a critical role on effects of opiodis. The objective of this study is to find a peripheral bio-marker in addiction studies through quantization of the expression of two MOR splice variants mRNA (hMOR-1A and hMOR-1O in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs of long-term abstinent former opioids addicts.

    Methods

    In this case-control study, case and control people were male and divided in two groups: people who gave up addiction to opioids (case and healthy individuals without history of addiction (control. The mRNA expression in PBLs of participants was detected and measured by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR using SYBR Green Dye.

    Results

    The hMOR-1A mRNA expression in PBLs of abstinent group was significantly reduced and reached to 0.33 of the control group (p<0.001. Similar results were obtained for the other splice variant with the mRNA expression of hMOR-1O in PBLs of abstinent group reaching to 0.38 of that of the control group (p < 0.001.

    Conclusion

    mRNA expression deficiency of two mu-opioid receptor splice variants, hMOR-1A and nMOR-1O, seams to be a risk factor making individuals vulnerable to drug addiction. Based on this analysis measuring the amount of mRNA expression of these two splice variants in PBLs can serve as a peripheral bio-marker for detecting people at risk.

  1. Buprenorphine Implants for Treatment of Opioid Dependence: Randomized Comparison to Placebo and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Ling, Walter; Casadonte, Paul; Vocci, Frank; Bailey, Genie L.; Kampman, Kyle; Patkar, Ashwin; Chavoustie, Steven; Blasey, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey; Beebe, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of buprenorphine implants (BI) versus placebo implants (PI) for the treatment of opioid dependence. A secondary aim compared BI to open-label sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets (BNX). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received either 4 buprenorphine implants (80 mg/implant) (n=114), 4 placebo implants (n=54), or open-label BNX (12–16 mg/d) (n=119). Setting 20 addiction treatment centers. Participants Adult outpatients (ages 18 to 65) with DSM-IV-TR opioid dependence. Measurements The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent of urine samples negative for opioids collected from weeks 1 to 24, examined as a cumulative distribution function (CDF). Findings The BI CDF was significantly different from placebo (P<.0001). Mean (95% CI) proportions of urines negative for opioids were: BI: 31.2% (25.3, 37.1) and PI: 13.4% (8.3, 18.6). BI subjects had a higher study completion rate relative to placebo (64% vs. 26%, P<.0001), lower clinician-rated (P<.0001) and patient-rated (P<.0001) withdrawal, lower patient-ratings of craving (P<.0001), and better subjects’ (P=.031) and clinicians’ (P=.022) global ratings of improvement. BI also resulted in significantly lower cocaine use (P=.0016). Minor implant-site reactions were comparable in the buprenorphine (27.2% [31/114]) and placebo groups (25.9% [14/54]). BI were non-inferior to BNX on percent urines negative for opioids [mean (95% CI): 33.5 (27.3, 39.6); CI for the difference of proportions, (−10.7, 6.2)]. Conclusions Compared with placebo, buprenorphine implants result in significantly less frequent opioid use, and are non-inferior to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. PMID:23919595

  2. Management of eight labor and delivery patients dependent on buprenorphine (Subutex™: A retrospective chart review [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solina Tith

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioid use during pregnancy is a growing concern in the United States. Buprenorphine has been recommended by “The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology” as an alternative to methadone to decrease risks associated with the use of illicit opioids during pregnancy. The partial μ-opioid agonists’ unique pharmacology, including its long half time and high affinity to the μ-opioid receptor, complicates patient management in a highly kinetic, and often urgent field like obstetric anesthesia. We reviewed our management and outcomes in this medically complex population. Methods: An Institutional Review Board (IRB approved retrospective chart review was conducted of women admitted to the University of Washington Medical Center Labor and Delivery unit from July 2012 to November 2013 using buprenorphine. All deliveries, including intrauterine fetal demise, were included. Results: Eight women were admitted during this period to our L&D floor on buprenorphine. All required peri-partum anesthetic management either for labor and/or cesarean delivery management. Analgesic management included dilaudid or fentanyl PCA and/or continued epidural infusion, and in one instance ketamine infusion, while the pre-admission buprenorphine regimen was continued. Five babies were viable, two women experienced intrauterine fetal death at 22 and 36 weeks gestational age (GSA, respectively, and one neonate died shortly after delivery due to a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Conclusions: This case series illuminates the medical complexity of parturients using buprenorphine. Different treatment modalities in the absence of evidence-based guidelines included additional opioid administration and continued epidural analgesia. The management of post-cesarean pain in patients on partial μ-opioid agonists remains complex and variable, and evidence-based guidelines could be useful for clinicians to direct care.

  3. High-dose buprenorphine: perioperative precautions and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D M; Meyer-Witting, M

    2005-02-01

    Buprenorphine has been in clinical use in anaesthesia for several decades. Recently, the high-dose sublingual formulation (Subutex, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, U.K.) has been increasingly used as maintenance therapy in opioid dependence, as an alternative to methadone and other pharmacological therapies. Buprenorphine has unique pharmacological properties making it well suited for use as a maintenance therapy in opioid dependence. However, these same properties may cause difficulty in the perioperative management of pain. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, attenuating the effects of supplemental illicit or therapeutic opioid agonists. As a result of its high receptor affinity, supplemental opioids do not readily displace buprenorphine from the opioid receptor in standard doses. High-dose buprenorphine has an extended duration of action that prolongs both of these effects. The perioperative management of patients stabilized on high-dose buprenorphine and undergoing surgery requires consideration of the likely analgesic requirements. Where possible the buprenorphine should be continued. Pain management should focus on maximizing non-opioid analgesia, local anaesthesia and non-pharmacological techniques. Where pain may not be adequately relieved by these methods, the addition of a full opioid agonist such as fentanyl or morphine at appropriate doses should be considered, accompanied by close monitoring in a high dependency unit. In situations where this regimen is unlikely to be effective, preoperative conversion to morphine or methadone may be an option. Where available, liaison with a hospital-based alcohol and drug service should always be considered.

  4. HIV-gp120 and physical dependence to buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J; Abood, M E; Benamar, K

    2015-05-01

    Opioids are among the most effective and commonly used analgesics in clinical practice for severe pain. However, the use of opioid medications is clinically limited by several adverse properties including dependence. While opioid dependence is a complex health condition, the treatment of HIV-infected individuals with opioid dependence presents additional challenges. The goal of this study was to examine the physical dependence to buprenorphine in the context of HIV. Young adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were pretreated with HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) injected into the periaqueductal gray area (PAG) and we examined the impact on physical dependence to opioid. It was found that the physical dependence to methadone occurred earlier than that to buprenorphine, and that gp120 did not enhance or precipitate the buprenorphine withdrawal. The results suggest that buprenorphine could be the better therapeutic option to manage opioid dependence in HIV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  6. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management.

  7. [Addictive behavior after starting buprenorphine maintenance treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanello, Serge; Daoud, Sidi; Panici, Jean Yves; Parot, Elsa; Hitoto, Hicombo; Garnier, François

    2006-02-01

    This study of a cohort of drug addicts receiving buprenorphine maintenance treatment in a district in western France focused on changes in their drug use and their social and work lives. It also looked at the health consequences of their drug use before and after maintenance treatment (mean: four years). From the files of an agency providing services to drug addicts, we randomly selected 180 of the 236 patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT). Usable questionnaires were returned by 118 subjects (66% response rate). This self-administered questionnaire included 32 items. The respondents accounted for half the population receiving drug maintenance treatment and were representative of the population for age and sex. The mean age was 30 +/- 5 years, mean BMT dose 6,5 mg/day, and mean duration of drug maintenance treatment 47 +/- 27 months. Other drug use diminished during the four years of maintenance treatment: three of every four heroin users had stopped, opiate users dropped from 31% to 5% of the population, and cocaine use followed a similar trend. Benzodiazepine use also fell, but remained relatively frequent (27%, compared with 68% four years earlier). Drinking patterns changed from strongly alcoholic beverages to lower-proof drinks. Arrest rates dropped from 70% to 25%. The percentage of persons seropositive for HIV (4%) and HCV (33%) remained low, but too many subjects had not been screened (35%). Roughly 10% of these subjects had returned to work, mainly those who had cut their drug use most. While our survey reveals some positive points, especially a reduction in illegal drug use, several negative observations appeared, including combined use of cannabis and benzodiazepines, inadequate screening, and misuse of BMD. These results underline how important it is for care providers to focus simultaneously on medical treatment and identification of co-morbidities and to provide social work when necessary. The employment rate remains too low.

  8. The effect of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine on rats subjected to surgically induced global cerebral ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Abelson, Klas; Koch, Janne

    2010-01-01

    in buprenorphine-treated and untreated animals. A part from a slightly higher hyperthermia immediately after surgery and typical opiate-associated behaviour, the buprenorphine treatment had no apparent adverse effects on the experimental model. In contrast, the analgesic treatment improved the model by minimizing......The effect of perioperatively administered buprenorphine analgesia on rats subjected to surgically induced global ischaemia was assessed. Rats supplied with buprenorphine, mixed in nut paste for voluntary ingestion, displayed significant reductions in postoperative excretions of faecal...

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following a two-stage intravenous infusion in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Lykke; Foster, David J.R.; Upton, Richard N.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following administration of an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. To date, the population kinetics of buprenorphine has been described for bolus administration only.......The aim of this investigation was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following administration of an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. To date, the population kinetics of buprenorphine has been described for bolus administration only....

  10. Impact of opioid therapy on gonadal hormones: focus on buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Anjali; Sapra, Mamta; Iranmanesh, Ali

    2018-02-17

    Objective The USA is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Understanding the impact of opioids and commonly used treatments for opioid dependence is essential for clinicians and researchers in order to educate and treat the nation's growing population with opioid use disorders. As a relatively new treatment for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is gaining popularity to the extent of becoming not only a preferred approach to the maintenance of opiate addiction, but also an option for chronic pain management. The purpose of this report is to review the available evidence on the endocrine effects of buprenorphine, particularly as it relates to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which is controversial and not fully defined. Method We conducted a Pubmed search (2000-2017) for human studies in the English language for articles that were available as full length regarding buprenorphine, endocrinopathy, hypogonadism, bone density, opioids. Case reports were also reviewed, although prospective studies and randomized controlled trials received more weight. Results Opioid induced hypogonadism is well established. Most studies report that buprenorphine being a partial agonist/antagonist may not be impacting the pituitary trophic hormones as much. There are reports of sexual dysfunction in subjects maintained on buprenorphine, some without hormonal correlation. Thus with the understanding that pertinent clinical studies are limited in number, varied in methodology, mostly cross sectional, predominantly in men and small number of participants, more research in this area is warranted. Conclusion Based on a comprehensive review of the available literature, we conclude that despite its increasing popularity, buprenorphine has not been adequately studied in respect to its long-term effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. There is a great need for longitudinal systematic trials to define the potential buprenorphine-induced endocrine consequences.

  11. Mother-child interaction and cognitive development in children prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnenberg, Carolien; Sarfi, Monica; Melinder, Annika

    2016-10-01

    To assess the influence of mother-child interaction on children's cognitive development in a group of children prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine. The study is part of a prospective longitudinal project investigating the development of children born to women in opioid maintenance therapy (OMT). The sample includes 67 children born between 2005 and 2007, 35 of which prenatally exposed to either methadone or buprenorphine and 32 non-exposed comparison children. Both groups scored within the normal range of development. However, the OMT group scored significantly lower on measures of cognitive development and mother-child interaction compared to the comparison group. Cognitive development was found to be affected by both group status, F(1,54)=5.65, p=0.02, η(2)=0.10 and mother-child interaction F(1,54)=5.26, p=0.03, η(2)=0.09. Behavioral inhibition (statue), sensorimotor function (imitating hand positions), and short-term memory (sentences) was influenced by group status while narrative memory and vocabulary were found to be more influenced by mother-child interaction. Different risk factors may influence different cognitive functions in children of women in OMT. Specifically, language-related cognitive skills may be more related to mother-child interaction while performance in higher cognitive functions requiring precise control over sensorimotor responses may be more sensitive to other factors such as prenatal OMT exposure, genetics, and/or prenatal exposure to other substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Embolic stroke associated with injection of buprenorphine tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C C Tchoyoson; Lee, Sze Haur; Wong, Yee-Choon; Hui, Francis

    2009-09-15

    Drug users who crush, dissolve, and inject buprenorphine tablets parenterally may be at risk of severe thromboembolic complications or death. We describe patients with neurologic complications after injecting buprenorphine tablets. Brain MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in patients admitted to the neurologic department after injecting buprenorphine tablets were reviewed. Seven men had neurologic complications after buprenorphine tablet injection. In 5 patients, multiple small scattered hyperintense lesions were detected on DWI in the cortex, white matter, and basal ganglia of the cerebral hemisphere; one patient had a single small lesion. The side of MRI abnormality corresponded to the side of needle marks on the neck except in one patient who had bilateral injections. One patient, who denied injecting into the neck, had DWI abnormalities in the middle cerebral artery territory on one side and occlusion of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Buprenorphine tablets can be intentionally or inadvertently injected into the carotid artery, causing a characteristic appearance on diffusion-weighted imaging, consistent with embolic cerebral infarction.

  13. Assessment of buprenorphine, carprofen, and their combination for postoperative analgesia in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sarah O; Halliday, Lisa C; French, Jeffrey A; Novikov, Dmitri D; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the efficacy of buprenorphine, carprofen, and a combination of the 2 analgesics in female baboons. Physiologic and behavioral parameters were assessed at baseline and postoperatively for 6 d by use of continuous noninvasive physiologic monitoring and twice-daily videotaping. Prior to surgery, all animals received a pre-emptive dose of either 0.01 mg/kg buprenorphine intramuscularly, 2.2 mg/kg carprofen intramuscularly, or a combination of 0.01 mg/kg buprenorphine and 2.2 mg/kg carprofen intramuscularly. All animals in the carprofen (n = 4) and buprenorphine+carprofen (n = 4) treatment groups appeared to have sufficient analgesia. Three of 4 animals in the buprenorphine group had adequate analgesia. The fourth animal had an elevated heart rate and spent less time standing during the postoperative period. In this study, the use of carprofen or a combination of carprofen plus buprenorphine provided more reliable postoperative analgesia than buprenorphine alone.

  14. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahila, H.; Kivitie-Kallio, S.; Halmesmaki, E.; Valanne, L.; Autti, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process

  15. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahila, H.; Kivitie-Kallio, S.; Halmesmaki, E.; Valanne, L.; Autti, T. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dept. of Pediatrics, and Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process.

  16. Transdermal buprenorphine, opioid rotation to sublingual buprenorphine, and the avoidance of precipitated withdrawal: a review of the literature and demonstration in three chronic pain patients treated with butrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Howard; Reetz, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid, used in the United States and abroad for both analgesia and addiction, with unique opioid receptor binding properties. There are several pharmacological features of buprenorphine that make it an emerging option for the long-term treatment of chronic pain-its respiratory suppression ceiling effect, its efficacy in neuropathic pain and hyperalgesic states, and its decreased suppression of the immune and endocrine systems compared with other long-acting opioids. Previous studies have shown that high-dose sublingual buprenorphine is an effective treatment of chronic pain patients not responding to other opioids. Guidelines for the introduction of sublingual buprenorphine, termed buprenorphine induction, include an opioid-free "withdrawal" period of 12-48 hours to avoid an anticipated and accelerated opioid withdrawal, a syndrome described in this article as precipitated withdrawal. The requirement of a period of opioid abstinence before buprenorphine use may present a significant barrier to its adoption for chronic pain. We present a case series of a novel method of sublingual buprenorphine introduction without an induction period, using the recently Food and Drug Administration-approved low-dose transdermal buprenorphine (Butrans; Purdue Pharma L.P.) as a bridge medication. In these cases, buprenorphine was started in opioid-dependent chronic noncancer pain patients who had taken short-acting opioid medications within hours of the initiation of the rotation. This method avoids the painful abstinence period and did not result in precipitated withdrawal or other significant adverse effects.

  17. Naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 03/03/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  18. Naltrexone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 09/12/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  19. Opioid Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 03/10/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  20. Methadone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 09/28/2015 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  1. The relationship between diversion-related attitudes and sharing and selling buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R; Anderson, Bradley J; Bailey, Genie L; Stein, Michael D

    2017-07-01

    Buprenorphine medication-assisted treatment (B-MAT) is an efficacious and popular outpatient treatment for opioid use disorder. However, the likelihood of buprenorphine diversion is a public health concern. We examined the relationship between attitudes toward diversion as predictors of both sharing and selling buprenorphine. Participants (n=476) were patients undergoing short-term inpatient opioid detoxification. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted association of sharing and selling buprenorphine with demographics, substance use behaviors, and attitudes toward sharing and selling buprenorphine. Among the two hundred persons who had ever been prescribed buprenorphine (73.4% male, 89% heroin users), 50.5% reported they had shared buprenorphine and 28.0% reported they had sold buprenorphine. Controlling for other covariates, the odds of sharing buprenorphine were 3.17 (95% CI 1.21; 8.32) times higher for persons who agreed that it was "right to share buprenorphine with dope sick friends" than for those who did not agree with this attitude. Attitudes toward selling (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.35; 6.21) and sharing (OR 4.12; 95% CI 1.64; 10.32) buprenorphine were the only significant correlates of selling, with the odds of selling exponentially greater among persons with favorable attitudes toward sharing or selling buprenorphine. Although considered diversion, sharing B-MAT is normative among B-MAT patients. Assessing B-MAT patients' attitudes about diversion may help identify patients requiring enhanced oversight, education, or intervention aimed at modifying attitudes to reduce their likelihood to share or sell buprenorphine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Opiate withdrawal syndrome in buprenorphine abusers admitted to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sex v time interaction and the mode of consumption of buprenorphine had significant ... and cancer patients. .... The anal- ysis of the main simple effects revealed a significant ef- fect of time on withdrawal scores for both men (F=65.4,.

  3. The Implementation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone in College Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaria, Peter A., Jr.; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Opiate abuse and dependence have become important concerns for college healthcare providers. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 and the approval of the combination buprenorphine/naloxone for office-based treatment of opiate dependence have increased the options available for college students and their healthcare providers. The…

  4. Dexamethasone hepatic induction in rats subsequently treated with high dose buprenorphine does not lead to respiratory depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hreiche, Raymond; Megarbane, Bruno; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Monier, Claire; Risede, Patricia; Milan, Nathalie; Descatoire, Veronique; Pessayre, Dominique; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-01-01

    In humans, asphyxic deaths and severe poisonings have been attributed to high-dosage buprenorphine, a maintenance therapy for heroin addiction. However, in rats, intravenous buprenorphine at doses up to 90 mg kg -1 was not associated with significant effects on arterial blood gases. In contrast, norbuprenorphine, the buprenorphine major cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A-derived metabolite, is a potent respiratory depressant. Thus, our aim was to study the consequences of CYP3A induction on buprenorphine-associated effects on resting ventilation in rats. We investigated the effects on ventilation of 30 mg kg -1 buprenorphine alone or following cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A induction with dexamethasone, using whole body plethysmography (N = 24) and arterial blood gases (N = 12). Randomized animals in 4 groups received sequential intraperitoneal dosing with: (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]), or (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]). Buprenorphine alone caused a significant rapid and sustained increase in the inspiratory time (P -1 buprenorphine on rat ventilation. Our results suggest a limited role of drug-mediated CYP3A induction in the occurrence of buprenorphine-attributed respiratory depression in addicts

  5. Advances in the delivery of buprenorphine for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal RN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard N Rosenthal,1 Viral V Goradia2 1Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, 2Department of Psychiatry, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Opioid use disorders (OUDs have long been a global problem, but the prevalence rates have increased over 20 years to epidemic proportions in the US, with concomitant increases in morbidity and all-cause mortality, but especially opioid overdose. These increases are in part attributable to a several-fold expansion in the prescription of opioid pain medications over the same time period. Opioid detoxification and psychosocial treatments alone have each not yielded sufficient efficacy for OUD, but μ-opioid receptor agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist medications have demonstrated the greatest overall benefit in OUD treatment. Buprenorphine, a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist, has been used successfully on an international basis for several decades in sublingual tablet and film preparations for the treatment of OUD, but the nature of formulation, which is typically self-administered, renders it susceptible to nonadherence, diversion, and accidental exposure. This article reviews the clinical trial data for novel buprenorphine delivery systems in the form of subcutaneous depot injections, transdermal patches, and subdermal implants for the treatment of OUD and discusses both the clinical efficacy of longer-acting formulations through increasing consistent medication exposure and their potential utility in reducing diversion. These new delivery systems also offer new dosing opportunities for buprenorphine and strategies for dosing intervals in the treatment of OUD. Keywords: opioid use disorder, buprenorphine, drug diversion, drug implants, depot medications, maintenance therapy, treatment adherence

  6. Successful medical treatment of glans ischemia after voluntary buprenorphine injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecheteau, François; Grison, Pierre; Abraham, Pierre; Lebdai, Souhil; Kemgang, Steve; Souday, Vincent; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Culty, Thibaut; Larré, Stéphane; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Bigot, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The diverted use of synthetic opioid buprenorphine by drug addicts can be responsible for serious ischemic and infectious complications, particularly in the case of intravenous injection. We present a case of serious glans ischemia after buprenorphine injection directly into the deep dorsal vein of the penis. Analysis using new medical imaging techniques and treatments is detailed below. A 26-year-old male drug addict presented with glans pain 4 days after self-injection of buprenorphine into the deep dorsal vein of the penis. The patient was apyretic and presented a urethral discharge. His glans was blue without discoloration on digital pressure. Additionally, his biologic and serologic tests were normal while bacteriology showed the presence of Enterobacter cloacae urethritis. After 48 hours of intravenous antibiotic treatment without improvement, a specific medical treatment using enoxaparin and ilomedin was initiated, with the assumption that there was an ischemic complication. Laser speckle contrast imaging allowed confirmation of the presence of distal penis ischemia and provided an accurate mapping of the ischemic zone. A 28-day treatment combining antibiotics, subcutaneous heparin at curative dose, antiplatelet drug, ilomedin, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in clinical improvement of the lesions with no functional complications. To date, no consensus exists on the proper diagnostic and treatment approach to severe glans ischemia due to buprenorphine injection into the deep dorsal vein of the penis. The results of laser speckle contrast imaging were of real interest during the process of diagnosis. In addition, the combination of ilomedin with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs appeared to be an effective therapy. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. Analgesic Effect of Tramadol and Buprenorphin in Continuous Propofol Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capík I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare in clinical patients the analgesic effect of the centrally acting analgesics tramadol and buprenorphine in continuous intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA with propofol. Twenty dogs undergoing prophylactic dental treatment, aged 2−7 years, weighing 6−27 kg, were included in ASA I. and II. groups. Two groups of dogs received intravenous (IV administration of tramadol hydrochloride (2 mg.kg−1 or buprenorphine hydrochloride (0.2 mg.kg−1 30 minutes prior to sedation, provided by midazolam hydrochloride (0.3 mg.kg−1 and xylazine hydrochloride (0.5 mg.kg-1 IV. General anaesthesia was induced by propofol (2 mg.kg−1 and maintained by a 120 minutes propofol infusion (0.2 mg.kg−1min−1. Oscilometric arterial blood pressure (ABP measured in mm Hg, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, SAT, body temperature (BT and pain reaction elicited by haemostat forceps pressure at the digit were recorded in ten minute intervals. The tramadol group of dogs showed significantly better parameters of blood pressure (P < 0.001, lower tendency to bradycardia (P < 0.05, and better respiratory rate (P < 0.001 without negative influence to oxygen saturation. Statistically better analgesia was achieved in the tramadol group (P < 0.001. Tramadol, in comparison with buprenorphine provided significantly better results with respect to the degree of analgesia, as well as the tendency of complications arising during anaesthesia.

  8. Dental health of young children prenatally exposed to buprenorphine. A concern of child neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivistö, K; Alapulli, H; Tupola, S; Alaluusua, S; Kivitie-Kallio, S

    2014-06-01

    To study the oral health and dental neglect of prenatally buprenorphine-exposed 3-year-old children. The study consisted of 51 children who as newborns tested positive for buprenorphine in a urine screen. The control group comprised 68 children previously unexposed to narcotics. The dentist examined the children and interviewed their guardians. Buprenorphine-exposed children exhibited significantly more early childhood caries than did the control group. Caries indices, the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth or tooth surfaces and decayed teeth were greater in the buprenorphine-exposed children than the control children (p = 0.004, p = 0.004, p = 0.001, respectively). In the buprenorphine group, more children showed visible plaque (p = 0.003) and fewer children were caries-free (p = 0.009) than in the control group. The control children's teeth were also brushed more often than the buprenorphine-exposed children's teeth (p = 0.001) and the parents were more involved in their children's tooth brushing than were those in the buprenorphine-exposed group (p = 0.035). More caries and dental neglect were found in buprenorphine-exposed children than in controls. These findings highlight the importance of routine dental appointments, caries screening and preventive care for children in substance-abusing families.

  9. False-positive buprenorphine EIA urine toxicology results due to high dose morphine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenore, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    In monitoring a patient with chronic pain who was taking high-dose morphine and oxycodone with weekly urine enzymatic immunoassay (EIA) toxicology testing, the authors noted consistent positives for buprenorphine. The patient was not taking buprenorphine, and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GCMS) testing on multiple samples revealed no buprenorphine, indicating a case of false-positive buprenorphine EIAs in a high-dose opiate case. The authors discontinued oxycodone for a period of time and then discontinued morphine. Urine monitoring with EIAs and GCMS revealed false-positive buprenorphine EIAs, which remained only when the patient was taking morphine. When taking only oxycodone and no morphine, urine samples became buprenorphine negative. When morphine was reintroduced, false-positive buprenorphine results resumed. Medical practitioners should be aware that high-dose morphine (with morphine urine levels turning positive within the 15,000 to 28,000 mg/mL range) may produce false-positive buprenorphine EIAs with standard urine EIA toxicology testing.

  10. The New Kid on the Block--Incorporating Buprenorphine into a Medical Toxicology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Buprenorphine represents a safe and effective therapy for treating opioid dependence, alleviating craving and withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent patients. Buprenorphine has a "blocking" effect against the action of other opioids at the mu-receptor, preventing not only opioid-induced euphoria, but CNS and respiratory depressant effects as well. Buprenorphine was approved for the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002 after the passage of Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA 2000) which allowed clinicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with specifically named opioid agonist therapies in an office setting. Buprenorphine programs reduce the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C and reduce criminal behaviors associated with illicit drug use. Patients stabilized on buprenorphine have increased employment, enhanced engagement with social services, and better overall health and well-being.

  11. Serum concentrations of buprenorphine after oral and parenteral administration in male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Hau, Jann

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the most commonly used drug for peri-operative pain relief in laboratory rodents. The systemic concentrations of buprenorphine were measured in mice following administration intravenously (IV), subcutaneously (SC), orally by gavage and by voluntary ingestion, to determine the post-administration...... serum concentration of buprenorphine. Voluntarily ingested buprenorphine resulted in long-lasting high serum concentrations, as did oral gavage administration (24h serum concentration: 110ngh/mL for both routes of administration). In contrast, buprenorphine administered parenterally remained...... in the circulation for a substantially shorter time (24h serum concentration for IV and SC were 40ngh/mL and 30ngh/mL, respectively). This marked difference was probably due to the higher dose used for oral administration, which is regarded necessary for sufficient analgesic effect, and to the slower absorption...

  12. Assessment of the sedative effects of buprenorphine administered with 20 microg/kg detomidine in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, E J; Taylor, P M; Murrell, J; Whay, H R; Waterman-Pearson, A E

    2011-04-16

    The aim of this randomised, observer-blinded, crossover study was to compare the effects of four treatments, administered intravenously to six horses: saline and saline; 10 µg/kg detomidine and 7.5 µg/kg buprenorphine; 20 µg/kg detomidine and 7.5 µg/kg buprenorphine; and 20 µg/kg detomidine and 10 µg/kg buprenorphine. Sedation was subjectively assessed and recorded on a visual analogue scale. Peak sedation and duration of sedation were investigated using a univariate general linear model with post-hoc Tukey tests (Pdetomidine from 10 to 20 µg/kg increased the degree of sedation when administered with the same dose of buprenorphine (7.5 µg/kg). When administered with 20 µg/kg detomidine, increasing the dose of buprenorphine from 7.5 to 10 µg/kg did not influence the degree of sedation achieved.

  13. Buprenorphine Maintenance for Opioid Dependence in Public Sector Healthcare: Benefits and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Laura G; Mendoza, Sonia; Hansen, Helena

    Since its U.S. FDA approval in 2002, buprenorphine has been available for maintenance treatment of opiate dependence in primary care physicians' offices. Though buprenorphine was intended to facilitate access to treatment, disparities in utilization have emerged; while buprenorphine treatment is widely used in private care setting, public healthcare integration of buprenorphine lags behind. Through a review of the literature, we found that U.S. disparities are partly due to a shortage of certified prescribers, concern of patient diversion, as well as economic and institutional barriers. Disparity of buprenorphine treatment dissemination is concerning since buprenorphine treatment has specific characteristics that are especially suited for low-income patient population in public sector healthcare such as flexible dosing schedules, ease of concurrently treating co-morbidities such as HIV and hepatitis C, positive patient attitudes towards treatment, and the potential of reducing addiction treatment stigma. As the gap between buprenorphine treatment in public sector settings and private sector settings persists in the U.S., current research suggests ways to facilitate its dissemination.

  14. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna IK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ish K Khanna, Sivaram PillarisettiNeuroPn Therapeutics, Alpharetta, GA, USAAbstract: Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed µ-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other µ-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain.Keywords: buprenorphine, opioids, opioid dependence, partial agonist, hyperalgesia, neuropathic pain

  15. Reversal of Stress-Induced Social Interaction Deficits by Buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2018-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating post-traumatic stress disorder. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of chronic social defeat stress to prospective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/d) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by chronic social defeat stress were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/d), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/d), and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/d). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by chronic social defeat stress following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 hours, also reinstated social interaction behavior in mice that were susceptible to chronic social defeat. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis found: (1) Oprm1 mRNA expression was reduced in the hippocampus and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice and (2) Oprk1 mRNA expression was reduced in the amygdala and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice compared to non-stressed controls and stress-resilient mice. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine

  16. Association between gene variants and response to buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerra, Gilberto; Somaini, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Claudio; Cortese, Elena; Maremmani, Icro; Manfredini, Matteo; Donnini, Claudia

    2014-01-30

    A variety of studies were addressed to differentiate responders and non-responders to substitution treatment among heroin dependent patients, without conclusive findings. In particular, preliminary pharmacogenetic findings have been reported to predict treatment effectiveness in mental health and substance use disorders. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of buprenorphine (BUP) treatment outcome with gene variants that may affect kappa-opioid receptors and dopamine system function. One hundred and seven heroin addicts (West European, Caucasians) who underwent buprenorphine maintenance treatment were genotyped and classified into two groups (A and B) on the basis of treatment outcome. Non-responders to buprenorphine (group B) have been identified taking into account early drop out, continuous use of heroin, severe behavioral or psychiatric problems, misbehavior and diversion during the 6 months treatment period. No difference was evidenced between responders and non-responders to BUP in the frequency of kappa opioid receptor (OPRK1) 36G>T SNP. The frequency of dopamine transporter (DAT) gene polymorphism (SLC6A3/DAT1), allele 10, was evidently much higher in "non-responder" than in "responder" individuals (64.9% vs. 55.93%) whereas the frequency of the category of other alleles (6, 7 and 11) was higher in responder than in non-responder individuals (11.02% vs. 2.13% respectively). On one hand, the hypothesis that possible gene-related changes in kappa-opioid receptor could consistently affect buprenorphine pharmacological action and clinical effectiveness was not confirmed in our study, at least in relation to the single nucleotide polymorphism 36G>T. On the other hand, the possibility that gene-related dopamine changes could have reduced BUP effectiveness and impaired maintenance treatment outcome was cautiously supported by our findings. DAT1 gene variants such as allele 10, previously reported in association with personality and

  17. Buprenorphine dose induction in non-opioid-tolerant pre-release prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocci, Frank J; Schwartz, Robert P; Wilson, Monique E; Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-11-01

    In a previously reported randomized controlled trial, formerly opioid-dependent prisoners were more likely to enter community drug abuse treatment when they were inducted in prison onto buprenorphine/naloxone (hereafter called buprenorphine) than when they received counseling without buprenorphine in prison (47.5% vs. 33.7%, p=0.012) (Gordon et al., 2014). In this communication we report on the results of the induction schedule and the adverse event profile seen in pre-release prisoners inducted onto buprenorphine. This paper examines the dose induction procedure, a comparison of the proposed versus actual doses given per week, and side effects reported for 104 adult participants who were randomized to buprenorphine treatment in prison. Self-reported side effects were analyzed using generalized estimated equations to determine changes over time in side effects. Study participants were inducted onto buprenorphine at a rate faster than the induction schedule. Of the 104 (72 males, 32 females) buprenorphine recipients, 64 (37 males, 27 females) remained on medication at release from prison. Nine participants (8.6%) discontinued buprenorphine because of unpleasant opioid side effects. There were no serious adverse events reported during the in-prison phase of the study. Constipation was the most frequent symptom reported (69 percent). Our findings suggest that buprenorphine administered to non-opioid-tolerant adults should be started at a lower, individualized dose than customarily used for adults actively using opioids, and that non-opioid-tolerant pre-release prisoners can be successfully inducted onto therapeutic doses prior to release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Buprenorphine Maintenance Subjects Are Hyperalgesic and Have No Antinociceptive Response to a Very High Morphine Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasos, Peter; Ling, Walter; Bochner, Felix; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2018-03-05

    Acute pain management in opioid-dependent persons is complicated because of tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Very high doses of morphine are ineffective in overcoming opioid-induced hyperalgesia and providing antinociception to methadone-maintained patients in an experimental setting. Whether the same occurs in buprenorphine-maintained subjects is unknown. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled. Subjects were tested on two occasions, at least five days apart, once with intravenous morphine and once with intravenous saline. Subjects were tested at about the time of putative trough plasma buprenorphine concentrations. Ambulatory. Twelve buprenorphine-maintained subjects: once daily sublingual dose (range = 2-22 mg); no dose change for 1.5-12 months. Ten healthy controls. Intravenous morphine bolus and infusions administered over two hours to achieve two separate pseudo-steady-state plasma concentrations one hour apart. Pain tolerance was assessed by application of nociceptive stimuli (cold pressor [seconds] and electrical stimulation [volts]). Ten blood samples were collected for assay of plasma morphine, buprenorphine, and norbuprenorphine concentrations until three hours after the end of the last infusion; pain tolerance and respiration rate were measured to coincide with blood sampling times. Cold pressor responses (seconds): baseline: control 34 ± 6 vs buprenorphine 17 ± 2 (P = 0.009); morphine infusion-end: control 52 ± 11(P = 0.04), buprenorphine 17 ± 2 (P > 0.5); electrical stimulation responses (volts): baseline: control 65 ± 6 vs buprenorphine 53 ± 5 (P = 0.13); infusion-end: control 74 ± 5 (P = 0.007), buprenorphine 53 ± 5 (P > 0.98). Respiratory rate (breaths per minute): baseline: control 17 vs buprenorphine 14 (P = 0.03); infusion-end: control 15 (P = 0.09), buprenorphine 12 (P < 0.01). Infusion-end plasma morphine concentrations (ng/mL): control 23 ± 1

  19. Comparing methadone and buprenorphine maintenance with methadone-assisted withdrawal for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund IO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ingunn O Lund1, Heather Fitzsimons2, Michelle Tuten2, Margaret S Chisolm2, Kevin E O’Grady3, Hendrée E Jones2,41SERAF-Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 3Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; 4Substance Abuse Treatment Evaluations and Interventions Research Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USAAbstract: Pregnancy can motivate opioid-dependent women to seek substance abuse treatment. Research has demonstrated that although prenatal exposure to buprenorphine results in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS relative to prenatal methadone exposure, the maternal and other neonatal outcomes are similar for the two medications. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving these medications have not been systematically compared with methadone-assisted withdrawal. The present study provides an initial assessment of the relative efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine maintenance versus methadone-assisted withdrawal in terms of neonatal and maternal delivery outcomes. Data were derived from (1 the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research study at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC, or (2 retrospective records review of women who underwent methadone-assisted withdrawal at the JHBMC during the time period in which participants were enrolled in the MOTHER study. Compared with the methadone maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group had a significantly lower mean NAS peak score (Means = 13.7 vs 7.0; P = 0.002, required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 82.8 vs 0.2; P < 0.001, had significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 31.5 vs 3.9; P < 0.001, and remained in the hospital for a significantly fewer number of

  20. Comment on "a comparison of buprenorphine + naloxone to buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Robert G; Gevertz, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    In a recent article, Lund et al sought to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of various treatment regimens for opioid dependence during pregnancy.1 In their background, discussion the authors state that "In the United States buprenorphine plus naloxone [Suboxone(®)] … has been the preferred form of prescribed buprenorphine due to its reduced abuse liability relative to buprenorphine alone [Subutex(®)]." This claim is certainly consistent with the view of the firm that has manufactured and sold both products, Reckitt Benckiser. In September of 2011, the company announced that it was "… discontinuing distribution and sale of Subutex(®) tablets as we believe that mono product (product containing buprenorphine alone with no naloxone) creates a greater risk of misuse, abuse and diversion …".2 Supporting evidence for the alleged "reduced abuse liability" appears to be lacking, however, and evidence cannot be located in the two references cited by Dr. Lund and his co-authors, which in fact are silent on the subject of abuse potential.3,4 In contrast, it has been reported that the transition to buprenorphine/naloxone from the mono formulation has been associated with "… no reduction in injection risk behaviors among IDUs."5.

