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Sample records for operational readiness review

  1. Operational readiness review phase-1 final report for WRAP-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27

    This report documents the Operational Readiness Review for WRAP-1 Phase-1 operations. The report includes all criteria, lines of inquiry with resulting Findings and Observations. The review included assessing operational capability of the organization and the computer controlled process and facility systems.

  2. Operational readiness reviews for restart of L reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The L Reactor at the Savannah River Plant is being restarted after being in a standby status since 1968. Operational Readiness Reviews (ORRs) were conducted by DOE-SR and contractor personnel concurrent with the restart activity. This paper summarizes the ORR activity

  3. Implementation plan for WRAP Module 1 operational readiness review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irons, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP 1) will be used to receive, sample, treat, and ship contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW) to storage and disposal sites both on the Hanford site and off-site. The primary mission of WRAP 1 is to characterize and certify CH waste in 55-gallon and 85-gallon drums; and its secondary function is to certify CH waste standard waste boxes (SWB) and boxes of similar size for disposal. The WRAP 1 will provide the capability for examination (including x-ray, visual, and contents sampling), limited treatment, repackaging, and certification of CH suspect-TRU waste in 55-gallon drums retrieved from storage, as well as newly generated CH LLW and CH TRU waste drums. The WRAP 1 will also provide examination (X-ray and visual only) and certification of CH LLW and CH TRU waste in small boxes. The decision to perform an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was made in accordance with WHC-CM-5-34, Solid Waste Disposal Operations Administration, Section 1.4, Operational Readiness Activities. The ORR will ensure plant and equipment readiness, management and personnel readiness, and management programs readiness for the initial startup of the facility. This implementation plan is provided for defining the conduct of the WHC ORR

  4. Operational Readiness Review: Savannah River Replacement Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Operational Readiness Review (ORR) is one of several activities to be completed prior to introducing tritium into the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Secretary of Energy will rely in part on the results of this ORR in deciding whether the startup criteria for RTF have been met. The RTF is a new underground facility built to safely service the remaining nuclear weapons stockpile. At RTF, tritium will be unloaded from old components, purified and enriched, and loaded into new or reclaimed reservoirs. The RTF will replace an aging facility at SRS that has processed tritium for more than 35 years. RTF has completed construction and is undergoing facility startup testing. The final stages of this testing will require the introduction of limited amounts of tritium. The US Department of Energy (DOE) ORR was conducted January 19 to February 4, 1993, in accordance with an ORR review plan which was developed considering previous readiness reviews. The plan also considered the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendations 90-4 and 92-6, and the judgements of experienced senior experts. The review covered three major areas: (1) Plant and Equipment Readiness, (2) Personnel Readiness, and (3) Management Systems. The ORR Team was comprised of approximately 30 members consisting of a Team Leader, Senior Safety Experts, and Technical Experts. The ORR objectives and criteria were based on DOE Orders, industry standards, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations guidelines, recommendations of external oversight groups, and experience of the team members

  5. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report

  6. Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIES, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR

  7. Phase V storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included

  8. Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, R.H.

    1997-05-30

    This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

  9. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation

  10. Operational Readiness Review Plan for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Materials Production Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. H.; Martin, M. M.; Riggs, C. R.; Beatty, R. L.; Ohriner, E. K.; Escher, R. N.

    1990-04-19

    In October 1989, a US shuttle lifted off from Cape Kennedy carrying the spacecraft Galileo on its mission to Jupiter. In November 1990, a second spacecraft, Ulysses, will be launched from Cape Kennedy with a mission to study the polar regions of the sun. The prime source of power for both spacecraft is a series of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which use plutonium oxide (plutonia) as a heat source. Several of the key components in this power system are required to ensure the safety of both the public and the environment and were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1980 to 1983 period. For these two missions, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), will provide an iridium alloy component used to contain the plutonia heat source and a carbon composite material that serves as a thermal insulator. ORNL alone will continue to fabricate the carbon composite material. Because of the importance to DOE that Energy Systems deliver these high quality components on time, performance of an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) of these manufacturing activities is necessary. Energy Systems Policy GP 24 entitled "Operational Readiness Process" describes the formal and comprehensive process by which appropriate Energy Systems activities are to be reviewed to ensure their readiness. This Energy System policy is aimed at reducing the risks associated with mission success and requires a management approved "readiness plan" to be issued. This document is the readiness plan for the RTG materials production tasks.

  11. Department of Energy Operational Readiness Review for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the restart of Contact Handled (CH) waste emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The ORR team assessed the readiness of Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC (NWP) to manage and perform receipt through CH waste emplacement, and associated waste handling and management activities, including the ability of the National TRU Program (NTP) to evaluate the waste currently stored at the WIPP site against the revised and enhanced Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Field work for this review began on November 14, 2015 and was completed on November 30, 2016. The DOE ORR was conducted in accordance with the Department of Energy Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, dated November 8, 2016, and DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities. The review activities included personnel interviews, record reviews, direct observation of operations and maintenance demonstrations, and observation of multiple operational and emergency drills/exercises. The DOE ORR also evaluated the adequacy of the contractor’s ORR (CORR) and the readiness of the DOE Carlsbad field Office (CBFO) to oversee the startup and execution of CH waste emplacement activities at the WIPP facility. The WIPP facility is categorized as a Hazard Category 2 DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facility for all surface and Underground (UG) operations per DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. In addition, the WIPP experienced two events in February, 2014 that resulted in Accident Investigations being performed in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 225.1B, Accident Investigations. Based upon the results of the accident investigations and hazard categorization of the facility, the team placed

  12. Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

    1995-04-05

    An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH& QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment.

