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Sample records for opioid sparing effect

  1. Opioid-sparing effects of the thoracic interfascial plane blocks: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preet Mohinder Singh

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Use of PECS block and its modifications with general anesthesia for breast surgery has significant opioid-sparing effect intraoperatively and during the first 24 h after surgery. It also has higher intraoperative opioid-sparing effect when compared to PVB. During the 1st postoperative day, PVB has slightly more morphine sparing potential that may however be associated with higher complication rates. The present PECS block techniques show marked interstudy variations and need standardization.

  2. Placebo controlled comparison of the opioid sparing effect of meloxicam and diclofenac after abdominal hysterectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwari, Jamil S.; Anjum, S.; Al-Khunain, S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to compare the opioid sparing effect of meloxicam and diclofenac after abdominal hysterectomy. This study was conducted at the Riyadh Military Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from February 2004 to November 2006. Women of American Society of Anesthesiologist's classification I or II of ages 25-60 years scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were included. Those with significant systematic disease or contraindication to opioid or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were excluded from the study. All patients received general anesthesia and intravenous (IV) morphine and were intubated and ventilated for the operation. The patients were randomized and rectally received meloxicam (15 mg), diclofenac (100 mg) or placebo suppository. Patients, postoperatively blinded were blinded to these drugs. In the recover room, (IV) patient controlled morphine was commenced. The information sought included patient characteristic (age, weight), duration operation and doses of morphine consumed in 24 hours. Seventy-five patients (25 in each group) participated in this study and only 5 patients dropped out. There was no difference in age and body weight of the patients and duration of operation. All underwent either total or sub-total hysterectomy. The mean (SD) morphine consumption in the 24 hour postoperative period was 37.7 (11.1) mg for the diclofenac group, 40.1 (7.8) mg for the meloxicam group and 45.2 (9.8) mg for the placebo group. As compared to placebo, the mean morphine consumption in diclofenac (but not in meloxicam) group was significantly (p<0.05) reduced. Our study demonstrates a significant opioid sparing effect after abdominal hysterectomy with diclofenac but not with meloxicam. (author)

  3. Opioid-sparing effects of the thoracic interfascial plane blocks: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preet Mohinder; Borle, Anuradha; Kaur, Manpreet; Trikha, Anjan; Sinha, Ashish

    2018-01-01

    Thoracic interfascial plane blocks and modification (PECS) have recently gained popularity for analgesic potential during breast surgery. We evaluate/consolidate the evidence on opioid-sparing effect of PECS blocks in comparison with conventional intravenous analgesia (IVA) and paravertebral block (PVB). Prospective, randomized controlled trials comparing PECS block to conventional IVA or PVB in patients undergoing breast surgery published till June 2017 were searched in the medical database. Comparisons were made for 24-h postoperative morphine consumption and intraoperative fentanyl-equivalent consumption. Final analysis included nine trials (PECS vs. IVA 4 trials and PECS vs. PVB 5 trials). PECS block showed a decreased intraoperative fentanyl consumption over IVA by 49.20 mcg (95% confidence interval [CI] =42.67-55.74) ( I 2 = 98.47%, P consumption with PECS block was lower than IVA by 7.66 mg (95% CI being 6.23-9.10) ( I 2 = 63.15, P < 0.001) but was higher than PVB group by 1.26 mg (95% CI being 0.91-1.62) ( I 2 = 99.53%, P < 0.001). Two cases of pneumothorax were reported with PVB, and no complication was reported in any other group. Use of PECS block and its modifications with general anesthesia for breast surgery has significant opioid-sparing effect intraoperatively and during the first 24 h after surgery. It also has higher intraoperative opioid-sparing effect when compared to PVB. During the 1 st postoperative day, PVB has slightly more morphine sparing potential that may however be associated with higher complication rates. The present PECS block techniques show marked interstudy variations and need standardization.

  4. The effects of preemptive pregabalin on attenuation of stress response to endotracheal intubation and opioid- sparing effect in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayya Syama Sundar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical study was designed to evaluate and compare single preoperative dose of pregabalin to a placebo regarding hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation, to assess perioperative fentanyl requirement and any side-effects. It was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel assignment, efficacy study. The study was done at a tertiary university hospital. This study was a comparison between two groups of 30 adult patients scheduled for elective off pump coronary artery bypass surgery. In the control group, the patients were given placebo capsules, and in the pregabalin group, the patients were given pregabalin 150 mg capsule orally 1 h before surgery. The patients were compared for hemodynamic changes before the start of the surgery, after induction, 1, 3, and 5 min after intubation. Additionally, fentanyl requirement during surgery and the first postoperative day was also compared. The present study shows that a single oral dose of 150 mg pregabalin given 1 h before surgery attenuated the pressor response to tracheal intubation in adults, but the drug did not show any effect on perioperative opioid consumption and was devoid of side-effects in the given dose.

  5. Opioid adjuvant strategy: improving opioid effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesics continue to be the mainstay of pharmacologic treatment of moderate to severe pain. Many patients, particularly those suffering from chronic pain, require chronic high-dose analgesic therapy. Achieving clinical efficacy and tolerability of such treatment regimens is hampered by the appearance of opioid-induced side effects such as tolerance, hyperalgesia and withdrawal syndrome. Among the therapeutic options to improve the opioid effectiveness, this current review focuses on strategies combining opioids to other drugs that can modulate opioid-mediated effects. We will discuss about experimental evidences reported for several potential opioid adjuvants, including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, 5-HT7 agonists, sigma-1 antagonists, I2-R ligands, cholecystokinin antagonists, neuropeptide FF-R antagonists and toll-like receptor 4 antagonists.

  6. Postoperative opioid sparing with injectable hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-diclofenac: pooled analysis of data from two Phase III clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan TJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tong J Gan,1 Neil Singla,2 Stephen E Daniels,3 Douglas A Hamilton,4,5 Peter G Lacouture,6,7 Christian RD Reyes,8 Daniel B Carr4,9 1Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, NY, 2Lotus Clinical Research, LLC, Pasadena, CA, 3Premier Research, Austin, TX, 4Javelin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 5New Biology Ventures, LLC, San Mateo, CA, 6Magidom Discovery, LLC, St Augustine, FL, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI, 8Hospira Inc., Lake Forest, IL, 9Department of Anesthesiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Use of nonopioid analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management can reduce opioid consumption and potentially prevent opioid-related adverse events. This study examined the postoperative opioid-sparing effect of repeated-dose injectable diclofenac formulated with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD-diclofenac. Patients and methods: Pooled data from two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled Phase III trials were analyzed. Patients received HPβCD-diclofenac, placebo, or ketorolac by intravenous injection every 6 hours for up to 5 days following abdominal/pelvic or orthopedic surgery. Rescue opioid use was evaluated from the time of first study drug administration to up to 120 hours following the first dose in the overall study population and in subgroups defined by baseline pain severity, age, and HPβCD-diclofenac dose. Results: Overall, 608 patients received ≥1 dose of study medication and were included in the analysis. While 93.2% of patients receiving placebo required opioids, the proportion of patients requiring opioids was significantly lower for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (18.75, 37.5, or 50 mg or ketorolac (P<0.005 for all comparisons. Mean cumulative opioid dose and number of doses were significantly lower among patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac versus placebo

  7. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  8. Co-morbid pain and opioid addiction: long term effect of opioid maintenance on acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence alters the pain experience. This study will evaluate changes pain sensitivity and tolerance with opioid treatments; and duration of this effect after treatment cessation. 120 Individuals with chronic pain were recruited in 4 groups (N = 30): 1-methadone for opioid addiction; 2-buprenorphine for opioid addiction; 3-history of opioid maintenance treatment for opioid addiction but with prolonged abstinence (M = 121 weeks; SD = 23.3); and 4-opioid naïve controls. Participants completed a psychological assessment and a cold water task including, time to first pain (sensitivity) and time to stopping the pain task (tolerance). Data analysis used survival analyses. A Kaplan-Meier-Cox survival analysis showed group differences for both pain sensitivity (log rank = 15.50; p opioid maintenance resulted in differing pain sensitivity compared to opioid naïve (p's opioid maintenance compared to active methadone patients (p opioid naïve control group participants (p's opioid abstinence increased (R = .37; p opioid maintenance, there appears to be long-term differences in pain sensitivity that do not resolve with discontinuation of opioid maintenance. Although pain sensitivity does not change, pain tolerance does improve after opioid maintenance cessation. Implications for treating co-morbid opioid addiction and pain (acute and chronic) are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  10. Protein Sparing Effects of Lipids in The Practical Diets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: A feeding trial was conducted to establish the protein sparing effects of various lipid sources in ... reported to utilize vegetable oil that is high in omega 6 .... origin up to 15 % without any negative effects on ..... Committee on Animal.

  11. Morphine sparing effect of low dose ketamine during patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2003-09-12

    Sep 12, 2003 ... KEY WORDS: Ketamine, morphine sparing effect, patient controlled intravenous analgesia. ... Measurements: Morphine consumption, visual analogue pain score (VAPS), pulse ..... Brain Research, 1990; 518: 218-222. 7.

  12. Non-analgesic effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including...... groups: no effects or worsening of cognitive function in cancer pain patients and no effect or improvements in the chronic non-cancer pain patients, however, due to methodological limitations and a huge variety of designs definite conclusions are difficult to draw from the studies. In studies of higher...

  13. Opioid receptor mediated anticonvulsant effect of pentazocine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, N; Khosla, R; Kohli, J

    1998-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of (+/-) pentazocine (10, 30 & 50 mg/kg), a Sigma opioid agonist, resulted in a dose dependent anticonvulsant action against maximal electroshock seizures in mice. This anticonvulsant effect of pentazocine was not antagonized by both the doses of naloxone (1 and 10 mg/kg) suggesting thereby that its anticonvulsant action is probably mediated by Sigma opiate binding sites. Its anticonvulsant effect was potentiated by both the anticonvulsant drugs viz. diazepam and diphenylhydantoin. Morphine, mu opioid agonist, on the other hand, failed to protect the animals against maximal electroshock seizures when it was given in doses of 10-40 mg/kg body wt.

  14. The opioid ketobemidone has a NMDA blocking effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S; Dickenson, A H; Kohn, M

    1996-01-01

    There are clinical observations that neurogenic pain can respond well to the opioid ketobemidone, in contrast to pethidine and morphine. This has led us to the hypothesis that the analgesic effect of ketobemidone in neurogenic pain may be due to both opioid as well as additional non-opioid effect...

  15. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: management of opioid-induced constipation by peripheral opioid receptor antagonists: prevention or withdrawal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic action of opioid analgesics is compromised by peripheral adverse effects among which opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is the most disabling, with a prevalence reported to vary between 15 and 90 %. Although OIC is usually treated with laxatives, there is insufficient clinical evidence that laxatives are efficacious in this indication. In contrast, there is ample evidence from double- blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trials that peripheral opioid receptor antagonists (PORAs) counteract OIC. This specific treatment modality is currently based on subcutaneous methylnaltrexone for the interruption of OIC in patients with advanced illness, and a fixed combination of oral prolonged-release naloxone with prolonged-release oxycodone for the prevention of OIC in the treatment of non-cancer and cancer pain. Both drugs counteract OIC while the analgesic effect of opioids remains unabated. The clinical studies show that more than 50 % of the patients with constipation under opioid therapy may benefit from the use of PORAs, while PORA-resistant patients are likely to suffer from non-opioid-induced constipation, the prevalence of which increases with age. While the addition of naloxone to oxycodone seems to act by preventing OIC, the intermittent dosing of methylnaltrexone every other day seems to stimulate defaecation by provoking an intestinal withdrawal response. The availability of PORAs provides a novel opportunity to specifically control OIC and other peripheral adverse effects of opioid analgesics (e.g., urinary retention and pruritus). The continuous dosing of a PORA has the advantage of few adverse effects, while intermittent dosing of a PORA can be associated with abdominal cramp-like pain.

  16. Polyglycerol-opioid conjugate produces analgesia devoid of side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rodríguez, Sara; Quadir, Mohiuddin A; Gupta, Shilpi; Walker, Karolina A; Zhang, Xuejiao; Spahn, Viola; Labuz, Dominika; Rodriguez-Gaztelumendi, Antonio; Schmelz, Martin; Joseph, Jan; Parr, Maria K; Machelska, Halina; Haag, Rainer; Stein, Christoph

    2017-07-04

    Novel painkillers are urgently needed. The activation of opioid receptors in peripheral inflamed tissue can reduce pain without central adverse effects such as sedation, apnoea, or addiction. Here, we use an unprecedented strategy and report the synthesis and analgesic efficacy of the standard opioid morphine covalently attached to hyperbranched polyglycerol (PG-M) by a cleavable linker. With its high-molecular weight and hydrophilicity, this conjugate is designed to selectively release morphine in injured tissue and to prevent blood-brain barrier permeation. In contrast to conventional morphine, intravenous PG-M exclusively activated peripheral opioid receptors to produce analgesia in inflamed rat paws without major side effects such as sedation or constipation. Concentrations of morphine in the brain, blood, paw tissue, and in vitro confirmed the selective release of morphine in the inflamed milieu. Thus, PG-M may serve as prototype of a peripherally restricted opioid formulation designed to forego central and intestinal side effects.

  17. Preference or fat? Revisiting opioid effects on food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Sharif A

    2010-07-14

    It is well established that opioid signaling in the central nervous system constitutes a powerful stimulus for food intake. The role of opioids in determining food preference, however, is less well defined. Opioids have been proposed to promote intake of preferred foods, or, alternatively, to preferentially increase consumption of fat. In the present manuscript, I comprehensively review results from previous studies investigating this issue. Data from these studies suggests a mechanism for opioid action that may reconcile the previously proposed hypotheses: opioid effects on food intake do appear to be largely specific for fat consumption, but individual animals' sensitivity to this effect may be dependent on baseline food preferences. In addition, I highlight the possibility that the selectivity of endogenous opioid effects may importantly differ from that of exogenous agonists in the degree to which baseline preferences, rather than macronutrient intake, are altered. The paper represents an invited review by a symposium, award winner or keynote speaker at the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior [SSIB] Annual Meeting in Portland, July 2009. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of ketamine as an adjuvant to opioid-based therapy in decreasing pain associated with opioid tolerance in adults undergoing orthopedic surgery: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Marsha; Bonanno, Laura; Kuhn, William

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this systematic review is to examine the best available evidence on the clinical effectiveness of ketamine as an adjuvant to opioid-based therapy versus opioid-based therapy alone in decreasing perioperative pain associated with opioid tolerance in adult patients, aged 18-70 years, undergoing orthopedic surgical procedures.The following question guides the systematic review: does the administration of ketamine as an adjuvant to opioid-based therapy, compared to opioid-based therapy alone, improve perioperative pain relief in opioid-tolerant adult patients undergoing orthopedic surgical procedures?

  19. Effect of Intravenous Acetaminophen on Postoperative Opioid Use in Bariatric Surgery Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shan; Saha, Ronik; Shah, Neal; Hanna, Adel; DeMuro, Jonas; Calixte, Rose; Brathwaite, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are often used to relieve pain after surgery, but they are associated with serious adverse effects. In this retrospective chart-review analysis, the use of intravenous acetaminophen did not reduce opioid use following bariatric surgery.

  20. The cognitive effects of opioids in cancer: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Lundorff, Lena; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: In order to better understand the effects of opioids on the cognitive function in cancer pain patients, a literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Lilacs databases. Ten controlled trials were selected and classified according to the study design...

  1. Post-nerve-sparing prostatectomy, dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy: effect on erectile function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastasch, Michael D.; Teh, Bin S.; Mai, W.-Y.; Carpenter, L. Steven; Lu, Hsin H.; Chiu, J. Kam; Woo, Shiao Y.; Grant, Walter H.; Miles, Brian J.; Kadmon, Dov; Butler, E. Brian

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The advent of widespread prostate-specific antigen screening has resulted in more younger, potent men being diagnosed with early-stage, organ-confined prostate cancer amenable to definitive surgery. Nerve-sparing prostatectomy is a relatively new surgical advance in the treatment of prostate cancer. Very few data exist on the effect of postoperative radiotherapy (RT) on erectile function after nerve-sparing prostatectomy. They are based on conventional techniques using moderate doses of radiation, 45-54 Gy. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is becoming more widespread because it allows dose escalation with increased sparing of the surrounding normal tissue. We investigated the effect of postprostatectomy, high-dose IMRT on patients' erectile function. Methods and Materials: A review of patient records found 51 patients treated between April 1998 and December 2000 with IMRT after unilateral or bilateral nerve-sparing prostatectomy. The pathologic disease stage in these patients was T2 in 47.4% and T3 in 52.6%. Postoperatively, 4 patients received hormonal ablation consisting of one injection of Lupron Depot (30 mg) 2 months before RT. The median age was 65 years (range 46-77) at the time of RT. The prescribed dose was 64 Gy (range 60-66). The mean dose was 69.6 Gy (range 64.0-72.3). Erectile function was assessed before and after RT by questionnaires. Sexual potency was defined as erectile rigidity adequate for vaginal penetration. Results: Of the 51 patients, 18 (35.3%) maintained their potency and 33 (64.7%) became impotent after nerve-sparing prostatectomy. Patients who underwent bilateral nerve-sparing prostatectomy had higher rates of postoperative potency than did those who underwent unilateral nerve-sparing surgery (72.2% vs. 27.8%; p=0.025). The follow-up for the entire group was 19.5 months. All 18 patients (100%) who were potent postoperatively remained potent after RT. The median follow-up for the 18 potent patients was 27.2 months, significantly

  2. Effect Of A “No Superuser Opioid Prescription” Policy On ED Visits And Statewide Opioid Prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary P. Kahler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The U.S. opioid epidemic has highlighted the need to identify patients at risk of opioid abuse and overdose. We initiated a novel emergency department- (ED based interventional protocol to transition our superuser patients from the ED to an outpatient chronic pain program. The objective was to evaluate the protocol’s effect on superusers’ annual ED visits. Secondary outcomes included a quantitative evaluation of statewide opioid prescriptions for these patients, unique prescribers of controlled substances, and ancillary testing. Methods: Patients were referred to the program with the following inclusion criteria: ≥ 6 visits per year to the ED; at least one visit identified by the attending physician as primarily driven by opioid-seeking behavior; and a review by a committee comprising ED administration and case management. Patients were referred to a pain management clinic and informed that they would no longer receive opioid prescriptions from visits to the ED for chronic pain complaints. Electronic medical record (EMR alerts notified ED providers of the patient’s referral at subsequent visits. We analyzed one year of data pre- and post-referral. Results: A total of 243 patients had one year of data post-referral for analysis. Median annual ED visits decreased from 14 to 4 (58% decrease, 95% CI [50 to 66]. We also found statistically significant decreases for these patients’ state prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP opioid prescriptions (21 to 13, total unique controlled-substance prescribers (11 to 7, computed tomography imaging (2 to 0, radiographs (5 to 1, electrocardiograms (12 to 4, and labs run (47 to 13. Conclusion: This program and the EMR-based alerts were successful at decreasing local ED visits, annual opioid prescriptions, and hospital resource allocation for this population of patients. There is no evidence that these patients diverted their visits to neighboring EDs after being informed that they

  3. Endogenous Opioid Function and Responses to Morphine: The Moderating Effects of Anger Expressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John W; Bruehl, Stephen; France, Christopher R; Schuster, Erik; Orlowska, Daria; Chont, Melissa; Gupta, Rajnish K; Buvanendran, Asokumar

    2017-08-01

    Long-term use of opioid analgesics may be ineffective or associated with significant negative side effects for some people. At present, there is no sound method of identifying optimal opioid candidates. Individuals with chronic low back pain (n = 89) and healthy control individuals (n = 102) underwent ischemic pain induction with placebo, opioid blockade (naloxone), and morphine in counterbalanced order. They completed the Spielberger Anger-Out subscale. Endogenous opioid function × Anger-out × Pain status (chronic pain, healthy control) interactions were tested for morphine responses to ischemic threshold, tolerance, and pain intensity (McGill Sensory and Affective subscales) and side effects. For individuals with chronic pain and healthy control participants, those with low endogenous opioid function and low anger-out scores exhibited the largest morphine analgesic responses, whereas those with high anger-out and low endogenous opioid function showed relatively weaker morphine analgesic responses. Further, individuals with chronic pain with low endogenous opioid function and low anger-out scores also reported the fewest negative effects to morphine, whereas those with low endogenous opioid function and high anger-out reported the most. Findings point toward individuals with chronic pain who may strike a favorable balance of good analgesia with few side effects, as well as those who have an unfavorable balance of poor analgesia and many side effects. We sought to identify optimal candidates for opioid pain management. Low back pain patients who express anger and also have deficient endogenous opioid function may be poor candidates for opioid therapy. In contrast, low back patients who tend not to express anger and who also have deficient endogenous opioid function may make optimal candidates for opioid therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of opioid drugs on dopamine mediated locomotor activity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leathern, L L

    1986-01-01

    Opioid drugs influence various behavioural parameters including locomotor activity in experimental animals. The interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems is one possible explanation for the effect of opioid drugs on locomotor activity. In this study behavioural and biochemical assays were done to investigate the interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems. Behavioural studies were done by measurement of locomotor activity (LA) of rats after acute or chronic pretreatment with opioid andor dopaminergic drugs. Biochemical studies were in the form of radioligand binding assays, the effect on the number (Bmax) and affinity (K/sub D/) of receptors was measured after chronic pretreatment with opioid andor dopaminergic drugs. The opioid drugs used are morphine, nalbuphine and naloxone. Dopaminergic drugs used included: agonists-apomorphine and piribedil; antagonists-pimozide, haloperidol, chlorpromazine. In the acute situation increased LA was obtained with morphine and the DA agonists. A correlation between the behavioural and biochemical assays was found. Chronic pretreatment with morphine enhanced apomorphine induced LA, this supersensitivity was also measured as an increased receptor density (Bmax) of D2 receptors in the striatum. Chronic morphine pretreatment caused a decrease in morphine induced LA, while this subsensitivity was not apparent in the ligand binding assays - where no change in receptor number was observed. Chronic naloxone pretreatment enhanced morphine induced LA, as well as increased the Bmax of opioid receptors in the whole brain. It is concluded that an interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems does exist, and may account for the mechanism of action of the opioids.

  5. Effects of combining opioids and clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijdelaar, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the effects of combining opioids with clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. There are a number of problems with the use of opioids, such as, the development of tolerance/hyperalgesia, the reduced effectiveness in (central)

  6. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  7. Dosimetric analysis of the alopecia preventing effect of hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, Anand; Sampson, Carrie; LaRosa, Salvatore; Floyd, Scott R.; Wong, Eric T.; Uhlmann, Erik J.; Sengupta, Soma; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2015-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is widely used for the treatment of brain metastases. Cognitive decline and alopecia are recognized adverse effects of WBRT. Recently hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation therapy (HS-WBRT) has been shown to reduce the incidence of memory loss. In this study, we found that multi-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), with strict constraints to the brain parenchyma and to the hippocampus, reduces follicular scalp dose and prevents alopecia. Suitable patients befitting the inclusion criteria of the RTOG 0933 trial received Hippocampus sparing whole brain radiation. On follow up, they were noticed to have full scalp hair preservation. 5 mm thickness of follicle bearing scalp in the radiation field was outlined in the planning CT scans. Conventional opposed lateral WBRT radiation fields were applied to these patient-specific image sets and planned with the same nominal dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The mean and maximum dose to follicle bearing skin and Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) data were analyzed for conventional and HS-WBRT. Paired t-test was used to compare the means. All six patients had fully preserved scalp hair and remained clinically cognitively intact 1–3 months after HS-WBRT. Compared to conventional WBRT, in addition to the intended sparing of the Hippocampus, HS-WBRT delivered significantly lower mean dose (22.42 cGy vs. 16.33 cGy, p < 0.0001), V 24 (9 cc vs. 44 cc, p < 0.0000) and V 30 (9 cc vs. 0.096 cc, p = 0.0106) to follicle hair bearing scalp and prevented alopecia. There were no recurrences in the Hippocampus area. HS-WBRT, with an 11-field set up as described, while attempting to conserve hippocampus radiation and maintain radiation dose to brain inadvertently spares follicle-bearing scalp and prevents alopecia

  8. [Effect of opioid receptors on acute stress-induced changes in recognition memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Yu-Wei; Qian, Zhao-Qiang; Yan, Cai-Fang; Fan, Ka-Min; Xu, Jin-Hui; Li, Xiao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-12-25

    Although ample evidence has shown that acute stress impairs memory, the influences of acute stress on different phases of memory, such as acquisition, consolidation and retrieval, are different. Experimental data from both human and animals support that endogenous opioid system plays a role in stress, as endogenous opioid release is increased and opioid receptors are activated during stress experience. On the other hand, endogenous opioid system mediates learning and memory. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of acute forced swimming stress on recognition memory of C57 mice and the role of opioid receptors in this process by using a three-day pattern of new object recognition task. The results showed that 15-min acute forced swimming damaged the retrieval of recognition memory, but had no effect on acquisition and consolidation of recognition memory. No significant change of object recognition memory was found in mice that were given naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, by intraperitoneal injection. But intraperitoneal injection of naloxone before forced swimming stress could inhibit the impairment of recognition memory retrieval caused by forced swimming stress. The results of real-time PCR showed that acute forced swimming decreased the μ opioid receptor mRNA levels in whole brain and hippocampus, while the injection of naloxone before stress could reverse this change. These results suggest that acute stress may impair recognition memory retrieval via opioid receptors.

  9. Side effects and opioid addiction in radiation-induced mucositis pain control in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Atsuhito; Shoji, Kazuhiko; Mizuta, Masanobu; Morita, Mami; Iki, Takehiro; Kojima, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy in head and neck malignancy may trigger mucositis poorly controlled by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Having already reported early opioid efficacy in radiation-induced mucositis pain in head and neck cancer, we discuss whether this resulted in severe side effects and opioid addiction. Of 11 persons (26.2%) with nausea, 3 could not tolerate opioid. Of 33 (78.6%) with constipation, all were controlled by purgatives. Seven had mild sleepiness. None had severe opioid side effects in radiation-induced mucositis pain treatment, but I showed opioid dependence after 128-days opioid administration. While opioid administration in radiation-induced mucositis pain may not cause addiction, lomg-term opioid use should be carefully monitored. (author)

  10. The effects of opioid drugs on dopamine mediated locomotor activity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leathern, L.L.

    1986-12-01

    Opioid drugs influence various behavioural parameters including locomotor activity in experimental animals. The interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems is one possible explanation for the effect of opioid drugs on locomotor activity. In this study behavioural and biochemical assays were done to investigate the interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems. Behavioural studies were done by measurement of locomotor activity (LA) of rats after acute or chronic pretreatment with opioid and/or dopaminergic drugs. Biochemical studies were in the form of radioligand binding assays, the effect on the number (Bmax) and affinity (K D ) of receptors was measured after chronic pretreatment with opioid and/or dopaminergic drugs. The opioid drugs used are morphine, nalbuphine and naloxone. Dopaminergic drugs used included: agonists-apomorphine and piribedil; antagonists-pimozide, haloperidol, chlorpromazine. In the acute situation increased LA was obtained with morphine and the DA agonists. A correlation between the behavioural and biochemical assays was found. Chronic pretreatment with morphine enhanced apomorphine induced LA, this supersensitivity was also measured as an increased receptor density (Bmax) of D2 receptors in the striatum. Chronic morphine pretreatment caused a decrease in morphine induced LA, while this subsensitivity was not apparent in the ligand binding assays - where no change in receptor number was observed. Chronic naloxone pretreatment enhanced morphine induced LA, as well as increased the Bmax of opioid receptors in the whole brain. It is concluded that an interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems does exist, and may account for the mechanism of action of the opioids

  11. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sparing effect of x-ray fractionation in mammary tumours and skin reactions of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.; Denekamp, J.; Sheldon, P.W.; Smith, A.M.; Begg, A.C.; Harris, S.R.; Page, A.L.

    1975-01-01

    The increase in total dose with number of fractions of x-rays between 2 and 15 was found to be similar for local control of tumours (TCD 50 ) and for skin reactions. This result could be explained if the gain from reoxygenation of hypoxic tumour cells was the same for two fractions as for larger numbers, and the dose-sparing effect of repair and repopulation was similar for the tumour and for skin. In addition, a split-dose experiment was carried out with the tumours clamped off to make them acutely hypoxic during irradiation. The resulting value of (D 2 -D 1 )sub(24h) was not significantly smaller than the value previously found for skin reactions. 1290 rad was found in anoxic conditions, corresponding to a dose increment for repair in oxygenated conditions of 430 to 520 rad, assuming an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3 to 2.5. Reduced values have been found from regrowth experiments on two other types of tumour in mice. These results are consistent with no significant difference in the sparing effect of x-ray fractionation on skin or C 3 H mammary tumours in mice for up to 15 equal fractions given in 18 days; but reduced repair plus more proliferation in tumours than in skin cannot be excluded. (author)

  13. The Effect of Opioid Prescribing Guidelines on Prescriptions by Emergency Physicians in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G; Baker, Olesya; Poon, Sabrina J; Rodgers, Ann F; Garner, Chad; Nelson, Lewis S; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2017-12-01

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the association between Ohio's April 2012 emergency physician guidelines aimed at reducing inappropriate opioid prescribing and the number and type of opioid prescriptions dispensed by emergency physicians. We used Ohio's prescription drug monitoring program data from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014, and included the 5 most commonly prescribed opioids (hydrocodone, oxycodone, tramadol, codeine, and hydromorphone). The primary outcome was the monthly statewide prescription total of opioids written by emergency physicians in Ohio. We used an interrupted time series analysis to compare pre- and postguideline level and trend in number of opioid prescriptions dispensed by emergency physicians per month, number of prescriptions stratified by 5 commonly prescribed opioids, and number of prescriptions for greater than 3 days' supply of opioids. Beginning in January 2010, the number of prescriptions dispensed by all emergency physicians in Ohio decreased by 0.3% per month (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.49% to -0.15%). The implementation of the guidelines in April 2012 was associated with a 12% reduction (95% CI -17.7% to -6.3%) in the level of statewide total prescriptions per month and an additional decline of 0.9% (95% CI -1.1% to -0.7%) in trend relative to the preguideline trend. The estimated effect of the guidelines on total monthly prescriptions greater than a 3-day supply was an 11.2% reduction in level (95% CI -18.8% to -3.6%) and an additional 0.9% (95% CI -1.3% to -0.5%) decline in trend per month after the guidelines. Guidelines were also associated with a reduction in prescribing for each of the 5 individual opioids, with various effect. In Ohio, emergency physician opioid prescribing guidelines were associated with a decrease in the quantity of opioid prescriptions written by emergency physicians. Although introduction of the guidelines occurred in parallel with other opioid-related interventions, our

  14. Examining the role of mu opioid receptor endocytosis in the beneficial and side-effects of prolonged opioid use: From a symposium on new concepts in mu-opioid pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Whistler, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid drugs remain the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain, both acute/post-surgical and chronic. However, the utility of opioid drugs for the treatment of chronic pain is compromised by the development of analgesic tolerance which, in turn, leads to dose-escalation and increased likelihood of dangerous side effects, including dependence. Consequently, there remains resistance among clinicians and the general population to using opiates for pain management because of risk of “addi...

  15. The steroid-sparing effect of long-term plasmapheresis in pemphigus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Klaus; Carstens, Jan; Jørgensen, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents can induce remission in most patients with pemphigus, but mortality remains at 5 to 15% due to complications from these drugs. We reviewed the adjunctive effect of long-term plasmapheresis in 8 patients with pemphigus. Four cases had been resistant to ...... where cyclosporine was introduced. This first report of long-term plasmapheresis demonstrates clinical efficacy in pemphigus and a considerable steroid-sparing effect.......Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive agents can induce remission in most patients with pemphigus, but mortality remains at 5 to 15% due to complications from these drugs. We reviewed the adjunctive effect of long-term plasmapheresis in 8 patients with pemphigus. Four cases had been resistant...

  16. Fast Effects of Cognitive Restructuring Training on Neurocognitive Functions in Opioid Addicts

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Tavakolian; Abbas Abolghasemi

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study This study intended to investigate the effect of cognitive restructuring training on prefrontal related neurocognitive functions in opioid addicts and its relationship with relapse prevention. Subject or material and methods Thirty opioid addicts who completed a 21-day detoxification program were randomly placed in experimental and control groups. Before and after the training, the subjects underwent urinalysis, Addiction-Stroop test, Iowa Gambling Task, Wisconsin C...

  17. Herbal medicines for the management of opioid addiction: safe and effective alternatives to conventional pharmacotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jeanine; Rosenbaum, Christopher; Hernon, Christina; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2011-12-01

    Striking increases in the abuse of opioids have expanded the need for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. The obstacles that confront effective treatment of opioid addiction - shortage of treatment professionals, stigma associated with treatment and the ability to maintain abstinence - have led to increased interest in alternative treatment strategies among both treatment providers and patients alike. Herbal products for opioid addiction and withdrawal, such as kratom and specific Chinese herbal medications such as WeiniCom, can complement existing treatments. Unfortunately, herbal treatments, while offering some advantages over existing evidence-based pharmacotherapies, have poorly described pharmacokinetics, a lack of supportive data derived from well controlled clinical trials, and severe toxicity, the cause for which remains poorly defined. Herbal products, therefore, require greater additional testing in rigorous clinical trials before they can expect widespread acceptance in the management of opioid addiction.

  18. Comparative Rates of Mortality and Serious Adverse Effects Among Commonly Prescribed Opioid Analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David L; Lebin, Jacob A; Severtson, Stevan G; Olsen, Heather A; Dasgupta, Nabarun; Dart, Richard C

    2018-03-26

    The epidemic of prescription opioid overdose and mortality parallels the dispensing rates of prescription opioids, and the availability of increasingly potent opioid analgesics. The common assumption that more potent opioid analgesics are associated with higher rates of adverse outcomes has not been adequately substantiated. We compared the rate of serious adverse events among commonly prescribed opioid analgesics of varying potency. Serious adverse events (SAEs; defined as death, major medical effect, or hospitalization) resulting from exposure to tablets containing seven opioid analgesics (oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, tapentadol, and tramadol) captured by the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS ® ) System Poison Center Program were evaluated from 2010 through 2016. Rates of SAEs were adjusted for availability through outpatient dispensing data and regressed on morphine milligram equivalents (MME). There were 19,480 cases of SAE during the 7-year study period. Hydrocodone and oxycodone contributed to 77% of SAE cases. Comparing rates of outcome by relative potency, a hierarchy was observed with hydromorphone (8.02 SAEs/100 kg) and tapentadol (0.27 SAE/100 kg) as the highest and lowest rates, reflecting a 30-fold difference among individual opioid products. SAE rate and potency were related linearly-SAEs increased 2.04 per 100 kg drug dispensed for each 1-unit rise in MME (p = 0.004). Linear regression of SAE/100 kg drug dispensed and drug potency identified that MME comprised 96% of the variation observed. In contrast, potency did not explain variation seen using other study denominators (prescriptions dispensed, dosage units dispensed, and the number of individuals filling a prescription). Potency of a prescription opioid analgesic demonstrates a significant, highly positive linear relationship with exposures resulting in SAEs per 100 kg drug dispensed reported to poison centers

  19. Simvastatin in the treatment of asthma: lack of steroid-sparing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Douglas C; Cowan, Jan O; Palmay, Rochelle; Williamson, Avis; Taylor, D Robin

    2010-10-01

    Statins have anti-inflammatory actions which in theory are potentially beneficial in asthma. Small trials have failed to show a significant benefit, but a systematic study to evaluate the steroid-sparing effect of statin treatment has not been carried out. A randomised, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was conducted of simvastatin 40 mg at night with simultaneous stepwise reduction of fluticasone propionate dose until loss of control occurred, followed by an increase until regain of control ('minimum' dose required) in 51 patients with asthma and sputum eosinophils (steroid-free) ≥ 2%. 43 patients completed the study. There was no significant difference in 'minimum' inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) dose requirement between simvastatin and placebo: (median (IQR) 50 μg daily (0-250) vs 100 μg daily (0-250), p=0.931). 'Minimum' dose distribution was similar (p=0.269). The fluticasone dose at which loss of control occurred did not differ significantly between simvastatin and placebo (p=0.404). In patients with loss of control in both treatment arms, fluticasone dose at loss of control was similar with simvastatin and placebo (median (IQR) 50 μg daily (0-100) for both, p=0.620). In those patients who reached 0 μg/day (n=18), Astma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) was lower (p=0.037), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) higher (p<0.01) and sputum eosinophils lower with simvastatin compared with placebo (9.5% compared with 25.4%, p=0.033). Simvastatin does not have clinically important steroid-sparing effects in patients with eosinophilic asthma. In the absence of steroid, simvastatin is associated with minor improvements in symptoms and lung function, and a reduction in sputum eosinophils. Clinical trial number ACTRN12606000531516.

  20. Effects of stress and. beta. -funal trexamine pretreatment on morphine analgesia and opioid binding in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.U.; Andrews, J.S.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Holtzman, S.G.

    1987-12-28

    This study was essentially an in vivo protection experiment designed to test further the hypothesis that stress induces release of endogenous opiods which then act at opioid receptors. Rats that were either subjected to restraint stress for 1 yr or unstressed were injected ICV with either saline or 2.5 ..mu..g of ..beta..-funaltrexamine (..beta..-FNA), an irreversible opioid antagonist that alkylates the mu-opioid receptor. Twenty-four hours later, subjects were tested unstressed for morphine analgesia or were sacrificed and opioid binding in brain was determined. (/sup 3/H)D-Ala/sup 2/NMePhe/sup 4/-Gly/sup 5/(ol)enkephalin (DAGO) served as a specific ligand for mu-opioid receptors, and (/sup 3/H)-bremazocine as a general ligand for all opioid receptors. Rats injected with saline while stressed were significantly less sensitive to the analgesic action of morphine 24 hr later than were their unstressed counterparts. ..beta..-FNA pretreatment attenuated morphine analgesia in an insurmountable manner. Animals pretreated with ..beta..-FNA while stressed were significantly more sensitive to the analgesic effect of morphine than were animals that received ..beta..-FNA while unstressed. ..beta..-FNA caused small and similar decreases in (/sup 3/H)-DAGO binding in brain of both stressed and unstressed animals. 35 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Medications Development for Opioid Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S. Stevens; Banks, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe methods for preclinical evaluation of candidate medications to treat opioid abuse and dependence. Our perspective is founded on the propositions that (1) drug self-administration procedures provide the most direct method for assessment of medication effects, (2) procedures that assess choice between opioid and nondrug reinforcers are especially useful, and (3) the states of opioid dependence and withdrawal profoundly influence both opioid reinforcement and the effects of candidate medications. Effects of opioid medications on opioid choice in nondependent and opioid-dependent subjects are reviewed. Various nonopioid medications have also been examined, but none yet have been identified that safely and reliably reduce opioid choice. Future research will focus on (1) strategies for increasing safety and/or effectiveness of opioid medications, and (2) continued development of nonopioids such as inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes or inhibitors of opioid-induced glial activation. PMID:23125072

  2. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic PreconditioningCraig...

  3. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenk, R.J.; Lin, E.N.J.T. van; Kollenburg, P. van; Kunze-Busch, M.C.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning

  4. Behavioral and electrographic effects of opioids on kindled seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldecott-Hazard, S; Shavit, Y; Ackermann, R F; Engel, J; Frederickson, R C; Liebeskind, J C

    1982-11-18

    Our laboratory previously suggested that opioid peptides are released by an amygdaloid kindled seizure and may affect the elicitation of a subsequent seizure. The present study examined the effects of morphine, naloxone, enkephalin analogues, and conditions of morphine tolerance and withdrawal on the severity and duration of a series of amygdaloid kindled seizures. The results suggest two distinct opiate/opioid actions on seizures. The first is an anticonvulsant effect on the behavioral manifestations of seizures. This effect is seen following a high dose (50 mg/kg) of morphine or a low dose (6 mg/kg) of enkephalin analogue (LY146104), and is reversed by naloxone. The second is a naloxone-reversible prolonging effect of the high dose of morphine on the electrographic components of the seizures. Receptor affinities of these various opiate/opioid drugs suggest that these two actions are mediated by different receptors which appear not to include high affinity mu receptors.

  5. Is systematic training in opioid overdose prevention effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosque-Prous, Marina; Folch, Cinta; Sarasa-Renedo, Ana; Majó, Xavier; Casabona, Jordi; Brugal, M. Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The objectives were to analyze the knowledge about overdose prevention, the use of naloxone, and the number of fatal overdoses after the implementation of Systematic Training in Overdose Prevention (STOOP) program. We conducted a quasi-experimental study, and held face-to-face interviews before (n = 725) and after (n = 722) implementation of systematic training in two different samples of people who injected opioids attending harm reduction centers. We asked participants to list the main causes of overdose and the main actions that should be taken when witnessing an overdose. We created two dependent variables, the number of (a) correct and (b) incorrect answers. The main independent variable was Study Group: Intervention Group (IG), Comparison Group (CG), Pre-Intervention Group With Sporadic Training in Overdose Prevention (PREIGS), or Pre-Intervention Group Without Training in Overdose Prevention (PREIGW). The relationship between the dependent and independent variables was assessed using a multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Finally, we conducted an interrupted time series analysis of monthly fatal overdoses before and after the implementation of systematic program during the period 2006–2015. Knowledge of overdose prevention increased after implementing systematic training program. Compared to the PREIGW, the IG gave more correct answers (IRR = 1.40;95%CI:1.33–1.47), and fewer incorrect answers (IRR = 0.33;95%CI:0.25–0.44). Forty percent of people who injected opioids who received a naloxone kit had used the kit in response to an overdose they witnessed. These courses increase knowledge of overdose prevention in people who use opioids, give them the necessary skills to use naloxone, and slightly diminish the number of fatal opioid overdoses in the city of Barcelona. PMID:29088247

  6. Isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration sparing effects of fentanyl in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Allan J; Soares, Joao H N; Pavlisko, Noah D; McAlister Council-Troche, Robert; Henao-Guerrero, Natalia

    2017-07-01

    To characterize the isoflurane-sparing effects of a high and a low dose of fentanyl in dogs, and its effects on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Prospective, randomized crossover trial. Eight healthy male Beagle dogs weighing 12.1 ± 1.6 kg [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] and approximate age 1 year. Dogs were anesthetized using isoflurane and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) was determined in duplicate by the bracketing method using an electrical stimulus on the tarsus. Animals were administered fentanyl: low dose (33 μg kg -1 loading dose, 0.2 μg kg -1  minute -1 ) or high dose (102 μg kg -1 loading dose, 0.8 μg kg -1  minute -1 ) and MAC was re-determined (MAC ISO-F ). Blood was collected for analysis of plasma fentanyl concentrations before administration and after MAC ISO-F determination. All values are presented as mean ± SD. Isoflurane MAC (MAC ISO ) was 1.30 ± 0.23% in the low dose treatment, which significantly decreased to 0.75 ± 0.22% (average MAC reduction 42.3 ± 9.4%). MAC ISO was 1.30 ± 0.18% in the high dose treatment, which significantly decreased to 0.30 ± 0.11% (average MAC reduction 76.9 ± 7.4%). Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations were 6.2 and 29.5 ng mL -1 for low and high dose treatments, respectively. MAP increased significantly only in the high dose treatment (from 81 ± 8 to 92 ± 9 mmHg). HR decreased significantly in both treatments from 108 ± 25 to 61 ± 14 beats minute -1 with the low dose and from 95 ± 14 to 42 ± 4 beats minute -1 with the high dose. Fentanyl administration resulted in a dose-dependent isoflurane MAC-sparing effect with bradycardia at both doses and an increase in MAP only at high dose. Further evaluation is needed to determine the effects of fentanyl on the overall cardiovascular function. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Balancing opioid-induced gastrointestinal side effects with pain management: Insights from the online community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Cynthia B; Reid, Mark W; Arnold, Corey; Patel, Haridarshan; Ursos, Lyann; Sa'adon, Roee; Pourmorady, Jonathan; Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2015-01-01

    Opioids cause gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, pain, and (in 40 percent) constipation that diminish patients' quality of life. Outside traditional surveys, little is known about the opioid-induced constipation (OIC) patient experience and its impact on pain management. The purpose of this study was to use data from social media platforms to qualitatively examine patient beliefs about OIC and other prominent GI side effects, their impact on effective pain management and doctor-patient interaction. The authors collected Tweets from March 25 to July 31, 2014, and e-forum posts from health-related social networking sites regardless of timestamp. The authors identified specific keywords related to opioids and GI side effects to locate relevant content in the dataset, which was then manually coded using ATLAS.ti software. The authors examined 2,519,868 Tweets and more than 1.8 billion e-forum posts, of which, 88,586 Tweets and 9,767 posts satisfied the search criteria. Three thousand three individuals experienced opioidinduced GI side effects, mostly related to phenanthrenes (n = 1,589), and 1,274 (42.4 percent) individuals described constipation. Over-the-counter medications and nonevidence-based natural approaches were most commonly used to alleviate constipation. Many individuals questioned, rotated, reduced, or stopped their opioid treatments as a result of their GI side effects. Investigation of social media reveals a struggle to balance pain management with opioid-induced GI side effects, especially constipation. Individuals are often unprepared to treat OIC, to modify opioid regiments without medical advice, and to resort to using natural remedies and treatments lacking scientific evidence of effectiveness. These results identify opportunities to improve physician-patient communication and explore effective treatment alternatives.

  8. Does mutual compensation of the cognitive effects induced by pain and opioids exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Malver, Lasse Paludan; Andresen, Trine

    2015-01-01

    hypotheses: (1) the analgesic effect of opioids improves cognitive function by decreasing pain, and (2) pain antagonizes cognitive effects of opioids. METHODS: Randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Three experiments were conducted with 22 healthy males. Sustained attention, memory and motor...... function/attention/mental flexibility were evaluated by continuous reaction time (CRT), verbal fluency test (VFT) and trail making test-B (TMT-B), respectively. In the 1st experiment, the cognitive effects of experimental tonic pain of mild and moderate intensities produced by a computer...

  9. Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the piracetam induced blockade of opioid effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal; Jindal, Seema

    2007-12-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on morphine/ buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats and effect of piracetam on morphine or minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Nociceptive threshold was measured by the tail flick test in rats. The cumulative dose responses of morphine or minoxidil were recorded in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Piracetam attenuated buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats. Piracetam significantly reduced the morphine and minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation suggesting that piracetam interferes with opioid receptor and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) opener mediated responses in vitro. Thus, it may be suggested that piracetam attenuates opioid effects by an opioid receptor-KATP channel linked mechanism.

  10. Sex versus sweet: opposite effects of opioid drugs on the reward of sucrose and sexual pheromones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Pavón, Carmen; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Martínez-García, Fernando; Lanuza, Enrique

    2008-04-01

    Endogenous opioids mediate some reward processes involving both natural (food, sweet taste) and artificial (morphine, heroin) rewards. In contrast, sexual behavior (which is also reinforcing) is generally inhibited by opioids. To establish the role of endogenous opioids for a newly described natural reinforcer, namely male sexual pheromones for female mice, we checked the effects of systemic injections of the general opioid antagonist naloxone (1-10 mg/kg) and the agonist fentanyl (0.1- 0.5 mg/kg) in a number of behavioral tests. Naloxone affected neither the innate preference for male-soiled bedding (vs. female-soiled bedding) in 2-choice tests nor the induction of place conditioning using male pheromones as rewarding stimuli, although it effectively blocked the preference for consuming a sucrose solution. In contrast, fentanyl inhibited the preference for male chemosignals without altering sucrose preference. These results suggest that, in macrosmatic animals such as rodents, opioidergic inhibition of sexual behavior might be due, at least partially, to an impaired processing of pheromonal cues and that the hedonic value of sweet-tasting solutions and sexual pheromones are under different opioid modulation.

  11. Opioid intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... easily result in intoxication. The provider prescribes a sleep medicine (sedative) in addition to the opioid. The provider ... an opioid with certain other drugs, such as sleep medicines or alcohol Taking the opioid in ways not ...

  12. The effect of benfotiamine on mu-opioid receptor mediated antinociception in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacitarhan, C; Minareci, E; Sadan, G

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a prevalent, disabling disorder. Currently, the only treatments available to patients with diabetic neuropathy are glucose control and pain management. B vitamin present neuroprotective effects, which are suggested to be related to their analgesic action in various models of neuropathic pain. According to our literature knowledge there is no report about antinociceptive effects of thiamine as benfotiamine and opioids together in diabetic mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of benfotiamine on the antinociception produced by mu-opioid receptor agonist fentanyl in diabetic mice. The effects of benfotiamine on antinociception produced by fentanyl in diabetic mice were studied in 4 groups. Antinociceptive effect was determined with tail flick, hot plate and formalin test. Our results showed that, mu-opioid agonist fentanyl in benfotiamine applied diabetic group caused more potent antinociceptive effect than in diabetic group without benfotiamine treatment. In brief benfotiamine supplement in diet did not bring out antinociceptive effect itself, but during development of STZ diabetes, benfotiamine replacement increased the antinociceptive effect of fentanyl in mice tail-flick test. This effect is probably due to the replacement of benfotiamine efficiency occurring in diabetes mellitus. Finally, we suppose that oral benfotiamine replacement therapy may be useful to ameliorate analgesic effect of mu-opioid agonists on neuropathic pain in diabetic case. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. By Default: The Effect of Prepopulated Prescription Quantities on Opioid Prescribing in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santistevan, Jamie R; Sharp, Brian R; Hamedani, Azita G; Fruhan, Scott; Lee, Andrew W; Patterson, Brian W

    2018-03-01

    Opioid prescribing patterns have come under increasing scrutiny with the recent rise in opioid prescriptions, opioid misuse and abuse, and opioid-related adverse events. To date, there have been limited studies on the effect of default tablet quantities as part of emergency department (ED) electronic order entry. Our goal was to evaluate opioid prescribing patterns before and after the removal of a default quantity of 20 tablets from ED electronic order entry. We performed a retrospective observational study at a single academic, urban ED with 58,000 annual visits. We identified all adult patients (18 years or older) seen in the ED and discharged home with prescriptions for tablet forms of hydrocodone and oxycodone (including mixed formulations with acetaminophen). We compared the quantity of tablets prescribed per opioid prescription 12 months before and 10 months after the electronic order-entry prescription default quantity of 20 tablets was removed and replaced with no default quantity. No specific messaging was given to providers, to avoid influencing prescribing patterns. We used two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test, two-sample test of proportions, and Pearson's chi-squared tests where appropriate for statistical analysis. A total of 4,104 adult patients received discharge prescriptions for opioids in the pre-intervention period (151.6 prescriptions per 1,000 discharged adult patients), and 2,464 post-intervention (106.69 prescriptions per 1,000 discharged adult patients). The median quantity of opioid tablets prescribed decreased from 20 (interquartile ration [IQR] 10-20) to 15 (IQR 10-20) (pdefault quantity. While the most frequent quantity of tablets received in both groups was 20 tablets, the proportion of patients who received prescriptions on discharge that contained 20 tablets decreased from 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] [0.48-0.52]) to 0.23 (95% CI [0.21-0.24]) (pdefault quantity removal. Although the median number of tablets differed significantly

  14. Effect of branched chain amino acid enrichment of total parenteral nutrition on nitrogen sparing and clinical outcome of sepsis and trauma: a prospective randomized double blind trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Meyenfeldt, M. F.; Soeters, P. B.; Vente, J. P.; van Berlo, C. L.; Rouflart, M. M.; de Jong, K. P.; van der Linden, C. J.; Gouma, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Administration of extra branched chain amino acids (BCAA) has been associated with a nitrogen sparing effect in septic and traumatized patients. Whether nitrogen sparing is associated with decreased morbidity and mortality rates is unknown. We therefore undertook a prospective, randomized, double

  15. Opioid dependence - management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Matthew

    2010-08-01

    Addiction to opioids, or opioid dependence, encompasses the biopsychosocial dysfunction seen in illicit heroin injectors, as well as aberrant behaviours in patients prescribed opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. To outline the management of opioid dependence using opioid pharmacotherapy as part of a comprehensive chronic illness management strategy. The same principles and skills general practitioners employ in chronic illness management underpin the care of patients with opioid dependence. Opioid pharmacotherapy, with the substitution medications methadone and buprenorphine, is an effective management of opioid dependence. Training and regulatory requirements for prescribing opioid pharmacotherapies vary between jurisdictions, but this treatment should be within the scope of most Australian GPs.

  16. [Effects of chronic experimental stress and endogenous opioids on histophysiological parameters of the thyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, R A; Glumova, V A; Riashchikov, S N; Proshutina, N E

    1992-01-01

    In adult rabbits stress was modelled by electrostimulation of the hypothalamus ventromedial nucleus (15-hour-long session during 30 days) and medulla's raphe big nucleus which is one of the central places of the opioid peptides synthesis was irritated. It is revealed, that under stress thyroid gland responds by serum T3 increase in comparison with control animals with statistically significant variability of the T4 profile. Chronicity of the emotional agitation involves destructive changes in the thyroid parenchyma the hurting effect of the negative emotional factor is expressed less during opioid peptides complex activation. It is suggested that there are its own stress-limiting mechanisms in thyroid gland.

  17. Renal function and symptoms/adverse effects in opioid-treated patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Lundström, S; Sjøgren, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal impairment and the risk of toxicity caused by accumulation of opioids and/or active metabolites is an under-investigated issue. This study aimed at analysing if symptoms/adverse effects in opioid-treated patients with cancer were associated with renal function. METHODS: Cross...... loss of appetite (P = 0.04). No other significant associations were found. CONCLUSION: Only severe constipation and loss of appetite were associated with low GFR in patients treated with morphine. Oxycodone and fentanyl, in relation to the symptoms studied, seem to be safe as used and titrated...

  18. Linear-quadratic model underestimates sparing effect of small doses per fraction in rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shun Wong, C.; Toronto University; Minkin, S.; Hill, R.P.; Toronto University

    1993-01-01

    The application of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe iso-effective fractionation schedules for dose fraction sizes less than 2 Gy has been controversial. Experiments are described in which the effect of daily fractionated irradiation given with a wide range of fraction sizes was assessed in rat cervical spine cord. The first group of rats was given doses in 1, 2, 4, 8 and 40 fractions/day. The second group received 3 initial 'top-up'doses of 9 Gy given once daily, representing 3/4 tolerance, followed by doses in 1, 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 fractions/day. The fractionated portion of the irradiation schedule therefore constituted only the final quarter of the tolerance dose. The endpoint of the experiments was paralysis of forelimbs secondary to white matter necrosis. Direct analysis of data from experiments with full course fractionation up to 40 fractions/day (25.0-1.98 Gy/fraction) indicated consistency with the LQ model yielding an α/β value of 2.41 Gy. Analysis of data from experiments in which the 3 'top-up' doses were followed by up to 10 fractions (10.0-1.64 Gy/fraction) gave an α/β value of 3.41 Gy. However, data from 'top-up' experiments with 20, 30 and 40 fractions (1.60-0.55 Gy/fraction) were inconsistent with LQ model and gave a very small α/β of 0.48 Gy. It is concluded that LQ model based on data from large doses/fraction underestimates the sparing effect of small doses/fraction, provided sufficient time is allowed between each fraction for repair of sublethal damage. (author). 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Oncologic effectiveness of nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Antonino; Bogani, Giorgio; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Martinelli, Fabio; Chiappa, Valentina; Lopez, Carlos; Perotto, Stefania; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    Nerve-sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH) was introduced with the aim to reduce pelvic dysfunctions related to conventional radical hysterectomy (RH). Here, we sought to assess the effectiveness and safety of NSRH in a relatively large number of the patients of cervical cancer (CC) patients undergoing either primary surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) followed by surgery. Outcomes of consecutive patients undergoing NSRH and of a historical cohort of patients undergoing conventional RH were retrospectively reviewed. This study included 325 (49.8%) and 327 (50.2%) undergoing NSRH and RH, respectively. Via a multivariable model, nodal status was the only factor predicting for DFS (hazard ratio [HR]=2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.17-3.73; p=0.01). A trend towards high risk of recurrence was observed for patients affected by locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) undergoing NACT followed by surgery (HR=2.57; 95% CI=0.95-6.96; p=0.06). Type of surgical procedures (NSRH vs. RH) did not influence risk of recurrence (p=0.47). Similarly, we observed that the execution of NSRH rather than RH had not a detrimental effect on OS (HR=1.19; 95% CI=0.16-9.01; p=0.87). Via multivariable model, no factor directly correlated with OS. No difference in early complication rates was observed between the study groups. Conversely, a significant higher number of late complications was reported in RH versus NSRH groups (p=0.02). Our data suggested that NSRH upholds effectiveness of conventional RH, without increasing recurrence and complication rates but improving pelvic dysfunction rates. Copyright © 2018. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  20. Panicolytic-like effect of tramadol is mediated by opioid receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal grey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiaes, Gislaine Cardoso de Souza; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Sestile, Caio Cesar; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Souza, Rodolfo Luis Silva; Porcu, Mauro; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2017-05-30

    Tramadol is a synthetic opioid prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain, acting as agonist of μ-opioid receptors and serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NE) reuptake inhibitor. This study evaluated the effects of tramadol in rats submitted to the elevated T-maze (ETM), an animal model that evaluates behavioural parameters such as anxiety and panic. Male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally (i.p.) treated acutely with tramadol (16 and 32mg/kg) and were submitted to the ETM. Tramadol (32mg/kg) promoted a panicolytic-like effect. Considering that dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG) is the main brain structure related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD), this study also evaluated the participation of 5-HT and opioid receptors located in the dPAG in the panicolytic-like effect of tramadol. Seven days after stereotaxic surgery for implantation of a cannula in the dPAG, the animals were submitted to the test. To assess the involvement of 5-HT 1A receptors on the effect of tramadol, we combined the 5-HT 1A receptor antagonist, WAY100635 (0.37nmol), microinjected intra-dPAG, 10min prior to the administration of tramadol (32mg/kg, i.p.). WAY100635 did not block the panicolytic-like effect of tramadol. We also associated the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, systemically (1mg/kg, i.p.) or intra-dPAG (0.5nmol) administered 10min prior to tramadol (32mg/kg, i.p.). Naloxone blocked the panicolytic-like effect of tramadol in both routes of administrations, showing that tramadol modulates acute panic defensive behaviours through its interaction with opioid receptors located in the dPAG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy on Urinary Continence in Patients With Preoperative Erectile Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hyun Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We aimed to assess whether nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nsRP is associated with improved recovery of urinary continence compared to non–nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nnsRP in patients with localized prostate cancer and preoperative erectile dysfunction. Methods: A total of 360 patients with organ-confined prostate cancer and an International Index of Erectile Function score of less than 17 were treated with nsRP or nnsRP in Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital. Patients who received neoadjuvant or adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy or had a history of prostate-related surgery were excluded. Recovery of urinary continence was assessed at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Postoperative recovery of continence was defined as zero pad usage. The association between nerve-sparing status and urinary continence was assessed by using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses after controlling for known predictive factors. Results: Urinary continence recovered in 279 patients (77.5% within the mean follow-up period of 22.5 months (range, 6–123 months. Recovery of urinary continence was reported in 74.6% and 86.4% of patients after nnsRP and nsRP, respectively, at 12 months (P=0.022. All groups had comparable perioperative criteria and had no significant preoperative morbidities. Age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and nerve-sparing status were significantly associated with recovery of urinary continence on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.254; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.002–1.478; P=0.026 and nerve-sparing status (HR, 0.713; 95% CI, 0.548–0.929; P=0.012 were independently associated with recovery of urinary continence. Conclusions: nsRP, as compared to nnsRP, improves recovery rates of urinary incontinence and decreases surgical morbidity without compromising pathologic outcomes.