  1. Comment on “A Comparison of Buprenorphine + Naloxone to Buprenorphine and Methadone in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence during Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Newman M.D., M.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article, Lund et al sought to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of various treatment regimens for opioid dependence during pregnancy. 1 In their background, discussion the authors state that “In the United States buprenorphine plus naloxone [Suboxone®] … has been the preferred form of prescribed buprenorphine due to its reduced abuse liability relative to buprenorphine alone [Subutex®].” This claim is certainly consistent with the view of the firm that has manufactured and sold both products, Reckitt Benckiser. In September of 2011, the company announced that it was “… discontinuing distribution and sale of Subutex® tablets as we believe that mono product (product containing buprenorphine alone with no naloxone creates a greater risk of misuse, abuse and diversion …”. 2 Supporting evidence for the alleged “reduced abuse liability” appears to be lacking, however, and evidence cannot be located in the two references cited by Dr. Lund and his co-authors, which in fact are silent on the subject of abuse potential. 3 , 4 In contrast, it has been reported that the transition to buprenorphine/naloxone from the mono formulation has been associated with “… no reduction in injection risk behaviors among IDUs.” 5

  2. Training rural practitioners to use buprenorphine; using The Change Book to facilitate technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Dennis; Rieckmann, Traci; Green, Carla; Gallon, Steve; Knudsen, Jeff

    2004-04-01

    The Opiate Medication Initiative for Rural Oregon Residents trained physicians and counselors in Central and Southwestern Oregon to use buprenorphine and develop service models that supported patient participation in drug abuse counseling. The Change Book from Addiction Technology Transfer Centers was used to structure the change process. Fifty-one individuals (17 physicians, 4 pharmacists, 2 nurse practitioners, and 28 drug abuse counselors and administrators) from seven counties completed the training and contributed to the development of community treatment protocols. A pre-post measure of attitudes and beliefs toward the use of buprenorphine suggested significant improvements in attitude after training, especially among counselors. Eight months after training, 10 of 17 physicians trained had received waivers to use buprenorphine and 29 patients were in treatment with six of the physicians. The Change Book facilitated development of county change teams and structured the planning efforts. The initiative also demonstrated the potential to concurrently train physicians, pharmacists, and counselors on the use of buprenorphine.

  3. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of buprenorphine + samidorphan for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragguett, Renee-Marie; Rong, Carola; Rosenblat, Joshua D; Ho, Roger C; McIntyre, Roger S

    2018-04-01

    Treatment resistant depression (TRD) represents approximately 20% of all individuals receiving care for major depressive disorder. The opioidergic system is identified as a novel target which hitherto has not been sufficiently investigated in adults with TRD. The combination product buprenorphine + samidorphan is an opioid modulatory agent which has demonstrated replicated evidence of efficacy in TRD without abuse liability. Areas covered: Databases Pubmed, Google Scholar and clinicaltrials.gov were searched from inception through December 2017 for clinical trial information, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of buprenorphine + samidorphan. Herein we provide a summary of the available information. Eight clinical trials were identified for inclusion, of the eight trials, five trials had available results and are included in detail in our review. Expert opinion: Buprenorphine + samidorphan has demonstrated efficacy in TRD. Extant evidence surrounding the safety and tolerability profile of buprenorphine + samidorphan does not identify any significant safety concerns. Additional studies are needed in order to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of this product.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of a concentrated buprenorphine formulation in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Molly D; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Knych, Heather K; Kass, Philip H; Drazenovich, Tracy L; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and sedative effects of 2 doses of a concentrated buprenorphine formulation after SC administration to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). ANIMALS 6 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES Concentrated buprenorphine (0.3 mg/kg, SC) was administered to all birds. Blood samples were collected at 10 time points over 24 hours after drug administration to determine plasma buprenorphine concentrations. After a 4-week washout period, the same birds received the same formulation at a higher dose (1.8 mg/kg, SC), and blood samples were collected at 13 time points over 96 hours. Hawks were monitored for adverse effects and assigned agitation-sedation scores at each sample collection time. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS Mean time to maximum plasma buprenorphine concentration was 7.2 minutes and 26.1 minutes after administration of the 0.3-mg/kg and 1.8-mg/kg doses, respectively. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were > 1 ng/mL for mean durations of 24 and 48 hours after low- and high-dose administration, respectively. Mean elimination half-life was 6.23 hours for the low dose and 7.84 hours for the high dose. Mean agitation-sedation scores were higher (indicating some degree of sedation) than the baseline values for 24 hours at both doses. No clinically important adverse effects were observed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Concentrated buprenorphine was rapidly absorbed, and plasma drug concentrations considered to have analgesic effects in other raptor species were maintained for extended periods. Most birds had mild to moderate sedation. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of these doses of concentrated buprenorphine in red-tailed hawks.

  5. Hospital morphine preparation for abstinence syndrome in newborns exposed to buprenorphine or methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Nathalie; Elias, Riad; Busuttil, Muriel; Dubuc, Myriam; Einaudi, Marie-Ange; Bues-Charbit, Martine

    2008-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the adequacy of a hospital formulated oral morphine preparation for management of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and to compare clinical features in infants exposed to methadone or buprenorphine in utero. Between October 1998 and October 2004 all infants born to mothers treated with buprenorphine or methadone during pregnancy were enrolled into this prospective study. Morphine hydrochloride solution (0.2 mg/ml) was prepared without preservatives under a flow laminar air box (class 100). Morphine solution: quantitative and qualitative HPLC analysis and microbiological study at regular intervals during storage at 4 degrees C for 6 months. Maternal characteristics: age, opiate dose during pregnancy. Neonatal characteristics: gestational age at delivery, birth weight, Lipsitz scores. Morphine dose: daily morphine dose, maximum morphine dose, duration of NAS, and duration of treatment required to achieve stable Lipsitz scores below 4. Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison of median values. Microbiological and HPLC analysis showed that the morphine preparation remained stable for 6 months at 4 degrees C. Nine methadone-exposed infants and 13 buprenorphine-exposed infants were included in the study. All infants presented NAS requiring treatment with the morphine solution. Lipsitz scores at birth were significantly different in the methadone and buprenorphine groups (P methadone group required significantly higher doses of morphine preparation than the buprenorphine group during the first 38 days of treatment (P methadone-exposed infants (range 6-24 h) and within 48 h after birth in buprenorphine-exposed infants (range 24-168 h). Due to the possibility of delayed onset of NAS up to 7 days, infants born to mothers treated with buprenorphine should be kept in the hospital for an appropriate surveillance period. Treatment time was significantly longer (45 vs. 28 days) and the mean morphine doses were higher (1.7 fold) in methadone

  6. Buprenorphine is protective against the depressive effects of norbuprenorphine on ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megarbane, Bruno; Marie, Nicolas; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Gueye, Papa N.; Risede, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Noble, Florence; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-01-01

    High dose buprenorphine is used as substitution treatment in heroin addiction. However, deaths have been reported in addicts using buprenorphine. The role of norbuprenorphine, an N-dealkyl metabolite of buprenorphine, was hypothesized to explain these fatal cases. We determined the median intravenous lethal dose (LD 5 ) of norbuprenorphine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of a single intravenous dose of 3 or 9 mg/kg norbuprenorphine alone on arterial blood gases were studied. Finally, the effect of pre- and post-administrations of buprenorphine on norbuprenorphine-induced changes on arterial blood gases were analyzed. Norbuprenorphine's LD 5 was 10 mg kg -1 . Norbuprenorphine 3 mg kg -1 produces the rapid onset of sustained respiratory depression, as demonstrated at 20 min by a maximal significant increase in PaCO 2 (8.4 ± 0.9 versus 5.7 ± 0.1 kPa), decrease in arterial pH (7.25 ± 0.06 versus 7.44 ± 0.01), and hypoxia (8.3 ± 0.6 versus 11.1 ± 0.2 kPa). Buprenorphine not only protected against the effects of 3 mg kg -1 norbuprenorphine in a dose-dependent manner but also reversed the effects when given afterward. Binding experiments suggest a role for mu- and to a lesser extent for delta-opioid receptors in buprenorphine protective effect against norbuprenorphine-induced respiratory depression. In conclusion, our data clearly show that norbuprenorphine alone causes important deleterious effects on ventilation in rats. However, buprenorphine protective effect calls into question the role for norbuprenorphine in respiratory toxicity associated with buprenorphine use

  7. Pharmacokinetics of oral transmucosal and intramuscular dexmedetomidine combined with buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, N; de Rooster, H; Bosmans, T; Baert, K; Cherlet, M; Croubels, S; De Backer, P; Polis, I

    2015-04-01

    Plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration of their combination in healthy adult cats were compared. According to a crossover protocol (1-month washout), a combination of dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) and buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) was given OTM (buccal cavity) or i.m. (quadriceps muscle) in six female neutered cats. Plasma samples were collected through a jugular catheter during a 24-h period. Plasma dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma concentration-time data were fitted to compartmental models. For dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) were significantly lower following OTM than following i.m. administration. For buprenorphine, time to reach Cmax was also significantly longer after OTM administration than after i.m. injection. Data suggested that dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) combined with buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) is not as well absorbed from the buccal mucosa site as from the intramuscular injection site. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Development of a radioimmunoassay for the determination of buprenorphine in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrabandere, L.; Boven, M. Van; Daenens, P.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay for the detection of buprenorphine in urine samples is described. With minor adjustments, the assay was also applied to the analysis for buprenorphine in plasma samples. The 2-diazobenzoic acid derivative of buprenorphine has been prepared as a hapten. The immunization of rabbits with the hapten-bovine serum albumin conjugate resulted in the production of antibodies, which cross-reacted with N-dealkylbuprenophine up to about the 90% level. The antibodies showed very low cross-reactivities with the 3-O-glucuronides and with the structural analogue etorphine. The assay was mainly used to prescreen for buprenorphine in urine samples of persons suspected of Temgesic misuse and to determine buprenorphine in plasma samples. A linear calibration graph for buprenorphine was obtained after logit-log regression. The spiking recovery study showed a linear regression. Intra-and inter-assay relative standard deviations were -1 (Student's t-distribution, p 0.01, degrees of freedom = 8). (Author)

  9. Evaluation of medetomidine, ketamine and buprenorphine for neutering feral cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kelly A; Robertson, Sheilah A; Levy, Julie K; Isaza, Natalie M

    2011-12-01

    A combination of medetomidine (M, 100 μg/kg), ketamine (K, 10 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (B, 10 μg/kg), administered by intramuscular injection, was evaluated for spaying and castration (neutering) of feral cats (n = 101). Eleven animals (11%) required supplemental anesthesia (isoflurane by mask) to maintain an adequate plane of surgical anesthesia. Atipamezole (A, 125 μg/kg) was administered subcutaneously at the completion of surgery. All cats recovered from surgery and were released the following day. A hemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) value of cats. This MKB combination can be used in a feral cat sterilization clinic, but isoflurane supplementation may be necessary. Further research is indicated to determine the clinical significance of the low SpO(2) values associated with this anesthetic regimen. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prescription opioid addiction and chronic pain: More than a feeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Walter

    2017-04-01

    A patient, long before becoming the subject of medical scrutiny is, at first simply a storyteller, a narrator of suffering-a traveler who has visited the kingdom of the ill. "To relieve an illness one must begin, then, by understanding the story." The Emperor of All Maladies; Siddhartha Mukherjee. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Personality Disorders Classification and Symptoms in Cocaine and Opioid Addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malow, Robert M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined extent to which personality disorders and associated symptom criteria were found among 117 cocaine- and opioid-dependent men in drug dependence treatment unit. Drug groups were distinguished by higher rates of antisocial and borderline symptomatology rather than by features associated with other personality disorders. Different…

  12. Intolerance of uncertainty and conditioned place preference in opioid addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milen L. Radell

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Several personality factors have been implicated in vulnerability to addiction by impacting learning and decision making. One such factor is intolerance of uncertainty (IU, the tendency to perceive uncertain situations negatively and avoid them. Conditioned place preference (CPP, which compares preference for contexts paired with reward, has been used to examine the motivation for both drug and non-drug rewards. However, preference for locations associated with non-drug reward, as well as the potential influence of IU, has not been thoroughly studied in individuals with addiction. In the current study, we examined CPP using a computer-based task in a sample of addicted individuals undergoing opioid maintenance treatment and never-addicted controls. Patients were confirmed to have higher IU than controls. In the CPP task, the two groups did not differ in overall time spent in the previously-rewarded context. However, controls were more likely than patients to immediately return to this context. Contrary to our predictions, IU was not a significant predictor of preference for the previously-rewarded context, although higher IU in controls was associated with a higher number of rewards obtained in the task. No such relationship was found in patients.

  13. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall

    2010-01-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction......, to investigate whether PC were applicable and to compare these criteria with the ICD-10 criteria. The study was cross-sectional and included 253 patients with chronic pain at a tertiary pain centre. Patients were screened for addiction by a physician and a nurse. The addiction prevalence was 14.4% according...... to ICD-10 and 19.3% according to PC. A significant difference between the prevalence of addiction according to ICD-10 and to PC was found. The inter-rater reliability was 0.95 for ICD-10 and 0.93 for PC. The sensitivity of PC was 0.85 and the specificity was 0.96. According to PC patients classified...

  14. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall

    2010-01-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction, to investi......Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction......, to investigate whether PC were applicable and to compare these criteria with the ICD-10 criteria. The study was cross-sectional and included 253 patients with chronic pain at a tertiary pain centre. Patients were screened for addiction by a physician and a nurse. The addiction prevalence was 14.4% according...... as addicted were treated with significantly higher opioid doses, drank more alcohol, smoked more tobacco, used benzodiazepines and had higher levels of depression. According to ICD-10 patients classified as addicted used higher doses of opioids, drank more alcohol and had higher scores of anxiety...

  15. A cluster-analytic profiling of heroin-dependent patients based on level, clinical adequacy, and patient-desired adjustment of buprenorphine dosage during buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment in sixteen Spanish centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Saul; González-Saiz, Francisco; Trujols, Joan; Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Siñol, Núria; Pérez de Los Cobos, José

    2018-06-01

    Buprenorphine dosage is a crucial factor influencing outcomes of buprenorphine treatment for heroin use disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to identify naturally occurring profiles of heroin-dependent patients regarding individualized management of buprenorphine dosage in clinical practice of buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment. 316 patients receiving buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment were surveyed at 16 Spanish centers during the stabilization phase of this treatment. Patients were grouped using cluster analysis based on three key indicators of buprenorphine dosage management: dose, adequacy according to physician, and adjustment according to patient. The clusters obtained were compared regarding different facets of patient clinical condition. Four clusters were identified and labeled as follows (buprenorphine average dose and percentage of participants in each cluster are given in brackets): "Clinically Adequate and Adjusted to Patient Desired Low Dosage" (2.60 mg/d, 37.05%); "Clinically Adequate and Adjusted to Patient Desired High Dosage" (10.71 mg/d, 29.18%); "Clinically Adequate and Patient Desired Reduction of Low Dosage" (3.38 mg/d, 20.0%); and "Clinically Inadequate and Adjusted to Patient Desired Moderate Dosage" (7.55 mg/d, 13.77%). Compared to patients from the other three clusters, participants in the latter cluster reported more frequent use of heroin and cocaine during last week, lower satisfaction with buprenorphine-naloxone as a medication, higher prevalence of buprenorphine-naloxone adverse effects and poorer psychological adjustment. Our results show notable differences between clusters of heroin-dependent patients regarding buprenorphine dosage management. We also identified a group of patients receiving clinically inadequate buprenorphine dosage, which was related to poorer clinical condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetics of Single- and Multiple-dose Buprenorphine Buccal Film in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Stephen A; Xiang, Qinfang; Finn, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Buprenorphine, a partial μ-receptor agonist, is approved for the management of moderate to severe pain, but it has low oral bioavailability. Two open-label studies were performed to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of buprenorphine from buccal film formulations of buprenorphine. Both studies enrolled healthy volunteers, aged 18 to 55 years, who received concurrent oral naltrexone to reduce adverse events (AEs); subjects with a history or evidence of substance abuse or current use of any product affecting cytochrome P450 3A4 activity were excluded. The first study (n = 25) was a 5-period crossover trial with 4 single doses (75 and 300 and 300 and 1200 μg) of 2 formulations (F14 and F24) of buccal buprenorphine (BBUP) and a 300-μg intravenous dose of buprenorphine with a 7-day washout between periods. In the second study, each subject (n = 10) received 6 doses of 4 BBUP strengths (60, 120, 180, and 240 μg BID) in a dose-escalation design. Plasma concentrations of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine were assayed, and pharmacokinetics were summarized with descriptive statistics and analyzed by using a linear mixed effects model (single-dose study). AEs were recorded. In the single-dose study, the 2 formulations exhibited comparable bioavailability of 46% to 51% that was independent of dose, with a single buprenorphine peak concentration from each BBUP dose occurring at 2.5 to 3 hours. The mean buprenorphine Cmax across the doses ranged from 0.17 ng/mL for the 75-µg dose to 1.43 ng/mL for the 1200-µg dose. AUC0-∞, AUC0-last, and Cmax were proportional to the dose of BBUP administered. Cmax of norbuprenorphine after BBUP administration was approximately one tenth that of buprenorphine Cmax. In the multiple-dose study, steady state was reached within 3 days of BID dosing. There was a linear increase in exposure across the dose range from 60 to 240 μg BID. Treatment-emergent AEs in both studies were consistent with those reported with opiate administration to

  17. Outcomes among buprenorphine-naloxone primary care patients after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Babak; Grossman, Ellie; Williams, Arthur R; Biary, Rana; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D

    2014-01-27

    The extent of damage in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was unprecedented. Bellevue Hospital Center (BHC), a tertiary public hospital, was evacuated and temporarily closed as a result of hurricane-related damages. BHC's large primary care office-based buprenorphine clinic was relocated to an affiliate public hospital for three weeks. The extent of environmental damage and ensuing service disruption effects on rates of illicit drug, tobacco, and alcohol misuse, buprenorphine medication supply disruptions, or direct resource losses among office-based buprenorphine patients is to date unknown. A quantitative and qualitative semi-structured survey was administered to patients in BHC's primary care buprenorphine program starting one month after the hurricane. Survey domains included: housing and employment disruptions; social and economic support; treatment outcomes (buprenorphine adherence and ability to get care), and tobacco, alcohol, and drug use. Open-ended questions probed general patient experiences related to the storm, coping strategies, and associated disruptions. There were 132 patients enrolled in the clinic at the time of the storm; of those, 91 patients were recruited to the survey, and 89 completed (98% of those invited). Illicit opioid misuse was rare, with 7 respondents reporting increased heroin or illicit prescription opioid use following Sandy. Roughly half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine-naloxone medication supply post-event, and self-lowering of daily doses to prolong supply was common. Additional buprenorphine was obtained through unscheduled telephone or written refills from relocated Bellevue providers, informally from friends and family, and, more rarely, from drug dealers. The findings highlight the relative adaptability of public sector office-based buprenorphine treatment during and after a significant natural disaster. Only minimal increases in self-reported substance use were reported

  18. Retention in buprenorphine treatment is associated with improved HCV care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, B L; Beitin, A; Glenn, M; DeLuca, J; Litwin, A H; Cunningham, C O

    2017-04-01

    Persons who inject drugs, most of whom are opioid dependent, comprise the majority of the HCV infected in the United States. As the national opioid epidemic unfolds, increasing numbers of people are entering the medical system to access treatment for opioid use disorder, specifically with buprenorphine. Yet little is known about HCV care in patients accessing buprenorphine-based opioid treatment. We sought to determine the HCV prevalence, cascade of care, and the association between patient characteristics and completion of HCV cascade of care milestones for patients initiating buprenorphine treatment. We reviewed electronic health records of all patients who initiated buprenorphine treatment at a primary-care clinic in the Bronx, NY between January 2009 and January 2014. Of the 390 patients who initiated buprenorphine treatment, 123 were confirmed to have chronic HCV infection. The only patient characteristic associated with achieving HCV care milestones was retention in opioid treatment. Patients retained (vs. not retained) in buprenorphine treatment were more likely to be referred for HCV specialty care (63.1% vs. 34.0%, p<0.01), achieve an HCV-specific evaluation (40.8% vs. 21.3%, p<0.05), be offered HCV treatment (22.4% vs. 8.5%, p<0.05), and initiate HCV treatment (9.2% vs. 6.4%, p=0.6). Given the current opioid epidemic in the US and the growing number of people receiving buprenorphine treatment, there is an unprecedented opportunity to access and treat persons with HCV, reducing HCV transmission, morbidity and mortality. Retention in opioid treatment may improve linkage and retention in HCV care; innovative models of care that integrate opioid drug treatment with HCV treatment are essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine and hydromorphone in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Lahner, Lesanna L; Baker, Bridget B; Johnson, Stephen M; Sladky, Kurt K

    2012-09-01

    Despite the frequent clinical use of buprenorphine in reptiles, its antinociceptive efficacy is not known. In a randomized, complete cross-over study, the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg s.c.) was compared with hydromorphone (0.5 mg/kg s.c.), and saline (0.9% s.c. equivalent volume) in 11 healthy red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). Additionally, buprenorphine at 0.1 and 1 mg/kg was compared with saline in six turtles. Hindlimb withdrawal latencies were measured after exposure to a focal, thermal noxious stimulus before and between 3 hr and up to 96 hr after drug administration. Buprenorphine did not significantly increase hindlimb withdrawal latencies at any time point compared with saline. In contrast, hydromorphone administration at 0.5 mg/kg significantly increased hindlimb withdrawal latencies for up to 24 hr. These results show that hydromorphone, but not buprenorphine, provides thermal antinociception in red-eared slider turtles.

  20. Antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in the hot-plate test in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Hestehave; Munro, Gordon; Brønnum Pedersen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    the animal to a thermal stimulus using a hot plate, significant antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine administered in Nutella® were demonstrated. This was evident at doses of 1.0 mg/kg 60 and 120 min post administration (Peffects were not as marked......Researchers performing experiments on animals should always strive towards the refinement of experiments, minimization of stress and provision of better animal welfare. An adequate analgesic strategy is important to improve post-operative recovery and welfare in laboratory rats and mice....... In addition, it is desirable to provide post-operative analgesia using methods that are minimally invasive and stressful. This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of orally administered buprenorphine ingested in Nutella® in comparison with subcutaneous buprenorphine administration. By exposing...

  1. Comparison of buprenorphine and methadone effects on opiate self-administration in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, N K; Bree, M P; Mendelson, J H

    1983-05-01

    The effects of ascending and descending doses of buprenorphine (0.014-0.789 mg/kg/day) and methadone (0.179-11.86 mg/kg/day) on opiate and food intake were studied in Macaque monkeys over 195 to 245 days. Food (1-g banana pellets) and i.v. drug self-administration (heroin 0.01 or 0.02 mg/kg/injection or Dilaudid 0.02 mg/kg/injection) were maintained on a second-order schedule of reinforcement [FR 4 (VR 16:S)]. Buprenorphine (0.282-0.789 mg/kg/day) produced a significant suppression of opiate self-administration at 2.5 to 7 times the dose shown to be effective in human opiate abusers (P less than .05-.001). Methadone (1.43-11.86 mg/kg/day) did not suppress opiate self-administration in four of five monkeys across a dose range equivalent to 100 to 800 mg/day in man. The distribution of opiate self-administration across drug sessions did not account for the absence of methadone suppression as monkeys took 43% of the total daily opiate injections during the first daily drug session, 2.5 hr after methadone administration. During buprenorphine maintenance, food intake remained stable or increased significantly above base-line levels. Methadone maintenance was associated with significant decrements in food intake in four of five monkeys. Buprenorphine appeared to be significantly more effective in suppressing opiate self-administration than methadone across the dose range studied. Buprenorphine had none of the toxic side effects (seizures, respiratory depression, profound psychomotor retardation) associated with high doses of methadone over 6 to 8 months of daily drug treatment. These data are consistent with clinical studies of buprenorphine effects on heroin self-administration in human opiate addicts.

  2. Root causes, clinical effects, and outcomes of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine by young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonas, Eric J; Banner, William; Bradt, Pamela; Bucher-Bartelson, Becki; Brown, Kimberly R; Rajan, Pradeep; Murrelle, Lenn; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the rates, root causes, and clinical effects of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine sublingual formulations among young children and to determine whether exposure characteristics differ between formulations. Unintentional exposures to buprenorphine-containing products among children 28 days to less than 6 years old were collected from the Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Addiction-Related Surveillance System Poison Center Program and Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals' pharmacovigilance system from October 2009-March 2012. After adjustment for drug availability, negative binomial regression was used to estimate average exposure rates. Root cause assessment was conducted, and an expert clinician panel adjudicated causality and severity of moderate to severe adverse events (AEs). A total of 2380 cases were reviewed, including 4 deaths. Exposures to buprenorphine-naloxone combination film were significantly less frequent than exposures to buprenorphine tablets (rate ratio 3.5 [95% CI, 2.7-4.5]) and buprenorphine-naloxone combination tablets (rate ratio 8.8 [7.2-10.6]). The most commonly identified root causes were medication stored in sight, accessed from a bag or purse, and not stored in the original packaging. Among 536 panel review cases, the most common AEs reported for all formulations were lethargy, respiratory depression, miosis, and vomiting. The highest level AE severity did not differ significantly by formulation. Unintentional exposure to buprenorphine can cause central nervous system depression, respiratory depression, and death in young children. Exposure rates to film formulations are significantly less than to tablet formulations. Package and storage deficiencies contribute to unintentional exposures in young children. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A double blind, within subject comparison of spontaneous opioid withdrawal from buprenorphine versus morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Smith, Michael T; Mintzer, Miriam Z; Campbell, Claudia M; Strain, Eric C

    2014-02-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that there is minimal withdrawal after the cessation of chronically administered buprenorphine and that opioid withdrawal symptoms are delayed compared with those of other opioids. The present study compared the time course and magnitude of buprenorphine withdrawal with a prototypical μ-opioid agonist, morphine. Healthy, out-of-treatment opioid-dependent residential volunteers (N = 7) were stabilized on either buprenorphine (32 mg/day i.m.) or morphine (120 mg/day i.m.) administered in four divided doses for 9 days. They then underwent an 18-day period of spontaneous withdrawal, during which four double-blind i.m. placebo injections were administered daily. Stabilization and spontaneous withdrawal were assessed for the second opioid using the same time course. Opioid withdrawal measures were collected eight times daily. Morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly (P withdrawal as measured by mean peak ratings of Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), all subscales of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), sick and pain (0-100) Visual Analog Scales, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and pupil dilation. Peak ratings on COWS and SOWS occurred on day 2 of morphine withdrawal and were significantly greater than on day 2 of buprenorphine withdrawal. Subjective reports of morphine withdrawal resolved on average by day 7. There was minimal evidence of buprenorphine withdrawal on any measure. In conclusion, spontaneous withdrawal from high-dose buprenorphine appears subjectively and objectively milder compared with that of morphine for at least 18 days after drug cessation.

  4. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Secher, EL; Skram, U

    2013-01-01

    Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than μ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore...... to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending...... pain modulation....

  5. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster LR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lynn R Webster,1 Michael D Smith,1 Cemal Unal,2 Andrew Finn3 1PRA Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Biometrical Solutions LLC, Raleigh, NC, USA; 3BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine–naloxone (BN sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90–1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15 of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15 of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001, and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001. Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Keywords: opioid dependence, withdrawal symptoms, abuse-deterrent, buprenorphine

  6. Effects of buprenorphine and meloxicam analgesia on induced cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6 male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Fauerby, Natasha; Raida, Zindy

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory mice constitute an extensively used model to study the pathologic and functional outcomes of cerebral ischemic stroke. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model requires surgical intervention, which potentially can result in postsurgical pain and stress. In the present study, we...... investigated whether buprenorphine and meloxicam, at clinically relevant doses provided pain relief without altering infarct volume in male C57BL/6 mice. Common known side-effects of buprenorphine, including decreased food consumption, were noted after surgery in buprenorphine-treated mice, but these effects...

  7. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-03-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Developing and Implementing a New Prison-Based Buprenorphine Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that buprenorphine treatment may be a promising intervention for incarcerated individuals with heroin addiction histories. However, its implementation varies from corrections-based methadone because of unique challenges regarding dosing, administration, and regulation. Describing the first randomized clinical trial of…

  9. Mobile phone use patterns and preferences in safety net office-based buprenorphine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Babak; Grossman, Ellie; Buirkle, Emily; McNeely, Jennifer; Gourevitch, Marc; Lee, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Integrating mobile phone technologies in addiction treatment is of increasing importance and may optimize patient engagement with their care and enhance the delivery of existing treatment strategies. Few studies have evaluated mobile phone and text message (TM) use patterns in persons enrolled in addiction treatment, and none have assessed the use in safety net, office-based buprenorphine practices. A 28-item, quantitative and qualitative semistructured survey was administered to opiate-dependent adults in an urban, publicly funded, office-based buprenorphine program. Survey domains included demographic characteristics, mobile phone and TM use patterns, and preferences pertaining to their recovery. Surveyors approached 73 of the 155 eligible subjects (47%); 71 respondents completed the survey. Nearly all participants reported mobile phone ownership (93%) and TM use (93%), and most reported "very much" or "somewhat" comfort sending TM (79%). Text message contact with 12-step group sponsors, friends, family members, and counselors was also described (32%). Nearly all preferred having their providers' mobile phone number (94%), and alerting the clinic via TM in the event of a potential relapse to receive both supportive TM and a phone call from their buprenorphine provider was also well received (62%). Mobile phone and TM use patterns and preferences among this sample of office-based buprenorphine participants highlight the potential of adopting patient-centered mobile phone-based interventions in this treatment setting.

  10. Comparison of efficacy between buprenorphine and tramadol in the detoxification of opioid (heroin)-dependent subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jatinder Mohan; Pal, Hemraj; Lal, Rakesh; Jain, Raka; Schooler, Nina; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic opiate and a centrally acting weak m-opioid receptor agonist. The potential advantages of tramadol include ease of administration, low abuse potential, and being nonscheduled. This study compared tramadol and buprenorphine for controlling withdrawal symptoms in patients with opioid dependence syndrome. Consenting male subjects between 20 and 45 years of age who fulfilled the ICD-10-DCR criteria for opiate dependence syndrome were randomly assigned in a double-blind, double-dummy placebo-controlled trial for detoxification. Those with multiple drug dependence, abnormal cardiac, renal and hepatic functions, psychosis, or organic mental illness were excluded. Assessments included Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), Objective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (OOWS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and Side Effect Check List. Subjects were evaluated daily and study duration was 10 days. Sixty two subjects were enrolled. The mean SOWS and OOWS and VAS were significantly lower in the buprenorphine group on second and third day of detoxification as compared to the tramadol group. Although the retention rate was higher for buprenorphine group throughout the study, when compared with tramadol the difference was not significant on any day. Three subjects in the tramadol group had seizures. Tramadol was found to have limited detoxification efficacy in moderate to severe opioid withdrawal and substantial risk of seizures as compared to buprenorphine. Further studies are warranted to examine its efficacy in mild opioid withdrawal symptoms and its potential use in outpatient settings where its administration advantages may be valuable.

  11. The Presence or Absence of QTc Prolongation in Buprenorphine-Naloxone Among Youth with Opioid Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Sabrina A.; Pecoraro, Anna; Subramaniam, Geetha; Woody, George; Vetter, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate buprenorphine-naloxone effects on the QTc in youth with opioid dependence. Buprenorphine is a partial agonist that is an effective treatment for opioid dependence. Compared to methadone it has a lower risk of QTc prolongation in adults but is less well studied in youth. It may also reduce the risk for torsades de pointes (TdP) an uncommon variant of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, that can result in syncope, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Methods Secondary analysis of ECG data from 95 subjects who participated in a multi-site trial for youth with opioid dependence. Subjects were randomized to a 2-week (DETOX), or a 12-week course of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP). 12-lead ECGs were done at baseline, weeks 4 and 12, and QTc intervals were hand measured and calculated using Bazett's formula. Increases > 60 milliseconds (ms) were considered clinically significant, and readings > 450 ms (males) and 470 ms (females) indicated a prolonged QTc. Results Mean QTc intervals were higher for BUP than DETOX participants at baseline, week 4, and week 12 (p = 0.045), and females had longer mean QTc intervals than males (p DETOX patients. Minimal changes in the QTc were seen at 4 and 12-weeks in a few patients in both groups. There was no evidence that buprenorphine-naloxone alone increased the QTc to a level that increased the risk for TdP. PMID:26690291

  12. Evaluation of sedation for standing clinical procedures in horses using detomidine combined with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Polly; Coumbe, Karen; Henson, Frances; Scott, David; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of including buprenorphine with detomidine for sedation of horses undergoing clinical procedures. Partially blinded, randomised, prospective clinical field trial. Eighty four client-owned horses scheduled for minor surgery or diagnostic investigation under standing sedation. The effects of buprenorphine (5 μg kg(-1) ) (Group B, n = 46) or placebo (5% glucose solution) (Group C, n = 38) in combination with detomidine (10 μg kg(-1) ) were compared in standing horses undergoing minor clinical procedures. The primary outcome measure was successful completion of the procedure. The degree of sedation and ataxia were scored using simple descriptive scales. Heart and respiratory rates were recorded at 15-30 minute intervals. Parametric data from each group were compared using anova or t-test and non parametric data using the Mann-Whitney U test. The procedure was carried out successfully in 91% of Group B and 63% of Group C (p detomidine, increased after buprenorphine but not glucose administration, was more profound in group B and lasted longer (60 versus 30 minutes) p detomidine 10 and 20 μg kg(-1) with minor side effects similar to other alpha2 agonist/opioid combinations. Detomidine-buprenorphine sedation is suitable for standing procedures in horses. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  13. Effects of buprenorphine and hepatitis C on liver enzymes in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Abbott, Patrick J; Kushner, Robert; Tonigan, J Scott; Woody, George E

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore changes in transaminase values associated with buprenorphine treatment and hepatitis C status among opioid dependent subjects aged 15-21. 152 subjects seeking treatment for opioid dependence were randomized to 2-week detoxification with buprenorphine/naloxone (DETOX) or 12 weeks buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP). Liver chemistries including transaminases were obtained baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. 111 patients had at least one set of transaminases during treatment and were included in analyses of treatment effects. Overall, 8/60 BUP participants vs. 12/51 DETOX participants had at least one elevated ALT value during follow-up (Chi-square n.s.). 5/60 BUP participants vs. 11/51 DETOX participants had at least one elevated AST value (Chi-square = 3.194, p = .048). Twenty-eight out of 152 participants were hepatitis C (HCV) positive at baseline, and 4 seroconverted within 12 weeks, 2 in each group. HCV status was significantly associated with transaminase abnormalities (p = .009 and p = .006 for ALT an AST, respectively). HCV status had a strong effect on transaminase abnormalities among participants assigned to DETOX, but not among those assigned to BUP. No evidence was found for hepatotoxicity of buprenorphine in this exploratory analysis. HCV was present in a significant minority of participants and was a significant predictor of transaminase elevation. Results suggest that stabilization on buprenorphine may decrease the frequency of transaminase abnormalities associated with HCV in opioid dependent young people. The high rate of seroconversion underscores the importance of effective treatment and prevention.