  13. Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH ampersand QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment

  14. Operational readiness review implementation plan for K Basin sludge water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRWIN, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    This Implementation Plan (IP) has been prepared consistent with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 425.1B, ''Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities'', and DOE-STD-3006-2000, ''Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews'' (ORR) (DOE 2002). The scope of the DOE ORR is described in the RL ''Plan of Action, K Basin Sludge Water System'' (Veitenheimer 2003), prepared by DOE project line management and approved by the RL Manager, the designated Approval Authority, on March 20, 2003. The scope of the contractor ORR is described in the contractor ''Plan of Action for the K Basins Sludge Water System Operational Readiness Review'' (FH 2002a) which was prepared by Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project line management and approved by the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) Manager on December 19, 2002. DOE Order 425.1B indicates that the Secretarial Officer is the Authorization Authority when substantial modifications are made to a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility. This Authorization Authority has been delegated to the RL Manager by memorandum from Jessie Hill Roberson, dated February 5, 2003 (Roberson 2003). This IP provides the overall approach and guidelines for performance of the DOE ORR. Appendix A contains the Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRAD), which define the review objectives and criteria as well as the approach for assessing each objective. ORR results will be published in a final report, as discussed in Section 9.4

  15. Operational readiness of EFAD systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabat, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    An assessment of the operational readiness of the Emergency Filtered Air Discharge (EFAD) systems, installed in Canadian CANDU multi-unit nuclear power plants, was performed in this project. Relevant Canadian and foreign standards and regulatory requirements have been reviewed and documentation on EFAD system design, operation, testing and maintenance have been assessed to identify likely causes and potential failures of EFAD systems and their components under both standby and accident conditions. Recommendations have also been provided in this report for revisions which are needed to achieve and maintain appropriate operational readiness of EFAD systems

  16. Operational readiness review of the Low Level Waste vaults at Savannah River Site: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; McVay, C.; Venkatesh, S.

    1994-01-01

    Low Level radioactive Waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site at Aiken, South Carolina, has traditionally been disposed of using engineered trenches in accordance with the guidelines and technology existing at the time. Recently, subgrade concrete vaults known as E-Area Vaults (EAV) have been constructed at SRS. The EAV project is a comprehensive effort for upgrading LLW disposal at SRS based on meeting the requirements of current Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, and addressing more stringent federal and state regulations. The EAV is a first of its kind state-of-the-art facility designed and built in the United States to receive LLW. Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) conducted an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) of the vaults prior to startup. The objective of the EAV ORR was to perform a comprehensive review of the operational readiness of the facilities per DOE guidelines including Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) recommendations. This review included assessing construction of the vaults as per design, adequate approved procedures, and training of all the personnel associated with the facility operations. EAV ORR incorporated the lessons learned from other DOE ORRs, included DNFSB recommendations, used a graded approach, and utilized subject matter experts for each functional area of assessment

  17. Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for the K Basin Fuel Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIES, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    This implementation plan has been prepared to comply with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 425.1A, Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities, and DOE-STD-3006-2000, Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews (ORR) (DOE 2002). The scope of the ORR is described in the contractor K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Plan of Action (POA), which was prepared by Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project line management and approved by the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) Manager on April 4, 2002 (FH 2002a). While the Project Hanford Management Contractor has been revised to include DOE Order 425.1B, the contractor implementing procedure, ''F-PRO-055, Startup Readiness (Revision 9) has not yet been approved by RL for contractor use. Appendix A provides a crosswalk between the requirements of DOE Order 425.1A and DOE Order 425.1B to show that all requirements of DOE 425.1B are covered by this implementation plan. DOE Order 425.1B indicates that the Secretarial Officer is the Authorization Authority when substantial modifications are made to a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility. This Authorization Authority has been delegated to the RL Manager by memorandum from Jessie Hill Roberson, dated November 20, 2001 (Roberson 2001). The scope of the ORR is described in the RL Plan of Action, K Basin Fuel Transfer System, prepared by DOE project line management and approved by the RL Manager, the designated approval authority, on September 12, 2002 (Schlender 2002). This implementation plan provides the overall approach and guidelines for performance of the DOE ORR. Appendix B contains the Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRAD), which define the review objectives and criteria as well as the approach for assessing each objective. ORR results will be published in a final report, as discussed in Section 9.4

  18. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

    1999-05-17

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation.

  19. Process operational readiness and operational readiness follow-on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nertney, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    The first document in the System Safety Development Center (SSDC) series deals with the subject of Occupancy-Use Readiness. The material included in that manual provided the basis for development of the SSDC workshop in Operational Readiness. The original Occupancy Readiness Manual, however, deals only generally with the subject of process safety; i.e., the safety of overall ''processes'' such as solar collection systems, nuclear reactors, and coal fired electrical plants. The manual also fails to detail the considerations involved in maintaining the state of readiness on a continuing basis. Both of the latter subjects are dealt with in some detail in the SSDC's Operational Readiness Workshop. The purpose of this document is to provide additional documentary material dealing with subjects introduced in SSDC-1 Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual, and SSDC-12, Safety Considerations in Evaluation of Maintenance Programs. In augmenting SSDC-1, Part I of this manual provides additional material related to process safety; in the case of SSDC-12, the subject of safety considerations in evaluation of maintenance programs is broadened in Part II to include maintenance of personnel systems and procedural systems as well as hardware. ''Maintenance'' is related more directly to the concept of operational readiness and an alternative analytical tree is provided for hardware maintenance program evaluation

  20. The tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems test contractor operational readiness review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Levine, J.; Norris, M.; Rehill, F.; Such, C.