  2. Effects of the morphine-lidocaine-ketamine combination on cardiopulmonary function and isoflurane sparing in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzane Lilian Beier

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the isoflurane sparing and clinical effects of a constant rate infusion of morphine – lidocaine – ketamine (MLK in healthy sheep undergoing experimental gastrointestinal surgery. Twelve adult female sheep (Texel breed were used, weighing 36.5 ± 8.1 kg. The sheep were anesthetized for the implantation of duodenal cannulas. The sheep were premedicated with 0.3 mg kg-1 intramuscular (IM morphine and 20 ?g kg-1 intravenous (IV detomidine. After premedication, anesthesia was induced using 5 mg kg-1 ketamine and 0.5 mg kg-1 diazepam IV and maintained using isoflurane in 100% oxygen. After the induction of anesthesia, the animals were allocated into two groups (each n=6; the GMLK (MLK group – 10 mg morphine, 150 mg lidocaine, 30 mg de ketamine were added in 500 mL saline received a 10 mL kg-1h-1 MLK infusion during the maintenance of anesthesia, and GCON (control group received 10 mL kg-1h-1 of 0.9% sodium chloride. The animals were mechanically ventilated. Cardiopulmonary variables and end-tidal isoflurane concentration (FE´Iso were measured at baseline (immediately before the surgery and 15, 30 and 45 minutes after initiation of surgery. In GMLK, there was a decrease in the FE´Iso at 15, 30 and 45 minutes, a reduction of up to 75.6% during the surgery. The HR was lower in GMLK compared with GCON at 30 minutes, and the MAP was at during baseline in GCON compared with GMLK. The standing time was less in GMLK than in GCON. The use of intravenous MLK was demonstrated to offer great efficiency as part of a balanced anesthesia protocol in sheep, with a 75.6% reduction in the need for isoflurane, providing stability of the cardiovascular parameters and blood gases with a shortened recovery period.

  3. Comparative study of analgesic efficacy and morphine-sparing effect of intramuscular dexketoprofen trometamol with ketoprofen or placebo after major orthopaedic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, M H; Elliott, K M; Stuart-Taylor, M E; Roberts, D R; Buggy, D; Arthurs, G J

    2003-01-01

    Aims Multimodal analgesia is thought to produce balanced and effective postoperative pain control. A combined therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and opiates could result in synergistic analgesia by acting through different mechanisms. Currently there are very few parenterally administered NSAIDs suitable for the immediate postoperative period. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the analgesic efficacy, relative potency, and safety of parenteral dexketoprofen trometamol following major orthopaedic surgery. Methods One hundred and seventy-two patients elected for prosthetic surgery, were randomized to receive two intramuscular injections (12 hourly) of either dexketoprofen 50 mg, ketoprofen 100 mg or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Postoperatively, the patient's pain was stabilized, then they were connected to a patient- controlled analgesia system (PCA) of morphine for 24 h (1 mg with 5 min lockout). Results The mean cumulative amount of morphine (CAM) used was of 39 mg in the dexketoprofen group and 45 mg in the ketoprofen group vs 64 mg in the placebo group. (Reduction in morphine use was approximately one-third between the active compounds compared with placebo (adjusted mean difference of −25 mg between dexketoprofen and placebo and −23 mg between ketoprofen and placebo. These differences were statistically significant: P ≤ 0.0003; 95% CI −35, −14. Pain-intensity scores were consistently lower with the active compounds, the lowest corresponded to the dexketoprofen-treated patients. Regarding sedation, there were statistically significant differences between the two active compounds and placebo only at the 2nd and 13th hours. Wound bleeding was specifically measured with no statistically significant differences found between all the groups. Conclusions Intramuscular administration of dexketoprofen trometamol 50 mg has good analgesic efficacy both in terms of opioid-sparing effect and control of pain after major

  4. Effects of Competing Narratives on Public Perceptions of Opioid Pain Reliever Addiction during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; McGinty, Emma E; Barry, Colleen L

    2016-10-01

    Opioid pain reliever addiction has increased among women of reproductive age over the last fifteen years. News media and public attention have focused on the implications of this trend for infants exposed to opioids prenatally, with state policy responses varying in the extent to which they are punitive or public health oriented. We fielded a six-group randomized experiment among a nationally representative sample of US adults to test the effects of narratives portraying a woman with opioid pain reliever addiction during pregnancy on beliefs about people addicted to opioid pain relievers, perceptions of treatment effectiveness, policy attitudes, and emotional responses. Portraying a high socioeconomic status (SES) woman in the narrative lowered perceptions of individual blame for addiction and reduced public support for punitive policies. Depicting the barriers to treatment faced by a low SES woman lowered support for punitive policies and increased support for expanded insurance coverage for treatment. The extent to which narratives portraying successfully treated addiction affected public attitudes depended on the SES of the woman portrayed. These findings can inform the development of communication strategies to reduce stigma toward this population, reduce support for punitive policies, and increase support for more public health-oriented approaches to addressing this problem. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  5. Effect of Tramadol (μ-opioid receptor agonist on orthodontic tooth movements in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Javadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tramadol is a synthetic analgesic of opioids which has more flexible mechanisms of action than typical opioids. Since it has been reported in previous study that typical opioids like morphine can affect the bone homeostasis, it is worthwhile to examine the effects of tramadol on tooth movement. In this study we investigated effects of tramadol on orthodontic tooth movement in rats.Materials and Methods: 30 male wistar rats were selected and received orthodontic appliance. 3 groups were designed based on the substance that they received daily injections of during a 2-week orthodontic treatment. 1. Control group with no injection.2.Control group with normal saline injection.3. the tramadol group. After the two-week treatment period the amount of tooth movement were measured in all the groups. Also the histological analysis was performed assessing the root resorption, osteoclasts numbers and bone resorption.Results: The amount of tooth movement was not significantl in the tramadol group comparing to the other groups (P>0.05.The results of 3 histological parameters (amount of root resorption, osteoclastic numbers and bone resorption were statistically insignificant (P>0.05.Conclusion: Tramadol as an atypical opioid does not interfere with the process of bone remodeling and tooth movement in rat. Tramadol does not affect osteoclastic activity and bone resorption and it does not cause to change the resulted root resorption either.

  6. Effect of Iboga alkaloids on µ-opioid receptor-coupled G protein activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Antonio

    Full Text Available The iboga alkaloids are a class of small molecules defined structurally on the basis of a common ibogamine skeleton, some of which modify opioid withdrawal and drug self-administration in humans and preclinical models. These compounds may represent an innovative approach to neurobiological investigation and development of addiction pharmacotherapy. In particular, the use of the prototypic iboga alkaloid ibogaine for opioid detoxification in humans raises the question of whether its effect is mediated by an opioid agonist action, or if it represents alternative and possibly novel mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to independently replicate and extend evidence regarding the activation of μ-opioid receptor (MOR-related G proteins by iboga alkaloids.Ibogaine, its major metabolite noribogaine, and 18-methoxycoronaridine (18-MC, a synthetic congener, were evaluated by agonist-stimulated guanosine-5´-O-(γ-thio-triphosphate ([(35S]GTPγS binding in cells overexpressing the recombinant MOR, in rat thalamic membranes, and autoradiography in rat brain slices.In rat thalamic membranes ibogaine, noribogaine and 18-MC were MOR antagonists with functional Ke values ranging from 3 uM (ibogaine to 13 uM (noribogaine and 18MC. Noribogaine and 18-MC did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human or rat MORs, and had only limited partial agonist effects in human embryonic kidney cells expressing mouse MORs. Ibogaine did not did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in any MOR expressing cells. Noribogaine did not stimulate [(35S]GTPγS binding in brain slices using autoradiography. An MOR agonist action does not appear to account for the effect of these iboga alkaloids on opioid withdrawal. Taken together with existing evidence that their mechanism of action also differs from that of other non-opioids with clinical effects on opioid tolerance and withdrawal, these findings suggest a novel mechanism of action, and

  7. Fractionated exposure of high energy iron ions has a sparing effect in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bakke, J.; Puey, A.

    The radiation environment in deep space is complex and includes a broad spectrum of charged and highly energetic particle radiations. Exposure to these types of radiations may pose potential health risks in manned space missions. The detection of particle radiation-induced genomic alterations in vivo, particularly in slow or non-dividing tissues, is therefore important to provide relevant information in estimating risks. We are using a plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mouse model system to rapidly measure, in a statistically reliable way, the mutagenic potential of charged particle radiations relevant in the space environment. The lacZ transgenic mouse has been constructed so that every cell of the animal contains multiple copies of an integrated target reporter gene, allowing us to measure tissue-specific radiation-induced changes as a function of dosing regime. The nature of these mutations can also be characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). To examine the impact of dose protraction, animals were exposed to a single dose or daily fractions of 1 GeV/n iron ions. Cytotoxicity in the peripheral blood was measured by enumerating the frequency of circulating micronucleated reticulocytes (fMN-RET) in a time course from 24 h up to 1 week after completion of the radiation protocol. Brain and spleen tissues were harvested at 8 weeks after exposure and mutant frequencies (MF) in the transgene in these tissues were measured. Results from the fractionated protocol were compared to the responses obtained after the animals were exposed to the single dose treatment. We noted significantly lower levels of micronucleated reticulocytes in peripheral blood at 48 h after fractionated doses of iron ions when compared to the same total dose delivered in a single exposure demonstrating that protracted exposures of particle radiation resulted in an overall sparing effect in cytogenetic toxicity in the hematopoietic system in animals. Transgene mutation analysis

  8. The effect of opioid receptor blockade on the neural processing of thermal stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter D Schoell

    Full Text Available The endogenous opioid system represents one of the principal systems in the modulation of pain. This has been demonstrated in studies of placebo analgesia and stress-induced analgesia, where anti-nociceptive activity triggered by pain itself or by cognitive states is blocked by opioid antagonists. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of opioid receptor blockade on the physiological processing of painful thermal stimulation in the absence of cognitive manipulation. We therefore measured BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent signal responses and intensity ratings to non-painful and painful thermal stimuli in a double-blind, cross-over design using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. On the behavioral level, we observed an increase in intensity ratings under naloxone due mainly to a difference in the non-painful stimuli. On the neural level, painful thermal stimulation was associated with a negative BOLD signal within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and this deactivation was abolished by naloxone.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of emergency department-initiated treatment for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Susan H; Fiellin, David A; Chawarski, Marek C; Owens, Patricia H; Pantalon, Michael V; Hawk, Kathryn; Bernstein, Steven L; O'Connor, Patrick G; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2017-11-01

    In a recent randomized trial, patients with opioid dependence receiving brief intervention, emergency department (ED)-initiated buprenorphine and ongoing follow-up in primary care with buprenorphine (buprenorphine) were twice as likely to be engaged in addiction treatment compared with referral to community-based treatment (referral) or brief intervention and referral (brief intervention). Our aim was to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of these three methods of intervening on opioid dependence in the ED. Measured health-care use was converted to dollar values. We considered a health-care system perspective and constructed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves that indicate the probability each treatment is cost-effective under different thresholds of willingness-to-pay for outcomes studied. An urban ED in the United States. Opioid-dependent patients aged 18 years or older. Self-reported 30-day assessment data were used to construct cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for patient engagement in formal addiction treatment at 30 days and the number of days illicit opioid-free in the past week. Considering only health-care system costs, cost-effectiveness acceptability curves indicate that at all positive willingness-to-pay values, ED-initiated buprenorphine treatment was more cost-effective than brief intervention or referral. For example, at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $1000 for 30-day treatment engagement, we are 79% certain ED-initiated buprenorphine is most cost-effective compared with other studied treatments. Similar results were found for days illicit opioid-free in the past week. Results were robust to secondary analyses that included patients with missing cost data, included crime and patient time costs in the numerator, and to changes in unit price estimates. In the United States, emergency department-initiated buprenorphine intervention for patients with opioid dependence provides high value compared with referral to community

  10. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention in opioid Dependence Treatment &Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Findings: therapy compliance, retention in treatment, decrease in somatic symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and increase in health was significantly in both combination of psychological intervention method than the Naltroxan group. Mindfulness-based on relapse prevention was more effective than CBT relapse prevention in decreasing of, social dysfunction, relapse prevention, increase of therapy compliance, and health. Results: Mindfulness based relapse prevention was superior to CBT and Naltroxan and considerably increased effectiveness of opioid relapse prevention therapy.

  11. The effect of setup uncertainty on normal tissue sparing with IMRT for head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Matthew A.; Wu Quiwen; Cardinale, Robert M.; Mohan, Radhe; Lauve, Andrew D.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Morris, Monica M.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being evaluated in the management of head-and-neck cancers at several institutions, and a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group study of its utility in parotid sparing is under development. There is an inherent risk that the sharper dose gradients generated by IMRT amplify the potentially detrimental impact of setup uncertainty. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 62 (ICRU-62) defined planning organ-at-risk volume (PRV) to account for positional uncertainties for normal tissues. The purpose of this study is to quantify the dosimetric effect of employing PRV for the parotid gland and to evaluate the use of PRV on normal-tissue sparing in the setting of small clinical setup errors. Methods and Materials: The optimized nine-beam IMRT plans for three head-and-neck cancer patients participating in an institutional review board approved parotid-sparing protocol were used as reference plans. A second optimized plan was generated for each patient by adding a PRV of 5 mm for the contralateral parotid gland. The effect of these additions on the quality of the plans was quantified, in terms of both target coverage and normal-tissue sparing. To test the value of PRV in a worst-case scenario, systematic translational setup uncertainties were simulated by shifting the treatment isocenter 5 mm superiorly, inferiorly, left, right, anteriorly, and posteriorly, without altering optimized beam profiles. At each shifted isocenter, dose distributions were recalculated, producing a total of six shifted plans without PRV and six shifted plans with PRV for each patient. The effect of setup uncertainty on parotid sparing and the value of PRV in compensating for the uncertainty were evaluated. Results: The addition of the PRV and reoptimization did not significantly affect the dose to gross tumor volume, spinal cord, or brainstem. In contrast, without any shift, the PRV did increase parotid sparing and reduce

  12. Cholecystokinin octapeptide induces endogenous opioid-dependent anxiolytic effects in morphine-withdrawal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, D; Sun, D; Zang, G; Hao, L; Liu, X; Yu, F; Ma, C; Cong, B

    2014-09-26

    Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), a brain-gut peptide, plays an important role in several opioid addictive behaviors. We previously reported that CCK-8 attenuated the expression and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference. The possible effects of CCK-8 on the negative affective components of drug abstinence are not clear. There are no studies evaluating the effect of CCK-8 on emotional symptoms, such as anxiety, in morphine-withdrawal animals. We investigated the effects of CCK-8 on the anxiety-like behavior in morphine-withdrawal rats using an elevated plus-maze. Morphine withdrawal elicited time-dependent anxiety-like behaviors with peak effects on day 10 (5 days after induction of morphine dependence). Treatment with CCK-8 (0.1 and 1 μg, i.c.v.) blocked this anxiety in a dose-dependent fashion. A CCK1 receptor antagonist (L-364,718, 10 μg, i.c.v.) blocked the effect of CCK-8. Mu-opioid receptor antagonism with CTAP (10 μg, i.c.v.) decreased the 'anxiolytic' effect. CCK-8 inhibited anxiety-like behaviors in morphine-withdrawal rats by up-regulating endogenous opioids via the CCK1 receptor in rats. This study clearly identifies a distinct function of CCK-8 and a potential medication target of central CCK1 receptors for drugs aimed at ameliorating drug addiction. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Justification of evaluation criteria of the effectiveness of choice of spare parts stored in the warehouse of the transport company to maintain in good condition of its rolling stock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonyuk O.P.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Support rolling stock of transport in good repair can be carried out using replacement parts that are stored on in the warehouses of transport enterprise and spare parts that are purchased as the need arises. For the uninterrupted transport services transport enterprise must have a certain amount of stock of spare parts at a given time. Rational organization of storage and inventory control of spare parts for motor plant affects the reducing operating costs and improving profitability of the transportation process. In the article the criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of choice of spare parts stored in the warehouse of the transport company to maintain in good condition of its rolling stock, taking into account the totality of the costs of purchase, transportation and storage of spare parts. Using these criteria allows to determine the advisability of keeping spare parts in stock of transport and procurement of necessary spare parts, provided the minimal costs of spare parts.

  14. The cardiovascular effects of a chimeric opioid peptide based on morphiceptin and PFRTic-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meixing; Zhou, Lanxia; Ma, Guoning; Cao, Shuo; Dong, Shouliang

    2013-01-01

    MCRT (YPFPFRTic-NH(2)) is a chimeric opioid peptide based on morphiceptin and PFRTic-NH(2). In order to assess the cardiovascular effect of MCRT, it was administered by intravenous (i.v.) injection targeting at the peripheral nervous system and by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection targeting at the central nervous system. Naloxone and L-NAME were injected before MCRT to investigate possible interactions with MCRT. Results show that administration of MCRT by i.v. or i.c.v. injection could induce bradycardia and decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) at a greater degree than that with morphiceptin and PFRTic-NH(2). When MCRT and NPFF were coinjected, we observed a dose-dependent weakening of these cardiovascular effects by MCRT. Because naloxone completely abolished the cardiovascular effects of MCRT, we conclude that opioid receptors are involved in regulating the MAP of MCRT regardless of modes of injection. The effect of MCRT on heart rate is completely dependent on opioid receptors when MCRT was administered by i.c.v. instead of i.v. The central nitric oxide (NO) pathway is involved in regulating blood pressure by MCRT under both modes of injection, but the peripheral NO pathway had no effect on lowering blood pressure mediated by MCRT when it was administered by i.c.v. Based on the results from different modes of injection, the regulation of heart rate by MCRT mainly involves in the central NO pathway. Lastly, we observed that the cardiovascular effects of MCRT such as bradycardia and decrease of blood pressure, were stronger than that of its parent peptides. Opioid receptors and the NO pathway are involved in the cardiovascular regulation by MCRT, and their degree of involvement differs between intravenous and intracerebroventricular injection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Are Prescription Opioids Driving the Opioid Crisis? Assumptions vs Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Mark Edmund

    2018-04-01

    Sharp increases in opioid prescriptions, and associated increases in overdose deaths in the 2000s, evoked widespread calls to change perceptions of opioid analgesics. Medical literature discussions of opioid analgesics began emphasizing patient and public health hazards. Repetitive exposure to this information may influence physician assumptions. While highly consequential to patients with pain whose function and quality of life may benefit from opioid analgesics, current assumptions about prescription opioid analgesics, including their role in the ongoing opioid overdose epidemic, have not been scrutinized. Information was obtained by searching PubMed, governmental agency websites, and conference proceedings. Opioid analgesic prescribing and associated overdose deaths both peaked around 2011 and are in long-term decline; the sharp overdose increase recorded in 2014 was driven by illicit fentanyl and heroin. Nonmethadone prescription opioid analgesic deaths, in the absence of co-ingested benzodiazepines, alcohol, or other central nervous system/respiratory depressants, are infrequent. Within five years of initial prescription opioid misuse, 3.6% initiate heroin use. The United States consumes 80% of the world opioid supply, but opioid access is nonexistent for 80% and severely restricted for 4.1% of the global population. Many current assumptions about opioid analgesics are ill-founded. Illicit fentanyl and heroin, not opioid prescribing, now fuel the current opioid overdose epidemic. National discussion has often neglected the potentially devastating effects of uncontrolled chronic pain. Opioid analgesic prescribing and related overdoses are in decline, at great cost to patients with pain who have benefited or may benefit from, but cannot access, opioid analgesic therapy.

  16. Peculiarities of vascular tunic microstructure of the white rat eyeball under the effect of opioid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateshuk-Vatseba, Lesya; Pidvalna, Uliana; Kost, Andriy

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with determination of changes in the structural organization of vascular tunic of the eyeball under the effect of opioid. The study was carried out on 24 mature white male rats aged 3.0-4.5 months and 170-280 g weight. The research material included histological specimen and semi-thin sections of white rats' eyeball vascular tunic. For the histological study, microscopic sections of the eyeball were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, Heidenhain's Azan trichrome. Specimens were studied and photographed with microscope magnification: ×600, ×1000. The first signs of microstructure disorder in all parts of vascular tunic of the eyeball are noticeable after two weeks of nalbuphine injection to the white rats. During the next four weeks of the experiment, the pathological changes increase and are manifested by the swelling and polymorphonuclear infiltration of the iris, ciliary body, choroid and by deep destructive changes of eyeball hemomicrocirculatory bloodstream. Histological and ultramicroscopic studies of the white rats' eyeball vascular tunic after six weeks of nalbuphine injections showed deep destructive changes in the structure of all parts of vascular tunic. Our study demonstrated a negative effect of the prolonged injection of opioid in the experiment on the state of microstructural organization of the eyeball vascular tunic. Development of angiopathy is the triggering for occurrence of destructive changes in the eyeball under the effect of opioid.

  17. Effect of prenatal methadone and ethanol on opioid receptor development in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, M.A.; Braun, R.L. (Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The current literature shows that the offspring of female rats exposed to methadone or ethanol display similar neurochemical and neurobehavioral alterations, and suggests that these drugs may be operating through a common mechanism. If this hypothesis is true, their effect on the endogenous opioid systems should be qualitatively similar. In this study virgin females were treated with methadone or 10% ethanol oral solution starting prior to conception and continued throughout gestation. When the offspring had reached 15 or 30 days of age they were sacrificed, the brain was removed and prepared for opioid receptor binding studies. ({sup 3}H)DAGO and ({sup 3}H)DADLE were used as ligands for the mu and delta receptors, respectively. These studies show significant treatment-related differences in both the number of mu and delta binding sites as well as in apparent receptor affinity. Significant sex- and age-related differences between treatments were also observed. These data show that methadone and ethanol, while manifesting some similar neurochemical and behavioral effects, have unique effects on opioid receptor binding, suggesting that they may be acting by different mechanisms.

  18. Implementation of methadone therapy for opioid use disorder in Russia - a modeled cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrisov, Bulat; Murphy, Sean M; Morrill, Tyler; Saadoun, Mayada; Lunze, Karsten; Shepard, Donald

    2017-01-20

    Opioid agonist therapy using methadone, an effective treatment of opioid use disorders (OUD) for people who inject drugs (PWID), is recommended by the World Health Organization as essential to curtail the growing HIV epidemic. Yet, despite increasing prevalence of OUD and HIV, methadone therapy has not yet been implemented in Russia. The aim of this modeling study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of methadone therapy for Russian adults with a diagnosed OUD. We modeled the projected program implementation costs and estimated disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted over a 10-year period, associated with the provision of methadone therapy for a hypothetical, unreplenished cohort of Russian adults with an OUD (n = 249,000), in comparison to the current therapies at existing addiction treatment facilities. Our model compared four distinct scenarios of treatment coverage in the cohort ranging from 3.1 to 55%. Providing methadone therapy to as few as 3.1% of adults with an OUD amounted to an estimated almost 50,000 DALYs averted over 10 years at a cost of just over USD 17 million. Further expanding service coverage to 55% resulted in an estimated almost 900,000 DALYs averted, at a cost of about USD 308 million. Our study indicated that implementing opioid agonist therapy with methadone to treat OUD at existing facilities in Russia is highly cost-effective.

  19. Differences between opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn; Jensen, Rasmus D.; Nielsen, Lecia M.

    2013-01-01

    to morphine. Although this approach is recognized as cost-effective in most cases there is solid evidence that, on an individual patient basis, opioids are not all equal. Therefore it is important to have an armamentarium of strong analgesics in clinical practice to ensure a personalized approach in patients...... who do not respond to standard treatment. In this review we highlight differences between opioids in human studies from a pharmacological, experimental, clinical and health economics point of view. We provide evidence that individuals respond differently to opioids, and that general differences......Clinical studies comparing the response and side effects of various opioids have not been able to show robust differences between drugs. Hence, recommendations of the regulatory authorities have been driven by costs with a general tendency in many countries to restrict physician's use of opioids...

  20. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist MR-2266-BS on the acquisition of ethanol preference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandi, C.; Borrell, J.; Guaza, C. (Cajal Institute, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-01-01

    Using a paradigm by which rats forced to drink a weak ethanol solution develop ethanol preference in consecutive retention testing days, the effects of the administration of the kappa opioid antagonist MR-2266-BS, prior to or after the forced ethanol session, were studied. Pre-conditioning subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of 1 mg/kg of MR-2266-BS induced a decrease in subsequent ethanol consumption without significantly modifying the acquisition of ethanol preference. Post-conditioning administration of MR-2266-BS induced both a dose-dependent reduction in ethanol consumption and in preference throughout the three following days. The results of the present study provide further support of the involvement of kappa-type opioids on drinking behavior, and suggest that kappa receptors may be involved in the consumption and development of preference to ethanol.

  1. Effects of music on psychophysiological responses and opioid dosage in patients undergoing total knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Ji; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Hsieh, Yuan-Mei; Lai, Hui-Ling

    2015-10-01

    The present authors examined the effects of listening to music on psychophysiological parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate) during preoperative and postoperative days and determined whether listening to music could lower pain intensity and opioid dosage during postoperative days in patients who underwent total knee replacements. This was a two group repeated measures design for 30 subjects aged 53-85 years who were scheduled for total knee replacement. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a music group or a control group. Psychophysiological parameters were obtained from patients' monitors. A visual analog scale was used to assess postoperative pain. Opioid dosage was recorded and converted to standardized units. Mann-Whitney U-test and generalized estimating equation analysis were used to compare groups. Respiratory rates while in the surgical waiting area were lower for the music group than for the control group (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference between these groups for blood pressure, heart rate, pain intensity, or opioid dosage. However, a within-group comparison showed that systolic blood pressure in the music group was significantly and consistently decreased during postoperative recovery (Wald = 9.21, P = 0.007). These results suggest that listening to music stabilized systolic blood pressure in patients during postoperative recovery. However, the effects of music on psychophysiological parameters, pain intensity, and opioid dosage in a surgical setting require further research. © 2015 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  2. Effects of opioids on local anesthesia in the rat: a codeine and tramadol study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Girio Carnaval

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are central analgesics that act on the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system. We investigated the effects of codeine (COD and tramadol (TRAM on local anesthesia of the sciatic nerve. Eighty Wistar male rats received the following SC injections in the popliteal fossa: local anesthetic with epinephrine (LA; local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (LA WV; COD; TRAM; LA + COD; LA + TRAM; COD 20 minutes prior to LA (COD 20' + LA or TRAM 20 minutes prior to LA (TRAM 20' + LA. As a nociceptive function, the blockade was considered the absence of a paw withdraw reflex. As a motor function, it was the absence of claudication. As a proprioceptive function, it was the absence of hopping and tactile responses. All data were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA. Opioids showed a significant increase in the level of anesthesia, and the blockade duration of LA + COD was greater than that of the remaining groups (p < 0.05. The associated use of opioids improved anesthesia efficacy. This could lead to a new perspective in controlling dental pain.

  3. Parotid gland sparing effect by computed tomography-based modified lower field margin in whole brain radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Oyeon; Chun, Mi Son; Oh, Young Taek; Kim, Mi Hwa; Park, Hae Jin; Nam, Sang Soo; Heo, Jae Sung; Noh, O Kyu; Park, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Parotid gland can be considered as a risk organ in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the parotid gland sparing effect of computed tomography (CT)-based WBRT compared to 2-dimensional plan with conventional field margin. From January 2008 to April 2011, 53 patients underwent WBRT using CT-based simulation. Bilateral two-field arrangement was used and the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 10 fractions. We compared the parotid dose between 2 radiotherapy plans using different lower field margins: conventional field to the lower level of the atlas (CF) and modified field fitted to the brain tissue (MF). Averages of mean parotid dose of the 2 protocols with CF and MF were 17.4 Gy and 8.7 Gy, respectively (p 98% of prescribed dose were 99.7% for CF and 99.5% for MF. Compared to WBRT with CF, CT-based lower field margin modification is a simple and effective technique for sparing the parotid gland, while providing similar dose coverage of the whole brain.

  4. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van; Kollenburg, Peter van; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and methods: In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning CT-scans were performed: with and without ERB. A prostate planning target volume (PTV) was defined, and the Awall was delineated, using two different methods. Three-field and 4-field 3D-CRT plans, and IMRT plans were generated with a prescription dose of 78 Gy. In 144 treatment plans, the minimum dose (D min ), maximum dose (D max ), and mean dose (D mean ) to the Awall were calculated, as well as the Awall volumes exposed to doses ranging from ≥20 Gy to ≥70 Gy (V 20 - V 70 , respectively). Results: In the 3D-CRT plans, an ERB significantly reduced D mean , D max , and V 30 - V 70 . For IMRT all investigated dose parameters were significantly reduced by the ERB. The absolute reduction of D mean was 12 Gy in 3D-CRT and was 7.5 Gy in IMRT for both methods of Awall delineation. Conclusions: Application of an ERB showed a significant Awall sparing effect in both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This may lead to reduced late anal toxicity in prostate radiotherapy.

  5. Anal wall sparing effect of an endorectal balloon in 3D conformal and intensity-modulated prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; van Lin, Emile N J Th; van Kollenburg, Peter; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the anal wall (Awall) sparing effect of an endorectal balloon (ERB) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. In 24 patients with localized prostate carcinoma, two planning CT-scans were performed: with and without ERB. A prostate planning target volume (PTV) was defined, and the Awall was delineated, using two different methods. Three-field and 4-field 3D-CRT plans, and IMRT plans were generated with a prescription dose of 78Gy. In 144 treatment plans, the minimum dose (D(min)), maximum dose (D(max)), and mean dose (D(mean)) to the Awall were calculated, as well as the Awall volumes exposed to doses ranging from >or=20Gy to >or=70Gy (V(20)-V(70), respectively). In the 3D-CRT plans, an ERB significantly reduced D(mean), D(max), and V(30)-V(70). For IMRT all investigated dose parameters were significantly reduced by the ERB. The absolute reduction of D(mean) was 12Gy in 3D-CRT and was 7.5Gy in IMRT for both methods of Awall delineation. Application of an ERB showed a significant Awall sparing effect in both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This may lead to reduced late anal toxicity in prostate radiotherapy.

  6. Activation of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptors Normalizes Caffeine Effects Modified in Nicotine-Dependent Rats during Nicotine Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakov, S K; Bogdanova, N G

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effect of peripheral (intragastric) ICI-204,448, an agonist of gastric κ-opioid receptors, on the psychostimulating and anxiolytic effects of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats at the stage of nicotine withdrawal. In these rats, the effects of caffeine (10 mg/kg) were perverted. In nicotine-dependent rats, caffeine produced an anxiolytic effect accompanied by pronounced stimulation of motor activity, in contrast to anxiogenic effect induced by caffeine in intact rats without nicotine dependence. During nicotine withdrawal, nicotine-dependent rats demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to nicotine. Intragastric administration of κ-opioid receptor agonist ICI-204,448 normalized the effect of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats. We have previously demonstrated that activation of peripheral κ-opioid receptors inhibited central κ-opioid activity and eliminated manifestations of nicotine withdrawal syndrome in nicotine-dependent rats, e.g. metabolism activation, stimulation of motor activity, and enhancement of food consumption. In its turn, inhibition of central κ-opioid structures activates the brain adenosine system, which can attenuate the caffeine-induced effects in nicotine-dependent rats.

  7. Weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir: a consequence of central nervous system-mediated reduced energy intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Jones, D; Danne, T; Hermansen, K; Niswender, K; Robertson, K; Thalange, N; Vasselli, J R; Yildiz, B; Häring, H U

    2015-10-01

    Insulin therapy is often associated with adverse weight gain. This is attributable, at least in part, to changes in energy balance and insulin's anabolic effects. Adverse weight gain increases the risk of poor macrovascular outcomes in people with diabetes and should therefore be mitigated if possible. Clinical studies have shown that insulin detemir, a basal insulin analogue, exerts a unique weight-sparing effect compared with other basal insulins. To understand this property, several hypotheses have been proposed. These explore the interplay of efferent and afferent signals between the muscles, brain, liver, renal and adipose tissues in response to insulin detemir and comparator basal insulins. The following models have been proposed: insulin detemir may reduce food intake through direct or indirect effects on the central nervous system (CNS); it may have favourable actions on hepatic glucose metabolism through a selective effect on the liver, or it may influence fluid homeostasis through renal effects. Studies have consistently shown that insulin detemir reduces energy intake, and moreover, it is clear that this shift in energy balance is not a consequence of reduced hypoglycaemia. CNS effects may be mediated by direct action, by indirect stimulation by peripheral mediators and/or via a more physiological counter-regulatory response to insulin through restoration of the hepatic-peripheral insulin gradient. Although the precise mechanism remains unclear, it is likely that the weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir can be explained by a combination of mechanisms. The evidence for each hypothesis is considered in this review. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effect of electroacupuncture on opioid consumption in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie CL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common and has been increasingly managed by opioid medications, of which the long-term efficacy is unknown. Furthermore, there is evidence that long-term use of opioids is associated with reduced pain control, declining physical function and quality of life, and could hinder the goals of integrated pain management. Electroacupuncture (EA has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative opioid consumption. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture could assist patients with chronic pain to reduce their requirements for opioids. The proposed research aims to assess if EA is an effective adjunct therapy to standard pain and medication management in reducing opioids use by patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, sham-acupuncture controlled, three-arm clinical trial, 316 patients regularly taking opioids for pain control and meeting the defined selection criteria will be recruited from pain management centres and clinics of primary care providers in Victoria, Australia. After a four-week run-in period, the participants are randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups to receive EA, sham EA or no-EA with a ratio of 2:1:1. All participants receive routine pain medication management delivered and supervised by the trial medical doctors. Twelve sessions of semi-structured EA or sham EA treatment are delivered over 10 weeks. Upon completion of the acupuncture treatment period, there is a 12-week follow-up. In total, participants are involved in the trial for 26 weeks. Outcome measures of opioid and non-opioid medication consumption, pain scores and opioid-related adverse events are documented throughout the study. Quality of life, depression, function, and attitude to pain medications are also assessed. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will determine whether EA is of significant clinical value in assisting the management of

  9. Opioid system and human emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Tuominen, Lauri

    2017-04-10

    Emotions are states of vigilant readiness that guide human and animal behaviour during survival-salient situations. Categorical models of emotions posit neurally and physiologically distinct basic human emotions (anger, fear, disgust, happiness, sadness and surprise) that govern different survival functions. Opioid receptors are expressed abundantly in the mammalian emotion circuit, and the opioid system modulates a variety of functions related to arousal and motivation. Yet, its specific contribution to different basic emotions has remained poorly understood. Here, we review how the endogenous opioid system and particularly the μ receptor contribute to emotional processing in humans. Activation of the endogenous opioid system is consistently associated with both pleasant and unpleasant emotions. In general, exogenous opioid agonists facilitate approach-oriented emotions (anger, pleasure) and inhibit avoidance-oriented emotions (fear, sadness). Opioids also modulate social bonding and affiliative behaviour, and prolonged opioid abuse may render both social bonding and emotion recognition circuits dysfunctional. However, there is no clear evidence that the opioid system is able to affect the emotions associated with surprise and disgust. Taken together, the opioid systems contribute to a wide array of positive and negative emotions through their general ability to modulate the approach versus avoidance motivation associated with specific emotions. Because of the protective effects of opioid system-mediated prosociality and positive mood, the opioid system may constitute an important factor contributing to psychological and psychosomatic resilience. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil enhances analgesic effect of opioids in patients with refractory cancer pain by increasing plasma β-endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Ou, Wu-Ling; Wang, Jun; Yao, Guo-Qing; Yang, Bo; Rao, Zhi-Guo; Gao, Jian-Fei; Zhang, Bi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the analgesic effect of a combination of intravenous flurbiprofen axetil and opioids, and evaluate the relationship between refractory pain relief and plasma β-endorphin levels in cancer patients. A total of 120 cancer patients was randomly divided into two groups, 60 patients took orally morphine sulfate sustained-release tablets in group A, and another 60 patients receiving the combination treatment of intravenous flurbiprofen axetil and opioid drugs in group B. After 7 days, pain relief, quality of life improvement and side effects were evaluated. Furthermore, plasma β-endorphin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. With the combination treatment of intravenous intravenous flurbiprofen axetil and opioids, the total effective rate of pain relief rose to 91.4%, as compared to 82.1% when morphine sulfate sustained-release tablet was used alone. Compared with that of group A, the analgesic effect increased in group B (p=0.031). Moreover, satisfactory pain relief was associated with a significant increase in plasma β-endorphin levels. After the treatment, plasma β-endorphin level in group B was 62.4±13.5 pg/ml, which was higher than that in group A (45.8±11.2 pg/ml) (pflurbiprofen axetil and opioids can enhance the analgesic effect of opioid drugs by increasing plasma β-endorphin levels, which would offer a selected and reliable strategy for refractory cancer pain treatment.

  11. Fractionation Spares Mice From Radiation-Induced Reductions in Weight Gain But Does Not Prevent Late Oligodendrocyte Lineage Side Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begolly, Sage; Shrager, Peter G.; Olschowka, John A.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; O'Banion, M. Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of fractionated versus single-dose cranial radiation on murine white matter. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to 0 Gy, 6 × 6 Gy, or 1 × 20 Gy cranial irradiation at 10 to 12 weeks of age. Endpoints were assessed through 18 months from exposure using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology. Results: Weight gain was temporarily reduced after irradiation; greater loss was seen after single versus fractionated doses. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were reduced early and late after both single and fractionated irradiation. Both protocols also increased myelin g-ratio, reduced the number of nodes of Ranvier, and promoted a shift in the proportion of small, unmyelinated versus large, myelinated axon fibers. Conclusions: Fractionation does not adequately spare normal white matter from late radiation side effects.

  12. Fractionation Spares Mice From Radiation-Induced Reductions in Weight Gain But Does Not Prevent Late Oligodendrocyte Lineage Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begolly, Sage [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Shrager, Peter G. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Olschowka, John A. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Williams, Jacqueline P. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); O' Banion, M. Kerry, E-mail: Kerry_OBanion@URMC.Rochester.edu [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of fractionated versus single-dose cranial radiation on murine white matter. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to 0 Gy, 6 × 6 Gy, or 1 × 20 Gy cranial irradiation at 10 to 12 weeks of age. Endpoints were assessed through 18 months from exposure using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology. Results: Weight gain was temporarily reduced after irradiation; greater loss was seen after single versus fractionated doses. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were reduced early and late after both single and fractionated irradiation. Both protocols also increased myelin g-ratio, reduced the number of nodes of Ranvier, and promoted a shift in the proportion of small, unmyelinated versus large, myelinated axon fibers. Conclusions: Fractionation does not adequately spare normal white matter from late radiation side effects.

  13. Role of the informed consent, from mesotherapy to opioid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, M; Lazzari, M; Maggiori, E; Gafforio, P; Tufaro, G; Baffini, S; Maggiori, S; Palombo, E; de Meo, B; Sabato, A F

    2014-01-01

    Informed consent is part of a process of communication useful to obtain an agreement (conscious, voluntary and free) between doctors and patients. Mesotherapy is based on the introduction of drugs by intradermal route in order to obtain a dose-sparing effect with respect to deeper administration. Opioids are the most appropriate therapy for patients who do not respond to other therapies. Proper communication between doctor and patient, including an explanation of the potential benefits, limitations and risks (even mild), is recommended both in clinical practice and research. Active participation of the patient has the advantage of better control of adverse events, both of mesotherapy and opioid-based therapy. This information-education process returns to the fundamental concept of "first do no harm" and set a "therapeutic partnership" with patients.

  14. Differential effect of opioids in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staahl, Camilla; Dimcevski, Georg; Andersen, Søren Due

    2007-01-01

    and morphine on experimental pain in patients with pain caused by chronic pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients took part in this blinded, cross-over study. The analgesic effects of morphine (30 mg, oral), oxycodone (15 mg, oral) and placebo were tested against multimodal (mechanical, thermal...

  15. Functional and psychosocial effects of multimodality limb-sparing therapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.E.; Steinberg, S.M.; Culnane, M.

    1989-01-01

    We have documented functional and psychosocial changes in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcomas who have undergone multimodality limb-sparing treatments. In 88 patients, parameters related to economic status, sexual activity, pain, limb function, and global quality of life (QOL) were recorded prior to surgery and every 6 months postoperatively. Changes from the preoperative assessment for every parameter were analyzed in each patient. Six months after surgery, there was a decrease in employment status, sexual activity, and in limb function in a significant number of patients. At 12 months, these decreases were still evident. Despite these changes, global QOL measured by a standardized test showed at least some improvement in a significant proportion of patients at 12 months. These findings highlight the difficulty in defining QOL. It could not be ascertained if radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy were causative factors in specific changes because of the small numbers of patients in each subgroup. However, among 60 patients with high-grade sarcomas, significant wound problems developed in 10 of 33 who received postoperative radiation therapy in combination with adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy compared with one of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy alone (P = .016). Also, among high-grade sarcoma patients with 12-month follow-up, six of 19 patients who received radiation therapy and chemotherapy developed joint contractures compared with zero of 15 patients who received chemotherapy alone (P less than .04). The combination of postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy appeared to be associated with significantly more tissue-related injury in patients with high-grade sarcomas compared with chemotherapy alone

  16. Functional and psychosocial effects of multimodality limb-sparing therapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A.E.; Steinberg, S.M.; Culnane, M.; Lampert, M.H.; Reggia, A.J.; Simpson, C.G.; Hicks, J.E.; White, D.E.; Yang, J.J.; Glatstein, E. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-09-01

    We have documented functional and psychosocial changes in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcomas who have undergone multimodality limb-sparing treatments. In 88 patients, parameters related to economic status, sexual activity, pain, limb function, and global quality of life (QOL) were recorded prior to surgery and every 6 months postoperatively. Changes from the preoperative assessment for every parameter were analyzed in each patient. Six months after surgery, there was a decrease in employment status, sexual activity, and in limb function in a significant number of patients. At 12 months, these decreases were still evident. Despite these changes, global QOL measured by a standardized test showed at least some improvement in a significant proportion of patients at 12 months. These findings highlight the difficulty in defining QOL. It could not be ascertained if radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy were causative factors in specific changes because of the small numbers of patients in each subgroup. However, among 60 patients with high-grade sarcomas, significant wound problems developed in 10 of 33 who received postoperative radiation therapy in combination with adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy compared with one of 27 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy alone (P = .016). Also, among high-grade sarcoma patients with 12-month follow-up, six of 19 patients who received radiation therapy and chemotherapy developed joint contractures compared with zero of 15 patients who received chemotherapy alone (P less than .04). The combination of postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy appeared to be associated with significantly more tissue-related injury in patients with high-grade sarcomas compared with chemotherapy alone.

  17. Evaluation of cyclosporine-sparing effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M R; Linek, M; Löwenstein, C; Röthig, A; Doucette, K; Thorstensen, K; Mueller, R S

    2016-04-01

    A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled multicentre trial was conducted in 36 dogs with atopic dermatitis to evaluate the cyclosporine-sparing effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Dogs were stable on their individual cyclosporine dosage and received either a mainly omega-3 fatty acid product with a minor omega-6 fatty acid fraction or placebo, orally for 12 weeks. Dogs were examined every 4 weeks and the Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI-03) was determined by a clinician. Pruritus, quality of life, global condition and coat quality were scored by the owner. If the dog's CADESI-03 and/or pruritus score improved by at least 25% compared with the previous visit, the cyclosporine dosage was decreased by approximately 25%. If the scores deteriorated by at least 25%, the cyclosporine dosage was increased by the same percentage. The median daily cyclosporine dosage/kg bodyweight decreased in the active group from 4.1 mg to 2.6 mg and in the placebo group from 3.5 mg to 3.3 mg over the study period. The difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.009). The improvement in median pruritus score from inclusion to completion was significantly greater in the active group than in the placebo group (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in CADESI-03 changes between groups (P = 0.38). The results of this study indicate a cyclosporine-sparing effect of a mainly omega-3 fatty acid supplement in dogs with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Site-specific effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug lysine clonixinate on rat brain opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortí, E; Coirini, H; Pico, J C

    1999-04-01

    In addition to effects in the periphery through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, several lines of evidence suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) act in the central nervous system. The possibility that the central action of NSAIDs involves regulation of opioid receptors was investigated by quantitative autoradiography of mu, delta, and kappa sites in rat brain slices. Increased (p lysine clonixinate. Labeling of delta receptors was lower in the lateral septum, and kappa sites decreased in thalamic nuclei. These effects were not mediated through direct interaction with opioid-binding sites, since receptor-binding assays using rat brain membranes confirmed that clonixinate up to 1 x 10(-4) mol/l does not inhibit mu, delta, and kappa receptor specific binding. Central effects of NSAIDs might, therefore, involve interaction with the opioid receptor system through indirect mechanisms.

  19. Low efficacy of non-opioid drugs in opioid withdrawal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Derik; Klages, Eckard; Welzel, Helga; Mann, Karl; Croissant, Bernhard

    2005-06-01

    Opioid withdrawal, stress or cues associated with opioid consumption can induce opioid craving. If opioids are not available, opioid-dependent patients usually search for alternative drugs. Because several non-opioid drugs stimulate the endogenous opioidergic system, this concept may explain their frequent use by opioid-dependent patients. We hypothesized that non-opioid drugs alleviate opioid withdrawal symptoms and are therefore consumed by opioid addicts. We asked 89 opioid-dependent patients participating in an out-patient opioid maintenance program to estimate the potential of several non-opioid drugs in being able to alleviate opioid withdrawal. We applied a five-point Lickert scale (1 = very good reduction of opioid withdrawal; 5 = no reduction of opioid withdrawal). Patients could also indicate a worsening of opioid withdrawal. Values (mean +/- SD) were: for benzodiazepines, 3.2 +/- 1.1; tricyclic antidepressants, 3.6 +/- 1.1; cannabis, 3.6 +/- 1.0; alcohol, 4.1 +/- 1.1; cocaine, 4.2 +/- 1.1; amphetamine, 4.4 +/- 0.9; nicotine, 4.7 +/- 0.7; and caffeine, 4.9 +/- 0.5. A worsening of opioid withdrawal was reported by 62% of the patients for cocaine, 62% for amphetamine, 50% for caffeine, 37.5% for cannabis, 27% for nicotine, 26% for alcohol, 8% for tricyclic antidepressants and 3% for benzodiazepines. Our study shows a low efficacy of non-opioid drugs in alleviating opioid withdrawal symptoms. The data basis of this study was good and the sample was suitable to be asked for estimations of drug-drug interactions. Of the patients, 26 - 62% even reported a worsening of opioid withdrawal for cannabis, alcohol, cocaine and amphetamine. Only benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants were reported to have a moderate positive effect on opioid withdrawal.

  20. Prescription Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy in a primary care setting struggles with opioid addiction. 4,5,6 Once addicted, it can be ... of drug overdose deaths involving methadone and other opioid analgesics in West Virginia. Addiction 2009;104(9):1541-8. Dunn KM, Saunders ...

  1. Possible role of opioids and KATP channels in neuroprotective effect of postconditioning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateliya, Bharat Bhai; Singh, Nirmal; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2008-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of opioids and K(ATP) channels in ischemic postconditioning-induced reversal of global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) induced neuronal injury. Mice were subjected to global ischemia by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 10 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h, to produce neuronal injury. Ischemic postconditioning was induced by three episodes of carotid artery occlusion and reperfusion of 10 s each, immediately after global ischemia. Morphine postconditioning was induced by administration of morphine (5 mg/kg i.v.), 5 min prior to reperfusion. Naloxone (5 mg/kg i.v.), opioid receptor antagonist, and glibenclamide (5 mg/kg i.v.), K(ATP) channel blocker were administered 10 min before global ischemia. Extent of cerebral injury was assessed by measuring cerebral infarct size using triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Short-term memory was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test, while degree of motor incoordination was evaluated using inclined beam-walking, rota-rod and lateral push tests. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion resulted in significant increase in infarct size, impairment in short-term memory and motor co-ordination. Ischemic/morphine postconditioning significantly attenuated I/R induced neuronal injury and behavioural alterations. Pretreatments with naloxone and glibenclamide attenuated the neuroprotective effects of ischemic/morphine postconditioning. It may be concluded that ischemic/morphine postconditioning protects I/R induced cerebral injury via activating opioid receptor and K(ATP) channel opening.

  2. Choice between delayed food and immediate opioids in rats: treatment effects and individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panlilio, Leigh V; Secci, Maria E; Schindler, Charles W; Bradberry, Charles W

    2017-11-01

    Addiction involves maladaptive choice behavior in which immediate drug effects are valued more than delayed nondrug rewards. To model this behavior and extend our earlier work with the prescription opioid oxycodone, we allowed rats to choose between immediate intravenous delivery of the short-acting opioid remifentanil and delayed delivery of highly palatable food pellets. Treatment drugs were tested on a baseline where remifentanil was preferred over food. Treatment with a high dose of the opioid antagonist naltrexone decreased but did not reverse the preference for remifentanil. Treatment with the serotonin 5-HT 2C agonist lorcaserin decreased remifentanil and food self-administration nonselectively. Across conditions in which the alternative to delayed food was either a moderate dose of oxycodone, a moderate or high dose of remifentanil, a smaller more immediate delivery of food, or timeout with no primary reinforcement, choice was determined by both the length of the delay and the nature of the alternative option. Delayed food was discounted most steeply when the alternative was a high dose of remifentanil, which was preferred over food when food was delayed by 30 s or more. Within-subject comparisons showed no evidence for trait-like impulsivity or sensitivity to delay across these conditions. Choice was determined more by the current contingencies of reinforcement than by innate individual differences. This finding suggests that people might develop steep delay-discounting functions because of the contingencies in their environment, and it supports the use of contingency management to enhance the relative value of delayed nondrug reinforcers.

  3. The effects of indomethacin, diclofenac, and acetaminophen suppository on pain and opioids consumption after cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godrat Akhavanakbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cesarean section is one of the common surgeries of women. Acute post-operative pain is one of the recognized post-operative complications. Aims: This study was planned to compare the effects of suppositories, indomethacin, diclofenac and acetaminophen, on post-operative pain and opioid usage after cesarean section. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind clinical trial study, 120 candidates of cesarean with spinal anesthesia and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I-II were randomly divided into four groups. Acetaminophen, indomethacin, diclofenac, and placebo suppositories were used in groups, respectively, after operation and the dosage was repeated every 6 h and pain score and opioid usage were compared 24 h after the surgery. The severity of pain was recorded on the basis of Visual Analog Scale (VAS and if severe pain (VAS > 5 was observed, 0.5 mg/kg intramuscular pethidine had been used. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed in SPSS software version 15 and analytical statistics such as ANOVA, Chi-square, and Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD post-hoc. Results : Pain score was significantly higher in control group than other groups, and also pain score in acetaminophen group was higher than indomethacin and diclofenac. The three intervention groups received the first dose of pethidine far more than control group and the distance for diclofenac and indomethacin were significantly longer (P < 0.001. The use of indomethacin, diclofenac, and acetaminophen significantly reduces the amount of pethidine usage in 24 h after the surgery relation to control group. Conclusions : Considering the significant decreasing pain score and opioid usage especially in indomethacin and diclofenac groups rather than control group, it is suggested using of indomethacin and diclofenac suppositories for post-cesarean section analgesia.

  4. Stress-related behavioral alterations accompanying cocaine toxicity: the effects of mixed opioid drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yamamoto, K

    2000-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of mixed opioid drugs on the severity of cocaine (COCA) toxicity by examining stress-related behavioral alterations in mice. In order to ascertain the strength of the stress, the continuous observation of the behavioral symptoms in the cage and the forced swimming test (Porsolt test) were performed in the COCA (75 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated groups, with or without the mixed mu-kappa receptor-related opioid drugs, buprenorphine (BUP) and pentazocine (PEN). Using the high-sensitivity activity measuring instrument Supermex, both the spontaneous behaviors in the cage and the forced swimming behaviors in the water were assessed as activity counts. The behavioral alterations in the COCA-treated groups were compared with a group of mice given a 10 min immobilization stress (IM group). In the COCA-only group, a prolonged increase in the spontaneous behaviors accompanied by convulsive seizures was observed even in the surviving mice, unlike in the IM group. However, an acceleration of behavioral despair in the Porsolt test similar to that observed in the IM group was observed in the COCA group after the disappearance of the acute toxic symptoms (5 hours after the COCA treatment). Among the opioid-treated groups, the mortality rate was attenuated only in the COCA-BUP (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) group. In the COCA-BUP group, a prolonged suppression of the morbid hyperactivity in the cage except for the convulsive seizures, and a normalization of the swimming behavior in the Porsolt test were observed in the survivors. On the other hand, in the COCA-PEN (5 mg/kg, i.p.) group, the swimming behavior in the Porsolt test was abnormally increased in addition to the prolonged morbid hyperactivity in the cage. Therefore, the COCA-induced stress-related behaviors were normalized in the group of mice treated with BUP, a group with a good prognosis.

  5. Effect of ethanol on enkephalinergic opioid system of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, N.A.; Balakireva, N.N.; Brusov, O.S.; Panchenko, L.F.

    1983-10-13

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-morphine and /sup 3/H-(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)-enkephalin (H-EN) with opiatic receptors was studied on white rats along with the content of Met- and Leu-enkephalin and the activity of enkephalinase in various brain segments after single dose (20% solution in 0.9% NaCl, IP; 1.5-4.5 g/kg body weight) and chronic injection (20% EtOH substituted for drinking water) of ethanol. The single injection of EtOH (1.5-4.5 g/kg) resulted in a depression of the specific binding of H-EN with opiate receptors. Doses of 1.5 and 2.5 g/kg led to a lower content of Leu-enkephalin in mid-brain but to an increase of Met-enkephalin; the 4.5 g/kg dose had no effect on the striatum. With chronic administration of EtOH, most of the values obtained on the experimental animals were similar to the control data. 23 references.

  6. Effects of pharmacological manipulation of the kappa opioid receptors on the aversive effects of nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Melissa; Norman, Haval; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2018-02-15

    Nicotine, an addictive component of tobacco smoke, produces both rewarding and aversive effects. Increasing the aversive effects of nicotine may help in promoting smoking cessation. However, neural targets mediating the aversive effects of nicotine have not been fully identified. In this study, we evaluated the role of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in the aversive effects of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, base; s.c.) using the nicotine-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) model in Wistar rats. The KORs were activated using the selective KOR agonist (±)U-50,488H (0, 0.03, 0.15 & 0.3mg/kg; s.c.) and inhibited using the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 0, 15 & 30mg/kg; s.c.) in separate groups of rats using a between-subjects design. Pretreatment with the KOR agonist (±)U-50,488H (0.3mg/kg) significantly increased aversion for the nicotine-associated solution. Additionally, (±)U-50,488H (0.3mg/kg) on its own induced aversion to the flavored solution associated with it even in the absence of nicotine, suggesting that the KOR agonist induced increase in nicotine-induced aversion was an additive effect. Interestingly, administration of the KOR antagonist nor-BNI (30mg/kg) prior to conditioning with nicotine/saline, but not after conditioning with nicotine/saline, attenuated nicotine-induced aversive effects compared to saline controls. Taken together, these data suggest a role for KORs in the aversive effects of nicotine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Saeed; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharraee, Banafsheh; Noroozi, Alireza; Habibi, Mojtaba; Bowen, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT) compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU).Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS) were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy) and control groups (the Usual Treatment).The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program. The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI) were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  8. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Imani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU.Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy and control groups (the Usual Treatment.The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program.  Methods:The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. Results:The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. Conclusion:The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  9. Chronic Opioid Use After Surgery: Implications for Perioperative Management in the Face of the Opioid Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Jennifer M; Bateman, Brian T; Ratliff, John; Curtin, Catherine; Sun, Eric

    2017-11-01

    Physicians, policymakers, and researchers are increasingly focused on finding ways to decrease opioid use and overdose in the United States both of which have sharply increased over the past decade. While many efforts are focused on the management of chronic pain, the use of opioids in surgical patients presents a particularly challenging problem requiring clinicians to balance 2 competing interests: managing acute pain in the immediate postoperative period and minimizing the risks of persistent opioid use after the surgery. Finding ways to minimize this risk is particularly salient in light of a growing literature suggesting that postsurgical patients are at increased risk for chronic opioid use. The perioperative care team, including surgeons and anesthesiologists, is poised to develop clinical- and systems-based interventions aimed at providing pain relief in the immediate postoperative period while also reducing the risks of opioid use longer term. In this paper, we discuss the consequences of chronic opioid use after surgery and present an analysis of the extent to which surgery has been associated with chronic opioid use. We follow with a discussion of the risk factors that are associated with chronic opioid use after surgery and proceed with an analysis of the extent to which opioid-sparing perioperative interventions (eg, nerve blockade) have been shown to reduce the risk of chronic opioid use after surgery. We then conclude with a discussion of future research directions.

  10. Involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and the opioid system in the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shirzadian, Armin; Dehdashtian, Amir; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic medication that mainly exerts its function through activating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. There is some evidence that zolpidem may have anticonvulsive effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we used the pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizure model in mice to investigate whether zolpidem can affect seizure threshold. We also further evaluated the roles of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels as well as μ-opioid receptors in the effects of zolpidem on seizure threshold. Our data showed that zolpidem in a dose-dependent manner increased the PTZ-induced seizure threshold. The noneffective (i.e., did not significantly alter the PTZ-induced seizure threshold by itself) doses of KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide) and nonselective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) were able to inhibit the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem. Additionally, noneffective doses of either KATP channel opener (cromakalim) or nonselective μ-opioid receptor agonist (morphine) in combination with a noneffective dose of zolpidem exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. A combination of noneffective doses of naloxone and glibenclamide, which separately did not affect zolpidem effect on seizure threshold, inhibited the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. These results suggest a role for KATP channels and the opioid system, alone or in combination, in the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of opioid antagonists on synergism between dexketoprofen and tramadol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegpi, C; Gonzalez, C; Pinardi, G; Miranda, H F

    2009-10-01

    The antinociceptive activity of dexketoprofen was studied in mice using the formalin assay for orofacial pain. The interaction between dexketoprofen and co-administered tramadol was studied using isobolographic analysis. The intraperitoneal administration of dexketoprofen or tramadol, showed dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in both phases of the assay. When administered together, the interaction was mildly synergistic during the first phase, and antagonistic in the second phase. Selective opioid receptor antagonists where used in order to measure the analgesic activity of tramadol in other regions of the CNS. The co-administration of dexketoprofen and tramadol, with previous administration of naltrexone, showed high synergistic activity during the first phase, and less but still synergistic during the second. When using naltrindole, the interaction was mildly more synergistic than the mixture dexketoprofen+tramadol during both phases. Using norbinaltorphimine, the interaction was synergistic in both phases, more marked in the second. These results suggest that the opioid activity of tramadol has an inhibiting effect in antinociceptive activity of the interaction between dexketoprofen and tramadol during the inflammatory (late) stages of pain.