  14. Use of 0.5% bupivacaine with buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Varun; Kaur, Tejinder; Kapila, Sarika; Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Yashmeet

    2017-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures are the most commonly performed procedures by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Performance of painless surgical procedure is highly appreciated by the patients and is possible through the use of local anesthesia, conscious sedation or general anesthesia. Postoperative pain can also be controlled by the use of opioids, as opioid receptors exist in the peripheral nervous system and offers the possibility of providing postoperative analgesia in the surgical patient. The present study compares the efficacy of 0.5% bupivacaine versus 0.5% bupivacaine with 0.3 mg buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures. The present study was conducted in 50 patients who required minor oral surgical procedures under local anesthesia. Two types of local anesthetic solutions were used- 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200000 epinephrine in group I and a mixture of 39 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 1 ml of 300 μg buprenorphine (3 μg/kg)in group II. Intraoperative and postoperative evaluation was carried out for both the anesthetic solutions. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia in bupivacaine group (508.92 ± 63.30 minutes) was quite less than the buprenorphine combination group (1840.84 ± 819.51 minutes). The mean dose of postoperative analgesic medication in bupivacaine group (1.64 ± 0.99 tablets) was higher than buprenorphine combination group (0.80 ± 1.08 tablets). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the onset of action of the anesthetic effect and duration of anesthesia. Buprenorphine can be used in combination with bupivacaine for patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures to provide postoperative analgesia for a longer duration.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine and naltrexone treatments for heroin dependence in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants' time were estimated using Malaysia's minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars. Muar, Malaysia. 126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003-2005) receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence. Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores. Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine and naltrexone treatments for heroin dependence in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prah Ruger

    Full Text Available To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia.We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants' time were estimated using Malaysia's minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars.Muar, Malaysia.126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003-2005 receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence.Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores.Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine.Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and Paw Withdrawal Pressure in Female Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus) Treated with Sustained-Release Buprenorphine and Buprenorphine Hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian J; Wegenast, Daniel J; Hansen, Ryan J; Hess, Ann M; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-11-01

    Providing appropriate analgesia is essential in minimizing pain and maintaining optimal animal care and welfare in laboratory animals. Guinea pigs are common animal models in biomedical research, often requiring analgesic support. Here we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of a sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine (Bup-SR) in this species. Guinea pigs (n = 7 each group) received either Bup-HCl (0.05 mg/kg BID for 3 d) or Bup-SR (0.3 mg/kg once). Plasma collection and measurement of paw-withdrawal pressure (PWP) was conducted at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 26, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Plasma levels of Bup-HCl peaked at 2331 pg/mL at 1 h after administration and declined to 165 pg/mL by 12 h. Plasma concentrations of Bup-SR peaked at 1344 pg/mL at 26 h after administration and declined to 429 pg/mL by 48 h. The PWP of the Bup-HCltreated guinea pigs peaked at 674 g at 1 h and declined to 402 g at 6 h, whereas that of Bup-SRtreated guinea pigs at 1 h was 361 g, 555 g at 6 h (significantly higher than that after Bup-HCl), and peaked at 680 g at 12 h. The PWP of both treatments was similar from 24 to 72 h and ranged from 348 to 450 g. The plasma concentration and PWP showed good correlation. These results suggest that Bup-SR provides consistent analgesia equivalent to that of Bup-HCl for a prolonged period of time and that Bup-SR is an alternative method of analgesia in guinea pigs.

  18. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient's satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery.

  19. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasem Soltani; Mahmood Khorsand; ALireza Sepehri Shamloo; Lida Jarahi; Nahid Zirak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They wer...

  20. At the Expense of a Life: Race, Class, and the Meaning of Buprenorphine in Pharmaceuticalized “Care”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Alexandrea E.; Mendoza, Sonia; Hansen, Helena

    2018-01-01

    Background/Objective Office-based buprenorphine maintenance has been legalized and promoted as a treatment approach that not only expands access to care, but also reduces the stigma of addiction treatment by placing it in a mainstream clinical setting. At the same time, there are differences in buprenorphine treatment utilization by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Methods This article draws on qualitative data from interviews with 77 diverse patients receiving buprenorphine in a primary care clinic and two outpatient substance dependence clinics to examine differences in patients’ experiences of stigma in relation their need for psychosocial supports and services. Results Management of stigma and perception of social needs varied significantly by ethnicity, race and SES, with white educated patients best able to capitalize on the medical focus and confidentiality of office-based buprenorphine, given that they have other sources of support outside of the clinic, and Black or Latino/a low income patients experiencing office-based buprenorphine treatment as isolating. Conclusion Drawing on Agamben’s theory of “bare life,” and on the theory of intersectionality, the article argues that without attention to the multiple oppressions and survival needs of addiction patients who are further stigmatized by race and class, buprenorphine treatment can become a form of clinical abandonment. PMID:29161171

  1. Diversion and injection of buprenorphine-naloxone film two years post-introduction in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larance, Briony; Mattick, Richard; Ali, Robert; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Jenkinson, Rebecca; White, Nancy; Kihas, Ivana; Cassidy, Rosemary; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 years of post-marketing surveillance of the diversion and injection of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX) film following its introduction in 2011. Interviews were conducted with people who inject drugs regularly (PWID) (2004-2013), opioid substitution therapy clients (2013, n = 492) and key experts (n = 44). Key outcomes were unsanctioned removal of supervised doses, diversion, injection and street price. Prevalence of past 6-month injection among PWID was adjusted for background availability of opioid substitution therapy medications using sales data. Among out-of-treatment PWID, the levels of regular (weekly+) BNX film injection were comparable to methadone and BNX tablets, and lower than mono-buprenorphine, adjusting for background availability. Fewer BNX film clients [3%; 95% (CI) 1-5] regularly injected their medication than mono-buprenorphine clients (25%; 95% CI 11-39), but at levels equivalent to those among methadone (3%; 95% CI 1-6) and BNX tablet clients (2%; 95% CI 0-6). Key experts perceived BNX film needed less supervised dosing time as it dissolved rapidly and was harder to remove from the mouth than sublingual tablets; however, removal of supervised doses was higher among BNX film clients (15%; 95% CI: 10-20) than methadone clients (3%; 95% CI 1-6), and not significantly different from BNX tablet (11%; 95% CI 2-21) and mono-buprenorphine clients (31%; 95% CI 16-46). Two years post-introduction, levels of BNX film diversion and injection remained comparable with those for methadone and BNX tablets, and lower than mono-buprenorphine. We found no evidence that BNX film has lower non-adherence and diversion than the tablet formulation. [Larance B, Mattick R, Ali R, Lintzeris N, Jenkinson R, White N, Kihas I, Cassidy R, Degenhardt L. Diversion and injection of buprenorphine-naloxone film two years post-introduction in Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  2. The introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone film in opioid substitution therapy in Australia: Uptake and issues arising from changing buprenorphine formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larance, Briony; Dietze, Paul; Ali, Robert; Lintzeris, Nicholas; White, Nancy; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2015-11-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX) film for opioid dependence treatment was introduced in Australia in 2011. A key difference in State policy approaches saw transfer from BNX tablets to BNX film mandated in South Australia (SA) with New South Wales (NSW) and Victoria (VIC) having less stringent policies. This study examined (i) how initiations and transfers were implemented, (ii) the profile and predictors of adverse effects as self-reported by BNX film clients, and (iii) dosing issues. Survey of 334 buprenorphine (BPN), BNX tablet and BNX film clients and semi-structured interviews with 39 key experts (KEs) in 2012. Comparisons are made between clients interviewed in SA versus NSW and VIC combined. Among the 180 current BNX film clients, 23% started treatment on BNX film, 18% requested a transfer to BNX film and 59% (n = 106) reported their clinic/prescriber recommended transfer to BNX film. Among clients who were offered but refused a transfer to BNX film (n = 66), the most common reason was 'I am happy with my current treatment and do not see a reason to change' (53%). Some opioid substitution therapy clients and KE viewed transfers as 'forced' (i.e. no choice of buprenorphine formulation). Multivariable regression showed residing in SA (vs. NSW/VIC) and a shorter length of current treatment episode were associated with more BNX film-attributed adverse effects but clinic/prescriber-recommended transfer was not. The introduction of BNX film in Australia varied across States. A perception of restricted choice in medication may have undermined initial acceptance in SA. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  3. Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Placebo and Buprenorphine Effects on Event-Related Potentials in Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials (ERPs) in experimental pain and the potential benefit of population pharmacodynamic modelling in data analysis. Nineteen healthy volunteers received transdermal placebo and buprenorphine...... in a cross-over study. Drug plasma concentrations and ERPs after electrical stimulation at the median nerve with intensity adjusted to pain detection threshold were recorded until 144 hrs after administration. Placebo and concentration-effect models were fitted to data using non-linear mixed......, pharmacodynamic modelling was successfully implemented to allow for placebo and variability correction in ERP of experimental pain. Improved outcome of ERP studies can be expected if variation between subjects and study occasions can be identified and described....

  4. [Understanding Oral and Nasal Mucosal Absorption of Fentanyl, and Rectal Absorption of Buprenorphine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi; Kubota, Yukino; Kato, Yoko

    2015-11-01

    One of the key issues in the treatment of pain is to choose the appropriate route and dosage form of analgesics for each individual patient in pain. New drug forms of fentanyl absorbed by oral or nasal mucosa, and buprenorphine absorbed by rectal mucosa are described in this chapter. Only lipophilic opioids such as fentanyl and buprenorphine can be absorbed via the mucosa of oral or nasal cavity of the human body. The T max of rapid onset opioids (ROO) such as fentanyl buccal or sublingual tablets is the fastest among various dosage forms of opioid analgesics. However, such rapid increase in plasma concentration of fentanyl by ROO formulations may cause the risk of respiratory depression. Safe ways to use ROO analgesics are described.

  5. Motivational assessment of non-treatment buprenorphine research participation in heroin dependent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, Gina; Greenwald, Mark K

    2012-06-01

    Heroin abuse remains an important public health problem, particularly in economically disadvantaged areas. Insight into this problem is gained from interviewing addicted individuals. However, we lack systematic data on factors that motivate heroin users to participate in non-treatment research that offers both financial incentives (compensation) and non-financial incentives (e.g., short-term medication). To better understand the relative importance of several types of personal motivations to participate in non-treatment buprenorphine research, and to relate self-motivations to social, economic, demographic and drug use factors. Heroin dependent volunteers (N=235 total; 57 female and 178 male; 136 African American, 86 Caucasian, and 13 Other) applied for non-therapeutic buprenorphine research in an urban outpatient setting from 2004 to 2008. We conducted a semi-structured behavioral economic interview, after which participants ranked 11 possible motivations for research participation. Although the study was repeatedly described as non-treatment research involving buprenorphine, participants often ranked some treatment-related motivations as important (wanting to reduce/stop heroin use, needing a medication to get stabilized/detoxify). Some motivations correlated with income, heroin use, and years since marketing of buprenorphine. Two dimensions emerged from principal component analysis of motivation rankings: (1) treatment motivation vs. greater immediate needs and (2) commitment to trying alternatives vs. a more accepting attitude toward traditional interventions. In summary, heroin addicts' self-motivations to engage in non-therapeutic research are complex--they value economic gain but not exclusively or primarily--and relate to variables such as socioeconomic factors and drug use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Criminal charges prior to and after initiation of office-based buprenorphine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Elizabeth E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little data on the impact of office-based buprenorphine therapy on criminal activity. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of primary care clinic-based buprenorphine maintenance therapy on rates of criminal charges and the factors associated with criminal charges in the 2 years after initiation of treatment. Methods We collected demographic and outcome data on 252 patients who were given at least one prescription for buprenorphine. We searched a public database of criminal charges and recorded criminal charges prior to and after enrollment. We compared the total number of criminal cases and drug cases 2 years before versus 2 years after initiation of treatment. Results There was at least one criminal charge made against 38% of the subjects in the 2 years after initiation of treatment; these subjects were more likely to have used heroin, to have injected drugs, to have had any prior criminal charges, and recent criminal charges. There was no significant difference in the number of subjects with any criminal charge or a drug charge before and after initiation of treatment. Likewise, the mean number of all cases and drug cases was not significantly different between the two periods. However, among those who were opioid-negative for 6 or more months in the first year of treatment, there was a significant decline in criminal cases. On multivariable analysis, having recent criminal charges was significantly associated with criminal charges after initiation of treatment (adjusted odds ratio 3.92; subjects who were on opioid maintenance treatment prior to enrollment were significantly less likely to have subsequent criminal charges (adjusted odds ratio 0.52. Conclusions Among subjects with prior criminal charges, initiation of office-based buprenorphine treatment did not appear to have a significant impact on subsequent criminal charges.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone Treatments for Heroin Dependence in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Aims To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. Design We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; soci...

  8. Evaluation of the Tolerability of Switching Patients on Chronic Full ?-Opioid Agonist Therapy to Buccal Buprenorphine

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Lynn; Gruener, Daniel; Kirby, Todd; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective?Assess whether patients with chronic pain receiving 80 to 220?mg oral morphine sulfate equivalent of a full ?-opioid agonist could be transitioned to buccal buprenorphine at approximately 50% of their full dose without inducing opioid withdrawal or sacrificing analgesic efficacy. Methods.?A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, two-period crossover study in adult patients receiving around-the-clock full opioid agonist therapy and confirmed to be opioid dependent...

  9. Association between the DRD2 A1 allele and response to methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2006-06-05

    The TaqI A polymorphism (A(1)) of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2), although not a specific predictor of opioid dependence, has been strongly associated with high levels of prior heroin use and poor treatment outcomes among methadone maintenance patients. The aims of this study were to confirm these findings via a retrospective analysis of A(1) allele frequency in methadone (n = 46) and buprenorphine (n = 25) patients, and non-opioid-dependent controls (n = 95). Subjects were genotyped at the DRD2 TaqI A locus using PCR amplification followed by TaqI restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. For methadone and buprenorphine subjects, heroin use (prior to treatment), treatment outcomes, and withdrawal occurrence were determined from comprehensive case notes. No significant differences in A(1) allele frequency (%) were observed between: methadone (19.6%), buprenorphine (18.0%), and control (17.9%) groups (P > 0.7); successful and poor treatment outcome groups, methadone: 20.0% and 19.2%, respectively (P = 1.0); buprenorphine: 18.4% and 20.0%, respectively (P = 1.0). Also, there were no significant relationships between TaqI A genotype and prior heroin use (P = 0.47). However, among the successful methadone subjects, significantly fewer A(1) allele carriers experienced withdrawal than non-A(1) carriers (P = 0.04). In conclusion, the DRD2 genotype effects did not affect opioid maintenance treatment outcomes. This suggests the need for a further prospective investigation into the role of the DRD2 A(1) allele in heroin use and response to maintenance pharmacotherapies for opioid dependence.

  10. Postoperative analgesic effects of dexketoprofen, buprenorphine and tramadol in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgaz, J; Navarrete, R; Muñoz-Rascón, P; Domínguez, J M; Fernández-Sarmiento, J A; Gómez-Villamandos, R J; Granados, M M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of dexketoprofen, tramadol, and buprenorphine in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Seventy-five adult female dogs were randomly assigned to receive an intravenous injection (IV) of 1mg/kg of dexketoprofen (D), 0.02 mg/kg of buprenorphine (B) or 2mg/kg of tramadol (T). Pain assessment was performed during 48 h after ovariohysterectomy using a dynamic interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS) and Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF). Rescue analgesia was required in 43%, 21%, and 5% of dogs in the B, T, and D groups, respectively, with significant differences between B and D (p=0.010) groups. The DIVAS and CMPS-SF values of the B group were significantly higher than those of the T and D groups. The most common undesirable effect was dysphoria in dexketoprofen group. Tramadol and dexketoprofen provide superior postoperative analgesia compared with buprenorphine in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine after single-dose subcutaneous administration in red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummrow, Maya S; Tseng, Florina; Hesse, Leah; Court, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Buprenorphine, a mu opioid receptor agonist, is expected to be a suitable analgesic drug for use in reptiles. However, to date, dosage recommendations have been based on anecdotal observations. The aim of this study was to provide baseline pharmacokinetic data in red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) targeting a plasma level of 1 ng/ml reported effective for analgesia in humans. Serial blood samples were taken after subcutaneous injection of buprenorphine, and plasma buprenorphine levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Pharmacokinetic parameters of a lower dose (0.02 mg/kg) injected into the forelimb were compared with a higher dose (0.05 mg/kg) given in the same forelimb as well as a lower dose (0.02 mg/kg) given in the hind limb of the same animals with 2 wk between studies. After administration of 0.05 mg/kg in the front limb, 85% of animals maintained the minimum effective plasma level for 24 hr, while only 43% of animals maintained this level after 0.02 mg/kg. After hind limb injection at 0.02 mg/kg, maximum plasma concentrations and areas under the buprenorphine concentration-time curve were less than 20% and 70%, respectively, of values after forelimb injection, consistent with substantial first pass extraction by the liver. Furthermore, a secondary rise in the buprenorphine level was found after having only a hind limb injection, probably from enterohepatic recirculation of glucuronidated drug. In conclusion, buprenorphine dosages of at least 0.075 mg/kg s.i.d. should be appropriate for evaluation of analgesia efficacy, and front limb administration may be preferable to hind limb administration for optimal drug exposure.

  12. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experiences with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (polder age (ppeople who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics aimed at improving entry into and retention in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. Methods In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experience with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Results All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (p<0.01), needle/syringe exchange programs (p<0.005), or be of Indian ethnicity (p<0.001). Past use of methadone (p<0.01), older age (p<0.001), stress symptom severity (p<0.001), and sharing of needles or syringes (p<0.05) were associated with higher treatment readiness scores. Conclusion There are suboptimal levels of OMT experience among people who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics

  14. Messages about methadone and buprenorphine in reality television: a content analysis of celebrity rehab with Dr. Drew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, Robert; Fuentes, Liza; Cheema, Mandeep

    2012-08-01

    Medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence is safe and effective, yet negative perceptions about methadone and buprenorphine may discourage patients from entering treatment. One source of information that may influence viewers' perceptions is television. We performed a content analysis of a popular reality television program on addiction treatment. Although many patients had histories of opioid use, there were no positive messages about methadone or buprenorphine. The two main messages were that they (1) are primarily drugs of abuse, and (2) not acceptable treatment options. These messages reinforce negative stereotypes and may perpetuate stigma. There were multiple missed opportunities to provide evidence-based information.

  15. Preliminary investigation comparing a detomidine continuous rate infusion combined with either morphine or buprenorphine for standing sedation in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Joanna J; MacFarlane, Paul D; Love, Emma J; Tremaine, Henry; Taylor, Polly M; Murrell, Joanna C

    2016-03-01

    To compare sedative and analgesic properties of buprenorphine or morphine for standing procedures combined with a detomidine continuous rate infusion (CRI). Blinded, prospective, randomized clinical pilot study. Ten horses presented for dental or sinus procedures. Horses received 0.02 mg kg(-1) acepromazine intravenously (IV), followed 30 minutes later by detomidine 10 μg kg(-1) IV. Five minutes later, buprenorphine 0.01 mg kg(-1) (n = 6) or morphine 0.1 mg kg(-1) (n = 4) was administered IV. Detomidine was administered by CRI (0.2 μg kg(-1) minute(-1)) and adjusted to maintain appropriate sedation. Heart rate, respiratory frequency, gastrointestinal motility and rectal temperature were measured; pain, ataxia and sedation were scored. Sedation, pain scores and ataxia scores were analysed using a mixed linear model. Detomidine dose and procedure success scores were compared using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Complications between groups were analysed using Fisher's exact test. Two horses had incomplete data. Weights and ages were not different between groups (p = 0.15 and p = 0.42, respectively). The dose rate for detomidine was not different between groups (0.33 ± 0.02 μg kg(-1) minute(-1) in the buprenorphine group and 0.33 ± 0.05 μg kg(-1) minute(-1), in the morphine group p = 0.89). Intraoperative visual analogue scale scores were greater after buprenorphine than morphine (mean ± SD, buprenorphine 48 ± 4, morphine 40 ± 5, p = 0.0497). Procedure duration was not different between groups (buprenorphine 142 ± 33, morphine 140 ± 12 minutes). All horses treated with buprenorphine experienced complications compared with none in the morphine group (p = 0.0286). At the doses used, buprenorphine produced greater sedation but more post-operative complications than morphine. However, Type I or Type II errors cannot be excluded and larger studies are required to confirm these findings. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of

  16. Sexual Dysfunction in Heroin Dependents: A Comparison between Methadone and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Yee

    Full Text Available Methadone has long been regarded as an effective treatment for opioid dependence. However, many patients discontinue maintenance therapy because of its side effects, with one of the most common being sexual dysfunction. Buprenorphine is a proven alternative to methadone. This study aimed to investigate sexual dysfunction in opioid-dependent men on buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT. The secondary aim was to investigate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and the quality of life in these patients.Two hundred thirty-eight men participated in this cross-sectional study. Four questionnaires were used, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Opiate Treatment Index, Malay version of the International Index of Erectile Function 15 (Mal-IIEF-15, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between MMT and BMT and the Mal-IIEF 15 scores while controlling for all the possible confounders.The study population consisted of 171 patients (71.8% on MMT and 67 (28.2% on BMT. Patients in the MMT group who had a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the sexual desire domain (p < 0.012 and overall satisfaction (p = 0.043 domain compared with their counterparts in the BMT group. Similarly, patients in the MMT group without a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the orgasmic function domain (p = 0.008 compared with those in the BMT group without a partner. Intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.026 and overall satisfaction (p = 0.039 were significantly associated with the social relationships domain after adjusting for significantly correlated sociodemographic variables.Sexual functioning is critical for improving the quality of life in patients in an opioid rehabilitation program. Our study showed that buprenorphine causes less sexual dysfunction than methadone. Thus, clinicians may consider the former when

  17. Perioperative analgesia with a buprenorphine transdermal patch for hallux valgus surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Can Xu, Mingqing Li, Chenggong Wang, Hui Li, Hua Liu Department of Orthopaedics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Hallux valgus surgery often results in significant postoperative pain. Adequate control of pain is essential for patient satisfaction and improves the outcome of the procedure. This study aimed to investigate the perioperative analgesic effect of a buprenorphine transdermal patch in patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery.Patients and methods: A total of 90 patients were randomly divided into the following three groups based on the perioperative analgesic method: flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection (Group F, oral celecoxib (Group C, and buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (BTDS (Group BTDS. The pain status, degree of satisfaction, adverse effects, and administration of tramadol hydrochloride for uncontrolled pain were recorded on the night before surgery, postoperative day 1, postoperative day 2, and postoperative day 3.Results: The BTDS could effectively control perioperative pain for patients undergoing ­hallux valgus surgery. The analgesic effect of the BTDS was better than that of oral celecoxib. In addition, statistically significant differences were not observed in the visual analog scale (VAS scores, adverse effects, and rescue analgesia between the patients who received the BTDS and the patients who received the flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection. However, the degree of patient satisfaction of the BTDS group was significantly higher (P<0.05 than that of the other two groups.Conclusion: The BTDS (a preemptive analgesia regimen could exert an analgesic effect during the perioperative period for patients who had received hallux valgus surgery, and this effect is beneficial for sustaining postoperative physiological and psychological states and promoting functional rehabilitation. Keywords: hallux valgus, buprenorphine transdermal

  18. Sedative and antinociceptive effects of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal or intramuscular administration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, Nathalie; Bosmans, Tim; Debille, Mariëlla; de Rooster, Hilde; Duchateau, Luc; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2014-01-01

    To compare sedation and antinociception after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (IM) administration of a dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine combination in healthy adult cats. Randomized, 'blinded' crossover study, with 1 month washout between treatments. Six healthy neutered female cats, weighing 5.3-7.5 kg. A combination of dexmedetomidine (40 μg kg(-1) ) and buprenorphine (20 μg kg(-1) ) was administered by either the OTM (buccal cavity) or IM (quadriceps muscle) route. Sedation was measured using a numerical rating scale, at baseline and at various time points until 6 hours after treatment. At the same time points, analgesia was scored using a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale, based on the response to an ear pinch, and by the cat's response to a mechanical stimulus exerted by a pressure rate onset device. Physiological and adverse effects were recorded, and oral pH measured. Signed rank tests were performed, with significance set at p < 0.05. Data are presented as median and range. There were no differences in sedation or antinociception scores between OTM and IM dosing at any of the time points. Nociceptive thresholds increased after both treatments but without significant difference between groups. Buccal pH remained between 8 and 8.5. Salivation was noted after OTM administration (n = 2) and vomiting after both OTM (n = 4), and IM (n = 3) dosing. In healthy adult cats, OTM administration of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine resulted in comparable levels of sedation and antinociception to IM dosing. The OTM administration may offer an alternative route to administer this sedative-analgesic combination in cats. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  19. COMPARISON OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE, BUPRENORPHINE AND FENTANYL AS AN ADJUVANT TO BUPIVACAINE DURING SPINAL ANAESTHESIA FOR HEMIARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Opioids such as fentanyl or buprenorphine are being added as adjuvant to local anaesthetic for spinal anaesthesia. Dexmedetomidine, a new α2 agonist is being tried as an adjuvant in the recent times. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients were randomised into three Groups (n=30 each by closed envelope technique. Patients in Group 1 received 10 µg fentanyl with 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, Group 2 received 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine supplemented with 30 µg of buprenorphine and Group 3 received 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 5 µg dexmedetomidine intrathecally. The time to reach maximum sensory and motor level, the regression time of the same, any adverse effects were recorded. Data were analysed using chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test for categorical data and analysis of variance for continuous data. A value of P<0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Settings and Design- The study was conducted in a prospective, randomised and double-blind manner. It included ninety American Society of Anaesthesiologists class I and II patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia. RESULTS In this study, the patients in dexmedetomidine group showed significantly longer duration of motor block (240±20 mins. and sensory blockade (180±22.2 mins. compared to other groups, which is statistically significant (P=0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively. The time to first request of analgesic postoperatively was also longer (260±30.2 in dexmedetomidine group when compared with other groups (P=0.0001. Haemodynamic parameters were stable and there were no complications in any group. CONCLUSIONS We concluded that intrathecal dexmedetomidine (5 µg with bupivacaine provides significantly longer duration of sensory and motor blockade and longer duration for first request of analgesia in the recovery than intrathecal buprenorphine (30 µg or fentanyl (10 µg with bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for

  20. Access to and Payment for Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment in Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore V Parran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Importance: Office-based opiate agonist therapy has dramatically expanded access to medication-assisted treatment over the past decade but has also led to increased buprenorphine diversion. Objective: Our study sought to characterize physicians who participate in office-based therapy (OBT to assess patient access to OBT in Ohio 10 years after its introduction. Design/Setting/Participants: Cross-sectional telephone survey of Drug Addiction Treatment Act–waivered physicians in Ohio listed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT. Main Outcomes: This study sought to determine what proportion of eligible physicians are actively prescribing buprenorphine, whether they accept insurance for OBT, and whether they accept insurance for non-OBT services. In addition, we evaluated what physician characteristics predicted those primary outcomes. We hypothesized that a significant minority of eligible physicians are not active prescribers of buprenorphine. In addition, we expected that a significant minority of OBT prescribers do not accept insurance, further restricting patient access. We further hypothesized that a large subset of OBT prescribers accept insurance in their regular practices but do not take insurance for OBT. Results: Of the 466 listed physicians, 327 (70.2% practice representatives were reached for interview. Thirty-three physicians were excluded, with a true response rate of 75.5%. In total, 80.7% of providers reached were active OBT prescribers. Of these, 52.7% accepted insurance for OBT, 20.8% accepted insurance for non-OBT services but not for OBT, and 26.5% did not accept insurance for any services. Practices who did not accept insurance were more likely among dedicated addiction clinics located outside of Ohio’s 6 major cities. Practices who normally accepted insurance but did not for OBT services were more likely in urban locations and were not associated with dedicated addiction practices. Neither business practice was

  1. Influence of detomidine and buprenorphine on motor-evoked potentials in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, H; Van Ham, L; Gasthuys, F; Dewulf, J; Vanderstraeten, G; Deprez, P

    2003-04-26

    Horses need to be sedated before they are investigated by transcranial magnetic stimulation because of the mild discomfort induced by the evoked muscle contraction and the noise of stimulation. This paper describes the influence of a combination of detomidine (10 microg/kg bodyweight) and a low dose of buprenorphine (2.4 microg/kg) on the onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor-evoked potentials in normal horses. There were no significant differences between measurements of these parameters made before the horses were sedated and measurements made 10 and 30 minutes after the drugs were administered.

  2. The antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine administered through the drinking water of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, L; Bjerrum, Ole Jannik; Christensen, Sten

    2007-01-01

    was assessed by use of an analgesiometric model measuring the rats' latency time to withdrawal from a noxious heat stimulus applied to the plantar surface of the paw. Results revealed that buprenorphine in drinking water (0.056 mg/mL) induced significant increases in paw withdrawal latency times during a three...... water may be a viable treatment option for the relief of pain in laboratory rats, but at the doses used in this study in pain-free rats it was associated with a decrease in water intake and some behavioural changes....

  3. Injectable naltrexone, oral naltrexone, and buprenorphine utilization and discontinuation among individuals treated for opioid use disorder in a United States commercially insured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jake R; Schackman, Bruce R; Leff, Jared A; Linas, Benjamin P; Walley, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    We investigated prescribing patterns for four opioid use disorder (OUD) medications: 1) injectable naltrexone, 2) oral naltrexone, 3) sublingual or oralmucosal buprenorphine/naloxone, and 4) sublingual buprenorphine as well as transdermal buprenorphine (which is approved for treating pain, but not OUD) in a nationally representative claims-based database (Truven Health MarketScan®) of commercially insured individuals in the United States. We calculated the prevalence of OUD in the database for each year from 2010 to 2014 and the proportion of diagnosed patient months on OUD medication. We compared characteristics of individuals diagnosed with OUD who did and did not receive these medications with bivariate descriptive statistics. Finally, we fit a Cox proportional hazards model of time to discontinuation of therapy as a function of therapy type, controlling for relevant confounders. From 2010 to 2014, the proportion of commercially insured individuals diagnosed with OUD grew by fourfold (0.12% to 0.48%), but the proportion of diagnosed patient-months on medication decreased from 25% in 2010 (0.05% injectable naltrexone, 0.4% oral naltrexone, 23.1% sublingual or oralmucosal buprenorphine/naloxone, 1.5% sublingual buprenorphine, and 0% transdermal buprenorphine) to 16% in 2014 (0.2% injectable naltrexone, 0.4% oral naltrexone, 13.8% sublingual or oralmucosal buprenorphine/naloxone, 1.4% sublingual buprenorphine, and 0.3% transdermal buprenorphine). Individuals who received medication therapy were more likely to be male, younger, and have an additional substance use disorder compared with those diagnosed with OUD who did not receive medication therapy. Those prescribed injectable naltrexone were more often male, younger, and diagnosed with additional substance use disorders compared with those prescribed other medications for opioid use disorder (MOUDs). At 30 days after initiation, 52% for individuals treated with injectable naltrexone, 70% for individuals treated

  4. Switching from high doses of pure u-opioid agonists to transdermal buprenorphine in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, Lena; Sjøgren, Per; Hansen, Ole Bo

    2013-01-01

    ) brief pain inventory; 3) pain relief and pain intensity; 4) quality of life; and 5) adverse events and symptoms. RESULTS: Eighteen patients receiving 150-516 mg of morphine/day were included. The buprenorphine dose at the end of the study varied between 52.5 and 140 μg/h. No difference in pain before...

  5. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  6. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  7. [Modification of the analgetic effects (buprenorphine, pentazocine, pethidine) on respiration and haemodynamics by epidural, halothane- or neuroleptanaesthesia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, H J; Moritz, K G; Sandmann, W; Richter, O

    1980-04-01

    In 38 patients buprenorphine, meperidine and pentazocine were given in a single dose for postoperative pain relief 20 hours after the end of anaesthesia. Measuring the parameters of the high- and low-pressure system as well as the metabolism the authors found that the effects of these analgetic medicaments, intravenously injected were significantly influenced by fentanyl, halothane or diazepam, given under the course of operation. Especially buprenorphine, injected after epidural anaesthesia in combination with diazepam sedation, proved to have a rather negative effect, because it caused a strong depression of respiration and circulation. On the other hand buprenorphine had, given after neuroleptanaesthesia, a neutralizing - and pentazocine and pethidine in combination with neuroleptanaesthesia a stimulating influence on the circulation. After halothane-anaesthesia the effect of the analegtics on the cardiovascular system was, when buprenorphine was given, depressing and when pentazocine was given indifferent. Similar reactions, but more pronounced, could be seen in the epidural group. With certain reservations, caused by the preliminary character of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn for the anaesthetic practice: 1 Choosing analgetic drugs for postoperative pain relief, the anaesthesist has to be aware of the interactions, possibly resulting from the medicaments, given during anaesthesia. 2. The number of medicaments, given during anaesthesia, should be kept small, considering the eventual interactions and the unintentional secondary effects.

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity, red flag behaviors, and associated outcomes among office-based buprenorphine patients following Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Arthur R; Tofighi, Babak; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D; Grossman, Ellie

    2014-04-01

    In October 2012, Bellevue Hospital Center (Bellevue) in New York City was temporarily closed as a result of Hurricane Sandy, the largest hurricane in US history. Bellevue's primary care office-based buprenorphine program was temporarily closed and later relocated to an affiliate public hospital. Previous research indicates that the relationships between disaster exposure, substance use patterns, psychiatric symptoms, and mental health services utilization is complex, with often conflicting findings regarding post-event outcomes (on the individual and community level) and antecedent risk factors. In general, increased use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is associated with both greater disaster exposure and the development or exacerbation of other psychiatric symptoms and need for treatment. To date, there is limited published information regarding post-disaster outcomes among patients enrolled in office-based buprenorphine treatment, as the treatment modality has only been relatively approved recently. Patients enrolled in the buprenorphine program at the time of the storm were surveyed for self-reported buprenorphine adherence and illicit substance and alcohol use, as well as disaster-related personal consequences and psychiatric sequelae post-storm. Baseline demographic characteristics and insurance status were available from the medical record. Analysis was descriptive (counts and proportions) and qualitative, coding open-ended responses for emergent themes. There were 132 patients enrolled in the program at the time of the storm; of those, 91 were contacted and 89 completed the survey. Almost half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine supply. Unexpectedly, patients with psychiatric comorbidity were no more likely to report increased use/relapse as a result. Rather, major risk factors associated with increased use or relapse post-storm were: (1) shorter length of time in treatment, (2) exposure to storm losses such as buprenorphine

  9. Craving and subsequent opioid use among opioid dependent patients who initiate treatment with buprenorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Strong, David R.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have directly assessed associations between craving and subsequent opioid use among treated patients. Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the relative utility of two craving questionnaires to predict opioid use among opioid dependent patients in treatment. Method Opioid dependent patients (n=147) initiating buprenorphine treatment were assessed for three months. Craving was measured using: 1) the Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ) and 2) the Penn Alcohol-Craving Scale adapted for opioid craving (PCS) for this study. Multi-level logistic regression models estimated the effects of craving on the likelihood of opioid use after adjusting for gender, age, ethnicity, education, opioid of choice, frequency of use, pain and depression. In these analyses craving assessed at time t was entered as a time-varying predictor of opioid use at time t+1. Results In adjusted regression models, a 1-point increase in PCS scores (on a 7-point scale) was associated with a significant increase in the odds of opioid use at the subsequent assessment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.08; 1.49, p .05) or DDQ control (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.85; 1.11, p > .05) scores. Conclusion Self-reported craving for opioids was associated with subsequent lapse to opioid use among a cohort of patients treated with buprenorphine. PMID:24521036

  10. Predictors of long term opioid withdrawal outcome after short-term stabilization with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M I

    2014-01-01

    We aim to examine predictors of opiate abstinence status 3 months after the end of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent participants. Participants (n= 516, age > 15 years) received buprenorphine/ naloxone treatment for 4 weeks and then randomly assigned to undergo dose tapering over either 7 days or 28 days. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify possible predictors of successful opiate abstinence outome (p-value opioid and drug urine tests result at the end taper; employment status, family problems, and alcohol use domains of addiction severity index (ASI) score; and clinical opiate withdrawal scale (COWS) at the end of stabilization. Final predictor list identified by logistic regression include: ASI score for family and alcohol problems, COWS at the end of stabilization and opiate urine test at the end of taper. Participants presenting with a negative urine test for opiate, more severe alcohol, more severe family problems, or more symptoms of opiate withdrawal at the end of stabilization were more likely to have a successful opiate abstinence.

  11. Women

    OpenAIRE

    Annesley, Claire; Himmelweit, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter examines the government's approach to fairness in its Comprehensive Spending Review and shows that it fails to acknowledge that men and women start from unequal positions, and that there are many barriers to social mobility other than lack of educational qualifications.\\ud Unequal employment opportunities and unpaid caring responsibilities are given as two examples. As a result women rely on public services to be able to combine care with employment and so cuts in public services...