    1993-01-01

    In preparation for D-T operations at TFTR, the TFTR project has successfully completed the C-ORR process which has led to the introduction of 200 curies of tritium to the site. Preparations for the C-ORR began approximately 2 years ago. During July 1992 a one-week Site Assistance Review was conducted by the C-ORR , and C-ORR Team consisting of 12 persons, all of whom were outside experts, many of whom were from other facilities within the DOE complex. During the July 1992 Site Assistance Review 201 findings were documented which fell into one of three categories. All of the 109 category one findings which were generated were required to be resolved prior to the introduction of tritium to the TFTR site. On April 5, 1993, the TFTR Tritium System Test C-ORR commenced. The results of the C-ORR as documented in the final report by the C-ORR was that category 1 findings were resolved, and it was the recommendation of the C-ORR Team to the PPPL ES ampersand H Board that TFTR initiate the Tritium Systems Test. DOE (Chicago Operations, Princeton Area Office) concurred with the C-ORR final report and on April 29, 1993, at 12:15 pm tritium was introduced to the TFTR site

  1. Acoustics Critical Readiness Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the acoustic equipment from the medical operations perspective. Included is information about the acoustic dosimeters, sound level meter, and headphones that are planned for use while on orbit. Finally there is information about on-orbit hearing assessments.

  2. Operational readiness review for the TSCA incinerator start-up at the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Elizabeth A.; Murray, Alexander P.; Kiang, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator at Oak Ridge K-25 Site was designed in the early 1980's as a treatment alternative for the increasing quantities of radioactive mixed waste accumulating from gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) operations. The waste feed principally contains low assay uranium and PCBs, although listed solvents and heavy metal containing sludges have also be incinerated. Construction was completed in 1986 and the unit underwent an extensive series of tests and trial burns, because of the following unique characteristics: the incinerator treats radioactive mixed wastes; increased size of the incinerator for greater waste throughout and treatment capacity; expansion of the waste acceptance criteria to include materials and radionuclides from non-GDP operations, such as ORNL and Y-12; modifications and improvement to the Air Pollution Control (APC) system; treatment of large quantities and concentrations of PCB containing materials; projected longevity of operation (40 years); humid, Eastern location with a high, annual precipitation. The incinerator was initially fired in July, 1986. The full performance testing (with the APC) and DOE acceptance of the facility occurred a year later. The trial burn period lasted from 1988 through 1990. Numerous equipment problems were initially encountered, including excessive draft fan wear and failure. These problems have been overcome, the facility is fully permitted, DOE provided authorization for full operations in 1991, and, to date, over two million pounds of mixed waste have been incinerated, with an average volume reduction factor of approximately nine. This paper discusses the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Readiness Review for the incinerator. (author)

  3. Implementation plan for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The primary technical objective for the WERF Restart Project is to assess, upgrade where necessary, and implement management, documentation, safety, and operation control systems that enable the resumption and continued operation of waste treatment and storage operations in a manner that is compliant with all environment, safety, and quality requirements of the US Department of Energy and Federal and State regulatory agencies. Specific processes that will be resumed at WERF include compaction of low-level compatible waste; size reduction of LLW, metallic and wood waste; incineration of combustible LLW and MLLW; and solidification of low-level and mixed low-level incinerator bottom ash, baghouse fly ash, and compatible sludges and debris. WERF will also provide for the operation of the WWSB which includes storage of MLLW in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements

  4. DOE Richland readiness review for PUREX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamorski, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    For ten months prior to the November 1983 startup of the Plutonium and URanium EXtraction (PUREX) Plant, the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office conducted an operational readiness review of the facility. This review was performed consistent with DOE and RL Order 5481.1 and in accordance with written plans prepared by the program and safety divisions. It involved personnel from five divisions within the office. The DOE review included two tasks: (1) overview and evaluation of the operating contractor's (Rockwell Hanford) readiness review for PUREX, and (2) independent assessment of 25 significant aspects of the startup effort. The RL reviews were coordinated by the program division and were phased in succession with the contractor's readiness review. As deficiencies or concerns were noted in the course of the review they were documented and required formal response from the contractor. Startup approval was given in three steps as the PUREX Plant began operation. A thorough review was performed and necessary documentation was prepared to support startup authorization in November 1983, before the scheduled startup date

  5. Vogtle Unit 1 readiness review: Assessment of Georgia Power Company readiness review pilot program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, G.

    1987-09-01

    Georgia Power Company (GPC) performed a readiness review at Vogtle Unit 1 as a pilot program. The pilot program was a new and innovative approach for the systematic and disciplined review, with senior management involvement, of GPC's implementation of design, construction, and operational readiness processes. The program's principal objective was to increase the level of assurance that quality programs at Vogtle Unit 1 have been accomplished in accordance with regulatory requirements. This report assesses the effectiveness of the GPC's readiness review pilot program (RRPP) at Vogtle Unit 1. It includes (1) an overview of what was experienced during the program's implementation, (2) an assessment of how well program objectives were met, and (3) lessons learned on the future use of the readiness review concept. Overall, GPC and the NRC staff believe that the RRPP at Vogtle Unit 1 was a success and that the program provided significant added assurance that Vogtle Unit 1 licensing commitments and NRC regulations have been adequately implemented. Although altering the NRC licensing review process for the few plants still in the construction pipeline may not be appropriate, licensees may benefit significantly by performing readiness reviews on their own initiative as GPC did for Vogtle. (7 refs.)

  6. AGR-5/6/7 LEUCO Kernel Fabrication Readiness Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Design and Development; Bailey, Kirk W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). ART Quality Assurance Engineer

    2015-02-01

    In preparation for forming low-enriched uranium carbide/oxide (LEUCO) fuel kernels for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel development and qualification program, Idaho National Laboratory conducted an operational readiness review of the Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group – Lynchburg (B&W NOG-L) procedures, processes, and equipment from January 14 – January 16, 2015. The readiness review focused on requirements taken from the American Society Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance Standard (NQA-1-2008, 1a-2009), a recent occurrence at the B&W NOG-L facility related to preparation of acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solution (ADUN), and a relook at concerns noted in a previous review. Topic areas open for the review were communicated to B&W NOG-L in advance of the on-site visit to facilitate the collection of objective evidences attesting to the state of readiness.