  12. Stereospecific effects of morphine on plasma opioid peptide levels and nociception in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.L.; Morris, D.L.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-03-05

    ..beta..-endorphin, (met)enkephalin, and (leu)enkephalin were quantitated in canine plasma by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after extraction of the peptides on Sep Pak C18 cartridges. Plasma samples were taken one hour after a 10 mg/kg s.c. injection of (-)-morphine SO/sub 4/ or (+)-morphine HBr. Antinociception, measured by a dog tail-flick test, and morphine-induced emesis, salivation, diarrhea, and ataxia were quantitated before sampling. Control levels for each dog were taken one week earlier at the same time of day after saline injections. Antinociception, morphine signs, and opioid peptide levels in plasma were significantly increased by (-)-morphine. Antinociception increased from zero to 83.54 +/- 11.0%. The number of morphine signs increased from zero to 2.9 +/- 0.28 per dog. ..beta..-endorphin levels increased from 44.52 +/- 4.25 to 90.6 +/- 7.38 pg/ml; (met)enkephalin levels increased from 253.56 +/- 22.04 to 497.1 +/- 58.12 pg/ml; (leu)-enkephalin increased from 141.65 +/- 12.9 to 313.24 +/- 35.95 pg/ml. None of these effects were observed in the dogs that received (+)-morphine. The conclude that morphine stereospecifically inhibits nociception, induces observable signs, and increases plasma opioid peptide levels in dogs.

  13. Stereospecific effects of morphine on plasma opioid peptide levels and nociception in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.L.; Morris, D.L.; Dewey, W.L.

    1986-01-01

    β-endorphin, [met]enkephalin, and [leu]enkephalin were quantitated in canine plasma by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after extraction of the peptides on Sep Pak C18 cartridges. Plasma samples were taken one hour after a 10 mg/kg s.c. injection of (-)-morphine SO 4 or (+)-morphine HBr. Antinociception, measured by a dog tail-flick test, and morphine-induced emesis, salivation, diarrhea, and ataxia were quantitated before sampling. Control levels for each dog were taken one week earlier at the same time of day after saline injections. Antinociception, morphine signs, and opioid peptide levels in plasma were significantly increased by (-)-morphine. Antinociception increased from zero to 83.54 +/- 11.0%. The number of morphine signs increased from zero to 2.9 +/- 0.28 per dog. β-endorphin levels increased from 44.52 +/- 4.25 to 90.6 +/- 7.38 pg/ml; [met]enkephalin levels increased from 253.56 +/- 22.04 to 497.1 +/- 58.12 pg/ml; [leu]-enkephalin increased from 141.65 +/- 12.9 to 313.24 +/- 35.95 pg/ml. None of these effects were observed in the dogs that received (+)-morphine. The conclude that morphine stereospecifically inhibits nociception, induces observable signs, and increases plasma opioid peptide levels in dogs

  14. An investigation into the receptor-regulating effects of the acute administration of opioid agonists and an antagonist on beta adrenergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roper, I.

    1987-01-01

    Past and current research indicated that biochemical deviations which might be involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of depression, included abnormalities or imbalances in the noradrenergic, serotonergic, hormonal and possibly in the endogenous opioid, dopaminergic, histaminergic, cholinergic and trace amine systems. In order to investigate a possible link between the noradrenergic system and opioids, it was decided to test the acute effects of opioid administration on cortical beta adrenoceptor numbers and affinity. As these receptors have been most consistently downregulated by antidepressant treatment, they may be involved in the mechanism of antidepressant action of these agents. It was decided to investigate beta adrenoceptor-regulatory effects of opioid treatment. Naloxone was tested alone, with a view to suppressing any possible endogenous opioid influences upon beta receptor status and revealing an effect which would possibly be the opposite of that brought about by the administration of opioid agonists. Naloxone was administered together with morphine to demonstrate that any beta receptor up- or downregulation which might be measured, had indeed been opioid-receptor mediated. It was found that the acute administration of four different mu opioid agonists, naloxone and naloxone plus morphine, did not cause any statistically significant alterations in cortical beta adrenergic receptor numbers or affinity in the rat. A radioactive ligand, the beta adrenoceptor-labelling compound referred to as DHA (L-dihydroalprenolol HCI) was used in this study

  15. An acidosis-sparing ketogenic (ASK) diet to improve efficacy and reduce adverse effects in the treatment of refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Alan W C; Walcutt, Isabel A; Sander, Josemir W

    2017-09-01

    Diets that increase production of ketone bodies to provide alternative fuel for the brain are evolving from the classic ketogenic diet for epilepsy devised nearly a century ago. The classic ketogenic diet and its more recent variants all appear to have similar efficacy with approximately 50% of users showing a greater than 50% seizure reduction. They all require significant medical and dietetic support, and there are tolerability issues. A review suggests that low-grade chronic metabolic acidosis associated with ketosis is likely to be an important contributor to the short term and long term adverse effects of ketogenic diets. Recent studies, particularly with the characterization of the acid sensing ion channels, suggest that chronic metabolic acidosis may increase the propensity for seizures. It is also known that low-grade chronic metabolic acidosis has a broad range of negative health effects and an increased risk of early mortality in the general population. The modified ketogenic dietary treatment we propose is formulated to limit acidosis by measures that include monitoring protein intake and maximizing consumption of alkaline mineral-rich, low carbohydrate green vegetables. We hypothesize that this acidosis-sparing ketogenic diet is expected to be associated with less adverse effects and improved efficacy. A case history of life-long intractable epilepsy shows this diet to be a successful long-term strategy but, clearly, clinical studies are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Opioid Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathing rate nausea, vomiting constipation physical agitation poor decision making abandoning responsibilities slurred speech sleeping more or less than normal mood swings euphoria (feeling high) irritability depression lowered motivation anxiety attacks. Symptoms of opioid overdose An overdose ...

  17. Opioid Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 03/10/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  18. A systematic review of the effectiveness of the community reinforcement approach in alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, H.G.; Boulogne, J.J.; Tulder, M.W. van; Brink, W. van den; Jong, C.A.J. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The community reinforcement approach (CRA) has been applied in the treatment of disorders resulting from alcohol, cocaine and opioid use. The objectives were to review the effectiveness of (1) CRA compared with usual care, and (2) CRA versus CRA plus contingency management. Studies were selected

  19. A systematic review of the effectiveness of the community reinforcement approach in alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, H.G.; Boulogne, J.J.; van Tulder, M.; van den Brink, W.; de Jong, C.A.J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The community reinforcement approach (CRA) has been applied in the treatment of disorders resulting from alcohol, cocaine and opioid use. The objectives were to review the effectiveness of (1) CRA compared with usual care, and (2) CRA versus CRA plus contingency management. Studies were selected

  20. A systematic review of the effectiveness of the community reinforcement approach in alcohol, cocaine and opioid addiction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, H.G.; Boulogne, J.J.; Tulder, van M.; Brink, van den W.; Jong, de C.A.J.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The community reinforcement approach (CRA) has been applied in the treatment of disorders resulting from alcohol, cocaine and opioid use. The objectives were to review the effectiveness of (1) CRA compared with usual care, and (2) CRA versus CRA plus contingency management. Studies were

  1. A Potential Role for mu-Opioids in Mediating the Positive Effects of Gratitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Max; Fox, Glenn R; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Gratitude is a complex emotional feeling associated with universally desirable positive effects in personal, social, and physiological domains. Why or how gratitude achieves these functional outcomes is not clear. Toward the goal of identifying its' underlying physiological processes, we recently investigated the neural correlates of gratitude. In our study, participants were exposed to gratitude-inducing stimuli, and rated each according to how much gratitude it provoked. As expected, self-reported gratitude intensity correlated with brain activity in distinct regions of the medial pre-frontal cortex associated with social reward and moral cognition. Here we draw from our data and existing literature to offer a theoretical foundation for the physiological correlates of gratitude. We propose that mu-opioid signaling (1) accompanies the mental experience of gratitude, and (2) may account for the positive effects of gratitude on social relationships, subjective wellbeing, and physiological health.

  2. Spared behavioral repetition effects in Alzheimer's disease linked to an altered neural mechanism at posterior cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broster, Lucas S; Li, Juan; Wagner, Benjamin; Smith, Charles D; Jicha, Gregory A; Schmitt, Frederick A; Munro, Nancy; Haney, Ryan H; Jiang, Yang

    2018-02-20

    Individuals with dementia of the Alzheimer type (AD) classically show disproportionate impairment in measures of working memory, but repetition learning effects are relatively preserved. As AD affects brain regions implicated in both working memory and repetition effects, the neural basis of this discrepancy is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the posterior repetition effect could account for this discrepancy due to the milder effects of AD at visual cortex. Participants with early AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls performed a working memory task with superimposed repetition effects while electroencephalography was collected to identify possible neural mechanisms of preserved repetition effects. Participants with AD showed preserved behavioral repetition effects and a change in the posterior repetition effect. Visual cortex may play a role in maintained repetition effects in persons with early AD.

  3. [The Analgesic Sparing Effect of Ketamine for Postoperative Pain Management after Pediatric Surgery on the Body Surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urabe, Tomoaki; Nakanuno, Ryuichi; Hayase, Kazuma; Sasada, Shogo; Iwamitsu, Reimi; Senami, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    It is reported that ketamine, a N-methyl-D-aspertate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, can provide analgesic effect improving postoperative pain management and decrease the supplementary analgesic requirement. We investigated the analgesic sparing effect of ketamine for postoperative pain in children undergoing surgery of body surface. Fifty eight patients (0-9 yrs) who had surgery of body surface were divided into two groups (ketamine : n = 27, Group K or control : n = 31, Group N). Postoperative analgesia extracted from charts was retrospectively evaluated by the times patients used analgesics until discharge after the operations. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. Results : The ketamine group received an intrave- nous bolus of ketamine (1 mg - kg-1) before surgical skin incision. However, there were no significant differ- ences of usage (Group K vs Group N : 4/27 vs 7/31, P=0.45) and frequency of supplementary analgesic us- ages (P=0.85) among groups. In addition, there were also no significant demographic differences between the two groups. Conclusions : Our investigation suggests that the intravenous bolus of ketamine (1 mg - kg-1) before surgical skin incision does not decrease the supple- mentary analgesic requirements on postoperative pain management in pediatric surgery of the body surface.

  4. Analysis of the dose-sparing effect of adjuvanted Sabin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuofan; Ding, Wenting; Guo, Qi; Liu, Ze; Zhu, Zhe; Song, Shaohui; Li, Weidong; Liao, Guoyang

    2018-03-30

    Sabin-based inactivated poliovirus vaccine(sIPV) is gradually replacing live-attenuated oral polio vaccine(OPV). Sabin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine(sIPV) has played a vital role in reducing economic burden of poliomyelitis and maintaining appropriate antibody levels in the population. However, due to its high cost and limited manufacturing capacity, sIPV cannot reach its full potential for global poliovirus eradication in developing countries. Therefore, to address this situation, we designed this study to evaluate the dose-sparing effects of AS03, CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) admixed with sIPV in rats. Our results showed that a combination of 1/4-dose sIPV adjuvanted with AS03 or AS03 with BW006 provides a seroconversion rate similar to that of full-dose sIPV without adjuvant and that, this rate is 5-fold higher than that of 1/4-dose sIPV without adjuvant after the first immunization. The combination of AS03 or AS03 with BW006 as an adjuvant effectively reduced sIPV dose by at least 4-fold and induced both humoral and cellular immune responses. Therefore, our study revealed that the combination of AS03 or AS03 with BW006 is a promising adjuvant for sIPV development.

  5. Using Behavioral Economic Theory to Increase Use of Effective Contraceptives among Opioid-maintained Women at Risk of Unintended Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Sarah H.; Hand, Dennis J.; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Badger, Gary J.; Meyer, Marjorie C.; Higgins, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective An unsettling aspect of the US opioid epidemic is the high rate of in utero exposure, especially since most of these pregnancies are unintended, due in part to low rates of effective contraceptive use among opioid-using women. This study tested an intervention informed by behavioral economic theory and aimed at promoting effective contraceptive use among opioid-maintained women at risk of unintended pregnancy in the Burlington, VT area between 2011–2013. Methods Thirty-one women were assigned (initial 5 consecutively, subsequent 26 randomly) to either usual care or an experimental intervention. Participants in usual care received condoms, a dose of emergency contraception, and referral to local providers. Participants in the experimental condition received usual care plus the World Health Organization’s contraception initiation protocol, including free prescription contraceptives, and financial incentives for attending 13 follow-up visits over 6 months to help manage side effects and other issues. Results Significantly more women in the experimental vs. usual care control conditions initiated prescription contraceptive use (100% vs. 29%) and reported prescription contraceptive use at 1-month (63% vs. 13%), 3-month (88% vs. 20%), and 6-month (94% vs. 13%) assessments. None of the experimental condition participants became pregnant during the 6-month protocol vs. three women (20%) in the control condition. Conclusions These results provide the first experimental evidence supporting the efficacy of an intervention for increasing prescription contraceptive use among opioid-maintained women at risk of unintended pregnancy. PMID:27346756

  6. The Risk of Opioid Intoxications or Related Events and the Effect of Alcohol-Related Disorders: A Retrospective Cohort Study in German Patients Treated with High-Potency Opioid Analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobski, K; Kollhorst, B; Schink, T; Garbe, Edeltraut

    2015-09-01

    Intoxications involving prescription opioids are a major public health problem in many countries. When taken with opioids, alcohol can enhance the effects of opioids, particularly in the central nervous system. However, data quantifying the impact of alcohol involvement in opioid-related intoxications are limited. Using claims data from the German Pharmacoepidemiological Research Database (GePaRD), we conducted a retrospective cohort study based on users of high-potency opioid (HPO) analgesics during the years 2005-2009. HPO use was classified as extended-release, immediate-release or both. We calculated incidence rates (IRs) for opioid intoxications or related events as well as adjusted IR ratios (aIRR) comparing HPO-treated patients with alcohol-related disorders (ARDs) to those without ARDs overall and within each HPO category. During the study period, 308,268 HPO users were identified with an overall IR of 340.4 per 100,000 person-years [95 % confidence interval (CI) 325.5-355.7]. The risk was highest when patients received concomitant treatment with extended- and immediate-release HPOs (IR 1093.8; 95 % CI 904.6-1310.9). ARDs increased the risk during HPO use by a factor of 1.7 and the highest aIRR was seen when comparing patients simultaneously exposed to extended- and immediate-release HPOs with ARDs to those without ARD also after excluding patients with potential improper/non-medical HPO use. Physicians should be aware of these elevated risks in HPO patients with ARDs. Active patient education by healthcare providers regarding the risk of opioid intoxications or related events due to alcohol in conjunction with HPOs is warranted.

  7. Changing patterns in opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Beth; Brands, Bruna; Li, Selina; Catz-Biro, Laura

    2009-01-01

    pathways leading to prescription opioid addiction is required in order to develop effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:19155373

  8. Effects of centrally administered endocannabinoids and opioids on orofacial pain perception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, Marek; Janecka, Anna; Liebold, Andreas; Ziegler, Mechthild; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Endocannabinoids and opioids play a vital role in mediating pain-induced analgesia. The specific effects of these compounds within the orofacial region are largely unknown. In this study, we tried to determine whether an increase in cannabinoid and opioid concentration in the CSF affects impulse transmission between the motor centres localized in the vicinity of the third and fourth cerebral ventricles. The study objectives were realized on rats using a method that allows the recording of the amplitude of evoked tongue jerks (ETJ) in response to noxious tooth pulp stimulation. The amplitude of ETJ was a measure of the effect of neurotransmitters on neural structures. Perfusion of cerebral ventricles with anandamide (AEA), endomorphin-2 (EM-2), URB597, an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and JZL195, a dual inhibitor of FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) reduced the ETJ amplitude. The antinociceptive effect of AEA, EM-2, URB597 and JZL195 was blocked by CB 1 receptor antagonist, AM251 and by μ receptor-antagonist, β-funaltrexamine. In contrast to AEA, 2-arachidonoylglycerol alone did not decrease ETJ amplitude. We demonstrated that in the orofacial area, analgesic activity is modulated by AEA and that EM-2-induced antinociception was mediated by μ and CB 1 receptors. The action of AEA and EM-2 is tightly regulated by FAAH and FAAH/MAGL, by preventing the breakdown of endogenous cannabinoids in regions where they are produced on demand. Therefore, the current findings support the therapeutic potential of FAAH and FAAH/MAGL inhibitors as novel pharmacotherapeutic agents for orofacial pain. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Managing spares for improved availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncrief, E.C.; Schroder, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A recent survey by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission of maintenance practices at U.S. nuclear power plants confirms that spare parts availability is, to some extent, a problem at all but a few plants. Fortunately, significant improvement is possible without ballooning inventory. The vast majority of total dollar value of spare parts inventory at power generation stations, whether nuclear or fossil, is rarely used (parts or components that are used 12 or less times per year including many with a history of no use for many years). Because rarely used inventory is not effectively managed with traditional inventory management techniques, opportunities exist both to increase availability and to reduce investment. But this requires a unique statistical tool that can recommend an unbiased, economic reorder point to be used in the materials management system. Inventory Solutions Inc. (ISI) of Akron, Ohio, has developed such a tool, rarely used inventory stocking logic (RUSL), which is a user friendly decision support tool for setting spare parts reorder points. RUSL, based on statistical computations enhanced to include the most advanced techniques developed for use in aerospace and military combat-readiness, calculates the optimum stocking level to achieve the desired spare part availability at the station

  10. Perioperative use of etoricoxib reduces pain and opioid side-effects after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viscusi, Eugene R; Frenkl, Tara L; Hartrick, Craig T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the effects of two different doses of etoricoxib delivered perioperatively compared with placebo and standard pain management on pain at rest, pain with mobilization, and use of additional morphine/opioids postoperatively. Research design and methods: In this double......-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, we evaluated postoperative pain following total abdominal hysterectomy over 5 days in patients receiving placebo or etoricoxib administered 90 min prior to surgery and continuing postoperatively. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n...... in the active treatment groups by ~10 hours vs. placebo. A greater proportion of patients on etoricoxib (10-30% greater than placebo) achieved mild levels of pain with movement, defined as pain pain measurements were not designated...

  11. Antinociceptive Effect of Ghrelin in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Involves TRPV1/Opioid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Mao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, defined as recurrent abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, seriously affects quality of life and ability to work. Ghrelin is a brain-gut hormone, which has been reported to show antinociceptive effects in peripheral pain. We investigated the effect of ghrelin on visceral hypersensitivity and pain in a rat model of IBS. Methods: Maternal deprivation (MD was used to provide a stress-induced model of IBS in Wistar rats. Colorectal distension (CRD was used to detect visceral sensitivity, which was evaluated by abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR scores. Rats that were confirmed to have visceral hypersensitivity after MD were injected with ghrelin (10 µg/kg subcutaneously twice a week from weeks 7 to 8. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (100 nmol/L and naloxone (100 nmol/L were administered subcutaneously to block growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS-R1α and opioid receptors, respectively. Expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and µ and κ opioid receptors (MOR and KOR in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex tissues were detected by western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical analyses and immunofluorescence. Results: Ghrelin treatment increased expression of opioid receptors and inhibited expression of TRPV1 in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex. The antinociceptive effect of ghrelin in the rat model of IBS was partly blocked by both the ghrelin antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Conclusion: The results indicate that ghrelin exerted an antinociceptive effect, which was mediated via TRPV1/opioid systems, in IBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Ghrelin might potentially be used as a new treatment for IBS.

  12. The effectiveness of telemedicine-delivered opioid agonist therapy in a supervised clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Joseph K; Gauthier, Graham; Pellegrini, David; Daiter, Jeffery; Varenbut, Michael; Hogenbirk, John C; Marsh, David C

    2017-07-01

    Opioid use disorder has been declared a public health crisis across North America and opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is the standard of care for these patients. Despite the increasing adoption of telemedicine as a delivery method for OAT, its effectiveness has not yet been evaluated against traditional in-person treatment. This study compared treatment outcomes for in-person versus telemedicine-delivered OAT. We conducted a non-randomized cohort comparison study using an administrative database for patients who commenced OAT between 2011 and 2012 across 58 clinic sites in the province of Ontario, Canada. Patients were stratified by primary treatment modality as being: in-person (telemedicine), mixed (25-75% by telemedicine), or via telemedicine (>75% appointments by telemedicine). The primary outcome was continuous retention in treatment as defined by one year of uninterrupted therapy, based on pharmacy dosing records. A total of 3733 OAT initiating patients were identified. Patients treated via telemedicine were more likely to be retained in therapy than patients treated in-person (n=1590; aOR=1.27; 95% CI 1.14-1.41; pTelemedicine patients demonstrated a retention rate of 50% at one year whereas in-person patients were retained at a rate of 39%. The mixed group also had higher likelihood of retention than the in-person group (n=418; aOR=1.26; 95% CI 1.08-1.47; p=0.001) and had a retention rate of 47% at one year. Telemedicine may be an effective alternative to delivering in person OAT, and it has the potential to expand access to care in rural, remote, and urban regions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. PolyMorphine provides extended analgesic-like effects in mice with spared nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lax, Neil C; Chen, Renxun; Leep, Sarah R; Uhrich, Kathryn E; Yu, Lei; Kolber, Benedict J

    2017-01-01

    Morphine is a well-characterized and effective analgesic commonly used to provide pain relief to patients suffering from both acute and chronic pain conditions. Despite its widespread use and effectiveness, one of the major drawbacks of morphine is its relatively short half-life of approximately 4 h. This short half-life often necessitates multiple administrations of the drug each day, which may contribute to both dependence and tolerance to morphine. Here, we tested the analgesic properties ...

  14. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalamachu S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.Keywords: extended-release opioids, chronic pain, opioid rotation

  15. MAC-sparing effect of nitrous oxide in sevoflurane anesthetized sheep and its reversal with systemic atipamezole administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, Antonio; Melosu, Valentino; Careddu, Giovanni Mario; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an anesthetic gas with antinociceptive properties and reduces the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for volatile anesthetic agents, potentially through mechanisms involving central alpha2-adrenoceptors. We hypothesized that 70% N2O in the inspired gas will significantly reduce the MAC of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in sheep, and that this effect can be reversed by systemic atipamezole. Materials and methods Animals were initially anesthetized with SEVO in oxygen (O2) and exposed to an electrical current as supramaximal noxious stimulus in order to determine MACSEVO (in duplicates). Thereafter, 70% N2O was added to the inspired gas and the MAC re-determined in the presence of N2O (MACSN). A subgroup of sheep were anesthetized a second time with SEVO/N2O for re-determination of MACSN, after which atipamezole (0.2 mg kg-1, IV) was administered for MACSNA determinations. Sheep were anesthetized a third time, initially with only SEVO/O2 to re-determine MACSEVO, after which atipamezole (0.2 mg kg-1, IV) was administered for determination of MACSA. Results MACSEVO was 2.7 (0.3)% [mean (standard deviation)]. Addition of N2O resulted in a 37% reduction of MACSEVO to MACSN of 1.7 (0.2)% (p <0.0001). Atipamezole reversed this effect, producing a MACSNA of 3.1 (0.7)%, which did not differ from MACSEVO (p = 0.12). MACSEVO did not differ from MACSA (p = 0.69). Cardiorespiratory variables were not different among experimental groups except a lower ETCO2 in animals exposed to SEVO/N2O. Conclusions N2O produces significant MACSEVO-reduction in sheep; this effect is completely reversed by IV atipamezole confirming the involvement of alpha2-adrenoreceptors in the MAC-sparing action of N2O. PMID:29315308

  16. The effects of disordered structure on the solubility and dissolution rates of some hydrophilic, sparingly soluble drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosharraf, M; Sebhatu, T; Nyström, C

    1999-01-15

    The effects of experimental design on the apparent solubility of two sparingly soluble hydrophilic compounds (barium sulphate and calcium carbonate) were studied in this paper. The apparent solubility appeared to be primarily dependent on the amount of solute added to the solvent in each experiment, increasing with increased amounts. This effect seems to be due to the existence of a peripheral disordered layer. However physico-chemical methods used in the present study were not able to unambiguously verify the existence of any disorder in the solid state structure of the drugs. At higher proportions of solute to solvent, the solubility reached a plateau corresponding to the solubility of the disordered or amorphous molecular form of the material. Milling the powders caused the plateau to be reached at lower proportions of solute to solvent, since this further disordered the surface of the drug particles. It was also found that the apparent solubility of the drugs tested decreased after storage at high relative humidities. A model for describing the effects of a disordered surface layer of varying thickness and continuity on the solubility of a substance is presented. This model may be used as a method for detection of minute amount of disorder, where no other technique is capable of detecting the disordered structure. It is suggested that recrystallisation of the material occurs via slow solid-state transition at the surface of the drug particle; this would slowly reduce the apparent solubility of the substance at the plateau level to the thermodynamically stable value. A biphasic dissolution rate profile was obtained. The solubility of the disordered surface of the particles appeared to be the rate-determining factor during the initial dissolution phase, while the solubility of the crystalline core was the rate-determining factor during the final slower phase.

  17. Improvement of Bone-Sparing Effect of Soy Isoflavones by Pre- and Probiotics in Postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mathey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Phytoestrogens consumption is targeted as a possible way to achieve hormonal permeation in postmenopausal women. However, their health effect could depend on their bioavailability. Objectives As phytoestrogens bioavailability could be improved by modulating intestinal microflora, the present study was undertaken to investigate whether isoflavones and pre-or probiotics may improve bone markers. Design An intervention trial (2 months was carried out on 39 postmenopausal women receiving 100 mg of IF aglycon equivalents daily, incorporated in two jelly milk and two cereal bars. After the first month, the participants were randomised into three treatment groups: soy (control group, soy + fructooligosaccharides (prebiotics group and soy + yoghurt cultures (probiotics group. Results Level of isoflavone intake was associated with a significant increase in plasma isoflavone levels from baseline to day 15 which was maintained until day 60. Probiotics consumption was associated with increased plasma equol levels at day 60. A 5% increase of bone alkaline phosphatase was elicited on day 30, compared to initial values. Pre- or probiotics did not modulate this parameter. Urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion was slightly increased at day 60. Prebiotics and probiotics consumption improved this parameter. The effect of prebiotics was exacerbated in early compared to late postmenopausal women. Conclusion Addition of prebiotics or probiotics to a diet providing isoflavones is able to improve parameters of bone turnover in early menopause.

  18. Use of opioid substitution therapies in the treatment of opioid use disorder: results of a UK cost-effectiveness modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, James; Yi, Yunni; Wright, Antony; Brown, Jim; Maria Madrigal, Ana; Dunlop, William C N

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) vs no opioid substitution therapy (OST) for the treatment of opioid use disorder, from the UK National Health Service (NHS)/personal social services (PSS) and societal perspectives over 1 year. Cost-effectiveness of OST vs no OST was evaluated by first replicating and then expanding an existing UK health technology assessment model. The expanded model included the impact of OST on infection rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Versus no OST, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for BMT and MMT were £13,923 and £14,206 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), respectively, from a NHS/PSS perspective. When total costs (NHS/PSS and societal) are considered, there are substantial savings associated with adopting OST; these savings are in excess of £14,032 for BMT vs no OST and £17,174 for MMT vs no OST over 1 year. This is primarily driven by a reduction in victim costs. OST treatment also impacted other aspects of criminality and healthcare resource use. The model's 1-year timeframe means long-term costs and benefits, and the influence of changes over time are not captured. OST can be considered cost-effective vs no OST from the UK NHS/PSS perspective, with a cost per QALY well below the UK's willingness-to-pay threshold. There were only small differences between BMT and MMT. The availability of two or more cost-effective options is beneficial to retaining patients in OST programs. From a societal perspective, OST is estimated to save over £14,032 and £17,174 per year for BMT and MMT vs no OST, respectively, due to savings in victim costs. Further work is required to fully quantify the clinical and health economic impacts of different OST formulations and their societal impact over the long-term.

  19. Effects of environmental enrichment on self-administration of the short-acting opioid remifentanil in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofford, Rebecca S; Chow, Jonathan J; Beckmann, Joshua S; Bardo, Michael T

    2017-12-01

    Opioid abuse is a major problem around the world. Identifying environmental factors that contribute to opioid abuse and addiction is necessary for decreasing this epidemic. In rodents, environmental enrichment protects against the development of low dose stimulant self-administration, but studies examining the effect of enrichment and isolation (compared to standard housing) on the development of intravenous opioid self-administration have not been conducted. The present study investigated the role of environmental enrichment on self-administration of the short-acting μ-opioid remifentanil. Rats were raised in an enriched condition (Enr), standard condition (Std), or isolated condition (Iso) beginning at 21 days of age and were trained to lever press for 1 or 3 μg/kg/infusion remifentanil in young adulthood. Acquisition of self-administration and responding during increasing fixed ratio requirements were assessed, and a dose-response curve was generated. In all phases, Enr rats lever pressed significantly less than Std and Iso rats, with Enr rats pressing between 9 and 40% the amount of Iso rats. Enr rats did not acquire remifentanil self-administration when trained with 1 μg/kg/infusion, did not increase responding over increasing FR when trained at either dose, and their dose-response curves were flattened compared to Std and Iso rats. When expressed as economic demand curves, Enr rats displayed a decrease in both essential value (higher α) and reinforcer intensity (Q 0 ) compared to Std and Iso rats at the 1 μg/kg/infusion training dose. Environmental enrichment reduced remifentanil intake, suggesting that social and environmental novelty may protect against opioid abuse.

  20. Lymphocyte-Sparing Effect of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Patients With Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Aaron T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Herman, Joseph M.; Dholakia, Avani S.; Moningi, Shalini [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lu, Yao [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rosati, Lauren M.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Assadi, Ryan K.; Saeed, Ali M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Weiss, Matthew J.; Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Grossman, Stuart A. [Department of Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ye, Xiaobu [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ellsworth, Susannah G., E-mail: sbatkoy2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-03-01

    studies. Given the association of severe RIL with survival in LAPC, further study of the effect of radiation technique on immune status is warranted.

  1. A Review Study on the Effect of Iranian Herbal Medicines on Opioid Withdrawal Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimie, Marzieh; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Saki, Kourosh

    2015-10-01

    Addiction is a chronic and recurring disease that recurrence phenomenon is the most important challenge in treatment of this disease. Recent experiences have shown that synthetic drugs have undesirable side effects. Recent studies on medicinal plants have shown that they might be effective in treatment of different stages of addiction with lower side effects and costs. The aim of this study was to review the effects of medicinal plants in the treatment of morphine addiction in experimental animals. In this review article, by using keywords of morphine, withdrawal, and plants or herbal medicine in databases of indexing cites, desired articles were obtained since 1994. Inclusion criteria for selecting articles were the articles related to application of medicinal plants in decreasing symptoms resulting from morphine withdrawal were selected. Results of this study on experimental studies have shown that medicinal plants such as Trachyspermum copticum L and Melissa officinalis decrease the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome in a dose-dependent. Also, medicinal plants like Avena sativa, Hypericum perforatu, Passiflora incarnate, Valeriana officinalis, Satureja hortensis L, and Mentha piperita can have effects on behavior, emotions, and other problems of addicts, decreasing withdrawal symptoms. Results of this study showed that medicinal plants can be effective in controlling deprivation, decreasing dependency creation, and possibly DETOXIFICATION: of opioid addicts. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Effects of vertebral-body-sparing proton craniospinal irradiation on the spine of young pediatric patients with medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain MacEwan, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Vertebral-body-sparing CSI with proton beam did not appear to cause increased severe spinal abnormalities in patients treated at our institution. This approach could be considered in future clinical trials in an effort to reduce toxicity and the risk of secondary malignancy and to improve adult height.

  3. Distinct roles of exogenous opioid agonists and endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral control of neuropathy-triggered heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-09-08

    Neuropathic pain often results from peripheral nerve damage, which can involve immune response. Local leukocyte-derived opioid peptides or exogenous opioid agonists inhibit neuropathy-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models. Since neuropathic pain can also be augmented by heat, in this study we investigated the role of opioids in the modulation of neuropathy-evoked heat hypersensitivity. We used a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, and tested opioid effects in heat and mechanical hypersensitivity using Hargreaves and von Frey tests, respectively. We found that although perineural exogenous opioid agonists, including peptidergic ligands, were effective, the endogenous opioid peptides β-endorphin, Met-enkephalin and dynorphin A did not alleviate heat hypersensitivity. Specifically, corticotropin-releasing factor, an agent triggering opioid peptide secretion from leukocytes, applied perineurally did not attenuate heat hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Exogenous opioids, also shown to release opioid peptides via activation of leukocyte opioid receptors, were equally analgesic in wild-type and opioid peptide-knockout mice, indicating that endogenous opioids do not contribute to exogenous opioid analgesia in heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, exogenously applied opioid peptides were ineffective as well. Conversely, opioid peptides relieved mechanical hypersensitivity. Thus, both opioid type and sensory modality may determine the outcome of neuropathic pain treatment.

  4. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deman, Pierre; Vautrin, Mathias; Edouard, Magali; Stupar, Vasile; Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Régine; Elleaume, Hélène; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Estève, François; Adam, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 × 5 × 4.8 mm 3 volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 × 8 × 7.8 mm 3 volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 ± 12.5 days versus 23.3 ± 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  5. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deman, Pierre [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Vautrin, Mathias [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); Edouard, Magali [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Stupar, Vasile [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Regine [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Elleaume, Helene [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Remy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L. [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Esteve, Francois [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Adam, Jean-Francois, E-mail: adam@esrf.fr [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 4.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 {+-} 12.5 days versus 23.3 {+-} 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  6. Opioid Use Disorder Induces Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: The Attenuating Effect of Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Salarian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Frequent use of opioids produces reactive oxygen species, upregulates inflammatory factors, and contributes to opiate dependence. In this study, we examined perturbations of plasma oxidative and inflammatory markers in patients with opioid use disorder in two phases. In the first phase, we compared the oxidative status in patients with opioid use disorders and in healthy controls; and in the second phase, we examined oxidative changes before and after methadone maintenance treatment.Method: To explore whether oxidative changes were associated with opioid use disorder, we compared plasma oxidative and inflammatory markers in patients with opioid use disorder and in smoking and non-smoking healthy participants. All participants completed measures of catalase (CAT, glutathione (GSH, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, and TNF-α at baseline. Baseline measures were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test. In the second phase, to explore oxidative changes during transition from opium use to methadone, blood and urine samples of patients with opioid use disorder were re-evaluated on Days 3, 7, and 14 after methadone therapy. Repeated measures analysis was used to determine the relative contribution of intervention to changes in CAT, GSH, MDA, SOD, MMP-9, and TNF-α level over time.Results: We observed lower SOD and catalase activities, and higher TNF-α and MMP-9 level in patients compared to the two comparison groups. Opioids exacerbated the oxidative imbalance and superimposed the underlying oxidative injury in smoker comparison group. Methadone therapy was associated with lower MMP-9 and TNF-α level, and higher SOD and catalase activities two weeks after therapy; showing an improvement in oxidative profile.Conclusion: This was an investigation indicating an oxidative imbalance before methadone therapy and during early days of transition from opium use to methadone. Being aware of redox status is

  7. The Effects of Anesthetic Technique on Postoperative Opioid Consumption in Ankle Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kristian P; Møller, Ann M.; Nielsen, Jesper K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the impact of common anesthetic techniques on postoperative opioid consumption in ankle fracture surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study on 622 patients with isolated ankle fractures undergoing primary reconstructive surgery. Patients...... anesthesia modalities reduce postoperative opioid consumption in ankle fracture surgery in comparison with GA. A benefit of PNBs is possibly due to an improved pain profile. Our study is retrospective and cannot predict the exact magnitude of this benefit....

  8. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is not mediated by opioid receptors in early postoperative pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tramadol is known as a central acting analgesic drug, used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Local analgesic effect has been demonstrated, in part due to local anesthetic-like effect, but other mechanisms remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect is not known. In this study, we examined role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect of tramadol in the plantar incision model. METHODS: Young male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups: control, intraplantar tramadol, intravenous tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol, and intravenous naloxone. After receiving the assigned drugs (tramadol 5 mg, naloxone 200 µg or 0.9% NaCl, rats were submitted to plantar incision, and withdrawal thresholds after mechanical stimuli with von Frey filaments were assessed at baseline, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after incision. RESULTS: Plantar incision led to marked mechanical hyperalgesia during the whole period of observation in the control group, no mechanical hyperalgesia were observed in intraplantar tramadol group, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol group and intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol. In the intravenous tramadol group a late increase in withdrawal thresholds (after 45 min was observed, the intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol group and intravenous naloxone remained hyperalgesic during the whole period. CONCLUSIONS: Tramadol presented an early local analgesic effect decreasing mechanical hyperalgesia induced by plantar incision. This analgesic effect was not mediated by peripheral opioid receptors.

  9. Individual variation in the motivational and neurobiological effects of an opioid cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Lindsay M; Pitchers, Kyle K; Flagel, Shelly B; Robinson, Terry E

    2015-03-13

    A discrete cue associated with intravenous injections of cocaine acquires greater control over motivated behavior in some rats ('sign-trackers', STs) than others ('goal-trackers', GTs). It is not known, however, if such variation generalizes to cues associated with other drugs. We asked, therefore, whether a discrete cue (a light) associated with the intravenous administration of an opioid drug (the short-acting mu receptor agonist, remifentanil) acquires incentive motivational properties differently in STs and GTs, as indicated by tests of Pavlovian conditioned approach and conditioned reinforcement. Consistent with studies using cocaine, STs approached a classically conditioned opioid cue more readily than GTs, and in a test of conditioned reinforcement worked more avidly to get it. Interestingly, STs and GTs did not differ in the acquisition of a conditioned orienting response. In addition, the performance of conditioned approach behavior, but not conditioned orientation, was attenuated by pretreatment with the dopamine receptor antagonist, flupenthixol, into the core of the nucleus accumbens. Lastly, food and opioid cues engaged similar amygdalo-striatal-thalamic circuitry to a much greater extent in STs than GTs, as indicated by Fos expression. Taken together, these data demonstrate that, similar to food and cocaine cues: (1) a discrete opioid cue attains greater incentive motivational value in STs than GTs; (2) the attribution of incentive motivational properties to an opioid cue is dopamine dependent; and (3) an opioid cue engages the so-called 'motive circuit' only if it is imbued with incentive salience.

  10. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  11. The Effect of a Statewide Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Opioid Prescribing by Emergency Medicine Providers Across 15 Hospitals in a Single Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffoletto, Brian; Lynch, Michael; Pacella, Charissa B; Yealy, Donald M; Callaway, Clifton W

    2018-04-01

    Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) enable registered prescribers to obtain real-time information on patients' prescription history of controlled medications. We sought to describe the effect of a state-mandated PDMP on opioid prescribing by emergency medicine providers. We retrospectively analyzed electronic medical records of 122,732 adult patients discharged with an opioid prescription from 15 emergency departments in a single health system in Pennsylvania from July 2015 to March, 2017. We used an interrupted time series design to evaluate the percentage of patients discharged each month with an opioid prescription before and after state law-mandated PDMP use on August 25, 2016. From August (pre-PDMP) to September, 2016 (post-PDMP), the opioid prescribing rate decreased from 12.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.8%-14.1%) to 10.2% (95% CI, 8.8%-11.8%). For each month between September 2016 to March 2017, there was a mean decline of .46% (95% CI, -.38% to -.53%) in the percentage of patients discharged with an opioid prescription. There was heterogeneity in opioid prescribing across hospitals as well as according to patient diagnosis. This study examined the effect of a state-mandated PDMP on opioid prescribing among emergency medicine providers from 15 different hospitals in a single health system. Findings support current PDMP mandates in reducing opioid prescriptions, which could curb the prescription opioid epidemic and may ultimately reduce abuse, misuse, and overdose death. Copyright © 2017 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Opioid-free anaesthesia in three dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. White

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Opioid-free anaesthesia (OFA is a relatively new and growing field in human medicine. There are multiple motivations behind this emerging practice with the recognition of several serious potential opioid-related adverse effects including opioid induced hyperalgesia, opioid tolerance and immunomodulatory effects of opioids. Opioids have long been the mainstay of veterinary anaesthesia and pain management practice. The feasibility of OFA in veterinary patients is presented here. A case series of three dogs that underwent OFA for canine ovariohysterectomy is reported. The authors conclude OFA is possible in veterinary medicine; however the move away from the familiar effects of opioids perioperatively is challenging. Gaining experience with these types of protocols for standard procedures in healthy animals, such as neutering, will provide the anaesthetist with the building blocks for more invasive surgeries.

  13. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is mediated by opioid receptors in late postoperative pain after plantar incision in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Junior, José Oswaldo; de Freitas, Milena Fernandes; Bullara de Andrade, Carolina; Chacur, Marucia; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol is a drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is known to present a peripheral effect, but the local mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in postoperative pain is not well understood. In the present study, we examined the peripheral opioid receptors to determine the local effect of tramadol in a plantar incision pain model. Rats were subjected to plantar incision and divided into four groups on postoperative day (POD) 1: SF_SF, 0.9% NaCl injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraI, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraC, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the contralateral hindpaw; and Nal_Tra, naloxone and tramadol injected into the ipsilateral hindpaw. To determine the animals' nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia was measured before incision, on POD1 before treatment and at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the incision. The same procedure was repeated on the POD2. The expression levels of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) were obtained through immunoblotting assays in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (L3-L6) in naïve rats and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after the incision. Our results showed that the plantar incision was able to cause an increase in mechanical hyperalgesia and that tramadol reversed this hyperalgesia on POD1 and POD2. Tramadol injections in the contralateral paw did not affect the animals' nociceptive threshold. Naloxone was able to antagonize the tramadol effect partially on POD1 and completely on POD2. The DOR expression increased on POD2, POD3, and POD7, whereas the MOR expression did not change. Together, our results show that tramadol promoted a local analgesic effect in the postoperative pain model that was antagonized by naloxone in POD2, alongside the increase of DOR expression.

  14. Basic and Advanced EMS Providers Are Equally Effective in Naloxone Administration for Opioid Overdose in Northern New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Nazey; Lahey, Joseph; Suozzi, James C; Sholl, Matthew; MacLean, Charles D; Wolfson, Daniel L

    2018-01-01

    Overdose mortality from illicit and prescription opioids has reached epidemic proportions in the United States, especially in rural areas. Naloxone is a safe and effective agent that has been shown to successfully reverse the effects of opioid overdose in the prehospital setting. The National EMS Scope of Practice Model currently only recommends advanced life support (ALS) providers to administer naloxone; however, some individual states have expanded this scope of practice to include intranasal (IN) administration of naloxone by basic life support (BLS) providers, including the Northern New England states. This study compares the effectiveness and appropriateness of naloxone administration between BLS and ALS providers. All Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine EMS patient encounters between April 1, 2014 and December 31, 2016 where naloxone was administered were examined and 3,219 patients were identified. The proportion of successful reversals of opioid overdose, based on improvement in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), respiratory rate (RR), and provider global assessment (GA) of response to medication was compared between BLS and ALS providers using a Chi-Squared statistic, Fisher's exact or Wilcoxon rank-sum test. There was no significant difference in the percent improvement in GCS between BLS and ALS (64% and 64% P = 0.94). There was no significant difference in the percentage of improvement in RR between BLS and ALS (45% and 48% P = 0.43). There was a significant difference in the percentage of improvement of GA between BLS and ALS (80% and 67% P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in determining appropriate cases to administer naloxone where RR < 12 and GCS < 15 between BLS and ALS (42% and 43% P = 0.94). BLS providers were as effective as ALS providers in improving patient outcome measures after naloxone administration and in identifying patients for whom administration of naloxone is appropriate. These findings support expanding the National EMS Scope

  15. Effects of kappa opioid receptors on conditioned place aversion and social interaction in males and females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Cindee F.; McMackin, Marissa Z.; Campi, Katharine L.; Doig, Ian E.; Takahashi, Elizabeth Y.; Pride, Michael; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of kappa opioid receptors (KOR) on motivated behavior are well established based on studies in male rodents, but relatively little is known about the effects of KOR in females. We examined the effects of KOR activation on conditioned place aversion and social interaction in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus). Important differences were observed in long-term (place aversion) and short-term (social interaction) effects. Females but not males treated with a 2.5mg/kg dose of U50,488 formed a place aversion, whereas males but not females formed a place aversion at the 10 mg/kg dose. In contrast the short term effects of different doses of U50,488 on social interaction behavior were similar in males and females. Acute injection with 10 mg/kg of U50,488 (but not lower doses) reduced social interaction behavior in both males and females. The effects of U50,488 on phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (pERK) and p38 MAP kinase were cell type and region specific. Higher doses of U50,488 increased the number of pERK neurons in the ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminals in males but not females, a nucleus implicated in male aggressive behavior. In contrast, both males and females treated with U50,488 had more activated p38 cells in the nucleus accumbens shell. Unexpectedly, cells expressing activated p38 co-expressed Iba-1, a widely used microglia marker. In summary we found strong sex differences in the effects of U50,488 on place aversion whereas the acute effects on U50,488 induced similar behavioral effects in males and females. PMID:24445073

  16. Sparing of contralateral major salivary glands has a significant effect on oral health in patients treated with radical radiotherapy of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, K.T.; Greiner, R.H.; Zehnder, D.; Lussi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Has a conscious exclusion of the contralateral major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) a significant impact on the milieu of the oral cavity (saliva flow, pH, buffer capacity, and colonisation with Streptococcus mutans) in patients with ENT tumors receiving radical radiotherapy? Patients and Methods: 20 consecutive consentient patients with ENT tumors were evaluated once before, weekly during, and 6 weeks after the end of treatment in regard to saliva flow, pH, buffer capacity, and colonisation with Streptococcus mutans. In 13 patients the major salivary glands on both sides were included in the treated volume, in seven patients the treatment portals excluded consciously the contralateral major salivary glands. Results: The stimulated saliva flow decreases already during the 1st week of radiotherapy, the decrease follows the dose exponentially; the saliva flow is further reduced in the weeks after the end of treatment. The effect is less pronounced in patients with sparing of contralateral major salivary glands. The majority of patients with unilateral sparing of the major salivary glands retain the baseline value of buffer capacity, whereas buffer capacity of all patients with inclusion of all major salivary glands is markedly reduced with 20 Gy already, without signs of recovery when treatment has stopped. With unilateral salivary gland sparing the pH always remains basic, in bilaterally irradiated patients the pH changes from a mean of 7.3 to 5.8 during treatment. The colonisation with Streptococcus mutans varies little in both groups during the radiotherapy; after the end of therapy, it is higher in bilaterally irradiated patients. Conclusions: The conscious arrangement of irradiation portals in order to spare contralateral major salivary glands in patients with radical radiotherapy of ENT tumors has a significant influence on the oral environment: the stimulated saliva flow is higher, the buffer capacity retains the

  17. [Effect of native aortic valve sparing aortic root reconstruction surgery on short- and long-term prognosis in Marfan syndrome patients:a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Wang, Zhiwei; Hu, Xiaoping; Wu, Hongbing; Zhou, Zhen

    2014-05-01

    This meta-analysis was performed to analyze the effect of preserving the native aortic valve on short- and long-term prognosis post aortic root reconstruction surgery for patients with Marfan syndrome. Database including Pubmed,Embase, Cochrane library, CNKI, Wanfang,VIP and CBM were searched to collect studies comparing clinical results of valve sparing surgery with composite valve graft surgery for patients with Marfan syndrome. Study quality was assessed by Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and publication bias was assessed by visual inspection of the funnel plot together with Egger test. Clinical outcomes data was extracted from the manuscripts and analyzed with Revman 5.0 supplied by Cochrane collaboration. Seven clinical trials with 690 patients were included. Meta- analysis demonstrated that valve sparing surgery was associated with a lower incidence of re-exploration (RR = 0.51, 95%CI:0.29- 0.90, P 0.05). Valve sparing aortic root reconstruction surgery is a superior procedure to composite valve graft surgery in term of improving the short- and long-term prognosis for patients with Marfan syndrome.

  18. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-01-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined 3 H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid

  19. Effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on focused attention in toddlers during free play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J W; Hans, S L

    1996-08-01

    The goals of this study were: (1) to determine if 24-month-old children exposed to opioids show decreased focused attention during free play compared with children of the same age who were not prenatally exposed; (2) to identify medical and social risk factors other than drug exposure that are related to focused attention; and (3) to determine if mothers' teaching ability had an effect on attention. Focused attention was rated during a 3-minute free play session for 30 toddlers who were methadone-exposed and for 44 comparison toddlers. The mother teaching the child to use a toy was also rated separately from the free play session. There was no difference in focused attention of 24 month olds during free play based only on prenatal exposure. Despite group differences in medical and social risk factors, only maternal IQ was significantly related to focused attention. Maternal instruction was strongly related to focused attention and mediated the effects of maternal IQ on attention.

  20. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  1. Placebo effects of a sham opioid solution: a randomized controlled study in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Regine; Kothe, Ralph; Schmitz, Julia; Kamping, Sandra; Flor, Herta

    2017-10-01

    This study tested the experimental placebo effect in a group of chronic pain patients. Forty-eight patients having chronic back pain participated in a randomized clinical trial that tested the efficacy of a sham opioid solution (NaCl) compared with an alleged neutral, completely inactive solution (NaCl). We shaped the placebo effect by 2 interventions: verbal instruction and conditioning. The patients were either told that the "solution reduces pain and improves physical capacity" or the "solution is neutral, a placebo." Half of each group was additionally conditioned (coupling solution with reduced experimental pain), yielding 4 subgroups with 12 participants each. Outcome measures were as follows: the patients' clinical back pain ratings and acute pain ratings (both examined by numerical rating scale 0-10) and self-rated functional capacity (0%-100%; time required for the exercise). Expected pain relief before and after solution intake was also assessed. The inactive solution (NaCl), when presented as an effective treatment (sham "opioid" solution), induced placebo analgesia as evident in lower ratings of the patients' clinical back pain (F(3.12,144.21) = 25.05, P pain ratings (F(1.99,87.40) = 18.12, P pain expectations, and they were maintained in both sham opioid groups. The results suggest that it may be clinically useful to explicitly integrate placebo analgesia responses into pain management.

  2. Spare Items validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Carratala, L.

    1998-01-01

    There is an increasing difficulty for purchasing safety related spare items, with certifications by manufacturers for maintaining the original qualifications of the equipment of destination. The main reasons are, on the top of the logical evolution of technology, applied to the new manufactured components, the quitting of nuclear specific production lines and the evolution of manufacturers quality systems, originally based on nuclear codes and standards, to conventional industry standards. To face this problem, for many years different Dedication processes have been implemented to verify whether a commercial grade element is acceptable to be used in safety related applications. In the same way, due to our particular position regarding the spare part supplies, mainly from markets others than the american, C.N. Trillo has developed a methodology called Spare Items Validation. This methodology, which is originally based on dedication processes, is not a single process but a group of coordinated processes involving engineering, quality and management activities. These are to be performed on the spare item itself, its design control, its fabrication and its supply for allowing its use in destinations with specific requirements. The scope of application is not only focussed on safety related items, but also to complex design, high cost or plant reliability related components. The implementation in C.N. Trillo has been mainly curried out by merging, modifying and making the most of processes and activities which were already being performed in the company. (Author)

  3. Effects of naltrexone on pain sensitivity and mood in fibromyalgia: no evidence for endogenous opioid pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred W Younger

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying fibromyalgia are still unknown, although some evidence points to endogenous opioid dysfunction. We examined how endogenous opioid antagonism affects pain and mood for women with and without fibromyalgia. Ten women with fibromyalgia and ten age- and gender-matched, healthy controls each attended two laboratory sessions. Each participant received naltrexone (50mg at one session, and placebo at the other session, in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Participants were tested for changes in sensitivity to heat, cold, and mechanical pain. Additionally, we collected measures of mood and opioid withdrawal symptoms during the laboratory sessions and at home the night following each session. At baseline, the fibromyalgia group exhibited more somatic complaints, greater sensory sensitivity, more opioid withdrawal somatic symptoms, and lower mechanical and cold pain-tolerance than did the healthy control group. Neither group experienced changes in pain sensitivity due to naltrexone administration. Naltrexone did not differentially affect self-reported withdrawal symptoms, or mood, in the fibromyalgia and control groups. Consistent with prior research, there was no evidence found for abnormal endogenous opioid activity in women with fibromyalgia.

  4. The Study of the Effectiveness of Olanzapine as a Maintenance Treatment in Opioid Dependents, a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azarekhsh Mokri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this research, researchers want to study the effectiveness of Olanzapine on reduction of substance abuse relapse among people who are dependent to opioid material, merely. Method: A randomized clinical trial was designed. The population was opioid dependence subjects (only men that were diagnosed based on DSM-IV TR criteria, and referred to national center of addiction studies clinic. Detoxification was done by using of Clonidine, Clonazepam, Disiklomin, and NSAIDS within7 through 10 days. In second stage, the Patients who were referred to the clinic those men who had satisfied criterions selected. Demographic forms, testimonial certificate, Addiction Severity Index, Beck Depression Questionnaire, Zung Self report anxiety test administered among selected sample. Sample divided to two groups (placebo and Olanzapine the research last for 8 weeks. Results: the results showed that addiction severity reduced in both groups, but there was not significant difference in reduction of addiction severity between two groups. There was significant difference in depression and anxiety among mean scores of base line and follow up in both groups but there was not significant difference between two groups in follow up measures. Conclusion: Altogether, the results did not confirm the effectiveness of Olanzapine on maintenance treatment of opioid dependence.

  5. Nalfurafine hydrochloride, a selective κ opioid receptor agonist, has no reinforcing effect on intravenous self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Nakao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nalfurafine hydrochloride [(E-N-[17-(cyclopropylmethyl-4,5α-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxymorphinan-6β-yl]-3-(furan-3-yl-N-methylprop-2-enamide monohydrochloride; nalfurafine] is used in Japan as an antipruritic for the treatment of intractable pruritus in patients undergoing hemodialysis or with chronic liver disease. It is a potent and selective agonist at the κ opioid receptor, but also has weak and partial agonist activity at μ opioid receptors. Opioids, especially those acting at μ receptors, carry a risk of abuse. This is an important factor in the consideration of therapeutic risk vs. benefit in clinical use and the potential for misuse as a public health problem. It is therefore necessary to carefully evaluate the reinforcing effects of nalfurafine. To this end, we investigated intravenous self-administration of nalfurafine in rhesus monkeys. The number of self-administration of nalfurafine at doses of 0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 μg/kg/infusion was not higher than that of saline in rhesus monkeys that frequently self-administered pentazocine (0.25 mg/kg/infusion. These results indicate that nalfurafine has no reinforcing effect in rhesus monkeys in the intravenous self-administration paradigm.

  6. Effect of Buprenorphine Weekly Depot (CAM2038) and Hydromorphone Blockade in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Comer, Sandra D; Lofwall, Michelle R; Vince, Bradley; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Kelsh, Debra; Coe, Marion A; Jones, Jermaine D; Nuzzo, Paul A; Tiberg, Fredrik; Sheldon, Behshad; Kim, Sonnie

    2017-09-01

    Buprenorphine is an efficacious, widely used treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD). Daily oral transmucosal formulations can be associated with misuse, diversion, and nonadherence; these limitations may be obviated by a sustained release formulation. To evaluate the ability of a novel, weekly, subcutaneous buprenorphine depot formulation, CAM2038, to block euphorigenic opioid effects and suppress opioid withdrawal in non-treatment-seeking individuals with OUD. This multisite, double-blind, randomized within-patient study was conducted at 3 controlled inpatient research facilities. It involved 47 adults with DSM-V moderate-to-severe OUD. The study was conducted from October 12, 2015 (first patient enrolled), to April 21, 2016 (last patient visit). A total of five 3-day test sessions evaluated the response to hydromorphone (0, 6, and 18 mg intramuscular in random order; 1 dose/session/day). After the first 3-day session (ie, qualification phase), participants were randomized to either CAM2038 weekly at 24 mg (n = 22) or 32 mg (n = 25); the assigned CAM2038 dose was given twice, 1 week apart (day 0 and 7). Four sets of sessions were conducted after randomization (days 1-3, 4-6, 8-10, and 11-13). The primary end point was maximum rating on the visual analog scale for drug liking. Secondary end points included other visual analog scale (eg, high and desire to use), opioid withdrawal scales, and physiological and pharmacokinetic outcomes. A total of 46 of 47 randomized participants (mean [SD] age, 35.5 [9] years; 76% male [n = 35]) completed the study. Both weekly CAM2038 doses produced immediate and sustained blockade of hydromorphone effects (liking maximum effect, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.813; P withdrawal (Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.617; P opioid blockade and withdrawal suppression. The results support the use of this depot formulation for treatment initiation and stabilization of patients with OUD, with

  7. Dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juurlink, David N; Dhalla, Irfan A

    2012-12-01

    The use of opioids for chronic noncancer pain has increased dramatically over the past 25 years in North America and has been accompanied by a major increase in opioid addiction and overdose deaths. The increase in opioid prescribing is multifactorial and partly reflects concerns about the effectiveness and safety of alternative medications, particularly the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, much of the rise in opioid prescribing reflects the assertion, widely communicated to physicians in the 1990s, that the risks of dependence and addiction during chronic opioid therapy were low, predictable, and could be minimized by the use of controlled-release opioid formulations. In this narrative review, we offer a critical appraisal of the publications most frequently cited as evidence that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is low. We conclude that very few well-designed studies support the notion that opioid addiction is rare during chronic opioid therapy and that none can be readily generalized to present-day practice. Despite serious methodological limitations, these studies have been repeatedly mischaracterized as showing that the risk of addiction during chronic opioid therapy is rare. These studies are countered by a larger, more rigorous and contemporary body of evidence demonstrating that dependence and addiction are relatively common consequences of chronic opioid therapy, occurring in up to one-third of patients in some series.

  8. The Effectiveness of Transdermal Opioid in the Management Multiple Rib Fractures: Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Solak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most commonly observed pathology in chest traumas is rib fracture, and the most important clinical symptom is severe pain. Aims: To investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular opioid (IMO, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA and the Fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system (TTS in the management of rib fracture pain. Study Design: Prospective randomized clinical trial. Methods: In our prospective and randomised study, we included 45 patients with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures. There were three groups and intercostal nerve blockage (ICB in the first day and oral paracetamol for five days was administered to each group as standard. In Group IMO (n=15, 4x40 mg pethidine HCl was administered to the patients, while in Group IVPCA (n=15 this was 5 µg/mL continuous intravenous fentanyl and was 50 µg fentanyl TTS in Group TTS (n=15. The demographics, injury data and vital signs of the patients were recorded. Pain was scored using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. The pain during lying down (VASl and mobilisation (VASm was detected. Results: There were no differences between the three groups regarding age, sex, the trauma pattern, the number and distribution of costal fracture localisations, the presence of additional pathology, complications, thoracal catheter and the duration of thoracal catheter. No significant difference between the groups regarding systolic and diastolic arterial tension, number of breaths and beats in a minute was observed (p>0.05. We observed an improvement in the mean VAS score after treatment in all three groups. The mean VASl score significantly decreased after treatment in each group (p0.05. Conclusion: In the analgesia of patients with multiple rib fractures, TTS administration with ICB showed similar effectiveness with IVPCA administration with ICB. In the management of pain due to multiple rib fractures, TTS administration is a safe, non-invasive and effective procedure.