  12. Preemptive Epidural Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief Revisited: Comparison of Combination of Buprenorphine and Neostigmine with Combination of Buprenorphine and Ketamine in Lower Abdominal Surgeries, A Double-blind Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sanjay; Singh, Raj Bahadur

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief provides subjective comfort to patient in addition to blunting of autonomic and somatic reflex responses to pain, subsequently enhancing restoration of function by allowing the patient to breathe, cough, and move easily. The aim is to evaluate and compare the effects of neostigmine + buprenorphine and ketamine + buprenorphine for preemptive epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under general anesthesia (GA). A double-blind randomized trial. A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Classes I and II patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under GA were taken up for the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups, Group A and Group B of thirty patients each. Preemptive epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief was provided by a combination of neostigmine 1 μg/kg + buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in Group A patients and ketamine 1 mg/kg + buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in Group B patients after induction of GA but before surgical incision. Postoperatively, vital parameters, pain score, requirement of top up doses, and side effects in the two groups were observed and recorded at 2, 4, 6, 10, 18, and 22 h. Mean values within each of the Group A and Group B were compared using one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA). Mean values between Group A and Group B were compared using double analysis of variance (two-way ANOVA). Group A patients had a significant analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] pain scores reduced significantly from 54.6 ± 6.3 at 2 h to 8.1 ± 8.9 at 22 h postoperatively). Group B patients had significant analgesia too (VAS pain scores reduced significantly from 36 ± 12.5 at 2 h to 5.3 ± 10.9 at 22 h postoperatively). There was however no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the degree of postoperative analgesia on comparison of VAS scores, effect on vital parameters, and incidence of side effects. Either of the two

  13. A Comparative Study of Analgesic Efficacy of Intrathecal Buprenorphine with Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Postcesarean Delivery Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marappa, Prakash; Chikkapillappa, Manjunath Abloodu; Chennappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa

    2017-01-01

    Women undergoing cesarean (CS) delivery present a unique set of challenges to the anesthetist in terms of postoperative pain management. This study was conducted to compare the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal buprenorphine (ITB) with ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in post-CS delivery pain. A prospective randomized comparative study of sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II pregnant patients divided into two groups of thirty each as ITB group and TAP block group after satisfying the inclusion criteria. In the present study, demographic data were comparable between both groups. The time to first analgesic request was significantly longer in ITB group (389.67 ± 90.78 min) compared to TAP group (669.17 ± 140.65 min) and was statistically significant, P consumption in the first 24 h was higher in the TAP group (3.5 g) compared to the ITB group (1.13 g) and was statistically significant, P consumption during the first 24 h. The benefits of neuraxial opiates are significant and far outweigh the side effects.

  14. Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Dependence with Continuation in Primary Care: Outcomes During and After Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Gail; Chawarski, Marek C; O'Connor, Patrick G; Pantalon, Michael V; Busch, Susan H; Owens, Patricia H; Hawk, Kathryn; Bernstein, Steven L; Fiellin, David A

    2017-06-01

    Emergency department (ED)-initiated buprenorphine/naloxone with continuation in primary care was found to increase engagement in addiction treatment and reduce illicit opioid use at 30 days compared to referral only or a brief intervention with referral. To evaluate the long-term outcomes at 2, 6 and 12 months following ED interventions. Evaluation of treatment engagement, drug use, and HIV risk among a cohort of patients from a randomized trial who completed at least one long-term follow-up assessment. A total of 290/329 patients (88% of the randomized sample) were included. The followed cohort did not differ significantly from the randomized sample. ED-initiated buprenorphine with 10-week continuation in primary care, referral, or brief intervention were provided in the ED at study entry. Self-reported engagement in formal addiction treatment, days of illicit opioid use, and HIV risk (2, 6, 12 months); urine toxicology (2, 6 months). A greater number of patients in the buprenorphine group were engaged in addiction treatment at 2 months [68/92 (74%), 95% CI 65-83] compared with referral [42/79 (53%), 95% CI 42-64] and brief intervention [39/83 (47%), 95% CI 37-58; p < 0.001]. The differences were not significant at 6 months [51/92 (55%), 95% CI 45-65; 46/70 (66%) 95% CI 54-76; 43/76 (57%) 95% CI 45-67; p = 0.37] or 12 months [42/86 (49%) 95% CI 39-59; 37/73 (51%) 95% CI 39-62; 49/78 (63%) 95% CI 52-73; p = 0.16]. At 2 months, the buprenorphine group reported fewer days of illicit opioid use [1.1 (95% CI 0.6-1.6)] versus referral [1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.3)] and brief intervention [2.0 (95% CI 1.5-2.6), p = 0.04]. No significant differences in illicit opioid use were observed at 6 or 12 months. There were no significant differences in HIV risk or rates of opioid-negative urine results at any time. ED-initiated buprenorphine was associated with increased engagement in addiction treatment and reduced illicit opioid use during the 2-month interval

  15. Withdrawal from Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Maintenance with a Natural Dopaminergic Agonist: A Cautionary Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Femino, John; Waite, Roger L; Benya, Lisa; Giordano, John; Borsten, Joan; Downs, William B; Braverman, Eric R; Loehmann, Raquel; Dushaj, Kristina; Han, David; Simpatico, Thomas; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2013-04-23

    While numerous studies support the efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine for the stabilization and maintenance of opioid dependence, clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms occur upon tapering and cessation of dosage. We present a case study of a 35 year old Caucasian female (Krissie) who was prescribed increasing dosages of prescription opioids after carpel tunnel surgery secondary to chronic pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy and fibromyalgia. Over the next 5 years, daily dosage requirements increased to over 80 mg of Methadone and 300 ug/hr Fentanyl transdermal patches, along with combinations of 12-14 1600 mcg Actig lollipop and oral 100 mg Morphine and 30 mg oxycodone 1-2 tabs q4-6hr PRN for breakthrough pain. Total monthly prescription costs including supplemental benzodiazepines, hypnotics and stimulants exceeded $50,000. The patient was subsequently transferred to Suboxone® in 2008, and the dosage was gradually tapered until her admission for inpatient detoxification with KB220Z a natural dopaminergic agonist. We carefully documented her withdrawal symptoms when she precipitously stopped taking buprenorphine/naloxone and during follow-up while taking KB220Z daily. We also genotyped the patient using a reward gene panel including (9 genes 18 alleles): DRD 2,3,4; MOA-A; COMT; DAT1; 5HTTLLR; OPRM1; and GABRA3. At 432 days post Suboxone® withdrawal the patient is being maintained on KB220Z, has been urine tested and is opioid free. Genotyping data revealed a moderate genetic risk for addiction showing a hypodopaminergic trait. This preliminary case data suggest that the daily use of KB220Z could provide a cost effective alternative substitution adjunctive modality for Suboxone®. We encourage double-blind randomized -placebo controlled studies to test the proposition that KB220Z may act as a putative natural opioid substitution maintenance adjunct.

  16. Predictors of buprenorphine treatment success of opioid dependence in two Baltimore City grassroots recovery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, April Joy; Mendelson, Tamar; Agus, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    Despite evidence for the efficacy of buprenorphine treatment in primary care, few studies have identified factors associated with treatment success, nor have such factors been evaluated in community settings. Identifying correlates of treatment success can facilitate the development of treatment models tailored for distinct populations, including low-income communities of color. The current study examined client-level socio-demographic factors associated with treatment success in community-based buprenorphine programs serving vulnerable populations. Data were abstracted from client records for participants (N=445) who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence and sought treatment at one of Behavioral Health Leadership Institute's two community-based recovery programs in Baltimore City from 2010 to 2015. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios of treatment success (defined as retention in treatment for ≥90days) by sociodemographic predictors including age, race, gender, housing, legal issues and incarceration. The odds of being retained in treatment ≥90days increased with age (5% increase with each year of age; pfactors. Clients who reported unstable housing had a 41% decreased odds of remaining in treatment for 90 or more days compared to clients who lived independently at intake. Treatment success did not significantly differ by several other client-level characteristics including gender, race, employment, legal issues and incarceration. In vulnerable populations, the age factor appears sufficiently significant to justify creating models formulated for younger populations. The data also support attention to housing needs for people in treatment. Findings from this paper can inform future research and program development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Trend in buprenorphine and methadone shopping behavior in France from 2004 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernisant, Mélanie; Delorme, Jessica; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Brousse, Georges; Laporte, Catherine; Zenut, Marie; Chenaf, Chouki; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    The opioid maintenance treatments (OMT) are widely misused and diverted in many countries. Doctor shopping represented the main way to obtain high quantities of opioids in abuse/diversion. The aim of this study was to assess the trends in the prevalence of doctor shopping for high dosage buprenorphine (HDB) and methadone (MTD) from 2004 to 2014 by using the French Health Insurance claims. This was a cross-sectional study of patients treated by OMT (High Dosage Buprenorphine or Methadone) between 2004 and 2014 from a representative sample of the French Health Insurance claims. Doctor shopping was defined as at least 1 day of overlapping prescriptions, written by at least 2 different prescribers and filled in at least 3 different pharmacies. HDB patients were more likely men (77.9 % in 2014) with a mean age ranged from 33.4±7.6 years in 2004 to 39.5±9.3 years in 2014, Pshopping for HDB decreased from 2004 to 2014 (12.6 % versus 3.9 %, Pshopping for MTD was very low during the period study (0.2 % to 0.5 %). Overall, the prevalence of doctor shopping was higher for HDB than for MTD whatever the year (Pshopping for HDB decreased significantly during the last decade while doctor shopping for MTD remained nearly inexistent even if it could be underestimated because of dispensations in specialized centers and in hospitals not comprised in the insurance claims. The low rates of doctor shopping reported in these last years could result from the guidelines for good practices in OMT use made in 2004 and the adjustments of ANSM (French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety) for HDB best use made in 2011. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of an optimal dose of medetomidine-ketamine-buprenorphine for anaesthesia in the Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inauris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Joubert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The optimal dose of medetomidine-ketamine-buprenorphine was determined in 25 Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris undergoing surgical implantation of a temperature logger into the abdominal cavity. At the end of anaesthesia, the squirrels were given atipamezole intramuscularly to reverse the effects of medetomidine. The mean dose of medetomidine was 67.6±9.2 μg/kg, ketamine 13.6±1.9 mg/kg and buprenorphine 0.5±0.06 μg/kg. Induction time was 3.1 ± 1.4 min. This produced surgical anaesthesia for 21± 4.2 min. Atipamezole 232±92 μg/kg produced a rapid recovery. Squirrels were sternally recumbent in 3.5 ± 2.2 min.

  19. Inhibition of CYP2D6-mediated tramadol O-demethylation in methadone but not buprenorphine maintenance patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coller, Janet K; Michalakas, Jennifer R; James, Heather M; Farquharson, Aaron L; Colvill, Joel; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2012-11-01

    Management of pain in opioid dependent individuals is problematic due to numerous issues including cross-tolerance to opioids. Hence there is a need to find alternative analgesics to classical opioids and tramadol is potentially one such alternative. Methadone inhibits CYP2D6 in vivo and in vitro. We aimed to investigate the effect of methadone on the pathways of tramadol metabolism: O-demethylation (CYP2D6) to the opioid-active metabolite M1 and N-demethylation (CYP3A4) to M2 in subjects maintained on methadone or buprenorphine as a control. Compared with subjects on buprenorphine, methadone reduced the clearance of tramadol to active O-desmethyl-tramadol (M1) but had no effect on N-desmethyltramadol (M2) formation. Similar to other analgesics whose active metabolites are formed by CYP2D6 such as codeine, reduced formation of O-desmethyltramadol (M1) is likely to result in reduced analgesia for subjects maintained on methadone. Hence alternative analgesics whose metabolism is independent of CYP2D6 should be utilized in this patient population. To compare the O- (CYP2D6 mediated) and N- (CYP3A4 mediated) demethylation metabolism of tramadol between methadone and buprenorphine maintained CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer subjects. METHODS Nine methadone and seven buprenorphine maintained subjects received a single 100 mg dose of tramadol hydrochloride. Blood was collected at 4 h and assayed for tramadol, methadone, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine (where appropriate) and all urine over 4 h was assayed for tramadol and its M1 and M2 metabolites. The urinary metabolic ratio [median (range)] for O-demethylation (M1) was significantly lower (P= 0.0002, probability score 1.0) in the subjects taking methadone [0.071 (0.012-0.103)] compared with those taking buprenorphine [0.192 (0.108-0.392)], but there was no significant difference (P= 0.21, probability score 0.69) in N-demethylation (M2). The percentage of dose [median (range)] recovered as M1 was significantly lower

  20. Management of moderate to severe chronic low back pain with buprenorphine buccal film using novel bioerodible mucoadhesive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergolizzi Jr JV

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph V Pergolizzi Jr,1 Robert B Raffa,2,3 Charles Fleischer,1 Gianpietro Zampogna,1 Robert Taylor Jr1 1NEMA Research, Naples, FL, 2University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, AZ, 3Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: With a global prevalence of ~9%–12%, low back pain (LBP is a serious public health issue, associated with high costs for treatment and lost productivity. Chronic LBP (cLBP involves central sensitization, a neuropathic pain component, and may induce maladaptive coping strategies and depression. Treating cLBP is challenging, and current treatment options are not fully satisfactory. A new BioErodible MucoAdhesive (BEMA® delivery system for buprenorphine has been developed to treat cLBP. The buccal buprenorphine (BBUP film developed for this product (Belbuca™ allows for rapid delivery and titration over a greater range of doses than was previously available with transdermal buprenorphine systems. In clinical studies, BBUP was shown to effectively reduce pain associated with cLBP at 12 weeks with good tolerability. The most frequently reported side effects with the use of BBUP were nausea, constipation, and vomiting. There was no significant effect on the QT interval vs placebo. Chronic pain patients using other opioids can be successfully rotated to BBUP without risk of withdrawal symptoms or inadequate analgesia. The role of BBUP in managing cLBP remains to be determined, but it appears to be a promising new product in the analgesic arsenal in general. Keywords: buccal, transmucosal, buprenorphine, chronic low back pain, BEMA, drug delivery Belbuca

  1. Preference for brand-name buprenorphine is related to severity of addiction among outpatients in opioid maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Messaadi, Nassir; Perault-Pochat, Marie-Christine; Gagey, Stéphanie; Brabant, Yann; Ingrand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As a form of opioid maintenance treatment, high-dose buprenorphine is increasingly being used in the United States. On the French market since 1996, it is the most commonly prescribed and frequently employed opioid maintenance treatment. For unknown reasons, the brand-name form is used far more often than the generic form (76-24%). The objective was to show that the patients' levels of addiction were differentiated according to the form of buprenorphine currently being used and to their previous experience of a different form. An observational study in 9 sites throughout France used self-assessment questionnaires filled out in retail pharmacies by all patients to whom their prescribed buprenorphine treatment was being delivered. The 151 canvassed pharmacies solicited 879 patients, of whom 724 completed the questionnaires. Participants were statistically similar to non-participants. The patients using the brand-name form subsequent to experience with the generic form exhibited a more elevated addiction severity index and a higher dosage than brand-name form users with no experience of a different form. Compared to generic users, their doses were higher, their was addiction more severe, and their alcohol consumption was more excessive; they were also more likely to make daily use of psychotropic substances. However, the level of misuse or illicit consumption was similar between these groups. Preferring the brand-name buprenorphine form to the generic form is associated with a higher level of severe addiction, a more frequent need for daily psychotropics, and excessive drinking; but the study was unable to show a causal link.

  2. Buprenorphine/Naloxone Maintenance Therapy: an Observational Retrospective Report on the Effect of Dose on 18 months Retention in an Office-Based Treatment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore V Parran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Context and objective: Buprenorphine has been available with few reports of the dose range necessary to adequately maintain patients. We report on the effect of 8 mg/d versus 16 mg/d of buprenorphine on long-term patient retention in office-based opioid maintenance (OBOMT. Design, setting, and participants: Case series, at an urban hospital-based primary care clinic providing OBOMT to 157 opiate-dependent, low socioeconomic status, uninsured, nonhomeless patients. Intervention: The OBOMT program operated by a comprehensive sobriety treatment program experienced State funding cuts. Thus, after 2 years, the program was required by the State funder to decrease the buprenorphine maintenance dose from 16 to 8 mg/d for all new admissions. We report on patient retention before and after dose reduction. Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes of this study were to measure and compare patient retention in the 2 cohorts at each point of treatment transition over the 18 months following OBOMT initiation. Results: No significant differences in patient retention were observed between the 16 and 8 mg/d patient cohorts. Lower dose buprenorphine maintenance (8 mg/d in uninsured patients enrolled in publicly funded long-term OBOMT combined with comprehensive sobriety counseling was as effective as higher dose therapy (16 mg/d in promoting patient retention throughout the study period. This lower dose resulted in a substantial saving to the public funding agency. Conclusions: In an observational retrospective report, retention in treatment of opiate-addicted patients was the same at 8 and 16 mg/d buprenorphine doses after 18 months. These data have implications for public and managed care funding of OBOMT, for the general prescribing of buprenorphine in outpatient care, and may be instructive in the ongoing debate about the relationship between buprenorphine dose.

  3. Assessment of carprofen and buprenorphine on recovery of mice after surgical removal of the mammary fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Trinka W; Kendall, Lon V; Goss, Sherri; Grayson, Kevin; Touma, Chadi; Palme, Rupert; Chen, Jane Q; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of pain elicited by mammary fat pad removal surgery and the effects of postoperative analgesics on recovery. Female FVB mice were anesthetized, and mammary fat pad removal was performed. After surgery, mice received carprofen, buprenorphine, a combination of carprofen and buprenorphine, or saline treatment. Additional mice received anesthesia but no surgery or treatment. Food and water intake, body weight, wheel running activity, and a visual assessment score were recorded daily for 4 d after surgery and compared with presurgical findings. Corticosterone metabolites in fecal samples were analyzed at 12 and 24 h postsurgically and compared with baseline values. All surgical groups had significantly decreased food intake at 24 h, with a return to baseline by 48 h. The combination treatment resulted in a significantly decreased water intake and body weight at 24 h. All surgical groups had significantly decreased wheel running activity at 24 h only. The visual assessment scores indicated mild pain for all surgical groups, with the buprenorphine treated mice showing the highest pain index scores, as compared with nonsurgical controls. Fecal corticosterone metabolite levels did not differ significantly between any of the groups or across time. The parameters used in this study did not indicate that administration of these analgesic regimens improved recovery as compared with that of saline-treated mice. Care should be taken when using visual assessment scores to evaluate pain in mice, given that analgesics may have side effects that inadvertently elevate the score.

  4. Assessment of the sedative effects of buprenorphine administered with 10 μg/kg detomidine in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, E J; Taylor, P M; Murrell, J; Whay, H R; Waterman-Pearson, A E

    2011-04-09

    The aim of this randomised, observer-blinded, crossover study was to compare the effects of six treatments, administered intravenously to six horses: saline and saline (S/S); detomidine and saline (D/S); detomidine and 5 µg/kg buprenorphine (D/B5); detomidine and 7.5 µg/kg buprenorphine (D/B7.5); detomidine and 10 µg/kg buprenorphine (D/B10); and detomidine and 25 µg/kg butorphanol (D/BUT). The detomidine dose was 10 µg/kg for all treatments in which it was included. Sedation was subjectively assessed and recorded on a visual analogue scale. Peak sedation, duration of sedation and the area under the curve (AUC) for sedation scores were investigated using a univariate general linear model with post-hoc Tukey tests (P<0.05). Peak sedation and duration of sedation were statistically significantly different between treatments (P<0.001). No sedation was apparent after administration of S/S. The AUC was significantly different between treatments (P=0.010), with S/S being significantly different from D/S, D/BUT, D/B5 and D/B7.5, but not D/B10 (P=0.051).

  5. Buprenorphine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called opiate partial agonists. It works to prevent withdrawal symptoms ... help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, ...

  6. In patients undergoing fast track total knee arthroplasty, addition of buprenorphine to a femoral nerve block has no clinical advantage A prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Rienk; Zonneveldt, Harry J.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Steens, Jeroen; Lirk, Phillip; Hollmann, Marcus W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several adjuvants have been proposed to prolong the effect of peripheral nerve blocks, one of which is buprenorphine. In this randomized double blinded placebo controlled trial we studied whether the addition of buprenorphine to a femoral nerve block prolongs analgesia in patients

  7. Comparison of prescriber evaluations and patient-directed self-reports in office-based practice for buprenorphine treatment of opiate-dependent individuals in France, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Lavie

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Estelle Lavie1, Mélina Fatséas1, Jean-Pierre Daulouède1,2, Cécile Denis1, Jacques Dubernet1, Laurent Cattan3, Marc Auriacombe11Laboratoire de psychiatrie/EA4139, INSERM IFR-99 and Faculté de médecine Victor Pachon, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux, France; 2Bizia, Centre de soins d’addictologie, Centre Hospitalier de la Côte Basque, Bayonne, France; 3Centre médical, Noisy-le-sec, FranceAbstract: The objective of this cross-sectional evaluation study was to compare data generated through prescriber assessments, and data generated from independent direct contact with opiate-dependent patients in office-based practice to evaluate buprenorphine treatment for modality of buprenorphine absorption, benzodiazepine use, and depressive symptoms. A group of buprenorphine office-based practice prescribers was selected to participate in this study. They were asked to screen for inclusion all their patients coming for a visit from February to August 2002. Once included by their prescribing physician, patients were given a series of self-administered questionnaires to be returned directly to the research staff, independently of their prescriber. Each prescriber was given a questionnaire to complete based on their knowledge and interview of the patient. Items assessed were history of current treatment, current substance use, buprenorphine treatment related behavior (daily frequency of intake, route of administration, benzodiazepine use and existence of a major depressive episode. Prescribers and patients’ questionnaires were compared. Concordance of both assessments was assessed by kappa statistics. The sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values of prescriber collected information were compared to that of their patients’. There was an overall good correlation between both data sources on the procedures for buprenorphine use especially for intravenous use of buprenorphine. There were important

  8. Chronic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Dilatation: Sonographic Screening in the Patients with Opioid Addiction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahmand, H.; PourGholami, M.; Fathollah, Sheikh [Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    One of the best known side effects of using opium is spasm of the sphincter of Oddi, which may increase the diameter of the extrahepatic bile ducts. Ultrasound is the first imaging modality used for evaluating the biliary system because it is commonly available and noninvasive. The principal objective of this study was to measure the common bile duct (CBD) diameter via ultrasonography in opium addicts and to evaluate the relation between the CBD diameter and the period of addiction. This research was an analytical-cross sectional study that was done on 110 opium addicts that were admitted to a drug treatment center. The diameter of the CBD in these cases was measured by ultrasonography and the results were analyzed with other factors like age, the period of addiction and the laboratory findings. According to the findings, there is a significant increase in the range of the CBD diameter in comparison with normal bile ducts. Also, the mean diameter of the CBD in the different age groups showed a significant difference (p < 0.0001) and there was a significant relation between the CBD diameter and the period of addiction (p < 0.001, r = 0.74); so, with the increased length of the addiction period, the mean CBD diameter increases. Opium addiction is one of the factors that causes extrahepatic bile duct dilatation, so in these cases, if no obstructing lesion was found on ultrasound examination and the serum bilirobine and alkaline phosphatase levels are normal, then further evaluation is not needed.

  9. Opioid addiction and misuse in adult and adolescent patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Ross; Hardy, Janet R

    2017-06-01

    In the context of a therapeutic opioid epidemic, particularly in the USA, where increasingly stringent screening for 'at risk' individuals and close monitoring of opioid prescription and use is strongly recommended, the issue of misuse within the cancer population must be addressed. Most patients with advanced cancer will have pain requiring opioid therapy at some stage during their disease course. In the majority, this will provide good pain relief with no short- or longer-term adverse sequelae. A subset will present with substance misuse issues that will influence management and prescribing practice. The potential ethical issues of limiting effective analgesia on the basis of addiction risk or history must be acknowledged. Both a judgemental or 'relaxed' approach to such patients is problematic. Ignoring the situation will not be in the patient's best interest, but an undue focus on this aspect may damage therapeutic relationships with clinicians and adversely affect a holistic approach to care. Clinical practitioners must be aware of the risk factors for opioid misuse and in patients who are not under palliative care consider screening prior to commencing opioids. Clinicians must be able to manage and monitor those identified as having an opioid misuse problem. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Trait Mindfulness and Progression to Injection Use in Youth With Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Deanna; Vo, Hoa; Matson, Pamela; Adger, Hoover; Barnett, Gabriela; Fishman, Marc

    2017-09-19

    Many youth initiate opioid misuse with prescription opioids and transition over time to more severe substance-using behaviors, including injection. Trait mindfulness is a potentially protective factor. This is a cross-sectional study characterizing a sample of opioid-using youth by level of mindfulness and examines the potential effect modification of emotion regulation on the relationship between mindfulness and progression to injection opioid use. A convenience sample of 112 youth (ages 14-24) was recruited during an episode of inpatient detoxification and residential treatment for opioid use disorders. We examined emotion regulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale), mindfulness (Child Acceptance and Mindfulness Measure), and opioid use. We completed multivariable regressions stratified by degree of emotion regulation looking at relationship of mindfulness on time to injection use from age of first prescription opioid. Youth had difficulties in emotion regulation (m = 104.2; SD = 2.41) and low mindfulness (m = 19.1;SD = 0.59). While we found overall that mindfulness was associated with time to progression to injection opioid use, there was significant effect modification. Among youth with high levels of difficulty in emotion regulation, those with high mindfulness trait had quicker progressions to injection (-1.31 years; p =.003). In contrast, youth with normal emotion regulation and high mindfulness trait had a slower progression to injection (1.67 years; p =.041). Conclusion/Importance: Our study showed a majority of youth presenting with opioid use disorders have impairments in emotion regulation and deficits in trait mindfulness. The relationship between mindfulness and opioid use is impacted by emotion regulation capacity. More research is needed to understand the various facets of mindfulness and how they interact with emotion regulation in youth.

  11. Drug-use pattern, comorbid psychosis and mortality in people with a history of opioid addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H J; Jepsen, P W; Haastrup, S

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the 15-year mortality of people with a history of opioid dependence that had achieved stable abstinence, with the mortality associated with continued drug use. Another objective was to study the influence of hospitalization with comorbid psychosis on the 15-year mortality. M...... at lower risk of premature death than people with continued drug use. A residual observed excess mortality in people who had apparently achieved stable abstinence from drug use is consistent with the view of drug addiction as a chronic disease....

  12. Competing neurobehavioral decision systems and the neuroeconomics of craving in opioid addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofis MJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Sofis,1 David P Jarmolowicz,1 Laura E Martin2 1University of Kansas, 2University of Kansas Medical Center, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Craving is typically thought of as a classically conditioned response characterized by an elevated mesolimbic dopamine response to drug-related stimuli. Although this definition has spurred considerable research, the clinical impact of the research conducted has been less robust. The current review takes a more contemporary approach by conceptualizing craving as the breakdown of executive function and relative strengthening of the limbic system, occurring in the presence of conditioned cues, leading to a maladaptive craving response (ie, an increased likelihood of drug consumption. Working from this framework, the present review focuses on four issues in drug craving research: pivotal findings and limitations of cue-reactivity and neurocognitive tasks; two main processes of craving that include self-control and reward-based explanations; integration of neuroeconomic approaches to craving; and the theoretical implications and future directions of drug craving research. Keywords: craving, competing decision systems, executive function, loss of control, substance abuse 

  13. Chronic Extrahepatic Bile Duct Dilatation: Sonographic Screening in the Patients with Opioid Addiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahmand, H.; PourGholami, M.; Fathollah, Sheikh

    2007-01-01

    One of the best known side effects of using opium is spasm of the sphincter of Oddi, which may increase the diameter of the extrahepatic bile ducts. Ultrasound is the first imaging modality used for evaluating the biliary system because it is commonly available and noninvasive. The principal objective of this study was to measure the common bile duct (CBD) diameter via ultrasonography in opium addicts and to evaluate the relation between the CBD diameter and the period of addiction. This research was an analytical-cross sectional study that was done on 110 opium addicts that were admitted to a drug treatment center. The diameter of the CBD in these cases was measured by ultrasonography and the results were analyzed with other factors like age, the period of addiction and the laboratory findings. According to the findings, there is a significant increase in the range of the CBD diameter in comparison with normal bile ducts. Also, the mean diameter of the CBD in the different age groups showed a significant difference (p < 0.0001) and there was a significant relation between the CBD diameter and the period of addiction (p < 0.001, r = 0.74); so, with the increased length of the addiction period, the mean CBD diameter increases. Opium addiction is one of the factors that causes extrahepatic bile duct dilatation, so in these cases, if no obstructing lesion was found on ultrasound examination and the serum bilirobine and alkaline phosphatase levels are normal, then further evaluation is not needed

  14. A statistical experimental design approach to evaluate the influence of various penetration enhancers on transdermal drug delivery of buprenorphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (patch with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed to deliver drug through the skin as a site of application. The objective of our effort was to study the influence of various chemical penetration enhancers on skin permeation rate and adhesion properties of a transdermal drug delivery system using Box–Behnken experimental design. The response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box–Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects on dependent variables including, the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties, namely peel strength and tack value. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol, and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers (patch formulations, containing 0–8% of each chemical penetration enhancer. Buprenorphine was used as a model penetrant drug. The results showed that incorporation of 20% chemical penetration enhancer into the mixture led to maximum skin permeation flux of buprenorphine from abdominal rat skin while the adhesion properties decreased. Also that skin flux in presence of levulinic acid (1.594 μg/cm2 h was higher than Tween 80 (1.473 μg/cm2 h and lauryl alcohol (0.843 μg/cm2 h, and in mixing these enhancers together, an additional effect was observed. Moreover, it was found that each enhancer increased the tack value, while levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol improved the peel strength but Tween 80 reduced it. These findings indicated that the best chemical skin penetration enhancer for buprenorphine patch was levulinic acid. Among the designed formulations, the one which contained 12% (wt/wt enhancers exhibited the highest efficiency.

  15. Acceptability of the use of cellular telephone and computer pictures/video for "pill counts" in buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive plan to attempt to minimize the diversion of prescribed controlled substances, many professional organization and licensing boards are recommending the use of "pill counts." This study sought to evaluate acceptability of the use of cellular phone and computer pictures/video for "pill counts" by patients in buprenorphine maintenance treatment. Patients prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone were asked a series of questions related to the type(s) of electronic communication to which they had access as well as their willingness to use these for the purpose of performing a "pill/film count." Of the 80 patients, 4 (5 percent) did not have a phone at all. Only 28 (35 percent) had a "smart phone" with some sort of data plan and Internet access. Forty (50 percent) of the patients had a phone with no camera and 10 (12.5 percent) had a phone with a camera but no video capability. All patients said that they would be willing to periodically use the video or camera on their phone or computer to have buprenorphine/naloxone pills or film counted as long as the communication was protected from electronic tampering. With the advent of applications for smart phones that allow for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant picture/video communication, a number of things can now be done that can enhance patient care as well as reduce the chances of misuse/diversion of prescribed medications. This could be used in settings where a larger proportion of controlled substances are prescribed including medication assisted therapy for opioid use disorders and pain management programs.

  16. Clinical effects of buprenorphine on open field behaviour and gait symmetry in healthy and lame weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Ellen; van Nes, Arie; Back, Willem; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-12-01

    Lameness in pigs decreases animal welfare and economic profit for the farmer. An important reason for impaired welfare in lame animals is pain due to lameness. No direct measurement of pain is possible in animals, and methods to indirectly detect and quantify the amount of pain an animal is experiencing are urgently needed. In this study, two methods to assess pain associated with lameness in pigs were evaluated to determine if they were sensitive enough to detect a lameness reduction as an effect of an experimental analgesic medication. Asymmetry associated with lameness was objectively quantified using pressure mat kinetic parameters: peak vertical force (PVF), load rate (LR), vertical impulse (VI) and peak vertical pressure (PVP). Locomotor activity was assessed in an open field test. A dose of 0.04 mg/kg buprenorphine, a strong analgesic, was used to treat 10 lame pigs, while eight other lame pigs, treated with physiological saline solution, served as controls. Buprenorphine decreased lameness-associated asymmetry for pressure mat LR (P = 0.002), VI (P = 0.003) and PVP (P = 0.001) and increased activity of the lame pigs in the open field (P = 0.023), while saline-treated animals did not show any changes in asymmetry and became less active in the open field (P open field test are both sensitive enough to detect the analgesic effects of buprenorphine when used to treat moderate to severe clinical pain in a relatively small group of affected pigs. The methods used in this study may also provide promising additional tools for future research into early pain recognition and lameness treatment in pigs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A statistical experimental design approach to evaluate the influence of various penetration enhancers on transdermal drug delivery of buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, S Mojtaba; Moghimi-Ardakani, Ali; Mohamadnia, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    A series of drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (patch) with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed to deliver drug through the skin as a site of application. The objective of our effort was to study the influence of various chemical penetration enhancers on skin permeation rate and adhesion properties of a transdermal drug delivery system using Box-Behnken experimental design. The response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box-Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects on dependent variables including, the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties, namely peel strength and tack value. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol, and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers (patch formulations, containing 0-8% of each chemical penetration enhancer). Buprenorphine was used as a model penetrant drug. The results showed that incorporation of 20% chemical penetration enhancer into the mixture led to maximum skin permeation flux of buprenorphine from abdominal rat skin while the adhesion properties decreased. Also that skin flux in presence of levulinic acid (1.594 μg/cm(2) h) was higher than Tween 80 (1.473 μg/cm(2) h) and lauryl alcohol (0.843 μg/cm(2) h), and in mixing these enhancers together, an additional effect was observed. Moreover, it was found that each enhancer increased the tack value, while levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol improved the peel strength but Tween 80 reduced it. These findings indicated that the best chemical skin penetration enhancer for buprenorphine patch was levulinic acid. Among the designed formulations, the one which contained 12% (wt/wt) enhancers exhibited the highest efficiency.