  7. Operational readiness of filtered air discharge monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafortune, J.F.; Jamieson, T.J.

    1993-08-01

    An assessment of the operational readiness of the Filtered Air Discharge (FAD) Stack Monitoring systems, installed in Canadian CANDU nuclear power plants, was performed in this project. Relevant Canadian and foreign standards and regulatory requirements have been reviewed and documentation on FAD stack monitoring system design, operation, testing and maintenance have been assessed to identify likely causes and potential failures of FAD stack monitoring systems and their components under both standby and accident conditions. Recommendations have also been provided in this report for design and performance review guidelines for CANDU stations. A case study of the FAD stack monitoring system at Pickering NGS is also documented in this report

  8. Readiness Review of BWXT for Fabrication of AGR 5/6/7 Compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Douglas William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharp, Michelle Tracy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In support of preparations for fabricating compacts for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification irradiation experiments (AGR-5/6/7), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted a readiness review of the BWX Technology (BWXT) procedures, processes, and equipment associated with compact fabrication activities at the BWXT Nuclear Operations Group (BWXT-NOG) facility outside Lynchburg, VirginiaVA. The readiness review used quality assurance requirements taken from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Nuclear Quality Assurance Standard (NQA-1-2008/1a-2009) as a basis to assess readiness to start compact fabrication.

  9. Readiness review plan for the in situ vitrification demonstration of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    A treatability study is planned that encompasses the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seepage Pit I during the third quarter of fiscal year 1995. Before the treatability study can be initiated, the proposed activity must be subjected to an Operational Readiness Review (ORR). ORR is a structured methodology of determining readiness to proceed as outlined in Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), Environmental Restoration Waste Management Procedure ER/C-P1610, which provides Energy Systems organizations assurance that the work to be performed is consistent with management's expectations and that the subject activity is ready to proceed safely. The readiness review plan provides details of the review plan overview and the scope of work to be performed. The plan also identifies individuals and position responsibilities for implementing the activity. The management appointed Readiness Review Board (RRB) has been identified. A Field Readiness Review Team (FRT), a management appointed multidisciplinary group, has been established (1) to evaluate the ISV treatability study, (2) to identify and assemble supporting objective evidences of the readiness to proceed, and (3) to assist the team leader in presenting the evidences to the RRB. A major component of RRB is the formulation of readiness review criteria months before the operation. A comprehensive readiness review tree (a positive logic tree) is included, which identifies the activities required for the development of the readiness criteria. The readiness review tree serves as a tool to prevent the omission of an item that could affect system performance. All deficiencies identified in the review will be determined as prestart findings and must be resolved before the project is permitted to proceed. The final approval of the readiness to proceed will be the decision of RRB

  10. Readiness evaluation report for operation of the 200-ZP-1 pump-and-treat system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrschall, R. R.

    1996-07-01

    The 200-ZP-1 Readiness Evaluation Team has completed a readiness evaluation (RE) of the 200-ZP-1 Interim Remedial Measure. During the RE process, other Environmental Restoration Contractor and Hanford Site project activities were assessed (i.e., using lessons learned reviews) for applicability to the 200-ZP-1 RE. Nine additional areas were discovered to be applicable to the 200-ZP-1 IRM and were incorporated into the RE process as functional readiness requirements. The goal of the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit IRM is to reduce further migration of the carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and trichloroethylene in the groundwater of the 200 West Area. The IRM treatment system has been designed to initiate hydraulic containment of the contaminant mass in the high-concentration portion of the CCl 4 plume

  11. Readiness factors for lean implementation in healthcare settings--a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balushi, S; Sohal, A S; Singh, P J; Al Hajri, A; Al Farsi, Y M; Al Abri, R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the readiness factors that are critical to the application and success of lean operating principles in healthcare organizations through a review of relevant literature. A comprehensive review of literature focussing on lean and lean healthcare was conducted. Leadership, organizational culture, communication, training, measurement, and reward systems are all commonly attributed readiness factors throughout general change management and lean literature. However, directly related to the successful implementation of lean in healthcare is that a setting is able to authorize a decentralized management style and undertake an end-to-end process view. These can be particularly difficult initiatives for complex organizations such as healthcare settings. The readiness factors identified are based on a review of the published literature. The external validity of the findings could be enhanced if tested using an empirical study. The readiness factors identified will enable healthcare practitioners to be better prepared as they begin their lean journeys. Sustainability of the lean initiative will be at stake if these readiness factors are not addressed. To the best of the knowledge, this is the first paper that provides a consolidated list of key lean readiness factors that can guide practice, as well as future theory and empirical research.

  12. Application of diagnostics to determine motor operated valve operational readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    ORNL has been carrying out an aging assessment of motor-operated valves (MOVs) with the primary objective of recommending diagnostic methods for detecting and trending aging. As a result of experimental investigations at ORNL, it was discovered that the motor current during a valve stroke was a very useful diagnostic parameter for detecting and trending many MOV drive train load variations. The motor current signatures were analyzed at four levels: mean value for a stroke, gross trends during a stroke, transients, and noise frequency spectra. Examples illustrating the use of this technique are presented. The use of motor current signature analysis was also shown to apply to other electric motor driven equipment. Future work includes developing a data base of MOV diagnostics, including criteria for determining the extent of degradation and application of the technique to other LWR motor driven safety equipment

  13. Readiness Assessment Plan, Hanford 200 areas treated effluent disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan documents Liquid Effluent Facilities review process used to establish the scope of review, documentation requirements, performance assessment, and plant readiness to begin operation of the Treated Effluent Disposal system in accordance with DOE-RLID-5480.31, Startup and Restart of Facilities Operational Readiness Review and Readiness Assessments

  14. Integrative Literature Review: Ascertaining Discharge Readiness for Pediatrics After Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Deborah R