  9. The effectiveness of transdermal opioid in the management multiple rib fractures: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Okan; Oz, Gürhan; Kokulu, Serdar; Solak, Ozlem; Doğan, Gökçen; Esme, Hıdır; Ocalan, Kubilay; Baki, Elif Doğan

    2013-09-01

    The most commonly observed pathology in chest traumas is rib fracture, and the most important clinical symptom is severe pain. To investigate the effectiveness of intramuscular opioid (IMO), intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IVPCA) and the Fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system (TTS) in the management of rib fracture pain. Prospective randomized clinical trial. In our prospective and randomised study, we included 45 patients with a diagnosis of multiple rib fractures. There were three groups and intercostal nerve blockage (ICB) in the first day and oral paracetamol for five days was administered to each group as standard. In Group IMO (n=15), 4×40 mg pethidine HCl was administered to the patients, while in Group IVPCA (n=15) this was 5 μg/mL continuous intravenous fentanyl and was 50 μg fentanyl TTS in Group TTS (n=15). The demographics, injury data and vital signs of the patients were recorded. Pain was scored using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The pain during lying down (VASl) and mobilisation (VASm) was detected. There were no differences between the three groups regarding age, sex, the trauma pattern, the number and distribution of costal fracture localisations, the presence of additional pathology, complications, thoracal catheter and the duration of thoracal catheter. No significant difference between the groups regarding systolic and diastolic arterial tension, number of breaths and beats in a minute was observed (p>0.05). We observed an improvement in the mean VAS score after treatment in all three groups. The mean VASl score significantly decreased after treatment in each group (p0.05). In the analgesia of patients with multiple rib fractures, TTS administration with ICB showed similar effectiveness with IVPCA administration with ICB. In the management of pain due to multiple rib fractures, TTS administration is a safe, non-invasive and effective procedure.

  10. Effects of Rearing Conditions on Behaviour and Endogenous Opioids in Rats with Alcohol Access during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Erika; Nylander, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Causal links between early-life stress, genes and later psychiatric diagnoses are not possible to fully address in human studies. Animal models therefore provide an important complement in which conditions can be well controlled and are here used to study and distinguish effects of early-life stress and alcohol exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of rearing conditions on behaviour in young rats and if these changes could be followed over time and to examine interaction effects between early-life environment and adolescent alcohol drinking on behaviour and immunoreactive levels of the opioid peptides dynorphin B, met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 and beta-endorphin. We employed a rodent model, maternal separation, to study the impact of rearing conditions on behaviour, voluntary alcohol consumption and alcohol-induced effects. The consequences of short, 15 min (MS 15), and long, 360 min (MS 360), maternal separation in combination with adolescent voluntary alcohol consumption on behaviour and peptides were examined. A difference in the development of risk taking behaviour was found between the MS15 and MS360 while the development of general activity was found to differ between intake groups. Beta-endorphin levels in the pituitary and the periaqueductal gray area was found to be higher in the MS15 than the MS360. Adolescent drinking resulted in higher dynorphin B levels in the hippocampus and higher met-enkephalin-Arg6Phe7 levels in the amygdala. Amygdala and hippocampus are involved in addiction processes and changes in these brain areas after adolescent alcohol drinking may have consequences for cognitive function and drug consumption behaviour in adulthood. The study shows that individual behavioural profiling over time in combination with neurobiological investigations provides means for studies of causality between early-life stress, behaviour and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders. PMID:24098535

  11. Analysis of opioid consumption in clinical trials: a simulation based analysis of power of four approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Inconsistent trial design and analysis is a key reason that few advances in postoperative pain management have been made from clinical trials analyzing opioid consumption data. This study aimed to compare four different approaches to analyze opioid consumption data. A repeated time-to-event (RTTE...... to determine sample size required to demonstrate efficacy with 80% power using t test, Mann-Whitney rank sum test, time-to-event (TTE) modeling and RTTE modeling. Precision of efficacy estimates for RTTE models were evaluated in 500 simulations. A sample size of 50 patients was required to detect 37% morphine...... sparing effect with at least 80% power in a 24 h trial with RTTE modeling whereas the required sample size was 200 for Mann-Whitney, 180 for t-test and 76 for TTE models. Extending the trial duration from 24 to 96 h reduced the required sample size by 3.1 fold with RTTE modeling. Precise estimate...

  12. Effect of perioperative administration of dexketoprofen on opioid requirements and inflammatory response following elective hip arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the safety and analgesic efficacy of perioperative dexketoprofen were evaluated. METHODS: Thirty ASA I or II patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty were randomized to one of two groups. One group (D) received dexketoprofen 25 mg tds for 24 h before and 48 h after surgery; the second group (P) received placebo tablets at equivalent times. Hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine (17.5 mg if greater than 70 kg and 15 mg if less than 70 kg) and preservative-free morphine (0.6 mg) were administered intrathecally. Postoperatively, PCA was provided (bolus morphine sulphate 1 mg; lockout 5 min; no continuous infusion). RESULTS: The two groups were similar in terms of age, gender, weight, height, ASA class, duration of operation, and level of sensory block on arrival to the recovery room. Groups were also similar in terms of blood loss, transfusion requirements, ventilatory frequency, and haemodynamic variables. According to visual analogue pain scores patients in group D experienced less pain at 15 h (P=0.02) postoperatively. Cumulative morphine consumption was also less in group D compared with group P at 6 (0.06 (0.2) vs 0.85 (1.4) mg, P=0.04) and 48 h postoperatively (10.1 (8) vs 26.2 (20) mg, P<0.01). Plasma interleukin 6 concentrations increased postoperatively to a significantly lesser extent in group D than in group P (P=0.02). Nausea and vomiting were less (P<0.01) in group D compared with group P at 18 h postoperatively. Sedation scores were less (P=0.03) in group D. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative administration of dexketoprofen 25 mg 8 hourly markedly improves analgesia and decreases opioid requirements (and associated adverse effects) following hip arthroplasty. It appears that this regimen decreases the postoperative pro-inflammatory response.

  13. Analgesic Effects of Diluted Bee Venom Acupuncture Mediated by δ-Opioid and α2-Adrenergic Receptors in Osteoarthritic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeong-Eun; Seo, Byung-Kwan; Lee, Jung-Woo; Kim, Chanyoung; Park, Yeon-Cheol; Lee, Jae-Dong; Baek, Yong-Hyeon

    2017-06-23

    Context • Pain from osteoarthritis is associated with peripheral nociception and central pain processing. Given the unmet need for innovative, effective, and well-tolerated therapies, many patients, after looking for more satisfactory alternatives, decide to use complementary and alternative modalities. The analgesic mechanism of subcutaneous injections of diluted bee venom into an acupoint is thought to be part of an anti-inflammatory effect and the central modulation of pain processing. Objectives • Using the rat model of collagenase-induced osteoarthritis (CIOA), the study intended to investigate the analgesic effects of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) as they are related to the acupuncture points and dosage used and to determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of BVA for pain were mediated by opioid or adrenergic receptors. Design • Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of 19 groups, with n = 10 for each group. Setting • The study was conducted at the East-West Bone and Joint Research Institute at Kyung Hee University (Seoul, South Korea). Intervention • All rats were intra-articularly injected with collagenase solution in the left knee, followed by a booster injection performed 4 d after the first injection. For the groups receiving BVA treatments, the treatment was administered into the ST-36 acupoint, except for 1 group that received the treatment into a nonacupoint. Three BVA intervention groups received no pretreatment with agonists or antagonists; 1 of them received a dose of 1 mg/kg of bee venom into acupoint ST-36, 1 received a dose of 2 mg/kg into acupoint ST-36, and 1 received a dose of 1 mg/kg into a nonacupoint location. For the intervention groups receiving pretreatments, the opioid-receptor or adrenergic-receptor agonists or antagonists were injected 20 min before the 1-mg/kg BVA treatments. Outcome Measures • Changes in the rats' pain thresholds were assessed by evaluation of pain-related behavior, using a tail flick

  14. Opioid Antagonists and the A118G Polymorphism in the μ-Opioid Receptor Gene: Effects of GSK1521498 and Naltrexone in Healthy Drinkers Stratified by OPRM1 Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nestor, Liam J; Subramaniam, Naresh; Dodds, Chris; Nathan, Pradeep J; Miller, Sam R; Sarai, Bhopinder K; Maltby, Kay; Fernando, Disala; Warren, Liling; Hosking, Louise K; Waterworth, Dawn; Korzeniowska, Anna; Win, Beta; Richards, Duncan B; Vasist Johnson, Lakshmi; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    The A118G single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1799971) in the μ-opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, has been much studied in relation to alcohol use disorders. The reported effects of allelic variation at this SNP on alcohol-related behaviors, and on opioid receptor antagonist treatments, have been inconsistent. We investigated the pharmacogenetic interaction between A118G variation and the effects of two μ-opioid receptor antagonists in a clinical lab setting. Fifty-six overweight and moderate–heavy drinkers were prospectively stratified by genotype (29 AA homozygotes, 27 carriers of at least 1 G allele) in a double-blind placebo-controlled, three-period crossover design with naltrexone (NTX; 25 mg OD for 2 days, then 50 mg OD for 3 days) and GSK1521498 (10 mg OD for 5 days). The primary end point was regional brain activation by the contrast between alcohol and neutral tastes measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Secondary end points included other fMRI contrasts, subjective responses to intravenous alcohol challenge, and food intake. GSK1521498 (but not NTX) significantly attenuated fMRI activation by appetitive tastes in the midbrain and amygdala. GSK1521498 (and NTX to a lesser extent) significantly affected self-reported responses to alcohol infusion. Both drugs reduced food intake. Across all end points, there was less robust evidence for significant effects of OPRM1 allelic variation, or for pharmacogenetic interactions between genotype and drug treatment. These results do not support strong modulatory effects of OPRM1 genetic variation on opioid receptor antagonist attenuation of alcohol- and food-related behaviors. However, they do support further investigation of GSK1521498 as a potential therapeutic for alcohol use and eating disorders. PMID:27109624

  15. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids applied peripherally at the site of surgery may produce postoperative analgesia with few side effects. We performed this systematic review to evaluate the analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids for acute postoperative pain. METHODS: We searched PubMed (1966 to June...... 2013), Embase (1980 to June 2013), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6). Randomized controlled trials investigating the postoperative analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids vs. systemic opioids or placebo, measured by pain intensity...... difference -5 mm, 95% CI: -7 to -3) for peripherally applied opioids vs. placebo and statistically significant increased time to first analgesic (mean difference 153 min, 95% CI: 41-265). When preoperative inflammation was reported (five studies), peripherally applied opioids significantly improved...

  16. Role of neurotensin and opioid receptors in the cardiorespiratory effects of [Ile⁹]PK20, a novel antinociceptive chimeric peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szereda-Przestaszewska, Małgorzata; Kleczkowska, Patrycja; Lipkowski, Andrzej W

    2014-10-15

    Ile(9)PK20 is a novel hybrid of opioid-neurotensin peptides synthesized from the C-terminal hexapeptide of neurotensin and endomorphin-2 pharmacophore. This chimeric compound shows potent central and peripheral antinociceptive activity in experimental animals, however nothing is known about its influence on the respiratory and cardiovascular parameters. The present study was designed to determine the cardiorespiratory effects exerted by an intravenous injection (i.v.) of [Ile(9)]PK20. Share of the vagal afferentation and the contribution of NTS1 neurotensin and opioid receptors were tested. Intravenous injection of the hybrid at a dose of 100 μg/kg in the intact, anaesthetized rats provoked an increase in tidal volume preceded by a prompt short-lived decrease. Immediately after the end of injection brief acceleration of the respiratory rhythm appeared, and was ensued by the slowing down of breathing. Changes in respiration were concomitant with a bi-phasic response of the blood pressure: an immediate increase was followed by a sustained hypotension. Midcervical vagotomy eliminated the increase in tidal volume and respiratory rate responses. Antagonist of opioid receptors - naloxone hydrochloride eliminated only [Ile(9)]PK20-evoked decline in tidal volume response. Blockade of NTS1 receptors with an intravenous dose of SR 142,948, lessened the remaining cardiorespiratory effects. This study depicts that [Ile(9)]PK20 acting through neurotensin NTS1 receptors augments the tidal component of the breathing pattern and activates respiratory timing response through the vagal pathway. Blood pressure effects occur outside vagal afferentation and might result from activation of the central and peripheral vascular NTS1 receptors. In summary the respiratory effects of the hybrid appeared not to be profound, but they were accompanied with unfavourable prolonged hypotension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. No morphine sparing effect of ketamine added to morphine for patient-controlled intravenous analgesia after uterine artery embolization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Luana Leonora; Handberg, Gitte; Helbo-Hansen, H S

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain following embolization of the uterine arteries (UAEs) is variable and may be very severe requiring large doses of parenteral opioids for relief. The present study tested the hypothesis that the addition of ketamine to i.v. patient-controlled morphine reduces the amount of morphine...... required for pain-control during the first 24 h after UAE embolization. METHODS: Fifty-six patients undergoing UAE embolization for treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomata were randomized to receive either 2 mg/ml of morphine (Control group, n=30) or 2 mg/ml of both morphine and ketamine (Ketamine......, visual disturbances, anxiety, dreaming and hallucinations, if any, were recorded for 24 h after embolization. RESULTS: The mean +/- SD 24-h consumption of patient-controlled morphine was 38.3 +/- 21.0 mg in the Ketamine group vs. 33.3 +/- 18.3 mg in the Control group (NS). The difference between...

  18. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  19. Can variability in the effect of opioids on refractory breathlessness be explained by genetic factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currow, David C; Quinn, Stephen; Ekstrom, Magnus; Kaasa, Stein; Johnson, Miriam J; Somogyi, Andrew A; Klepstad, Päl

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Opioids modulate the perception of breathlessness with a considerable variation in response, with poor correlation between the required opioid dose and symptom severity. The objective of this hypothesis-generating, secondary analysis was to identify candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from those associated with opioid receptors, signalling or pain modulation to identify any related to intensity of breathlessness while on opioids. This can help to inform prospective studies and potentially lead to better tailoring of opioid therapy for refractory breathlessness. Setting 17 hospice/palliative care services (tertiary services) in 11 European countries. Participants 2294 people over 18 years of age on regular opioids for pain related to cancer or its treatment. Primary outcome measures The relationship between morphine dose, breathlessness intensity (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire; EORTCQLQC30 question 8) and 112 candidate SNPs from 25 genes (n=588). Secondary outcome measures The same measures for people on oxycodone (n=402) or fentanyl (n=429). Results SNPs not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or with allele frequencies (<5%) were removed. Univariate associations between each SNP and breathlessness intensity were determined with Benjamini-Hochberg false discovery rate set at 20%. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression, clustering over country and adjusting for available confounders, was conducted with remaining SNPs. For univariate morphine associations, 1 variant on the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3B (HTR3B) gene, and 4 on the β-2-arrestin gene (ARRB2) were associated with more intense breathlessness. 1 SNP remained significant in the multivariable model: people with rs7103572 SNP (HTR3B gene; present in 8.4% of the population) were three times more likely to have more intense breathlessness (OR 2.86; 95% CIs 1.46 to 5.62; p=0.002). No associations were seen with fentanyl nor with

  20. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid-Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    tested whether performing midline 150-kDyn contusion SCI at T9 with 1 s dwell elicited more robust pain symptoms. For locomotor recovery (BBB scale...addition, we tested the hypotheses that acute morphine would worsen locomotor recovery and chronic neuropathic pain, and that acute (+)-naltrexone could...This proposal will test a clinically relevant therapeutic, (+)-naltrexone, that we predict will improve the efficacy of opioids for controlling SCI

  1. A Novel Approach for Effectively Treating SCI Pain, Improving Opioid Efficacy, and Preventing Opioid Induced Constipation: Key Role of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    tested whether performing midline 150-kDyn contusion SCI at T9 with 1 s dwell elicited more robust pain symptoms. For locomotor recovery (BBB scale...addition, we tested the hypotheses that acute morphine would worsen locomotor recovery and chronic neuropathic pain, and that acute (+)-naltrexone could...This proposal will test a clinically relevant therapeutic, (+)-naltrexone, that we predict will improve the efficacy of opioids for controlling SCI

  2. Dose-Effect Relationships for the Submandibular Salivary Glands and Implications for Their Sparing by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Kim, Hyugnjin M.; Vineberg, Karen A.; Ship, Jonathan; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Submandibular salivary glands (SMGs) dysfunction contributes to xerostomia after radiotherapy (RT) of head-and-neck (HN) cancer. We assessed SMG dose-response relationships and their implications for sparing these glands by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 148 HN cancer patients underwent unstimulated and stimulated SMG salivary flow rate measurements selectively from Wharton's duct orifices, before RT and periodically through 24 months after RT. Correlations of flow rates and mean SMG doses were modeled throughout all time points. IMRT replanning in 8 patients whose contralateral level I was not a target incorporated the results in a new cost function aiming to spare contralateral SMGs. Results: Stimulated SMG flow rates decreased exponentially by (1.2%) Gy as mean doses increased up to 39 Gy threshold, and then plateaued near zero. At mean doses ≤39 Gy, but not higher, flow rates recovered over time at 2.2%/month. Similarly, the unstimulated salivary flow rates decreased exponentially by (3%) Gy as mean dose increased and recovered over time if mean dose was <39 Gy. IMRT replanning reduced mean contralateral SMG dose by average 12 Gy, achieving ≤39 Gy in 5 of 8 patients, without target underdosing, increasing the mean doses to the parotid glands and swallowing structures by average 2-3 Gy. Conclusions: SMG salivary flow rates depended on mean dose with recovery over time up to a threshold of 39 Gy. Substantial SMG dose reduction to below this threshold and without target underdosing is feasible in some patients, at the expense of modestly higher doses to some other organs

  3. Anti-nociceptive effect of patchouli alcohol: Involving attenuation of cyclooxygenase 2 and modulation of mu-opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuan; Wang, Xin-Pei; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Lei, Fan; Xing, Dong-Ming; Guo, Yue-Ying; Du, Li-Jun

    2017-08-09

    To explore the anti-nociceptive effect of patchouli alcohol (PA), the essential oil isolated from Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Bent, and determine the mechanism in molecular levels. The acetic acid-induced writhing test and formalin-induced plantar injection test in mice were employed to confifirm the effect in vivo. Intracellular calcium ion was imaged to verify PA on mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and MOR of mouse brain were expressed for determination of PA's target. Cellular experiments were carried out to find out COX2 and MOR expression induced by PA. PA significantly reduced latency period of visceral pain and writhing induced by acetic acid saline solution (Peffect of PA. A decrease in the intracellular calcium level (Peffect. PA showed the characters of enhancing the MOR expression and reducing the intracellular calcium ion similar to opioid effect. Both COX2 and MOR are involved in the mechanism of PA's anti-nociceptive effect, and the up-regulation of the receptor expression and the inhibition of intracellular calcium are a new perspective to PA's effect on MOR.

  4. Effect of the opioid methionine enkephalinamide on signal transduction in human T-lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1998-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR/CD3) induced fluctuations in intracellular free ionizied calcium, [Ca2+]i, was analysed in the human T leukemia cell clone, Jurkat, cultured in the presence of the opioid methionine enkephalinamide (Met-Enk) in titrated concentrations (10[-7] to 10[-15] M) or saline (PBS....... Moreover, the levels of [Ca2+]i in this particular fraction were lower than control levels prior to ligation of the TCR/CD3 complex. The data support the idea that signal transduction in T cells can be influenced by endogenous opioid. The data therefore give credit to the evolving hypothesis...... of a functional relationship between the neuroendocrine system and the immune system....

  5. Prescribing practices amid the OxyContin crisis: examining the effect of print media coverage on opioid prescribing among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borwein, Alexandra; Kephart, George; Whelan, Emma; Asbridge, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The pain medication OxyContin (hereafter referred to as oxycodone extended release) has been the subject of sustained, and largely negative, media attention in recent years. We sought to determine whether media coverage of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers has led to changes in prescribing of the drug in Nova Scotia, Canada. An interrupted time-series design examined the effect of media attention on physicians' monthly prescribing of opioids. The outcome measures were, for each physician, the monthly proportions of all opioids prescribed and the proportion of strong opioids prescribed that were for oxycodone extended release. The exposure of interest was media attention defined as the number of articles published each month in 27 North American newspapers. Variations in media effects by provider characteristics (specialty, prescribing volume, and region) were assessed. Within-provider changes in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release in Nova Scotia were observed, and they followed changes in media coverage. Oxycodone extended release prescribing rose steadily prior to receiving media attention. Following peak media attention in the United States, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release slowed. Likewise, following peak coverage in Canadian newspapers, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release declined. These patterns were observed across prescriber specialties and by prescriber volume, though the magnitude of change in prescribing varied. This study demonstrates that print media reporting of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers, and its continued portrayal as a social problem, coincided with reductions in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release by physicians in Nova Scotia. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Healthy Adult Male Facial Skin Surface Lipid Pheromone p.o. to Treat Opioid Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Opioid Addiction; Opioid Abuse, Continuous Use; Opioid Use; Opioid-Related Disorders; Paternal Pheromone Deficiency; Opioid Dependence; Opioid Abuse; Opioid-use Disorder; Opioid Intoxication; Opioid Abuse, Episodic

  7. MDAN-21: A Bivalent Opioid Ligand Containing mu-Agonist and Delta-Antagonist Pharmacophores and Its Effects in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario D. Aceto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MDAN-21, 7′-{2-[(7-{2-[({(5α,6α-4,5-Epoxy-3,14-dihydroxy-17-methylmorphin-6-yl}-aminocarbonylmetoxy]-acetylamino}-heptylaminocarbonyl-methoxy]-acetylamino}-naltrindole, a bivalent opioid ligand containing a mu-opioid receptor agonist (derived from oxymorphone linked to the delta-opioid receptor antagonist (related to naltrindole by a spacer of 21 atoms, was reported to have potent analgesic properties in mice. Tolerance, physical dependence, and conditioned place preference were not evident in that species. The finding that bivalent ligands in this series, with spacers 19 atoms or greater, were devoid of tolerance and dependence led to the proposal that MDAN-21 targets heteromeric mu-delta-opioid receptors. The present study focused on its effects in nonhuman primates (Macaca mulatta, a species with a physiology and behavioral repertoire not unlike humans. With regard to opioids, this species usually better predicts clinical outcomes. MDAN-21 substituted for morphine in morphine-dependent monkeys in the remarkably low dose range 0.006–0.032 mg/kg, subcutaneously. Although MDAN-21 failed to produce reliable thermal analgesia in the dose range 0.0032–0.032 mg/kg, intramuscularly, it was active in the same dose range and by the same route of administration, in the capsaicin-induced thermal allodynia assay. The results suggest that MDAN-21 may be useful in the treatment of opioid dependence and allodynia. The data provide additional evidence that opioid withdrawal is associated with sensitized pain.

  8. The effects of epidural/spinal opioids in labour analgesia on neonatal outcomes: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Cao, Liang; Deng, Qian; Sun, Li-Qiang; Gu, Tian-Yu; Song, Jie; Qi, Dun-Yi

    2014-08-01

    Epidural/spinal opioids are increasingly used to relieve parturients' pain in labour. Some studies indicate that opioids can induce side effects in neonates, such as respiratory depression and neurobehavioural changes. This meta-analysis aimed to clarify the effects of opioids in labour analgesia on neonates. PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and EMBASE™ were searched for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The neonatal data of Apgar scores, Neurological and Adaptive Capacity Scores (NACS), and umbilical cord pH values were extracted. Statistical analyses were carried out using Review Manager 5.2 and Stata(®) 10. Twenty-one trials with 2,859 participants were included in our meta-analysis. No difference in the incidence of Apgar scores analgesia are safe for neonates up to 24 hr after delivery. In future studies, more attention should be paid to the long-term side effects in neonates.

  9. Craving and subsequent opioid use among opioid dependent patients who initiate treatment with buprenorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Strong, David R.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have directly assessed associations between craving and subsequent opioid use among treated patients. Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the relative utility of two craving questionnaires to predict opioid use among opioid dependent patients in treatment. Method Opioid dependent patients (n=147) initiating buprenorphine treatment were assessed for three months. Craving was measured using: 1) the Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ) and 2) the Penn Alcohol-Craving Scale adapted for opioid craving (PCS) for this study. Multi-level logistic regression models estimated the effects of craving on the likelihood of opioid use after adjusting for gender, age, ethnicity, education, opioid of choice, frequency of use, pain and depression. In these analyses craving assessed at time t was entered as a time-varying predictor of opioid use at time t+1. Results In adjusted regression models, a 1-point increase in PCS scores (on a 7-point scale) was associated with a significant increase in the odds of opioid use at the subsequent assessment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.08; 1.49, p .05) or DDQ control (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.85; 1.11, p > .05) scores. Conclusion Self-reported craving for opioids was associated with subsequent lapse to opioid use among a cohort of patients treated with buprenorphine. PMID:24521036

  10. The opioid receptor pharmacology of GSK1521498 compared to other ligands with differential effects on compulsive reward-related behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J; Sava, Anna; Roth, Adelheid L; Felici, Antonio; Maltby, Kay; Nathan, Pradeep J; Bullmore, Edward T; Henderson, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The novel opioid receptor antagonist, GSK1421498, has been shown to attenuate reward-driven compulsive behaviours, such as stimulant drug seeking or binge eating, in animals and humans. Here, we report new data on the receptor pharmacology of GSK121498, in comparison to naltrexone, naloxone, 6-β-naltrexol and nalmefene. To determine whether the novel opioid antagonist, GSK1521498, is an orthosteric or allosteric antagonist at the μ opioid receptor (MOPr) and whether it has neutral antagonist or inverse agonist properties. A combination of radioligand binding assays and [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays was employed. GSK1521498 completely displaced [(3)H]naloxone binding to MOPr and did not alter the rate of [(3)H]naloxone dissociation from MOPr observations compatible with it binding to the orthosteric site on MOPr. GSK1521498 exhibited inverse agonism when MOPr was overexpressed but not when the level of MOPr expression was low. In parallel studies under conditions of high receptor expression density, naloxone, naltrexone, 6-β-naltrexol and nalmefene exhibited partial agonism, not inverse agonism as has been reported previously for naloxone and naltrexone. In brain tissue from mice receiving a prolonged morphine pre-treatment, GSK1521498 exhibited slight inverse agonism. Differences between GSK1521498 and naltrexone in their effects on compulsive reward seeking are arguably linked to the more selective and complete MOPr antagonism of GSK1521498 versus the partial MOPr agonism of naltrexone. GSK1521498 is also pharmacologically differentiated by its inverse agonist efficacy at high levels of MOPr expression, but this may be less likely to contribute to behavioural differentiation at patho-physiological levels of expression.

  11. Spinal antinociceptive effects of [D-Ala2]deltorphin II, a novel and highly selective delta-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, G; Broccardo, M

    1992-01-01

    Pharmacological assays in isolated tissues and binding tests have recently shown that two peptides, with the sequence Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Asp-(or Glu)- Val-Val-Gly-NH2, isolated from skin extracts of Phyllomedusa bicolor and named [D-Ala2]deltorphin I and II, respectively, possess a higher affinity and selectivity for delta-opioid receptors than any other known natural compound. Since much evidence supports the role of spinal delta-opioid sites in producing antinociceptive effects, we investigated whether analgesia might be detected by direct spinal cord administration of [D-Ala2]deltorphin II (DADELT II) in the rat. The thermal antinociceptive effects of intrathecal DADELT II and dermorphin, a potent mu-selective agonist, were compared at different postinjection times by means of the tail-flick test. The DADELT II produced a dose-related inhibition of the tail-flick response, which lasted 10-60 min depending on the dose and appeared to be of shorter duration than the analgesia produced in rats after intrathecal injection of dermorphin (20-120 min). The analgesic effect of infused or injected DADELT II was completely abolished by naltrindole, the highly selective delta antagonist. These results confirm the involvement of delta receptors in spinal analgesic activity in the rat.

  12. Sustained platelet-sparing effect of weekly low dose paclitaxel allows effective, tolerable delivery of extended dose dense weekly carboplatin in platinum resistant/refractory epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagden Sarah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum agents have shown demonstrable activity in the treatment of patients with platinum resistant, recurrent ovarian cancer when delivered in a "dose-dense" fashion. However, the development of thrombocytopenia limits the weekly administration of carboplatin to no greater than AUC 2. Paclitaxel has a well-described platelet sparing effect however its use to explicitly provide thromboprotection in the context of dose dense carboplatin has not been explored. Methods We treated seven patients with platinum resistant ovarian cancer who had previously received paclitaxel or who had developed significant peripheral neuropathy precluding the use of further full dose weekly paclitaxel. Results We were able to deliver carboplatin AUC 3 and paclitaxel 20 mg/m2 with no thrombocytopenia or worsening of neuropathic side-effects, and with good activity. Conclusions We conclude that this regimen may be feasible and active, and could be formally developed as a "platinum-focussed dose-dense scaffold" into which targeted therapies that reverse platinum resistance can be incorporated, and merits further evaluation.

  13. Efficacy and side-effect profiles of lactulose, docusate sodium, and sennosides compared to PEG in opioid-induced constipation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruston, Teresa; Hunter, Kathleen; Cummings, Greta; Lazarescu, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a side effect of opioid therapy that can affect quality of life, adherence to treatment, and morbidity and possibly mortality. To investigate whether docusate sodium, sennosides, and lactulose have equal efficacy and side effect profiles compared to PEG in the management of OIC in adults. A systematic review was undertaken. Randomized controlled trials of adults taking opioids for cancer or non-cancer pain were considered if they met inclusion criteria. Statistical pooling was not possible as no studies met inclusion criteria. Large, well-powered, randomized controlled trials are feasible. Standard definitions of OIC would assist with the execution of these studies and contribute to their internal and external validity. Further research is strongly encouraged.

  14. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  15. Comparative Effectiveness of Tacrolimus-Based Steroid Sparing versus Steroid Maintenance Regimens in Kidney Transplantation: Results from Discrete Event Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Vibha C A; Ferrand, Yann; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Kelton, Christina M L; Caro, J Jaime; Goebel, Jens; Heaton, Pamela C

    2017-10-01

    Corticosteroids used as immunosuppressants to prevent acute rejection (AR) and graft loss (GL) following kidney transplantation are associated with serious cardiovascular and other adverse events. Evidence from short-term randomized controlled trials suggests that many patients on a tacrolimus-based immunosuppressant regimen can withdraw from steroids without increased AR or GL risk. To measure the long-term tradeoff between GL and adverse events for a heterogeneous-risk population and determine the optimal timing of steroid withdrawal. A discrete event simulation was developed including, as events, AR, GL, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, cytomegalovirus, and new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM), among others. Data from the United States Renal Data System were used to estimate event-specific parametric regressions, which accounted for steroid-sparing regimen (avoidance, early 7-d withdrawal, 6-mo withdrawal, 12-mo withdrawal, and maintenance) as well as patients' demographics, immunologic risks, and comorbidities. Regression-equation results were used to derive individual time-to-event Weibull distributions, used, in turn, to simulate the course of patients over 20 y. Patients on steroid avoidance or an early-withdrawal regimen were more likely to experience AR (45.9% to 55.0% v. 33.6%, P events and other outcomes with no worsening of AR or GL rates compared with steroid maintenance.

  16. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is not mediated by opioid receptors in early postoperative pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Sousa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Tramadol is known as a central acting analgesic drug, used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Local analgesic effect has been demonstrated, in part due to local anesthetic-like effect, but other mechanisms remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect is not known. In this study, we examined role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect of tramadol in the plantar incision model. Methods: Young male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups: control, intraplantar tramadol, intravenous tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol, and intravenous naloxone. After receiving the assigned drugs (tramadol 5 mg, naloxone 200 μg or 0.9% NaCl, rats were submitted to plantar incision, and withdrawal thresholds after mechanical stimuli with von Frey filaments were assessed at baseline, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after incision. Results: Plantar incision led to marked mechanical hyperalgesia during the whole period of observation in the control group, no mechanical hyperalgesia were observed in intraplantar tramadol group, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol group and intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol. In the intravenous tramadol group a late increase in withdrawal thresholds (after 45 min was observed, the intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol group and intravenous naloxone remained hyperalgesic during the whole period. Conclusions: Tramadol presented an early local analgesic effect decreasing mechanical hyperalgesia induced by plantar incision. This analgesic effect was not mediated by peripheral opioid receptors. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: Tramadol é conhecido como um fármaco analgésico de ação central, usado para o tratamento de dor moderada a grave. O efeito analgésico local foi demonstrado, em parte devido ao efeito

  17. Involvement of Opioid System, TRPM8, and ASIC Receptors in Antinociceptive Effect of Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC Bureau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Peixoto Rodrigues

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC Bureau is a medicinal plant found in Brazil. Known as “cipó-una”, it is popularly used as a natural therapeutic agent against pain and inflammation. This study evaluated the chemical composition and antinociceptive activity of the dichloromethane fraction from the roots of A. brachypoda (DEAB and its mechanism of action. The chemical composition was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, and this fraction is composed only of dimeric flavonoids. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated in formalin and hot plate tests after oral administration (10–100 mg/kg in male Swiss mice. We also investigated the involvement of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8, and ASIC (acid-sensing ion channel, as well as the opioidergic, glutamatergic, and supraspinal pathways. Moreover, the nociceptive response was reduced (30 mg/kg in the early and late phase of the formalin test. DEAB activity appears to involve the opioid system, TRPM8, and ASIC receptors, clearly showing that the DEAB alleviates acute pain in mice and suggesting the involvement of the TRPM8 and ASIC receptors and the opioid system in acute pain relief.

  18. Involvement of Opioid System, TRPM8, and ASIC Receptors in Antinociceptive Effect of Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC) Bureau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vinícius Peixoto; Rocha, Cláudia Quintino da; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Santos, Raquel de Cássia Dos; Ohara, Rie; Nishijima, Catarine Massucato; Ferreira Queiroz, Emerson; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado da; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2017-11-02

    Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC) Bureau is a medicinal plant found in Brazil. Known as "cipó-una", it is popularly used as a natural therapeutic agent against pain and inflammation. This study evaluated the chemical composition and antinociceptive activity of the dichloromethane fraction from the roots of A. brachypoda (DEAB) and its mechanism of action. The chemical composition was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, and this fraction is composed only of dimeric flavonoids. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated in formalin and hot plate tests after oral administration (10-100 mg/kg) in male Swiss mice. We also investigated the involvement of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1), TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8), and ASIC (acid-sensing ion channel), as well as the opioidergic, glutamatergic, and supraspinal pathways. Moreover, the nociceptive response was reduced (30 mg/kg) in the early and late phase of the formalin test. DEAB activity appears to involve the opioid system, TRPM8, and ASIC receptors, clearly showing that the DEAB alleviates acute pain in mice and suggesting the involvement of the TRPM8 and ASIC receptors and the opioid system in acute pain relief.

  19. The effect of cognitive load and patient race on physicians' decisions to prescribe opioids for chronic low back pain: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Diana J; Phelan, Sean; Workman, Michael; Hagel, Emily; Nelson, David B; Fu, Steven S; Widome, Rachel; van Ryn, Michelle

    2014-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that racial biases in opioid prescribing would be more likely under high levels of cognitive load, defined as the amount of mental activity imposed on working memory, which may come from environmental factors such as stressful conditions, chaotic workplace, staffing insufficiency, and competing demands, one's own psychological or physiological state, as well as from demands inherent in the task at hand. Two (patient race: White vs Black) by two (cognitive load: low vs high) between-subjects factorial design. Ninety-eight primary care physicians from the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System. Web-based experimental study. Physicians were randomly assigned to read vignettes about either a Black or White patient, under low vs high cognitive load, and to indicate their likelihood of prescribing opioids. High cognitive load was induced by having physicians perform a concurrent task under time pressure. There was a three-way interaction between patient race, cognitive load, and physician gender on prescribing decisions (P = 0.034). Hypotheses were partially confirmed. Male physicians were less likely to prescribe opioids for Black than White patients under high cognitive load (12.5% vs 30.0%) and were more likely to prescribe opioids for Black than White patients under low cognitive load (30.8% vs 10.5%). By contrast, female physicians were more likely to prescribe opioids for Black than White patients in both conditions, with greater racial differences under high (39.1% vs 15.8%) vs low cognitive load (28.6% vs 21.7%). Physician gender affected the way in which patient race and cognitive load influenced decisions to prescribe opioids for chronic pain. Future research is needed to further explore the potential effects of physician gender on racial biases in pain treatment, and the effects of physician cognitive load on pain treatment. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Condition based spare parts supply

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, X.; Basten, Robertus Johannes Ida; Kranenburg, A.A.; van Houtum, Geert-Jan

    2012-01-01

    We consider a spare parts stock point that serves an installed base of machines. Each machine contains the same critical component, whose degradation behavior is described by a Markov process. We consider condition based spare parts supply, and show that an optimal, condition based inventory policy

  1. The impact of opioids on the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Nathaniel; Mazer, Norman A

    2009-02-01

    Opioids have been used for medicinal and analgesic purposes for centuries. However, their negative effects on the endocrine system, which have been known for some times, are barely discussed in modern medicine. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the impact of opioids on the endocrine system. A review of the English language literature on preclinical and clinical studies of any type on the influence of opioids on the endocrine system was conducted. Preliminary recommendations for monitoring and managing these problems were provided. Long-term opioid therapy for either addiction or chronic pain often induces hypogonadism owing to central suppression of hypothalamic secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Symptoms of opioid-induced hypogonadism include loss of libido, infertility, fatigue, depression, anxiety, loss of muscle strength and mass, osteoporosis, and compression fractures in both men and women; impotence in men; and menstrual irregularities and galactorrhea in women. In view of the increased use of opioids for chronic pain, it has become increasingly important to monitor patients taking opioids and manage endocrine complications. Therefore, patients on opioid therapy should be routinely screened for such symptoms and for laboratory abnormalities in sex hormones. Opioid-induced hypogonadism seems to be a common complication of therapeutic or illicit opioid use. Patients on long-term opioid therapy should be prospectively monitored, and in cases of opioid-induced hypogonadism, we recommend nonopioid pain management, opioid rotation, or sex hormone supplementation after careful consideration of the risks and benefits.

  2. The prescription opioid epidemic: an overview for anesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Asim; Juurlink, David N

    2016-01-01

    The objectives for preparing this article were to review the historical context and epidemiology surrounding the North American prescription opioid crisis, to summarize the evidence regarding the benefits and harms of long-term opioid therapy for non-cancer pain, and to outline ways in which anesthesiologists may help ameliorate the problem. We searched PubMed, Google Scholar, and EMBASE™ for relevant articles using various search terms, including pain, opioid epidemic, history of opioid use, perioperative care, and addiction. Related citations were further explored and searched depending on the specific subtopic of interest. In the 1980s and early 1990s, opioids were infrequently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Thereafter, however, physicians were gradually inculcated with the message that long-term opioid therapy was a safe and effective treatment option for patients with chronic non-cancer pain. Pharmaceutical companies supported this growing movement and employed aggressive and sometimes misleading marketing strategies for new opioid formulations. As a result, the practice of prescribing opioids flourished in the late 1990s. The surge in prescribing opioids was accompanied by a marked increase in opioid-related morbidity and mortality. This change in practice transpired despite the absence of randomized trials showing clinically significant benefit from the long-term use of opioids. Subsequently, however, a large and growing body of evidence has emerged quantifying the harms associated with long-term opioid therapy. Anesthesiologists widely prescribe opioids for acute and chronic pain; yet, as a group, they may be largely unaware of the current state of this growing epidemic and what role they can play to rectify this problem. Anesthesiologists are well positioned to take a leadership role in the management of postoperative discharge opioid therapy in an effort to curb the overutilization of opioids. Furthermore, anesthesiologists who regularly

  3. Insulin-sparing and fungible effects of E4orf1 combined with an adipocyte-targeting sequence in mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, I-S; Park, S; Kim, R-H; Ko, H L; Nam, J-H

    2017-10-01

    Obesity impairs glycemic control and causes insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adenovirus 36 (Ad36) infection can increase the uptake of excess glucose from blood into adipocytes by increasing GLUT4 translocation through the Ras-Akt signaling pathway, which bypasses PI3K-Akt-mediated insulin receptor signaling. E4orf1, a viral gene expressed early during Ad36 infection, is responsible for this insulin-sparing effect and may be an alternative target for improving insulin resistance. To deliver the gene to adipocytes only, we connected the adipocyte-targeting sequence (ATS) to the 5' end of E4orf1 (ATS-E4orf1). In vitro transfection of ATS-E4orf1 into preadipocytes activated factors for GLUT4 translocation and adipogenesis to the same extent as did Hemagglutinin (HA)-E4orf1 transfection as positive reference. Moreover, the Transwell migration assay also showed that ATS-E4orf1 secreted by liver cells activated Akt in preadipocytes. We used a hydrodynamic gene delivery technique to deliver ATS-E4orf1 into high-fat diet-fed and streptozotocin-injected mice (disease models of type 2 and type 1 diabetes, respectively). ATS-E4orf1 improved the ability to eliminate excess glucose from the blood and ameliorated liver function in both disease models. These findings suggest that ATS-E4orf1 has insulin-sparing and fungible effects in type 2 and 1 diabetes independent of the presence of insulin.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent youth: data from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Daniel; Glick, Henry A; Yang, Jianing; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Poole, Sabrina A; Woody, George E

    2010-09-01

    The objective is to estimate cost, net social cost and cost-effectiveness in a clinical trial of extended buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP) treatment versus brief detoxification treatment in opioid-dependent youth. Economic evaluation of a clinical trial conducted at six community out-patient treatment programs from July 2003 to December 2006, who were randomized to 12 weeks of BUP or a 14-day taper (DETOX). BUP patients were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to zero at the end of week 12. DETOX patients were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to zero on day 14. All were offered twice-weekly drug counseling. 152 patients aged 15-21 years. Data were collected prospectively during the 12-week treatment and at follow-up interviews at months 6, 9 and 12. The 12-week out-patient study treatment cost was $1514 (P DETOX. One-year total direct medical cost was only $83 higher for BUP (P = 0.97). The cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX was $1376 in terms of 1-year direct medical cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $25,049 in terms of out-patient treatment program cost per QALY. The acceptability curve suggests that the cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX has an 86% chance of being accepted as cost-effective for a threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Extended BUP treatment relative to brief detoxification is cost effective in the US health-care system for the outpatient treatment of opioid-dependent youth.

  5. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy. Effect on outcome and toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, M.; Nevens, D.; Nuyts, S. [University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-03-15

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has rapidly become standard of care in the management of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, our aim was to retrospectively investigate the effect of the introducing IMRT on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Material and methods: A total of 245 patients with stage III and IV HNSCC treated with primary radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in this analysis: 135 patients were treated with 3DCRT, 110 patients with IMRT. Groups were compared for acute and late toxicity, locoregional control (LRC), and overall survival (OS). Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using a log-rank test. Acute toxicity was analyzed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and late toxicity was scored using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system. Results: Median follow-up was 35 months in the IMRT group and 68 months in the 3DCRT group. No significant differences were found in 3-year LRC and OS rates between the IMRT group and 3DCRT group. Significantly less acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was observed in the IMRT group (32% vs. 44%, p = 0.03). There was significantly less late xerostomia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (23% vs. 68%, p < 0.001). After 24 months, there was less dysphagia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group although differences failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The introduction of IMRT in the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced head and neck cancer significantly improved late toxicity without compromising tumor control compared to a parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  6. Sparing of contralateral major salivary glands has a significant effect on oral health in patients treated with radical radiotherapy of head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, K.T.; Greiner, R.H. [Klinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Univ. Bern, Inselspital (Switzerland); Zehnder, D.; Lussi, A. [Klinik fuer Zahnerhaltung, Kinder- und Praeventivmedizin, Univ. Bern, Inselspital (Switzerland)

    2002-12-01

    Background: Has a conscious exclusion of the contralateral major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) a significant impact on the milieu of the oral cavity (saliva flow, pH, buffer capacity, and colonisation with Streptococcus mutans) in patients with ENT tumors receiving radical radiotherapy? Patients and Methods: 20 consecutive consentient patients with ENT tumors were evaluated once before, weekly during, and 6 weeks after the end of treatment in regard to saliva flow, pH, buffer capacity, and colonisation with Streptococcus mutans. In 13 patients the major salivary glands on both sides were included in the treated volume, in seven patients the treatment portals excluded consciously the contralateral major salivary glands. Results: The stimulated saliva flow decreases already during the 1st week of radiotherapy, the decrease follows the dose exponentially; the saliva flow is further reduced in the weeks after the end of treatment. The effect is less pronounced in patients with sparing of contralateral major salivary glands. The majority of patients with unilateral sparing of the major salivary glands retain the baseline value of buffer capacity, whereas buffer capacity of all patients with inclusion of all major salivary glands is markedly reduced with 20 Gy already, without signs of recovery when treatment has stopped. With unilateral salivary gland sparing the pH always remains basic, in bilaterally irradiated patients the pH changes from a mean of 7.3 to 5.8 during treatment. The colonisation with Streptococcus mutans varies little in both groups during the radiotherapy; after the end of therapy, it is higher in bilaterally irradiated patients. Conclusions: The conscious arrangement of irradiation portals in order to spare contralateral major salivary glands in patients with radical radiotherapy of ENT tumors has a significant influence on the oral environment: the stimulated saliva flow is higher, the buffer capacity retains the

  7. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheb G

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ghoncheh Raheb,1,2 Esmat Khaleghi,1 Amir Moghanibashi-Mansourieh,1 Ali Farhoudian,2 Robab Teymouri3 1Department of Social Work, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Substance Abuse and Dependence Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 3Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran Purpose: This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. Patients and methods: This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group; the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30 and control (30 groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. Results: A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t-test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Conclusion: Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients’ self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning. Keywords: social work, intervention, systematic approach, general health, opioid addicts

  8. Objective methods for the assessment of the spinal and supraspinal effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Iben W; Hansen, Tine M; Lelic, Dina

    2017-01-01

    : The literature search was conducted in Pub Med (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed) from November 2014 to June 2016, using free-text terms: "opioid", "morphine" and "oxycodone" combined with the terms "pupillometry," "magnetic resonance spectroscopy," "fMRI," "BOLD," "PET," "pharmaco-EEG", "electroencephalogram...... imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG) and evoked potentials (EPs). Pupillometry is a non-invasive tool used in research as well as in the clinical setting. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used for the last decades and it is a non......-invasive technique for measurement of in vivo brain metabolite concentrations. fMRI has been a widely used non-invasive method to estimate brain activity, where typically from the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal. PET is a nuclear imaging technique based on tracing radio labeled molecules injected...

  9. Divergent short- and long-term effects of acute stress in object recognition memory are mediated by endogenous opioid system activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava-Mesa, Mauricio O; Lamprea, Marisol R; Múnera, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    Acute stress induces short-term object recognition memory impairment and elicits endogenous opioid system activation. The aim of this study was thus to evaluate whether opiate system activation mediates the acute stress-induced object recognition memory changes. Adult male Wistar rats were trained in an object recognition task designed to test both short- and long-term memory. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive an intraperitoneal injection of saline, 1 mg/kg naltrexone or 3 mg/kg naltrexone, four and a half hours before the sample trial. Five minutes after the injection, half the subjects were submitted to movement restraint during four hours while the other half remained in their home cages. Non-stressed subjects receiving saline (control) performed adequately during the short-term memory test, while stressed subjects receiving saline displayed impaired performance. Naltrexone prevented such deleterious effect, in spite of the fact that it had no intrinsic effect on short-term object recognition memory. Stressed subjects receiving saline and non-stressed subjects receiving naltrexone performed adequately during the long-term memory test; however, control subjects as well as stressed subjects receiving a high dose of naltrexone performed poorly. Control subjects' dissociated performance during both memory tests suggests that the short-term memory test induced a retroactive interference effect mediated through light opioid system activation; such effect was prevented either by low dose naltrexone administration or by strongly activating the opioid system through acute stress. Both short-term memory retrieval impairment and long-term memory improvement observed in stressed subjects may have been mediated through strong opioid system activation, since they were prevented by high dose naltrexone administration. Therefore, the activation of the opioid system plays a dual modulating role in object recognition memory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Tolerance and withdrawal from prolonged opioid use in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Willson, Douglas F; Berger, John; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen L; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Newth, Christopher J L; Prodhan, Parthak; Dean, J Michael; Nicholson, Carol

    2010-05-01

    After prolonged opioid exposure, children develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and withdrawal. Strategies for prevention and management should be based on the mechanisms of opioid tolerance and withdrawal. Relevant manuscripts published in the English language were searched in Medline by using search terms "opioid," "opiate," "sedation," "analgesia," "child," "infant-newborn," "tolerance," "dependency," "withdrawal," "analgesic," "receptor," and "individual opioid drugs." Clinical and preclinical studies were reviewed for data synthesis. Mechanisms of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance suggest important drug- and patient-related risk factors that lead to tolerance and withdrawal. Opioid tolerance occurs earlier in the younger age groups, develops commonly during critical illness, and results more frequently from prolonged intravenous infusions of short-acting opioids. Treatment options include slowly tapering opioid doses, switching to longer-acting opioids, or specifically treating the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Novel therapies may also include blocking the mechanisms of opioid tolerance, which would enhance the safety and effectiveness of opioid analgesia. Opioid tolerance and withdrawal occur frequently in critically ill children. Novel insights into opioid receptor physiology and cellular biochemical changes will inform scientific approaches for the use of opioid analgesia and the prevention of opioid tolerance and withdrawal.

  11. A randomized matched-pairs study of feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of systems consultation: a novel implementation strategy for adopting clinical guidelines for Opioid prescribing in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Andrew; Brown, Randall T; Zgierska, Aleksandra E; Jacobson, Nora; Robinson, James M; Johnson, Roberta A; Deyo, Brienna M; Madden, Lynn; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Alagoz, Esra

    2018-01-25

    This paper reports on the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of an innovative implementation strategy named "systems consultation" aimed at improving adherence to clinical guidelines for opioid prescribing in primary care. While clinical guidelines for opioid prescribing have been developed, they have not been widely implemented, even as opioid abuse reaches epidemic levels. We tested a blended implementation strategy consisting of several discrete implementation strategies, including audit and feedback, academic detailing, and external facilitation. The study compares four intervention clinics to four control clinics in a randomized matched-pairs design. Each systems consultant aided clinics on implementing the guidelines during a 6-month intervention consisting of monthly site visits and teleconferences/videoconferences. The mixed-methods evaluation employs the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) framework. Quantitative outcomes are compared using time series analysis. Qualitative methods included focus groups, structured interviews, and ethnographic field techniques. Seven clinics were randomly approached to recruit four intervention clinics. Each clinic designated a project team consisting of six to eight staff members, each with at least one prescriber. Attendance at intervention meetings was 83%. More than 80% of staff respondents agreed or strongly agreed with the statements: "I am more familiar with guidelines for safe opioid prescribing" and "My clinic's workflow for opioid prescribing is easier." At 6 months, statistically significant improvements were noted in intervention clinics in the percentage of patients with mental health screens, treatment agreements, urine drug tests, and opioid-benzodiazepine co-prescribing. At 12 months, morphine-equivalent daily dose was significantly reduced in intervention clinics compared to controls. The cost to deliver the strategy was $7345 per clinic. Adaptations were

  12. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  13. Effect size comparison of ketorolac nasal spray and commonly prescribed oral combination opioids for pain relief after third molar extraction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebler, Gwendolyn; Dayno, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are frequently used for treatment of moderate to severe short-term pain, but concerns exist about this treatment approach. Ketorolac tromethamine nasal spray, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory, is indicated for the short-term management of moderate to moderately severe pain requiring analgesia at the opioid level. However, there are no direct comparison studies between ketorolac nasal spray and opioids. The objective of this study was to use an effect size analysis to compare the effectiveness of ketorolac nasal spray with oral combination opioid formulations in treating moderate to severe short-term pain. An effect size analysis of three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of third molar extraction surgery compared pain relief with ketorolac nasal spray and commonly prescribed combination opioids including hydrocodone/acetaminophen (APAP), oxycodone/APAP, oxycodone/ibuprofen and tramadol HCl/APAP. Effect size comparisons were made using total pain relief scores (TOTPAR6 or TOTPAR8; the weighted sum of pain relief scores through 6 or 8 h). Pain relief was measured using a five-point categorical rating scale (0 = none; 4 = complete). The effect size equivalent correlation, r, was determined using an online effect size calculator. The treatment effect size r compared with placebo was classified using established criteria (small = 0.20-0.49, moderate = 0.50-0.79 and large = ≥ 0.80). TOTPAR6 data indicated a moderate effect size for ketorolac nasal spray 31.5 mg (0.51) and oxycodone/ibuprofen 5/400 mg (0.64) and a small effect size for hydrocodone/APAP 7.5/500 mg (0.24) and oxycodone/APAP 5/325 mg (0.32). TOTPAR8 data indicated small effect sizes for ketorolac nasal spray (0.48), hydrocodone/APAP 10/650 mg (0.43), tramadol HCl/APAP 75/650 mg (0.35) and tramadol HCl/APAP 37.5/325 mg (0.17). The treatment effect sizes of ketorolac nasal spray were similar to or higher than the opioid comparators after third molar surgery, a well-accepted pain

  14. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Chang, K.-J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  15. Dextromethorphan differentially affects opioid antinociception in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung; Chow, Lok-Hi; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2005-01-01

    Opioid drugs such as morphine and meperidine are widely used in clinical pain management, although they can cause some adverse effects. A number of studies indicate that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may play a role in the mechanism of morphine analgesia, tolerance and dependence. Being an antitussive with NMDA antagonist properties, dextromethorphan (DM) may have some therapeutic benefits when coadministered with morphine. In the present study, we investigated the effects of DM on the antinociceptive effects of different opioids. We also investigated the possible pharmacokinetic mechanisms involved. The antinociceptive effects of the μ-opioid receptor agonists morphine (5 mg kg−1, s.c.), meperidine (25 mg kg−1, s.c.) and codeine (25 mg kg−1, s.c.), and the κ-opioid agonists nalbuphine (8 mg kg−1, s.c.) and U-50,488H (20 mg kg−1, s.c.) were studied using the tail-flick test in male Sprague–Dawley rats. Coadministration of DM (20 mg kg−1, i.p.) with these opioids was also performed and investigated. The pharmacokinetic effects of DM on morphine and codeine were examined, and the free concentration of morphine or codeine in serum was determined by HPLC. It was found that DM potentiated the antinociceptive effects of some μ-opioid agonists but not codeine or κ-opioid agonists in rats. DM potentiated morphine's antinociceptive effect, and acutely increased the serum concentration of morphine. In contrast, DM attenuated the antinociceptive effect of codeine and decreased the serum concentration of its active metabolite (morphine). The pharmacokinetic interactions between DM and opioids may partially explain the differential effects of DM on the antinociception caused by opioids. PMID:15655510

  16. Systematic review of the quality and generalizability of studies on the effects of opioids on driving and cognitive/psychomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Lakha, Shehnaz Fatima; Furlan, Andrea; Nicholson, Keith; Yegneswaran, Balaji; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2012-07-01

    The effect of opioids on driving performance has been much debated. Driving is a complex task requiring integration of psychomotor, cognitive, motor and decision-making skills, visual-spatial abilities, divided attention, and behavioral and emotional control. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the quality of studies and to revisit the concept that patients on stable opioids are safe to drive as it applies to everyday practice. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCinfo, CENTRAL, TRANSPORT, CINAHL, reference lists of retrieved articles and narrative reviews, for studies on chronic cancer and noncancer pain patients on opioids, tested by driving, driving simulator, or cognitive/psychomotor tests. Methodological quality was assessed with Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies, cognitive/psychomotor tests were appraised regarding their sensitivity and validation, and whether confounding variables potentially affecting the study conclusions were recorded. The results were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. We included 35 studies (2044 patients, 1994 controls), 9% of the studies were of poor, 54% of fair, and 37% of high quality; 3 quarters of the studies used high sensitivity cognitive tests. Amount and dose of opioids varied largely in many studies. Mean number of possible but unreported confounders was 2.2 (range, 0 to 4), relating to failure of the studies to mention co-prescriptions with psychotropic effects, pain severity, sleep disorder or daytime somnolence, and/or significant depressive or anxiety-related problems. The commonly held concept that "chronic pain patients on stable opioids are safe to drive" cannot be generalized to all such patients in everyday practice, but may be applicable only to a subset who meet certain criteria.

  17. Effects of Chronic Social Defeat Stress on Sleep and Circadian Rhythms Are Mitigated by Kappa-Opioid Receptor Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Audrey M; Ridener, Elysia; Bourbonais, Clinton A; Kim, Woori; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Carroll, F Ivy; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Cohen, Bruce M; Carlezon, William A

    2017-08-09

    Stress plays a critical role in the neurobiology of mood and anxiety disorders. Sleep and circadian rhythms are affected in many of these conditions. Here we examined the effects of chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), an ethological form of stress, on sleep and circadian rhythms. We exposed male mice implanted with wireless telemetry transmitters to a 10 day CSDS regimen known to produce anhedonia (a depressive-like effect) and social avoidance (an anxiety-like effect). EEG, EMG, body temperature, and locomotor activity data were collected continuously during the CSDS regimen and a 5 day recovery period. CSDS affected numerous endpoints, including paradoxical sleep (PS) and slow-wave sleep (SWS), as well as the circadian rhythmicity of body temperature and locomotor activity. The magnitude of the effects increased with repeated stress, and some changes (PS bouts, SWS time, body temperature, locomotor activity) persisted after the CSDS regimen had ended. CSDS also altered mRNA levels of the circadian rhythm-related gene mPer2 within brain areas that regulate motivation and emotion. Administration of the κ-opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist JDTic (30 mg/kg, i.p.) before CSDS reduced stress effects on both sleep and circadian rhythms, or hastened their recovery, and attenuated changes in mPer2 Our findings show that CSDS produces persistent disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythmicity, mimicking attributes of stress-related conditions as they appear in humans. The ability of KOR antagonists to mitigate these disruptions is consistent with previously reported antistress effects. Studying homologous endpoints across species may facilitate the development of improved treatments for psychiatric illness. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Stress plays a critical role in the neurobiology of mood and anxiety disorders. We show that chronic social defeat stress in mice produces progressive alterations in sleep and circadian rhythms that resemble features of depression as it appears in

  18. Opioid-Induced Glial Activation: Mechanisms of Activation and Implications for Opioid Analgesia, Dependence, and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hutchinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will introduce the concept of toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated glial activation as central to all of the following: neuropathic pain, compromised acute opioid analgesia, and unwanted opioid side effects (tolerance, dependence, and reward. Attenuation of glial activation has previously been demonstrated both to alleviate exaggerated pain states induced by experimental pain models and to reduce the development of opioid tolerance. Here we demonstrate that selective acute antagonism of TLR4 results in reversal of neuropathic pain as well as potentiation of opioid analgesia. Attenuating central nervous system glial activation was also found to reduce the development of opioid dependence, and opioid reward at a behavioral (conditioned place preference and neurochemical (nucleus accumbens microdialysis of morphine-induced elevations in dopamine level of analysis. Moreover, a novel antagonism of TLR4 by (+- and (˗-isomer opioid antagonists has now been characterized, and both antiallodynic and morphine analgesia potentiating activity shown. Opioid agonists were found to also possess TLR4 agonistic activity, predictive of glial activation. Targeting glial activation is a novel and as yet clinically unexploited method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover, these data indicate that attenuation of glial activation, by general or selective TLR antagonistic mechanisms, may also be a clinical method for separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted (tolerance, dependence, and reward actions of opioids, thereby improving the safety and efficacy of their use.