  18. Very early disengagement and subsequent re-engagement in primary care Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Weinstein, Zoe M; Cheng, Debbie M; Quinn, Emily; Kim, Hyunjoong; Labelle, Colleen; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2017-08-01

    Patients with opioid use disorder often require multiple treatment attempts before achieving stable recovery. Rates of disengagement from buprenorphine are highest in the first month of treatment and termination of buprenorphine therapy results in return to use rates as high as 90%. To better characterize these at-risk patients, this study aims to describe: 1) the frequency and characteristics of patients with very early disengagement (≤1month) from Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine and 2) the frequency and characteristics of patients who re-engage in care at this same OBOT clinic within 2years, among the subset of very early disengagers. This is a retrospective cohort study of adult patients enrolled in a large urban OBOT program. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the proportion of patients with very early (≤1month) disengagement and their re-engagement. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify patient characteristics associated with the outcomes of very early disengagement and re-engagement. Potential predictors included: sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, employment, opioid use history, prior substance use treatments, urine drug testing, and psychiatric diagnoses. Overall, very early disengagement was unusual, with only 8.4% (104/1234) of patients disengaging within the first month. Among the subset of very early disengagers with 2years of follow-up, the proportion who re-engaged with this OBOT program in the subsequent 2years was 11.9% (10/84). Urine drug test positive for opiates within the first month (AOR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.02-3.93) was associated with increased odds of very early disengagement. Transferring from another buprenorphine prescriber (AOR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.70) was associated with decreased odds of very early disengagement. No characteristics were significantly associated with re-engagement. Early disengagement is uncommon; however, continued opioid use appeared to

  19. Trends in Receipt of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone for Opioid Use Disorder Among Adolescents and Young Adults, 2001-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Scott E; Wharam, J Frank; Schuster, Mark A; Zhang, Fang; Samet, Jeffrey H; Larochelle, Marc R

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) frequently begins in adolescence and young adulthood. Intervening early with pharmacotherapy is recommended by major professional organizations. No prior national studies have examined the extent to which adolescents and young adults (collectively termed youth) with OUD receive pharmacotherapy. To identify time trends and disparities in receipt of buprenorphine and naltrexone among youth with OUD in the United States. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using deidentified data from a national commercial insurance database. Enrollment and complete health insurance claims of 9.7 million youth, aged 13 to 25 years were analyzed, identifying individuals who received a diagnosis of OUD between January 1, 2001, and June 30, 2014, with final follow-up date December 31, 2014. Analysis was conducted from April 25 to December 31, 2016. Time trends were identified and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine sociodemographic factors associated with medication receipt. Sex, age, race/ethnicity, neighborhood education and poverty levels, geographic region, census region, and year of diagnosis. Dispensing of a medication (buprenorphine or naltrexone) within 6 months of first receiving an OUD diagnosis. Among 20 822 youth diagnosed with OUD (0.2% of the 9.7 million sample), 13 698 (65.8%) were male and 17 119 (82.2%) were non-Hispanic white. Mean (SD) age was 21.0 (2.5) years at the first observed diagnosis. The diagnosis rate of OUD increased nearly 6-fold from 2001 to 2014 (from 0.26 per 100 000 person-years to 1.51 per 100 000 person-years). Overall, 5580 (26.8%) youth were dispensed a medication within 6 months of diagnosis, with 4976 (89.2%) of medication-treated youth receiving buprenorphine and 604 (10.8%) receiving naltrexone. Medication receipt increased more than 10-fold, from 3.0% in 2002 (when buprenorphine was introduced) to 31.8% in 2009, but declined in subsequent years (27.5% in 2014). In multivariable

  20. Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A.; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2012-01-01

    Background In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Methods Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15–21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Conclusions Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/ Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. PMID:22626890

  1. Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2012-09-01

    In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15-21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Buprenorphine/naloxone treatment practices in Malaysia: Results of national surveys of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicknasingam, B; Dazali, M N M; Singh, D; Schottenfeld, R S; Chawarski, M C

    2015-07-01

    Medication assisted treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx), including prescribing and dispensing practices of general practitioners (GPs) in Malaysia and their patients' experiences with this treatment have not been systematically examined. The current study surveyed GPs providing Bup/Nx treatment and patients receiving office-based Bup/Nx treatment in Malaysia. Two cross-sectional surveys of GPs (N=115) providing outpatient Bup/Nx maintenance treatment and of patients (N=253) currently receiving Bup/Nx treatment throughout peninsular Malaysia. Physicians prescribed Bup/Nx dosages in the range of 2-4mg daily for 70% of patients and conducted urine testing in the past month on approximately 16% of their patients. In the patient survey, 79% reported taking daily Bup/Nx doses of 2mg or less; 82% reported that no urine toxicology testing had been conducted on them in the past month, 36% had an opiate positive urine test at the time of the survey, 43% reported illicit opiate use, 15% reported injection of heroin and 22% reported injection of Bup/Nx in the past month. Low daily Bup/Nx doses, lack of behavioral monitoring or counseling, and high rates of continued drug use, including injection of drugs and medications during Bup/Nx treatment in Malaysia, indicate continuing problems with implementation and less than optimal treatment effectiveness. High cost of Bup/Nx in Malaysia may deter patients from seeking treatment and contribute to taking low Bup/Nx dosages. Improved training of physicians and establishing standards for Bup/Nx dosing, routine toxicology testing, and counseling may be needed to improve care and treatment response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) as an agonist opioid treatment in Spain: a budgetary impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Raga, José; González Saiz, Francisco; Pascual, César; Casado, Miguel A; Sabater Torres, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) as an agonist opioid treatment for opiate dependence. A budgetary impact analysis model was designed to calculate the annual costs (drugs and associated costs) to the Spanish National Healthcare System of methadone versus B/N. Data for the model were obtained from official databases and expert panel opinion. It was estimated that 86,017 patients would be in an agonist opioid treatment program each of the 3 years of the study. No increase in the number of patients is expected with the introduction of B/N combination. The budgetary impact (drugs and associated costs) for agonist opiate treatment in the first year of the study would be 89.53 million EUR. In the first year of B/N use, the budgetary impact would rise by 4.39 million EUR (4.6% of the total impact), with an incremental cost of 0.79 million EUR (0.9% of the total impact). The budgetary increase would be 0.6% (0.48 million EUR increase) and 0.6% (0.49 million EUR increase) in the second and third years of use, respectively. The mean cost per patient in the first year with and without B/N would be EUR 1,050 and 1,041, respectively. The most influential variables in the sensitivity analysis were logistics and production costs of methadone and the percentage use of B/N. With an additional cost of only EUR 9 per patient, B/N is an efficient addition to the therapeutic arsenal in the drug treatment of opiate dependence, particularly when considering clinical aspects of novel pharmacotherapy. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Enzymatic assays for detecting lactose and sucrose in urine to reveal intravenous drug abuse with emphasis on buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltanen, T; Mariottini, C; Walta, A M; Rahikainen, A L; Ojanperä, I

    2017-06-01

    Buprenorphine and methadone are commonly used medications for opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), using sublingual and oral administration, respectively. Although beneficial for OMT, these drugs can also be abused by intravenous administration. In intravenous abuse cases, the adjuvants lactose and sucrose are excreted in urine without hydrolysis to monosaccharides, since there are no disaccharidases in the blood. We validated enzymatic methods for the analysis of lactose and sucrose in urine. The analytical performance of both assays was considered appropriate for detecting intravenous drug abuse. The principle was proven by analyzing 93 postmortem (PM) urine samples for lactose, following comprehensive toxicological drug screening. In addition, 32 clinical urine samples from potential drug abusers were analyzed to assess the effect of PM changes on the assay. The mean level of lactose was low in clinical samples and relatively low in PM samples in which no drugs were found. Markedly elevated levels were seen in many of the buprenorphine positive samples, suggesting intravenous administration. Enzymatic methods could provide a simple and cost effective way to assess the intravenous administration of OMT drugs or drugs of abuse. Very high levels of glucose in urine may interfere with the assays. Furthermore, other causes for elevated urine disaccharides, such as hypolactasia and increased intestinal permeability, need to be considered in the interpretation of the results. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. A comparison of epidural buprenorphine plus detomidine with morphine plus detomidine in horses undergoing bilateral stifle arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Berit L; Ludders, John W; Asakawa, Makoto; Fortier, Lisa A; Fubini, Susan L; Nixon, Alan J; Radcliffe, Rolfe M; Erb, Hollis N

    2009-01-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine plus detomidine with that of morphine plus detomidine when administered epidurally in horses undergoing bilateral stifle arthroscopy. Prospective, randomized, blinded clinical trial. Twelve healthy adult horses participating in an orthopedic research study. Group M (n = 6) received morphine (0.2 mg kg(-1)) and detomidine (0.15 mg kg(-1)) epidurally; group B (n = 6) received buprenorphine (0.005 mg kg(-1)) and detomidine (0.15 mg kg(-1)) epidurally. Horses received one of two epidural treatments following induction of general anesthesia for bilateral stifle arthroscopy. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), end-tidal CO(2) (Pe'CO(2)), and end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (E'Iso%) were recorded every 15 minutes following epidural administration. Post-operative assessment was performed at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours after standing; variables recorded included HR, respiratory rate (f(R)), abdominal borborygmi, defecation, and the presence of undesirable side effects. At the same times post-operatively, each horse was videotaped at a walk and subsequently assigned a lameness score (0-4) by three ACVS diplomates blinded to treatment and who followed previously published guidelines. Nonparametric data were analyzed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum test. Inter- and intra-rater agreement were determined using weighted kappa coefficients. Statistical significance was set at p detomidine injected epidurally produced analgesia similar in intensity and duration to that of morphine plus detomidine injected epidurally.

  6. Hormonal, metabolic and physiological effects of laparoscopic surgery using a detomidine-buprenorphine combination in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, P; Lankveld, D P K; Rijkenhuizen, A B M; Jonker, F H

    2003-04-01

    To assess the hormonal, metabolic and physiological effects of laparascopic surgery performed under a sedative analgesic combination of detomidine and buprenorphine in standing horses. Prospective study. Eight healthy adult Dutch Warmblood horses and five healthy adult ponies undergoing laparoscopy were studied. Five healthy adult horses not undergoing laparoscopy were used as a control group. The sedative effect of an initial detomidine and buprenorphine injection was maintained using a continuous infusion of detomidine alone. The heart and respiratory rate, arterial blood pH and arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions were monitored, while blood samples were taken for the measurement of glucose, lactate, cortisol, insulin and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). The same variables were monitored in a control group of horses which were sedated, but which did not undergo surgery. At the end of the sedation period the effects of detomidine were antagonized using atipamezole. The protocol provided suitable conditions for standing laparoscopy in horses. Laparoscopy induced obvious metabolic and endocrine responses which, with the exception of NEFA values, were not significantly different from changes found in the control group. While atipamezole did not produce detectable adverse effects, it is possible that anatagonism may not be essential. The technique described reliably produces adequate sedation and analgesia for laparoscopic procedures. The level of sedation/analgesia was controlled by decreasing or increasing the infusion rate. Antagonism of the effects of detomidine may not be necessary in all cases.

  7. Barriers and facilitators to primary care or human immunodeficiency virus clinics providing methadone or buprenorphine for the management of opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barbara J; Laine, Christine; Lin, Yi-Ting; Lynch, Kevin

    Federal initiatives aim to increase office-based treatment of opioid dependence, but, to our knowledge, factors associated with willingness to deliver this care have not been defined. The objective of this study was to describe clinics' willingness to provide methadone hydrochloride or buprenorphine hydrochloride for opioid dependence. The design of the study was a survey conducted in New York State. Two hundred sixty-one directors of primary care and/or human immunodeficiency virus specialty clinics (response rate, 61.1%) that serve Medicaid enrollees were questioned. Outcomes were willingness to provide methadone and buprenorphine. Predictors included clinic characteristics, attitudes about drug users and their treatment, and reported barriers and facilitators to treatment. Clinics were more willing to provide buprenorphine than methadone treatment (59.8% vs 32.6%; P methadone. Willingness was positively associated with continuing medical education credits for training, but negatively associated with greater concern about medication abuse. Immediate telephone access to an addiction expert was associated with willingness to provide buprenorphine (AOR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.15-3.76). Greater willingness to provide methadone was associated with a belief that methadone-treated patients should be seen along with other patients (AOR, 6.20; 95% CI, 1.78-21.64), methadone program affiliation (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.64-13.82), and having more patients with chronic pain in the clinic (AOR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.44-5.44). These clinics serving Medicaid enrollees were more receptive to buprenorphine than methadone treatment. Willingness to provide this care was greater in clinics offering human immunodeficiency virus services, treating more chronic pain, or affiliated with methadone programs. Accessible addiction experts and continuing medical education for training may facilitate adoption of this care.

  8. Efficacy of buprenorphine added to 2% lignocaine plus adrenaline 1:80,000 in providing postoperative analgesia after lower third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, N; Sharma, P; Chhabra, S; Gupta, N

    2016-12-01

    A number of trials have examined the peripheral analgesic effect of opioids, known to have an anti-nociceptive effect at the central and/or spinal cord level. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of buprenorphine added to 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:80,000 in providing postoperative analgesia after lower third molar surgery. Sixty patients were randomized to three groups: group A received lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB), along with intramuscular (IM) injection of 1ml saline; group B received buprenorphine mixed with lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for IANB (0.01mg buprenorphine/ml lignocaine with adrenaline), along with 1ml saline IM; group C received lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for IANB, along with 0.03mg buprenorphine IM. Mean postoperative pain scores (visual analogue scale; when the patient first felt pain) were 6.0 for group A, 1.0 for group B, and 4.4 for group C. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 3.5h in groups A and C and 12h in group B. The mean number of postoperative analgesics consumed was 5.8 in groups A and C and 3.9 in group B. The addition of buprenorphine (0.03mg) to 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:80,000 significantly reduced the severity of postoperative pain and prolonged the duration of analgesia, thereby decreasing the need for postoperative analgesics. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of Buprenorphine Weekly Depot (CAM2038) and Hydromorphone Blockade in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Comer, Sandra D; Lofwall, Michelle R; Vince, Bradley; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Kelsh, Debra; Coe, Marion A; Jones, Jermaine D; Nuzzo, Paul A; Tiberg, Fredrik; Sheldon, Behshad; Kim, Sonnie

    2017-09-01

    Buprenorphine is an efficacious, widely used treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD). Daily oral transmucosal formulations can be associated with misuse, diversion, and nonadherence; these limitations may be obviated by a sustained release formulation. To evaluate the ability of a novel, weekly, subcutaneous buprenorphine depot formulation, CAM2038, to block euphorigenic opioid effects and suppress opioid withdrawal in non-treatment-seeking individuals with OUD. This multisite, double-blind, randomized within-patient study was conducted at 3 controlled inpatient research facilities. It involved 47 adults with DSM-V moderate-to-severe OUD. The study was conducted from October 12, 2015 (first patient enrolled), to April 21, 2016 (last patient visit). A total of five 3-day test sessions evaluated the response to hydromorphone (0, 6, and 18 mg intramuscular in random order; 1 dose/session/day). After the first 3-day session (ie, qualification phase), participants were randomized to either CAM2038 weekly at 24 mg (n = 22) or 32 mg (n = 25); the assigned CAM2038 dose was given twice, 1 week apart (day 0 and 7). Four sets of sessions were conducted after randomization (days 1-3, 4-6, 8-10, and 11-13). The primary end point was maximum rating on the visual analog scale for drug liking. Secondary end points included other visual analog scale (eg, high and desire to use), opioid withdrawal scales, and physiological and pharmacokinetic outcomes. A total of 46 of 47 randomized participants (mean [SD] age, 35.5 [9] years; 76% male [n = 35]) completed the study. Both weekly CAM2038 doses produced immediate and sustained blockade of hydromorphone effects (liking maximum effect, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.813; P withdrawal (Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.617; P opioid blockade and withdrawal suppression. The results support the use of this depot formulation for treatment initiation and stabilization of patients with OUD, with

  10. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1996-01-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[ 11 C]methyl]buprenorphine ([ 11 C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% ± 2.2% and 43% ± 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [ 11 C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal ( 11 C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi

  11. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P

    1996-04-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine ([{sup 11}C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% {+-} 2.2% and 43% {+-} 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [{sup 11}C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (< 15%) effects on cerebellum. Naloxone treatment significantly reduced the slope of the Patlak plot in receptor-containing regions. These results demonstrate that [{sup 11}C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi.

  12. Sciatic and femoral nerve blockade using bupivacaine alone, or in combination with dexmedetomidine or buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, M C; Doodnaught, G M; Fantoni, D T; Steagall, P V M

    2017-06-17

    The aim of this study was to determine the onset and offset of antinociception after sciatic (ScN) and femoral (FN) nerve blocks. Six healthy adult cats (4.8±1.3years; 4.3±0.4 kg) were included in a randomised, crossover, blinded and controlled study. Following sedation with dexmedetomidine (25 µg/kg, intramuscular), each ScN and FN injection was performed using 0.1 ml/kg of saline (CONTROL), bupivacaine (0.46 per cent, 0.46 mg/kg; BUPI), bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine (1 µg/kg; BUPI-DEX) or bupivacaine and buprenorphine (2.5 µg/kg; BUPI-BUPRE). Atipamezole (250 µg/kg) was administered after injections. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT) and motor blockade were evaluated before sedation and up to 24 hours. The PWT were significantly increased at half an hour in CONTROL, from two to four hours in BUPI and BUPI-DEX when compared with baseline. Motor blockade was observed between one and three hours in treatments using bupivacaine. Ability to walk was significantly impaired in BUPI at half an hour to two hours, BUPI-DEX at one to two hours and BUPI-BUPRE at two hours. Antinociception was observed in BUPI between one and eight hours, and in BUPI-DEX and BUPI-BUPRE between one and four hours. This study could not demonstrate a benefit of administering bupivacaine with dexmedetomidine or buprenorphine in cats. Results in BUPI-DEX may have been biased by the administration of atipamezole. British Veterinary Association.

  13. Incidence of high dosage buprenorphine and methadone shopping behavior in a retrospective cohort of opioid-maintained patients in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Jessica; Chenaf, Chouki; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Pereira, Bruno; Mulliez, Aurélien; Tremey, Aurore; Brousse, Georges; Zenut, Marie; Laporte, Catherine; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) misuse and diversion have significantly increased worldwide. Obtaining OST prescriptions from multiple prescribers, known as doctor shopping, is a way in which opioids may be diverted. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of OST (high dosage buprenorphine (HDB) and methadone (MTD)) shopping behavior and identify associated risk factors, and its impact on mortality. A retrospective cohort of patients treated by OST between April 1, 2004 and December 31, 2012 from a sample of the French Health Insurance database was established. Doctor shopping was defined as ≥1 day of overlapping prescriptions written by ≥2 different prescribers and filled in ≥3 different pharmacies. A total of 2043 patients were enrolled, 1450HDB and 593 MTD. The one-year incidence of shopping behavior was 8.4% (95% CI: 7.0-10.1) in HDB group and 0% in MTD group, compared to 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.2) for diuretics. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with HDB shopping behavior were: male gender HR: 1.74 (95% CI: 1.20-2.54); low-income status HR: 2.95 (95% CI: 2.07-4.44); mental health disorders HR: 1.43 (95% CI: 1.06-1.94); concurrent hypnotics use HR: 1.90 (95% CI: 1.39-2.61); concurrent use of weak opioids HR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.09-1.99) and morphine HR: 1.69 (95% CI: 1.02-2.80). HDB shoppers had a higher, yet non-significant risk of death (HR: 1.56 (95% CI: 0.64-3.81)) than non HDB shoppers. Shopping behavior was only found in high dosage buprenorphine patients and concerned almost one out ten patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravn P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernille Ravn,1 Erik L Secher,2 Ulrik Skram,3 Trine Therkildsen,1 Lona L Christrup,1 Mads U Werner41Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Juliane Marie Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 3Department of Intensive Care, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 4Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Neuroscience Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, DenmarkPurpose: Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than µ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending pain modulation.Subjects and methods: Twenty-eight healthy subjects were included. The study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study with a multimodal (electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimuli testing technique. After baseline assessments, intravenous infusions of morphine (10/20 mg, buprenorphine (0.3/0.6 mg, or placebo (normal saline were administered over a 210-minute period, during which a cold pressor test, heat injury (47°C, 7 minutes, 12.5 cm2, and the first postburn assessment were done. After completion of the drug infusions, two additional postburn assessments were done. The subjects were monitored during each 8-hour session by an anesthesiologist.Results: For nearly all tested variables, significant dose-dependent analgesic effects were demonstrated. The median antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio (secondary hyperalgesia

  15. Carprofen neither reduces postoperative facial expression scores in rabbits treated with buprenorphine nor alters long term bone formation after maxillary sinus grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenqvist, Patricia; Trbakovic, Amela; Thor, Andreas; Ley, Cecilia; Ekman, Stina; Jensen-Waern, Marianne

    2016-08-01

    In connection with bilateral maxillary sinus augmentation, the acute effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug carprofen on facial expressions and long-term effects on bone formation were evaluated in 18 male New Zealand White rabbits. A 10×10mm bone window was drilled in the maxilla, the sinus membrane elevated and a titanium mini-implant inserted. One of two test materials was randomly inserted unilaterally and bovine bone chips (control) on the contralateral side in the created space. Rabbits were randomly allocated to receive buprenorphine plus carprofen (n=9) or buprenorphine plus saline (n=9) postoperatively. Buprenorphine was administered subcutaneously every 6h for 3days in a tapered dose (0.05-0.01mg/kg) and carprofen (5mg/kg) or saline administered subcutaneously 1h before, and daily for 4days postoperatively. To assess pain, clinical examination, body weight recording and scoring of facial expressions from photos taken before, and 6-13h after surgery were performed. Twelve weeks after surgery the rabbits were euthanized and sections of maxillary bones and sinuses were analysed with histomorphometry and by qualitative histology. Carprofen had no effect on mean facial expression scores, which increased from 0.0 to 3.6 (carprofen) and 4.3 (saline), of a maximum of 8.0. Neither did carprofen have an effect on bone formation or implant incorporation, whereas the test materials had. In conclusion, treatment with 5mg/kg carprofen once daily for 5days did not reduce facial expression scores after maxillary sinus augmentation in buprenorphine treated rabbits and did not affect long term bone formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative Analgesia Due to Sustained-Release Buprenorphine, Sustained-Release Meloxicam, and Carprofen Gel in a Model of Incisional Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Travis L; Adams, Sean C; Felt, Stephen A; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Yeomans, David C; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative analgesia in laboratory rats is complicated by the frequent handling associated with common analgesic dosing requirements. Here, we evaluated sustained-release buprenorphine (Bup-SR), sustained-release meloxicam (Melox-SR), and carprofen gel (CG) as refinements for postoperative analgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether postoperative administration of Bup-SR, Melox-SR, or CG effectively controls behavioral mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups: saline, 1 mL/kg SC BID; buprenorphine HCl (Bup HCl), 0.05 mg/kg SC BID; Bup-SR, 1.2 mg/kg SC once; Melox-SR, 4 mg/kg SC once; and CG, 2 oz PO daily. Mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were tested daily from day-1 through 4. Bup HCl and Bup-SR attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity on days 1 through 4. Melox-SR and CG attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity-but not thermal hypersensitivity-on days 1 through 4. Plasma concentrations, measured by using UPLC with mass spectrometry, were consistent between both buprenorphine formulations. Gross pathologic examination revealed no signs of toxicity in any group. These findings suggest that postoperative administration of Bup HCl and Bup-SR-but not Melox-SR or CG-effectively attenuates mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain.

  17. Buprenorphine from detox and beyond: preliminary evaluation of a pilot program to increase heroin dependent individuals' engagement in a full continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Dennis M; Knox, Patricia C; Skytta, Jenny A F; Blayney, Jessica A; DiCenzo, Jessica

    2013-04-01

    Absence of successful transition to post-detoxification treatment leads to high rates of relapse among detoxified heroin users. The present study evaluated a pilot buprenorphine treatment program (BTP). Heroin dependent individuals were inducted onto buprenorphine/naloxone in detox, maintained while transitioning through an intensive inpatient program (IIP), and gradually tapered off medication over 5 months of outpatient (OP) treatment. Compared to programmatic indicators of treatment engagement in the year prior to BTP implementation, referrals from detox to IIP, entry into and completion of IIP and subsequent OP, and days in OP treatment increased substantially. BTP completers, compared to non-completers, viewed abstinence as more difficult and as requiring more assistance to achieve, were less likely to be current cocaine and alcohol users or to have relapsed during the course of treatment. Although preliminary and in need of replication, initial adjunctive use of buprenorphine in an abstinence-based continuum of care may improve post-detoxification treatment entry, engagement, and completion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdurg, Santosh; Ambekar, Atul; Lal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30) and naltrexone (n = 30) maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses.

  19. Methadone inhibits CYP2D6 and UGT2B7/2B4 in vivo: a study using codeine in methadone- and buprenorphine-maintained subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelston, Eloise A; Coller, Janet K; Lopatko, Olga V; James, Heather M; Schmidt, Helmut; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To compare the O-demethylation (CYP2D6-mediated), N-demethylation (CYP3A4-mediated) and 6-glucuronidation (UGT2B4/7-mediated) metabolism of codeine between methadone- and buprenorphine-maintained CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer subjects. METHODS Ten methadone- and eight buprenorphine-maintained subjects received a single 60 mg dose of codeine phosphate. Blood was collected at 3 h and urine over 6 h and assayed for codeine, norcodeine, morphine, morphine-3- and -6-glucuronides and codeine-6-glucuronide. RESULTS The urinary metabolic ratio for O-demethylation was significantly higher (P = 0.0044) in the subjects taking methadone (mean ± SD, 2.8 ± 3.1) compared with those taking buprenorphine (0.60 ± 0.43), likewise for 6-glucuronide formation (0.31 ± 0.24 vs. 0.053 ± 0.027; P D6 and UGTs 2B4 and 2B7 reactions in vivo, even though it is not a substrate for these enzymes. Plasma morphine was not altered, owing to the opposing effects of inhibition of both formation and elimination; however, morphine-6-glucuronide (analgesically active) concentrations were substantially reduced. Drug interactions with methadone are likely to include drugs metabolized by various UGTs and CYP2D6. PMID:22092298

  20. Memory function in opioid-dependent patients treated with methadone or buprenorphine along with benzodiazepine: longitudinal change in comparison to healthy individuals

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    Rapeli Pekka

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid-substitution treatment (OST for opioid dependence (OD has proven effective in retaining patients in treatment and reducing illegal opiate abuse and crime. Consequently, the World Health Organization (WHO has listed the opioid agonists methadone and buprenorphine as essential drugs for OD that should be available worldwide. In many areas of the world, OD is often associated with concomitant benzodiazepine (BZD dependence and abuse, which complicates treatment. However, possible changes in the cognitive functioning of these patients are not well-known. The present study is the first to examine longitudinal stability of memory function in OST patients with BZD use, thus providing a new tool for health policy authorities in evaluating the usefulness of OST. Methods Within the first two months (T1 and between 6–9 months (T2 after OST admission, we followed the working memory, immediate verbal memory, and memory consolidation of 13 methadone- and 15 buprenorphine- or buprenorphine/naloxone-treated patients with BZD dependence or abuse disorder. The results were compared to those of fifteen normal comparison participants. All participants also completed a self-reported memory complaint questionnaire on both occasions. Results Both patient groups performed statistically significantly worse than normal comparison participants in working memory at time points T1 and T2. In immediate verbal memory, as measured by list learning at T1, patients scored lower than normal comparison participants. Both patient groups reported significantly more subjective memory problems than normal comparison participants. Patients with more memory complaints recalled fewer items at T2 from the verbal list they had learned at T1 than those patients with fewer memory complaints. The significance of the main analyses remained nearly the same when the statistical tests were performed without buprenorphine-only patients leaving 12 patients to

  1. Tolerability of buprenorphine transdermal system in nursing home patients with advanced dementia: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial (DEP.PAIN.DEM

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    Erdal A

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ane Erdal,1 Elisabeth Flo,2 Dag Aarsland,3,4 Geir Selbaek,5–7 Clive Ballard,8 Dagrun D Slettebo,1 Bettina S Husebo1,9 1Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Elderly and Nursing Home Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 2Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 3Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK; 4Centre for Age-Related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway; 5Centre for Old Age Psychiatric Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Ottestad, Norway; 6National Advisory Unit on Aging and Health, Tønsberg, Norway; 7Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 8Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; 9Municipality of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Purpose: Buprenorphine transdermal system is increasingly prescribed in people with advanced dementia, but no clinical trial has investigated the safety and factors associated with discontinuation due to adverse events in this population. Patients and methods: One hundred sixty-two people with advanced dementia and significant depression from 47 nursing homes were included and randomized to active analgesic treatment (acetaminophen/buprenorphine or identical placebo for 13 weeks. In this secondary analysis, the main outcomes were time to and reasons for discontinuation of buprenorphine due to adverse events. Change in daytime activity as measured by actigraphy was a secondary outcome. Results: Of the 44 patients who received active buprenorphine 5 μg/hour, 52.3% (n=23 discontinued treatment due to adverse events compared to 13.3% (6 of 45 in the placebo group (p<0.001. Psychiatric and neurological adverse events were the most frequently reported causes of discontinuation (69.6%, n=16. Concomitant use of antidepressants significantly increased the risk of discontinuation (HR 23.2, 95

  2. Erectile dysfunction and quality of life in men receiving methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment. A cross-sectional multicentre study.

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    Fabio Lugoboni

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is common among men on opioid replacement therapy (ORT, but most previous studies exploring its prevalence and determinants yielded contrasting findings. Moreover, the impact of ED on patients' quality of life (QoL has been seldom explored.To explore the prevalence and determinants of ED in men on ORT, and the impact on QoL.In a multicentre cross-sectional study, we recruited 797 consecutive male patients on methadone and buprenorphine treatment, collected data on demographic, clinical, and psychopathological factors, and explored their role as predictors of ED and QoL through univariate and multivariate analysis. ED severity was assessed with a self-assessment questionnaire.Nearly half of patients in our sample were sexually inactive or reported some degree of ED. Some demographic, clinical and psychopathological variables significantly differed according to the presence or absence of ED. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that age, employment, smoke, psychoactive drugs, opioid maintenance dosage, and severity of psychopathological factors significantly influenced the risk and severity of ED. QoL was worse in patients with ED and significantly correlated with ED severity. Age, education, employment, opioid maintenance dosage, ED score, and severity of psychopathology significantly influenced QoL in the multivariate analysis.ED complaints can be explored in male opioid users on ORT through a simple and quick self-assessment tool. ED may have important effects on emotional and social well-being, and may affect outcome.

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sun; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Ye-Soo; Lee, Kyu-Yeol; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA) in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14-90 days postsurgery) were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS ( n = 47; 5  μ g/h titrated to 20  μ g/h) or twice-daily TA ( n = 40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets) for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL), treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS -2.02; TA -2.76, both P pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  4. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in addiction severity, HIV risk, and quality of life among adults in opioid detoxification: results from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

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    Bruce Burchett

    2010-12-01

    more likely than whites to use heroin and cocaine and to have more severe alcohol and employment problems.Conclusions: Women and whites show more psychopathology than men and African Americans. These results highlight the need to monitor an increased trend of opioid addiction among women and whites and to develop effective combined psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments to meet the diverse needs of the expanding opioid-abusing population. Elevated levels of HIV risk behaviors among Hispanics and whites also warrant more research to delineate mechanisms and to reduce their risky behaviors.Keywords: buprenorphine, clinical trials network, gender differences, heath disparity, HIV risk behavior, methadone, opioid dependence, rehabilitation

  5. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence

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    Santosh Ramdurg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30 and naltrexone (n = 30 maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. Results: The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P < 0.05 there were no significant differences among both the groups except above findings. Conclusion: Conclusion was treatment is associated with sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses.

  6. The extramedical use and diversion of opioid substitution medications and other medications in prison settings in Australia following the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nancy; Ali, Robert; Larance, Briony; Zador, Deborah; Mattick, Richard P; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    Around 65% of people incarcerated in prisons in Australia, America and Europe have a history of drug dependence, sometimes treated with opioid substitution treatment (OST) medications. Studies report that those in treatment in prison do engage in some level of diversion to others, whether on a voluntary or coerced basis. We aimed to examine the use of prescribed and non-prescribed OST medications by those in prisons, especially buprenorphine-naloxone film (BNX-F); the extent of non-adherence and diversion and reasons for such practices; and the impact of the introduction of BNX-F into the prison system. Mixed methods study drawing on: (i) structured interviews with current OST clients (n = 60) who reported being incarcerated in the 12 months prior to being interviewed and (ii) qualitative interviews with key experts working in corrections and prison (or justice) health settings. The majority were prescribed OST medications in prison, with 25% removing all or part of their supervised dose on at least one occasion, and 44% reporting use of non-prescribed medications. Some reported intravenous use (14% injected). One-third of OST recipients reported selling/sharing OST medications with others in prison. The introduction of BNX-F into the prison system saw different diversion methods used and removal from dosing within prison. Despite prison being a highly regulated and controlled environment, some level of diversion and sharing of psychoactive medication occurs among prisoners. The buprenorphine formulations used in OST present particular challenges with respect to supervised dosing in this setting. [White N, Ali R, Larance B, Zador D, Mattick RP, Degenhardt L. The extramedical use and diversion of opioid substitution medications and other medications in prison settings in Australia following the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone film. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;●●:●●-●●]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Effect of buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patientcontrolled intravenous analgesia on the serum pain-related biochemical indexes in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture

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    Lei Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patientcontrolled intravenous analgesia on the serum pain-related biochemical indexes in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture. Methods: A total of 92 elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture who received surgical treatment in the hospital between August 2014 and January 2017 were collected and divided into control group (n=46 and observation group (n=46 according to the random number table method. The control group received patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, and the observation group received buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia. Differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress indexes and pain mediators of two groups of patients were measured before and 24h after surgery. Results: Differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress indexes and pain mediators were not statistically significant between the two groups before surgery; 24 h after surgery, serum IL- 1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MDA, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, HA and NPY levels of both groups of patients increased significantly while SOD, TAC and CAT levels decreased significantly, and serum IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MDA, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, HA and NPY levels of observation group were lower than those of control group while SOD, TAC and CAT levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia can effectively inhibit the expression of pain-related indexes and relieve early postoperative pain intensity in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent youth: data from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Daniel; Glick, Henry A; Yang, Jianing; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Poole, Sabrina A; Woody, George E

    2010-09-01

    The objective is to estimate cost, net social cost and cost-effectiveness in a clinical trial of extended buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP) treatment versus brief detoxification treatment in opioid-dependent youth. Economic evaluation of a clinical trial conducted at six community out-patient treatment programs from July 2003 to December 2006, who were randomized to 12 weeks of BUP or a 14-day taper (DETOX). BUP patients were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to zero at the end of week 12. DETOX patients were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to zero on day 14. All were offered twice-weekly drug counseling. 152 patients aged 15-21 years. Data were collected prospectively during the 12-week treatment and at follow-up interviews at months 6, 9 and 12. The 12-week out-patient study treatment cost was $1514 (P DETOX. One-year total direct medical cost was only $83 higher for BUP (P = 0.97). The cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX was $1376 in terms of 1-year direct medical cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $25,049 in terms of out-patient treatment program cost per QALY. The acceptability curve suggests that the cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX has an 86% chance of being accepted as cost-effective for a threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Extended BUP treatment relative to brief detoxification is cost effective in the US health-care system for the outpatient treatment of opioid-dependent youth.

  9. Use of conventional, complementary, and alternative treatments for pain among individuals seeking primary care treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Declan T.; Savant, Jonathan D.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Moore, Brent A.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have not examined patterns of pain treatment use among patients seeking office-based buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (BNT) for opioid dependence. Objectives To examine, among individuals with pain seeking BNT for opioid dependence, the use of pain treatment modalities, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in pursuing pain treatment while in BNT. Methods 244 patients seeking office-based BNT for opioid dependence completed measures of demographics, pain status (i.e. “chronic pain (CP)” [pain lasting at least 3 months] vs. “some pain (SP)” [pain in the past week not meeting the duration criteria for chronic pain]), pain treatment use, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in receiving pain treatment while in BNT. Results In comparison to the SP group (N = 87), the CP group (N = 88) was more likely to report past-week medical use of opioid medication (AOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2–8.4), lifetime medical use of non-opioid prescribed medication (AOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.7), and lifetime use of prayer (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.2–6.5), and was less likely to report lifetime use of yoga (AOR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.7) to treat pain. While the two pain groups did not differ on levels of perceived efficacy of prior lifetime pain treatments, in comparison to the SP group, the CP group was more likely to report interest in receiving pain treatment while in BNT (P pain seeking BNT for opioid dependence report a wide range of conventional, complementary, and alternative pain-related treatments and are interested (especially those with CP) in receiving pain management services along with BNT. PMID:23041680

  10. Retention on buprenorphine is associated with high levels of maximal viral suppression among HIV-infected opioid dependent released prisoners.

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    Sandra A Springer

    Full Text Available HIV-infected prisoners lose viral suppression within the 12 weeks after release to the community. This prospective study evaluates the use of buprenorphine/naloxone (BPN/NLX as a method to reduce relapse to opioid use and sustain viral suppression among released HIV-infected prisoners meeting criteria for opioid dependence (OD.From 2005-2010, 94 subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for OD were recruited from a 24-week prospective trial of directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART for released HIV-infected prisoners; 50 (53% selected BPN/NLX and were eligible to receive it for 6 months; the remaining 44 (47% selected no BPN/NLX therapy. Maximum viral suppression (MVS, defined as HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL, was compared for the BPN/NLX and non-BPN/NLX (N = 44 groups.The two groups were similar, except the BPN/NLX group was significantly more likely to be Hispanic (56.0% v 20.4%, from Hartford (74.4% v 47.7% and have higher mean global health quality of life indicator scores (54.18 v 51.40. MVS after 24 weeks of being released was statistically correlated with 24-week retention on BPN/NLX [AOR = 5.37 (1.15, 25.1], having MVS at the time of prison-release [AOR = 10.5 (3.21, 34.1] and negatively with being Black [AOR = 0.13 (0.03, 0.68]. Receiving DAART or methadone did not correlate with MVS.In recognition that OD is a chronic relapsing disease, strategies that initiate and retain HIV-infected prisoners with OD on BPN/NLX is an important strategy for improving HIV treatment outcomes as a community transition strategy.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery

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    Jae Hyup Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Methods. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14–90 days postsurgery were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS (n=47; 5 μg/h titrated to 20 μg/h or twice-daily TA (n=40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL, treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs were assessed. Findings. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS −2.02; TA −2.76, both P<0.0001 and improved QoL (mean EQ-5D index change: BTDS 0.10; TA 0.19, both P<0.05. The BTDS group achieved better medication compliance (97.8% versus 91.0%. Incidence of AEs (26.1% versus 20.0% and adverse drug reactions (20.3% versus 16.9% were comparable between groups. Implications. For patients with persistent pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  12. Prescription Opioid Abuse, Prescription Opioid Addiction, and Heroin Abuse among Adolescents in a Recovery High School: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosburg, Suzanne K.; Eaton, Thomas A.; Sokolowska, Marta; Osgood, Eric D.; Ashworth, Judy B.; Trudeau, Jeremiah J.; Muffett-Lipinski, Michelle; Katz, Nathaniel P.