    2016-02-01

    Unplanned hospital readmissions after the administration of general anesthesia for ambulatory procedures may contribute to loss of reimbursement and assessment of financial penalties. Pediatric patients represent a unique anesthetic risk. The purpose of this integrative literature review was to ascertain specific criteria used to evaluate discharge readiness for pediatric patients after anesthesia. This study is an integrative review of literature. An integrative literature search was conducted and included literature sources dated January 2008 to November 2013. Key words included pediatric, anesthesia, discharge, criteria, standards, assessment, recovery, postoperative, postanesthesia, scale, score, outpatient, and ambulatory. Eleven literature sources that contributed significantly to the research question were identified. Levels of evidence included three systematic reviews, one randomized controlled trial, three cohort studies, two case series, and two expert opinions. This integrative literature review revealed evidence-based discharge criteria endorsing home readiness for postanesthesia pediatric patients should incorporate consideration for physiological baselines, professional judgment with regard to infant consciousness, and professional practice standards/guidelines. Additionally, identifying and ensuring discharge to a competent adult was considered imperative. Nurses should be aware that frequently used anesthesia scoring systems originated in the 1970s, and this review was unable to locate current literature examining the reliability and validity of their use in conjunction with modern anesthesia-related health care practices. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EG&G Florida, Inc., KSC base operations contractor Launch Readiness Assessment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geaslen, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized Launch Readiness Assessment System (LRAS) which compares 'current status' of readiness against the 'required status' of readiness for the Space Shuttle. The five subsystems of the LRAS are examined in detail. The LRAS Plan specifies the overall system requirements, procedures, and reports. The LRAS Manager drives the operation of the LRAS system. The Responding Units (RU) maintain support plans and procedures which specify the detail requirements for each mission or milestone. The Master Data Tables contain the milestone, responsible RU relationships, and requirements assessment categories. The LRAS Status System serves as the launch readiness assessment reporting system. The relationships between these subsystems are displayed in diagrams.

  16. Readiness evaluation plan for operation of the 200-ZP-1 pump-and-treat system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehrschall, R.R.

    1996-03-01

    The Project Readiness Evaluation (RE) process will show that the 200-ZP-1 Phase 2 and Phase 3 Interim Response Measure (IRM) remedial activity is prepared to safely and effectively commence work activities. In order to ensure readiness to commence the 200-ZP-1 Pump-and-Treat (P and T) activities, a formal RE will be performed in accordance with this plan. A Readiness Evaluation Team (RET) will evaluate and confirm readiness by reviewing the work activities and by conducting field verifications. The Project Final Hazard Classification (FHC) prepared for the 200-ZP-1 P and T IRM has determined that the operation is a Non-Nuclear Low Hazard activity. The goal of this IRM is to reduce further migration of the carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and trichloroethylene (TCE) in the groundwater of the 200 West Area. The Phase 2 and Phase 3 IRM treatment system will be designed to initiate hydraulic containment of the contaminant mass in the high-concentration portion (i.e., the 2,000- to 3,000-ppb contour) of the CCl 4 plume. This system will be located just north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant in the 200 West Area and will utilize air stripping and vapor-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption of the CCl 4 . Air stripping is performed by forcing clean air through the contaminated groundwater stream. Based on chemical equilibrium, volatile organic compounds are transferred from the groundwater stream into the air stream. The air stream, containing the contamination in vapor phase, will be passed through vapor-phase GAC columns to remove and collect the organic contaminants. Saturated GAC will then be shipped offsite for carbon regeneration, where the contamination will be destroyed at a permitted facility

  17. Operational readiness decisions at nuclear power plants - part 2. Which factors influence the decisions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena; Petterson, Sara

    2008-04-01

    The first report contained a summary of relevant research of decision making, a case study at Ringhals power plant and an analysis of some real cases of operational readiness decisions. In this report two case studies in the Swedish power plants, OKG and Forsmark are presented. The case study description consists of three parts; a description of the support from the management system for the decision making process, interviews with decision makers and an analysis of real cases of operational readiness decisions. The purpose of the project has been to increase the understanding of the decision process in operational readiness decisions as well as the support given from the management system and what factors influence the decisions. From a general point of view the circumstances where the decision must be taken varies, but situations and events that lead to questioning of the operational readiness are often easy to identify. There are often support documents such as procedures, rules and technical documents which specify operational limitations which give explicit decision criteria. These decisions are easy. When needed colleagues can be consulted for support. In unclear situations and/or when the technical criteria is not clear, e.g. when the rules and regulations are vague or even in conflict or when it is not evident that you need to question the operational readiness, the decision is more difficult to make. The results from the study shows that such decisions in general are not made by the shift crew manager but handed over to the next management level. The decision making process differs between the power plants. At one of the power plants the decision process is organised in specific meetings where decision made are reviewed by the next higher management level. At another plant the decisions are often made in groups or in consultation with colleagues. The management system makes a distinction between decisions made in consultation and when decisions already

  18. Naval Readiness, Operational Training, and Environmental Protection: Achieving an Appropriate Balance between Competing National Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    Readiness: Operational Traininz; Polution 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) This paper describes the...materials, radioactive materials, heat. wrecked or discarded equipment, rock, sand, cellar dirt and industrial, municipal, and agricultural waste