  19. Opioids, pain, the brain, and hyperkatifeia: a framework for the rational use of opioids for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurman, Joseph; Koob, George F; Gutstein, Howard B

    2010-07-01

    Opioids have relieved more human suffering than any other medication, but their use is still fraught with significant concerns of misuse, abuse, and addiction. This theoretical article explores the hypothesis that opioid misuse in the context of pain management produces a hypersensitivity to emotional distress, termed hyperkatifeia. In the misuse of opioids, neural substrates that mediate positive emotional states (brain reward systems) are compromised, and substrates mediating negative emotional states (brain stress systems) are enhanced. A reflection and early marker of such a nonhomeostatic state may be the development of opioid-induced hyperkatifeia, defined as the increased intensity of the constellation of negative emotional/motivational symptoms and signs observed during withdrawal from drugs of abuse (derived from the Greek "katifeia" for dejection or negative emotional state) and is most likely to occur in subjects in whom the opioid produces a break with homeostasis and less likely to occur when the opioid is restoring homeostasis, such as in effective pain treatment. When the opioid appropriately relieves pain, opponent processes are not engaged. However, if the opioid is administered in excess of need because of overdose, pharmacokinetic variables, or treating an individual without pain, then the body will react to that perturbation by engaging opponent processes in the domains of both pain (hyperalgesia) and negative emotional states (hyperkatifeia). Repeated engagement of opponent processes without time for the brain's emotional systems to reestablish homeostasis will further drive changes in emotional processes that may produce opioid abuse or addiction, particularly in individuals with genetic or environmental vulnerability.

  20. Modification of radiation dose-rate sparing effects in a human carcinoma of the cervix cell line by inhibitors of DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelland, L.R.; Steel, G.G.

    1988-08-01

    The in vitro cell survival of a human cervix carcinoma cell line (HX156c) was assessed using /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays administered at 150 cGy/min or 3.2 cGy/min dose rate. Recovery during low dose-rate irradiation was observed; dose reduction factor at 10/sup -2/ cell kill for 150 versus 3.2 cGy/min was around 1.3. Possible underlying mechanisms of this recovery process have been investigated by addition of non-toxic concentrations of various agents thought to inhibit eukaryotic DNA repair. Differential effects among inhibitors were observed; aphidicolin had no effect on cell survival, novobiocin, hydroxyurea and 3-aminobenzamide reduced survival by a similar extent at both dose rates, ..beta..-ara A and caffeine reduced survival to a greater extent during low dose-rate irradiation. ..beta..-ara A and caffeine seemed to effect mainly by increasing the alpha component of the acute survival curve. Since survival curves obtained at dose rates of around 3 cGy/min help define a dominant component of the initial slope of the acute curve the authors claim to demonstrate that ..beta..-ara A and caffeine modify the initial slope, probably by inhibiting DNA repair processes involved in tumour cell sparing during protracted irradiation.

  1. Experience of the use of Ketamine to manage opioid withdrawal in an addicted woman: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Lalanne, Laurence; Nicot, Chloe; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Bertschy, Gilles; Salvat, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids are good painkillers, but many patients treated with opioids as painkillers developed a secondary addiction. These patients need to stop misusing opioids, but the mild-to-severe clinical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal risk increasing their existing pain. In such cases, ketamine, which is used by anaesthetists and pain physicians to reduce opioid medication, may be an effective agent for managing opioid withdrawal. Case presentation We describe the case of a woma...

  2. Development and preliminary validation of the Opioid Abuse Risk Screener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Henrie-Barrus

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid drug abuse has reached epidemic proportions. Individuals with chronic pain represent a large population at considerable risk of abusing opioids. The Opioid Abuse Risk Screener was developed as a comprehensive self-administered measure of potential risk that includes a wide range of critical elements noted in the literature to be relevant to opioid risk. The creation, refinement, and preliminary modeling of the item pool, establishment of preliminary concurrent validity, and the determination of the factor structure are presented. The initial development and validation of the Opioid Abuse Risk Screener shows promise for effective risk stratification.

  3. The use of opioids at the end of life: the knowledge level of Dutch physicians as a potential barrier to effective pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boddaert Manon SA

    2010-11-01

    which it seems likely that an improvement can improve the quality of pain management at the end of life for many patients in the Netherlands: 1palliative sedation; 2expected effect of opioids on survival; and 3 opioid rotation.

  4. [Effects of pathological assessment of endometrial tissue in fertility-sparing treatment with progestin for endometrial carcinoma of stage I a and complex atypical hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qinglin; Chen, Xiaoduan; Xie, Xing

    2014-09-01

    To assess the efficacy and pathological change of fertility-sparing treatment with progestin for endometrial carcinoma (EC) of stage I a and complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH) and to observe the prognosis of the treatment. Nine EC patients of stage I a and 21 CAH patients aged under 40 years who desired childbearing and retaining their fertility were enrolled into this study. All patients were given a daily oral high-dose of progestin with duration of treatment ranging from 6 to 9 months. Diagnostic curettage was performed every 3 months as a modality for seeing the histologic change of neoplastic tissues and endometrial tissue. A careful and long- term follow- up is necessary for patients with complete response (CR). During the first period of fertility-sparing management, according to histologic change, 5 EC patients and 18 CAH patients showed CR with no evidence of endometrial adenocarcinoma or hyperplasia, 2 EC patients and 2 CAH patients showed partial response with a regression to complex or simple hyperplasia without atypia, 2 EC patients and 1 CAH patient showed stable disease or progressive disease. Accordingly, a total of 26 patients showed CR (26 of 30 patients). The median time to CR was 6 months (range, 3 to 21 months) of progestin treatment. The median follow-up time was 55.5 months (range, 24 to 104 months) and all patients were alive. During follow-up, among the 26 patients with CR, 3 of 6 EC patients achieved CR recurred disease after a median time interval of 10 months (range, 6 to 51 months), 7 of 20 CAH patients achieved CR had recurrent disease after a median time interval of 12 months (range, 6 to 55 months). Four of 7 CAH with recurrent disease achieved CR to progestin re-treatment. Eight of 26 patients achieved CR continued a further 3 or 6 months of consolidation therapy, 3 of them had recurrent disease, the remaining 18 stopped progesterone treatment after CR and 7 patients had recurrent disease; there was no significant statistical

  5. Prescription opioid abuse, pain and addiction: clinical issues and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Hillhouse, Maureen

    2011-05-01

    Prescription opioid misuse in the USA has increased over threefold since 1990 to epidemic proportions, with substantial increases in prescription opioid use also reported in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand. The broad availability of prescription pain medications, coupled with public misconceptions about their safety and addictive potential, have contributed to the recent surge in non-medical use of prescription opioids and corresponding increases in treatment admissions for problems related to opioid misuse. Given competing pressures faced by physicians to both diagnose and treat pain syndromes and identify individuals at risk for addictive disorders, the use of opioids in the treatment of pain poses a significant clinical challenge. This paper reviews the interaction between pain and opioid addiction with a focus on clinical management issues, including risk factors for opioid dependence in patients with chronic pain and the use of assessment tools to identify and monitor at-risk individuals. Treatment options for opioid dependence and pain are reviewed, including the use of the partial µ agonist buprenorphine in the management of concurrent pain and opioid addiction. Physicians should strive to find a reasonable balance between minimising potential adverse effects of opioid medications without diminishing legitimate access to opioids for analgesia. The article discusses the need to identify methods for minimising risks and negative consequences associated with opioid analgesics and poses research directions, including the development of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, genetic risk factors for opioid dependence and opioid-induced hyperalgesia as a potential target for medication therapy. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: opioid addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Opioid addiction Opioid addiction Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Opioid addiction is a long-lasting (chronic) disease that can ...

  7. Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  8. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  9. Combined effects of diethylpropion and alcohol on locomotor activity of mice: participation of the dopaminergic and opioid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevaerd M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread consumption of anorectics and combined anorectic + alcohol misuse are problems in Brazil. In order to better understand the interactive effects of ethanol (EtOH and diethylpropion (DEP we examined the locomotion-activating effects of these drugs given alone or in combination in mice. We also determined whether this response was affected by dopamine (DA or opioid receptor antagonists. A total of 160 male Swiss mice weighing approximately 30 g were divided into groups of 8 animals per group. The animals were treated daily for 7 consecutive days with combined EtOH + DEP (1.2 g/kg and 5.0 mg/kg, ip, EtOH (1.2 g/kg, ip, DEP (5.0 mg/kg, ip or the control solution coadministered with the DA antagonist haloperidol (HAL, 0.075 mg/kg, ip, the opioid antagonist naloxone (NAL, 1.0 mg/kg, ip, or vehicle. On days 1, 7 and 10 after the injections, mice were assessed in activity cages at different times (15, 30, 45 and 60 min for 5 min. The acute combination of EtOH plus DEP induced a significantly higher increase in locomotor activity (day 1: 369.5 ± 34.41 when compared to either drug alone (day 1: EtOH = 232.5 ± 23.79 and DEP = 276.0 ± 12.85 and to control solution (day 1: 153.12 ± 7.64. However, the repeated administration of EtOH (day 7: 314.63 ± 26.79 and day 10: 257.62 ± 29.91 or DEP (day 7: 309.5 ± 31.65 and day 10: 321.12 ± 39.24 alone or in combination (day 7: 459.75 ± 41.28 and day 10: 427.87 ± 33.0 failed to induce a progressive increase in the locomotor response. These data demonstrate greater locomotion-activating effects of the EtOH + DEP combination, probably involving DA and/or opioid receptor stimulation, since the daily pretreatment with HAL (day 1: EtOH + DEP = 395.62 ± 11.92 and EtOH + DEP + HAL = 371.5 ± 6.76; day 7: EtOH + DEP = 502.5 ± 42.27 and EtOH + DEP + HAL = 281.12 ± 16.08; day 10: EtOH + DEP = 445.75 ± 16.64 and EtOH + DEP + HAL = 376.75 ± 16.4 and NAL (day 1: EtOH + DEP = 553.62 ± 38.15 and Et

  10. Spares management for improved maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncrief, E.C.; Schroder, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A recent survey by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of maintenance practices at US nuclear power plants confirms that spare parts availability is, to some extent, a problem at all but a few plants, and that 57% of the plants sometimes operated in a limiting condition for operation over the last year due to unavailability of spare parts. That's the bad news. The good news is that significant improvement is possible without ballooning inventory. The vast majority of total dollar value of spare parts inventory at power generation stations, whether nuclear or fossil, is rarely used (parts or components that are used 12 or less times per year including many with a history of no use for many years). Inventory Solutions of Akron, Ohio, has developed such a tool, called rarely used inventory stocking logic (RUSL) which is a user-friendly decision support tool for setting spare parts reorder points. Based on statistical computations enhanced to include the most advanced techniques developed for use in aerospace and military combat readiness, RUSL calculates the optimum stocking level to achieve the desired spare part availability at the station. In doing so, it considers the importance of the part in preventing an outage, as well as key economic ordering parameters, such as part cost, carrying cost, number of parts in service, historical observed usage, anticipated future usage, and lead time to replenish

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide in the mouse forced swimming test involves opioid and serotonergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, César Augusto; Souza, Ana Cristina Guerra; Gai, Bibiana Mozzaquatro; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2011-05-11

    Serotonergic and opioid systems have been implicated in major depression and in the action mechanism of antidepressants. The organoselenium compound m-trifluoromethyl-diphenyl diselenide (m-CF(3)-PhSe)(2) shows antioxidant and anxiolytic activities and is a selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A activity. The present study was designed to investigate the antidepressant-like effect of (m-CF(3)-PhSe)(2) in female mice, employing the forced swimming test. The involvement of the serotonergic and opioid systems in the antidepressant-like effect of (m-CF(3)-PhSe)(2) was appraised. (m-CF(3)-PhSe)(2) at doses of 50 and 100mg/kg (p.o.) exhibited antidepressant-like action in the forced swimming test. The effect of (m-CF(3)-PhSe)(2) (50mg/kg p.o.) was prevented by pretreatment of mice with WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg, s.c. a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist), ritanserin (4 mg/kg, i.p., a non-selective 5HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist), ondansetron (1mg/kg, i.p., a selective 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist) and naloxone (1mg/kg, i.p., a non-selective antagonist of opioid receptors). These results suggest that (m-CF(3)-PhSe)(2) produced an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse forced swimming test and this effect seems most likely to be mediated through an interaction with serotonergic and opioid systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of social work intervention with a systematic approach to improve general health in opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheb, Ghoncheh; Khaleghi, Esmat; Moghanibashi-Mansourieh, Amir; Farhoudian, Ali; Teymouri, Robab

    2016-01-01

    This study takes a systematic approach to investigate the effect of social work intervention aimed at increasing general health among opioid addicts in addiction treatment centers. This is an experimental plan (pretest to posttest with a control group); the study sample included 60 patients with drug dependencies undergoing treatment in addiction treatment centers. These patients were randomly assigned as case (30) and control (30) groups. The case group was subjected to intervention over ten sessions, whereas the control group received no intervention. Both groups then passed through a posttest, while a follow-up was conducted after 4 months. Data were obtained via a General Health Questionnaire. A covariance analysis test and independent and dependent t -test results indicated that a social work intervention adopting systematic approach was effective in increasing the general health of drug-addicted patients under treatment. Thus, the nature of the presence of social workers in addiction treatment centers has been effective and can have a significant influence by reducing anxiety and insomnia and somatic symptoms, improving patients' self-understanding and self-recognition, and enhancing social functioning.

  13. Central effects of some peptide and non-peptide opioids and naloxone on thermoregulation in the rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of several peptide and non-peptide opiods and naloxone on induced hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. The effect of tyical mu, kappa, and sigma receptor antagonists (morphine, ketocyclazcine and SKF 10,0 10, 047) and some opioid peptides (Beta-endorphin /BE/, methionine-enkaphalin /ME/, and D-Ala2-methionine-enkaphalin-amide /DAME/ are determined. The role of prostaglandins (PG), cAMP, and norepinephrine (NE) in morphine, BE, and DAME induced hyperthermia is investigated. In addition, the effect of naloxone on pyrogen, arachidonic acid, PGE2, prostacyclin, dibutyryl cAMP, and NE induced hyperthermia is determined. Among other results, it is found that the three receptor antagonists induced hyperthermia in rabbits. BE, ME, and DAME were also found to cause hyperthermia, and it is suggested that they act on the same type of receptor. It is also determined that neither NE nor cAMP is involved in the hyperthermia due to morphine, BE, and DAME. It is suggested that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone sensitive receptors plays little role in normal thermoregulation or in hyperthermia.

  14. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  15. Opioid antagonists with minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M

    2017-05-29

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of long-term substitution treatment. To assess the effects of opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal. Comparators were placebo as well as more established approaches to detoxification, such as tapered doses of methadone, adrenergic agonists, buprenorphine and symptomatic medications. We updated our searches of the following databases to December 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We also searched two trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant studies. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials along with prospective controlled cohort studies comparing opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation versus other approaches or different opioid antagonist regimens for withdrawal in opioid-dependent participants. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Ten studies (6 randomised controlled trials and 4 prospective cohort studies, involving 955 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the review. We considered 7 of the 10 studies to be at high risk of bias in at least one of the domains we assessed.Nine studies compared an opioid antagonist-adrenergic agonist combination versus a treatment regimen based primarily on an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist (clonidine or lofexidine). Other comparisons (placebo, tapered doses of methadone, buprenorphine) made by included studies were too diverse for any meaningful analysis. This review therefore focuses on the nine studies comparing an opioid antagonist (naltrexone or naloxone) plus clonidine or lofexidine versus treatment primarily based on clonidine or lofexidine.Five studies took place in an inpatient setting, two studies were in outpatients with day care, two used day care only for the first day of opioid antagonist administration, and one study described the setting as outpatient

  16. Opposite effects of alcohol in regulating stress-induced changes in body weight between the two mouse lines with enhanced or low opioid system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacharczuk, Mariusz; Sadowski, Bogdan; Jaszczak, Kazimierz; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2010-04-19

    Considering the involvement of the opioid system in alcoholism, depression and metabolism - known risk factors in human obesity, we studied the effects of chronic mild stress (CMS) and alcohol intake on body weight in two mouse lines selected for high (HA-high analgesia) or low (LA-low analgesia) swim stress-induced analgesia. In comparison to LA mice, HA mice exhibit an upregulation of opioid receptor system function, different depression-like behavior and reduced energy expenditure in stress. LA animals showed enhanced basal and CMS-induced alcohol drinking versus HA. Now we report different effects of alcohol under no stress (control) and CMS conditions on food intake and body weight between the lines. CMS in animals with no access to alcohol increased body weight in both HA and LA mice, with no effect of CMS on food intake in either line and without differences between the lines. In LA mice alcohol reduced body weight under both conditions although significantly more under the control than CMS conditions. In contrast, in HA mice alcohol increased body weight more under the CMS than under control conditions. The results suggest that opioid system may modulate effects of alcohol on stress -induced changes in body weight. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An examination of the effects of subthalamic nucleus inhibition or μ-opioid receptor stimulation on food-directed motivation in the non-deprived rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Wayne E.; Choi, Eugene; Guy, Elizabeth G.

    2012-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) serves important functions in regulating movement, cognition, and motivation and is connected with cortical and basal ganglia circuits that process reward and reinforcement. In order to further examine the role of the STN on motivation toward food in non-deprived rats, these experiments studied the effects of pharmacological inhibition or μ-opioid receptor stimulation of the STN on the 2-hr intake of a sweetened fat diet, the amount of work exerted to earn sucrose on a progressive ratio 2 (PR-2) schedule of reinforcement, and performance on a differential reinforcement of low-rate responding (DRL) schedule for sucrose reward. Separate behavioral groups (N = 6–9) were tested following bilateral inhibition of the STN with the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol (at 0–5 ng/0.5 μl/side) or following μ-opioid receptor stimulation with the agonist D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol-enkephalin (DAMGO; at 0, 0.025 or 0.25 μg/0.5 μl/side). Although STN inhibition increased ambulatory behavior during 2-hr feeding sessions, it did not significantly alter intake of the sweetened fat diet. STN inhibition also did not affect the breakpoint for sucrose pellets during a 1-hr PR-2 reinforcement schedule or impact the number of reinforcers earned on a 1-hr DRL-20 sec reinforcement schedule in non-deprived rats. In contrast, STN μ-opioid receptor stimulation significantly increased feeding on the palatable diet and reduced the reinforcers earned on a DRL-20 schedule, although DAMGO microinfusions had no effect on PR-2 performance. These data suggest that STN inhibition does not enhance incentive motivation for food in the absence of food restriction and that STN μ-opioid receptors play an important and unique role in motivational processes. PMID:22391117

  18. Evaluation of the acceptability and usability of a decision support system to encourage safe and effective use of opioid therapy for chronic, noncancer pain by primary care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trafton, Jodie; Martins, Susana; Michel, Martha; Lewis, Eleanor; Wang, Dan; Combs, Ann; Scates, Naquell; Tu, Samson; Goldstein, Mary K

    2010-04-01

    To develop and evaluate a clinical decision support system (CDSS) named Assessment and Treatment in Healthcare: Evidenced-Based Automation (ATHENA)-Opioid Therapy, which encourages safe and effective use of opioid therapy for chronic, noncancer pain. CDSS development and iterative evaluation using the analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation process including simulation-based and in-clinic assessments of usability for providers followed by targeted system revisions. Volunteers provided detailed feedback to guide improvements in the graphical user interface, and content and design changes to increase clinical usefulness, understandability, clinical workflow fit, and ease of completing guideline recommended practices. Revisions based on feedback increased CDSS usability ratings over time. Practice concerns outside the scope of the CDSS were also identified. Usability testing optimized the CDSS to better address barriers such as lack of provider education, confusion in dosing calculations and titration schedules, access to relevant patient information, provider discontinuity, documentation, and access to validated assessment tools. It also highlighted barriers to good clinical practice that are difficult to address with CDSS technology in its current conceptualization. For example, clinicians indicated that constraints on time and competing priorities in primary care, discomfort in patient-provider communications, and lack of evidence to guide opioid prescribing decisions impeded their ability to provide effective, guideline-adherent pain management. Iterative testing was essential for designing a highly usable and acceptable CDSS; however, identified barriers may limit the impact of the ATHENA-Opioid Therapy system and other CDSS on clinical practices and outcomes unless CDSS are paired with parallel initiatives to address these issues.

  19. The novel δ opioid receptor agonist KNT-127 produces antidepressant-like and antinociceptive effects in mice without producing convulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sugiyama, Azusa; Nemoto, Toru; Fujii, Hideaki; Wada, Keiji; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Nagase, Hiroshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2011-10-01

    We previously reported that the δ opioid receptor (DOP) agonists SNC80 and TAN-67 produce potent antidepressant-like and antinociceptive effects in rodents. However, SNC80 produced convulsive effects. Recently, we succeeded in synthesizing a novel DOP agonist called KNT-127. The present study examined the convulsive, antidepressant-like, and antinociceptive effects of KNT-127 in mice. In contrast to SNC80, KNT-127 produced no convulsions at doses of up to 100mg/kg. In mice subjected to the forced swim test, a screening model for antidepressants, KNT-127 (1mg/kg, s.c.) significantly decreased the duration of immobility and increased the duration of swimming without influencing spontaneous locomotor activity. These behavioral changes were similar to that observed for the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (6mg/kg). The antidepressant-like effect of KNT-127 in mice was antagonized by pretreatment with naltrindole (NTI), a selective DOP antagonist, or naltriben, a putative DOP(2) subtype antagonist. In addition, KNT-127 (3mg/kg, s.c.) significantly reduced the number of acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions and the duration of licking time, respectively, in mice subjected to a writhing test and a formalin test. These antinociceptive effects were antagonized by pretreatment with either NTI or 7-benzylidenenaltrexone, a putative DOP(1) subtype antagonist. We propose that KNT-127 should be considered as a candidate compound for the development of DOP-based antidepressants and/or analgesics that lack convulsive effects. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Mohammed; Al Alem, Hala; Al Shehri, Ali; Al-Jeraisy, Majed

    2016-01-01

    Objective . Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM) is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design . Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT). Setting . Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients . Thirty-six pediatric patients 2-14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions . Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results . This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo ( p = 0.127). Conclusions . Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435.

  1. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Naeem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design. Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT. Setting. Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients. Thirty-six pediatric patients 2–14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions. Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results. This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo (p=0.127. Conclusions. Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435.

  2. Foveal sparing in stargardt disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huet, R.A.C. van; Bax, N.M.; Westeneng-van Haaften, S.C.; Muhamad, M.; Zonneveld-Vrieling, M.N.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide a clinical and genetic description of a patient cohort with Stargardt disease (STGD1) with identifiable foveal sparing. METHODS: Patients with retinal atrophy (defined as an absence of autofluorescence) that surrounded the fovea by at least 180 degrees and did not include the

  3. Post-operative analgesic effects of paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Nielsen, Rasmus; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    , and no well-documented 'gold standards' exist. The aim of the present topical, narrative review is to provide an update of the evidence for post-operative analgesic efficacy with the most commonly used, systemic non-opioid drugs, paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)/COX-2 antagonists......, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids, and combinations of these. The review is based on data from previous systematic reviews with meta-analyses, investigating effects of non-opioid analgesics on pain, opioid-requirements, and opioid-related adverse effects. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin....... Trials of pregabalin > 300 mg/day indicated a morphine-sparing effect of 13.4 (4, 22.8) mg morphine/24 h. Notably, though, the available evidence for additive or synergistic effects of most combination regimens was sparse or lacking. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, selective COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin all...

  4. Human psychopharmacology and dose-effects of salvinorin A, a kappa opioid agonist hallucinogen present in the plant Salvia divinorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Reissig, Chad J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2011-05-01

    Salvinorin A is a potent, selective nonnitrogenous kappa opioid agonist and the known psychoactive constituent of Salvia divinorum, a member of the mint family that has been used for centuries by Mazatec shamans of Mexico for divination and spiritual healing. S. divinorum has over the last several years gained increased popularity as a recreational drug. This is a double-blind, placebo controlled study of salvinorin A in 4 psychologically and physically healthy hallucinogen-using adults. Across sessions, participants inhaled 16 ascending doses of salvinorin A and 4 intermixed placebo doses under comfortable and supportive conditions. Doses ranged from 0.375 μg/kg to 21 μg/kg. Subject-rated drug strength was assessed every 2 min for 60 min after inhalation. Orderly time- and dose-related effects were observed. Drug strength ratings peaked at 2 min (first time point) and definite subjective effects were no longer present at approximately 20 min after inhalation. Dose-related increases were observed on questionnaire measures of mystical-type experience (Mysticism Scale) and subjective effects associated with classic serotonergic (5-HT2(A)) hallucinogens (Hallucinogen Rating Scale). Salvinorin A did not significantly increase heart rate or blood pressure. Participant narratives indicated intense experiences characterized by disruptions in vestibular and interoceptive signals (e.g., change in spatial orientation, pressure on the body) and unusual and sometimes recurring themes across sessions such as revisiting childhood memories, cartoon-like imagery, and contact with entities. Under these prepared and supportive conditions, salvinorin A occasioned a unique profile of subjective effects having similarities to classic hallucinogens, including mystical-type effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of kappa-opioid receptors in the effects of salvinorin A and ketamine on attention in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Christina L; Paine, Tracie A; Rittiner, Joseph E; Béguin, Cécile; Carroll, F Ivy; Roth, Bryan L; Cohen, Bruce M; Carlezon, William A

    2010-06-01

    Disruptions in perception and cognition are characteristic of psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia. Studies of pharmacological agents that alter perception and cognition in humans might provide a better understanding of the brain substrates of these complex processes. One way to study these states in rodents is with tests that require attention and visual perception for correct performance. We examined the effects of two drugs that cause disruptions in perception and cognition in humans-the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist salvinorin A (salvA; 0.125-4.0 mg/kg) and the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (0.63-20 mg/kg)-on behavior in rats using the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT), a food-motivated test that quantifies attention. We also compared the binding profiles of salvA and ketamine at KORs and NMDA receptors. SalvA and ketamine produced the same pattern of disruptive effects in the 5CSRTT, characterized by increases in signs often associated with reduced motivation (omission errors) and deficits in processing (elevated latencies to respond correctly). Sessions in which rats were fed before testing suggest that reduced motivation produces a subtly different pattern of behavior. Pretreatment with the KOR antagonist JDTic (10 mg/kg) blocked all salvA effects and some ketamine effects. Binding and function studies revealed that ketamine is a full agonist at KORs, although not as potent or selective as salvA. SalvA and ketamine have previously under-appreciated similarities in their behavioral effects and pharmacological profiles. By implication, KORs might be involved in some of the cognitive abnormalities observed in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  6. Sex differences in the effects of adolescent social deprivation on alcohol consumption in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Yuki; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Hall, F Scott; Sakakibara, Yasufumi; Uhl, George R; Tomita, Hiroaki; Sora, Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    Evidence based on clinical and experimental animal studies indicates that adolescent social deprivation influences alcohol consumption in a sex-dependent manner, perhaps by influencing stress responses. However, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between these phenomena remain to be elucidated. Since the μ-opioid receptor (MOP) has been reported to have key roles in social stress responses as well as the reinforcing/addictive effects of ethanol, MOP is a candidate molecule that may link adolescent social deprivation and subsequent alterations in alcohol consumption. To evaluate the involvement of MOP and social isolation-induced changes in alcohol consumption, as well as the effect of sex differences on responses to social isolation, alcohol consumption was assessed using a two-bottle home-cage consumption procedure (8 % ethanol vs. water) in MOP knockout (MOP-KO) and wild type (WT) mice of both sexes exposed to adolescent social deprivation or reared socially. Isolation rearing had no effects upon alcohol consumption of WT mice, whereas it significantly altered alcohol consumption in both male and female MOP-KO mice. Interestingly, social isolation affected ethanol consumption differently in male and female mice. Ethanol consumption was increased in male MOP-KO mice, but decreased in female MOP-KO mice, by isolation rearing. These results indicate that disturbances of MOP function influence the effects of isolation rearing on ethanol consumption in a sex-dependent manner. Consequently, this suggests the possibility that genetic variation that influences MOP function may have differential roles in alcoholism in men and women, and alcoholism treatments that target MOP function may be differentially effective in males and females.

  7. The gut-brain interaction in opioid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarali, Hamid I; Dewey, William L

    2017-12-01

    The prevailing opioid crisis has necessitated the need to understand mechanisms leading to addiction and tolerance, the major contributors to overdose and death and to develop strategies for developing drugs for pain treatment that lack abuse liability and side-effects. Opioids are commonly used for treatment of pain and symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. The significant effect of opioids in the gut, both acute and chronic, includes persistent constipation and paradoxically may also worsen pain symptoms. Recent work has suggested a significant role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in behavioral responses to opioids, including the development of tolerance to its pain-relieving effects. In this review, we present current concepts of gut-brain interaction in analgesic tolerance to opioids and suggest that peripheral mechanisms emanating from the gut can profoundly affect central control of opioid function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Is this ?complicated? opioid withdrawal?

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, S.R.; Seethalakshmi, R; Adarkar, S; Kharawala, S

    2006-01-01

    Seven patients with opioid dependence admitted in the de-addiction centre for detoxification developed convulsions and delirium during the withdrawal phase. After ruling out all other possible causes of these complications, opioid withdrawal seemed to emerge as the most likely explanation. The unpredictability of the course of opioid dependence and withdrawal needs to be considered when treating patients with opioid dependence.

  9. Spare Parts Management of Aging Capital Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hekimoğlu (Mustafa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSpare parts are critical for operations of capital products such as aircraft, refineries, trucks, etc/, which require maintenance regularly. Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) bear the responsibility of undisrupted maintenance service and spare parts flow for their capital products.

  10. Undertreatment of pain and low use of opioids in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, César Amescua; Santos Garcia, Joao Batista; Rosario Berenguel Cook, María Del; Colimon, Frantz; Flores Cantisani, José Alberto; Guerrero, Carlos; Rocío Guillén Núnez, María Del; Hernández Castro, John Jairo; Kraychete, Durval Campos; Lara-Solares, Argelia; Lech, Osvandré; Rico Pazos, María Antonieta; Gallegos, Manuel Sempértegui; Marcondes, Lizandra Pattaro

    2018-05-01

    Pain is highly prevalent among the adult Latin American population. However, many patients with moderate to severe pain do not have access to effective pain management with opioids due to limited access to healthcare, overuse of nonopioid analgesics, regulatory barriers and lack of appropriate information about opioids. There is scarce training on use of opioids among physicians and other healthcare providers, which leads to misconceptions, mainly related to a fear of prescribing opioids. Although opioids are safe and effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain, the use of opioids in Latin American nations is clearly below standards compared with developed countries.

  11. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Landucci, Gina; McTavish, Fiona; Kornfield, Rachel; Johnson, Roberta A; Mares, Marie-Louise; Westergaard, Ryan P; Quanbeck, Andrew; Alagoz, Esra; Pe-Romashko, Klaren; Thomas, Chantelle; Shah, Dhavan

    2016-12-12

    Opioid dependence has devastating and increasingly widespread consequences and costs, and the most common outcome of treatment is early relapse. People who inject opioids are also at disproportionate risk for contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study tests an approach that has been shown to improve recovery rates: medication along with other supportive services (medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) against MAT combined with a smartphone innovation called A-CHESS (MAT + A-CHESS). This unblinded study will randomly assign 440 patients to receive MAT + A-CHESS or MAT alone. Eligible patients will meet criteria for having an opioid use disorder of at least moderate severity and will be taking methadone, injectable naltrexone, or buprenorphine. Patients with A-CHESS will have smartphones for 16 months; all patients will be followed for 24 months. The primary outcome is the difference between patients in the two arms in percentage of days using illicit opioids during the 24-month intervention. Secondary outcomes are differences between patients receiving MAT + A-CHESS versus MAT in other substance use, quality of life, retention in treatment, health service use, and, related to HIV and HCV, screening and testing rates, medication adherence, risk behaviors, and links to care. We will also examine mediators and moderators of the effects of MAT + A-CHESS. We will measure variables at baseline and months 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. At each point, patients will respond to a 20- to 30-min phone survey; urine screens will be collected at baseline and up to twice a month thereafter. We will use mixed-effects to evaluate the primary and secondary outcomes, with baseline scores functioning as covariates, treatment condition as a between-subject factor, and the outcomes reflecting scores for a given assessment at the six time points. Separate analyses will be conducted for each outcome. A-CHESS has been shown to

  12. Opioid withdrawal suppression efficacy of oral dronabinol in opioid dependent humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2016-07-01

    The cannabinoid (CB) system is a rational novel target for treating opioid dependence, a significant public health problem around the world. This proof-of-concept study examined the potential efficacy of a CB1 receptor partial agonist, dronabinol, in relieving signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Twelve opioid dependent adults participated in this 5-week, inpatient, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Volunteers were maintained on double-blind oxycodone (30mg oral, four times/day) and participated in a training session followed by 7 experimental sessions, each testing a single oral test dose (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30mg [decreased from 40mg]). Placebo was substituted for oxycodone maintenance doses for 21h before each session in order to produce measurable opioid withdrawal. Outcomes included observer- and participant-ratings of opioid agonist, opioid withdrawal and psychomotor/cognitive performance. Oxycodone produced prototypic opioid agonist effects (i.e. suppressing withdrawal and increasing subjective effects indicative of abuse liability). Dronabinol 5 and 10mg produced effects most similar to placebo, while the 20 and 30mg doses produced modest signals of withdrawal suppression that were accompanied by dose-related increases in high, sedation, bad effects, feelings of heart racing, and tachycardia. Dronabinol was not liked more than placebo, showed some impairment in cognitive performance, and was identified as marijuana with increasing dose. CB1 receptor activation is a reasonable strategy to pursue for the treatment of opioid withdrawal; however, dronabinol is not a likely candidate given its modest withdrawal suppression effects of limited duration and previously reported tachycardia during opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Is there a role for opioids in the treatment of fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Guymer, Emma K; Ngian, Gene-Siew

    2016-05-01

    The use of opioids for chronic pain has increased significantly due to a combination of the high patient burden of pain and the more widespread availability of a range of long-acting opioid preparations. This increased opioid use has translated into the care of many patients with fibromyalgia. The pain mechanism in fibromyalgia is complex but does not seem to involve disturbance of opioid analgesic functions. Hence, there is general concern about the harms in the absence of benefits of opioids in this setting. There is no evidence that pure opioids are effective in fibromyalgia but there is some evidence that opioids with additional actions on the norepinephrine-related pain modulatory pathways, such as tramadol, can be clinically useful in some patients. Novel actions of low-dose opioid antagonists may lead to better understanding of the role of opioid function in fibromyalgia.

  14. Drug interactions: volatile anesthetics and opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, P S; Gan, T J; Howell, S; Ginsberg, B

    1997-09-01

    Multiple drugs are used to provide anesthesia. Volatile anesthetics are commonly combined with opioids. Several studies have demonstrated that small doses of opioid (i.e., within the analgesic range) result in a marked reduction in minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of the volatile anesthetic that will prevent purposeful movement in 50% of patients at skin incision). Further increases in opioid dose provide only a further small reduction in MAC. Thus, a ceiling effect of the opioid is observed at a MAC value of the volatile anesthetic equal to its MAC awake. Recovery from anesthesia when an opioid is combined with a volatile anesthetic is dependent on the rate of decrease of both drugs to their respective concentrations that are associated with adequate spontaneous ventilation and awakening. Through an understanding of the pharmacodynamic interaction of volatile anesthetics with opioids and the pharmacokinetic processes responsible for the recovery from drug effect, optimal dosing schemes can thus be developed. A review of these pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic principles that will allow clinicians to administer drugs to provide a more optimal anesthetic is provided.

  15. Hiperalgesia Inducida por Opioides

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Salazar, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Los opioides producen analgesia a través de un efecto inhibitorio sobre el sistema nociceptivo principalmente. Hasta la fecha, los opioides siguen siendo los analgésicos más potentes para el manejo de dolor moderado a severo. La Asociación Internacional del Estudio del Dolor (IASP, en inglés) define hiperalgesia como "un aumento de la respuesta a un estímulo que normalmente es doloroso". En contraste, está bien establecido que la terapia crónica con opioides se asocia con el desarrollo de ...

  16. Neurobiology of opioid withdrawal: Role of the endothelin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Andurkar, Shridhar V; Gulati, Anil

    2016-08-15

    Morphine and oxycodone are potent opioid analgesics most commonly used for the management of moderate to severe acute and chronic pain. Their clinical utility is limited by undesired side effects like analgesic tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal. We have previously demonstrated that endothelin-A (ETA) receptor antagonists potentiate opioid analgesia and eliminate analgesic tolerance. Mechanistically, G proteins and regulatory proteins such as β-arrestins have shown to play an important role in mediating opioid tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal. Recently, the involvement of central ET mechanisms in opioid withdrawal was investigated. ETA receptor antagonist was shown to block majority of the signs and symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal. This review focuses on ET as one of the potential novel strategies to manage the challenge of opioid withdrawal. An overview of additional players in this process (G proteins and β-arrestin2), and the possible therapeutic implications of these findings are presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Induction of synaptic long-term potentiation after opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drdla, Ruth; Gassner, Matthias; Gingl, Ewald; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2009-07-10

    mu-Opioid receptor (MOR) agonists represent the gold standard for the treatment of severe pain but may paradoxically also enhance pain sensitivity, that is, lead to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). We show that abrupt withdrawal from MOR agonists induces long-term potentiation (LTP) at the first synapse in pain pathways. Induction of opioid withdrawal LTP requires postsynaptic activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and a rise of postsynaptic calcium concentrations. In contrast, the acute depression by opioids is induced presynaptically at these synapses. Withdrawal LTP can be prevented by tapered withdrawal and shares pharmacology and signal transduction pathways with OIH. These findings provide a previously unrecognized target to selectively combat pro-nociceptive effects of opioids without compromising opioid analgesia.

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  19. Benzodiazepines and Opioid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  20. Opioid Summaries by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  1. Opioid Overdose Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  2. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.

  3. Chronic Pain, Chronic Opioid Addiction: a Complex Nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsitz, Edwin A

    2016-03-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been a significant increase in the prescribing of opioids, with associated increases in opioid addiction and overdose deaths. This article reviews the evidence for the effectiveness and risk of developing an opioid use disorder (OUD) in those patients treated with chronic opioid therapy (COT) for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP). Rates of development of OUD range from 0-50 %, and aberrant drug related behaviors (ADRBs) are reported to be 20 %. Health care providers must properly assess, screen, and carefully monitor patients on COT utilizing evidence-based tools.

  4. Cost-effectiveness of extended release naltrexone to prevent relapse among criminal justice-involved individuals with a history of opioid use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean M; Polsky, Daniel; Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Kinlock, Timothy W; Nunes, Edward V; Bonnie, Richard J; Gordon, Michael; Chen, Donna T; Boney, Tamara Y; O'Brien, Charles P

    2017-08-01

    Criminal justice-involved individuals are highly susceptible to opioid relapse and overdose-related deaths. In a recent randomized trial, we demonstrated the effectiveness of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol ® ) in preventing opioid relapse among criminal justice-involved US adults with a history of opioid use disorder. The cost of XR-NTX may be a significant barrier to adoption. Thus, it is important to account for improved quality of life and downstream cost-offsets. Our aims were to (1) estimate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for XR-NTX versus treatment as usual (TAU) and evaluate it relative to generally accepted value thresholds; and (2) estimate the incremental cost per additional year of opioid abstinence. Economic evaluation of the aforementioned trial from the taxpayer perspective. Participants were randomized to 25 weeks of XR-NTX injections or TAU; follow-up occurred at 52 and 78 weeks. Five study sites in the US Northeast corridor. A total of 308 participants were randomized to XR-NTX (n = 153) or TAU (n = 155). Incremental costs relative to incremental economic and clinical effectiveness measures, QALYs and abstinent years, respectively. The 25-week cost per QALY and abstinent-year figures were $162 150 and $46 329, respectively. The 78-week figures were $76 400/QALY and $16 371/abstinent year. At 25 weeks, we can be 10% certain that XR-NTX is cost-effective at a value threshold of $100 000/QALY and 62% certain at $200 000/QALY. At 78 weeks, the cost-effectiveness probabilities are 59% at $100 000/QALY and 76% at $200 000/QALY. We can be 95% confident that the intervention would be considered 'good value' at $90 000/abstinent year at 25 weeks and $500/abstinent year at 78 weeks. While extended-release naltrexone appears to be effective in increasing both quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and abstinence, it does not appear to be cost-effective using generally accepted value

  5. Atypical Opioid Mechanisms of Control of Injury-Induced Cutaneous Pain by Delta Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    treat, and current opioids (i.e. mu opioid receptor agonists such as morphine) cause unacceptable side effects including addiction . Injuries suffered...treat, and current opioids that act on mu opioid receptors such as morphine generate significant side effects including addiction . War-related...al., J Neurosci Methods, 1994), starting with 0.1 g and ending with 2.0 g filament as cutoff value. As shown in Figure 2, our preliminary experiments

  6. The Protective Effects of Κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension Involve Inhibition of Autophagy Through the AMPK-MTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaguang Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In a previous study, we showed that κ-opioid receptor stimulation with the selective agonist U50,488H ameliorated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH. However, the roles that pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy play in κ-opioid receptor-mediated protection against HPH are still unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of autophagy in U50,488H-induced HPH protection and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Rats were exposed to 10% oxygen for three weeks to induce HPH. After hypoxia, the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP and the right ventricular pressure (RVP were measured. Cell viability was monitored using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8 assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and Western blot. Autophagy was assessed by means of the mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus transfection assay and by Western blot. Results: Inhibition of autophagy by the administration of chloroquine prevented the development of HPH in the rat model, as evidenced by significantly reduced mPAP and RVP, as well as decreased autophagy. U50,488H mimicked the effects of chloroquine, and the effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI, a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist. In vitro experiments showed that the inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine was associated with decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis of PASMCs. Under hypoxia, U50,488H also significantly inhibited autophagy, reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of PASMCs. These effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. Moreover, exposure to hypoxic conditions significantly increased AMPK phosphorylation and reduced mTOR phosphorylation, and these effects were abrogated by U50,488H. The effects of U50,488H on PASMC autophagy were inhibited by AICAR, a selective AMPK agonist, or by rapamycin, a selective mTOR inhibitor. Conclusion: Our data provide evidence for the first time that κ-opioid receptor

  7. Phytohormone abscisic acid elicits antinociceptive effects in rats through the activation of opioid and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors β/δ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollashahi, Mahtab; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed

    2018-08-05

    The phytohormone abscisic acid exists in animal tissues particularly in the brain. However, its neurophysiological effects have not yet been fully clarified. This study was designed to evaluate the possible antinociceptive effects of abscisic acid on animal models of pain and determine its possible signaling mechanism. Tail-flick, hot-plate and formalin tests were used to assess the nociceptive threshold. All experiments were carried out on male Wistar rats. To determine the role of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) and opioid receptors on the induction of abscisic acid antinociception, specific antagonists were injected 15 min before abscisic acid. The data showed that abscisic acid (5, 10 and 15 µg/rat, i.c.v.) significantly decreased pain responses in formalin test. In addition, it could also produce dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in tail-flick and hot-plate tests. Administration of PPARβ/δ antagonist (GSK0660, 80 nM, i.c.v.) significantly attenuated the antinociceptive effect of abscisic acid in all tests. The antinociceptive effects of abscisic acid were completely inhibited by naloxone (6 µg, i.c.v.) during the time course of tail-flick and hot-plate tests. The results indicated that the central injection of abscisic acid has potent pain-relieving property which is mediated partly via the PPAR β/δ and opioid signaling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of adding magnesium sulphate to bupivacaine on the clinical profile of ultrasound-guided thoracic paravertebral block in patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsayed Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Adding magnesium sulphate to bupivacaine in ultrasound-guided paravertebral block resulted in more efficient analgesia and opioid-sparing in female patients undergoing modified radical mastectomy.

  9. The effect of toothpicks containing flavoring and flavoring plus jambu extract (spilanthol) to promote salivation in patients -diagnosed with opioid-induced dry mouth (xerostomia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bennet; Davis, Kathy; Bigelow, Sandy; Healey, Patricia

    To determine if the use of toothpicks infused with flavoring and flavoring plus the food additive spilanthol (Xerosticks™) improve saliva flow in people with opioid-induced dry mouth. Time series, nonrandomized, double-blind within-subject design. Private practice/academic multidisciplinary pain and palliative care clinic. Ten subjects with opioid-induced dry mouth were recruited, and all finished the study. Salivary flow and pH were measured consecutively at baseline, following use of a mango-flavored toothpick, and again after use of a mango-flavored toothpick infused with spilanthol. Salivary flow rates and saliva pH were compared between flavored and baseline, between flavored + spilanthol and baseline, and between the flavored and flavored + spilanthol. Mouthfeel of each toothpick was assessed using the Bluestone Mouthfeel Questionnaire. The primary measure was salivary flow, and the secondary measures were salivary pH and mouthfeel. Saliva flow increased 440 percent over baseline with use of a flavored toothpick and 628 percent over baseline with similarly flavored toothpicks infused with spilanthol, and these differences are significant (p = 0.00002). Saliva pH increased with both toothpicks (p = 0.04). The addition of spilanthol produced a greater increase in salivary flow (p = 0.05) compared to control toothpicks with flavoring alone. Furthermore, addition of spilanthol improved the "mouthfeel" of the toothpick (p = 0.00001). Toothpicks infused with either flavoring or flavoring plus spilanthol are likely to be an effective remedy for opioid-induced dry mouth. Addition of spilanthol may improve effectiveness over flavoring alone and may be better ac-cepted because spilanthol appears to improve mouthfeel.

  10. Endogenous opioids regulate moment-to-moment neuronal communication and excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Bryony L.; Gregoriou, Gabrielle C.; Kissiwaa, Sarah A.; Wells, Oliver A.; Medagoda, Danashi I.; Hermes, Sam M.; Burford, Neil T.; Alt, Andrew; Aicher, Sue A.; Bagley, Elena E.

    2017-01-01

    Fear and emotional learning are modulated by endogenous opioids but the cellular basis for this is unknown. The intercalated cells (ITCs) gate amygdala output and thus regulate the fear response. Here we find endogenous opioids are released by synaptic stimulation to act via two distinct mechanisms within the main ITC cluster. Endogenously released opioids inhibit glutamate release through the δ-opioid receptor (DOR), an effect potentiated by a DOR-positive allosteric modulator. Postsynaptically, the opioids activate a potassium conductance through the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), suggesting for the first time that endogenously released opioids directly regulate neuronal excitability. Ultrastructural localization of endogenous ligands support these functional findings. This study demonstrates a new role for endogenously released opioids as neuromodulators engaged by synaptic activity to regulate moment-to-moment neuronal communication and excitability. These distinct actions through MOR and DOR may underlie the opposing effect of these receptor systems on anxiety and fear. PMID:28327612

  11. Stochastic model of forecasting spare parts demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan S. Milojević

    2012-01-01

    hypothesis of the existence of phenomenon change trends, the next step in the methodology of forecasting is the determination of a specific growth curve that describes the regularity of the development in time. These curves of growth are obtained by the analytical representation (expression of dynamic lines. There are two basic stages in the process of expression and they are: - The choice of the type of curve the shape of which corresponds to the character of the dynamic order variation - the determination of the number of values (evaluation of the curve parameters. The most widespread method of forecasting is the trend extrapolation. The basis of the trend extrapolation is the continuing of past trends in the future. The simplicity of the trend extrapolation process, on the one hand, and the absence of other information on the other hand, are the main reasons why the trend extrapolation is used for forecasting. The trend extrapolation is founded on the following assumptions: - The phenomenon development can be presented as an evolutionary trajectory or trend, - General conditions that influenced the trend development in the past will not undergo substantial changes in the future. Spare parts demand forecasting is constantly being done in all warehouses, workshops, and at all levels. Without demand forecasting, neither planning nor decision making can be done. Demand forecasting is the input for determining the level of reserve, size of the order, ordering cycles, etc. The question that arises is the one of the reliability and accuracy of a forecast and its effects. Forecasting 'by feeling' is not to be dismissed if there is nothing better, but in this case, one must be prepared for forecasting failures that cause unnecessary accumulation of certain spare parts, and also a chronic shortage of other spare parts. All this significantly increases costs and does not provide a satisfactory supply of spare parts. The main problem of the application of this model is that each

  12. Anti-analgesic effect of the mu/delta opioid receptor heteromer revealed by ligand-biased antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Milan-Lobo

    Full Text Available Delta (DOR and mu opioid receptors (MOR can complex as heteromers, conferring functional properties in agonist binding, signaling and trafficking that can differ markedly from their homomeric counterparts. Because of these differences, DOR/MOR heteromers may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of pain. However, there are currently no ligands selective for DOR/MOR heteromers, and, consequently, their role in nociception remains unknown. In this study, we used a pharmacological opioid cocktail that selectively activates and stabilizes the DOR/MOR heteromer at the cell surface by blocking its endocytosis to assess its role in antinociception. We found that mice treated chronically with this drug cocktail showed a significant right shift in the ED50 for opioid-mediated analgesia, while mice treated with a drug that promotes degradation of the heteromer did not. Furthermore, promoting degradation of the DOR/MOR heteromer after the right shift in the ED50 had occurred, or blocking signal transduction from the stabilized DOR/MOR heteromer, shifted the ED50 for analgesia back to the left. Taken together, these data suggest an anti-analgesic role for the DOR/MOR heteromer in pain. In conclusion, antagonists selective for DOR/MOR heteromer could provide an avenue for alleviating reduced analgesic response during chronic pain treatment.

  13. Characteristics of prescribers whose patients shop for opioids: results from a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Berlin, Jesse A; Mastrogiovanni, Gregory; Yuan, Yingli

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of opioid shoppers in clinical practices and the relation between prescriber characteristics and the risk of having opioid shoppers. Describe the prevalence of opioid shoppers in prescribers' practices. Assess the relation between prescribers' characteristics and patient opioid shopping behavior. Retrospective cohort study using a large US retail prescription database. Patients with ≥1 opioid dispensing were followed 18 months. These patients' prescribers are the focus of the study. A patient was a "shopper" if he or she had opioid prescriptions written by ≥1 prescriber with ≥1 day of overlap filled at ≥3 pharmacies and a "heavy shopper" if he or she had ≥5 shopping episodes. The proportions of shoppers by prescriber and the proportion of prescribers with ≥1 shopper or heavy shopper were calculated. Among 858,290 opioid prescribers, most (87 percent) had no shoppers and 98 percent had no heavy shoppers. Prescribers who were aged 70-79 years, male, or who prescribed schedule II opioids had an increased likelihood of having shoppers. As the number of patients for whom a prescriber prescribed opioids increased, the proportion of shoppers also increased. Prescribers with 66 or more patients receiving opioids, who represented 25 percent of prescribers, prescribed for 82 percent of all shoppers. The great majority of opioid prescribers appear to have no shoppers in their practice. Any educational program will be more cost effective if targeted to prescribers of schedule II opioids with a large volume of patients requiring opioids.

  14. Effects of opioids in the formalin test in the Speke's hinged tortoise (Kinixy's spekii)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wambugu, SN; Towett, PK; Kiama, SG

    2010-01-01

    decrease in the duration of limb retraction in the formalin test. The anti-nociceptive effects were naloxone (5 mg/kg) reversible. The data suggest that the formalin test is a good test for studying nociception and anti-nociception in tortoises and that the opioidergic system plays a role in the control......Little is known about analgesia in lower vertebrates such as the Speke's hinged tortoise (Kinixy's spekii), yet of late they are increasingly being adopted as pets. The effects of morphine (5, 7.5, 10 and 20 mg/kg), pethidine (10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) and naloxone (5 mg/kg) on nociception induced...... by the formalin test (12.5%, 100 microL) were studied in the Speke's hinged tortoise. Formalin induced a monophasic limb retraction behavioural response and its duration was recorded. The behaviour lasted for 16.4 +/- 0.8 min. Morphine (7.5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) and pethidine (20 and 50 mg/kg) induced significant...

  15. Who Benefits from Chronic Opioid Therapy? Rethinking the Question of Opioid Misuse Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Huber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Beginning in the late 1990s, a movement began within the pain management field focused upon the underutilization of opioids, thought to be a potentially safe and effective class of pain medication. Concern for addiction and misuse were present at the start of this shift within pain medicine, and an emphasis was placed on developing reliable and valid methods and measures of identifying those at risk for opioid misuse. Since that time, the evidence for the safety and effectiveness of chronic opioid therapy (COT has not been established. Rather, the harmful, dose-dependent deleterious effects have become clearer, including addiction, increased risk of injuries, respiratory depression, opioid induced hyperalgesia, and death. Still, many individuals on low doses of opioids for long periods of time appear to have good pain control and retain social and occupational functioning. Therefore, we propose that the question, “Who is at risk of opioid misuse?” should evolve to, “Who may benefit from COT?” in light of the current evidence.

  16. Novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment of opioid-induced neonatal abstinence syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    McLemore, Gabrielle L.; Lewis, Tamorah; Jones, Catherine H.; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2012-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription drugs, in general, and opioids, in particular, is a national epidemic, resulting in enormous addiction rates, healthcare expenditures, and overdose deaths. Prescription opioids are overly prescribed, illegally trafficked, and frequently abused, all of which have created a new opioid addiction pathway, adding to the number of opioid-dependent newborns requiring treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), and contributing to challenges in effective care...

  17. Endogene opioider og deres terapeutiske anvendelse i smertebehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, A T

    1990-01-01

    Cancer patients with chronic pain and obstetric patients have participated in clinical trials of the analgesic effects of endogenous opioids. It is possible to achieve adequate relief of pain in these patients following epidural or intrathecal administration of endogenous opioids. Further investi...

  18. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation : Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Mazen; Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2017-10-01

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  19. Biased Agonism of Endogenous Opioid Peptides at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Georgina L; Lane, J Robert; Coudrat, Thomas; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2015-08-01

    Biased agonism is having a major impact on modern drug discovery, and describes the ability of distinct G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands to activate different cell signaling pathways, and to result in different physiologic outcomes. To date, most studies of biased agonism have focused on synthetic molecules targeting various GPCRs; however, many of these receptors have multiple endogenous ligands, suggesting that "natural" bias may be an unappreciated feature of these GPCRs. The μ-opioid receptor (MOP) is activated by numerous endogenous opioid peptides, remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain, and exhibits biased agonism in response to synthetic opiates. The aim of this study was to rigorously assess the potential for biased agonism in the actions of endogenous opioids at the MOP in a common cellular background, and compare these to the effects of the agonist d-Ala2-N-MePhe4-Gly-ol enkephalin (DAMGO). We investigated activation of G proteins, inhibition of cAMP production, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation, β-arrestin 1/2 recruitment, and MOP trafficking, and applied a novel analytical method to quantify biased agonism. Although many endogenous opioids displayed signaling profiles similar to that of DAMGO, α-neoendorphin, Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, and the putatively endogenous peptide endomorphin-1 displayed particularly distinct bias profiles. These may represent examples of natural bias if it can be shown that they have different signaling properties and physiologic effects in vivo compared with other endogenous opioids. Understanding how endogenous opioids control physiologic processes through biased agonism can reveal vital information required to enable the design of biased opioids with improved pharmacological profiles and treat diseases involving dysfunction of the endogenous opioid system. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Experience of the use of Ketamine to manage opioid withdrawal in an addicted woman: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, Laurence; Nicot, Chloe; Lang, Jean-Philippe; Bertschy, Gilles; Salvat, Eric

    2016-11-10

    Opioids are good painkillers, but many patients treated with opioids as painkillers developed a secondary addiction. These patients need to stop misusing opioids, but the mild-to-severe clinical symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal risk increasing their existing pain. In such cases, ketamine, which is used by anaesthetists and pain physicians to reduce opioid medication, may be an effective agent for managing opioid withdrawal. We describe the case of a woman who developed a severe secondary addiction to opioids in the context of lombo-sciatic pain. She presented a severe opioid addiction, and her physicians refused to prescribe such high doses of opioid treatment (oxycontin® extended-release 120 mg daily, oxycodone 60 mg daily, and acetaminophen/codeine 300 mg/25 mg 6 times per day). To assist her with her opioid withdrawal which risked increasing her existing pain, she received 1 mg/kg ketamine oral solution, and two days after ketamine initiation her opioid treatment was gradually reduced. The patient dramatically reduced the dosage of opioid painkillers and ketamine was withdrawn without any withdrawal symptoms. Ketamine displays many interesting qualities for dealing with all symptoms relating to opioid withdrawal. Accordingly, it could be used instead of many psychotropic treatments, which interact with each other, to help with opioid withdrawal. However, the literature describes addiction to ketamine. All in all, although potentially addictive, ketamine could be a good candidate for the pharmacological management of opioid withdrawal.

  1. Bilateral Breast Reduction Without Opioid Analgesics: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Fereydoun Don; Cheng, Justin; Stephan, Brad; Castel, Nikki; Kim, Leslie; Murariu, Daniel; Parsa, Alan A

    2017-09-01

    Breast reduction has traditionally been performed under general anesthesia with adjunct opioid use. However, opioids are associated with a wide variety of adverse effects, including nausea, vomiting, constipation, postoperative sedation, dizziness, and addiction. This study compares bilateral breast reduction using a multimodal opioid-free pain management regimen vs traditional general anesthesia with adjunct opioids. A total of 83 female patients were enrolled in this study. Group 1 includes a retrospective series of 39 patients that underwent breast reduction via general anesthesia with adjunct opioid use. This series was compared to 2 prospective groups of patients who did not receive opioids either preoperatively or intraoperatively. In group 2, twenty-six patients underwent surgery under intravenous sedation and local anesthesia. In group 3, eighteen patients underwent surgery with general anesthesia. All patients in groups 2 and 3 received preoperative gabapentin and celecoxib along with infiltration of local anesthetics during the operation and prior to discharge to the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). Primary outcome measures included the duration of surgery, time from end of operation to discharge home, postoperative opioid and antiemetic use, and unplanned postoperative hospitalizations. When compared to group 1, groups 2 and 3 experienced a shorter time from end of operation to discharge home (P opioid use (P opioid-free bilateral breast reduction either under local or general anesthesia as an outpatient. This method resulted in significantly less morbidity, use of opioids postoperatively, as well as unplanned hospital admissions compared to "traditional" breast reduction under general anesthesia with the use of opioids. 3. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Effects of chronic postnatal opioid receptor blockade by naltrexone upon proliferation capacity in the prenatally x-irradiated brain of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmahl, W.; Miaskowski, U. (Department of Pathology, Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen-und Umweltforschung mbh Muechen, Neuherberg (West Germany))

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported that in rats prenatally x-irradiated on gestation day 14 with 1 Gy, postnatal chronic application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (Nx) led to a remarkable growth spurt of the microencephalic brain. In the present study we present histological and autoradiographic results found in the subependymal layer (SEL) of the forebrain lateral ventricles. Nx led to an intermittent augmentation of the mitotic index of the x-irradiated brains within a postnatal observation period of 24 weeks. The most conspicuous finding was transient hyperplasia of the SEL at 4-6 weeks of age which occurred in close proximity to an intact ependymal lining. Districts of the lateral ventricles which were denuded from ependyme and where the rest of the ependymal layer (EL) was dislocated peripherally showed upon Nx treatment a long-lasting SEL hyperplasia with a tendency towards dysplasia. These results revealed that repair proliferation of embryotoxic x-irradiation is normally under strong control by the opioid system. If that system, which exerts a suppressing effect upon glial growth, is blocked by Nx, prominent hyperplastic reactions occur which may be useful for repairing the lesion pattern.