    2016-01-01

    The progression from prescription opioid (RXO) abuse to RXO addiction is not well understood in adolescents, nor is the progression from RXO addiction to heroin abuse. The purpose of this pilot study was to characterize the development of RXO drug abuse, RXO drug addiction, and heroin abuse in a small cohort of adolescents recovering from opioid…

  13. A systematic review of the effectiveness of the community reinforcement approach in alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, H.G.; Boulogne, J.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Brink, W. van den; Jong, C.A.J. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The community reinforcement approach (CRA) has been applied in the treatment of disorders resulting from alcohol, cocaine and opioid use. The objectives were to review the effectiveness of (1) CRA compared with usual care, and (2) CRA versus CRA plus contingency management. Studies were selected

  14. A systematic review of the effectiveness of the community reinforcement approach in alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, H.G.; Boulogne, J.J.; van Tulder, M.; van den Brink, W.; de Jong, C.A.J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The community reinforcement approach (CRA) has been applied in the treatment of disorders resulting from alcohol, cocaine and opioid use. The objectives were to review the effectiveness of (1) CRA compared with usual care, and (2) CRA versus CRA plus contingency management. Studies were selected

  15. A systematic review of the effectiveness of the community reinforcement approach in alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, H.G.; Boulogne, J.J.; Tulder, van M.; Brink, van den W.; Jong, de C.A.J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The community reinforcement approach (CRA) has been applied in the treatment of disorders resulting from alcohol, cocaine and opioid use. The objectives were to review the effectiveness of (1) CRA compared with usual care, and (2) CRA versus CRA plus contingency management. Studies were

  16. Assessing Differences in the Availability of Opioid Addiction Therapy Options: Rural Versus Urban and American Indian Reservation Versus Nonreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirchak, Katherine A; Murphy, Sean M

    2017-01-01

    Opioid misuse is a large public health problem in the United States. Residents of rural areas and American Indian (AI) reservation/trust lands represent traditionally underserved populations with regard to substance-use disorder therapy. Assess differences in the number of opioid agonist therapy (OAT) facilities and physicians with Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA) waivers for rural versus urban, and AI reservation/trust land versus non-AI reservation/trust land areas in Washington State. The unit of analysis was the ZIP code. The dependent variables were the number of OAT facilities and DATA-waivered physicians in a region per 10,000 residents aged 18-64 in a ZIP code. A region was defined as a ZIP code and its contiguous ZIP codes. The independent variables were binary measures of whether a ZIP code was classified as rural versus urban, or AI reservation/trust land versus non-AI reservation/trust land. Zero-inflated negative binomial regressions with robust standard errors were estimated. The number of OAT clinics in a region per 10,000 ZIP-code residents was significantly lower in rural versus urban areas (P = .002). This did not differ significantly between AI reservation/trust land and non-AI reservation/trust land areas (P = .79). DATA-waivered physicians in a region per 10,000 ZIP-code residents was not significantly different between rural and urban (P = .08), or AI reservation/trust land versus non-AI reservation/trust land areas (P = .21). It appears that the potential for Washington State residents of rural and AI reservation areas to receive OAT is similar to that of residents outside of those areas; however, difficulties in accessing therapy may remain, highlighting the importance of expanding health care insurance and providing support for DATA-waivered physicians. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  17. Using [11C]diprenorphine to image opioid receptor occupancy by methadone in opioid addiction: clinical and preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melichar, Jan K; Hume, Susan P; Williams, Tim M; Daglish, Mark R C; Taylor, Lindsay G; Ahmad, Rabia; Malizia, Andrea L; Brooks, David J; Myles, Judith S; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Nutt, David J

    2005-01-01

    Substitute methadone prescribing is one of the main modes of treatment for opioid dependence with established evidence for improved health and social outcomes. However, the pharmacology underpinning the effects of methadone is little studied despite controversies about dosing in relation to outcome. We therefore examined the relationship between methadone dose and occupation of opioid receptors in brain using the positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(11)C]diprenorphine in humans and rats. Eight opioid-dependent subjects stable on their substitute methadone (18-90 mg daily) had an [(11)C]diprenorphine PET scan at predicted peak plasma levels of methadone. These were compared with eight healthy controls. No difference in [(11)C]diprenorphine binding was found between the groups, with no relationship between methadone dose and occupancy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that had been given an acute i.v. injection of methadone hydrochloride (0.35, 0.5, 0.7, or 1.0 mg kg(-1)) before [(11)C]diprenorphine showed a dose-dependent increase in biodistribution but no reduction in [(11)C]diprenorphine binding. We suggest that the lack of a dose-dependent relationship between methadone dose, either given chronically in human or acutely in rat, and occupancy of opioid receptor measured with [(11)C]diprenorphine PET is related to efficacy of this opioid agonist at very low levels of opioid receptor occupancy. This has implications for understanding the actions of methadone in comparison with other opioid drugs such as partial agonists and antagonists.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and Adverse Effects of 3 Sustained-release Buprenorphine Dosages in Healthy Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Andrea S; Putta, Sumanth K; Casebolt, Donald B; Louie, Stan G

    2017-11-01

    In guinea pigs, studies addressing the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profiles of different sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) formulations are still in their infancy. Here we assessed the pharmacokinetic profiles of 3 SRB dosages (SR-LAB, ZooPharm; SRBLow, 0.15 mg/kg; SRBMedium, 0.3 mg/kg; and SRBHigh, 0.6 mg/kg) for 72 h after a single subcutaneous administration to 8 (4 male and 4 female) healthy guinea pigs. Body weight, fecal output, and cortisol levels were also monitored and the results compared with those of the sham group. Within the first h after administration, the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) of the drug was 64.3 ± 9.2 ng/mL (males) and 71.3 ± 3.7 ng/mL (females) in the SRBHigh group; 11.5 ± 3.2 ng/mL (males) and 6.9 ± 0.9 ng/mL (females) in the SRBMedium group; and 2.3 ± 0.8 ng/mL (males) and 2.0 ± 0.5 ng/mL (females) in the SRBLow group. After 72 h, therapeutic levels of the drug (>1 ng/mL) were observed only in guinea pigs treated with SRBHigh (both sexes) and males treated with SRBMediu cm. Fecal output (quantity and distribution) and body weight were significantly lower in the SRB groups as compared with the sham group, and with the SRBHigh group showing larger reductions. Baseline levels of serum cortisol in healthy females (1440 ± 106 ng/mL) were significantly greater than in males (550 ± 66 ng/mL). But, independent of the sex, SRB administration significantly reduced those levels. In conclusion, the data indicate that all 3 SRB dosages can be safely used in guinea pigs. However, therapeutic levels of the drug were observed for at least 48 h only guinea pigs treated with SRBHigh and SRBMedium. Further investigation is needed to determine if these dosages can alleviate pain in guinea pigs.

  19. Treating opioid dependence. Growing implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2004-02-09

    Almost 3 million Americans have abused heroin. The most effective treatment for this concerning epidemic is opioid replacement therapy. Although, from a historical perspective, acceptance of this therapy has been slow, growing evidence supports its efficacy. There are 3 approved medications for opioid maintenance therapy: methadone hydrochloride, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine hydrochloride. Each has unique characteristics that determine its suitability for an individual patient. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported with methadone and levomethadyl, but not with buprenorphine. Due to concerns about cardiac risk, levomethadyl use has declined and the product may ultimately be discontinued. These recent safety concerns, specifics about opioid detoxification and maintenance, and new federal initiatives were studied. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Although only a minority of eligible patients are engaged in treatment, opioid maintenance therapy appears to offer the greatest public health benefits. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. This model has gained wide acceptance in Europe and is now being implemented in the United States. The recent Drug Addiction Treatment Act enables qualified physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting. Mainstreaming opioid addiction treatment has many advantages; its success will depend on resolution of ethical and delivery system issues as well as improved and expanded training of physicians in addiction medicine.

  20. Using behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Shoptaw, Steven J; Bickel, Warren K; Ling, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Research grounded in behavioral economics has previously linked addictive behavior to disrupted decision-making and reward-processing, but these principles have not been examined in prescription opioid addiction, which is currently a major public health problem. This study examined whether pre-treatment drug reinforcement value predicted opioid use during outpatient treatment of prescription opioid addiction. Secondary analyses examined participants with prescription opioid dependence who received 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone and counseling in a multi-site clinical trial (N=353). Baseline measures assessed opioid source and indices of drug reinforcement value, including the total amount and proportion of income spent on drugs. Weekly urine drug screens measured opioid use. Obtaining opioids from doctors was associated with lower pre-treatment drug spending, while obtaining opioids from dealers/patients was associated with greater spending. Controlling for demographics, opioid use history, and opioid source frequency, patients who spent a greater total amount (OR=1.30, peconomic resources to drugs, reflects propensity for continued opioid use during treatment among individuals with prescription opioid addiction. Future studies should examine disrupted decision-making and reward-processing in prescription opioid users more directly and test whether reinforcer pathology can be remediated in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development and application of carbon nanotubes assisted electromembrane extraction (CNTs/EME) for the determination of buprenorphine as a model of basic drugs from urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminasab, Kobra Sadat; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-03-12

    In this work carbon nanotubes assisted electromembrane extraction (CNTs/EME) coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed for the determination of buprenorphine as a model of basic drugs from urine samples. Carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber was used in this research. Here the CNTs serve as a sorbent and provide an additional pathway for solute transport. The presence of CNTs in the hollow fiber wall increased the effective surface area and the overall partition coefficient on the membrane; and lead to an enhancement in the analyte transport. For investigating the influence of the presence of CNTs in the SLM on the extraction efficiency, a comparative study was carried out between EME and CNTs/EME methods. Optimization of the variables affecting these methods was carried out in order to achieve the best extraction efficiency. Optimal extractions were accomplished with NPOE as the SLM, with 200V as the driving force, and with pH 2.0 in the donor and pH 1.0 in the acceptor solutions with the whole assembly agitated at 750rpm after 25min and 15min for EME and CNTs/EME, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, in comparison with the conventional EME method, CNTs/EME provided higher extraction efficiencies in shorter time. This method provided lower limit of detection (1ngmL(-1)), higher preconcentration factor (185) and higher recovery (92). Finally, the applicability of this method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of buprenorphine in patients' urine samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative study of the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patches and prolonged-release tramadol tablets for postoperative pain control after spinal fusion surgery: a prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Nam, Yunjin; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

    2017-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of a transdermal buprenorphine patch (5, 10, 15, and 20 μg/h) with that of oral tramadol (150, 200, 250, and 300 mg) for postoperative pain control after single level spinal fusion surgery. The present study (ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02416804) was a prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial designed to determine the efficacy of buprenorphine TDS for alleviating postoperative pain following patient controlled analgesia (PCA) in persons underwent a single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery through 1:1 allocation. The primary outcome was the Visual Analog Pain Scale (VAS) score for postoperative back pain at 7 days after surgery. The non-inferior margin of the VAS was set at δ = 1.5 points. The VAS score (primary outcome) for postoperative back pain at 7 days after surgery in the Buprenorphine group was not inferior compared to the Tramadol group. The overall changes in VAS scores for postoperative pain during follow-up assessments over a 2-week period did not differ between both groups. However, the VAS scores for postoperative pain significantly improved with time after surgery in both groups. The patterns of changes in the VAS scores for postoperative pain during the follow-up period were not significantly different between the both groups. The efficacy of buprenorphine TDS was not inferior to that of oral tramadol medication for alleviating postoperative pain in the subacute period from 72 h after surgery, following PCA administration. In addition, adverse events were similar between both groups.

  3. Pain Relievers - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... español (Spanish) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Fentanyl - Opioid addiction, part 6 - English PDF Fentanyl - Opioid addiction, part 6 - español (Spanish) PDF Fentanyl - Opioid addiction, ...

  4. Safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine versus oral tramadol for the treatment of post-operative pain following surgery for fracture neck of femur: A prospective, randomised clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sameer N; Badiger, Santhoshi V; Tokur, Shreesha B; Naik, Prashanth A

    2017-03-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine, which is used in chronic pain management, has rarely been studied for use in acute pain management. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch to oral tramadol for post-operative analgesia, following proximal femur surgeries. Fifty adult patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture under spinal anaesthesia were included in this study. One group (Group TDB) received transdermal buprenorphine 10 mcg/h patch applied a day before the surgery and other group received oral tramadol 50 mg three times a day for analgesia (Group OT). They were allowed to take diclofenac and paracetamol tablets for rescue analgesia. Pain scores at rest, on movement, rescue analgesic requirement and side effects were compared between the groups over 7 days. Chi-square and independent sample t -test were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Resting pain scores and pain on movement were significantly lower in TDB Group on all 7 days starting from 24 h post-operatively. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly lower in TDB Group compared to OT Group. All the patients needed rescue analgesic in OT Group whereas 68% of the patients needed the same in TDB Group. Incidence of vomiting was less and satisfaction scores were much higher in TDB Group as compared to OT Group (79% vs. 66%, P pain after 24 hours, with fewer side effects when compared to oral tramadol.

  5. Efeitos cardiorrespiratórios da buprenorfina em cães anestesiados pelo desfluorano Cardiorespiratory effects of buprenorphine in dogs anesthetized with desflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Pereira de Souza

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com este estudo, avaliar os efeitos da buprenorfina sobre variáveis cardiovasculares e respiratórias em cães durante anestesia com desfluorano. Para tanto, foram utilizados 20 cães adultos, distribuídos em dois grupos (GB e GC. A anestesia foi induzida com propofol (8mg kg-1 IV e em seguida os animais foram intubados com sonda de Magill, a qual foi conectada ao aparelho de anestesia para administração de desfluorano (1,5 CAM. Após 30 minutos, foi aplicado no GB buprenorfina (0,02mg kg-1 e no GC solução de NaCl à 0,9% (0,05ml kg-1. Avaliaram-se: freqüências cardíaca e respiratória (FC e ¦; pressões arteriais sistólica, diastólica e média (PAS, PAD e PAM; débito cardíaco (DC; pressão venosa central (PVC; e as variáveis hemogasométricas pH, PaCO2, PaO2, HCO3, SatO2 e DB. As colheitas dos dados foram feitas aos 30 minutos após o início da administração do desfluorano (MO, 15 minutos após a administração do opióide ou placebo (M15, e a cada 15 minutos após Ml5 (M30, M45, M60 e M75. A avaliação estatística dos dados foi efetuada por meio de Análise de Perfil (P¦ e o pH tiveram reduções no GB, enquanto a PaCO2 esteve aumentada. Concluiu-se que a inclusão da buprenorfina durante anestesia inalatória pelo desfluorano determina discretas alterações cardiovasculares, bem-como potencializa a hipoventilação promovida pelo desfluorano, com a manifestação de hipercapnia, o que não contra-indica o seu uso em pacientes estáveis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of buprenorphine on cardiovascular and respiratory variables in dogs anesthetized with desflurane. Twenty adult healthy male and female mongrel dogs were randomly distributed in two groups of ten animals each (GB and GC. The anesthetic induction was done using propofol (8mg kg-1, IV, and immediately, the dogs were intubated and submited to desflurane anesthesia administrated at 1.5 MAC. After 30 minutes of induction, animals

  6. Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  7. Analgesia after feline ovariohysterectomy under midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine anaesthesia with buprenorphine or butorphanol, and carprofen or meloxicam: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, Sally; Taylor, Polly M; Yates, David

    2012-08-01

    One hundred female cats undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy under midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine anaesthesia were included in a blinded, randomised, prospective clinical study to compare postoperative analgesia produced by four analgesic drug combinations given preoperatively (n = 25 per group). A secondary aim was to assess the effects in kittens and pregnant animals. Buprenorphine 180 µg/m(2) or butorphanol 6 mg/m(2) were given with either carprofen 4 mg/kg (groups BUPC and BUTC, respectively) or meloxicam 0.3 mg/kg (groups BUPM or BUTM, respectively). Medetomidine was not antagonised. A simple, descriptive scale (SDS; 0-4), a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS; 0-100 mm) and mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MT; 2.5-mm diameter probe) were used to evaluate postoperative pain. All pain scores were low (DIVAS 10 N) and there were no significant differences between the groups. It was concluded that all protocols provided adequate analgesia and when used with midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine are effective for routine feline ovariohysterectomy.

  8. [National and regional market penetration rates of generic's high dosage buprenorphine: its evolution from 2006 to 2008, using reimbursed drug database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Christelle; Frauger, Elisabeth; Micallef, Joëlle; Allaria-Lapierre, Véronique; Reggio, Patrick; Sciortino, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    To assess the national market penetration rate (PR) of generic high-dosage buprenorphine (HDB) in 2008 and its evolution since their marketing (2006), and making a point for each dosage and at regional level. Retrospective study over data using national and regional health reimbursement database over three years (2006-2008). In 2008, the generic HDB's national MPR was 31%. The PR for each dosage were 45% for 0.4 mg, 36% for 2 mg and 19% for 8 mg. The (PR) based on Defined Daily Dose (DDD) was 23% in 2008, 15% in 2007 and 4% in 2006. In 2008, at the regional level, disparities were observed in the adjusted penetration rate from 15% in Île de France to 39% in Champagne Ardennes Lorraine. The national PR of generic HDB has increased. There are differences in MPR in terms of dosage and area. However, this PR is still low (in 2008, 82% of the delivered drugs are generics). © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  9. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlin, Leif; Hesse, Morten; Fridell, Mats; Tätting, Per

    2011-05-12

    Continuous abstinence and retention in treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders are central challenges for the treatment providers. The literature has failed to show consistent, strong predictors of retention. Predictors and treatment structure may differ across treatment modalities. In this study the structure was reinforced by the addition of supervised urine samples three times a week and mandatory daily work/structured education activities as a prerequisite of inclusion in the program. Of 128 patients consecutively admitted to buprenorphine maintenance treatment five patients dropped out within the first week. Of the remaining 123 demographic data and psychiatric assessment were used to predict involuntary discharge from treatment and corresponding cumulative abstinence probability. All subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, and the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Of 123 patients admitted, 86 (70%) remained in treatment after six months and 61 (50%) remained in treatment after 12 months. Of those discharged involuntarily, 34/62 individuals were readmitted after a suspension period of three months. Younger age at intake, poly-substance abuse at intake (number of drugs in urine), and number of conduct disorder criteria on the SCID Screen were independently associated with an increased risk of involuntary discharge. There were no significant differences between dropouts and completers on SCL-90, SSP, SOC or AUDIT. Of the patients admitted to the programme 50% stayed for the first 12 months with continuous abstinence and daily work. Poly-substance use before intake into treatment, high levels of conduct disorder on SCID screen and younger age at intake had a negative impact on

  10. Triggers of Substance Abuse Slip and Relapse During Outpatient Treatment in Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Clinics: A Predictive Model with Emphasis on Treatment-Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Komasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Most addicts relapse in the first year of treatment especially in the first 3 - 6 months, which is the most vulnerable period. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the predictors of substance abuse slip and relapse among addicts in the first 6 months of treatment with an emphasis on treatment related factors. Methods The data of this cross-sectional study collected through assessment of 148 patients who were referred to the Methadone/Buprenorphine maintenance therapy clinics of Kermanshah city during April to September of 2015. Demographic, history, treatment checklist, comorbidity index, and medical records were used for collecting data. Data was analyzed through chi-square, t-test, and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results The mean age of total participants was 42.4 ± 11.3 years and 98% of them were male. 27% and 35.1% of the patients, respectively, had a slip and relapse during the first 6 months of treatment. After adjustment for all demographic data, it was indicated that self-employment (P = 0.037, more treatment costs (P = 0.049, previous treatment history (P = 0.027, not satisfied dose of medication (P = 0.012, and lack of medical therapy history under physicians supervision (P = 0.046 can increase the possibility of a slip significantly. Conclusions Despite the fact that prevention of re-abuse and relapse of disease includes multi-factorial approach, it seems that the treatment-related factors are as the most major factors in relapse and slip during the first 6 months of treatment. Health practitioners’ special attention to treatment related factors in addiction, especially previous treatment history as the most important predictor of relapse, are probably effective in the control and decrease of a slip and relapse.

  11. Understanding abuse of buprenorphine/naloxone film versus tablet products using data from ASI-MV® substance use disorder treatment centers and RADARS® System Poison Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stephen F; Black, Ryan A; Severtson, Stevan Geoffrey; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L

    2018-01-01

    The objectives were to examine the abuse prevalence and route-of-administration (ROA) profiles of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination (BNX) film in comparison with the BNX tablet and to identify clinically-relevant subgroups of patients or geographic patterns. Between Q1 2015 through Q3 2015, data were collected from two major surveillance systems: (1) assessment of individuals in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment collected from the National Addictions Vigilance Intervention and Prevention Program (NAVIPPRO®) ASI-MV® system and (2) intentional abuse/misuse exposures in the RADARS® System Poison Center Program. Poisson regression models were tailored to each system's data characteristics by population (all SUD treatment patients, US census) and adjusted for prescription volume. Effects of gender, race, age and US region as well as ROA profile were examined. For the ASI-MV study, 45,695 assessments of unique adults evaluated for substance use problems were collected. The abuse rate unadjusted for prescription volume of BNX tablet formulation was 2.64 cases/100 ASI-MV respondents versus 7.01 cases for the film formulation (RR=0.390, pfilm) (RR=1.25, pfilm abuse (0.0364) were greater than for tablet (0.0161), while prescription-adjusted rates were greater for tablet (0.2114) than for film (0.1703) per 100,000 prescriptions. ASI-MV ROA analyses indicated less abuse of the film by any alternate route, insufflation or injection than the tablet. Poison center data found more injection of tablets than film, although insufflation was not significantly different. On a prescription-adjusted basis, overall abuse of the BNX tablet is greater than that of the sublingual film formulation. For those who continue to abuse BNX, use by alternate ROAs was, in general, lower for the film. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fridell Mats

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous abstinence and retention in treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders are central challenges for the treatment providers. The literature has failed to show consistent, strong predictors of retention. Predictors and treatment structure may differ across treatment modalities. In this study the structure was reinforced by the addition of supervised urine samples three times a week and mandatory daily work/structured education activities as a prerequisite of inclusion in the program. Methods Of 128 patients consecutively admitted to buprenorphine maintenance treatment five patients dropped out within the first week. Of the remaining 123 demographic data and psychiatric assessment were used to predict involuntary discharge from treatment and corresponding cumulative abstinence probability. All subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, and the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90, the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT, the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC, all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Results Of 123 patients admitted, 86 (70% remained in treatment after six months and 61 (50% remained in treatment after 12 months. Of those discharged involuntarily, 34/62 individuals were readmitted after a suspension period of three months. Younger age at intake, poly-substance abuse at intake (number of drugs in urine, and number of conduct disorder criteria on the SCID Screen were independently associated with an increased risk of involuntary discharge. There were no significant differences between dropouts and completers on SCL-90, SSP, SOC or AUDIT. Conclusion Of the patients admitted to the programme 50% stayed for the first 12 months with continuous abstinence and daily work. Poly-substance use before intake into treatment, high levels of conduct disorder on SCID

  13. Buprenorphine/naloxone as a promising therapeutic option for opioid abusing patients with chronic pain: reduction of pain, opioid withdrawal symptoms, and abuse liability of oral oxycodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Perrine; Sullivan, Maria A; Cohen, Julien; Fugon, Lionel; Jones, Jermaine D; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Cooper, Ziva D; Manubay, Jeanne M; Mogali, Shanthi; Comer, Sandra D

    2013-08-01

    Few studies have examined abuse of prescription opioids among individuals with chronic pain under buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx) maintenance. The current 7-week inpatient study assessed oral oxycodone self-administration by patients with chronic pain who had a history of opioid abuse. Participants (n=25) were transitioned from their preadmission prescribed opioid to Bup/Nx. All of the participants were tested under each of the sublingual Bup/Nx maintenance doses (2/0.5, 8/2 or 16/4 mg) in random order. During each maintenance period, participants could self-administer oxycodone orally (0, 10, 20, 40 or 60 mg prescription opioids) or receive money during laboratory sessions. Drug choice (percentage) was the primary dependent variable. Subjective ratings of clinical pain and withdrawal symptoms also were measured. Mann-Whitney tests compared percentage of drug choice for each active oxycodone dose to placebo. Logistic regression analyses identified correlates of oxycodone preference, defined as 60% or greater choice of oxycodone compared to money. Pain was significantly reduced while participants were maintained on Bup/Nx compared to preadmission ratings. No differences in percentage drug choice were observed between the active oxycodone doses and placebo under each Bup/Nx maintenance dose. However, factors associated with oxycodone preference were lower Bup/Nx maintenance dose, more withdrawal symptoms and more pain. These data suggest that Bup/Nx was effective in reducing pain and supplemental oxycodone use. Importantly, adequate management of pain and withdrawal symptoms by Bup/Nx may reduce oxycodone preference in this population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Efficacy and tolerability of buccal buprenorphine in opioid-experienced patients with moderate to severe chronic low back pain: results of a phase 3, enriched enrollment, randomized withdrawal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Joseph; Spierings, Egilius L H; Katz, Nathaniel; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A buccal film of buprenorphine (BBUP) was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal study in opioid-experienced patients (30 to ≤160 mg/d morphine sulfate equivalent) with moderate to severe chronic low back pain taking around-the-clock opioid analgesics. Patients' opioid doses were tapered to ≤30 mg morphine sulfate equivalent before open-label titration with BBUP (range, 150-900 μg every 12 hours). Patients who responded (received adequate analgesia that was generally well tolerated for 14 days) were randomized to receive buprenorphine (n = 254) or placebo (n = 257) buccal film. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 of double-blind treatment in mean average daily pain-intensity scores using a rating scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). In the intent-to-treat population, mean pain scores were 6.7 after opioid taper and declined to 2.8 after the BBUP titration period. After randomization, mean pain scores were lower in the BBUP group than in the placebo group; the difference between groups in the mean change from baseline to week 12 was -0.98 (95% CI, -1.32 to -0.64; P opioid-experienced patients taking around-the-clock opioid treatment for chronic low back pain.

  15. Medically assisted recovery from opiate dependence within the context of the UK drug strategy: methadone and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone) patients compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeganey, Neil; Russell, Christopher; Cockayne, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    The focus of drug policy in the UK has shifted markedly in the past 5 years to move beyond merely emphasising drug abstinence towards maximising individuals' opportunities for recovery. The UK government continues to recognise the prescribing of narcotic medications indicated for opiate dependence as a key element of these individuals' recovery journey. This article describes a small, naturalistic comparison of the efficacy of the two most commonly prescribed opiate substitute medications in the UK--methadone hydrochloride (methadone oral solution) and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone sublingual tablets)--for reducing current heroin users' (n = 34) days of heroin use, and preventing short-term abstainers (n = 37) from relapsing to regular heroin use. All patients had been prescribed either methadone or Suboxone for maintenance for 6 months prior to intake. Results showed that when controlling for a number of patient-level covariates, both methadone and Suboxone significantly reduced current users' days of heroin use between the 90 days prior to intake and at the 8-month follow-up, with Suboxone yielding a significantly larger magnitude reduction in heroin use days than methadone. Methadone and Suboxone were highly and equally effective for preventing relapse to regular heroin use, with all but 3 of 37 (91.9%) patients who were abstinent at intake reporting past 90-day point prevalence heroin abstinence at the 8-month follow-up. Overall, prescribing methadone or Suboxone for eight continuous months was highly effective for initiating abstinence from heroin use, and for converting short-term abstinence to long-term abstinence. However, the study design, which was based on a relatively small sample size and was not able randomise patients to medication and so could not control for the effects of potential prognostic factors inherent within each patient group, means that these conclusions can only be made tentatively. These positive but preliminary indications of the

  16. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benéitez, M Cristina; Gil-Alegre, M Esther

    2017-01-01

    Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  17. Disrupting the downward spiral of chronic pain and opioid addiction with mindfulness-oriented recovery enhancement: a review of clinical outcomes and neurocognitive targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L

    2014-06-01

    Prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients are problems of growing medical and social significance. Chronic pain patients often require intervention to improve their well-being and functioning, and yet, the most commonly available form of pharmacotherapy for chronic pain is centered on opioid analgesics--drugs that have high abuse liability. Consequently, health care and legal systems are often stymied in their attempts to intervene with individuals who suffer from both pain and addiction. As such, novel, nonpharmacologic interventions are needed to complement pharmacotherapy and interrupt the cycle of behavioral escalation. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the downward spiral of chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse may be targeted by one such intervention, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), a new behavioral treatment that integrates elements from mindfulness training, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and positive psychology. The clinical outcomes and neurocognitive mechanisms of this intervention are reviewed with respect to their effects on the risk chain linking chronic pain and prescription opioid misuse. Future directions for clinical and pharmacologic research are discussed.

  18. Assessing Differences in the Availability of Opioid Addiction Therapy Options: Rural Versus Urban and American Indian Reservation Versus Non-Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirchak, Katherine A.; Murphy, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Opioid misuse is a large public health problem in the United States. Residents of rural areas and American Indian (AI) reservation/trust lands represent traditionally underserved populations with regard to substance-use-disorder therapy. Purpose Assess differences in the number of opioid agonist therapy (OAT) facilities and physicians with Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA) waivers for rural versus urban, and AI reservation/trust land versus non-AI reservation/trust land areas in Washington State. Methods The unit of analysis was the zip code. The dependent variables were the number of OAT facilities and DATA-waivered physicians in a region per 10,000 residents aged 18–64 in a zip code. A region was defined as a zip code and its contiguous zip codes. The independent variables were binary measures of whether a zip code was classified as rural versus urban, or AI reservation/trust land versus non-AI reservation/trust land. Zero-inflated negative binomial regressions with robust standard errors were estimated. Results The number of OAT clinics in a region per 10,000 zip-code residents was significantly lower in rural versus urban areas (P = .002). This did not differ significantly between AI reservation/trust land and non-AI reservation/trust land areas (P = .79). DATA-waivered physicians in a region per 10,000 zip-code residents was not significantly different between rural and urban (P = .08), or AI reservation/trust land versus non-AI reservation/trust land areas (P = .21). Conclusions It appears that the potential for Washington State residents of rural and AI reservation areas to receive OAT is similar to that of residents outside of those areas; however, difficulties in accessing therapy may remain, highlighting the importance of expanding health care insurance and providing support for DATA-waivered physicians. PMID:26987797

  19. Opioid Addiction: Social Problems Associated and Implications of Both Current and Possible Future Treatments, including Polymeric Therapeutics for Giving Up the Habit of Opioid Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Benéitez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Detoxification programmes seek to implement the most secure and compassionate ways of withdrawing from opiates so that the inevitable withdrawal symptoms and other complications are minimized. Once detoxification has been achieved, the next stage is to enable the patient to overcome his or her drug addiction by ensuring consumption is permanently and completely abandoned, only after which can the subject be regarded as fully recovered. Methods. A systematic search on the common databases of relevant papers published until 2016 inclusive. Results and Conclusion. Our study of the available oral treatments for opioid dependence has revealed that no current treatment can actually claim to be fully effective. These treatments require daily oral administration and, consequently, regular visits to dispensaries, which in most cases results in a lack of patient compliance, which causes fluctuations in drug plasma levels. We then reviewed alternative treatments in the available scientific literature on polymeric sustained release formulations. Research has been done not only on release systems for detoxification but also on release systems for giving up the habit of taking opioids. These efforts have obtained the recent authorization of polymeric systems for use in patients that could help them to reduce their craving for drugs.

  20. Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Böger, Rainer H; Budd, Keith; Dahan, Albert; Erdine, Serdar; Hans, Guy; Kress, Hans-Georg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Raffa, Robert B; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY OF CONSENSUS: 1. The use of opioids in cancer pain: The criteria for selecting analgesics for pain treatment in the elderly include, but are not limited to, overall efficacy, overall side-effect profile, onset of action, drug interactions, abuse potential, and practical issues, such as cost and availability of the drug, as well as the severity and type of pain (nociceptive, acute/chronic, etc.). At any given time, the order of choice in the decision-making process can change. This consensus is based on evidence-based literature (extended data are not included and chronic, extended-release opioids are not covered). There are various driving factors relating to prescribing medication, including availability of the compound and cost, which may, at times, be the main driving factor. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine is available in most European countries, particularly those with high opioid usage, with the exception of France; however, the availability of the sublingual formulation of buprenorphine in Europe is limited, as it is marketed in only a few countries, including Germany and Belgium. The opioid patch is experimental at present in U.S.A. and the sublingual formulation has dispensing restrictions, therefore, its use is limited. It is evident that the population pyramid is upturned. Globally, there is going to be an older population that needs to be cared for in the future. This older population has expectations in life, in that a retiree is no longer an individual who decreases their lifestyle activities. The "baby-boomers" in their 60s and 70s are "baby zoomers"; they want to have a functional active lifestyle. They are willing to make trade-offs regarding treatment choices and understand that they may experience pain, providing that can have increased quality of life and functionality. Therefore, comorbidities--including cancer and noncancer pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and postherpetic neuralgia--and patient functional

  1. Women's series: by women, for women?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitert, L.; Spiers, J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the striking phenomena in the 19th century publishing history is the abundant publication of publisher''s series. This contribution concerns series specifically meant for women. The focus is on Dutch literary series for women, mostly 19th century.

  2. Women boxers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gems, Gerald; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2014-01-01

    of women as the weak sex. Vaudeville provided women with an opportunity to present physical performances that surpassed the restrictions placed on women within the mainstream middle-class society. This article includes biographical sketches of some of the outstanding female boxers of the era by drawing......This article fills a gap in the very limited literature on women's boxing by examining the gendered space in which women engaged in the sport as participants in saloons, vaudeville theatres and the prize ring. In doing so, they challenged the contemporary gender order and disputed the notion...

  3. Empowering Women

    OpenAIRE

    UNCTAD; World Bank

    2018-01-01

    This note addresses practices for reducing gender inequalities and for empowering women to make a positive contribution to development through agricultural investments. Women make a crucial contribution to the agriculture sector and account for over 40 percent of agricultural labor in developing countries. However, they are frequently marginalized and their contributions under-acknowledged...

  4. Women's studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    On March 31, 1997, the Association for Women Geoscientists will award two Chrysalis Scholarships to women who have returned to school after an interruption in their education for a year or longer. The $750 awards will be given to geoscience master's or Ph.D. candidates to cover expenses in finishing their theses.The application deadline is February 28, 1997.

  5. Evaluation of the vaginal flora in pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter W; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-08-05

    Vaginal infections are a risk factor for preterm delivery. In this study, we sought to evaluate the vaginal flora of pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) in comparison to non-dependent, non-maintained controls. A total of 3763 women with singleton pregnancies who underwent routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections between 10 + 0 and 16 + 0 gestational weeks were examined. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained, and microscopically evaluated for bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. In a retrospective manner, data of 132 women receiving OMT (cases) were matched for age, ethnicity, parity, education, previous preterm delivery, and smoking status to the data of 3631 controls. The vaginal flora at antenatal screening served as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were gestational age and birth weight. In the OMT group, 62/132 (47 %) pregnant women received methadone, 39/132 (29.5 %) buprenorphine, and 31/132 (23.5 %) slow-release oral morphine. Normal or intermediate flora was found in 72/132 OMT women (54.5 %) and 2865/3631 controls [78.9 %; OR 0.49 (95 % CI, 0.33-0.71); p Candidiasis occurred more frequently in OMT women than in controls [OR 2.11 (95 % CI, 1.26-3.27); p candidiasis) and trichomoniasis. Compared to infants of the control group, those of women with OMT had a lower mean birth weight [MD -165.3 g (95 % CI, -283.6 to -46.9); p = 0.006]. Pregnant women with OMT are at risk for asymptomatic vaginal infections. As recurrent candidiasis is associated with preterm delivery, the vulnerability of this patient population should lead to consequent antenatal infection screening at early gestation.

  6. Women's health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nurse midwives This list may not be all-inclusive. References Freund K. Approach to women's health. In: ... of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed ...

  7. women's entrepreneurship

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-17

    May 17, 2016 ... It describes the economic benefits to women's economic empowerment, .... Public procurement makes up a significant proportion of a ...... vides a comparison of cost effectiveness of programs), Cho and Honorati (2013),.

  8. Leibniz's women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2004-12-01

    Enlightenment natural philosophers were linked to one another in an extended correspondence network, but the female participants in this international Republic of Letters are rarely mentioned. Gottfried Leibniz relied on several such women not only for financial patronage, but also for intellectual stimulation. Although this hardworking and underpaid librarian at the Hanoverian Court is now one of the world's most famous mathematical philosophers, the women on whom he depended for ideas as well as support have been largely forgotten.

  9. Involving women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, J

    1994-01-01

    I am a primary health care (PHC) coordinator working with the May Day Rural project, a local NGO involved in integrated approaches and programs with rural communities in the Ga District of the Greater-Accra region in Ghana. When we talk about the community development approach we must first and foremost recognize that we are talking about women, because in the developing world frequent childbirths mean that her burden of mortality is higher than a man's; her workload is extremely heavy--whether in gardening, farming, other household duties, caring for the sick, or the rearing of children; she has a key role in PHC and community development, because men are always looking for greener pastures elsewhere, leaving the women behind. Women's concerns are critical in most health care projects and women and children are their main beneficiaries. Why not include women in the management team, project design, implementation and evaluation processes? That is what the May Day Rural project is practicing, encouraging women's participation and creating a relationship of trust. full text

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help ...

  11. Women in Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Liz

    1982-01-01

    Suggesting that women are at a disadvantage in cities and towns, discusses experiences of women at home, working women, women traveling, shopping, and growing old in cities. Includes suggestions for studying women in cities. (JN)

  12. Rebellious Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    At the background of a short presentation of concepts of discourse (in particular in Jürgen Habermas and Michel Foucault) and of the concept of shari'a a Spanish court case against an imam in reference to his publication on Women in Islam, where sura 4 verse 34 of the Quran is a central reference...