  19. Control area readiness audit report of the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladish, L.A.; Campoli, G.; Le, Q.; Farrokhpay, S.; Kirby, B.; Penwell, C.; Weaver, S.; Vicini, D.; Wells, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO) is a control area authority that is responsible for the safe and reliable operation of its portion of the bulk electric system in cooperation with neighbouring control areas. This audit by the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) reviewed the readiness of Ontario's IMO to meets its responsibilities as a control area operator. NERC recommended specific actions to correct the deficiencies that resulted in the blackout in southeastern Ontario and northeastern United States on August 14, 2003. Initiatives to strengthen compliance with existing standards were also suggested along with longer-term technical initiatives to prevent or mitigate the impacts of cascading blackouts in the future. The audit process included: a self-assessment questionnaire to the control area being audited; a questionnaire to neighbouring control areas; a questionnaire to the reliability coordinator and an on-site audit by a selected audit team. The following issues were reviewed: criteria and compliance, authority, responsibilities in the planning time frame, real time monitoring, system restoration, delegation of reliability coordinator functions, outage coordination, transmission and generation relaying, energy emergency plan, operating policy, line clearances, and nuclear power plant requirements. It was concluded that the IMO has the necessary plans, procedures, processes, tools and trained personnel to respond to emergency events. The audit did not find any major operational problems, but offered a few recommendations for improvement. tabs

  20. Assessment of nonintrusive methods for monitoring the operational readiness of solenoid-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOVs) are being studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study is to identify and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, and maintenance of SOVs that can ensure their operational readiness-- that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions. An earlier (Phase I) study described SOV failure modes and causes and identified measurable parameters that might be used to monitor the various degradations that lead to functional failure. The present (Phase II) study focuses on devising and then demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques and/or equipment with which to measure the previously identified performance parameters and thus detect and trend the progress of any degradation. Several nonintrusive techniques are currently under investigation. Recent experimental results which demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of the techniques being studied are presented. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Decommissioning project readiness reviews at the Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington, Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, D.R.; Holmes, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Two Hanford Site contractors independently formulated readiness review methods to prepare for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects. One readiness review method provided an independent management review process. The other method provided a review by personnel directly involved in the project and concise documentation procedures. A unified system is now used at Hanford which combines the best aspects of both readiness review methods. The unified method assigns category levels based on certain job characteristics. The category assigned to the project then indicates the required level of management review prior to proceeding with the D and D project. In addition, the concise documentation procedures are now used for all category levels

  2. Pipeline system operability review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Kjell [Det Norske Veritas (Norway); Davies, Ray [CC Technologies, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Pipeline operators are continuously working to improve the safety of their systems and operations. In the US both liquid and gas pipeline operators have worked with the regulators over many years to develop more systematic approaches to pipeline integrity management. To successfully manage pipeline integrity, vast amounts of data from different sources needs to be collected, overlaid and analyzed in order to assess the current condition and predict future degradation. The efforts undertaken by the operators has had a significant impact on pipeline safety, nevertheless, during recent years we have seen a number of major high profile accidents. One can therefore ask how effective the pipeline integrity management systems and processes are. This paper will present one methodology 'The Pipeline System Operability Review' that can evaluate and rate the effectiveness of both the management systems and procedures, as well as the technical condition of the hardware. The result from the review can be used to compare the performance of different pipelines within one operating company, as well as benchmark with international best practices. (author)

  3. Pipeline system operability review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Kjell [Det Norske Veritas (Norway); Davies, Ray [CC Technologies, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Pipeline operators are continuously working to improve the safety of their systems and operations. In the US both liquid and gas pipeline operators have worked with the regulators over many years to develop more systematic approaches to pipeline integrity management. To successfully manage pipeline integrity, vast amounts of data from different sources needs to be collected, overlaid and analyzed in order to assess the current condition and predict future degradation. The efforts undertaken by the operators has had a significant impact on pipeline safety, nevertheless, during recent years we have seen a number of major high profile accidents. One can therefore ask how effective the pipeline integrity management systems and processes are. This paper will present one methodology 'The Pipeline System Operability Review' that can evaluate and rate the effectiveness of both the management systems and procedures, as well as the technical condition of the hardware. The result from the review can be used to compare the performance of different pipelines within one operating company, as well as benchmark with international best practices. (author)

  4. Reviewing operational experience feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide detailed supplementary guidance to OSART experts to aid in the evaluation of operational experience feedback (OEF) programmes at nuclear power plants. The document begins by describing the objectives of an OEF programme. It goes on to indicate preparatory work and investigatory guidance for the expert. Section 5 describes attributes of an excellent OEF programme. Appended to these guidelines are examples of OEF documents from various plants. These are intended to help the expert by demonstrating the actual implementation of OEF in practice. These guidelines are in no way intended to conflict with existing national regulations and rules. A comprehensive OEF programme, as described in Section 2, would be impossible to evaluated in detail in the amount of time typically allocated for assessing OEF in an OSART review. The expert must use his or her time wisely by concentrating on those areas that appear to be the weakest

  5. Readiness factors for information system strategic planning among universities in developing countries: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, M.; Putra, S. J.; Alam, C. N.; Subiyakto, A.; Wahana, A.

    2018-03-01

    The implementation of information system strategic planning (ISSP) in higher education institutions is to improve work efficiency, management effectiveness in order to improve organizational competitive advantage. However, the question of whether all universities are ready to implement ISSP as a way to achieve organizational goals has not been answered. This study aims to investigate the readiness phenomena through literature study. The method used is by using the Systematic Literature Review (SLR) instrument to identify readiness factors on the implementation of ISSP, especially among the institutions of higher education in developing countries. This study has identified 10 readiness measurement. There are three categories of measurement, namely people, processes and technologies that represent 11 factors of ISSP readiness measurement in universities.

  6. After ISAF: Implications for the Shift from Operations to Readiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breitenbauch, Henrik Ø.

    2014-01-01

    NATO’s leaving Afghanistan represents an immediate and discomforting challenge for NATO’s partners. Throughout the ISAF era, partners were able to maintain and increase their standing in relation to the Alliance as such and in strategically important bilateral relationships (such as to the United...... States) by contributing to Allied operations. Without ISAF, the strategic ‘stock value’ of traditional partnership mechanisms increases abruptly because they not only give access to NATO best practices but also enables the development of long-term security relationships. Professional Military Education...