  3. Effects of chronic postnatal opioid receptor blockade by naltrexone upon proliferation capacity in the prenatally x-irradiated brain of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmahl, W.; Miaskowski, U.

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported that in rats prenatally x-irradiated on gestation day 14 with 1 Gy, postnatal chronic application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (Nx) led to a remarkable growth spurt of the microencephalic brain. In the present study we present histological and autoradiographic results found in the subependymal layer (SEL) of the forebrain lateral ventricles. Nx led to an intermittent augmentation of the mitotic index of the x-irradiated brains within a postnatal observation period of 24 weeks. The most conspicuous finding was transient hyperplasia of the SEL at 4-6 weeks of age which occurred in close proximity to an intact ependymal lining. Districts of the lateral ventricles which were denuded from ependyme and where the rest of the ependymal layer (EL) was dislocated peripherally showed upon Nx treatment a long-lasting SEL hyperplasia with a tendency towards dysplasia. These results revealed that repair proliferation of embryotoxic x-irradiation is normally under strong control by the opioid system. If that system, which exerts a suppressing effect upon glial growth, is blocked by Nx, prominent hyperplastic reactions occur which may be useful for repairing the lesion pattern

  4. Opioid Usage During Admission in Hip Fracture Patients-The Effect of the Continuous Femoral Nerve Block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helsø, Ida; Jantzen, Christopher; Lauritzen, Jes Bruun

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a difference in opioid usage during admission for hip fracture patients with continuous femoral nerve block (cFNB) when compared to patients nonfemoral nerve block (nFNB). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients were identified from...... the local database on all hip fracture patients admitted to Bispebjerg University Hospital, Denmark. Four hundred fifty-six hip fracture patients were included during the period September 2008 to October 2010. RESULTS: Three hundred sixty-six hip fracture patients had cFNB. The mean time with cFNB was 3...

  5. Changing Trends in Opioid Use Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jeffrey R; Xie, Fenglong; Smith, Christian; Saag, Kenneth G; Chen, Lang; Beukelman, Timothy; Mannion, Melissa; Yun, Huifeng; Kertesz, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Opioid prescribing recently has come under intense scrutiny. However, longitudinal patterns of prescription opioid receipt in a population-based cohort of patients with chronic pain, such as those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have not been well characterized. The aim of this study was to examine both trends over time and variability in individual physician prescribing of short-term and long-term use of opioids. We identified a cohort of RA patients based on 2006-2014 Medicare data and evaluated longitudinal time trends in "regular" use of opioids. A separate analysis conducted in 2014 assessed rheumatologist-specific variability in regular use of opioid prescriptions in patients with RA. We identified 97,859 RA patients meeting the eligibility criteria. The mean age of the patients was 67 years, 80% were female, 82% were white, and 12% were African American. The most commonly used opioids were those that combined acetaminophen with hydrocodone or propoxyphene. Regular opioid prescribing increased slowly but peaked in 2010 before propoxyphene was withdrawn from the market. Following the withdrawal of propoxyphene, receipt of hydrocodone and tramadol increased commensurately, and overall opioid use declined only slightly. Factors associated with regular use of opioids included younger age, female sex, African American race, back pain, fibromyalgia, anxiety, and depression. Variability between US rheumatologists (n = 4,024) in prescribing the regular use of opioids for their RA patients was high; in the average rheumatologist's practice, 40% of RA patients used prescription opioids regularly. In almost half of the patients, at least some opioid prescriptions were written by a rheumatologist, and 14% received opioids that were co-prescribed concurrently by more than 1 physician. In the US, opioid use in older patients with RA peaked in 2010 and is now declining slightly. Withdrawal of propoxyphene from the US market in 2010 had minimal effect on overall opioid

  6. Treating opioid dependence. Growing implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2004-02-09

    Almost 3 million Americans have abused heroin. The most effective treatment for this concerning epidemic is opioid replacement therapy. Although, from a historical perspective, acceptance of this therapy has been slow, growing evidence supports its efficacy. There are 3 approved medications for opioid maintenance therapy: methadone hydrochloride, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine hydrochloride. Each has unique characteristics that determine its suitability for an individual patient. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported with methadone and levomethadyl, but not with buprenorphine. Due to concerns about cardiac risk, levomethadyl use has declined and the product may ultimately be discontinued. These recent safety concerns, specifics about opioid detoxification and maintenance, and new federal initiatives were studied. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Although only a minority of eligible patients are engaged in treatment, opioid maintenance therapy appears to offer the greatest public health benefits. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. This model has gained wide acceptance in Europe and is now being implemented in the United States. The recent Drug Addiction Treatment Act enables qualified physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting. Mainstreaming opioid addiction treatment has many advantages; its success will depend on resolution of ethical and delivery system issues as well as improved and expanded training of physicians in addiction medicine.

  7. Core sampling system spare parts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    Soon, there will be 4 independent core sampling systems obtaining samples from the underground tanks. It is desirable that these systems be available for sampling during the next 2 years. This assessment was prepared to evaluate the adequacy of the spare parts identified for the core sampling system and to provide recommendations that may remediate overages or inadequacies of spare parts

  8. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolbergen, David R.; Manshanden, Johan S. J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Blom, Nico A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Hazekamp, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed.

  9. Laryngeal Muscles Are Spared in the Dystrophin Deficient "mdx" Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa B.; Joseph, Gayle L.; Adkins, Tracey D.; Andrade, Francisco H.; Stemple, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: "Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)" is caused by the loss of the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. The disease leads to severe and progressive skeletal muscle wasting. Interestingly, the disease spares some muscles. The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of dystrophin deficiency on 2 intrinsic laryngeal muscles, the…

  10. Opioid Prescribing PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the July 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Higher opioid prescribing puts patients at risk for addiction and overdose. Learn what can be done about this serious problem.  Created: 7/6/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  11. Pain Therapy Guided by Purpose and Perspective in Light of the Opioid Epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie L. Severino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid misuse is an ongoing and escalating epidemic. Although these pharmacological agents are highly effective analgesics prescribed for different types of pain, opioids also induce euphoria, leading to increasing diversion and misuse. Opioid use and related mortalities have developed in spite of initial claims that OxyContin, one of the first opioids prescribed in the USA, was not addictive in the presence of pain. These claims allayed the fears of clinicians and contributed to an increase in the number of prescriptions, quantity of drugs manufactured, and the unforeseen diversion of these drugs for non-medical uses. Understanding the history of opioid drug development, the widespread marketing campaign for opioids, the immense financial incentive behind the treatment of pain, and vulnerable socioeconomic and physical demographics for opioid misuse give perspective on the current epidemic as an American-born problem that has expanded to global significance. In light of the current worldwide opioid epidemic, it is imperative that novel opioids are developed to treat pain without inducing the euphoria that fosters physical dependence and addiction. We describe insights from preclinical findings on the properties of opioid drugs that offer insights into improving abuse-deterrent formulations. One finding is that the ability of some agonists to activate one pathway over another, or agonist bias, can predict whether several novel opioid compounds bear promise in treating pain without causing reward among other off-target effects. In addition, we outline how the pharmacokinetic profile of each opioid contributes to their potential for misuse and discuss the emergence of mixed agonists as a promising pipeline of opioid-based analgesics. These insights from preclinical findings can be used to more effectively identify opioids that treat pain without causing physical dependence and subsequent opioid abuse.

  12. Pain Therapy Guided by Purpose and Perspective in Light of the Opioid Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Amie L.; Shadfar, Arash; Hakimian, Joshua K.; Crane, Oliver; Singh, Ganeev; Heinzerling, Keith; Walwyn, Wendy M.

    2018-01-01

    Prescription opioid misuse is an ongoing and escalating epidemic. Although these pharmacological agents are highly effective analgesics prescribed for different types of pain, opioids also induce euphoria, leading to increasing diversion and misuse. Opioid use and related mortalities have developed in spite of initial claims that OxyContin, one of the first opioids prescribed in the USA, was not addictive in the presence of pain. These claims allayed the fears of clinicians and contributed to an increase in the number of prescriptions, quantity of drugs manufactured, and the unforeseen diversion of these drugs for non-medical uses. Understanding the history of opioid drug development, the widespread marketing campaign for opioids, the immense financial incentive behind the treatment of pain, and vulnerable socioeconomic and physical demographics for opioid misuse give perspective on the current epidemic as an American-born problem that has expanded to global significance. In light of the current worldwide opioid epidemic, it is imperative that novel opioids are developed to treat pain without inducing the euphoria that fosters physical dependence and addiction. We describe insights from preclinical findings on the properties of opioid drugs that offer insights into improving abuse-deterrent formulations. One finding is that the ability of some agonists to activate one pathway over another, or agonist bias, can predict whether several novel opioid compounds bear promise in treating pain without causing reward among other off-target effects. In addition, we outline how the pharmacokinetic profile of each opioid contributes to their potential for misuse and discuss the emergence of mixed agonists as a promising pipeline of opioid-based analgesics. These insights from preclinical findings can be used to more effectively identify opioids that treat pain without causing physical dependence and subsequent opioid abuse. PMID:29740351

  13. Effectiveness and gastrointestinal tolerability during conversion and titration with once-daily OROS® hydromorphone extended release in opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale ME

    2013-05-01

    than patients who discontinued during titration for each of these measures (P < 0.001. Almost 80% of patients achieving a stable dose (213/268 had a ≥30% reduction in pain. Commonly reported AEs were constipation (15.4%, nausea (11.9%, somnolence (8.7%, headache (7.8%, and vomiting (6.5%; 13.0% discontinued from the study due to AEs. Conclusion: The majority of opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain were successfully converted to effective doses of OROS hydromorphone ER within 2 to 4 weeks. Keywords: chronic low back pain, noncancer pain, extended-release opioids, OROS hydromorphone ER, opioid rotation, conversion and titration

  14. Renal-sparing strategies in cardiac transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Ross, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Renal dysfunction due to calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) toxicity is a major clinical problem in cardiac transplantation. The aim of the article is to review the efficacy and safety of various renal sparing strategies in cardiac transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: Small studies have...... reduction in terms of preserving renal function. Patients with longstanding CNI treatment or proteinuria are less likely to respond favourably to a switch from a CNI-based regimen to a proliferation signal inhibitor-based regimen. SUMMARY: Each cardiac transplant recipient with renal dysfunction must...... documented that late initiation of CNI is safe in patients treated with induction therapy at the time of transplantation. Use of mycophenolate is superior when compared with azathioprine to allow for CNI reduction. More substantial reduction in CNI levels is safe and effective with the introduction...

  15. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  16. Configuration model of partial repairable spares under batch ordering policy based on inventory state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruan Minzhi; Luo Yi; Li Hua

    2014-01-01

    Rational planning of spares configuration project is an effective approach to improve equipment availability as well as reduce life cycle cost (LCC). With an analysis of various impacts on support system, the spares demand rate forecast model is constructed. According to systemic analysis method, spares support effectiveness evaluation indicators system is built, and then, initial spares configuration and optimization method is researched. To the issue of discarding and con-sumption for incomplete repairable items, its expected backorders function is approximated by Laplace demand distribution. Combining the (s-1, s) and (R, Q) inventory policy, the spares resup-ply model is established under the batch ordering policy based on inventory state, and the optimi-zation analysis flow for spares configuration is proposed. Through application on shipborne equipment spares configuration, the given scenarios are analyzed under two constraint targets:one is the support effectiveness, and the other is the spares cost. Analysis reveals that the result is consistent with practical regulation;therefore, the model’s correctness, method’s validity as well as optimization project’s rationality are proved to a certain extent.

  17. Acupuncture's Role in Solving the Opioid Epidemic: Evidence, Cost-Effectiveness, and Care Availability for Acupuncture as a Primary, Non-Pharmacologic Method for Pain Relief and Management-White Paper 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Arthur Yin; Miller, David W; Bolash, Bonnie; Bauer, Matthew; McDonald, John; Faggert, Sarah; He, Hongjian; Li, Yong Ming; Matecki, Amy; Camardella, Lindy; Koppelman, Mel Hopper; Stone, Jennifer A M; Meade, Lindsay; Pang, John

    2017-11-01

    The United States (U.S.) is facing a national opioid epidemic, and medical systems are in need of non-pharmacologic strategies that can be employed to decrease the public's opioid dependence. Acupuncture has emerged as a powerful, evidence-based, safe, cost-effective, and available treatment modality suitable to meeting this need. Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for the management of numerous types of pain conditions, and mechanisms of action for acupuncture have been described and are understandable from biomedical, physiologic perspectives. Further, acupuncture's cost-effectiveness can dramatically decrease health care expenditures, both from the standpoint of treating acute pain and through avoiding addiction to opioids that requires costly care, destroys quality of life, and can lead to fatal overdose. Numerous federal regulatory agencies have advised or mandated that healthcare systems and providers offer non-pharmacologic treatment options for pain. Acupuncture stands out as the most evidence-based, immediately available choice to fulfil these calls. Acupuncture can safely, easily, and cost-effectively be incorporated into hospital settings as diverse as the emergency department, labor and delivery suites, and neonatal intensive care units to treat a variety of commonly seen pain conditions. Acupuncture is already being successfully and meaningfully utilized by the Veterans Administration and various branches of the U.S. Military, in some studies demonstrably decreasing the volume of opioids prescribed when included in care.

  18. Opioid Overdose Prevention: Safety Advice for Patients & Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the effects of opioids. Naloxone works by blocking opiate receptor sites. It is not effective in treating ... agitation, anxiety, confusion, or ringing in your ears.  Seizures (convulsions).  Feeling that you might pass out.  Slow ...

  19. Reappraisal deficits promote craving and emotional distress among chronic pain patients at risk for prescription opioid misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L; Hanley, Adam W; Bedford, Carter E; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Howard, Matthew O; Nakamura, Yoshio; Donaldson, Gary W; Froeliger, Brett

    2018-06-04

    A subset of chronic pain patients misuse prescription opioids as a means of regulating negative emotions. However, opioid misuse may result in deficits in emotion regulation strategies like reappraisal by virtue of the deleterious effects of chronic opioid exposure. The aim of this study was to characterize differences in reappraisal use among chronic pain patients at risk for opioid misuse and those who report taking opioids as prescribed. A sample of 127 pain patients receiving chronic opioid analgesic pharmacotherapy were classified as at risk for opioid misuse (n = 62) or taking opioids as prescribed (n = 65) using the Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM). The Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ) characterized use of emotion regulation strategies including reappraisal and expressive suppression. Participants also reported levels of opioid craving, emotional distress, and pain severity. Patients at risk for opioid misuse reported significantly less reappraisal use (M = 25.31, SD = 7.33) than those who reportedly took opioids as prescribed (M = 30.28, SD = 7.50), p<.001, but did differ with regard to suppression strategies. Reduced reappraisal use was associated with higher opioid craving and emotional distress that mediated the association between reappraisal deficits and opioid misuse risk. Further, there was a significant indirect effect of opioid misuse on emotional distress via reappraisal use. Opioid misuse risk was associated with reduced use of reappraisal, which in turn was associated with dysregulated negative emotions and increased appetitive drive towards consuming opioids. Studying individual differences in emotion regulation may yield efficacious intervention and prevention approaches to stem the rising tide of the prescription opioid crisis.

  20. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  1. Opioid Abuse and Addiction - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish) PDF The basics - Opioids, part 1 - English MP3 The basics - Opioids, part 1 - español (Spanish) MP3 The basics - Opioids, part 1 - English MP4 The ... español (Spanish) PDF Pain - Opioids, part 2 - English MP3 Pain - Opioids, part 2 - español (Spanish) MP3 Pain - ...

  2. Long-term evaluation of opioid treatment in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaomei; Robinson, Rebecca L; Mease, Philip; Kroenke, Kurt; Williams, David A; Chen, Yi; Faries, Douglas; Wohlreich, Madelaine; McCarberg, Bill; Hann, Danette

    2015-01-01

    In a 12-month observational study, we evaluated the effect of opioid use on the outcomes in 1700 adult patients with fibromyalgia. Data were evaluated using propensity score matching after patients were divided into cohorts based on their baseline medication use: (1) taking an opioid (concurrent use of tramadol was permitted); (2) taking tramadol (but no opioids); and (3) not taking opioids or tramadol. Changes in outcomes were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory for severity and pain-related interference (BPI-S, BPI-I), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Patient Health Questionnaire for depression (PHQ-8), Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7), and economic factors. Time-to-opioid or tramadol discontinuation was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival analyses. Compared with the opioid cohort, the nonopioid cohort demonstrated significantly greater reductions (PFIQ, PHQ-8, SDS, and ISI; the tramadol cohort compared with the opioid group showed greater reductions on FIQ and ISI. Reductions in BPI-S and GAD-7 did not differ significantly among cohorts. Compared with the opioid cohort, patients in the tramadol cohort had fewer outpatient visits to health care providers. Few significant differences were found between the tramadol and nonopioid cohorts across outcomes. Although pain severity was reduced over time in all cohorts, opioid users showed less improvement in pain-related interference with daily living, functioning, depression, and insomnia. Overall, the findings show little support for the long-term use of opioid medications in patients with fibromyalgia given the poorer outcomes across multiple assessment domains associated with this cohort.

  3. A new and novel treatment of opioid dependence: nigella sativa 500 mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangi, S.; Ahmed, S.P.; Channa, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Opioid dependence is one of the major social and psychiatric problem of society. Unfortunately there is no non opiate treatment available. For centuries man has used plants for their healing proprieties. These plants play a fundamental part in all treatment modalities, both ancient and modern. This study was conducted to find non opiate treatment for opiate withdrawal. Total 35 known addicts of opiates were included in the study. This study was based on DSM IV criteria for opioid dependence. This study demonstrates that non opioid treatment for opioid addiction decreases the withdrawal effects significantly. It further demonstrates that there are no changes in physiological parameters of subjects during treatment (BP, Pulse rate etc.). There is increased appetite but no significant weight gain in the subjects. Non opioid drug Nigella sativa is effective in long term treatment of opioid dependence. It not merely cures the opioid dependence but also cures the infections and weakness from which majority of addicts suffer. (author)

  4. Clinical utility of naloxegol in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Heather C; Atayee, Rabia S; Edmonds, Kyle P; Buckholz, Gary T

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are a class of medications frequently used for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, exerting their desired effects at central opioid receptors. Agonism at peripherally located opioid receptors, however, leads to opioid-induced constipation (OIC), one of the most frequent and debilitating side effects of prolonged opioid use. Insufficient relief of OIC with lifestyle modification and traditional laxative treatments may lead to decreased compliance with opioid regimens and undertreated pain. Peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORAs) offer the reversal of OIC without loss of central pain relief. Until recently, PAMORAs were restricted to subcutaneous route or to narrow patient populations. Naloxegol is the first orally dosed PAMORA indicated for the treatment of OIC in noncancer patients. Studies have suggested its efficacy in patients failing traditional constipation treatments; however, insufficient evidence exists to establish its role in primary prevention of OIC at this time.

  5. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation. Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Mazen; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Faculty of Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  6. Chimeric opioid peptides: tools for identifying opioid receptor types.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, G X; Miyajima, A; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Goldstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We synthesized several chimeric peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the kappa opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surf...

  7. Effectiveness and gastrointestinal tolerability during conversion and titration with once-daily OROS® hydromorphone extended release in opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Martin E; Nalamachu, Srinivas R; Khan, Arif; Kutch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone extended-release tablets (OROS hydromorphone ER) during dose conversion and titration. Patients and methods A total of 459 opioid-tolerant adults with chronic moderate to severe low back pain participated in an open-label, 2- to 4-week conversion/titration phase of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal trial, conducted at 70 centers in the United States. Patients were converted to once-daily OROS hydromorphone ER at 75% of the equianalgesic dose of their prior total daily opioid dose (5:1 conversion ratio), and titrated as frequently as every 3 days to a maximum dose of 64 mg/day. The primary outcome measure was change in pain intensity numeric rating scale; additional assessments included the Patient Global Assessment and the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire scores. Safety assessments were performed at each visit and consisted of recording and monitoring all adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs. Results Mean (standard deviation) final daily dose of OROS hydromorphone ER was 37.5 (17.8) mg. Mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) numeric rating scale scores decreased from 6.6 (0.1) at screening to 4.3 (0.1) at the final titration visit (mean [SEM] change, −2.3 [0.1], representing a 34.8% reduction). Mean (SEM) change in Patient Global Assessment was −0.6 (0.1), and mean change (SEM) in the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire was −2.8 (0.3). Patients achieving a stable dose showed greater improvement than patients who discontinued during titration for each of these measures (P < 0.001). Almost 80% of patients achieving a stable dose (213/268) had a ≥30% reduction in pain. Commonly reported AEs were constipation (15.4%), nausea (11.9%), somnolence (8.7%), headache (7.8%), and vomiting (6.5%); 13.0% discontinued from the study due to AEs. Conclusion The majority of opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain were successfully converted to effective doses of

  8. Sparing land for biodiversity at multiple spatial scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan eEkroos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A common approach to the conservation of farmland biodiversity and the promotion of multifunctional landscapes, particularly in landscapes containing only small remnants of non-crop habitats, has been to maintain landscape heterogeneity and reduce land-use intensity. In contrast, it has recently been shown that devoting specific areas of non-crop habitats to conservation, segregated from high-yielding farmland (‘land sparing’, can more effectively conserve biodiversity than promoting low-yielding, less intensively managed farmland occupying larger areas (‘land sharing’. In the present paper we suggest that the debate over the relative merits of land sparing or land sharing is partly blurred by the differing spatial scales at which it is suggested that land sparing should be applied. We argue that there is no single correct spatial scale for segregating biodiversity protection and commodity production in multifunctional landscapes. Instead we propose an alternative conceptual construct, which we call ‘multiple-scale land sparing’, targeting biodiversity and ecosystem services in transformed landscapes. We discuss how multiple-scale land sparing may overcome the apparent dichotomy between land sharing and land sparing and help to find acceptable compromises that conserve biodiversity and landscape multifunctionality.

  9. CDC Vital Signs: Opioid Painkiller Prescribing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mental Health Services Administration Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Addiction: Facts for Families and Friends Opioid Overdose Prevention ... Abuse Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction Opioid and Pain Management CMEs/CEs Prescription Drugs U.S. ...

  10. Isobolographic analysis of the opioid-opioid interactions in a tonic and a phasic mouse model of induced nociceptive pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Zanetta, Pilar; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Prieto-Rayo, Juan Carlos; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2014-07-15

    Opioids have been used for the management of pain and coadministration of two opioids may induce synergism. In a model of tonic pain, the acetic acid writhing test and in a phasic model, the hot plate, the antinociceptive interaction between fentanyl, methadone, morphine, and tramadol was evaluated. The potency of opioids in the writhing test compared to the hot plate assay was from 2.5 (fentanyl) to 15.5 (morphine) times, respectively. The ED50 was used in a fixed ratio for each of the six pairs of opioid combinations, which, resulted in a synergistic antinociception except for methadone/tramadol and fentanyl/tramadol which were additive, in the hot plate. The opioid antagonists naltrexone, naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, suggests that the synergism of morphine combinations are due to the activation of MOR subtypes with partially contribution of DOR and KOR, however fentanyl and methadone combinations are partially due to the activation of MOR and DOR subtypes and KOR lack of participation. The antinociceptive effects of tramadol combinations, are partially due to the activation of MOR, DOR and KOR opioid subtypes. These results suggets that effectiveness and magnitude of the interactions between opioids are dependent on pain stimulus intensity.

  11. Homonymous Hemianopia with Macular Sparing: Clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Osoba

    peripheral vision function in the cerebral cortex is located. Sparing ... Key words: brain, magnetic resonance imaging, macula, occipital lobe, vision ... luminance right homonymous hemianopia affecting inferior and superior ... infarction in left.

  12. Reduction of opioid withdrawal and potentiation of acute opioid analgesia by systemic AV411 (ibudilast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Mark R; Lewis, Susannah S; Coats, Benjamen D; Skyba, David A; Crysdale, Nicole Y; Berkelhammer, Debra L; Brzeski, Anita; Northcutt, Alexis; Vietz, Christine M; Judd, Charles M; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R; Johnson, Kirk W

    2009-02-01

    Morphine-induced glial proinflammatory responses have been documented to contribute to tolerance to opioid analgesia. Here, we examined whether drugs previously shown to suppress glial proinflammatory responses can alter other clinically relevant opioid effects; namely, withdrawal or acute analgesia. AV411 (ibudilast) and minocycline, drugs with distinct mechanisms of action that result in attenuation of glial proinflammatory responses, each reduced naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Analysis of brain nuclei associated with opioid withdrawal revealed that morphine altered expression of glial activation markers, cytokines, chemokines, and a neurotrophic factor. AV411 attenuated many of these morphine-induced effects. AV411 also protected against spontaneous withdrawal-induced hyperactivity and weight loss recorded across a 12-day timecourse. Notably, in the spontaneous withdrawal study, AV411 treatment was delayed relative to the start of the morphine regimen so to also test whether AV411 could still be effective in the face of established morphine dependence, which it was. AV411 did not simply attenuate all opioid effects, as co-administering AV411 with morphine or oxycodone caused three-to-five-fold increases in acute analgesic potency, as revealed by leftward shifts in the analgesic dose response curves. Timecourse analyses revealed that plasma morphine levels were not altered by AV411, suggestive that potentiated analgesia was not simply due to prolongation of morphine exposure or increased plasma concentrations. These data support and extend similar potentiation of acute opioid analgesia by minocycline, again providing converging lines of evidence of glial involvement. Hence, suppression of glial proinflammatory responses can significantly reduce opioid withdrawal, while improving analgesia.

  13. Pain in the management of opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirohi S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sunil Sirohi,1 Amit K Tiwari21Laboratory of Endocrine and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA, 2Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USAOpioids remain the drug of choice for the clinical management of moderate to severe pain. However, in addition to their most effective analgesic actions, opioids also produce a sense of well-being and euphoria, which may trigger significant concerns associated with their use.1 In fact, there has been an alarming increase in prescription opioid use, abuse and illicit use; and according to the National Center for Health Statistics, the total number of deaths related to opioid overdose has more than tripled from 2011 to 2014.2–5 Although representing 5.0 % of the global population, studies report that Americans consume 80% of the global opioid supply,3 and the United States is experiencing an opioid abuse epidemic.6 Considering this unprecedented rise in opioid consumption, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has listed prescription opioid overdose among one of the 10 most important public health problems in all the 50 states.7

  14. Opioid withdrawal syndrome: emerging concepts and novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Jaggi, Amteshwar S; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-02-01

    Opioid withdrawal syndrome is a debilitating manifestation of opioid dependence and responds poorly to the available clinical therapies. Studies from various in vivo and in vitro animal models of opioid withdrawal syndrome have led to understanding of its pathobiology which includes complex interrelated pathways leading to adenylyl cyclase superactivation based central excitation. Advancements in the elucidation of opioid withdrawal syndrome mechanisms have revealed a number of key targets that have been hypothesized to modulate clinical status. The present review discusses the neurobiology of opioid withdrawal syndrome and its therapeutic target recptors like calcitonin gene related peptide receptors (CGRP), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, gamma aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA), G-proteingated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels and calcium channels. The present review further details the potential role of second messengers like calcium (Ca2+) / calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), nitric oxide synthase, cytokines, arachidonic acid metabolites, corticotropin releasing factor, fos and src kinases in causing opioid withdrawal syndrome. The exploitation of these targets may provide effective therapeutic agents for the management of opioid dependence-induced abstinence syndrome.

  15. Methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld1, Kelly M Standifer21Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, Department of Physiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Constipation is a significant problem related to opioid medications used to manage pain. This review attempts to outline the latest findings related to the therapeutic usefulness of a μ opioid receptor antagonist, methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. The review highlights methylnaltrexone bromide (RelistorTM; Progenics/Wyeth a quaternary derivative of naltrexone, which was recently approved in the United States, Europe and Canada. The Food and Drug Administration in the United States approved a subcutaneous injection for the treatment of opioid bowel dysfunction in patients with advanced illness who are receiving palliative care and when laxative therapy has been insufficient. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally restricted, μ opioid receptor antagonist that accelerates oral–cecal transit in patients with opioidinduced constipation without reversing the analgesic effects of morphine or inducing symptoms of opioid withdrawal. An analysis of the mechanism of action and the potential benefits of using methylnaltrexone is based on data from published basic research and recent clinical studies.Keywords: methylnaltrexone, constipation, opioid

  16. Opioid-induced preconditioning: recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Jason N; Gross, Eric R; Gross, Garrett J

    2005-01-01

    Opioids, named by Acheson for compounds with morphine-like actions despite chemically distinct structures, have received much research interest, particularly for their central nervous system (CNS) actions involved in pain management, resulting in thousands of scientific papers focusing on their effects on the CNS and other organ systems. A more recent area which may have great clinical importance concerns the role of opioids, either endogenous or exogenous compounds, in limiting the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart and brain. The role of endogenous opioids in hibernation provides tantalizing evidence for the protective potential of opioids against ischemia or hypoxia. Mammalian hibernation, a distinct energy-conserving state, is associated with depletion of energy stores, intracellular acidosis and hypoxia, similar to those which occur during ischemia. However, despite the potentially detrimental cellular state induced with hibernation, the myocardium remains resilient for many months. What accounts for the hypoxia-tolerant state is of great interest. During hibernation, circulating levels of opioid peptides are increased dramatically, and indeed, are considered a "trigger" of hibernation. Furthermore, administration of opioid antagonists can effectively reverse hibernation in mammals. Therefore, it is not surprising that activation of opioid receptors has been demonstrated to preserve cellular status following a hypoxic insult, such as ischemia-reperfusion in many model systems including the intestine [Zhang, Y., Wu, Y.X., Hao, Y.B., Dun, Y. Yang, S.P., 2001. Role of endogenous opioid peptides in protection of ischemic preconditioning in rat small intestine. Life Sci. 68, 1013-1019], skeletal muscle [Addison, P.D., Neligan, P.C., Ashrafpour, H., Khan, A., Zhong, A., Moses, M., Forrest, C.R., Pang, C.Y., 2003. Noninvasive remote ischemic preconditioning for global protection of skeletal muscle against infarction. Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ

  17. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Dinarvand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction.  Methods: 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR whose products were then sequenced.  Results: Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T>C and 877G>A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G>C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant.  Discussion: It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T>C, 877G>A and 1043G>C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population.

  18. Dose--effect relationships for femoral fractures after multimodality limb-sparing therapy of soft-tissue sarcomas of the proximal lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A; Griffith, Kent A; Sabolch, Aaron; Chugh, Rashmi; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Biermann, Janet Sybil; Feng, Mary

    2012-07-15

    We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V(d)) receiving specified doses (≥30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 ± 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 ± 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 ± 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 ± 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 ± 20.8 Gy, 4.8 ± 5.6 cc, 2.5 ± 3.9 cc, and 0.8 ± 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dose-Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Biostatistics Unit, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sabolch, Aaron [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chugh, Rashmi [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Janet Sybil [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V{sub d}) receiving specified doses ({>=}30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 {+-} 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 {+-} 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 {+-} 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 {+-} 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 {+-} 20.8 Gy, 4.8 {+-} 5.6 cc, 2.5 {+-} 3.9 cc, and 0.8 {+-} 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose-volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  20. Dose–Effect Relationships for Femoral Fractures After Multimodality Limb-Sparing Therapy of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Proximal Lower Extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, Daniel; Vineberg, Karen A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Sabolch, Aaron; Chugh, Rashmi; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Biermann, Janet Sybil; Feng, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the clinical and dosimetric predictors for radiation-associated femoral fractures in patients with proximal lower extremity soft tissue sarcomas (STS). Methods and Materials: We examined 131 patients with proximal lower extremity STS who received limb-sparing surgery and external-beam radiation therapy between 1985 and 2006. Five (4%) patients sustained pathologic femoral fractures. Dosimetric analysis was limited to 4 fracture patients with full three-dimensional dose information, who were compared with 59 nonfracture patients. The mean doses and volumes of bone (V d ) receiving specified doses (≥30 Gy, 45 Gy, 60 Gy) at the femoral body, femoral neck, intertrochanteric region, and subtrochanteric region were compared. Clinical predictive factors were also evaluated. Results: Of 4 fracture patients in our dosimetric series, there were three femoral neck fractures with a mean dose of 57.6 ± 8.9 Gy, V30 of 14.5 ± 2.3 cc, V45 of 11.8 ± 1.1 cc, and V60 of 7.2 ± 2.2 cc at the femoral neck compared with 22.9 ± 20.8 Gy, 4.8 ± 5.6 cc, 2.5 ± 3.9 cc, and 0.8 ± 2.7 cc, respectively, for nonfracture patients (p < 0.03 for all). The femoral neck fracture rate was higher than at the subtrochanteric region despite lower mean doses at these subregions. All fracture sites received mean doses greater than 40 Gy. Also, with our policy of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for high-risk patients, there was no significant difference in fracture rates between patients with and without periosteal excision. There were no significant differences in age, sex, tumor size, timing of radiation therapy, and use of chemotherapy between fracture and nonfracture patients. Conclusions: These dose–volume toxicity relationships provide RT optimization goals to guide future efforts for reducing pathologic fracture rates. Prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing may also reduce fracture risk for susceptible patients.

  1. Intentional intrathecal opioid detoxification in 3 patients: characterization of the intrathecal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tracy P; Lonergan, Daniel F; Todd, R David; Martin, Peter R

    2013-04-01

    Intrathecal (IT) drug delivery systems for patients with chronic non-malignant pain are intended to improve pain and quality of life and reduce side effects of systemic use. A subset of patients may have escalating pain, functional decline, and/or intolerable side effects even as IT opioid doses are increased. Discontinuation of IT medications may represent a viable treatment option but strategies to accomplish this are needed. Three patients with intrathecal drug delivery systems (IDDS), inadequate pain control, and declining functionality underwent abrupt IT opioid cessation. This was accomplished through a standardized protocol with symptom-triggered administration of clonidine and buprenorphine, monitored using the clinical opiate withdrawal scale. Symptoms of IT withdrawal were similar in all patients and included diuresis, agitation, hyperalgesia, mild diarrhea, yawning, and taste and smell aversion. Hypertension and tachycardia were effectively controlled by clonidine administration. Classic symptoms of withdrawal, such as piloerection, chills, severe diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, myoclonus, and mydriasis, were not noted. At 2 to 3 months follow-up, patients reported decreased, but ongoing pain, with improvements in functional capacity and quality of life. This preliminary work demonstrates the safety of abrupt IT opioid cessation utilizing standardized inpatient withdrawal protocols. To our knowledge, these are among the first reported cases of intentional, controlled IT opioid cessation without initiation of an opioid bridge: self-reported pain scores, functional capacity, and quality of life improved. The IT opioid withdrawal syndrome is characterized based upon our observations and a review of the literature. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  2. Chimeric opioid peptides: Tools for identifying opioid receptor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, G.; Miyajima, A.; Yokota, T.; Arai, K.; Goldstein, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors synthesized several chimeric [125J-labelled] peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the κ opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surface or membrane preparation, these peptides could still bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody. These chimeric peptides should be useful for isolating μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors and for identifying opioid receptors on transfected cells in expression cloning procedures. The general approach using chimeric peptides should be applicable to other peptide receptors

  3. The influence of propoxyphene withdrawal on opioid use in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Corey J; Hudson, Teresa J; Phillips, Martha M; Bursac, Zoran; Williams, James S; Austin, Mark A; Edlund, Mark J; Martin, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Our aim is to determine if propoxyphene withdrawal from the US market was associated with opioid continuation, continued chronic opioid use, and secondary propoxyphene-related adverse events (emergency department visits, opioid-related events, and acetaminophen toxicity). Medical service use and pharmacy data from 19/11/08 to 19/11/11 were collected from the national Veterans Healthcare Administration healthcare databases. A quasi-experimental pre-post retrospective cohort design utilizing a historical comparison group provided the study framework. Logistic regression controlling for baseline covariates was used to estimate the effect of propoxyphene withdrawal. There were 24,328 subjects (policy affected n = 10,747; comparison n = 13,581) meeting inclusion criteria. In the policy-affected cohort, 10.6% of users ceased using opioids, and 26.6% stopped chronic opioid use compared with 3.8% and 13.5% in the historical comparison cohort, respectively. Those in the policy-affected cohort were 2.7 (95%CI: 2.5-2.8) and 3.2 (95%CI: 2.9-3.6) times more likely than those in the historical comparison cohort to discontinue chronic opioid and any opioid use, respectively. Changes in adverse events and Emergency Department (ED) visits were not different between policy-affected and historical comparison cohorts (p > 0.05). The withdrawal of propoxyphene-containing products resulted in rapid and virtually complete elimination in propoxyphene prescribing in the veterans population; however, nearly 90% of regular users of propoxyphene switched to an alternate opioid, and three quarters continued to use opioids chronically. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Macroeconomic conditions and opioid abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Alex; Ruhm, Christopher J; Simon, Kosali

    2017-12-01

    We examine how deaths and emergency department (ED) visits related to use of opioid analgesics (opioids) and other drugs vary with macroeconomic conditions. As the county unemployment rate increases by one percentage point, the opioid death rate per 100,000 rises by 0.19 (3.6%) and the opioid overdose ED visit rate per 100,000 increases by 0.95 (7.0%). Macroeconomic shocks also increase the overall drug death rate, but this increase is driven by rising opioid deaths. Our findings hold when performing a state-level analysis, rather than county-level; are primarily driven by adverse events among whites; and are stable across time periods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie H. Rose

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc κ opioid receptors (KOR in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs.

  6. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs. PMID:27472317

  7. Sex determines effect of physical activity on diet preference: Association of striatal opioids and gut microbiota composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenna R; Muckerman, Julie E; Wright, Anna M; Davis, Daniel J; Childs, Tom E; Gillespie, Catherine E; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Booth, Frank W; Ericsson, Aaron C; Will, Matthew J

    2017-09-15

    Previous studies suggest an interaction between the level of physical activity and diet preference. However, this relationship has not been well characterized for sex differences that may exist. The present study examined the influence of sex on diet preference in male and female Wistar rats that were housed under either sedentary (no wheel access) (SED) or voluntary wheel running access (RUN) conditions. Following a 1 week acclimation period to these conditions, standard chow was replaced with concurrent ad libitum access to a choice of 3 pelleted diets (high-fat, high-sucrose, and high-corn starch) in the home cage. SED and RUN conditions remained throughout the next 4 week diet preference assessment period. Body weight, running distance, and intake of each diet were measured daily. At the conclusion of the 4 week diet preference test, animals were sacrificed and brains were collected for mRNA analysis. Fecal samples were also collected before and after the 4 week diet preference phase to characterize microbiota composition. Results indicate sex dependent interactions between physical activity and both behavioral and physiological measures. Females in both RUN and SED conditions preferred the high-fat diet, consuming significantly more high-fat diet than either of the other two diets. While male SED rats also preferred the high-fat diet, male RUN rats consumed significantly less high-fat diet than the other groups, instead preferring all three diets equally. There was also a sex dependent influence of physical activity on both reward related opioid mRNA expression in the ventral striatum and the characterization of gut microbiota. The significant sex differences in response to physical activity observed through both behavioral and physiological measures suggest potential motivational or metabolic difference between males and females. The findings highlight the necessity for further exploration between male and female response to physical activity and feeding

  8. Critical spare parts ordering decisions using conditional reliability and stochastic lead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, David R.; Pascual, Rodrigo; Knights, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Asset-intensive companies face great pressure to reduce operation costs and increase utilization. This scenario often leads to over-stress on critical equipment and its spare parts associated, affecting availability, reliability, and system performance. As these resources impact considerably on financial and operational structures, the opportunity is given by demand for decision-making methods for the management of spare parts processes. We proposed an ordering decision-aid technique which uses a measurement of spare performance, based on the stress–strength interference theory; which we have called Condition-Based Service Level (CBSL). We focus on Condition Managed Critical Spares (CMS), namely, spares which are expensive, highly reliable, with higher lead times, and are not available in store. As a mitigation measure, CMS are under condition monitoring. The aim of the paper is orienting the decision time for CMS ordering or just continuing the operation. The paper presents a graphic technique which considers a rule for decision based on both condition-based reliability function and a stochastic/fixed lead time. For the stochastic lead time case, results show that technique is effective to determine the time when the system operation is reliable and can withstand the lead time variability, satisfying a desired service level. Additionally, for the constant lead time case, the technique helps to define insurance spares. In conclusion, presented ordering decision rule is useful to asset managers for enhancing the operational continuity affected by spare parts

  9. Medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Betty; Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The “Medication-Assisted Therapy for Opioid Addiction” session was chaired by Dr. Betty Tai and had three presenters. The presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Andrew J. Saxon (Methadone and Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction and HIV Risk Reduction), Dr. Walter Ling (Opioid Antagonist Treatment for Opioid Addiction), and Dr. Betty Tai (Chronic Care Model for Substance Use Disorder).

  10. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Navani, Dipesh M.; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A.; Yoburn, Byron C.

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, ...

  11. Opioid pharmaceuticals and addiction: the issues, and research directions seeking solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Wendy M; Miotto, Karen A; Evans, Christopher J

    2010-05-01

    There are few pharmaceuticals superior to opiates for the treatment of pain. However, with concerns of addiction, withdrawal and questionable efficacy for all types of pain, these compounds are far from a magical panacea for pain-relief. As it is unlikely that other classes of compounds will supersede the opioids in the very near future, it is important to both optimize current opioid therapies and curb the astounding diversion of opioids from their intended analgesic use to non-medical abuse. In optimizing opioid therapeutics it is necessary to enhance the clinical awareness of the benefits of treating pain and combine this with aggressive strategies to reduce diversion for non-medical use. At the heart of the issue of opioid misuse is the role of opioid systems in the reward circuitry, and the adaptive processes associated with repetitive opioid use that manifest during withdrawal. Emerging pharmacological insights of opioid receptors will be reviewed that provide future hope for developing opioid-based analgesics with reduced addictive properties and perhaps, reduced opponent processes. In addition, with the increased understanding of nociceptive circuitry and the molecules involved in transmitting pain, new therapeutic targets have become evident that may result in effective analgesics either alone or in combination with current opioid therapies.

  12. Erlotinib-induced rash spares previously irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M.; Vonk, Ernest J.A.; Koster, Mariska E.Y.; Houwing, Ronald H.

    2011-01-01

    Erlotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor prescribed to patients with locally advanced or metastasized non-small cell lung carcinoma after failure of at least one earlier chemotherapy treatment. Approximately 75% of the patients treated with erlotinib develop acneiform skin rashes. A patient treated with erlotinib 3 months after finishing concomitant treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer is presented. Unexpectedly, the part of the skin that had been included in his previously radiotherapy field was completely spared from the erlotinib-induced acneiform skin rash. The exact mechanism of erlotinib-induced rash sparing in previously irradiated skin is unclear. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon needs to be explored further, because the number of patients being treated with a combination of both therapeutic modalities is increasing. The therapeutic effect of erlotinib in the area of the previously irradiated lesion should be assessed. (orig.)

  13. Opioid mediated activity and expression of mu and delta opioid receptors in isolated human term non-labouring myometrium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Rebecca A

    2013-01-05

    The existence of opioid receptors in mammalian myometrial tissue is now widely accepted. Previously enkephalin degrading enzymes have been shown to be elevated in pregnant rat uterus and a met-enkephalin analogue has been shown to alter spontaneous contractility of rat myometrium. Here we have undertaken studies to determine the effects of met-enkephalin on in vitro human myometrial contractility and investigate the expression of opioid receptors in pregnant myometrium. Myometrial biopsies were taken from women undergoing elective caesarean delivery at term. Organ bath experiments were used to investigate the effect of the met-enkephalin analogue [d-Ala 2, d-met 5] enkephalin (DAMEA) on spontaneous contractility. A confocal immunofluorescent technique and real time PCR were used to determine the expression of protein and mRNA, respectively for two opioid receptor subtypes, mu and delta. DAMEA had a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on contractile activity (1 × 10(-7)M-1 × 10(-4)M; 54% reduction in contractile activity, P<0.001 at 1 × 10(-4)M concentration). Mu and delta opioid receptor protein sub-types and their respective mRNA were identified in all tissues sampled. This is the first report of opioid receptor expression and of an opioid mediated uterorelaxant action in term human non-labouring myometrium in vitro.

  14. Yiguanjian cataplasm attenuates opioid dependence in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Gao, Hong; Fan, Yuchen; Zhang, Guanghua; Sun, Fengkai; Zhao, Jing; Li, Feng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effect of Yiguanjian (YGJ) cataplasm on the development of opioid dependence in a mouse model of naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal syndrome. One hundred Swiss albino mice, of equal male to female ratio, were randomly and equally divided into 10 groups. A portion (3 cm2) of the backside hair of the mice was removed 1 day prior to the experiment. Morphine (5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered twice daily for 5 days. YGJ cataplasm was prepared and pasted on the bare region of the mice immediately before morphine administration on day 3 and subsequently removed at the end day 5. On day 6, naloxone (8 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected to precipitate opioid withdrawal syndrome. Behavioral observation was performed in two 30-min phases immediately after naloxone injection. The YGJ cataplasm significantly and dose-dependently attenuated morphine-naloxone- induced experimental opioid withdrawal, in terms of withdrawal severity score and the frequencies of jumping, rearing, forepaw licking, and circling behaviors. However, YGJ cataplasm treatment did not alter the acute analgesic effect of morphine. YGJ cataplasm could attenuate opioid dependence and its associated withdrawal symptoms. Therefore, YGJ cataplasm could serve as a potential therapy for opioid addiction in the future.

  15. Possible Involvement of µ Opioid Receptor in the Antidepressant-Like Effect of Shuyu Formula in Restraint Stress-Induced Depression-Like Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently μ opioid receptor (MOR has been shown to be closely associated with depression. Here we investigated the action of Shuyu, a Chinese herbal prescription, on repeated restraint stress induced depression-like rats, with specific attention to the role of MOR and the related signal cascade. Our results showed that repeated restraint stress caused significant depressive-like behaviors, as evidenced by reduced body weight gain, prolonged duration of immobility in forced swimming test, and decreased number of square-crossings and rearings in open field test. The stress-induced depression-like behaviors were relieved by Shuyu, which was accompanied by decreased expression of MOR in hippocampus. Furthermore, Shuyu upregulated BDNF protein expression, restored the activity of CREB, and stimulated MEK and ERK phosphorylation in hippocampus of stressed rats. More importantly, MOR is involved in the effects of Shuyu on these depression-related signals, as they can be strengthened by MOR antagonist CTAP. Collectively, these data indicated that the antidepressant-like properties of Shuyu are associated with MOR and the corresponding CREB, BDNF, MEK, and ERK signal pathway. Our study supports clinical use of Shuyu as an effective treatment of depression and also suggests that MOR might be a target for treatment of depression and developing novel antidepressants.

  16. The Protein-Sparing Modified Fast Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Bakhach MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF is a rigorous way of rapidly losing a large amount of weight. Although adult studies have shown the PSMF to be effective, data in adolescents are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of the PSMF in severely obese adolescents. Methods: 12 subjects who were evaluated in the Obesity Management Program at the Cleveland Clinic from 2011 to 2014 were included. The subjects were initiated on the PSMF after failing other conventional methods of weight loss. Once the goal weight was achieved, subjects were transitioned to the refeeding phase for weight maintenance. Results: Follow-up was scheduled at 3-month (11 patients and 6-month (6 patients intervals. At the 6-month follow-up visit, the average weight loss was 11.19 kg (95% confidence interval = -5.4, -27.8, P = .028, with average of 9.8% from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects had >5% weight loss and 20% had >10% weight loss. Four patients were lost to the follow-up (40%. An improvement was noted in total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein. Due to a small sample size these results were not statistically significant. Side effects reported by subjects were mild dehydration due to nausea (2 patients, decreased energy (1 patient, and transient labile mood (1 patient. No life-threatening side effects were reported. Conclusion: Our results show that the PSMF diet can be used as an effective and safe method in the outpatient setting for rapid weight loss in adolescents with severe obesity.

  17. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Opioids for Acute Pain in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Karen J; McAllister, Kelly B; Ray, Meredith; Heitz, Corey

    2017-06-01

    This study had five objectives: 1) to measure and compare total opioid use and number of opioid doses in patients treated with opioids versus ketamine in conjunction with opioids; 2) to measure pain scores up to 2 hours after presentation in the ED patient with pain, comparing standard opioid pain control to ketamine in conjunction with opioids; 3) to compare patient satisfaction with pain control using opioids alone versus ketamine in conjunction with opioids; 4) to monitor and compare side effects in patients treated with opioids versus ketamine in conjunction with opioids; and 5) to identify effect variation between different subgroups of patients, with the purpose of focusing future research. We hypothesized that low-dose ketamine, compared to placebo, as an adjunctive treatment to opioids would result in better pain control over 2 hours and greater patient satisfaction with pain control; further, this protocol will result in a lower opioid dosage over 2 hours. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial at a single academic emergency department evaluating the use of ketamine versus placebo in conjunction with opioids for moderate to severe pain. Subjects with a continued high level of pain after an initial dose of opioid analgesia were randomized to receive either 0.1 mg/kg ketamine or placebo prior to protocol-based dosing of additional opioid analgesia, if required. Over 120 minutes, subjects were assessed for pain level (0-10), satisfaction with pain control (0-4), side effects, sedation level, and need for additional pain medication. Total opioid dose, including the initial dose, was compared between groups. Sixty-three subjects were randomized to the placebo group and 53 to the ketamine group. No significant differences were found in demographics between the groups. Patients receiving ketamine reported lower pain scores over 120 minutes than patients receiving placebo (p = 0.015). Total opioid dose was lower in the ketamine group

  18. Creating opioid dependence in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhye, Suneel

    2018-01-01

    Clinical question What is the risk of creating opioid dependence from an ED opioid prescription? Article chosen Barnett ML, Olenski AR, Jena AB. Opioid-prescribing patterns of emergency physicians and risk of long-term use. N Engl J Med 2017;376:663-73, doi:10.1056/NEJMsa1610524. This study examined the risk of creating long-term opioid dependence from a prescription written in an opioid-naive patient in the ED.

  19. Tolerance to Non-Opioid Analgesics is Opioid Sensitive in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Merab G; Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac, and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compare to the saline control, i.e., tolerance develops to these drugs in male rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone into the NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs on the first day of testing in the tail-flick (TF) reflex and hot plate (HP) latency tests. On the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests and impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine, and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  20. A critical spare part inventory control based on hazard function approach: A case study in a garment company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinda, Intan Dewi; Jauhari, Wakhid Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    Spare part procurement is a complex issue and requires an accurate analysis. Stock outs of spare part can leads a great impact on production. Therefore, it is necessary to design the inventory control of spare parts that guarantee the availability of spare parts needed for supporting the maintenance activity. This paper studies the inventory policy for sewing machine spare part using hazard function to approximate the demand. Hazard function is the indicator of the effect of ageing on the reliability of the system. It quantifies the risk of failure as the age of the system increases. We use a continuous review policy based on Hadley Within Approach to calculate the optimum inventory level for critical spare parts. There are four spare parts categorized as critical spare parts, which are needle plate, feed dog, rotary and binder attachment. The optimal ordering quantity for needle plate, feed, rotary and binder attachment are 5 units, 17 units, 5 units, and 9 units, respectively and the reorder point are 2 units, 1 unit, 2 units and 1 unit, respectively. Finally, the service level achieved by the proposed policy is in a range of 95.91%-97.93%, which indicates that the inventory level of spare parts can be used to support the required parts in the maintenance activity.

  1. Incidence of iatrogenic opioid dependence or abuse in patients with pain who were exposed to opioid analgesic therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C; Smith, B H; Matthews, K

    2018-06-01

    The prevalence and incidence of chronic conditions, such as pain and opioid dependence, have implications for policy development, resource allocation, and healthcare delivery. The primary objective of the current review was to estimate the incidence of iatrogenic opioid dependence or abuse after treatment with opioid analgesics. Systematic electronic searches utilised six research databases (Embase, Medline, PubMed, Cinahl Plus, Web of Science, OpenGrey). A 'grey' literature search and a reference search of included articles were also undertaken. The PICOS framework was used to develop search strategies and the findings are reported in accordance with the PRISMA Statement. After eligibility reviews of 6164 articles, 12 studies (involving 310 408 participants) were retained for inclusion in the meta-analyses. A random effects model (DerSimonian-Laird method) generated a pooled incidence of opioid dependence or abuse of 4.7%. There was little within-study risk of bias and no significant publication bias; however, substantial heterogeneity was found among study effects (99.78%). Sensitivity analyses indicated that the diagnostic criteria selected for identifying opioid dependence or abuse (Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM-IV) vs International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9)) accounted for 20% and duration of exposure to opioid analgesics accounted for 18% of variance in study effects. Longer-term opioid analgesic exposure, and prescription of strong rather than weak opioids, were associated with a significantly lower incidence of opioid dependence or abuse. The incidence of iatrogenic opioid dependence or abuse was 4.7% of those prescribed opioids for pain. Further research is required to confirm the potential for our findings to inform prevention of this serious adverse event. Copyright © 2018 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety of oral dronabinol during opioid withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jicha, Crystal J; Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Babalonis, Shanna; Elayi, Samy Claude; Walsh, Sharon L

    2015-12-01

    Opioid dependence remains a significant public health problem worldwide with only three FDA-approved treatments, all targeting the mu-opioid receptor. Dronabinol, a cannabinoid (CB) 1 receptor agonist, is currently under investigation as a novel opioid withdrawal treatment. This study reports on safety outcomes of dronabinol among adults in opioid withdrawal. Twelve adults physically dependent on short-acting opioids participated in this 5-week within-subject, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study. Volunteers were maintained on oral oxycodone 30 mg qid. Double-blind placebo substitutions occurred for 21 h before each of 7 experimental sessions in order to produce opioid withdrawal. A single oral test dose was administered each session (placebo, oxycodone 30 and 60 mg, dronabinol 5, 10, 20, and 30 mg [decreased from 40 mg]). Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory outcomes and pupil diameter were assessed repeatedly. Dronabinol 40 mg produced sustained sinus tachycardia accompanied by anxiety and panic necessitating dose reduction to 30 mg. Sinus tachycardia and anxiety also occurred in one volunteer after dronabinol 20mg. Compared to placebo, dronabinol 20 and 30 mg produced significant increases in heart rate beginning 1h after drug administration that lasted approximately 2h (popioid agonist effects (e.g., miosis). Dronabinol 20mg and higher increased heart rate among healthy adults at rest who were in a state of opioid withdrawal, raising concern about its safety. These results have important implications for future dosing strategies and may limit the utility of dronabinol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Opioid interruptions, pain, and withdrawal symptoms in nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Sarah E; Liu, Sophia; Hung, William W; Boockvar, Kenneth S

    2014-11-01

    during the follow-up periods (difference 0.09 points per day; 95% CI, -0.01 to 0.019; P = 0.08). In particular, patients who received the highest quartile of opioid dose before interruption experienced increases in pain scores over time that were 0.22 points per day larger (95% CI, 0.02 to 0.41; P = 0.03) than those without interruption. Withdrawal scores were not associated with opioid interruption regardless of dose before interruption. Nursing home patients often experience interruptions in opioid dosing, which can be associated with worse pain, but not withdrawal symptoms, during acute illnesses. Clinicians should be aware of the potential risks and effects of opioid interruptions during acute illnesses in this patient group. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Safety and efficacy of an oxycodone vaccine: Addressing some of the unique considerations posed by opioid abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Raleigh

    Full Text Available Among vaccines aimed at treating substance use disorders, those targeting opioids present several unique medication development challenges. 1 Opioid overdose is a common complication of abuse, so it is desirable for an opioid vaccine to block the toxic as well as the addictive effects of opioids. 2 It is important that an opioid vaccine not interfere with the action of opioid antagonists used to reverse opioid overdose or treat addiction. 3 Some opioids are immunosuppressive and chronic ongoing opioid use could interfere with vaccine immunogenicity. 4 Although antibody-bound oxycodone is unable to enter the brain because of its size, it might still be able to activate peripheral opioid receptors. To assess vaccine impact on opioid toxicity, rats vaccinated with oxycodone conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin subunit dimer (OXY-dKLH adsorbed to alum or controls vaccinated with dKLH were compared with regard to oxycodone-induced hotplate analgesia and oxycodone-induced respiratory depression and bradycardia. Vaccination shifted the dose-response curves to the right, representing protection, for each of these endpoints. Naloxone was equally effective in both OXY-dKLH and control groups, providing complete and rapid reversal of respiratory depression. The administration of a long-acting naltrexone formulation during vaccination did not impair vaccine immunogenicity in mice. Similarly, serum anti-oxycodone antibody titers were not altered by continuous morphine infusion during vaccination compared to opioid-naïve controls. Competitive ELISA assay showed negligible or low affinity of immune antiserum for endogenous opioids or opioid antagonists. In vitro receptor binding assays showed that antibody-bound oxycodone does not activate mu opioid receptors. These data support further study of OXY-dKLH as a potential treatment for oxycodone abuse and suggest that vaccination might also reduce the severity of oxycodone overdose.

  5. Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive effects of chimeric peptides consisting of a micro-opioid receptor agonist and an ORL1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Susumu; Ito, Risa; Nishiyama, Miharu; Kubo, Mai; Matsushima, Tomoko; Minamisawa, Motoko; Ambo, Akihiro; Sasaki, Yusuke

    2007-07-01

    Receptor binding properties and antinociceptive activities of chimeric peptides linked by spacers were investigated. The peptides consisted of the micro-opioid receptor ligand dermorphin (Tyr-D-Ala-Phe-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Ser-NH(2)) or its analog YRFB (Tyr-D-Arg-Phe-betaAla-NH(2)) linked to the ORL1 receptor ligand Ac-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg-Ile-Lys-NH(2) (Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2)). All chimeric peptides were found to possess high receptor binding affinities for both micro-opioid and ORL1 receptors in mouse brain membranes although their binding affinities for both receptors in spinal membranes were significantly lower. Among them, chimeric peptide 2, which consists of dermorphin and Ac-RYYRIK-NH(2) connected by a long spacer, had the highest binding affinity towards both receptors. In the tail-flick test following intrathecal (i.t.) administration to mice, all chimeric peptides showed potent and dose-dependent antinociceptive activities with an ED(50) of 1.34-4.51 (pmol/mouse), nearly comparable to dermorphin alone (ED(50); 1.08 pmol/mouse). In contrast to their micro-opioid receptor binding profiles, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of the chimeric peptides resulted in much less potent antinociceptive activity (ED(50) 5.55-100peptides, and the regulation of mu-opioid receptor-mediated antinociception in brain. The present chimeric peptides may be useful as pharmacological tools for studies on micro-opioid receptor/ORL1 receptor heterodimers.