  13. Women's Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Arlene Kaplan

    1978-01-01

    The women's movement may show us some of the changes to come in the content and form of the social sciences. Among issues which will be increasingly addressed are those of work and the family, personal growth and social responsibility, and the emotional component in rational, objective, and scientific enterprise. (Author/GC)

  14. Women's worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, N

    1992-01-01

    Jill Conway is a feminist historian, writer, teacher, and now-emerita 1st woman president of Smith College. She claims that women today still suffer from a great deal of oppression. Women around the world are currently in a disadvantage position. In 7 countries women do not have the right to vote. In the US less that .5% of top executives are women. The wage gap in the US between 1939 and 1989 has only shrunk $.10, from $.58-$.68. Conway points out that we are all constrained by our social mores, generational attitudes, political events, and economic circumstances. Few people are able to overcome these things in the way that they live their lives. Conway questions the validity of history written from a male dominated point of view. Around the world the value of women's work is almost always lower than that of men. India is just 1 example, there 75% of women are illiterate and 1/2 the population lives in poverty based on a caste system. Female literacy tripled in the 1st 30 years of independence and by 1981 it had reached 25%. The literacy gap is actually growing in India Today with 44% of girls aged 6 to 11, who are eligible to attend school, not doing so. Rural poverty keeps them at home because their domestic work is more valuable than their education. Other cultural tradition compound the problem: arranged marriages often result in motherhood for 14 year old girls. This is done for many reasons, 1 of which is crop failure insurance. When 2 families are combined through marriage, their total land share grows and they are thus more likely to have enough to eat. Education is just 1 necessary step. Developed nations must realize the realities that exist in the countries they provide aid for. In Africa for example, 70% of continent's food is produced by women. Yet the aid programs of the past have only been designed to offer assistant to men and create jobs for men.

  15. Women's Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Women's Club

    2012-01-01

     Coffee Morning Tuesday 7th February 2012, 9:00 – 11:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant n°2 – DSR) 1st Floor, Club Room 3 Presentation of cheque to Terre des Hommes Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited.You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  16. Women's club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club des cernoises

    2012-01-01

    Coffee MorningTuesday 9th October 2012, 9:00 – 11:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant No 2 – DSR) 1st Floor, Club Room 3 Presentation of the charity to benefit from the Christmas Sale “Nous aussi”. Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  17. Women's Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Women's Club

    2014-01-01

        CERN WOMEN’S CLUB Coffee Morning Tuesday 8th Avril 2014, 9:30 – 14:00 Bldg 504 (Restaurant No 2 – DSR) Ground Floor Spring Jumble Sale   Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  18. Women's Club

    CERN Document Server

    Club des Cernoises

    2012-01-01

    Coffee Morning   Tuesday 24th  April 2012, 9:00 – 14:00 Bldg 504, Ground Floor Spring Jumble Sale   Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/

  19. Grassroots Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Kay

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The economic, social and political changes that have occurred in Russia over the last 10 years have had a profound effect on Russian women’s lives. Economic reform has brought poverty, insecurity and high levels of anxiety and stress to much of the population, both male and female. The impact of these changes on women was amplified in the early 1990s by their structural positioning both within the workforce and within the population, brought about by the legacies of the Soviet planned economy, Soviet attitudes to gender and long established demographic trends. Alongside these historical influences, ‘new’ essentialist attitudes towards gender and the appropriate roles and responsibilities of women in post-Soviet Russian society have been strongly promoted through the media, political and social discourses, imposing new pressures and dilemmas on many post-Soviet Russian women. Numerous women’s organisations have been established in Russia since the early 1990s, many of them with a specific remit of helping Russian women to overcome the upheavals and hardships which they face. Struggling to survive themselves with very few resources and minimal external support, Russia’s grassroots women’s organisations have nonetheless offered practical help and advice and emotional support and solidarity to their members. This paper is based on the findings of a period of intensive fieldwork carried out in 1995-6 with grassroots women’s organisations in Moscow and three Russian provincial centres. It will present the aims, activities and impact of the groups studied. It will also investigate the ways in which these groups and their membership positioned themselves in relation to the development of essentialist attitudes and opinions on gender within Russia on the one hand, and a dialogue with ‘western’ feminist theory and practice on the other.

  20. Women's Health Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women's Health Topics Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print National Women's Health Week May 13 - 19, 2018 Join us ...

  1. Women's club

    CERN Document Server

    Club des Cernoises

    2012-01-01

        CWC – Chinese Women's Community at CERN With an increasing number of Chinese people working at CERN, there are also surely an increasing number of Chinese women in the area, who are not always familiar with the environment, languages, or the people. In the context of the CERN Women’s Club, let's meet together and chat about integrating into the local community, available activities, commerce’s, restaurants, etc. It is also obviously a good opportunity to meet new friends. Everyone is welcome to join us to meet for tea, coffee, and a chat. We will meet every 3rd Tuesday of the month, starting on 20th March 2012, in building 504 (Restaurant 2) in room E-005. 20th March at 9-11am 17th April at 9-11am 22nd May at 9-11am 19th June at 9-11am For more details contact Mme Jean RODERICK, +41 (0) 76 426 61 08, jean.chow.roderick@gmail.com http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/     CWC-華人茶敍 越來�...

  2. Women's Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club des Cernoises

    2012-01-01

    Coffee Morning Tuesday 13th  March 2012, 9:00 – 11:00 - Bldg 504 (Restaurant No 2 – DSR) - 1st Floor, Club Room 3. German Theme Those interested in helping should come along. New arrivals and all members are cordially invited. You can enrol for membership, renew membership, find out about and sign up for our activities. Visit our website: http://club-womensclub.web.cern.ch/Club-WomensClub/     CWC – Chinese Women's Community at CERN With an increasing number of Chinese people working at CERN, there are also surely an increasing number of Chinese women in the area, who are not always familiar with the environment, languages, or the people. In the context of the CERN Women’s Club, let's meet together and chat about integrating into the local community, available activities, commerce’s, restaurants, etc. It is also obviously a good opportunity to meet new friends. Everyone is welcome to join us to meet fo...

  3. Dual Diagnosis - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Library of Medicine Comorbidity or dual diagnosis - Opioid addiction, part 9 - English PDF Comorbidity or dual diagnosis - Opioid addiction, part 9 - español (Spanish) PDF Comorbidity or dual ...

  4. Mental Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MP4 Healthy Roads Media Comorbidity or dual diagnosis - Opioid addiction, part 9 - English PDF Comorbidity or dual diagnosis - Opioid addiction, part 9 - español (Spanish) PDF Comorbidity or dual ...

  5. Celebrate Women's History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Carolyn M.; Baradar, Mariam

    This teachers' guide to activities celebrating Women's History Month focuses on women whose important contributions have been omitted from history textbooks. Women's History Month grew from a 1977 celebration of Women's History Week and is intended to bring women's history into the school curriculum. International Women's Day, celebrated on March…

  6. A Systematic, Intensive Statistical Investigation of Data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) for Compliance and Illicit Opioid Abstinence in Substance Addiction Treatment with Buprenorphine/naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Han, David; Modestino, Edward J; Saunders, Scott; Roy, A Kennison; Jacobs, W; Inaba, Darryl S; Baron, David; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Hauser, Mary; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smith, David E; Femino, John; Gold, Mark S

    2018-01-28

    Buprenorphine and naloxone (bup/nal), a combination partial mu receptor agonist and low-dose delta mu antagonist, is presently recommended and used to treat opioid-use disorder. However, a literature review revealed a paucity of research involving data from urine drug tests that looked at compliance and abstinence in one sample. Statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) was used to assess compliance and abstinence during treatment in a large cohort of bup/nal patients attending chemical-dependency programs from eastern USA in 2010 and 2011. Part 1: Bup/nal was present in 93.4% of first (n = 1,282; p drugs were present in 47.7% (n = 655, p =.0261) of samples. Patients who were compliant to the bup/nal prescription were more likely than noncompliant patients to be abstinent during treatment (p =.0012; odds ratio = 1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Part 2: An analysis of all samples collected in 2011 revealed a significant improvement in both compliance (p < 2.2 × 10 -16 ) and abstinence (p < 2.2 × 10 -16 ) during treatment. Conclusion/Importance: While significant use of illicit opioids during treatment with bup/nal is present, improvements in abstinence and high compliance during maintenance-assisted therapy programs may ameliorate fears of diversion in comprehensive programs. Expanded clinical datasets, the treatment modality, location, and year of sampling are important covariates, for further studies. The potential for long-term antireward effects from bup/nal use requires consideration in future investigations.

  7. Effectiveness and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine Versus Sustained-release Tramadol in Patients With Moderate to Severe Musculoskeletal Pain: An 8-Week, Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Multicenter, Active-controlled, Noninferiority Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaomei; Li, Zhanguo; Lv, Houshan; Zheng, Yi; Liu, Yi; Dai, Kerong; Yao, Chen; Yan, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this noninferiority study was to investigate clinical effectiveness and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) in patients with moderate to severe musculoskeletal pain inadequately controlled with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, compared with sustained-release tramadol tablets. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1) to receive low-dose 7-day BTDS (5, 10, and 20 μg/h, maximum dosage of 20 μg/h) or sustained-release tramadol tablets (100 mg, maximum dosage of 400 mg/d) over an 8-week double-blind treatment period (3-week titration, 5-week maintenance). The primary endpoint was the difference in the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores from baseline to treatment completion. Noninferiority was assumed if the treatment difference on the VAS scale was within ±1.5 cm, this threshold indicating a clinically meaningful result. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01476774. Two hundred eighty patients were randomized to BTDS (n=141) or to tramadol (n=139). Both treatments were associated with a significant reduction in pain by the end of the treatment. The least squares mean difference of the change from baseline in VAS scores between the BTDS and tramadol groups were 0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.02 to 0.91), which was within the ±1.5 cm predefined threshold, indicating that the effectiveness of BTDS was not inferior to the effectiveness of sustained-release tramadol tablets. The incidence of adverse events was comparable between the 2 treatment groups. Our results suggest that BTDS is a good therapeutic option for patients experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain of moderate to severe intensity that is insufficiently controlled by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  8. Researcher Women

    OpenAIRE

    Katalin Lipták

    2016-01-01

    I think that the equal opportunity and the underprivileged marginal labour-market layers’ significance play an important role in the economics of our days, so the women’s labour-market participation. Analysing the Hungarian data lines, we can see that the women’s labour-market participation significantly lags behind the men’s. I wish to prove with a questionnaire survey that in the North-Hungarian region the women’s labour-market situation and the career opportunities of the researcher women ...

  9. Researcher Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Lipták

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available I think that the equal opportunity and the underprivileged marginal labour-market layers’ significance play an important role in the economics of our days, so the women’s labour-market participation. Analysing the Hungarian data lines, we can see that the women’s labour-market participation significantly lags behind the men’s. I wish to prove with a questionnaire survey that in the North-Hungarian region the women’s labour-market situation and the career opportunities of the researcher women lags behind the men’s slightly. Based on my research, beyond the women’s traditional home tasks have appeared the claims for work derives from the employment, so the double burden is put into practice, too. we can explain with the difficulties of the compatibility of childbearing and the work, the undertaking extra limited tasks of the workplace, providing extra performance which is sensible for the women, that in the North-Hungarian region the female career path move more slowly than the men’s.

  10. 42 CFR 8.11 - Opioid treatment program certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 823(g)(1)) to dispense opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. An OTP... opioid addiction. (2) To obtain certification from SAMHSA, an OTP must meet the Federal opioid treatment... governmental entities to regulate the use of opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. The provisions...

  11. Healthcare for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Health Care for Women What women with Spina Bilda need to know about sexuality, ... the risk of a urinary tract infection. For women who do not catheterize, they should also urinate ...

  12. Women's Heart Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Email: Click for e-News archive The Women's Heart Foundation is a 501c3 dedicated to prevention, ... Care Initiative® to achieve excellence of care of women. Executive nurses, civic leaders, women survivors and sponsors ...

  13. Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women It is a common misconception that osteoporosis only ... seizures. Are There Any Special Issues for Hispanic Women Regarding Bone Health? Several studies indicate a number ...

  14. Immunization for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACOG Update on Zika Virus Pregnancy Attention pregnant women! Pregnant women, their unborn babies, and newborns have a higher ... a new MMWR Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Pregnant Women - United States, 2016-17 Influenza Season September 26, ...

  15. Women and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  16. Myths, Management and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biles, George E.; Pryatel, Holly A.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses some of the outmoded but still prevailing misconceptions about women in management positions. Suggestions are offered for increasing the number of women managers and providing equal treatment and opportunity for women. (MF)

  17. Women's Earnings: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, women's real earnings rose whereas those of men declined. Even as the gender pay gap narrowed, earnings differences between white women and black and Hispanic women continued to grow. (Author)

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and ... blood sugar. Follow Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled by maintaining a ...

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women with diabetes can make a difference. Other Resources from the FDA FDA Information on Diabetes Treatment ... for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main page content Skip to search Skip to topics menu Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics Mammography Women and ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's ... Archive Combination Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education ...

  6. Women of ATLAS - International Women's Day 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Women play key roles in the ATLAS Experiment: from young physicists at the start of their careers to analysis group leaders and spokespersons of the collaboration. Celebrate International Women's Day by meeting a few of these inspiring ATLAS researchers.

  7. Women NGO's and Women Empowerment in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    more effective and offer greater benefits in the development of Nigeria and. Nigerian women. ... taboos averse to women education should be dismantled. Keywords: ... were gender blind, and gave no specific place to gender issues in Nigeria.

  8. The Case for Women Mentoring Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Betty Ann; Tietjen-Smith, Tara

    2016-01-01

    The authors argue that there will be a critical mass of women in leadership positions in kinesiology and across higher education for substantial gender-based mentoring to take place in the 21st century. First, the current state of women in higher education leadership, trends in mentoring, and the reasons it is important for women who have…

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other ... YourDiabetesInfo.org American Diabetes Association Get Other FDA Publications for Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information ...

  10. The Women's Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Catharine R.; And Others

    Barnard College has created a Women's Center that devotes itself to the task of reaffirming the dignity, autonomy, and equality of women. For too long society has held that women are less rational than men, less capable than men, and thus that educating women is less useful than educating men. Replacing myth with fact is the responsibility of…

  11. Women in 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citizens Advisory Council on the Status of Women, Washington, DC.

    This is a report on the legal, political and social status of women in the year1974. The report includes the laws passed by Congress for equal rights for women, laws for equal pay, amendments that provide for flexible working hours and childbearing leave for women; and some cases of job discrimination against women. Legal amendments to insure…

  12. Long term Suboxone™ emotional reactivity as measured by automatic detection in speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Hill

    Full Text Available Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation's most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states ("true ground emotionality" in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of "true" emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA. Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate "true ground" emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™. We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01, and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction.

  13. Challenges before Women Scientists, Technologists & Engineers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sastry Indrakanti

    Women & Social responsibility. ➢ Women and Human Resource. Development & Management. ➢ Women and Agricultural & Rural. Development. ➢ Women & Technological Development. ➢ Women and Medicine & Health Care. ➢ Women and Education. ➢ Women and Population Growth. ➢ Women and Indian Economy.

  14. Prescription opioid abuse, pain and addiction: clinical issues and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Hillhouse, Maureen

    2011-05-01

    Prescription opioid misuse in the USA has increased over threefold since 1990 to epidemic proportions, with substantial increases in prescription opioid use also reported in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand. The broad availability of prescription pain medications, coupled with public misconceptions about their safety and addictive potential, have contributed to the recent surge in non-medical use of prescription opioids and corresponding increases in treatment admissions for problems related to opioid misuse. Given competing pressures faced by physicians to both diagnose and treat pain syndromes and identify individuals at risk for addictive disorders, the use of opioids in the treatment of pain poses a significant clinical challenge. This paper reviews the interaction between pain and opioid addiction with a focus on clinical management issues, including risk factors for opioid dependence in patients with chronic pain and the use of assessment tools to identify and monitor at-risk individuals. Treatment options for opioid dependence and pain are reviewed, including the use of the partial µ agonist buprenorphine in the management of concurrent pain and opioid addiction. Physicians should strive to find a reasonable balance between minimising potential adverse effects of opioid medications without diminishing legitimate access to opioids for analgesia. The article discusses the need to identify methods for minimising risks and negative consequences associated with opioid analgesics and poses research directions, including the development of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, genetic risk factors for opioid dependence and opioid-induced hyperalgesia as a potential target for medication therapy. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  15. Women and AIDS caregiving: women's work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songwathana, P

    2001-01-01

    In this ethnographic study, I examine personal, kinship, and social obligations and the role of women in the traditional Thai family. Under what circumstances do women take on the responsibility to care or not care, and how do they cope with the disease and care when they are also infected? Fifteen women who were afflicted or affected by HIV/AIDS participated in in-depth interviews and participant observations. Analysis employed mainly qualitative methods following Spradley. I show that women who are responsible for caring for both themselves and others, including members of their immediate families or extended family members, face a double jeopardy by virtue of their inferior role and status. When HIV-infected women experience illness, sometimes they feel split; they are incapable of functioning normally, yet they are obligated to do "What they've got to do." Women as carers feel that they have to care because they want to free someone else from suffering despite the fact that they are also suffering. Women roles as family carers seem to be both psychologically and socially constructed. AIDS care is not just a labour of love, but also is done in the spirit of work following Buddhist beliefs of karma and metta. In conclusion, traditional, persistent gender imbalances and inequalities influence women's sexuality, vulnerability, responsibility, and caregiving. When women become infected with HIV and sick with AIDS, their quality of life drops because of the physical, psychological, cultural value, and economic burdens of care they face. AIDS then necessitates rather than prevents women from fulfilling their multiple roles. Consequently, there is a need for greater support especially among Thai women who are afflicted and affected with AIDS.

  16. Albanian women in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deda, Antoneta; Alushllari, Mirela; Mico, Silvana

    2015-12-01

    In this report, presented at the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, we describe the status of women physicists in Albania and offer some statistical data illustrating the present situation. Undergraduate physics enrollment by girls is high and stable, more women are receiving financial support for doctoral studies, women are well represented in recent academic promotions, and recently women scientists have been appointed to several leadership positions. However, both women and men are challenged by the overall low levels of funding for research and by issues of availability and affordability of child care.

  17. Women in public life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The UN Division for the Advancement of Women publication has devoted an issue to the role of women in public lie based on an analysis of women's status in industrialized countries presented in Vienna, Austria, in May 1991. Women already contribute to political life and make a difference in politics, but societal institutions and government processes have not yet adapted to this fact. Women's nongovernmental organizations promote women's interests at the governmental level, but often do not have the economic or political power as do other interests groups such as trade unions. Women often participation public life via their membership in women's organizations, community action groups, voluntary organizations, and other close to home groups. They prefer to participate in activities which are problem solving rather than institution building. These activities and groups operate outside established political institutions and are not considered as part of public and political life. Society's exclusion of women from leadership positions in public life keeps it from benefiting from the special contributions that women bring to decision making. Women show a tendency to have different leadership styles than men (e.g., ability to relate to people affected by their decisions), which are most needed for the modern world. They often do not campaign just for women's issues, but, once in office, they do tend to become more involved in women's issues. Women have affected positive changes in career and child care, often on a non-Socialist agenda, in various countries (e.g. Norway). This effect is referred to as the politics of motherhood. More access to politics and public life calls for removal of structural and situational barriers including the glass ceiling, discrimination, insufficient funds, and bearing most of the responsibility for child care. The UN women's groups has drafted a platform for interregional consultation on women's role in public life and scheduled the 4th

  18. Breast Pain in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effective, some women feel better when changing bra styles and cutting back on salt and caffeine. Breast ... Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care ...

  19. Women and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Women and Alcohol Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Women react differently than men to alcohol and face higher risks from it. Pound for ...

  20. Women and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV: Get the Facts on HIV Testing, Prevention, and Treatment Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... How can you lower your chance of HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  1. Toxoplasmosis and Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Pregnant Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... my unborn child against toxoplasmosis? Cat owners and women who are exposed to cats should follow the ...

  2. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consultations, and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Infection with ... of parasites can lead to unique consequences for women. Some examples are given below. Infection with Toxoplasma ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Women For Women Homepage FDA Diabetes Information for Patients Page Last Updated: 02/16/2018 Note: If ... FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory Committees Regulatory Information Safety Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicines and Devices Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the ... Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health is partnering ...

  6. Women Veteran Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report summarizes the history of women Veterans in the military and as Veterans. It profiles the characteristics of women Veterans in 2015, and illustrates how...

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  8. Gestational Diabetes and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This women's health podcast focuses on gestational diabetes (GDM) to help educate women who may have been diagnosed with GDM now or in the past. GDM is a condition that can lead to pregnancy complications.

  9. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More ... Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety ...

  10. Improving women's lives

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC has supported poor women in develop- ing countries ... and business management. Thanks to ... to local levels has changed the face of gov- ... Although formidable challenges ... Technology helps Asian women balance family and work.

  11. Reforming Water, Adding Women?

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Karen Kershaw

    Progressive social movements around water and women's rights. • Drought prone state ... What role does civil society (NGOs, CBOs, networks, academia) play in this ... Women's presence in the public sphere improved but class, caste, martial ...

  12. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  13. National Women's Science Congress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TSC

    This National Women's Science Congress is planned essentially to bring women to the forefront ... The following areas are indicative of this wide coverage, in each of which ... C. V. Raman, two great scientists of the world; Marie Curie Mahila.

  14. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... on testing your blood sugar. Follow Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled ... Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National ...

  15. College Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health - Learn the facts about HPV, HIV, and birth control. College Women's Social Media Toolkit - Share health tips with your campus community. College Women's Campaign - Find out how your school can join. Sign up for email alerts. Order ...

  16. Adult Education for Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagappa, T. R.

    1980-01-01

    Apathy, indifference, and neglect has characterized adult education for women in India. The National Adult Education Programme must focus attention and funding on women if the extremely low percentage of female literacy is to be improved. (SK)

  17. Heart Failure in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Biykem; Khalaf, Shaden

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in women, and they tend to develop it at an older age compared to men. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is more common in women than in men and accounts for at least half the cases of heart failure in women. When comparing men and women who have heart failure and a low left ventricular ejection fraction, the women are more symptomatic and have a similarly poor outcome. Overall recommendations for guideline-directed medical therapies show no differences in treatment approaches between men and women. Overall, women are generally underrepresented in clinical trials for heart failure. Further studies are needed to shed light into different mechanisms, causes, and targeted therapies of heart failure in women. PMID:29744014

  18. Women and schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Thara, R.; Kamath, Shantha

    2015-01-01

    Women's mental health is closely linked to their status in society. This paper outlines the clinical features of women with schizophrenia and highlights the interpersonal and social ramifications on their lives. There is no significant gender difference in the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia. There is no clear trend in mortality, although suicides seem to be more in women with schizophrenia. In India, women face a lot of problems, especially in relation to marriage, pregnancy, child...

  19. Women Fellows of INSA | Women in Science | Initiatives | Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Initiatives; Women in Science; Women Fellows of INSA. Women Fellows of INSA. INSA - Indian National Science Academy ... Charusita Chakravarty, one of the stars of our community of women scientists, at a young age of 52, after a ...

  20. Women Young Scientists of INSA | Women in Science | Initiatives ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Initiatives; Women in Science; Women Young Scientists of INSA. Women Young Scientists of INSA. INSA - Indian National Science Academy .... Charusita Chakravarty, one of the stars of our community of women scientists, at a young ...

  1. Women in Leading Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The questions related to the role of women in the world of labour and to the rate of female and male employees are issues that have been discussed since long ago. Equality of women and the fight against the discrimination of women are hot topics not only for the "weaker sex" as there are abundant research and literature dealing with the…

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... raise awareness about diverse women of different ages, races, ethnic backgrounds, and health conditions participating in clinical trials. Visit the Women in Clinical Trials webpage to learn how women with diabetes can make a difference. Other Resources from the FDA FDA Information on ...

  3. Women of Niger Delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Religion Dept

    The Indispensability of Women in Conflict Resolution in the Niger Delta ... The situation leads to a shift in gender roles with a dramatic increase in the number of women .... organization is to work in partnership with the Nigerian Government and the .... that “women are the impartial arbitrators in family or clan disputes or.

  4. Teaching Women's History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, George

    1995-01-01

    Argues that women's history should stress the broad sociological view of women's roles not only in politics but in mundane, day-to-day life throughout all of history, rather that reducing women's history to a few token figures. Notes that many college and secondary texts and testing materials have recognized the trend toward the inclusion of…

  5. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health is partnering with the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health to raise awareness about diverse ...

  6. Managerial Success for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Elaine R.

    1977-01-01

    The author's personal account of her experiences in being promoted from an engineer with limited management responsibility to vice president of a large company in New York City. She notes that many women are still isolated from the executive society, which puts the burden on those women who do achieve positions of power to help those women who…

  7. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women ...

  8. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skip to common links HHS U.S. Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ...

  9. Women's Work in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, D. Radha; Ravindran, M.

    1983-01-01

    The proportion of women in paid employment in India is very low, and working women tend to be concentrated in low-wage, low-status, unskilled jobs, especially in agriculture. Even for the few women working in the modern sector, discrimination is pervasive, and change seems unlikely to occur soon. (IS)

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Devices Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical ...

  11. Workplace Safety and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on four important issues for women at work: job stress, work schedules, reproductive health, and workplace violence.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women's Health (OWH) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  12. Psychotherapy and Women's Liberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean

    1976-01-01

    Personality theories and scientific data on women frequently contribute negatively to the psychotherapy of female clients. This paper examines some of the background factors which have shaped our information about women, and then reviews some contemporaneous approaches to the therapy of women. (Author)

  13. Women, the Poorer Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Maureen

    The purpose of this document is to present statistics which show clearly that poverty is a women's issue. The position of poor women relative to the total population living below the Federal poverty line is demonstrated. Income levels are analyzed to reveal the percentages of women whose annual income is below $5,000. The relationship of income…

  14. Pennsylvania Women's Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towns, Kathryn; And Others

    Women have undergone a revolution in their self-perception and their traditional relationships to work, money, marriage, and family. These social changes have implications for every aspect of women's lives, including their mental health. Because of the special problems and conflicts confronting women today, data need to be analyzed on policies,…

  15. Educating Women in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Sally

    1987-01-01

    Surveys literature on the history of coeducation, focusing on the marginalization of women. Discusses these themes: republican education; female literacy; the girls' academy; women and the history of teaching; life-cycle patterns; the migration of teachers from New England; black women teachers; urbanization and feminization; immigration; students…

  16. Longevity of Women Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Kim C.

    2014-01-01

    Public schools are facing a leadership crisis regarding the lack of women superintendents in the United States. Although, historically, women have dominated the positions of classroom teachers and outnumbered men in receiving administrative leadership certificates, there is a disproportion in the number of men and women superintendents leading the…

  17. [Health for women; women for health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This document describes a proposed new health policy for Colombian women. The rationale for the new policy, known as "Health for women, women for health", is discussed, and the general and specific objectives, program description, actions and strategies are presented for each of 5 subprograms. The subprograms cover health promotion and self-care for women, reproductive and sexual health care, prevention of abuse and services for women and children who are victims of violence, mental health, and occupational health Changes in Colombian society and living conditions and in the role of women over the past few decades have been reflected in changing epidemiologic profiles, life expectancy, and demands placed on health services. The Health for women, women for health policy takes into account social discrimination against women and its impact on female health. The subprogram of health promotion and self-care is intended to complement, reinforce, and broaden preventive interventions already offered by the health services. The subprogram will require a mobile interdisciplinary team to conduct educational campaigns and to coordinate activities. Promotional actions include staff training in a gender focus on health and health policy for women, development of a health manual for women, and a mass media campaign on self-care for women. The subprogram for reproductive health and sexuality will reorient existing maternal health services away from their emphasis on increasing coverage of prenatal care, promoting births in health facilities, and actions to reduce infant mortality and toward services appropriate to the different phases of the female reproductive cycle. The subprogram will include provision of family planning services, preventing and managing high risk pregnancies, providing adequate care in maternity centers for labor and delivery, and preventing avoidable maternal deaths. Reviewing and revising existing legislation to protect reproductive health is among proposed

  18. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Asian American Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Asian American women are at high risk for ... medications. Are There Any Special Issues for Asian Women Regarding Bone Health? Recent studies indicate a number ...

  19. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treximet), and zolmitriptan (Zomig); mirtazapine (Remeron); muscle relaxants; opiate (narcotic) medications for pain control and cough; rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifater, in Rifamate); medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol, Teril, others), phenobarbital, ...

  20. Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  1. Evaluation of tribromoethanol, tribromoethanol-buprenorphine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    and alleviate the stress associated with surgery in laboratory animals. ... Aside from the adverse effects associated with the .... better understand the pathology of osteoarthritis in .... anaesthetic agent can depress the thalamus resulting.

  2. Women and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aegerter, Irene [Sulzer Brothers Limited, Swiss Association ' Women for Energy' (Switzerland)

    1989-07-01

    Surveys in most countries show, that women's attitude towards nuclear energy differ quite a bit from that of men. Why is this so and what can be done about it? The difference is that a cigarette is a familiar risk. But only few women are familiar with nuclear risks, especially radioactivity, be it scientifically or emotionally. Women in general are less inclined to technical subjects. Technical matters still are male. Technical issues are - by education and in schools - (at least in Switzerland) no female subjects. Therefore we have to change this in order to change women's attitudes towards technical subjects. How can women become more technology-oriented?.

  3. Women and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aegerter, Irene

    1989-01-01

    Surveys in most countries show, that women's attitude towards nuclear energy differ quite a bit from that of men. Why is this so and what can be done about it? The difference is that a cigarette is a familiar risk. But only few women are familiar with nuclear risks, especially radioactivity, be it scientifically or emotionally. Women in general are less inclined to technical subjects. Technical matters still are male. Technical issues are - by education and in schools - (at least in Switzerland) no female subjects. Therefore we have to change this in order to change women's attitudes towards technical subjects. How can women become more technology-oriented?

  4. Bipolar Disorder in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The research on gender's role in bipolar disorders has drawn significant interest recently. The presentation and course of bipolar disorder differs between women and men. Women experience depressive episodes, dysphoric mood, mixed states, rapid cycling and seasonal patterns more often than men. Comorbidity, particularly thyroid disease, migraine, obesity, and anxiety disorders laso occur more frequently in women than men. On the other hand men with bipolar disorder are also more likely than women to have problems with drug or alcohol abuse. The pregnancy and postpartum period is a time of high risk for onset and recurrence of bipolar disorder in women.

  5. Women in Leading Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rácz Anita

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The questions related to the role of women in the world of labour and to the rate of female and male employees are issues that have been discussed since long ago. Equality of women and the fight against the discrimination of women are hot topics not only for the “weaker sex” as there are abundant research and literature dealing with the question whether feminism, the lengthy pursuit for the equality of women can be regarded successful or there are still much to do for the elimination of negative discrimination of women at workplaces. In this context, I examine in my study whether the increasing of the share of female employees, the action plans on raising the share of executive positions filled by women, and the related conferences live up to the expectations, and can women really have the same place on the labour market as men have.

  6. Hypertension in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Eduardo

    2012-02-01

    Hypertension is an important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality, and a highly prevalent condition in both men and women. However, the prevalence of hypertension is predicted to increase more among women than men. Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) can induce hypertension in a small group of women and, increase CV risk especially among those with hypertension. Both COC-related increased CV risk and blood pressure (BP) returns to pretreatment levels by 3 months of its discontinuation. The effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on BP are controversial, and COCs and HRT containing the new generation progestin drospirenone are preferred in women with established hypertension. Despite the high incidence of cancer in women, CV disease remains the major cause of death in women and comparable benefit of antihypertensive treatment have been demonstrated in both women and men.

  7. Violence against Amazon women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Vera Lúcia de Azevedo; Souza, Maria de Lourdes de; Monticelli, Marisa; Oliveira, Marília de Fátima Vieira de; Souza, Carlos Benedito Marinho de; Costa, Carlos Alberto Leal da; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative and exploratory study analyzed violence against Amazon women presented in print media according to type and severity, and whether aggressors fell under the Maria da Penha law. A total of 181 issues of a regional newspaper were consulted. Based on content analysis, 164 items addressing violence against women were selected and 46 were included in the corpus of analysis. Results were gathered in three thematic groups: women killed with cruelty, sexual violence against women regardless of age, and violence against women and the limitations of the Maria da Penha law. Violence against these women varied in terms of form and severity, including up to homicide. Women are submitted to sexual violence from childhood through adulthood. The enforcement of this law shows the community it has a means to cope with this social phenomenon.

  8. Women scientists joining Rokkasho women to sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aratani, Michi [Office of Regional Collaboration, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Sasagawa, Sumiko

    1999-09-01

    Women scientists generally play a great role in the public acceptance (PA) for the national policy of atomic energy developing in Japan. The reason may be that, when a woman scientist stands in the presence of women audience, she will be ready to be accepted by them as a person with the same gender, emotion and thought to themselves. A case of interchange between the Rokkasho women and the women scientists either resident at the nuclear site of Rokkasho or staying for a short time at Rokkasho by invitation has been described from the viewpoint of PA for the national policy of atomic energy developing, and more fundamentally, for promotion of science education. (author)

  9. Women residents, women physicians and medicine's future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Karen

    2007-08-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased dramatically in the last few decades, and women now represent half of all incoming medical students. Yet residency training still resembles the historical model when there were few women in medicine. This article reviews the issues facing women in residency today. Data suggest that the experience of female residents is more negative than that of males. Unique challenges facing female residents include the existence of gender bias and sexual harassment, a scarcity of female mentors in leadership positions, and work/family conflicts. Further research is needed to understand the experience of female residents and to identify barriers that hinder their optimal professional and personal development. Structural and cultural changes to residency programs are needed to better accommodate the needs of female trainees.

  10. Women scientists joining Rokkasho women to sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aratani, Michi; Sasagawa, Sumiko

    1999-01-01

    Women scientists generally play a great role in the public acceptance (PA) for the national policy of atomic energy developing in Japan. The reason may be that, when a woman scientist stands in the presence of women audience, she will be ready to be accepted by them as a person with the same gender, emotion and thought to themselves. A case of interchange between the Rokkasho women and the women scientists either resident at the nuclear site of Rokkasho or staying for a short time at Rokkasho by invitation has been described from the viewpoint of PA for the national policy of atomic energy developing, and more fundamentally, for promotion of science education. (author)

  11. Women in physics in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierron-Bohnes, Véronique [CNRS-University of Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2015-12-31

    We present six associations and entities working in France on issues of women in physics: the Women and Physics Commission, French Physical Society; Women in Nuclear (WiN) France; Women and Science Association; Mission for the Place of Women at CNRS; Parity, Diversity, and Women Network, CEA; and the Network of University Equality-Diversity Representatives.

  12. Women's Athletics: Coping with Controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoepner, Barbara J., Ed.

    This book is a collection of papers discussing controversial topics in women's athletics. Section one, "Overview--Women's Rights," includes articles on women's rights and equal opportunities in sports, the emergence of women in sports, and significant events in a century of American women's sports. Section two, "Women's Intercollegiate…

  13. Women in physics in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierron-Bohnes, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    We present six associations and entities working in France on issues of women in physics: the Women and Physics Commission, French Physical Society; Women in Nuclear (WiN) France; Women and Science Association; Mission for the Place of Women at CNRS; Parity, Diversity, and Women Network, CEA; and the Network of University Equality-Diversity Representatives

  14. Women's dreaming: women, sexuality and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, E

    1996-01-01

    This essay opens by invoking the dreams of women that arise from their life experiences and lead women, despite their powerlessness, to desire to create a different kind of society. The essay continues by exploring the relationship between analysis and practice and the contention that analysis of a problem shapes development practice, social policy, research priorities, and activism. Poverty provides an example of a complex, chaotic phenomenon that is often reduced to simplistic, measurable variables such as income or consumption deprivation. Attention is then paid to the population debate where linkages between the analytical framework and program development are clear. These simplified linkages led to macro analysis of events played out on the micro level and to the choice of women rather than men as the most effective change agents. The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, however, gave rise to a new analytical framework emphasizing women's empowerment, women's health, women's rights, and men's participation and responsibility. This approach embraces the complexity of the situation and, thus, provides a road map for effective programs and policies. The next section of the essay considers gender analysis and how this concept leads to a demand on the part of women for access to men's privileges and a climate of confrontation arising from this demand. The inadequacies of using a woman-centered gender analysis as a framework for understanding male behavior are also discussed. Alternative concepts from the feminist movement are explored for their usefulness in generating social change, and the efforts of the Bangladesh Rural Achievement Committee to improve female literacy are used as an example of the value of cooperative, consciousness-raising groups. It is concluded that radical changes will be required to realize women's dreams of social changes.