  7. Cognitive Readiness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison, John

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive readiness is described as the mental preparation an individual needs to establish and sustain competent performance in the complex and unpredictable environment of modern military operations...

  8. Remedial action and waste disposal project - ERDF readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casbon, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    This Readiness Evaluation Report presents the results of the project readiness evaluation to assess the readiness of the Environmental Restoration and Disposal Facility. The evaluation was conducted at the conclusion of a series of readiness activities that began in January 1996. These activities included completion of the physical plant; preparation, review, and approval of operating procedures; definition and assembly of the necessary project and operational organizations; and activities leading to regulatory approval of the plant and operating plans

  9. Factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life - A scoping literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, Tiina; Eklöf, Niina; Salminen, Leena

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this scoping literature review was to identify the factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life. The literature search was carried out in autumn 2017 in PubMed and CINAHL databases. The studies selected for this review (n = 17) were analyzed thematically with inductive content analysis. Four subthemes that were combined into two main factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life were found. The main factors found were 1) educational factors and 2) personal factors. Educational factors consisted of professional competence and clinical practice, while personal factors consisted of nursing students' background and feelings. Some nursing students tend to feel insecure about entering working life as a newly graduated nurse. This literature review also supports the importance of clinical practice periods in nursing education and for readiness for working life. Nurse education needs to ensure clinical practice periods which support nursing students' professional growth. Further research is needed on how the factors related to nursing students' readiness to enter working life correlate with each other. Particularly, the association between competence, readiness and positive feelings towards graduation needs further investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. River Protection Project (RPP) Readiness-to-Proceed 2 Internal Independent Review Team Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the results of an independent review team brought in to assess CH2M HILL Hanford's readiness and ability to support the RPP's move into its next major phase - retrieval and delivery of tank waste to the Privatization Contractor

  11. River Protection Project (RPP) Readiness-to-Proceed 2 Internal Independent Review Team Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the results of an independent review team brought in to assess CH2M Hill Hanford Group's readiness and ability to support the RPP's move into its next major phase - retrieval and delivery of tank waste to the Privatization Contractor

  12. Effects of Ready-to-Eat-Cereals on Key Nutritional and Health Outcomes : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priebe, Marion G.; McMonagle, Jolene R.

    2016-01-01

    Background In many countries breakfast cereals are an important component of breakfast. This systematic review assesses the contribution of consumption of ready-to eat cereal (RTEC) to the recommended nutrient intake. Furthermore, the effects of RTEC consumption on key health parameters are

  13. EMSL 2008 Operational Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-08-12

    The William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is a national user facility that contains state-of-the-art instrumentation and expert resources available for use by researchers from academia, industry, and the national laboratory system. The facility is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Biological and Environmental Research Program, but the research conducted within the facility benefits many funding agencies, including other branches of DOE, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Defense. EMSL requires the continued funding and support of its stakeholders and clients to continue to grow its mission, build its reputation as a sought-after national user facility with cutting-edge capabilities, and attract high-profile users who will work to solve the most critical scientific challenges that affect DOE and the nation. In this vein, this document has been compiled to provide these stakeholders and clients with a review document that provides an abundance of information on EMSL’s history, current research activities, and proposed future direction.

  14. CORR Guidelines. Preparing and Conducting Review Missions of Construction Project Readiness for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The construction readiness review (CORR) mission for nuclear power plant projects has been established with the aim of conducting peer reviews of construction projects related to nuclear power plants. Such a mission provides a detailed assessment of readiness for construction, construction progress, readiness for turnover, as well as recommendations for improvement. Organizations in Member States, such as nuclear utilities, owners, regulators and technical support organizations, can benefit from such reviews. A team of international experts with complementing specialities will conduct the CORR mission. The review is based on appropriate IAEA publications, such as IAEA Safety Standards Series Guides and IAEA Nuclear Energy Series publications, as well as on internationally recognized project and construction management guides. Mission findings are summarized in a mission report, which includes a list of recommendations, suggestions and identified good practices. The review is not intended to be a regulatory inspection or an audit against international codes and standards. Rather, it is a peer review aimed at improving implementation processes and procedures through an exchange of technical experiences and practices at the working level. The mission is applicable at any stage of a nuclear power plant construction project, although two specific phases are targeted: (1) start of construction mission (Phase 1 mission) and (2) an in-progress mission (Phase 2 mission). Missions are initiated when official requests are submitted by Member States through the appropriate IAEA channels

  15. Increment 23/24 Critical Readiness Review Health Maintenance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschwitz, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Health Maintenance System. It includes information on the carbon dioxide (CO2) and moisture removal system (CMRS), the variable oxygen system,rendevous station panels, and the crew contamination protection kit (CCPK).

  16. Results of readiness review for start of Title II Design of ESF in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Readiness Review Board recommends that the ESF Title II Design be initiated after approval of revised Functional Design Criteria for Title II design. This review was conducted assuming a Deaf Smith location for ESF. Seventy-four open items and eight technical holds were identified during the Readiness Review that must be addressed and resolved to ensure successful completion of the ESF Title II Design. These items include definition and approval of surface based, EDH, and subsurface testing requirements; development of an approved OCRWM/SRPO licensing position for the ESF; and acquisition and availability of site-specific confirmatory data. A Risk Assessment should be conducted to define corrective action data and technical, cost and schedule impacts and associated program risks of continuation of Title II design activities beyond those dates

  17. Critical Readiness Review EHS Water Quality and Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Presentation reviews the status in reference to the Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) of the water quality and microbiology for the International Space Station. It includes information about crew training, hardware delivery, and those items that will be returned for study.

  18. An examination of the Marine Operating and Support Information System (MOSIS) as a mechanism for linking resources to readiness for Marine Operating Forces

    OpenAIRE

    Cucinotta, Paul D.