  6. Prescription opioid use and misuse: piloting an educational strategy for rural primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anita; Kahan, Meldon; Jiwa, Ashifa

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a multifaceted educational intervention to improve the opioid prescribing practices of rural family physicians in a remote First Nations community. Prospective cohort study. Sioux Lookout, Ont. Family physicians. Eighteen family physicians participated in a 1-year study of a series of educational interventions on safe opioid prescribing. Interventions included a main workshop with a lecture and interactive case discussions, an online chat room, video case conferencing, and consultant support. Responses to questionnaires at baseline and after 1 year on knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to opioid prescribing. The main workshop was feasible and was well received by primary care physicians in remote communities. At 1 year, physicians were less concerned about getting patients addicted to opioids and more comfortable with opioid dosing. Multifaceted education and consultant support might play an important role in improving family physician comfort with opioid prescribing, and could improve the treatment of chronic pain while minimizing the risk of addiction.

  7. The effect of post-traumatic stress disorder on the risk of developing prescription opioid use disorder: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ahmed N; Foll, Bernard Le; Imtiaz, Sameer; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of baseline post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and each symptoms cluster on the risk of developing opioid use disorder (OUD) in those exposed to opioid painkillers and to assess the effect of comorbid PTSD and OUD on functioning, OUD severity, and treatment seeking compared with individuals with OUD only. We obtained data from 4025 individuals exposed to opioid painkillers from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III. We matched individuals with baseline PTSD with individuals without PTSD on demographics, developmental background, family history, personalities, and exposure to stressful life events with propensity score methodology. We controlled for clinical diagnoses and other risk factors that may have occurred after PTSD onset. Quality of life was assessed with the SF-12; the number of diagnostic criteria met indicated OUD severity. Baseline PTSD predicted OUD after controlling for matching variables and other risk factors, including baseline mood/anxiety disorders and other substance use disorders (odds ratio[OR]: 1.58; 95% confidence interval[CI]: 1.14-2.17; p=0.02). Among individuals with PTSD, arousal/reactivity cluster predicted OUD. Individuals with comorbid PTSD and OUD had lower mean scores on the SF-12 scale and greater severity of OUD than individuals with OUD. There were no differences in help-seeking. Baseline PTSD increases the risk of developing OUD after exposure to opioid painkillers. Clinicians should screen for PTSD diagnosis and arousal/reactivity symptoms prior to prescribing painkillers. Integrated treatments are strongly recommended for patients with this dual diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumaier, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid peptides as neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus was investigated by using extracellular recording and radioligand binding techniques in the hippocampal slice preparation. Synaptic conductances from endogenously released opioid peptides have been difficult to detect. This problem was approach by designing a novel assay of opioid peptide release, in which release was detected by measuring binding competition between endogenous opioids and added radioligand. Membrane depolarization displaced [ 3 H]-diprenorphine binding in a transient, calcium-dependent, and peptidase-sensitive manner. Autoradiographic localization of the sites of [ 3 H]-diprenorphine binding displacement showed that significant opioid peptide release and receptor occupancy occurred in each major subregion of the hippocampal slices. This assay method can not be used to define optimal electrical stimulation conditions for releasing endogenous opioids. The binding displacement method was extended to the study of the sigma receptor. Depolarization of hippocampal slices was found to reduce the binding of the sigma-selective radioligand [ 3 H]-ditolylguanidine in a transient and calcium-dependent manner with no apparent direct effects on sigma receptor affinity

  9. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  10. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Charlotte; Sobotka, Fabian; Karavasopoulou, Athina; Ward, Stephen; Bantel, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses' mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses' mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580) and one German (n=799) hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. A total of 511 (37.1%) questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation) age of participants were 37 (11) years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87% did not regard opioids as drugs to help patients die, and 72% did not view them as drugs of abuse. More English (41%) than German (28%) nurses were afraid of criminal investigations and were constantly aware of side effects (UK, 94%; Germany, 38%) when using opioids. Four latent variables were identified which likely influence nurses' mental models: "conscious decision-making"; "medication-related fears"; "practice-based observations"; and "risk assessment". They were predicted by strength of religious beliefs and indicators of informal learning such as experience but not by indicators of formal learning such as conference attendance. Nurses in both countries employ analytical and affective mental models when administering the opioids and seem to learn from experience

  11. Pleiotropic opioid regulation of spinal endomorphin 2 release and its adaptations to opioid withdrawal are sexually dimorphic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sumita; Liu, Nai-Jiang; Zadina, James E; Sharma, Tarak; Gintzler, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    We studied adaptations to acute precipitated opioid withdrawal of spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-coupled regulation of the release of endomorphin 2 (EM2). The release of this highly MOR-selective endogenous opioid from opioid-naive spinal tissue of male rats is subjected to MOR-coupled positive as well as negative modulation via cholera toxin-sensitive G(s) and pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i)/G(o), respectively. The net effect of this concomitant bidirectional modulation is inhibitory. MOR-coupled pleiotropic regulation of EM2 release is retained in opioid-withdrawn spinal tissue of male rats, but the balance of MOR-coupled inhibitory and facilitatory regulation shifted such that facilitatory regulation predominates. Augmented coupling of MOR to G(s) is causally associated with this change. Strikingly, pleiotropic characteristics of MOR-coupled regulation of spinal EM2 release and adaptations thereof to opioid withdrawal are male-specific. In females, MOR-coupled regulation of EM2 release from opioid-naive and -withdrawn spinal tissue does not have a significant G(s)-coupled facilitatory component, and MOR-coupled inhibition of EM2 release persists unabated in withdrawn preparations. The male-specific adaptations to chronic morphine that shift the relative predominance of opposing dual G protein-coupled MOR pathways provides a mechanism for mitigating inhibitory MOR signaling without losing MOR-coupled feedback regulation. These adaptations enable using endogenous EM2 as a substitute for morphine that had been precipitously removed. The sexually dimorphic functionality and regulation of spinal EM2/MOR-coupled signaling suggest the clinical utility of using sex-specific treatments for addiction that harness the activity of endogenous opioids.

  12. "Effects of the novel relatively short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonist LY2444296 in behaviors observed after chronic extended-access cocaine self-administration in rats".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Marta; Butelman, Eduardo R; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2017-08-01

    The recruitment of the stress circuitry contributes to a shift from positive to negative reinforcement mechanisms sustaining long-term cocaine addiction. The kappa opioid receptor (KOPr) signaling is upregulated by stress and chronic cocaine exposure. While KOPr agonists induce anhedonia and dysphoria, KOPr antagonists display antidepressant and anxiolytic properties. Most of the knowledge on KOPr antagonism is based on drugs with unusual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, complicating interpretation of results. Here we characterized in vivo behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of the novel relatively short-acting KOPr antagonist LY2444296. To date, no study has investigated whether systemic KOPr blockade reduced anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors in animals previously exposed to chronic extended access cocaine self-administration. We tested the effect of LY2444296 in blocking KOPr-mediated aversive and neuroendocrine effects. Then, we tested acute systemic LY2444296 in reducing anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, as well as releasing the stress hormone corticosterone (CORT), observed after chronic extended access (18 h/day for 14 days) cocaine self-administration. LY2444296 blocked U69,593-induced place aversion and -reduced motor activity as well as U69,593-induced release of serum CORT, confirming its major site of action, without exerting an effect per se. Acute systemic administration of LY2444296 reduced anxiety-like and depressive-like behaviors, as well as CORT release, in rats tested after chronic extended access cocaine self-administration, but not in cocaine-naïve rats. Results suggest that acute blockade of KOPr by a relatively short-acting antagonist produces therapeutic-like effects selectively in rats with a history of chronic extended access cocaine self-administration.

  13. The long-term effects of stress and kappa opioid receptor activation on conditioned place aversion in male and female California mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman-Maharg, Abigail R; Copeland, Tiffany; Sanchez, Evelyn Ordoñes; Campi, Katharine L; Trainor, Brian C

    2017-08-14

    Psychosocial stress leads to the activation of kappa opioid receptors (KORs), which induce dysphoria and facilitate depression-like behaviors. However, less is known about the long-term effects of stress and KORs in females. We examined the long-term effects of social defeat stress on the aversive properties of KOR activation in male and female California mice (Peromyscus californicus) using a conditioned place aversion paradigm. Female California mice naïve to social defeat, formed a place aversion following treatment with 2.5mg/kg of the KOR agonist U50,488, but females exposed to defeat did not form a place aversion to this dose. This supports the finding by others that social defeat weakens the aversive properties of KOR agonists. In contrast, both control and stressed males formed an aversion to 10mg/kg of U50,488. We also examined EGR1 immunoreactivity, an indirect marker of neuronal activity, in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and found that stress and treatment with 10mg/kg of U50,488 increased EGR1 immunoreactivity in the NAc core in females but reduced activation in males. The effects of stress and U50,488 on EGR1 were specific to the NAc, as we found no differences in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. In summary, our data indicate important sex differences in the long-term effects of stress and indicate the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms mediating the behavioral effects of KOR in both males and females. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nucleus accumbens opioid, GABaergic, and dopaminergic modulation of palatable food motivation: contrasting effects revealed by a progressive ratio study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Balmadrid, Christian; Kelley, Ann E

    2003-04-01

    The current studies were designed to evaluate whether incentive motivation for palatable food is altered after manipulations of opioid, GABAergic, and dopaminergic transmission within the nucleus accumbens. A progressive ratio schedule was used to measure lever-pressing for sugar pellets after microinfusion of drugs into the nucleus accumbens in non-food-deprived rats. The mu opioid agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo15-enkephalin and the indirect dopamine agonist amphetamine induced a marked increase in break point and correct lever-presses; the GABA(A) agonist muscimol did not affect breakpoint or lever-presses. The data suggest that opioid, dopaminergic, and GABAergic systems within the accumbens differentially modulate food-seeking behavior through mechanisms related to hedonic evaluation of food, incentive salience, and control of motor feeding circuits, respectively.

  15. Towards safer use of opioids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carson, R W R

    2009-09-01

    The main aim of our work was to improve the safety of opioid use in our institution, an acute generalhospital with 620 beds. Initially, all reported opioid errors from 2001 - 2006 were audited. The findings directed a range of multidisciplinary staff educational inputs to improve opioid prescribing and administration practice, and encourage drug error reporting. 448 drug errors were reported, of which 54 (12%) involved opioids; of these, 43 (79%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. 31 of the errors (57%) were associated with administration, followed by 12 (22%) with dispensing and 11 (20%) with prescribing. There were 2 reports of definite patient harm. A subsequent audit examined a 17-month period following the introduction of the above teaching: 17 errors were noted, of which 14 (83%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. Again, drug administration was most error-prone, comprising 11 (65%) of reports. However, just 2 (12%) of the reported errors now involved prescribing, which was a reduction.

  16. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  17. Second Line of Defense Spares Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Dale L.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Muller, George; Mercier, Theresa M.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Perkins, Casey J.; Cooley, Scott K.; Thorsen, Darlene E.

    2012-11-20

    During Fiscal Year 2012, a team from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an assessment and analysis of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Sustainability spare parts program. Spare parts management touches many aspects of the SLD Sustainability Program including contracting and integration of Local Maintenance Providers (LMP), equipment vendors, analyses and metrics on program performance, system state of health, and maintenance practices. Standardized spares management will provide better data for decisions during site transition phase and will facilitate transition to host country sustainability ownership. The effort was coordinated with related SLD Sustainability Program initiatives, including a configuration items baselining initiative, a metrics initiative, and a maintenance initiative. The spares study has also led to pilot programs for sourcing alternatives that include regional intermediate inventories and partnering agreements that leverage existing supply chains. Many partners from the SLD Sustainability program contributed to and were consulted in the course of the study. This document provides a description of the findings, recommendations, and implemented solutions that have resulted from the study.

  18. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  19. Pregabalin for Opioid-Refractory Pain in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos A. Kontoangelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a systemic inflammatory disease with chronic back pain as the most common presenting symptom. We present a case of a male patient with AS reporting symptoms of severe low back pain, buttock pain, and limited spinal mobility. After chronic treatment with opioids, we administered pregabalin at a dose of 300 mg as an analgesic agent while opioids were discontinued. Findings. Pain symptoms improved progressively, and opioids were gradually discontinued without any withdrawal symptoms reported. Conclusions. Pregabalin is potentially useful in the management of pain in patients with AS while effectively managing the discontinuation of opioid treatment.

  20. Gabapentin, opioids, and the risk of opioid-related death: A population-based nested case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid use is highly associated with risk of opioid-related death, with 1 of every 550 chronic opioid users dying within approximately 2.5 years of their first opioid prescription. Although gabapentin is widely perceived as safe, drug-induced respiratory depression has been described when gabapentin is used alone or in combination with other medications. Because gabapentin and opioids are both commonly prescribed for pain, the likelihood of co-prescription is high. However, no published studies have examined whether concomitant gabapentin therapy is associated with an increased risk of accidental opioid-related death in patients receiving opioids. The objective of this study was to investigate whether co-prescription of opioids and gabapentin is associated with an increased risk of accidental opioid-related mortality.We conducted a population-based nested case-control study among opioid users who were residents of Ontario, Canada, between August 1, 1997, and December 31, 2013, using administrative databases. Cases, defined as opioid users who died of an opioid-related cause, were matched with up to 4 controls who also used opioids on age, sex, year of index date, history of chronic kidney disease, and a disease risk index. After matching, we included 1,256 cases and 4,619 controls. The primary exposure was concomitant gabapentin use in the 120 days preceding the index date. A secondary analysis characterized gabapentin dose as low (<900 mg daily, moderate (900 to 1,799 mg daily, or high (≥1,800 mg daily. A sensitivity analysis examined the effect of concomitant nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use in the preceding 120 days. Overall, 12.3% of cases (155 of 1,256 and 6.8% of controls (313 of 4,619 were prescribed gabapentin in the prior 120 days. After multivariable adjustment, co-prescription of opioids and gabapentin was associated with a significantly increased odds of opioid-related death (odds ratio [OR] 1.99, 95% CI

  1. Intrathecal opioids versus epidural local anesthetics for labor analgesia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Brenda A; Chestnut, David H; Hawkins, Joy L

    2002-01-01

    Some anesthesiologists contend that intrathecal opioid administration has advantages over conventional epidural techniques during labor. Randomized clinical trials comparing analgesia and obstetric outcome using single-injection intrathecal opioids versus epidural local anesthetics suggest that intrathecal opioids provide comparable analgesia with few serious side effects. This meta-analysis compared the analgesic efficacy, side effects, and obstetric outcome of single-injection intrathecal opioid techniques versus epidural local anesthetics in laboring women. Relevant clinical studies were identified using electronic and manual searches of the literature covering the period from 1989 to 2000. Searches used the following descriptors: intrathecal analgesia, spinal opioids, epidural analgesia, epidural local anesthetics, and analgesia for labor. Data were extracted from 7 randomized clinical trials comparing analgesic measures, incidence of motor block, pruritus, nausea, hypotension, mode of delivery, and/or Apgar scores. Combined test results indicated comparable analgesic efficacy 15 to 20 minutes after injection with single-injection intrathecal opioid administration. Intrathecal opioid injections were associated with a greater incidence of pruritus (odds ratio, 14.01; 99% confidence interval, 6.9 to 28.3), but there was no difference in the incidence of nausea or in the method of delivery. Published studies suggest that intrathecal opioids provide comparable early labor analgesia when compared with epidural local anesthetics. Intrathecal opioid administration results in a greater incidence of pruritus. The choice of technique does not appear to affect the method of delivery.

  2. Clinical utility of naloxegol in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruner HC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heather C Bruner,1 Rabia S Atayee,2 Kyle P Edmonds,3 Gary T Buckholz3 1Scripps Health and University of California San Diego, Joint Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship, San Diego, CA, USA; 2University of California San Diego, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, La Jolla, CA, USA; 3Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, Doris A Howell Palliative Care Service, La Jolla, CA, USA Abstract: Opioids are a class of medications frequently used for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, exerting their desired effects at central opioid receptors. Agonism at peripherally located opioid receptors, however, leads to opioid-induced constipation (OIC, one of the most frequent and debilitating side effects of prolonged opioid use. Insufficient relief of OIC with lifestyle modification and traditional laxative treatments may lead to decreased compliance with opioid regimens and undertreated pain. Peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORAs offer the reversal of OIC without loss of central pain relief. Until recently, PAMORAs were restricted to subcutaneous route or to narrow patient populations. Naloxegol is the first orally dosed PAMORA indicated for the treatment of OIC in noncancer patients. Studies have suggested its efficacy in patients failing traditional constipation treatments; however, insufficient evidence exists to establish its role in primary prevention of OIC at this time. Keywords: opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, chronic pain, peripherally-acting mu-opioid antagonist, bowel care, OIC, OIBD 

  3. Ablation of kappa-opioid receptors from brain dopamine neurons has anxiolytic-like effects and enhances cocaine-induced plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van't Veer, Ashlee; Bechtholt, Anita J; Onvani, Sara; Potter, David; Wang, Yujun; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Schütz, Günther; Chartoff, Elena H; Rudolph, Uwe; Cohen, Bruce M; Carlezon, William A

    2013-07-01

    Brain kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) are implicated in states of motivation and emotion. Activation of KORs negatively regulates mesolimbic dopamine (DA) neurons, and KOR agonists produce depressive-like behavioral effects. To further evaluate how KOR function affects behavior, we developed mutant mice in which exon 3 of the KOR gene (Oprk1) was flanked with Cre-lox recombination (loxP) sites. By breeding these mice with lines that express Cre-recombinase (Cre) in early embryogenesis (EIIa-Cre) or only in DA neurons (dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre), we developed constitutive KOR knockouts (KOR(-/-)) and conditional knockouts that lack KORs in DA-containing neurons (DAT-KOR(lox/lox)). Autoradiography demonstrated complete ablation of KOR binding in the KOR(-/-) mutants, and reduced binding in the DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mutants. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) studies confirmed that KOR mRNA is undetectable in the constitutive mutants and reduced in the midbrain DA systems of the conditional mutants. Behavioral characterization demonstrated that these mutant lines do not differ from controls in metrics, including hearing, vision, weight, and locomotor activity. Whereas KOR(-/-) mice appeared normal in the open field and light/dark box tests, DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mice showed reduced anxiety-like behavior, an effect that is broadly consistent with previously reported effects of KOR antagonists. Sensitization to the locomotor-stimulating effects of cocaine appeared normal in KOR(-/-) mutants, but was exaggerated in DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mutants. Increased sensitivity to cocaine in the DAT-KOR(lox/lox) mutants is consistent with a role for KORs in negative regulation of DA function, whereas the lack of differences in the KOR(-/-) mutants suggests compensatory adaptations after constitutive receptor ablation. These mouse lines may be useful in future studies of KOR function.

  4. The relative potency of inverse opioid agonists and a neutral opioid antagonist in precipitated withdrawal and antagonism of analgesia and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Madia, Priyanka A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2009-08-01

    Opioid antagonists can be classified as inverse agonists and neutral antagonists. In the opioid-dependent state, neutral antagonists are significantly less potent in precipitating withdrawal than inverse agonists. Consequently, neutral opioid antagonists may offer advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose. In this study, the relative potency of three opioid antagonists to block opioid analgesia and toxicity and precipitate withdrawal was examined. First, the potency of two opioid inverse agonists (naltrexone and naloxone) and a neutral antagonist (6beta-naltrexol) to antagonize fentanyl-induced analgesia and lethality was determined. The order of potency to block analgesia was naltrexone > naloxone > 6beta-naltrexol (17, 4, 1), which was similar to that to block lethality (13, 2, 1). Next, the antagonists were compared using withdrawal jumping in fentanyl-dependent mice. The order of potency to precipitate withdrawal jumping was naltrexone > naloxone 6beta-naltrexol (1107, 415, 1). The relative potencies to precipitate withdrawal for the inverse agonists compared with the neutral antagonist were dramatically different from that for antagonism of analgesia and lethality. Finally, the effect of 6beta-naltrexol pretreatment on naloxone-precipitated jumping was determined in morphine and fentanyl-dependent mice. 6beta-Naltrexol pretreatment decreased naloxone precipitated withdrawal, indicating that 6beta-naltrexol is a neutral antagonist. These data demonstrate that inverse agonists and neutral antagonists have generally comparable potencies to block opioid analgesia and lethality, whereas the neutral opioid antagonist is substantially less potent in precipitating opioid withdrawal. These results support suggestions that neutral antagonists may have advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose.

  5. Tolerance to the Diuretic Effects of Cannabinoids and Cross-Tolerance to a κ-Opioid Agonist in THC-Treated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopda, Girish R; Parge, Viraj; Thakur, Ganesh A; Gatley, S John; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Paronis, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    Daily treatment with cannabinoids results in tolerance to many, but not all, of their behavioral and physiologic effects. The present studies investigated the effects of 7-day exposure to 10 mg/kg daily of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the diuretic and antinociceptive effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid AM4054. Comparison studies determined diuretic responses to the κ-opioid agonist U50,488 and furosemide. After determination of control dose-response functions, mice received 10 mg/kg daily of THC for 7 days, and dose-response functions were re-determined 24 hours, 7 days, or 14 days later. THC and AM4054 had biphasic diuretic effects under control conditions with maximum effects of 30 and 35 ml/kg of urine, respectively. In contrast, antinociceptive effects of both drugs increased monotonically with dose to >90% of maximal possible effect. Treatment with THC produced 9- and 7-fold rightward shifts of the diuresis and antinociception dose-response curves for THC and, respectively, 7- and 3-fold rightward shifts in the AM4054 dose-response functions. U50,488 and furosemide increased urine output to >35 ml/kg under control conditions. The effects of U50,488 were attenuated after 7-day treatment with THC, whereas the effects of furosemide were unaltered. Diuretic effects of THC and AM4054 recovered to near-baseline levels within 14 days after stopping daily THC injections, whereas tolerance to the antinociceptive effects persisted longer than 14 days. The tolerance induced by 7-day treatment with THC was accompanied by a 55% decrease in the Bmax value for cannabinoid receptors (CB1). These data indicate that repeated exposure to THC produces similar rightward shifts in the ascending and descending limbs of cannabinoid diuresis dose-effect curves and to antinociceptive effects while resulting in a flattening of the U50,488 diuresis dose-effect function. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid

  7. Tamoxifen and estradiol improved locomotor function and increased spared tissue in rats after spinal cord injury: their antioxidant effect and role of estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Laurivette; Colón, Jennifer M; Santiago, José M; Torrado, Aranza I; Meléndez, Margarita; Segarra, Annabell C; Rodríguez-Orengo, José F; Miranda, Jorge D

    2014-05-02

    17β-Estradiol is a multi-active steroid that imparts neuroprotection via diverse mechanisms of action. However, its role as a neuroprotective agent after spinal cord injury (SCI), or the involvement of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) in locomotor recovery, is still a subject of much debate. In this study, we evaluated the effects of estradiol and of Tamoxifen (an estrogen receptor mixed agonist/antagonist) on locomotor recovery following SCI. To control estradiol cyclical variability, ovariectomized female rats received empty or estradiol filled implants, prior to a moderate contusion to the spinal cord. Estradiol improved locomotor function at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post injury (DPI), when compared to control groups (measured with the BBB open field test). This effect was ER-α mediated, because functional recovery was blocked with an ER-α antagonist. We also observed that ER-α was up-regulated after SCI. Long-term treatment (28 DPI) with estradiol and Tamoxifen reduced the extent of the lesion cavity, an effect also mediated by ER-α. The antioxidant effects of estradiol were seen acutely at 2 DPI but not at 28 DPI, and this acute effect was not receptor mediated. Rats treated with Tamoxifen recovered some locomotor activity at 21 and 28 DPI, which could be related to the antioxidant protection seen at these time points. These results show that estradiol improves functional outcome, and these protective effects are mediated by the ER-α dependent and independent-mechanisms. Tamoxifen׳s effects during late stages of SCI support the use of this drug as a long-term alternative treatment for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Desipramine in opioid-dependent cocaine abusers maintained on buprenorphine vs methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveto, A H; Feingold, A; Schottenfeld, R; Jatlow, P; Kosten, T R

    1999-09-01

    Cocaine abuse occurs in 40% to 60% of patients entering opioid maintenance treatment, and effective pharmacotherapies are needed for this combined dependence. This 13-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of desipramine hydrochloride (0 or 150 mg/d) plus buprenorphine hydrochloride (12 mg/d) or methadone hydrochloride (65 mg/d) in 180 opioid-dependent cocaine abusers (124 men, 56 women). Supervised urine samples were obtained thrice weekly, and self-reported cocaine and heroin use was reported once weekly. Desipramine plasma levels were determined at weeks 4 and 10. In men, opioid abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine, whereas cocaine abstinence was increased more with buprenorphine than with methadone. In women, opioid abstinence was increased the least rapidly when treated with buprenorphine plus placebo, while cocaine abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine. Regardless of sex or opioid medication, desipramine increased opioid and cocaine abstinence more rapidly over time than placebo. Self-reported opioid use confirmed these findings. Desipramine plasma levels were higher in women than in men, particularly those on buprenorphine maintenance. Higher desipramine plasma levels were associated with greater opioid, but not cocaine, abstinence. Desipramine may be a useful adjunctive medication in facilitating opioid and cocaine abstinence in opioid-maintained patients. The efficacy of opioid medications to treat opioid or cocaine dependence may differ by sex. These findings highlight the importance of including sex as a factor when examining treatment outcome in these types of trials.

  9. Prescription opioids for occupational injury: results from workers' compensation claims records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Collie, Alex; McClure, Roderick J

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the prevalence of opioid prescription use in an Australian workers' compensation population and assess predictors of long-term use. Retrospective administrative data analysis. WorkSafe Victoria (Australia) workers' compensation. Workers with a workers' compensation claim were included if the injury/illness started in 2008 or 2009 (N = 54,931). Claim payments records dating up to 2 years postinjury were analyzed to determine receipt of prescription opioids. Long-term use was defined as use of any opioid beyond 1 year postinjury. Within the follow-up period, 8,933 (16.3%) workers claimed prescription opioids: 10.0% claimed opioids in the first year only, and 6.3% claimed opioids beyond the first year. The most commonly received opioids were codeine (10.4%), oxycodone (7.5%), and tramadol (5.0%). Dextropropoxyphene, which is considered unsafe in many countries because of potentially fatal side effects, was used by 1.9% of injured workers. Progression to long-term use of opioids was common (N = 3,446; 39%): age (35-64 years; the association with age followed an inverse U-shaped curve), women, laborers, lower socioeconomic status, greater work disability, and greater hospital expense were associated with opioid use beyond the first year postinjury. Prescription opioid use for workplace injury in Australia is common but not as common as reports from U.S. workers' compensation schemes. The type of opioid and number of repeat prescriptions are factors that should be carefully considered by practitioners prescribing opioids to injured workers: progression to long-term use is common and not fully explained by injury severity. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Prescription Opioid Usage and Abuse Relationships: An Evaluation of State Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Reisman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The dramatic rise in the use of prescription opioids to treat non-cancer pain has been paralleled by increasing prescription opioid abuse. However, detailed analyses of these trends and programs to address them are lacking. Objective To study the association between state shipments of prescription opioids for medical use and prescription opioid abuse admissions and to assess the effects of state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs on prescription opioid abuse admissions. Design and Setting A retrospective ecological cohort study comparing state prescription opioid shipments (source: Automation of Reports and Consolidated Orders Systems database and inpatient admissions for prescription opioid abuse (source: Treatment Episode Data Set in 14 states with PDMPs (intervention group and 36 states without PDMPs (control group for the period 1997–2003. Results From 1997 to 2003, oxycodone, morphine, and hydrocodone shipments increased by 479%, 100%, and 148% respectively. Increasing prescription oxycodone shipments were significantly associated with increasing prescription opioid admission rates (p < 0.001. PDMP states had significantly lower oxycodone shipments than the control group. PDMP states had less increase in prescription opioid admissions per year (p = 0.063. A patient admitted to an inpatient drug abuse rehabilitation program in a PDMP state was less likely to be admitted for prescription opioid drug abuse (Odds ratio = 0.775, 95% Confidence Interval 0.764–0.785. Conclusions PDMPs appear to decrease the quantity of oxycodone shipments and the prescription opioid admission rate for states with these programs. Overall, opioid shipments rose significantly in PDMP states during the study period indicating a negligible “chilling effect” on physician prescribing.

  11. Computer Modeling of Human Delta Opioid Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Dzimbova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of selective agonists of δ-opioid receptor as well as the model of interaction of ligands with this receptor is the subjects of increased interest. In the absence of crystal structures of opioid receptors, 3D homology models with different templates have been reported in the literature. The problem is that these models are not available for widespread use. The aims of our study are: (1 to choose within recently published crystallographic structures templates for homology modeling of the human δ-opioid receptor (DOR; (2 to evaluate the models with different computational tools; and (3 to precise the most reliable model basing on correlation between docking data and in vitro bioassay results. The enkephalin analogues, as ligands used in this study, were previously synthesized by our group and their biological activity was evaluated. Several models of DOR were generated using different templates. All these models were evaluated by PROCHECK and MolProbity and relationship between docking data and in vitro results was determined. The best correlations received for the tested models of DOR were found between efficacy (erel of the compounds, calculated from in vitro experiments and Fitness scoring function from docking studies. New model of DOR was generated and evaluated by different approaches. This model has good GA341 value (0.99 from MODELLER, good values from PROCHECK (92.6% of most favored regions and MolProbity (99.5% of favored regions. Scoring function correlates (Pearson r = -0.7368, p-value = 0.0097 with erel of a series of enkephalin analogues, calculated from in vitro experiments. So, this investigation allows suggesting a reliable model of DOR. Newly generated model of DOR receptor could be used further for in silico experiments and it will give possibility for faster and more correct design of selective and effective ligands for δ-opioid receptor.

  12. Exercise induced asthma and endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, R C; Bachman, M; Rochat, T; Egger, D; de Haller, R; Junod, A F

    1986-01-01

    Concentrations of endogenous opioid peptides in the plasma are increased during exercise and these substances have been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma induced by chloropropramide and alcohol in diabetic patients. This work was undertaken to determine whether exercise induced asthma might be mediated by endogenous opioids. Plasma beta endorphin, met-enkephalin, and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations were measured in five asthmatic patients and five normal volunteers breathing cold air during exercise. In four of the patients the effect of an infusion of naloxone on FEV1 was also measured during exercise induced asthma. Exercise produced acute bronchoconstriction in all asthmatics, characterised by a fall in FEV1; whereas no change occurred in normal subjects. There was no difference in plasma met-enkephalin, beta endorphin, and ACTH concentration between the two groups. Infusion of naloxone neither prevented nor worsened exercise induced asthma. These data suggest that endogenous opioids probably do not play a part in the development of exercise induced asthma. PMID:2944240

  13. Illicit Opioid Intoxication: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fareed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid intoxications and overdose are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Opioid overdose may occur in the setting of intravenous or intranasal heroin use, illicit use of diverted opioid medications, intentional or accidental misuse of prescription pain medications, or iatrogenic overdose. In this review, we focused on the epidemiology of illict opioid use in the United States and on the mechanism of action of opioid drugs. We also described the signs and symptoms, and diagnoses of intoxication and overdose. Lastly, we updated the reader about the most recent recommendations for treatment and prevention of opioid intoxications and overdose.

  14. Targinact--opioid pain relief without constipation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Targinact (Napp Pharmaceuticals Ltd) is a modified-release combination product containing the strong opioid oxycodone plus the opioid antagonist naloxone. It is licensed for "severe pain, which can be adequately managed only with opioid analgesics".1 The summary of product characteristics (SPC) states that "naloxone is added to counteract opioid-induced constipation by blocking the action of oxycodone at opioid receptors locally in the gut". Advertising for the product claims "better pain relief", "superior GI [gastrointestinal] tolerability" and "improved quality of life" "compared to previous treatment in a clinical practice study (n=7836)". Here we consider whether Targinact offers advantages over using strong opioids plus laxatives where required.

  15. Neurocognitive sparing of desktop microbeam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Soha; Inscoe, Christina R; Benefield, Thad; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2017-08-11

    Normal tissue toxicity is the dose-limiting side effect of radiotherapy. Spatial fractionation irradiation techniques, like microbeam radiotherapy (MRT), have shown promising results in sparing the normal brain tissue. Most MRT studies have been conducted at synchrotron facilities. With the aim to make this promising treatment more available, we have built the first desktop image-guided MRT device based on carbon nanotube x-ray technology. In the current study, our purpose was to evaluate the effects of MRT on the rodent normal brain tissue using our device and compare it with the effect of the integrated equivalent homogenous dose. Twenty-four, 8-week-old male C57BL/6 J mice were randomly assigned to three groups: MRT, broad-beam (BB) and sham. The hippocampal region was irradiated with two parallel microbeams in the MRT group (beam width = 300 μm, center-to-center = 900 μm, 160 kVp). The BB group received the equivalent integral dose in the same area of their brain. Rotarod, marble burying and open-field activity tests were done pre- and every month post-irradiation up until 8 months to evaluate the cognitive changes and potential irradiation side effects on normal brain tissue. The open-field activity test was substituted by Barnes maze test at 8th month. A multilevel model, random coefficients approach was used to evaluate the longitudinal and temporal differences among treatment groups. We found significant differences between BB group as compared to the microbeam-treated and sham mice in the number of buried marble and duration of the locomotion around the open-field arena than shams. Barnes maze revealed that BB mice had a lower capacity for spatial learning than MRT and shams. Mice in the BB group tend to gain weight at the slower pace than shams. No meaningful differences were found between MRT and sham up until 8-month follow-up using our measurements. Applying MRT with our newly developed prototype compact CNT-based image-guided MRT system

  16. Spatiotemporal expression of endogenous opioid processing enzymes in mouse uterus at peri-implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwei; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Bingyan; Chen, Yongjie; Wang, Haibin

    2016-02-01

    Successful implantation requires intimate interactions between a competent blastocyst and a receptive uterus. We recently demonstrated that the aberrant activation of opioid signaling by exogenous ligands adversely affects preimplantation embryonic development and subsequent implantation in mice. However, the underlying machinery governing the dynamic homeostasis of the endogenous opioid system in the uterus during early pregnancy remains elusive. We now show that all three major endogenous opioid precursors are spatiotemporally expressed in the uterus during early pregnancy. Moreover, we observe the well-coordinated expression of the synthetic enzyme prohormone convertases 1/3 (PC1/3) at lower levels and of its inhibitor proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 1 inhibitor (Pcsk1n) and the degrading enzyme membrane metallo-endopeptidase (MME) at higher levels in the receptive uterus. Both estrogen and progestin tend to reduce the uterine levels of opioid ligand precursors in the ovariectomized mouse model. This tight regulation of the endogenous opioid system by PC1/3, Pcsk1n and MME has been further confirmed in physiologically related pseudopregnancy and delayed implantation mouse models. The coordinated regulation of opioid precursor biosynthesis and metabolism helps to create appropriate opioid signaling ensuring uterine receptivity for implantation. Thus, endogenous uterine opioid levels are primarily determined by the coordinated expressions of PC1/3, Pcsk1n and MME under the influence of ovarian progestin and estrogen. Our findings raise an additional cautionary note regarding the effects of opioid abuse on early pregnancy events.

  17. Is tapentadol different from classical opioids? A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Richard M; Knaggs, Roger; Farquhar-Smith, Paul; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2016-11-01

    Tapentadol is a single molecule able to deliver analgesia by two distinct mechanisms, a feature which differentiates it from many other analgesics. Pre-clinical data demonstrate two mechanisms of action: mu-opioid receptor agonist activity and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibition. From these, one may predict that tapentadol would be applicable across a broad spectrum of pain from nociceptive to neuropathic. The evidence in animal models suggests that norepinephrine re-uptake inhibition (NRI) is a key mechanism and may even predominate over opioid actions in chronic (and especially neuropathic) pain states, reinforcing that tapentadol is different to classical opioids and may, therefore, be an a priori choice for the treatment of neuropathic and mixed pain. The clinical studies and subsequent practice experience and surveillance support the concept of opioid and non-opioid mechanisms of action. The reduced incidence of some of the typical opioid-induced side effects, compared to equianalgesic doses of classical opioids, supports the hypothesis that tapentadol analgesia is only partially mediated by opioid agonist mechanisms. Both the pre-clinical and clinical profiles appear to be differentiated from those of classical opioids.

  18. Buprenorphine for managing opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Mbewe, Dalitso

    2017-02-21

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of substitution treatment. To assess the effects of buprenorphine versus tapered doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists, symptomatic medications or placebo, or different buprenorphine regimens for managing opioid withdrawal, in terms of the intensity of the withdrawal syndrome experienced, duration and completion of treatment, and adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2016), MEDLINE (1946 to December week 1, 2016), Embase (to 22 December 2016), PsycINFO (1806 to December week 3, 2016), and the Web of Science (to 22 December 2016) and handsearched the reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials of interventions using buprenorphine to modify the signs and symptoms of withdrawal in participants who were primarily opioid dependent. Comparison interventions involved reducing doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists (clonidine or lofexidine), symptomatic medications or placebo, and different buprenorphine-based regimens. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 27 studies involving 3048 participants. The main comparators were clonidine or lofexidine (14 studies). Six studies compared buprenorphine versus methadone, and seven compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction. We assessed 12 studies as being at high risk of bias in at least one of seven domains of methodological quality. Six of these studies compared buprenorphine with clonidine or lofexidine and two with methadone; the other four studies compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction.For the comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in tapered doses, meta-analysis was not possible for the outcomes of intensity of withdrawal or adverse effects. However, information reported by the individual studies was suggestive of buprenorphine and methadone having similar capacity to

  19. A multi-center randomized, controlled, open-label trial evaluating the effects of eosinophil-guided corticosteroid-sparing therapy in hospitalised patients with COPD exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Moberg, Mia; Eklöf, Josefin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The most commonly applied treatment for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is a 5-day course of high-dose systemic corticosteroids. However, this treatment has not been shown to reduce mortality and can potentially have serious side effects. Recent...... in hospitalised patients with AECOPD. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02857842 , 02-august-2016. Clinicaltrialregister.eu: Classification Code: 10,010,953, 02-marts-2016....

  20. Effectiveness of Relapse Prevention Cognitive-Behavioral Model in Opioid-Dependent Patients Participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashaei, Tahereh; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Ghazitabatabae, Mahmoud; Moeeni, Maryam; Rajati, Fatemeh; M Razzaghi, Emran

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a relapse prevention cognitive-behavioral model, based on Marlatt treatment approach, in Opioid-dependent patients participating in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) in Iran. The study consisted of 92 individuals treated with methadone in Iranian National Center of Addiction Studies (INCAS). Participants were randomized into two groups: educational intervention group (N=46) and control group (N=46). The intervention was comprised of 10 weekly 90 minute sessions, done during a period of 2.5 months based on the most high risk situations determined using Inventory Drug Taking Situation instrument. Relapse was defined as not showing up for MMT, drug use for at least 5 continuous days, and a positive urinary morphine test. While, only 36.4% of the intervention group relapsed into drug use, 63.6% of the control group relapsed. The result of the logistic regressions showed that the odd ratio of the variable of intervention program for the entire follow up period was 0.43 (P<0.01). Further, the odd ratio of this variable in one month, three months, and 195 days after the therapy were 0.48 (P<.03), 0.31 (P<.02), and 0.13 (P<.02) respectively that revealed that on average, the probability of relapse among individuals in the intervention group was lower than patients in control group. Relapse prevention model based on Marlatt treatment approach has an effective role in decreasing relapse rate. This model can be introduced as a complementary therapy in patients treated with methadone maintenance.

  1. Changes in misuse and abuse of prescription opioids following implementation of Extended-Release and Long-Acting Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher Bartelson, Becki; Le Lait, M Claire; Green, Jody L; Cepeda, M Soledad; Coplan, Paul M; Maziere, Jean-Yves; Wedin, Gregory P; Dart, Richard C

    2017-09-01

    An unintended consequence of extended-release (ER) and long-acting (LA) prescription opioids is that these formulations can be more attractive to abusers than immediate-release (IR) formulations. The US Food and Drug Administration recognized these risks and approved the ER/LA Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (ER/LA REMS), which has a goal of reducing opioid misuse and abuse and their associated consequences. The primary objective of this analysis is to determine whether ER/LA REMS implementation was associated with decreased reports of misuse and abuse. Data from the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS(R)) System Poison Center Program were utilized. Poison center cases are assigned a reason for exposure, a medical outcome, and a level of health care received. Rates adjusted for population and drug utilization were analyzed over time. RADARS System Poison Center Program data indicate a notable decrease in ER/LA opioid rates of intentional abuse and misuse as well as major medical outcomes or hospitalizations following implementation of the ER/LA REMS. While similar decreases were observed for the IR prescription opioid group, the decreasing rate for the ER/LA opioids exceeded the decreasing rates for the IR prescription opioids and was distinctly different than that for the prescription stimulants, indicating that the ER/LA REMS program may have had an additional effect on decreases in opioid abuse and intentional misuse beyond secular trends. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Impact of opioid therapy on gonadal hormones: focus on buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Anjali; Sapra, Mamta; Iranmanesh, Ali

    2018-02-17

    Objective The USA is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Understanding the impact of opioids and commonly used treatments for opioid dependence is essential for clinicians and researchers in order to educate and treat the nation's growing population with opioid use disorders. As a relatively new treatment for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is gaining popularity to the extent of becoming not only a preferred approach to the maintenance of opiate addiction, but also an option for chronic pain management. The purpose of this report is to review the available evidence on the endocrine effects of buprenorphine, particularly as it relates to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which is controversial and not fully defined. Method We conducted a Pubmed search (2000-2017) for human studies in the English language for articles that were available as full length regarding buprenorphine, endocrinopathy, hypogonadism, bone density, opioids. Case reports were also reviewed, although prospective studies and randomized controlled trials received more weight. Results Opioid induced hypogonadism is well established. Most studies report that buprenorphine being a partial agonist/antagonist may not be impacting the pituitary trophic hormones as much. There are reports of sexual dysfunction in subjects maintained on buprenorphine, some without hormonal correlation. Thus with the understanding that pertinent clinical studies are limited in number, varied in methodology, mostly cross sectional, predominantly in men and small number of participants, more research in this area is warranted. Conclusion Based on a comprehensive review of the available literature, we conclude that despite its increasing popularity, buprenorphine has not been adequately studied in respect to its long-term effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. There is a great need for longitudinal systematic trials to define the potential buprenorphine-induced endocrine consequences.

  3. The addition of tramadol as a second opioid may improve pain relief in severe osteoarthritis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Luigi; Foti, Calogero; Forte, Alfonso Maria; Palmieri, Enzo; Formisano, Rita; Vatakencherry, Abraham; Pappagallo, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Opioid combination has been shown to reduce the need for escalating doses for the treatment of cancer pain. A prospective study was planned to evaluate the addition of tramadol to a stronger opioid for the treatment of severe pain as a result of osteoarthritis, previously uncontrolled by non-opioid analgesics or weak opioids. All subjects received tramadol 200 mg and tizanidine 2 mg. At 2 weeks, tramadol was discontinued for patients still reporting poor pain relief (effectiveness ≤50%), and a stronger opioid was titrated to a morphine equivalent amount (MEA) of 40-60 mg orally. After two additional weeks, patients were then divided into two groups: the Strong Opioid Group (SO) and the Tramadol plus the Strong Opioid Group (TSO). The SO group was allowed to escalate opioid dose for lack of effectiveness; the TSO group received tramadol 150 mg daily, thereafter additional strong opioid titration was allowed. A total of 74 patients were studied: SO (n = 40) and TSOG (n = 34). All patients eventually achieved pain relief quality, with both groups reporting similar Karnofsky Performance Scale effectiveness. The SO group achieved satisfactory pain relief (>50%) at an average daily oral MEA of 120 mg. TSO subjects achieved satisfactory pain relief (>50%) at an average daily oral MEA of 95 mg. The addition of tramadol provided a synergistic effect resulting in a 30-mg decrease in necessary morphine equivalents with fewer opioid-related adverse effects. © 2010 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2010 World Institute of Pain.

  4. 42 CFR 8.11 - Opioid treatment program certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 823(g)(1)) to dispense opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. An OTP... opioid addiction. (2) To obtain certification from SAMHSA, an OTP must meet the Federal opioid treatment... governmental entities to regulate the use of opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. The provisions...

  5. Sex and age-dependent effects of a maternal junk food diet on the mu-opioid receptor in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugusheff, Jessica R; Bae, Sung Eun; Rao, Alexandra; Clarke, Iain J; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Coen, Clive W; Muhlhausler, Beverly S

    2016-03-15

    Perinatal junk food exposure increases the preference for palatable diets in juvenile and adult rat offspring. Previous studies have implicated reduced sensitivity of the opioid pathway in the programming of food preferences; however it is not known when during development these changes in opioid signalling first emerge. This study aimed to determine the impact of a maternal junk food (JF) diet on mu-opioid receptor (MuR) expression and ligand binding in two key regions of the reward pathway, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in rats during the early suckling (postnatal day (PND) 1 and 7) and late suckling/early post-weaning (PND 21 and 28) periods. Female rats were fed either a JF or a control diet for two weeks prior to mating and throughout pregnancy and lactation. MuR expression in the VTA was significantly reduced in female JF offspring on PND 21 and 28 (by 32% and 57% respectively, Pjunk food exposure on MuR mRNA expression or binding were detected at these time points in male offspring. These findings provide evidence that the opioid signalling system is a target of developmental programming by the end of the third postnatal week in females, but not in males. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 19 CFR 10.537 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... parts, or tools will be taken into account as originating or non-originating materials, as the case may... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.537 Section... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.537 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. Accessories, spare...

  7. Nitrogen sparing effect of structured triglycerides containing both medium-and long-chain fatty acids in critically ill patients; a double blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, B F; Ruokonen, E; Magnusson-Borg, K; Takala, J

    2001-02-01

    Patients with sepsis and trauma are characterised by hypermetabolism, insulin resistance and protein catabolism. Fat emulsions containing medium chain triglycerides have been suggested to be beneficial for these patients since medium chain fatty acids are a more readily available source of energy when compared to long chain fatty acids. The aim of this study was to compare a medium and long chain triglyceride emulsion consisting of structured triglycerides (ST) with a long chain triglyceride (LCT) emulsion in terms of effects on nitrogen balance, energy metabolism and safety. 30 ICU patients with sepsis or multiple injury received a fat emulsion with ST or 20% LCT (1.5 g triglycerides/kg body weight/day) as a component of total parenteral nutrition (TPN), for 5 days in a double blind randomised parallel group design. The main analysis was made on the 3 day per protocol population due to lack of patients at day 5. There were no differences in baseline characteristics of the two groups receiving either the LCT or the ST emulsion. The efficacy analysis was performed on the per protocol population (n=9 ST, n=11 LCT). There was a significant difference between the two treatments regarding daily nitrogen balances when the first 3 days were analysed P=0.0038). This resulted in an amelioration of the nitrogen balance on day 3 in the group on ST as compared to those on LCT (0.1+/-2.4 g vs -9.9+/-2.1 g P=0.01). The 3 day cumulative nitrogen balance was significantly better in the group receiving ST compared to those on LCT (-0.7+/-6.0 vs -16.7+/-3.9 P=0.03). This better cumulative nitrogen balance on day 3 was also preserved as a tendency (P=0.061) in the analysis of the intention to treat population, but on day 5 there was no significant difference (P=0.08). The ST emulsion was well tolerated and no difference was found compared to the LCT emulsion regarding respiratory quotient, energy expenditure, glucose or triglyceride levels during infusion. Administration of a

  8. Steroid-sparing effect of extracorporeal photopheresis in the therapy of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussowicz, M; Musiał, J; Mielcarek, M; Tomaszewska, A; Nasiłowska-Adamska, B; Kałwak, K; Gorczyńska, E; Mariańska, B; Chybicka, A

    2013-11-01

    Steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a challenging therapeutic problem after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP), and its impact on intensivity of immunosuppresive therapy in allogeneic HSCT patients. In this study 443 Therakos ECP procedures were performed in 21 patients after allogeneic HSCT with acute (aGVHD, 8 patients) or chronic (cGVHD, 13 patients) therapy-refractory GVHD. The median age at ECP onset was 20.5 years (range, 10-55). Venous access was provided by a nontunelized central venous catheter (12 patients) or 9.6-French portacath (9 patients). In the cGVHD group 9/13 patients were improved with a 4-year overall survival rate of 67.7%. ECP led to steroid discontinuation in 6 and substantial dose reduction in 5 patients. The prednisone dose equivalent per kilogram body weight decreased from 0.32 mg to 0.07 mg after therapy. Therapy of aGVHD led to complete or partial symptom remission in 3/9 subjects. The change in steroid dose in the aGVHD group was not significant, there were no long-term survivors. Portacath access was well tolerated and provided adequate blood flow rates. The ECP therapy significantly reduced the rates of remissions with steroid discontinuation among cGVHD but not aGVHD patients. Rare ECP-related complications were either catheter related or anticoagulation induced during ECP procedures. Photopheresis was a safe, effective method to treat steroid-resistant cGVHD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  10. Benzodiazepines, opioids and driving: an overview of the experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Stefanie Y

    2011-05-01

    Road crashes contribute significantly to the total burden of injury in Australia, with the risk of injury being associated with the presence of drugs and/or alcohol in the driver's blood. Increasingly, some of the most commonly detected drugs include prescription medicines, the most notable of these being benzodiazepines and opioids. However, there is a paucity of experimental research into the effects of prescribed psychoactive drugs on driving behaviours. This paper provides an overview of experimental studies investigating the effects of prescribed doses of benzodiazepines and opioids on driving ability, and points to future directions for research. There is growing epidemiological evidence linking the therapeutic use of benzodiazepines and opioids to an increased crash risk. However, the current experimental literature remains unclear. Limitations to study methodologies have resulted in inconsistent findings. Limited experimental evidence exists to inform policy and guidelines regarding fitness-to-drive for patients taking prescribed benzodiazepines and opioids. Further experimental research is required to elucidate the effects of these medications on driving, under varying conditions and in different medical contexts. This will ensure that doctors prescribing benzodiazepines and opioids are well informed, and can appropriately advise patients of the risks associated with driving whilst taking these medications. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. Resisting Prescribed Opioids: A Qualitative Study of Decision Making in Patients Taking Opioids for Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Charlotte; Ledgerwood, Kay; Arnold, Carolyn; Hogg, Malcolm; Xue, Charlie; Zheng, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Opioids are increasingly prescribed for chronic noncancer pain across the developed world. Clinical guidelines for management of these patients focus on over-use. However, research into other types of long-term medication indicates that many patients minimize drug use whenever possible. To identify the varying influences on patients' decisions about their use of prescribed opioids and explore whether concepts of resistance and minimization of intake apply to these patients. A multiprofessional team performed a qualitative interview study using the constant-comparative method. Patient's decision making was explored in depth and with a thematic analysis utilizing a published "Model of medicine-taking." A purposive sample of 20 participants drawn from two pain clinics in Melbourne, Australia. The sample was biased toward patients interested in nonmedication pain management options. Patients' needs to obtain relief from severe pain, maintain function, and minimize side effects could lead to under-use as well as over-use of prescribed opioids. In keeping with the published Model of medicine-taking, resistance to taking opioids was a common and important influence on behavior. In the face of severe chronic pain, many participants used a variety of strategies to evaluate, avoid, reduce, self-regulate, and replace opioids. Furthermore, participants perceived a resistance to opioids within the system and among some healthcare professionals. This sometimes adversely affected their adherence. Both patients and doctors exhibit aspects of resistance to the use of prescribed opioids for chronic noncancer pain, suggesting that this shared concern could be the basis of a productive therapeutic alliance to improve communication and shared decision making. Clinical guidelines for opioids use for chronic noncancer pain focus on over-use. Our qualitative interview study found that many patients resisted and minimized the use of opioids. Using a published "Model of medicine-taking," we

  12. Opioid tapering in patients with prescription opioid use disorder : A retrospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Kehua; Jia, Peng; Bhargava, Swati; Zhang, Yong; Reza, Taslima; Peng, Yuan Bo; Wang, Gary G.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Opioid use disorder (OUD) refers to a maladaptive pattern of opioid use leading to clinically significant impairment or distress. OUD causes, and vice versa, misuses and abuse of opioid medications. Clinicians face daily challenges to treat patients with prescription opioid use

  13. SU-E-T-321: The Effects of a Dynamic Collimation System On Proton Pencil Beams to Improve Lateral Tissue Sparing in Spot Scanned Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P; Wang, D; Flynn, R; Hyer, D [University Of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the lateral beam penumbra in pencil beam scanning proton therapy delivered using a dynamic collimator device capable of trimming a portion of the primary beam in close proximity to the patient. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of pencil beams were performed using MCNPX. Each simulation transported a 125 MeV proton pencil beam through a range shifter, past acollimator, and into a water phantom. Two parameters were varied among the simulations, the source beam size (sigma in air from 3 to 9 mm), and the position of the edge of the collimator (placed from 0 to 30 mm from the central axis of the beam). Proton flux was tallied at the phantom surface to determine the effective beam sizefor all combinations of source beam size and collimator edge position. Results: Quantifying beam size at the phantom surface provides a useful measure tocompare performance among varying source beam sizes and collimation conditions. For arelatively large source beam size (9 mm) entering the range shifter, sigma at thesurface was found to be 10 mm without collimation versus 4 mm with collimation. Additionally, sigma at the surface achievable with collimation was found to be smallerthan for any uncollimated beam, even for very small source beam sizes. Finally, thelateral penumbra achievable with collimation was determined to be largely independentof the source beam size. Conclusion: Collimation can significantly reduce proton pencil beam lateral penumbra.Given the known dosimetric disadvantages resulting from large beam spot sizes,employing a dynamic collimation system can significantly improve lateral tissuesparing in spot-scanned dose distributions.

  14. Inventory Centralization Decision Framework for Spare Parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Nicklas; Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee

    2018-01-01

    Within the current literature, there is a lack of a holistic and multidisciplinary approach to managing spare parts and their inventory configuration. This paper addresses this research gap by examining the key contextual factors which influence the degree of inventory centralization and proposes...... a novel holistic theoretical framework, the Inventory Centralization Decision Framework (ICDF), useful for practitioners. Through an extensive review of inventory management literature, six contextual factors influencing the degree of inventory centralization have been identified. Using the ICDF...... practitioners can assess the most advantageous inventory configuration of spare parts. The framework is tested on a large global company which, as a result, today actively uses the ICDF; thus showing its practical applicability....

  15. Nicotine and endogenous opioids: neurochemical and pharmacological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Maria; Neff, Norton H

    2011-06-01

    Although the mesolimbic dopamine hypothesis is the most influential theory of nicotine reward and reinforcement, there has been a consensus that other neurotransmitter systems contribute to the addictive properties of nicotine as well. In this regard, the brain opioidergic system is of interest. Striatum is rich in opioid peptides and opioid receptors, and striatal opioidergic neurons are engaged in a bidirectional communication with midbrain dopaminergic neurons, closely regulating each other's activity. Enkephalins and dynorphins exert opposing actions on dopaminergic neurons, increasing and decreasing dopamine release respectively, and are components of circuits promoting positive or negative motivational and affective states. Moreover, dopamine controls the synthesis of striatal enkephalins and dynorphins. Evidence suggests that opioidergic function is altered after nicotine and endogenous opioids are involved in nicotine's behavioral effects. 1) The synthesis and release of β-endorphin, met-enkephalin and dynorphin in brain, especially nucleus accumbens (NAc), are altered after acute or chronic nicotine treatment and during nicotine withdrawal. 2) Although opioid receptor binding and mRNA do not appear to change in the striatum during nicotine withdrawal, the activity of κ-opioid (KOPr) and δ-opioid (DOPr) receptors is attenuated in NAc. 3) The nicotine withdrawal syndrome reminisces that of opiates, and naloxone precipitates some of its somatic, motivational, and affective signs. 4) Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that μ-opioid (MOPr) receptors are mainly involved in nicotine reward, while DOPrs contribute to the emotional and KOPrs to the aversive responses of nicotine. 5) Finally, MOPrs and enkephalin, but not β-endorphin or dynorphin, are necessary for the physical manifestations of nicotine withdrawal. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier

  16. Review of Opioid Pharmacogenetics and Considerations for Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu Obeng, Aniwaa; Hamadeh, Issam; Smith, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Opioid analgesics are the standards of care for the treatment of moderate to severe nociceptive pain, particularly in the setting of cancer and surgery. Their analgesic properties mainly emanate from stimulation of the μ receptors, which are encoded by the OPRM1 gene. Hepatic metabolism represents the major route of elimination, which, for some opioids, namely codeine and tramadol, is necessary for their bioactivation into more potent analgesics. The highly polymorphic nature of the genes coding for phase I and phase II enzymes (pharmacokinetics genes) that are involved in the metabolism and bioactivation of opioids suggests a potential interindividual variation in their disposition and, most likely, response. In fact, such an association has been substantiated in several pharmacokinetic studies described in this review, in which drug exposure and/or metabolism differed significantly based on the presence of polymorphisms in these pharmacokinetics genes. Furthermore, in some studies, the observed variability in drug exposure translated into differences in the incidence of opioid-related adverse effects, particularly nausea, vomiting, constipation, and respiratory depression. Although the influence of polymorphisms in pharmacokinetics genes, as well as pharmacodynamics genes (OPRM1 and COMT) on response to opioids has been a subject of intense research, the results have been somehow conflicting, with some evidence insinuating for a potential role for OPRM1. The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines provide CYP2D6-guided therapeutic recommendations to individualize treatment with tramadol and codeine. However, implementation guidelines for other opioids, which are more commonly used in real-world settings for pain management, are currently lacking. Hence, further studies are warranted to bridge this gap in our knowledge base and ultimately ascertain the role of pharmacogenetic markers as predictors of response to opioid analgesics. © 2017

  17. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L; Greene, Marion S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university-affiliated integrated mental health-addiction treatment clinic. Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long-acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. There were no group differences post-injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol-only patients. Post-first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p opioid prescriptions (p Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP-measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol-only patients. This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557-564). © 2016 The Authors. The American Journal on Addictions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP).

  18. Sparing analysis for FGD systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dene, C.E.; Weiss, J.; Twombly, M.A.; Witt, J.