  15. First Mayan Women's Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teissedre, S

    1997-01-01

    In October 1997, over 200 participants attended the First Mayan Women's Congress in Mexico and called for financial assistance, capacity building, and training to help Mayan women escape poverty. The Congress was initiated by the UN Development Fund for Women in collaboration with the Small Grants Program of the UN Development Program. Traditionally, Mayan women and men have played distinct roles in society, and efforts are underway to increase gender sensitivity and achieve a new balance of power. Mayan women attending the Congress reported that they face daily challenges in gaining their husbands' approval for participation in income-generating activities outside of the home. Eventually, however, some husbands also start working in these enterprises and are learning to assume their share of domestic responsibilities. Mayan women have been forced to reevaluation their role in society by a prevailing agricultural and environmental crisis as well as a high unemployment rate. Crafts that were once produced only for household consumption are now considered for export. Because the women need funds to initiate income-generating activities, the Conference linked women's groups with development practitioners, policy-makers, and donors. The women requested financial aid for more than 30 specific projects, and Congress participants agreed to pursue innovate strategies to support the enterprises with funds, training, and technical assistance. The Congress also encouraged environmental nongovernmental organizations to include Mayan women in mainstream development activities. This successful Congress will be duplicated in other Mexican states.

  16. Women and political representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, P B

    1999-01-01

    A remarkable progress in women's participation in politics throughout the world was witnessed in the final decade of the 20th century. According to the Inter-Parliamentary Union report, there were only eight countries with no women in their legislatures in 1998. The number of women ministers at the cabinet level worldwide doubled in a decade, and the number of countries without any women ministers dropped from 93 to 48 during 1987-96. However, this progress is far from satisfactory. Political representation of women, minorities, and other social groups is still inadequate. This may be due to a complex combination of socioeconomic, cultural, and institutional factors. The view that women's political participation increases with social and economic development is supported by data from the Nordic countries, where there are higher proportions of women legislators than in less developed countries. While better levels of socioeconomic development, having a women-friendly political culture, and higher literacy are considered favorable factors for women's increased political representation, adopting one of the proportional representation systems (such as a party-list system, a single transferable vote system, or a mixed proportional system with multi-member constituencies) is the single factor most responsible for the higher representation of women.

  17. Brazilian women in politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, T G

    1987-01-01

    Women are gradually gaining influence in Brazilian politics, especially since recent advances in the women's movement, but they still play a limited role. There have been journals devoted to feminism and some notable feminists since 1850. In 1932 suffragettes in Brazil gained women the right to vote. Women's associations burgeoned in the 1940s and 1950s, culminating in a peak in number of women in national elected positions in 1965. A repressive military regime reversed the process, which resumed in 1975. 1975 was also significant for the Brazilian women's movement because of the U.N. Women's Year. Several large, influential feminist political action groups were formed, typically by upper class women with leftist views, although some church and union groups from lower classes also appeared. In 1979-1981, the coherence of these groups fell into schism and fragmentation, because of disagreements over the feminist political doctrines and roles, views on legality of abortion, and special interest groups such as lesbians. Another bitter dispute is opposition by leftist women to BEMFAM, the Brazilian Society of Family Welfare, which provides family planning for the poor: leftists oppose BEMFAM because it is supported by funds from "imperialist" countries such as the U.S. There are several types of feminists groups: those that emphasize health, sexuality and violence; those composed of lesbians; those originating from lower classes and unions; publicly instituted organizations. Brazilian law forbids discrimination against women holding public office, but in reality very few women actually do hold office, except for mayors of small towns and a few administrators of the Education and Social Security ministries. Political office in Brazil is gained by clientism, and since women rarely hold powerful positions in business, they are outsiders of the system. Brazilian women have achieved much, considering the low female literacy rate and traditional power system, but their

  18. Women in service uniforms

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna Karaszewska; Maciej Muskała

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the problems of women who work in the uniformed services with the particular emphasis on the performing of the occupation of the prison service. It presents the legal issues relating to equal treatment of men and women in the workplace, formal factors influencing their employment, the status of women in prison, and the problems of their conducting in the professional role. The article also presents the results of research conducted in Poland and all over the world, on th...

  19. Chlamydia and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-02

    This women's health podcast focuses on chlamydia, its severe health consequences for women if left untreated, and the importance of annual chlamydia screening.  Created: 4/2/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 4/2/2009.

  20. WOMEN IN FAMILY BUSINESS

    OpenAIRE

    Mr Anshu

    2012-01-01

    The role of women in family businesses is explored in the paper. Although recognized as generally very important players, the role of women is often defined as invisible in business decision-making, supportive in men’s traditional business domains and only rarelyadequately recognized and rewarded. The paper explores possible differences in the views of men and women who manage small family firms. Their attitudes opposing the traditional business roles ofwomen, different views on managerial, o...

  1. Women And Leadership Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Parikh Indira J

    2003-01-01

    Women and Leadership Roles is culled from workshops conducted by Prof. Indira Parikh at the IIMA. From 1980 till date programmes exploring issues facing Women in Management are offered at the Institute. Issues surrounding leadership, work roles and authority are debated. The objectives are to explore the influence of the transformation of organisations on womens roles in the corporate world; to explore leadership roles and also individual life-spaces; to discover wholesome ways to actualise d...

  2. Obesity and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on obesity in women and girls. It discusses obesity-related health risks and includes tips to help achieve and maintain a healthy weight.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  3. Women in Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell Ferster, Ashley P; Hu, Amanda

    2017-08-01

    Advances in gender equality have been sought in the field of medicine for centuries, including the specialty of otolaryngology. Currently, about 14.5% of practicing otolaryngologists are women. Strides have been made to support equality by the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery through the development of the Women in Otolaryngology Section in 2010, among other efforts. This article reviews the literature of women in otolaryngology, as well as current trends toward equality among otolaryngologists of all genders.

  4. Hypertension in women

    OpenAIRE

    Hage, Fadi G; Mansur, Sulaf J; Xing, Dongqi; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in both men and women. The prevalence and severity of hypertension rise markedly with age, and blood pressure control becomes more difficult with aging in both genders, particularly in women. In addition, there are forms of hypertension that occur exclusively in women, e.g., hypertension related to menopause, oral contraceptive use, or pregnancy (e.g., chronic hypertension, gestationa...

  5. Women in crime

    OpenAIRE

    Campaniello, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, women’s participation in the labor market has increased considerably in most countries and is converging toward the participation rate of men. Though on a lesser scale, a similar movement toward gender convergence seems to be occurring in the criminal world, though many more men than women still engage in criminal activity. Technological progress and social norms have freed women from the home, increasing their participation in both the labor market and the crime market. ...

  6. Gestational Diabetes and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on gestational diabetes (GDM) to help educate women who may have been diagnosed with GDM now or in the past. GDM is a condition that can lead to pregnancy complications.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  7. Women in service uniforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Karaszewska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problems of women who work in the uniformed services with the particular emphasis on the performing of the occupation of the prison service. It presents the legal issues relating to equal treatment of men and women in the workplace, formal factors influencing their employment, the status of women in prison, and the problems of their conducting in the professional role. The article also presents the results of research conducted in Poland and all over the world, on the functioning of women in prison and their relations with officers of the Prison Service, as well as with inmates.

  8. Women in Meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemone, Margaret A.; Waukau, Patricia L.

    1982-11-01

    The names of 927 women who are or have been active in meteorology or closely related fields have been obtained from various sources. Of these women, at least 500 are presently active. An estimated 4-5% of the total number of Ph.D.s in meteorology are awarded to women. About 10% of those receiving B.S. and M.S. degrees are women.The work patterns, accomplishments, and salaries of employed women meteorologists have been summarized from 330 responses to questionnaires, as functions of age, family status, part- or full-time working status, and employing institutions. It was found that women meteorologists holding Ph.D.s are more likely than their male counterparts to be employed by universities. As increasing number of women were employed in operational meteorology, although few of them were married and fewer still responsible for children. Several women were employed by private industry and some had advanced into managerial positions, although at the present time, such positions remain out of the reach of most women.The subjective and objective effects of several gender-related factors have been summarized from the comments and responses to the questionnaires. The primary obstacles to advancement were found to be part-time work and the responsibility for children. Part-time work was found to have a clearly negative effect on salary increase as a function of age. prejudicated discrimination and rules negatively affecting women remain important, especially to the older women, and affirmative action programs are generally seen as beneficial.Surprisingly, in contrast to the experience of women in other fields of science, women Ph.D.s in meteorology earn salaries comparable of their employment in government or large corporations and universities where there are strong affirmative action programs and above-average salaries. Based on the responses to the questionnaire, the small size of the meteorological community is also a factor, enabling women to become recognized

  9. Health of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the problems that women face in social, health, and nutritional areas in India. India's 135th ranking in the Human Development Index reflects the marginalization of women, the aged, the poor, the disabled, lower castes, and other neglected groups. The sex ratio has declined. Maternal mortality is high. 84% of rural women and 42% of urban women rely on untrained persons during childbirth. The systems of education, religion, health care, law, employment, and the mass media promote gender discrimination. Patriarchal structures resist efforts to build a gendered perspective and to provide gender sensitivity within health care and development. Women experience deficits in educational development, rest, food, recreation, and freedom of movement and action. Girls lack sufficient breast feeding and health care from a health system that is 80% private. 40% of the population is poor and needs access to affordable health services. Inadequate diets and nutrition have long term health consequences. Women's health deteriorates due to early marriage and childbearing. Adequate nutrition is exacerbated by high food prices, limits in the Public Distribution System, and the shift to non-edible cash crops. The family planning program focuses on women, despite the prevailing belief that women are not in a position to make decisions. Responsible use of modern contraception requires adequate health infrastructure, personnel, and gender sensitivity. The new emphasis on reproductive health must address the issues of unsafe abortion, reproductive tract infections, women's domestic burden, violence, and mental health.

  10. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  11. Married Professional Women: How They Feel about the Women's Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Janet Dreyfus

    1979-01-01

    Investigated how married professional women feel about the women's movement. Data revealed that the majority were working to change societal definitions of women's roles but that a sizable minority had little interest in the women's movement. The women's movement has also brought about increased role conflicts for many. (Author/BEF)

  12. (Non) value in women`s magazines

    OpenAIRE

    Denisa Elena CHIRIŢĂ

    2012-01-01

    Dedicated to a specific audience, women willing to be professionally successful and financially independent, the current magazines for women tend to alter the feminism`s mission stated at the beginning of the XXth century. It seems that the “new woman”, promoted by those magazines, has a single purpose: not to hide anymore her sexuality. The pages dedicated to this „liberation” abound in diets, pieces of advice, testimonials of a “more exciting sex”1, daily sensuality, leading towards a new p...

  13. Jobs: women's double burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Whereas international conventions and national laws provide equal opportunities for women in employment, the reality of women's lives keeps a disproportionate number of women unemployed, underemployed, and living in poverty. The UN itself, which officially is working toward equity among its employees, has a staff composed of just 32.6% women, and women comprise only 10.5% of the top end of the hierarchy. In areas where women's labor force participation has increased dramatically, women typically earn 30-40% less than men doing the same job or else their employment is limited to "traditional female" service positions. The fact that women and girls have received an inadequate education makes it extremely difficult to break the barriers of discrimination in developing countries. The empowerment of women will break the education barrier, and, when that falls, many other barriers will follow suit. Efforts are already underway to break structural barriers caused by economic and social policies. For example, a more flexible pattern of work has been proposed which will include the voluntary assumption of flexible hours, job-sharing, and part-time work. The concept of work is also being broadened to include the important human services that women traditionally provide on a volunteer basis. This will lead to a valuation of women's contribution to society which can be added to calculations of gross domestic product. Women also need protection as they attempt to eke out a living in the informal sector which has been the traditional avenue for women to earn money. This sector is not protected by law and is subject to extortion by officials and by male competitors. A variety of measures is under consideration to increase the protection of informal sector workers. Women also need protection in the conventional work place, especially as they enter fields traditionally reserved for men. These questions are important even in the context of global unemployment because these issues

  14. Health screenings for women over age 65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - women - over age 65; Physical exam - women - over age 65; Yearly exam - women - over age 65; Checkup - women - over age 65; Women's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - women - over ...

  15. Review: Disabled Addicted Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Hemmati

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Women have suffered from drug abuse for conturies, although formal Treatment assistance for women has been recognized as important only during the past few decades. The nature and underlying reasons for women's drug abuse differ from men’s behavior in many ways. It is finally understood that research on men will not simply translate into effective solutions for women as well. Here deal with the many issues that can arise in working with disabled women suffered from drug abuse because biologically, Culturally, and socially, their experience is different from that of men and other women and key theme For this discourse is that a woman who suffered from drug abuse is first and foremost a woman. Disabled women also have specific issues that must acknowledge and incorporate into the counseling, social work and other experince, so, here review is based on more than 25 years of the collective experience and firsthand knowledge of Monique Cohen and their Counselors at The CASPAR outpatient Clinic in Cambridge, Massachusett (2000 about women with drug abuse and alcoholism. The clinic Provides omprehensive substance abuse treatment to Individuals and Families struggling with either one or multiple addictions.

  16. Women: A Select Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusnerz, Peggy A., Comp.; Pollack, Ann M., Comp.

    This select bibliography lists books, monographs, journals and newsletters which relate to feminism, women's studies, and other perspectives on women. Selections are organized by topic: general, bibliographies, art and literature, biography/autobiography, economics, education, family and marriage, history, politics and sex roles. Also included is…

  17. Women in rural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, I

    1980-01-01

    The integration of women in rural development means something more than mere labor involvement, but there has never been a clear definition of what it means. 4 principal concerns of policy-makers are briefly described as they affect women: unemployment and inadequate employment; 2) the satisfaction of basic needs and women's participation in decision-making; 3) population issues; and 4) rural-to-urban migration. The actual inter-household and inter-personal distribution of more work and higher productivity work could result in some hard-working people working even longer hours because of additional tasks with others losing their intermittent employment opportunities due to mechanization. These contradictions can be particularly acute for women. The non-material basic need of decision-making powers is more important in the case of women than of men, yet the personal status of women is being threatened by the institution-building that accompanies peasant-based agricultural intensification plans and anti-poverty programs. The education of females has been seen as a possible factor favoring family planning. In addition, education for women can mean access to public information and new expectations from life for themselves. At this time more women than men seem to be migrating to towns and cities in a number of countries with varied economic structures. 3 cases studies of agricultural development in Kenya, Bangladesh and Java, Indonesia are presented.

  18. Urinary retention in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary retention in women. Urinary retention in women is often transient and of no known cause. ... stones, constipation, urethral cancer, uterine fibroids ... present with abnormal bladder function secondary to ... (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or myelography ... full blood count, urea, electrolytes and creatinine can ...

  19. Women Deans: Leadership Becoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Carol A.; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.; Koro-Ljungberg, Mirka

    2009-01-01

    The term "leadership" metaphorically embodies a gendered hierarchy of labour. In this study women deans' values were found to be incongruent with the masculine discourse creating inner conflicts and alternative discourses. Data collected from 10 women deans from both male-dominated and female-dominated colleges were used to deconstruct leadership…

  20. Entrepreneurs: Women and Minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Lilialyce

    A program was designed to meet the needs of Kentucky women who wished to supplement their incomes by producing articles in their homes for sale. Its three-phase objective was to identify women who already had knitting skills and train them to produce a finished product; to provide basic knowledge about how to run a small business; and to provide…

  1. Women as Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda L.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses theories that socialization or "the system" cause women's problems in management, contending that both contribute. Analyzes women manager's problems in using and misusing power and coping with stress. Discusses public/private sector differences. Suggests that networking and constructive self-analysis can alleviate some problems. (AYC)

  2. The Modularization of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Yen; Brockmann, C. Thomas

    The standard classification of women's roles into the traditional, dual career, and single parent constellations is unnecessarily restrictive and stereotyping. These categories reflect neither the myriad of role choices facing women today, nor the forces shaping the resulting contexts. This paper focuses upon modules, the component task or…

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression in Older Women More in Women's Health Topics ... Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination ...

  4. Violence against women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiva, M

    1999-01-01

    In India, violence against women is increasing and takes many forms while laws to protect women are ignored. Despite this fact, the new reproductive and child health program ignores sexual violence. Health personnel can respond by: 1) accepting the magnitude of the problem; 2) investigating the deaths of young women; 3) documenting findings; 4) ensuring that sexual abuse is recognized as a public health problem; 5) disseminating findings; 6) ensuring the protection of female field workers; 7) recognizing violence as an occupational health hazard; 8) facilitating the empowerment of women; 9) training women in self-defense; 10) ensuring that colleges and training institutes address violence as a women's health concern; 11) studying the psychological effects of violence; 12) collaborating with the National Commission for Women and the National Human Rights Commission; and 13) advocating for incorporation of sexual violence as a reproductive health issue in the national reproductive health program. In particular, domestic violence is a pervasive violation of women's human rights and has been resistant to social advances because of its "hidden" nature. Domestic violence exists because husbands believe they have an absolute right over the sexuality of their wives. Abusive husbands also abuse their daughters while sons learn violent behavior from their fathers. Crimes must be considered irrespective of whether they are committed outside or inside the home.

  5. Women, Families, and Prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Marian B.; And Others

    Services to imprisoned women under the age of 21 and the effects of incarceration on inmate mothers and their children are the two major subjects discussed in this report of a study conducted at the two state prison facilities for women in North Carolina. Information on these topics was obtained through site visits, interviews with staff and…

  6. Oral Health and Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-12

    This women's health podcast focuses on the importance of maintaining good oral health during pregnancy.  Created: 5/12/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/12/2009.

  7. Women Lead the Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    Female corporate leaders are becoming more common, but that does not mean it was a snap for them to get there. Much has been said about the hard road faced by women who seek top spots in corporate America. Many point out, for instance, that women executives still often are paid less than their male counterparts, and that they face stereotypes,…

  8. Women and Private Pensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Helene A.

    This speech focuses on women and private pension plans, such as private pension coverage and smaller benefit amounts. Pension issues affecting women as employees include participation in plans, vesting, break-in service, benefit accruals, integration with Social Security, sex-based actuarial tables, portability, inflation, and individual…

  9. Career Development of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Anna M., Ed.; Vetter, Louise, Ed.

    The five major papers whose full texts are included address themselves to various topics that can influence the lives of women in their career choices and advancement. Federal Legislation: Impact on Women's Careers, Mary Allen Jolley, discusses sex discrimination, legal gains made over the past 10 years, sex role stereotyping, and vocational…

  10. Women and Land

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Women in many African countries have a legal right to own land, but ... And so, Banda says, “we've come to see that changing the law and the ... Because the people in charge ... women's insecure tenure, despite gender-neutral statutory laws.

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Monitoring Devices FDA Diabetes Information on WebMD Order Free Women's Health Publications Women's Health Information on Twitter Information from Other Government Agencies and Offices National Diabetes Education Program Diabetes Information on MedlinePlus Diabetes and Depression ...

  12. Women in Science Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harassment of Women: Climate, Culture, and Consequences in Academic Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine June 12, 2018, 11 am - 12:30 pm ET Washington, DC Report Discussion Sexual Harassment of Women: Climate . EDUCATION Elementary and Secondary Mathematics and Science Education High School Graduates who Completed

  13. What Women Have Wrought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Marjorie

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four books: "Counter Cultures" (Susan Porter Benson); "Once a Cigar Maker" (Patricia A. Cooper); "To Toil the Livelong Day" (Carol Groneman and Mary Beth North eds.); and "Gender at Work" (Ruth Milkman). The works examine cultural stereotypes about the nature of work and women and they attempt to dispel the ideas that women are less…

  14. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign-up for a ... to help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse Women in Clinical ...

  15. Married Women's Retirement Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Pozzebon; Olivia S. Mitchell

    1986-01-01

    In this paper we examine the economic and family determinants of married women's retirement behavior. A model of wives' retirement decisions is developed and tested empirically using data on working married women. Estimated response parameters are compared to those obtained previously for male workers. Our findings are directly relevant to policy questions regarding pension and Social Security reform.

  16. Women's Health Insurance Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women's Health Policy Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Women’s Health Insurance Coverage Published: Oct 31, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn ... that many women continue to face. Sources of Health Insurance Coverage Employer-Sponsored Insurance: Approximately 57.9 million ...

  17. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  18. [Violence towards pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramek, J; Grzymała-Krzyzostaniak, A; Celewicz, Z; Ronin-Walknowska, E

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of the scale of violence towards pregnant women in the westpomeranian province, the definition of the social-biological profile of women exposed to violence and social-biological profile of their partners. The evaluation of the influence of violence on pregnant women's ending term and the weight of the newborns. 481 women were enrolled and an anonymous study was used in the form of questionnaires. A questionnaire was a modified form of a query-sheet proposed by WHO. 25% of the enrolled women were exposed to physical and psychological (emotional) abuse, 7.1% to psychical violence, women and men exposed to violence in their childhood more often become violent in their adult life. Men that physically abuse pregnant women are often of primary school education, are unemployed, drink alcohol and smoke. Physical abuse by a partner during pregnancy usually experience women with primary school education, who drink and smoke. Violence during pregnancy is usually associated with premature delivery as well as low birth weight of the newborns.

  19. Venous thromboembolism in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Group, ESHRE Capri Workshop; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a specific reproductive health risk for women. METHODS Searches were performed in Medline and other databases. The selection criteria were high-quality studies and studies relevant to clinical reproductive medicine. Summaries were presented and discussed...... is associated with an inherited thrombophilia in men and women. Changes in the coagulation system and in the risk of clinical VTE in women also occur during pregnancy, with the use of reproductive hormones and as a consequence of ovarian stimulation when hyperstimulation syndrome and conception occur together...... therapy (HRT) increases the VTE risk 2- to 4-fold. There is a synergistic effect between thrombophilia and the various reproductive risks. Prevention of VTE during pregnancy should be offered to women with specific risk factors. In women who are at high risk, CHC and HRT should be avoided. CONCLUSIONS...

  20. Injuries in women's basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojian, Thomas H; Ragle, Rosemary B

    2008-03-01

    Women's basketball has changed over time. It is a faster paced game than it was 30 years ago. Greatplayers, like Anne Meyers,who was the first, and only, woman to be signed to an NBA contract, would agree today's game is different. The game is played mostly "below the rim" but with players like Candice Parker, Sylvia Fowles and Maya Moore able to dunk the ball, the game is still changing. The one thing that remains constant in basketball, especially women's basketball, is injury. The majority of injuries in women's basketball are similar to those in men's basketball. Studies at the high school and college level show similar injury rates between women and men. ACL injuries are one exception, with female athletes having atwo to four times higher rate ofACL injuries. In this article, we review the common injuries in women's basketball. We discuss treatment issues and possible preventive measures.

  1. 121 WOMEN AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: IGBO WOMEN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their economy is the major area of importance over other sectors of life. They ensured that .... instance, a woman must have her husband's consent to open a bank account. Women are known ... in gainful employment because she should stay at home and depend on her husband and .... Okpoko, A.I. (2002). Empowering ...

  2. Discrimination against women and the human rights of women

    OpenAIRE

    Žunić Natalija

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the concept of the human rights of women and its connection with the phenomenon and the instances of discrimination against women. Discrimination against women, its social visibility and the fight against it, within the idea of the rights and the equality of women, are a source of many theoretical debates. Academic discussions and a powerful influence of the women's movement have brought about the establishment and the exercise of the human rights of women at different...

  3. International Women's Day speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts.

  4. Low Sex Drive in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low sex drive in women Overview Women's sexual desires naturally fluctuate over the years. Highs and lows commonly coincide ... used for mood disorders also can cause low sex drive in women. If your lack of interest ...

  5. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Hispanic Women “I thought it couldn’t be true,” says ... disease is their No. 1 killer. Why Hispanic women? While heart disease doesn’t discriminate, you could ...

  6. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  7. Financial Literacy Education for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarecke, Jodi; Taylor, Edward W.; Hira, Tahira K.

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the pedagogical approaches of four women's financial literacy education programs, this chapter provides an overview of trends and needs in financial education for women and offers pedagogical strategies for teaching women about finance.

  8. Migration of women: Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Ivnik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is a result of a field work in three asylum seekers centres in Serbia. The author deals with migrant and refugee women's experiences on the western Balkan route. The methodology used is mainly semi-structured and un-structured interviews with migrants, employees in asylum seekers centres and local inhabitants. The article examines the specific experiences of migrant and refugee women on their way into Europe. It focuses on the different forms of violence they face, on the experiences of pregnant women and on the changes to their situations during the mobility process. It further deals with the legislation concerning refugees and tries to show how legislation indirectly creates threats to women migrants while at the same time depriving them of power and victimizing them. It is based on understanding the legislature as a male-centred, which means that it is mainly shaped by experiences of men while often not examining the specific experiences and needs of women. The author notes that refugee women need to submit to the dominant representation of them as victims, even though there is a great deal of autonomy, solidarity and perseverance in the stories of the women interviewed.

  9. Women and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, A

    1996-01-01

    Smoking kills over half a million women each year and is the most important preventable cause of female premature death in several developed countries. However, in many countries, cigarette smoking still tends to be regarded as a mainly male problem. This paper explores the reasons why more attention needs to be paid to issues around smoking and women, even in countries which currently have low levels of female cigarette smoking. The article includes an overview of current patterns and trends of smoking among women, and the factors which influence smoking uptake and cessation in women compared to men. The experience of countries with the longest history of widespread female smoking is used to identify some of the key challenges facing developed and developing countries. Tobacco companies have identified women as a key target group, therefore particular attention is given to the ways in which they have attempted to reach women through advertising and other marketing strategies. It is concluded that in order to halt and ultimately reverse the tobacco epidemic among women, tobacco control policies need to encompass both gender-specific and gender-sensitive approaches. Examples are given of the types of action that are needed in relation to research, public policy and legislation, and education.

  10. Osteoporosis in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdahl, Bente L

    2017-07-01

    The scope of this review was to review the newest developments in the context of the existing knowledge on premenopausal bone fragility. Fragility fractures are common in postmenopausal women and men and diagnostic criteria for osteoporosis have been agreed and multiple pharmacological treatments have been developed over the last 25 years. In premenopausal women, fragility fractures and very low bone mass are uncommon and osteoporosis in premenopausal women has therefore attracted much less interest. Recent studies have highlighted that lifestyle and dietary habits affect premenopausal bone mass. Bone mass may be improved by sufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D together with increased physical activity in premenopausal women with idiopathic osteoporosis. If pharmacological treatment is needed, teriparatide has been demonstrated to efficiently increase bone mass; however, no fracture studies and no comparative studies against antiresorptive therapies have been conducted. Pregnancy affects bone turnover and mass significantly, but pregnancy-associated osteoporosis is a rare and heterogeneous condition. The diagnosis of osteoporosis should only be considered in premenopausal women with existing fragility fractures, diseases or treatments known to cause bone loss or fractures. Secondary causes of osteoporosis should be corrected or treated if possible. The women should be recommended sufficient intake of calcium and vitamin and physical activity. In women with recurrent fractures or secondary causes that cannot be eliminated, for example glucocorticoid or cancer treatment, pharmacological intervention with bisphosphonates or teriparatide (not in the case of cancer) may be considered.

  11. Women's work in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonder, Bette R; Bazyk, Susan; Reilly, Bridget; Toyota, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe women's work in Maya communities in the Guatemala Highlands, along with some of the trends accompanying the rapid societal change there. Over the course of six years, observations and interviews focused on two specific groups of women. The first were traditional, home-based women, the second, teachers in a primary school. Resulting transcripts and field notes were analyzed by the researchers to identify themes related to the women's perspectives on work, the patterns of their work activities, and the importance of work in their lives. Women who had been interviewed were asked to reflect on the themes identified. All the women engaged in paid work activities and were responsible for obligatory tasks in the home. The traditional group preserved the tradition of weaving, but remained largely illiterate, while the emerging group was literate, but did not learn to weave. Cultural change is both positive and negative, as described by these women. It is important to understand the particular values of the culture, and to recognize that these may not conform to Western (that is to say U.S.) beliefs and practices.

  12. Women, 'madness' and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardes, Jennifer Jane

    2018-03-21

    The positive relationship between exercise and mental health is often taken for granted in today's society, despite the lack of academic literature evidencing this symbiosis. Gender is considered a significant determinant in a number of mental health diagnoses. Indeed, women are considered twice as likely as men to experience the most pervasive mental health condition, depression. Exercise for women's mental health is promoted through various macrolevel charity, as well as microlevel, campaigns that influence government healthcare policy and National Health Service guidelines. Indeed, 'exercise prescriptions' in the treatment of depression is not uncommon. Yet, this link between exercise as a treatment for women's mental health has not always been so pervasive. In fact, an examination of asylum reports and medical journals from the late 19th century highlights a significant shift in attitude towards the role of exercise in the treatment of women's emotional states and mental health. This paper specifically examines how this treatment of women's mental health through exercise has moved from what might be regarded as a focus on exercise as a 'cause' of women's mental ailments to exercise promoted as a 'cure'. Unpacking the changing medical attitudes towards exercise for women in line with larger sociopolitical and historic contexts reveals that while this shift towards exercise promotion might prima facie appear as a less essentialist view of women and their mental and physical states, it inevitably remains tied to larger policy and governance agendas. New modes of exercise 'treatment' for women's mental health are not politically neutral and, thus, what appear to emerge as forms of liberation are, in actuality, subtler forms of regulation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  14. Violence Against Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulu, Emma; Miedema, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Globalization theories have proliferated over the past two decades. However, global developments have yet to be systematically incorporated into theories around violence against women. This article proposes to add a global level to the existing ecological model framework, popularized by Lori Heise in 1998, to explore the relationships between global processes and experiences of violence against women. Data from the Maldives and Cambodia are used to assess how globalized ideologies, economic development and integration, religious fundamentalisms, and global cultural exchange, as components of a larger globalization process, have affected men and women’s experiences and perceptions of violence against women. PMID:26215287

  15. Women Physicists Speak Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Rachel; Guo, Stacy

    2005-10-01

    More than 1350 women physicists from more than 70 countries responded to a survey designed to identify issues important to women in physics. Women physicists had many areas of concern, notably discrimination and career/family balance. However, they also had many successes in physics. The majority would choose physics again and felt that they had progressed in their careers at least as quickly as their colleagues. Many spoke eloquently about their love of physics, the support they had received from others, and about their own determination and hard work.

  16. Status of women microbiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashket, E R; Robbins, M L; Leive, L; Huang, A S

    1974-02-08

    The general picture that emerges from this study is that the woman microbiologist, upon entering the professional job market, faces (i) slower advancement; (ii) restricted extramural recognition; and (iii) fewer positions of a supervisory or administrative nature, when compared to men. Most striking is the salary differential, which increases with increasing educational level, with increasing rank, and with increasing seniority. From the beginning of her professional training, the woman microbiologist feels handicapped by lack of encouragement and proper role models. She generally receives little advice regarding her professional future and rarely feels pushed to take the most challenging position. Should she be married, she feels that her mobility is severely restricted. Even though the subjective nature of these feelings may be interpreted as projections of failure, subtle inducements for women to stay at lower levels may well exist, in addition to more objective measurements, such as lower salary levels and slower professional advancement. Despite these handicaps, professional women continue to work. As a group, they work for the same reasons that men do, they work as long and as hard as men do, and they remain at their positions as long as men do. Women and men rate themselves equally as to job performance, degree of independence, and publication rate. On the basis of this study, it should not be surprising that women professionals are less visible than men and that only a small proportion of women become what is considered successful by the usual external criteria. If women were to receive continued encouragement, scientific contact, and professional recognition at each stage of their professional lives, they would undoubtedly become more visible. The lack of encouragement and selfconfidence leading to isolation, which then leads to lack of recognition, is a vicious circle that must be broken for the woman professional. This can be done most easily for the

  17. Entrepreneurship Womens Business

    OpenAIRE

    M. Tony Bledsoe; Rebecca J. Oatsvall

    2010-01-01

    One outstanding impact in the twenty first century US economy is the phenomenally expanding role and importance of women entrepreneurs. The Center for Women’s Business Research reports “nearly 10.4 million firms are 50% or more owned by women, employing more than 12.8 million people, and generating $1.9 trillion in sales.” (2007) This growth is evidenced by the fact that majority women-owned firms grew at twice the rate of all firms between 1997 and 2006. (Center for Women’s Business Research...

  18. Security for women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    International Rescue Committee

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available An assessment by the International Rescue Committee in 1996 in Kibondo District, Tanzania, indicated that 27 per cent of women between the ages of 12 and 49 had experienced sexual violence since becoming refugees.

  19. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Email Print Diabetes is a serious illness that affects over 29 million people in the United States. ... help doctors learn more about how diabetes medicines affect women during pregnancy. Diabetes and Pregnancy (CDC) Diverse ...

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  1. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes. Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other ... Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need ...

  2. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health is partnering with the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health to raise awareness about diverse ... Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take diabetes ... talk with your health care provider about your diabetes treatment. Diabetes Medicines - easy-to-read booklet for women ...

  4. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. The FDA Office of Women's Health is partnering with the NIH Office of Research ...

  5. How Women Manage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuer, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Discusses why women managers are overrepresented in low-level, low-status positions; why they are in go-nowhere staff roles, managing functions not people; and why so few hold top management positions in America's organizations. (JOW)

  6. Women and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be more vulnerable to brain damage than teen boys who drink. Women also may be more susceptible than men to alcohol-related blackouts, defined as periods of memory loss of events during intoxication without loss of consciousness. ...

  7. Cancer and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Infographics Cancer and Alcohol Web Features Breast Cancer Awareness Breast Cancer in Young Women Cancer and Men ... in Childhood Cancer, the Flu, and You Cervical Cancer Awareness Colorectal Cancer Awareness Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Health Disparities ...

  8. Women demand development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, I

    2000-07-01

    This study was conducted by a research team in Dar es Salaam to identify which policy changes might strengthen rural food security in Tanzania. The participatory research revealed much about the impact of gender and culture on food security. In both districts of Ngorongoro and Shinyanga, control of resources favored men. They managed the income from high-value resources like cattle, cotton, and maize, while women managed low-value resources like milk, hides, and goats. Also, it was evident that in both districts, violence against women had an impact on women's confidence and levels of control, and was felt to exacerbate food insecurity. In view of this, the research recommends support to groups of women and youths to organize themselves and lobby for change, as well as support to government and other officials to help them listen to those voices and respond more effectively.

  9. Women Scientists in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    participate in large numbers not just in learning ... earlier reports and give a summary of the situation .... noting best practices and recommendations that ..... service. This certainly has helped women working in organizations. In fact India has ...

  10. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Beware of Illegally Sold Diabetes Treatments Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ... care provider about how to manage diabetes during pregnancy. Medicine and Pregnancy Fact Sheet Pregnancy Registries - Sign- ...

  11. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you need depends on your health and the type of diabetes you have. Use these resources to help you ... Diabetes and Pregnancy Some women develop diabetes for the first time ...

  12. Democracy and Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Jalil

    2009-01-01

    New research on broader determinants of health has culminated into the new paradigm of social determinants of health. The fundamental view that underlies this new paradigm is that socioeconomic and political contexts in which people live have significant bearing upon their health and well-being. Unlike a wealth of research on socioeconomic determinants, few studies have focused on the role of political factors. Some of these studies examine the role of political determinants on health through their mediation with the labour environments and systems of welfare state. A few others study the relationship between polity regimes and population health more directly. However, none of them has a focus on women's health. This study explores the interactions, both direct and indirect, between democracy and women's health. In doing so, it identifies some of the main health vulnerabilities for women and explains, through a conceptual model, how democracy and respect for human rights interacts with women's health. PMID:21836777

  13. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Us on Twitter There is good news. Diabetes can be controlled by maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, ... Diverse Women in Clinical Trials Campaign Clinical trials can help doctors learn more about treatments for diabetes. ...

  14. Women in Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Antwerp, Dacia

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the special vocational needs of women who are planning careers in corporate management. Suggests three basic areas that counselors should cover with these clients: goals, expertise, and teamwork. (HMV)

  15. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women Other FDA Information on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people ... back to top Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News Releases ...

  16. Violence against Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for example diarrhoeal disease or malnutrition). Social and economic costs The social and economic costs of intimate partner and sexual violence are ... Gynecologists (FIGO) and the UN Joint Programme on Essential Services Package for Women Subject to Violence. (1) ...

  17. Women and Land

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Participation-oriented research methods are much more likely to bring about .... Examining the specific types of relations that women have to land reveals the ways ..... information – builds capacity to acquire sound qualitative data and, thereby, ...

  18. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diabetes for the first time when they become pregnant. This is called gestational (jes-Tay-shun-ul) diabetes. Other women have diabetes before they get pregnant. Use these resources to help you talk to ...

  19. Women in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, Dorothy Rosenthal

    1978-01-01

    Literature written since 1973 about the individual woman physician and the situation of United States women in medicine is examined and reviewed. Discrimination problems, identity conflicts, and a "typical" personality profile are some of the issues addressed. (Author/ KR)

  20. Women and Diabetes

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Food Safety for People with Diabetes Your Glucose Meter - easy-to-read booklet for women Other FDA ... on Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to ...