    1992-01-01

    With the passage of federal clean air legislation, utilities will be evaluating the capability of various flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system design configurations and operating scenarios to meet sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) removal goals. The primary goal in reviewing these alternatives will be to optimize SO 2 removal capability in relation to power production costs. The Electric Power Research institute (EPRI) and its contractor, ARINC Research Corporation, have developed an automated FGD Analysis System that can evaluate competing FGD design alternatives in terms of their SO 2 removal capability and operating costs. The FGD Analysis System can be used to evaluate different design configurations for new systems or to calculate the effect of changes in component reliability for existing FGD systems. The system is based on the EPRI UNIRAM methodology and evaluates the impact of alternative FGD component configurations on the expected unit emission rates. The user interactively enters FGD design data, unit SO 2 generation-level data, and FGD chemical additive-level data for the design configuration to be evaluated. The system then calculates expected SO 2 removal capability and operating cost data for operation of the design configuration over a user specified time period. This paper provides a brief description of the FGD Analysis System and presents sample results for three typical design configurations with different redundancy levels

  19. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane eAllouche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioid receptors are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization and post-endocytic fate of the receptor.

  20. The spares provisioning problem with parts inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Abboud, Nadim E.

    1990-01-01

    In this research, we consider the spares provisioning problem, where a finite population of homogeneous machines are being deployed to meet a constant demand. While a machine is operating, it could become inoperable due to the failure of a critical built-in part in the machine. Before repairs on the machine can be initiated, however, a replacement part must be obtained. If a replacement part is available from stock, the machine is immediately transferred to the repair subsystem...

  1. Help, Resources and Information: National Opioids Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search Help, Resources and Information National Opioids Crisis Search Search Need Help? Call the National Helpline ... HHS 5-POINT STRATEGY TO COMBAT THE OPIOIDS CRISIS BETTER ADDICTION PREVENTION, TREATMENT, AND RECOVERY SERVICES BETTER ...

  2. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  3. Novel approaches for the treatment of psychostimulant and opioid abuse - focus on opioid receptor-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Chris P; Husbands, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Psychostimulant and opioid addiction are poorly treated. The majority of abstinent users relapse back to drug-taking within a year of abstinence, making 'anti-relapse' therapies the focus of much current research. There are two fundamental challenges to developing novel treatments for drug addiction. First, there are three key stimuli that precipitate relapse back to drug-taking: stress, presentation of drug-conditioned cue, taking a small dose of drug. The most successful novel treatment would be effective against all three stimuli. Second, a large number of drug users are poly-drug users: taking more than one drug of abuse at a time. The ideal anti-addiction treatment would, therefore, be effective against all classes of drugs of abuse. In this review, the authors discuss the clinical need and animal models used to uncover potential novel treatments. There is a very broad range of potential treatment approaches and targets currently being examined as potential anti-relapse therapies. These broadly fit into two categories: 'memory-based' and 'receptor-based' and the authors discuss the key targets here within. Opioid receptors and ligands have been widely studied, and research into how different opioid subtypes affect behaviours related to addiction (reward, dysphoria, motivation) suggests that they are tractable targets as anti-relapse treatments. Regarding opioid ligands as novel 'anti-relapse' medication targets, research suggests that a 'non-selective' approach to targeting opioid receptors will be the most effective.

  4. An update on the role of opioids in the management of chronic pain of nonmalignant origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-10-01

    To summarize and reflect over primarily recent epidemiological and randomized controlled trials in opioid-treated chronic nonmalignant pain patients, focusing on effects, side effects, risks and long-term consequences of the treatment. In the western world opioids are increasingly being used for long-term treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain. While the long-term benefits of opioids regarding pain relief, functional capacity and health-related quality of life still remain to be proven, studies are emerging that describe serious long-term consequences such as addiction, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, cognitive disorders, and suppression of the immune and reproductive systems. Much more research is needed concerning long-time effects and consequences of opioid therapy in chronic nonmalignant pain patients; however, some clear warning signals have been sent out within recent years.

  5. DYNAMICS OF OPIOID SUBSTITUTION TREATMENTIN DIFFERENT INITIAL SUBSTANCE USER OPIOID DEPENDENT PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todadze, Kh; Mosia, S

    2016-05-01

    Injecting drug user size estimation studies carried out in 2009, 2012 and 2015 revealed growing trends of drug abuse in Georgia:estimated number of people who inject drugs (PWID) have been increased from 40000 and 45000 to 50000. Since Soviet period the most popular injective narcotics have been opioids: home-made opium, heroine, buprenorphine and home-made desomorphine ("Krokodile") replacing each other on the black market. Self-made desomorphine typically contains big amounts of different toxic substances and causes significant somatic disorders, especially skin, bone, blood infections, liver and kidney failure; is highly addictive, associates with frequent injections that enhance injecting-related harm, including the risk of HIV transmission, in comparison with typical opioids. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of opioid substitution treatment (OST) on depression and anxiety in opioid dependent clients with history of different opioid substance use. 104 opioid drug users undergoing OST with intensive psychological counseling have been divided in 5 groups according to the principal opioid drug that was abused during past 6 months before starting treatment: heroine, desomorphine, illicit methadone injectors, illicit buprenorphine injectors, and multiple drug abusers consuming opioids as primary drugs. Level of depression (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Spielberger Anxiety Inventory) as well as clinical symptoms, risky behavior, quality of life (WHO), and other data were measured before starting and after 3, 9, 15, 21 months of treatment. The illegal use of psychotropic-narcotics was checked through random urine-testing 1-2 times per patient per month. In all five groups remarkable decrease of depression and anxiety was observed in comparison with the starting data. Before inclusion desomorphine and poly-drug users had the highest scores of depression and anxiety while buprenorphine users manifested the lowest rate. Improvement of

  6. Haloperidol Disrupts Opioid-Antinociceptive Tolerance and Physical Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Chen, Yan; Tang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory and others have implicated a critical role of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in opioid tolerance and dependence. Translational research targeting the CaMKII pathway is challenging, if not impossible, because of a lack of selective inhibitors. We discovered in a preliminary study that haloperidol, a butyrophenone antipsychotic drug, inhibited CaMKII, which led us to hypothesize that haloperidol can attenuate opioid tolerance and dependence by inhibiting CaMKII. The hypothesis was tested in two rodent models of opioid tolerance and dependence. Pretreatment with haloperidol (0.2–1.0 mg/kg i.p.) prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence in a dose-dependent manner. Short-term treatment with haloperidol (0.06–0.60 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently reversed the established morphine-antinociceptive tolerance and physical dependence. Correlating with behavioral effects, pretreatment or short-term treatment with haloperidol dose-dependently inhibited morphine-induced up-regulation of supraspinal and spinal CaMKIIα activity. Moreover, haloperidol given orally was also effective in attenuating morphine-induced CaMKIIα activity, antinociceptive tolerance, and physical dependence. Taken together, these data suggest that haloperidol attenuates opioid tolerance and dependence by suppressing CaMKII activity. Because haloperidol is a clinically used drug that can be taken orally, we propose that the drug may be of use in attenuating opioid tolerance and dependence. PMID:21436292

  7. Using [11C]diprenorphine to image opioid receptor occupancy by methadone in opioid addiction: clinical and preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melichar, Jan K; Hume, Susan P; Williams, Tim M; Daglish, Mark R C; Taylor, Lindsay G; Ahmad, Rabia; Malizia, Andrea L; Brooks, David J; Myles, Judith S; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Nutt, David J

    2005-01-01

    Substitute methadone prescribing is one of the main modes of treatment for opioid dependence with established evidence for improved health and social outcomes. However, the pharmacology underpinning the effects of methadone is little studied despite controversies about dosing in relation to outcome. We therefore examined the relationship between methadone dose and occupation of opioid receptors in brain using the positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(11)C]diprenorphine in humans and rats. Eight opioid-dependent subjects stable on their substitute methadone (18-90 mg daily) had an [(11)C]diprenorphine PET scan at predicted peak plasma levels of methadone. These were compared with eight healthy controls. No difference in [(11)C]diprenorphine binding was found between the groups, with no relationship between methadone dose and occupancy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that had been given an acute i.v. injection of methadone hydrochloride (0.35, 0.5, 0.7, or 1.0 mg kg(-1)) before [(11)C]diprenorphine showed a dose-dependent increase in biodistribution but no reduction in [(11)C]diprenorphine binding. We suggest that the lack of a dose-dependent relationship between methadone dose, either given chronically in human or acutely in rat, and occupancy of opioid receptor measured with [(11)C]diprenorphine PET is related to efficacy of this opioid agonist at very low levels of opioid receptor occupancy. This has implications for understanding the actions of methadone in comparison with other opioid drugs such as partial agonists and antagonists.

  8. Role and psychological dependenci arrangement of opioid by type of reseptor opioid

    OpenAIRE

    Arif Nurrochmad, Arif Nurrochmad

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptor can be classified as p., 8, and K-opioid receptor that widely expressed in the CNS. The development of selective receptor agonist and cloning of each receptor have contributed greatly to our increasing knowledge of the neuropharmacological profile of each opioid receptor type. This review focuses on the functional interaction among these opioid receptor types that contribute to opioid dependence especially in psychological dependence. Several lines of evidence provide argument...

  9. Spare part management of an electricity distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauronen, J.

    1998-07-01

    Electricity distribution companies are required to improve their operational cost effectiveness. The storage systems of the companies have traditionally been based on the 'adequate' number of stores with plenty of different components. Therefore, they are potential objects for cost reduction. The effective operation of spare part management of an electricity distribution network requires that the spare components can be delivered at the fault site quickly in order to avoid excessive outage costs. In a fault situation the stores form a net structure. Currently the rural electricity distribution companies lack suitable methods for designing a spare part storage system. This thesis presents a suitable method for the designing problem. The models assume that faults of a distribution network are stochastic. Therefore, they are best suited for component types installed in large quantities. Improved methods for defining the outage, material and total costs for perpetual order quantity and periodic order-up-to-level storage control systems are described. The method for determining the control parameters of the stores is also presented and ways for finding the necessary initial parameter values are introduced. The developed method is tested in Haemeen Saehko Oy (HSOY). The results of the calculations are given. The key findings are: Small differences in the designing results can increase costs remarkably. For example, in HSOY too low stock levels can result in even eight folds higher outage costs than in the proper design. The best number of stores is not the same for all component types. For example, in HSOY the best number of stores is seven for the 50 kVA transformers and one for the 315 kVA transformers in a summer. If the stock levels are increased the protection against the demand variations is the better the shorter the duration of the review period and/or the replenishment lead time is. (orig.)

  10. Spare part management of an electricity distribution network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauronen, J

    1998-07-01

    Electricity distribution companies are required to improve their operational cost effectiveness. The storage systems of the companies have traditionally been based on the 'adequate' number of stores with plenty of different components. Therefore, they are potential objects for cost reduction. The effective operation of spare part management of an electricity distribution network requires that the spare components can be delivered at the fault site quickly in order to avoid excessive outage costs. In a fault situation the stores form a net structure. Currently the rural electricity distribution companies lack suitable methods for designing a spare part storage system. This thesis presents a suitable method for the designing problem. The models assume that faults of a distribution network are stochastic. Therefore, they are best suited for component types installed in large quantities. Improved methods for defining the outage, material and total costs for perpetual order quantity and periodic order-up-to-level storage control systems are described. The method for determining the control parameters of the stores is also presented and ways for finding the necessary initial parameter values are introduced. The developed method is tested in Haemeen Saehko Oy (HSOY). The results of the calculations are given. The key findings are: Small differences in the designing results can increase costs remarkably. For example, in HSOY too low stock levels can result in even eight folds higher outage costs than in the proper design. The best number of stores is not the same for all component types. For example, in HSOY the best number of stores is seven for the 50 kVA transformers and one for the 315 kVA transformers in a summer. If the stock levels are increased the protection against the demand variations is the better the shorter the duration of the review period and/or the replenishment lead time is. (orig.)

  11. Differential effects of dopamine and opioid receptor blockade on motivated Coca-Cola drinking behavior and associated changes in brain, skin and muscle temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, E A

    2010-05-05

    Although pharmacological blockade of both dopamine (DA) and opiate receptors has an inhibiting effect on appetitive motivated behaviors, it is still unclear which physiological mechanisms affected by these treatments underlie the behavioral deficit. To clarify this issue, we examined how pharmacological blockade of either DA (SCH23390+eticlopride at 0.2 mg/kg each) or opioid receptors (naloxone 1 mg/kg) affects motor activity and temperature fluctuations in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), temporal muscle, and facial skin associated with motivated Coca-Cola drinking behavior in rats. In drug-free conditions, presentation of a cup containing 5 ml of Coca-Cola induced locomotor activation and rapid NAcc temperature increases, which both transiently decreased during drinking, and phasically increased again after the cup was emptied. Muscle temperatures followed this pattern, but increases were weaker and more delayed than those in the NAcc. Skin temperature rapidly dropped after cup presentation, remained at low levels during consumption, and slowly restored during post-consumption behavioral activation. By itself, DA receptor blockade induced robust decrease in spontaneous locomotion, moderate increases in brain and muscle temperatures, and a relative increase in skin temperatures, suggesting metabolic activation coupled with adynamia. Following this treatment (approximately 180 min), motor activation to cup presentation and Coca-Cola consumption were absent, but rats showed NAcc and muscle temperature increases following cup presentation comparable to control. Therefore, DA receptor blockade does not affect significantly central and peripheral autonomic responses to appetitive stimuli, but eliminates their behavior-activating effects, thus disrupting appetitive behavior and blocking consumption. Naloxone alone slightly decreased brain and muscle temperatures and increased skin temperatures, pointing at the enhanced heat loss and possible minor inhibition of basal

  12. Endogenous opioid antagonism in physiological experimental pain models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Pereira, Manuel P; Andersen, Lars Peter H

    2015-01-01

    hyperalgesia models (6 studies), 'pain' models (25 studies), summation models (2 studies), nociceptive reflex models (3 studies) and miscellaneous models (2 studies). A consistent reversal of analgesia by a MOR-antagonist was demonstrated in 10 of the 25 ITP-studies, including stress-induced analgesia and r...... ratings, threshold assessments and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), did not appear consistent in 28 out of 32 'pain' model studies. In conclusion, only in 2 experimental human pain models, i.e., stress-induced analgesia and rTMS, administration of MOR-antagonist demonstrated a consistent effect......Opioid antagonists are pharmacological tools applied as an indirect measure to detect activation of the endogenous opioid system (EOS) in experimental pain models. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effect of mu-opioid-receptor (MOR) antagonists in placebo-controlled, double...

  13. Parenteral Opioid Analgesics Utilization Pattern in Amir-al-Momenin Hospital, Zabol-IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Vatanpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are the most available medicines to get rid of any general severe pain and avoiding of any deleterious sequential that can worsen patient outcomes. Rational prescription of opioid analgesics with respect to the possibility of abuse is a big concern in the medical care costs. Zabol, where is located in eastern part of Iran and has common border with Afghanistanhas the most opioid traffic in the region. In this study the rational prescription of parenteral opioid in Amir-al-Momenin general hospital was investigated. A retrospective drug utilization review was performed on 509 in-patients who received parenteral opioids including Morphine, Pethidin, Pentazocin, Fentanyl, Alfentanil, Sufentanil and Methadone from March 21sttoSeptember 23rd, 2011. Multivariate conditional regression modeling was used to determine independent predictors for daily parenteral opioid consumption. Total daily parenteral opioid consumption was 38.63 DDDs/100bed-days for Morphine, Pethidine and Pentazocin and 84564.78 PFEQs/100bed-days for Fentanyl, Alfentanil and Sufentanil and 766 mg for Methadone. Pethidine was the most frequently prescribed parenteral opioid. Most patients who were prescribed by the intramuscular routes, ordered PRN. Daily parenteral opioid consumption was the highest in the emergency ward whereas it was considered as the lowest in the intensive care unit[ICU]. According to our findings, total daily parenteral opioid consumption was almost high in Amir-al-Momenin Hospital. Unlike to some relevant factors that can effect on the consumption of analgesic opioids like gender, age, drug-drug interaction and etc, we found no rational prescription and consumption in the mentioned hospital.

  14. What do providers want to know about opioid prescribing? A qualitative analysis of their questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Phoebe A; Liebschutz, Jane M; Hodgkin, Joseph G; Shanahan, Christopher W; White, Julie L; Hardesty, Ilana; Alford, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) responded to the opioid crisis with a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy, requiring manufacturers of extended-release/long-acting opioids to fund continuing medical education based on the "FDA Blueprint for Prescriber Education." Topics in the Blueprint are "Assessing Patients for Treatment," "Initiating Therapy, Modifying Dosing, and Discontinuing Use," "Managing Therapy," "Counseling Patients and Caregivers about Safe Use," "General Drug Information," and "Specific Drug Information." Based on the FDA Blueprint, Boston University School of Medicine's "Safe and Competent Opioid Prescribing Education" (SCOPE of Pain) offers live trainings for physicians and other prescribers. During trainings, participants submit written questions about the curriculum and/or their clinical experiences. The objective was to compare themes that arose from questions asked by SCOPE of Pain participants with content of the FDA Blueprint in order to evaluate how well the Blueprint answers prescribers' concerns. The authors conducted qualitative analyses of all 1309 questions submitted by participants in 29 trainings across 16 states from May 2013 to May 2015, using conventional content analysis to code the questions. Themes that emerged from participants' questions were then compared with the Blueprint. Most themes fell into the topic categories of the Blueprint. Five main themes diverged: Participants sought information on (1) safe alternatives to opioids, (2) overcoming barriers to safe opioid prescribing, (3) government regulations of opioid prescribing, (4) the role of marijuana in opioid prescribing, and (5) maintaining a positive provider-patient relationship while prescribing opioids. In addition to learning the mechanics of safe opioid prescribing, providers want to understand government regulations and effective patient communication skills. Aware of the limitations of opioids in managing chronic pain, providers seek advice

  15. "I was a little surprised": Qualitative Insights from Patients Enrolled in a 12-Month Trial Comparing Opioids to Non-Opioid Medications for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne S Matthias; Donaldson, Melvin T; Jensen, Agnes C; Krebs, Erin E

    2018-04-28

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a major public health problem. Although opioid prescribing for chronic pain has increased dramatically since the 1990s, this practice has come under scrutiny because of increases in opioid-related harms and lack of evidence for long-term effectiveness. The Strategies for Prescribing Analgesics Comparative Effectiveness (SPACE) trial was a pragmatic 12-month randomized trial comparing benefits and harms of opioid versus non-opioid medications for chronic musculoskeletal pain. The current qualitative study was designed to better understand trial results by exploring patients' experiences, including perceptions of medications, experiences with the intervention, and whether expectations were met. Thirty-four participants who were purposefully sampled based on treatment group and intervention response participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparison method guided analysis. Results revealed that participants often held strong beliefs about opioid medications, which sometimes changed during the trial as they gained experience with medications; participants described a wide variety of experiences with treatment effectiveness, regardless of study group or their response to the intervention; and participants highly valued the personalized pain care model used in SPACE. SPACE trial results indicated no advantage for opioid over non-opioid medications. Qualitative findings suggest that, for patients in both treatment groups, pre-existing expectations of medications and of anticipated improvement in pain shaped experiences with and responses to medications. In addition, the personalized pain care model was described as contributing to positive outcomes in both groups. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Structure of the Nanobody-Stabilized Active State of the Kappa Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Tao; Majumdar, Susruta; Zaidi, Saheem A; Ondachi, Pauline; McCorvy, John D; Wang, Sheng; Mosier, Philip D; Uprety, Rajendra; Vardy, Eyal; Krumm, Brian E; Han, Gye Won; Lee, Ming-Yue; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Huang, Xi-Ping; Strachan, Ryan T; Tribo, Alexandra R; Pasternak, Gavril W; Carroll, F Ivy; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Wacker, Daniel; Roth, Bryan L

    2018-01-11

    The κ-opioid receptor (KOP) mediates the actions of opioids with hallucinogenic, dysphoric, and analgesic activities. The design of KOP analgesics devoid of hallucinatory and dysphoric effects has been hindered by an incomplete structural and mechanistic understanding of KOP agonist actions. Here, we provide a crystal structure of human KOP in complex with the potent epoxymorphinan opioid agonist MP1104 and an active-state-stabilizing nanobody. Comparisons between inactive- and active-state opioid receptor structures reveal substantial conformational changes in the binding pocket and intracellular and extracellular regions. Extensive structural analysis and experimental validation illuminate key residues that propagate larger-scale structural rearrangements and transducer binding that, collectively, elucidate the structural determinants of KOP pharmacology, function, and biased signaling. These molecular insights promise to accelerate the structure-guided design of safer and more effective κ-opioid receptor therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  18. Buprenorphine implants in medical treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavoustie, Steven; Frost, Michael; Snyder, Ole; Owen, Joel; Darwish, Mona; Dammerman, Ryan; Sanjurjo, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease that encompasses use of both prescription opioids and heroin and is associated with a high annual rate of overdose deaths. Medical treatment has proven more successful than placebo treatment or psychosocial intervention, and the partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and κ-opioid receptor antagonist buprenorphine is similar in efficacy to methadone while offering lower risk of respiratory depression. However, frequent dosing requirements and potential for misuse and drug diversion contribute to significant complications with treatment adherence for available formulations. Areas covered: This review describes the development of and preliminary data from clinical trials of an implantable buprenorphine formulation. Efficacy and safety data from comparative studies with other administrations of buprenorphine, including tablets and sublingual film, will be described. Key premises of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy program for safely administering buprenorphine implants, which all prescribing physicians must complete, are also discussed. Expert commentary: Long-acting implantable drug formulations that offer consistent drug delivery and lower risk of misuse, diversion, or accidental pediatric exposure over traditional formulations represent a promising development for the effective treatment of opioid use disorder.

  19. Reducing the health consequences of opioid addiction in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Sarah; Eiserman, Julie; Beletsky, Leo; Stancliff, Sharon; Bruce, R Douglas

    2013-07-01

    Addiction to prescription opioids is prevalent in primary care settings. Increasing prescription opioid use is largely responsible for a parallel increase in overdose nationally. Many patients most at risk for addiction and overdose come into regular contact with primary care providers. Lack of routine addiction screening results in missed treatment opportunities in this setting. We reviewed the literature on screening and brief interventions for addictive disorders in primary care settings, focusing on opioid addiction. Screening and brief interventions can improve health outcomes for chronic illnesses including diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. Similarly, through the use of screening and brief interventions, patients with addiction can achieve improved health outcome. A spectrum of low-threshold care options can reduce the negative health consequences among individuals with opioid addiction. Screening in primary care coupled with short interventions, including motivational interviewing, syringe distribution, naloxone prescription for overdose prevention, and buprenorphine treatment are effective ways to manage addiction and its associated risks and improve health outcomes for individuals with opioid addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. GRK2 Constitutively Governs Peripheral Delta Opioid Receptor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Doyle Brackley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Opioids remain the standard for analgesic care; however, adverse effects of systemic treatments contraindicate long-term administration. While most clinical opioids target mu opioid receptors (MOR, those that target the delta class (DOR also demonstrate analgesic efficacy. Furthermore, peripherally restrictive opioids represent an attractive direction for analgesia. However, opioid receptors including DOR are analgesically incompetent in the absence of inflammation. Here, we report that G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 naively associates with plasma membrane DOR in peripheral sensory neurons to inhibit analgesic agonist efficacy. This interaction prevents optimal Gβ subunit association with the receptor, thereby reducing DOR activity. Importantly, bradykinin stimulates GRK2 movement away from DOR and onto Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP. protein kinase C (PKC-dependent RKIP phosphorylation induces GRK2 sequestration, restoring DOR functionality in sensory neurons. Together, these results expand the known function of GRK2, identifying a non-internalizing role to maintain peripheral DOR in an analgesically incompetent state.

  1. Development and implementation of intranasal naloxone opioid overdose response protocol at a homeless health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Chin Hwa Y; Horstman, Molly J; Williams, Brent C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of Opioid Overdose Response Protocol using intranasal (IN) naloxone in a homeless shelter. Opioid Overdose Response Protocol and training curriculum were developed using the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Opioid Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) flow chart, the American Heart Association (AHA) simplified adult basic life support algorithm, and resources through Harms Reduction Coalition. Intranasal naloxone offers a safe and effective method for opioid reversal. To combat the rising incidence of opioid overdose, IN naloxone should be made available at homeless shelters and other facilities with high frequency of opioid overdose, including the training of appropriate staff. This project has demonstrated the effective training and implementation of an Opioid Overdose Response Protocol, based on feedback received from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trained nonhealthcare staff. Nurse practitioners (NPs), with our focus on patient care, prevention, and education, are well suited to the deployment of this life-saving protocol. NPs are in critical positions to integrate opioid overdose prevention education and provide naloxone rescue kits in clinical practices. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  2. Tramadol versus methadone for the management of acute opioid withdrawal: an add-on study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Salehi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioid agonists such as methadone have been used widely in controlling opioid withdrawal symptoms. Tramadol, a partial opioid agonist, also has been prescribed to manage acute and chronic pain. We sought to compare the efficacy of tramadol and methadone in reducing the severity of opioid withdrawal symptoms. METHODS: In a double blind clinical trial 70 opioid dependent patients who used daily opium equal to 15 mg methadone randomly were assigned in two groups. In one group, methadone was started at 15 mg/day while in the other group 450 mg/day tramadol was prescribed. Both drugs were tapered in a week and placebo was prescribed in the 2nd week. The severity of withdrawal symptoms were assessed five times by short opioid withdrawal scale (SOWS. Data were analyzed by Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon tests. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences between two groups in the severity of anxiety (P = 0.015, irritability (P = 0.044, palpitation (P = 0.018, agitation (P = 0.037, and dysphoria (P = 0.044 that all were more common in methadone group. Comparison of side effects revealed statistically significant differences in sweating (P = 0.003 and drowsiness (P = 0.019 between two groups that were more frequent in methadone group. DISCUSSION: Tramadol was more efficacious in controlling opioid withdrawal symptoms with lower side effects. KEYWORDS: Methadone, tramadol, opioid withdrawal.

  3. The Effect of the [mu]-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Naloxone on Extinction of Conditioned Fear in the Developing Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Richardson, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies report that neurotransmitters that are critically involved in extinction in adult rats are not important for extinction in young rats. Specifically, pretest injection of the [gamma]-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor inverse agonist FG7142 has no effect on extinction in postnatal day (P)17 rats, although it reverses…

  4. Radical prostatectomy, sparing of the seminal vesicles, and painful orgasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogorovich, Andrea; Nilsson, Andreas E; Tyritzis, Stavros I; Carlsson, Stefan; Jonsson, Martin; Haendler, Leif; Nyberg, Tommy; Steineck, Gunnar; Wiklund, N Peter

    2013-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction has been widely investigated as the major factor responsible for sexual bother in patients after radical prostatectomy (RP); painful orgasm (PO) is one element of this bother, but little is known about its prevalence and its effects on sexual health. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of PO and to identify potential risk factors. A total of 1,411 consecutive patients underwent open (radical retropubic prostatectomy) or robot-assisted laparoscopic RP between 2002 and 2006. The patients were asked to complete a study-specific questionnaire. Of a total of 145 questions, 5 dealt with the orgasmic characteristics. The questionnaire was also administered to a comparison group of 442 persons, matched for age and area of residency. The response rate was 91% (1,288 patients). A total of 143 (11%) patients reported PO. Among the 834 men being able to have an orgasm, the prevalence was 18% vs. 6% in the comparison group (relative risk [RR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-4.5). When analyzed as independent variables, bilateral seminal vesicle (SV)-sparing approach (RR 2.33, 95% CI 1.0-5.3, P = 0.045) and age <60 years were significantly related to the presence of PO (95% CI 0.5-0.9, P = 0.019). After adjustment for age, bilateral SV-sparing still remained a significant predictor for occurrence of PO. We found that PO occurs significantly more often in patients undergoing bilateral SV-sparing RP when compared with age-matched comparison population. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  5. Joint optimization of preventive maintenance and spare parts inventory for an optimal production plan with consideration of CO_2 emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba, Kader; Dellagi, Sofiene; Rezg, Nidhal; Erray, Walid

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a joint optimization of spare parts inventory and preventive maintenance. While minimizing CO_2 emissions, this approach is based on an optimal production plan achieved thanks to the HMMS model. The process which is studied in this paper only manufactures one type of product. The purpose of the paper is to determine for a random demand over a given period, a cost-effective production plan and a maintenance policy which integrates a spare parts strategy in accordance with environmental requirements and regulations. Our green spare parts management can be defined as a set of actions that are applied in order to decrease the spare parts footprint in its lifetime (Ba et al., 2015) [1]. Indeed, we take into account the spare parts characteristics (new or used) which will be used during maintenance actions (preventive or corrective) to preserve the environment. Consequently, we set up analytical models based on the effect of the production rate on the system deterioration so as to substantially cut the maintenance costs, production costs and CO_2 emissions. To evaluate the performance of our models, we give some illustrative examples. - Highlights: • Establishment of an optimal production plan for a manufacturing process. • Cost-effective maintenance strategy with a green spare parts strategy. • Possibility to choose between used and new spare parts to execute maintenance action.

  6. Effect of transversus abdominis plane block in combination with general anesthesia on perioperative opioid consumption, hemodynamics, and recovery in living liver donors: The prospective, double-blinded, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Mehmet A; Ozgul, Ulku; Uçar, Muharrem; Yalin, Mehmet R; Colak, Yusuf Z; Çolak, Cemil; Toprak, Huseyin I

    2017-04-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block provides effective postoperative analgesia after abdominal surgeries. It can be also a useful strategy to reduce perioperative opioid consumption, support intraoperative hemodynamic stability, and promote early recovery from anesthesia. The aim of this prospective randomized double-blind study was to assess the effect of subcostal TAP blocks on perioperative opioid consumption, hemodynamic, and recovery time in living liver donors. The prospective, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted with 49 living liver donors, aged 18-65 years, who were scheduled to undergo right hepatectomy. Patients who received subcostal TAP block in combination with general anesthesia were allocated into Group 1, and patients who received general anesthesia alone were allocated into Group 2. The TAP blocks were performed bilaterally by obtaining an image with real-time ultrasound guidance using 0.5% bupivacaine diluted with saline to reach a total volume of 40 mL. The primary outcome measure in our study was perioperative remifentanil consumption. Secondary outcomes were mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), mean desflurane requirement, anesthesia recovery time, frequency of emergency vasopressor use, total morphine use, and length of hospital stay. Total remifentanil consumption and the anesthesia recovery time were significantly lower in Group 1 compared with Group 2. Postoperative total morphine use and length of hospital stay were also reduced. Changes in the MAP and HR were similar in the both groups. There were no significant differences in HR and MBP between groups at any time. Combining subcostal TAP blocks with general anesthesia significantly reduced perioperative and postoperative opioid consumption, provided shorter anesthesia recovery time, and length of hospital stay in living liver donors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Evolving paradigms in the treatment of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Nilsson, Matias; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2015-11-01

    In recent years prescription of opioids has increased significantly. Although effective in pain management, bothersome gastrointestinal adverse effects are experienced by a substantial proportion of opioid-treated patients. This can lead to difficulties with therapy and subsequently inadequate pain relief. Collectively referred to as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, these adverse effects are the result of binding of exogenous opioids to opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. This leads to disturbance of three important gastrointestinal functions: motility, coordination of sphincter function and secretion. In the clinic this manifests in a wide range of symptoms such as reflux, bloating, abdominal cramping, hard, dry stools, and incomplete evacuation, although the most known adverse effect is opioid-induced constipation. Traditional treatment with laxatives is often insufficient, but in recent years a number of novel pharmacological approaches have been introduced. In this review the pathophysiology, symptomatology and prevalence of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction is presented along with the benefits and caveats of a suggested consensus definition for opioid-induced constipation. Finally, traditional treatment is appraised and compared with the latest pharmacological developments. In conclusion, opioid antagonists restricted to the periphery show promising results, but use of different definitions and outcome measures complicate comparison. However, an international working group has recently suggested a consensus definition for opioid-induced constipation and relevant outcome measures have also been proposed. If investigators within this field adapt the suggested consensus and include symptoms related to dysfunction of the upper gut, it will ease comparison and be a step forward in future research.

  8. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueou...

  9. Adrenergic Agonists Bind to Adrenergic-Receptor-Like Regions of the Mu Opioid Receptor, Enhancing Morphine and Methionine-Enkephalin Binding: A New Approach to "Biased Opioids"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Turke, Miah; Subhramanyam, Udaya K Tiruttani; Churchill, Beth; Labahn, Joerg

    2018-01-17

    Extensive evidence demonstrates functional interactions between the adrenergic and opioid systems in a diversity of tissues and organs. While some effects are due to receptor and second messenger cross-talk, recent research has revealed an extracellular, allosteric opioid binding site on adrenergic receptors that enhances adrenergic activity and its duration. The present research addresses whether opioid receptors may have an equivalent extracellular, allosteric adrenergic binding site that has similar enhancing effects on opioid binding. Comparison of adrenergic and opioid receptor sequences revealed that these receptors share very significant regions of similarity, particularly in some of the extracellular and transmembrane regions associated with adrenergic binding in the adrenergic receptors. Five of these shared regions from the mu opioid receptor (muOPR) were synthesized as peptides and tested for binding to adrenergic, opioid and control compounds using ultraviolet spectroscopy. Adrenergic compounds bound to several of these muOPR peptides with low micromolar affinity while acetylcholine, histamine and various adrenergic antagonists did not. Similar studies were then conducted with purified, intact muOPR with similar results. Combinations of epinephrine with methionine enkephalin or morphine increased the binding of both by about half a log unit. These results suggest that muOPR may be allosterically enhanced by adrenergic agonists.

  10. Baclofen for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial [ISRCTN32121581

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi-Abhari Seyed Ali

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of preclinical studies suggest that the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen may be useful in treatment of opioid dependence. This study was aimed at assessing the possible efficacy of baclofen for maintenance treatment of opioid dependence. Methods A total of 40 opioid-dependent patients were detoxified and randomly assigned to receive baclofen (60 mg/day or placebo in a 12-week, double blind, parallel-group trial. Primary outcome measure was retention in treatment. Secondary outcome measures included opioids and alcohol use according to urinalysis and self-report ratings, intensity of opioid craving assessed with a visual analogue scale, opioid withdrawal symptoms as measured by the Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale and depression scores on the Hamilton inventory. Results Treatment retention was significantly higher in the baclofen group. Baclofen also showed a significant superiority over placebo in terms of opiate withdrawal syndrome and depressive symptoms. Non-significant, but generally favorable responses were seen in the baclofen group with other outcome measures including intensity of opioid craving and self-reported opioid and alcohol use. However, no significant difference was seen in the rates of opioid-positive urine tests. Additionally, the drug side effects of the two groups were not significantly different. Conclusion The results support further study of baclofen in the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence.

  11. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Anna K; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-15

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in "ligated" rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex.

  12. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest C

    2017-03-01

    % did not regard opioids as drugs to help patients die, and 72% did not view them as drugs of abuse. More English (41% than German (28% nurses were afraid of criminal investigations and were constantly aware of side effects (UK, 94%; Germany, 38% when using opioids. Four latent variables were identified which likely influence nurses’ mental models: “conscious decision-making”; “medication-related fears”; “practice-based observations”; and “risk assessment”. They were predicted by strength of religious beliefs and indicators of informal learning such as experience but not by indicators of formal learning such as conference attendance. Conclusion: Nurses in both countries employ analytical and affective mental models when administering the opioids and seem to learn from experience rather than from formal teaching. Additionally, some attitudes and emotions towards opioids are likely the result of nurses’ cultural background. Keywords: nurses, opioids, mental models, decision-making

  13. Common and specific liability to addiction: approaches to association studies of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, David A; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2012-06-01

    Opioid addiction, whether to opiates such as heroin and morphine, and/or to non-medical use of opioids, is a major problem worldwide. Although drug-induced and environmental factors are essential for the liability to develop opioid addiction, the genetic background of an individual is now known also to play a substantial role. The overall goal of this article is to address the common and specific liabilities to addiction in the context of approaches to studies of one addiction, opioid addiction. Literature on identifying genetic variants that may play a role in the development of opioid addiction was reviewed. A substantial number of genetic variants have been reported to be associated with opioid addiction. No single variant has been found in any of the reported GWAS studies with a substantial effect size on the liability to develop heroin addiction. It appears that there is a complex interaction of a large number of variants, some rare, some common, which interact with the environment and in response to specific drugs of abuse to increase the liability of developing opioid addiction. In spite of the inherent difficulties in obtaining large well-phenotyped cohorts for genetic studies, new findings have been reported that are being used to develop testable hypotheses into the biological basis of opioid addiction. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. The downward spiral of chronic pain, prescription opioid misuse, and addiction: cognitive, affective, and neuropsychopharmacologic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Eric L; Froeliger, Brett; Zeidan, Fadel; Partin, Kaitlyn; Howard, Matthew O

    2013-12-01

    Prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients are emerging public health concerns of considerable significance. Estimates suggest that more than 10% of chronic pain patients misuse opioid analgesics, and the number of fatalities related to nonmedical or inappropriate use of prescription opioids is climbing. Because the prevalence and adverse consequences of this threat are increasing, there is a pressing need for research that identifies the biobehavioral risk chain linking chronic pain, opioid analgesia, and addictive behaviors. To that end, the current manuscript draws upon current neuropsychopharmacologic research to provide a conceptual framework of the downward spiral leading to prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients receiving opioid analgesic pharmacotherapy. Addictive use of opioids is described as the outcome of a cycle initiated by chronic pain and negative affect and reinforced by opioidergic-dopamingeric interactions, leading to attentional hypervigilance for pain and drug cues, dysfunctional connectivity between self-referential and cognitive control networks in the brain, and allostatic dysregulation of stress and reward circuitry. Implications for clinical practice are discussed; multimodal, mindfulness-oriented treatment is introduced as a potentially effective approach to disrupting the downward spiral and facilitating recovery from chronic pain and opioid addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists and for nicotine and α-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas μ, δ, and κ opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides (β-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer

  16. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. (National Cancer Institute-Navy Medical Oncology Branch, Bethesda, MD (USA) Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  17. Functional characteristics of the naked mole rat μ-opioid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Busch-Dienstfertig

    Full Text Available While humans and most animals respond to µ-opioid receptor (MOR agonists with analgesia and decreased aggression, in the naked mole rat (NMR opioids induce hyperalgesia and severe aggression. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1 can underlie altered behavioral responses to opioids. Therefore, we hypothesized that the primary structure of the NMR MOR may differ from other species. Sequencing of the NMR oprm1 revealed strong homology to other mammals, but exposed three unique amino acids that might affect receptor-ligand interactions. The NMR and rat oprm1 sequences were cloned into mammalian expression vectors and transfected into HEK293 cells. Radioligand binding and 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP enzyme immunoassays were used to compare opioid binding and opioid-mediated cAMP inhibition. At normalized opioid receptor protein levels we detected significantly lower [3H]DAMGO binding to NMR compared to rat MOR, but no significant difference in DAMGO-induced cAMP inhibition. Strong DAMGO-induced MOR internalization was detectable using radioligand binding and confocal imaging in HEK293 cells expressing rat or NMR receptor, while morphine showed weak or no effects. In summary, we found minor functional differences between rat and NMR MOR suggesting that other differences e.g. in anatomical distribution of MOR underlie the NMR's extreme reaction to opioids.

  18. Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia Is Associated with Negative Health Related Measures in a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Fitzcharles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As pain is the cardinal symptom of fibromyalgia (FM, strategies directed towards pain relief are an integral component of treatment. Opioid medications comprise a category of pharmacologic treatments which have impact on pain in various conditions with best evidence for acute pain relief. Although opioid therapy other than tramadol has never been formally tested for treatment of pain in FM, these agents are commonly used by patients. We have examined the effect of opioid treatments in patients diagnosed with FM and followed longitudinally in a multidisciplinary pain center over a period of 2 years. In this first study reporting on health related measures and opioid use in FM, opioid users had poorer symptoms and functional and occupational status compared to nonusers. Although opioid users may originally have had more severe symptoms at the onset of disease, we have no evidence that these agents improved status beyond standard care and may even have contributed to a less favourable outcome. Only a formal study of opioid use in FM will clarify this issue, but until then physicians must be vigilant regarding the multiple adverse consequences of opioid therapy.

  19. Opioid-induced hyponatremia in a patient with central diabetes insipidus: independence from ADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nandini; Balliu, Erjola; Osipoff, Jennifer; Lane, Andrew; Wilson, Thomas

    2017-05-24

    Hyponatremia can be a complication of opioid therapy, which has been postulated to occur secondary to inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion [SIADH]). We report severe hyponatremia following wisdom teeth extraction with opioid analgesia in a 19-year-old female with diabetes insipidus (DI) and acquired panhypopituitarism that challenges this theory. As this patient has DI, we believe opioid treatment caused severe hyponatremia by the following mechanisms: (1) Opioids have a direct antidiuretic effect independent of changes in ADH, as demonstrated in Brattleboro rats with central DI. (2) Hydrocodone may have stimulated this patient's thirst center contributing to hyponatremia, as demonstrated in animal studies. Opioid use can cause hyponatremia in patients independent of ADH. It is important for clinicians to be aware of this so that patients can be appropriately counseled.

  20. Randomized comparison of effectiveness of unimodal opioid analgesia with multimodal analgesia in post–cesarean section pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniji AO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Adetunji Oladeni Adeniji,1 Oluseyi Olaboyede A Atanda21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, NigeriaBackground: Postoperative pain leads to patient discomfort, decreased level of satisfaction, prolonged recovery, and higher health costs. Acute pain control therefore improves the overall quality of life in patients undergoing cesarean section. Pain relief is a fundamental human right, but there is no gold standard for post–cesarean section pain management.Objective: To compare the efficacy of pentazocine and tramadol used in unimodal and multimodal (in combination with piroxicam approach, in the management of post–cesarean section pain.Materials and methods: This study employed a random allocation design to compare the effectiveness of intramuscular pentazocine (60 mg or tramadol (100 mg as single analgesic agent and in combination with daily intramuscular piroxicam 20 mg, for the management of post–cesarean section pain during the immediate 12 hours after surgery. The primary outcome measure was control of postoperative pain, while the secondary outcome measures were the analgesic agent onset of action, duration of action, patient satisfaction, and maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes. Data obtained were entered into a predesigned sheet and analyzed with the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17. Means ± standard deviation (SD were calculated for the quantitative variables, and the difference between two independent groups was compared using unpaired Student's t-test. The level of significance was set at 0.05.Results: A total of 120 patients were equally and randomly allocated to four study groups – two that received unimodal analgesia (the pentazocine group and the tramadol group and two that received multimodal analgesia (the pentazocine

  1. [The endogenous opioid system and drug addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, R

    2010-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder leading to complex adaptive changes within the brain reward circuits. Several neurotransmitters, including the endogenous opioid system are involved in these changes. The opioid system plays a pivotal role in different aspects of addiction. Thus, opioid receptors and endogenous opioid peptides are largely distributed in the mesolimbic system and modulate dopaminergic activity within the reward circuits. Opioid receptors and peptides are selectively involved in several components of the addictive processes induced by opioids, cannabinoids, psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine. This review is focused on the contribution of each component of the endogenous opioid system in the addictive properties of the different drugs of abuse. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Tadalafil Once-Daily or On-Demand vs Placebo on Return to Baseline Erectile Function After Bilateral Nerve-Sparing Radical Prostatectomy - Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial (REACTT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulhall, John P; Brock, Gerald; Oelke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND AIM: The multicenter, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo-controlled REACTT trial suggested that treatment with tadalafil once daily (OaD) started early after bilateral nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (nsRP) for prostate cancer may contribute to erectile function......: REACTT included 422 men blind treatment (DBT) with tadalafil 5 mg OaD (n = 139), tadalafil 20 mg on...

  3. Pain relief and clinical outcome: from opioids to balanced analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1996-01-01

    If it is generally accepted that adequate postoperative pain relief will improve outcome from surgery, several controlled trials demonstrated this only for lower body surgical procedures with epidural and spinal anesthetics. Important effects on outcome were not shown when postoperative opioids...... were administered with patient controlled (PCA) or epidural techniques. However, the most optimal pain relief seems to be best achieved with balanced analgesia techniques using combinations of epidural opioids and local anesthetics and systemic non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Future efforts...... should aim at including physical rehabilitation programs in the pain treatment regimen....

  4. Predictors of opioid efficacy in patients with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Kasper; Olesen, Anne E; Gram, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    of life after 14 days of opioid treatment. Secondary outcomes included patient's global impression of clinical change and side effects. Logistic regression models adjusted for age and sex were used to identify biomarkers predictive for successful treatment, defined as at least a 30% reduction in average.......03), relative delta (OR: 0.76; P = 0.03) and beta EEG activity (OR: 1.18; P = 0.04) induced by experimental cold pain. None of the study variables were related to improvement in quality of life. For the first time, individual pain processing characteristics have been linked to opioid response in a mixed chronic...

  5. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolbergen, David R; Manshanden, Johan S J; Bouma, Berto J; Blom, Nico A; Mulder, Barbara J M; de Mol, Bas A J M; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate our results of valve-sparing aortic root replacement and associated (multiple) valve repair. From September 2003 to September 2013, 97 patients had valve-sparing aortic root replacement procedures. Patient records and preoperative, postoperative and recent echocardiograms were reviewed. Median age was 40.3 (range: 13.4-68.6) years and 67 (69.1%) were male. Seven (7.2%) patients were younger than 18 years, the youngest being 13.4 years. Fifty-four (55.7%) had Marfan syndrome, 2 (2.1%) other fibrous tissue diseases, 15 (15.5%) bicuspid aortic valve and 3 (3.1%) had earlier Fallot repair. The reimplantation technique was used in all, with a straight vascular prosthesis in 11 (26-34 mm) and the Valsalva prosthesis in 86 (26-32 mm). Concomitant aortic valve repair was performed in 43 (44.3%), mitral valve repair in 10 (10.3%), tricuspid valve repair in 5 (5.2%) and aortic arch replacement in 3 (3.1%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.4 years. Follow-up was complete in all. One 14-year old patient died 1.3 years post-surgery presumably of ventricular arrhythmia. One patient underwent reoperation for aneurysm of the proximal right coronary artery after 4.9 years and 4 patients required aortic valve replacement, 3 of which because of endocarditis after 0.1, 0.8 and 1.3 years and 1 because of cusp prolapse after 3.8 years. No thrombo-embolic complications occurred. Mortality, root reoperation and aortic regurgitation were absent in 88.0 ± 0.5% at 5-year follow-up. Results of valve-sparing root replacement are good, even in association with a high incidence of concomitant valve repair. Valve-sparing aortic root replacement can be performed at a very young age as long as an adult size prosthesis can be implanted. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Sistem Pendukung Keputusan Pengalokasian Spare Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Wiryasaputra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Era informasi yang semakin berkembang mempengaruhi lingkungan bisnis. Pengaruhnya dapat dilihat pada proses pengambilan keputusan. Proses pengambilan keputusan terhadap sejumlah alternatif dan sejumlah tujuan diselesaikan dengan sebuah sistem. Sistem  yang bermodelkan Multi Attribute Decision Making (MADM dan Multi Objective Decision Making (MODM. Model MODM digunakan untuk menyelesaikan perancangan alternatif terbaik dan model MADM digunakan untuk menyelesaikan penyeleksian terhadap beberapa alternatif dalam jumlah yang terbatas. Salah satu pendekatan model MADM adalah TOPSIS (Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution. Konsep utama TOPSIS adalah alternatif preferensi terbaik memiliki jarak terpendek dari solusi ideal positif dan memiliki jarak terjauh dari solusi ideal negatif. Hasil metode TOPSIS adalah perankingan terhadap sejumlah alternatif. Salah satu masukan dari metode TOPSIS adalah nilai pembobotan kriteria. Nilai pembobotan kriteria dapat diberikan secara langsung oleh pengambil keputusan atau dihitung melalui sebuah metode. Penelitian akan menghitung nilai pembobotan kriteria dengan metode Entropy. Tujuannya adalah untuk memberikan objektifitas pembobotan kriteria. Penelitian mengangkat kasus tentang pengalokasian spare part ke sejumlah store. Alternatif terbaik dengan sumber daya yang terbatas, beberapa tujuan yang saling bertentangan didekati dengan metode Goal programming. Pengambilan keputusan akan lebih terarah karena sistem menghasilkan perankingan store spare part, dan menampilkan  informasi alokasi spare part.   Kata kunci— Sistem Pendukung Keputusan, Entropy, TOPSIS, Goal Programming   Abstract The capabilities of computrized systems facilitate decision support in a number of ways, such as speed computations, increased productivity ,improved data management and others. Decisions are often made by individuals. There may be conflicting objectives even for a  decision maker. The conflicting

  7. Analgesic synergy between opioid and α2 -adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot-Doré, A-J; Schuster, D J; Stone, L S; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    Opioid and α2 -adrenoceptor agonists are potent analgesic drugs and their analgesic effects can synergize when co-administered. These supra-additive interactions are potentially beneficial clinically; by increasing efficacy and/or reducing the total drug required to produce sufficient pain relief, undesired side effects can be minimized. However, combination therapies of opioids and α2 -adrenoceptor agonists remain underutilized clinically, in spite of a large body of preclinical evidence describing their synergistic interaction. One possible obstacle to the translation of preclinical findings to clinical applications is a lack of understanding of the mechanisms underlying the synergistic interactions between these two drug classes. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of the interactions between different opioid and α2 -adrenoceptor agonist combinations in preclinical studies. These studies have identified the spinal cord as an important site of action of synergistic interactions, provided insights into which receptors mediate these interactions and explored downstream signalling events enabling synergy. It is now well documented that the activation of both μ and δ opioid receptors can produce synergy with α2 -adrenoceptor agonists and that α2 -adrenoceptor agonists can mediate synergy through either the α2A or the α2C adrenoceptor subtypes. Current hypotheses surrounding the cellular mechanisms mediating opioid-adrenoceptor synergy, including PKC signalling and receptor oligomerization, and the evidence supporting them are presented. Finally, the implications of these findings for clinical applications and drug discovery are discussed. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Opioid use in palliative care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    care. The confident and safe use of opioids in palliative care is an essential skill required by all. d o c t o r s . ... patient for ongoing clinical review. Start the elderly and frail .... (24 hour subcutaneous infusion ... (nursing or medical), pain special-.

  9. Influence of stereoelectronic effects on the non-opioid analgesics gaboxadol and gaboxadol hydrochloride: Spectral and DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaraj, D. R.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2018-05-01

    The stereoelectronic properties of the molecular structure of most stable conformers of gaboxadol and gaboxadol hydrochloride have been studied using DFT/B3P86-LANL2DZ methodology. The energies of stable conformers of gaboxadol and gaboxadol hydrochloride are -494.2689 and -510.0117 hartrees, respectively. The stability of the molecules arising from stereoelectronic interactions, leading to its bioactivity, has been confirmed using natural bond orbital analysis. The natural bond orbital analysis of donor-acceptor (σ→σ* and n→σ*) interactions showed that the stereoelectronic hyperconjugative and anomeric interactions are exhibited in gaboxadol hydrochloride and gaboxadol, respectively. Lengthening of the axial and equatorial C-H bond lengths and natural population analysis support these results. Spectral features of gaboxadol hydrochloride have been explored by the Fourier transform infrared, Raman and Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques combined with density functional theory computations. NH+ … Cl- hydrogen bonding has been noticeable as a broad and strong absorption in the 2800-2400 cm-1 region. Broad peaks obtained by proton NMR are a result of the quadrupole effect of the N+ atom. Docking studies using representative GABA receptor crystal structures revealed that molecules containing azinane and isoxazole cores fit within the ligand binding domains, and the gaboxadol hydrochloride molecule shows the best binding energy with the 3D32 GABA receptor. Also, gaboxadol hydrochloride has obtained a high value of HOMO energy and a narrow HOMO- LUMO energy gap, which enhances reactivity.

  10. Effects of age on spatial information processing: relationship to senescent changes in brain noradrenergic and opioid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapp, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    A major focus in current research on aging is the identification of senescent changes in cognitive function in laboratory animals. This literature indicates that the processing of spatial information may be particularly impaired during senescence. The degree to which nonspecific factors (eg. sensory of motor deficits) contribute to behavioral impairments in aging, however, remains largely uninvestigated. In addition, few studies have attempted to identify senescent changes in brain structure and function which might underlie the behavioral manifestations of aging. In the behavioral experiments reported here, the authors tested young, middle-age, and senescent rates in several versions of a spatial memory task, the Morris water maze. The results of these investigations demonstrate that aged rats are significantly impaired in the Morris task compared to young or middle-age animals. In addition, these studies indicate that age-related deficits in the water maze reflect a specific dysfunction in the ability of older animals to effectively process spatial information rather than a senescent decline in sensory or motor functions. Using the subjects from the behavioral studies, additional investigations assessed whether age-dependent changes in neurochemical and neuroanatomical systems which are known to mediate spatial learning in young animals were related to the behavioral deficits exhibited by aged rats. The results of these studies demonstrate that a portion of senescent animals exhibit significant increases in lateral septal 3 H-desmethylimipramine binding and decrease in 3 H-naloxone binding in this same region as assessed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

  11. Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Tuominen, Lauri; de Boer, Femke E; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-08-23

    The endogenous opioid system supports a multitude of functions related to appetitive behavior in humans and animals, and it has been proposed to govern hedonic aspects of feeding thus contributing to the development of obesity. Here we used positron emission tomography to investigate whether feeding results in hedonia-dependent endogenous opioid release in humans. Ten healthy males were recruited for the study. They were scanned with the μ-opioid-specific ligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after a palatable meal, a nonpalatable meal, and after an overnight fast. Subjective mood, satiety, and circulating hormone levels were measured. Feeding induced significant endogenous opioid release throughout the brain. This response was more pronounced following a nonpalatable meal versus a palatable meal, and independent of the subjective hedonic responses to feeding. We conclude that feeding consistently triggers cerebral opioid release even in the absence of subjective pleasure associated with feeding, suggesting that metabolic and homeostatic rather than exclusively hedonic responses play a role in the feeding-triggered cerebral opioid release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The endogenous opioid system supports both hedonic and homeostatic functions. It has been proposed that overeating and concomitant opioid release could downregulate opioid receptors and promote the development of obesity. However, it remains unresolved whether feeding leads to endogenous opioid release in humans. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to test whether feeding triggers cerebral opioid release and whether this response is associated with pleasurable sensations. We scanned volunteers using the μ-opioid receptor-specific radioligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after an overnight fast, after consuming a palatable meal, and after consuming a nonpalatable meal. Feeding led to significant endogenous opioid release, and this occurred also in the absence of feeding

  12. Opioid system of the brain and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogichadze, M; Mgaloblishvili-Nemsadze, M; Oniani, N; Emukhvary, N; Basishvili, T

    2009-04-01

    Influence of blocking of opioid receptors with concomitant intraperitoneal injections of Naloxone (20 mg/kg) (non-selective antagonist of opioid system) on the outcomes of anesthetic dose of ethanol (4,25 ml /kg 25% solution) was investigated in the rats. The sleep-wakefulness cycle (SWC) was used as a model for identification of the effects. Alterations of the SWC structure adequately reflect the neuro-chemical changes, which may develop during pharmacological and non-pharmacological impact. Administration of anesthetic dose of ethanol evoked considerable modification of spontaneous EEG activity of the neocortex. The EEG activity was depressed and full inhibition of spinal reflexes and somatic muscular relaxation did occur. During EEG depression regular SWC did not develop. All phases of SWC were reduced. The disturbances of SWC, such as decrease of slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep duration and increase of wakefulness, remained for several days. At concomitant administration of Naloxone and ethanol, duration of EEG depression decreased significantly. Generation of normal SWC was observed on the same experimental day. However, it should be noted that complete abolishment of ethanol effects by Naloxone was not observed. The results obtained suggest that Naloxone partially blocks ethanol depressogenic effects and duration of this effect is mediated by GABA-ergic system of the brain.

  13. Incorporating single-side sparing in models for predicting parotid dose sparing in head and neck IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Lulin; Wu, Q. Jackie; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yoo, David; Jiang, Yuliang; Ge, Yaorong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Sparing of single-side parotid gland is a common practice in head-and-neck (HN) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. It is a special case of dose sparing tradeoff between different organs-at-risk. The authors describe an improved mathematical model for predicting achievable dose sparing in parotid glands in HN IMRT planning that incorporates single-side sparing considerations based on patient anatomy and learning from prior plan data. Methods: Among 68 HN cases analyzed retrospectively, 35 cases had physician prescribed single-side parotid sparing preferences. The single-side sparing model was trained with cases which had single-side sparing preferences, while the standard model was trained with the remainder of cases. A receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the best criterion that separates the two case groups using the physician's single-side sparing prescription as ground truth. The final predictive model (combined model) takes into account the single-side sparing by switching between the standard and single-side sparing models according to the single-side sparing criterion. The models were tested with 20 additional cases. The significance of the improvement of prediction accuracy by the combined model over the standard model was evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Using the ROC analysis, the best single-side sparing criterion is (1) the predicted median dose of one parotid is higher than 24 Gy; and (2) that of the other is higher than 7 Gy. This criterion gives a true positive rate of 0.82 and a false positive rate of 0.19, respectively. For the bilateral sparing cases, the combined and the standard models performed equally well, with the median of the prediction errors for parotid median dose being 0.34 Gy by both models (p = 0.81). For the single-side sparing cases, the standard model overestimates the median dose by 7.8 Gy on average, while the predictions by the combined

  14. Trait Mindfulness and Progression to Injection Use in Youth With Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J Deanna; Vo, Hoa; Matson, Pamela; Adger, Hoover; Barnett, Gabriela; Fishman, Marc

    2017-09-19

    Many youth initiate opioid misuse with prescription opioids and transition over time to more severe substance-using behaviors, including injection. Trait mindfulness is a potentially protective factor. This is a cross-sectional study characterizing a sample of opioid-using youth by level of mindfulness and examines the potential effect modification of emotion regulation on the relationship between mindfulness and progression to injection opioid use. A convenience sample of 112 youth (ages 14-24) was recruited during an episode of inpatient detoxification and residential treatment for opioid use disorders. We examined emotion regulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale), mindfulness (Child Acceptance and Mindfulness Measure), and opioid use. We completed multivariable regressions stratified by degree of emotion regulation looking at relationship of mindfulness on time to injection use from age of first prescription opioid. Youth had difficulties in emotion regulation (m = 104.2; SD = 2.41) and low mindfulness (m = 19.1;SD = 0.59). While we found overall that mindfulness was associated with time to progression to injection opioid use, there was significant effect modification. Among youth with high levels of difficulty in emotion regulation, those with high mindfulness trait had quicker progressions to injection (-1.31 years; p =.003). In contrast, youth with normal emotion regulation and high mindfulness trait had a slower progression to injection (1.67 years; p =.041). Conclusion/Importance: Our study showed a majority of youth presenting with opioid use disorders have impairments in emotion regulation and deficits in trait mindfulness. The relationship between mindfulness and opioid use is impacted by emotion regulation capacity. More research is needed to understand the various facets of mindfulness and how they interact with emotion regulation in youth.

  15. Endogenous opioid activity in the anterior cingulate cortex is required for relief of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; Meske, Diana; Qu, Chaoling; Morimura, Kozo; Okun, Alec; Arakawa, Naohisa; Ossipov, Michael; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2015-05-06

    Pain is aversive, and its relief elicits reward mediated by dopaminergic signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a part of the mesolimbic reward motivation pathway. How the reward pathway is engaged by pain-relieving treatments is not known. Endogenous opioid signaling in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), an area encoding pain aversiveness, contributes to pain modulation. We examined