    1997-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Continued downsizing efforts have imposed increasingly stringent restrictions on Department of Defense budgetary resources. Program and activity managers are expected to justify their budgets based on well defined quantitative measures of performance, activity level and readiness. This thesis examines the resources to readiness issues in DoD, specifically focusing on Marine Corps Operating Forces. Additionally, this thesis evaluates th...

  19. Readiness Review Plan for the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in Waste Area Grouping 11 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This Readiness Review Plan was prepared by the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 11 Site Project Readiness Review Team as an overview of the Interim Remedial Action on Surface Debris in WAG 11 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, including major readiness milestones, criteria development methodology, and a list of events to occur as part of the review process for determining readiness for each project phase

  20. Application of signature analysis for determining the operational readiness of motor-operated valves under blowdown test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the NRC-funded Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has carried out a comprehensive aging assessment of Motor-Operated Valves (MOVs). As part of this work, ORNL participated in the Gate Valve Flow Interruption Blowdown (GVFIB) tests carried out in Huntsville, Alabama. The GVFIB tests were intended primarily to determine the behavior of motor-operated gate valves under the temperature, pressure, and flow conditions expected to be experienced by isolation valves in Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) during a high energy line break (blowdown) outside of containment. In addition, the tests provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate signature analysis methods for determining the operational readiness of the MOVs under those accident conditions. ORNL acquired motor current and torque switch shaft angular position data on two test MOVs during various times of the GVFIB tests. The reduction in operating ''margin'' of both MOVs due to the presence of additional valve running loads imposed by high flow was clearly observed in motor current and torque switch angular position signatures. In addition, the effects of differential pressure, fluid temperature, and line voltage on MOV operations were observed and more clearly understood as a result of utilizing signature analysis techniques. 1 ref.; 16 figs

  1. Organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care: a review of theoretical components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background With the persistent gaps between research and practice in healthcare systems, knowledge translation (KT) has gained significance and importance. Also, in most industrialized countries, there is an increasing emphasis on managing chronic health conditions with the best available evidence. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care (CC) require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR) for KT. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to review and synthesize the existing evidence on conceptual models/frameworks of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) in healthcare as the basis for the development of a comprehensive framework of OR for KT in the context of CC. Data sources We conducted a systematic review of the literature on OR for KT in CC using Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Web of Sciences (SCI and SSCI), and others. Search terms included readiness; commitment and change; preparedness; willing to change; organization and administration; and health and social services. Study selection: The search was limited to studies that had been published between the starting date of each bibliographic database (e.g., 1964 for PubMed) and November 1, 2012. Only papers that refer to a theory, a theoretical component from any framework or model on OR that were applicable to the healthcare domain were considered. We analyzed data using conceptual mapping. Data extraction: Pairs of authors independently screened the published literature by reviewing their titles and abstracts. Then, the two same reviewers appraised the full text of each study independently. Results Overall, we found and synthesized 10 theories, theoretical models and conceptual frameworks relevant to ORC in healthcare described in 38 publications. We identified five core concepts, namely organizational dynamics, change process, innovation readiness, institutional readiness, and personal readiness. We extracted 17 dimensions and 59 sub-dimensions related to these 5 concepts

  2. Organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care: a review of theoretical components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Randa; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Estabrooks, Carole A; Légaré, France; Ouimet, Mathieu; Roch, Geneviève; Ghandour, El Kebir; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2013-11-28

    With the persistent gaps between research and practice in healthcare systems, knowledge translation (KT) has gained significance and importance. Also, in most industrialized countries, there is an increasing emphasis on managing chronic health conditions with the best available evidence. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care (CC) require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR) for KT. The purpose of this study is to review and synthesize the existing evidence on conceptual models/frameworks of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) in healthcare as the basis for the development of a comprehensive framework of OR for KT in the context of CC. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on OR for KT in CC using Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Web of Sciences (SCI and SSCI), and others. Search terms included readiness; commitment and change; preparedness; willing to change; organization and administration; and health and social services. The search was limited to studies that had been published between the starting date of each bibliographic database (e.g., 1964 for PubMed) and November 1, 2012. Only papers that refer to a theory, a theoretical component from any framework or model on OR that were applicable to the healthcare domain were considered. We analyzed data using conceptual mapping. Pairs of authors independently screened the published literature by reviewing their titles and abstracts. Then, the two same reviewers appraised the full text of each study independently. Overall, we found and synthesized 10 theories, theoretical models and conceptual frameworks relevant to ORC in healthcare described in 38 publications. We identified five core concepts, namely organizational dynamics, change process, innovation readiness, institutional readiness, and personal readiness. We extracted 17 dimensions and 59 sub-dimensions related to these 5 concepts. Our findings provide a useful overview for researchers interested in ORC and aims

  3. Motor current signature analysis for determining operational readiness of motor-operated valves (MOVs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryter, R.C.; Haynes, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Motor current signature analysis (MCSA) is a novel diagnostic process for condition monitoring of electric-motor-driven mechanical equipment (e.g., pumps, motor-operated valves, compressors, and processing machinery). The MCSA process identifies, characterizes, and trends over time the instantaneous load variations of mechanical equipment in order to diagnose changes in the condition of the equipment (e.g., due to degradation or service wear), which, if allowed to continue, may lead to failure. It monitors the instantaneous variations (noise content) in the electric current flowing through the power leads to the electric motor that drives the equipment. The motor itself thereby acts as a transducer, sensing both large and small, long-term and rapid, mechanical load variations and converting them to variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. This motor current noise signature is detected, amplified, and further processed as needed to examine its time domain and frequency domain (spectral) characteristics. The operational principles of MCSA and the nonintrusive data collection apparatus and procedure used with MOVs will be described. Data collected from MOVs in both laboratory and in-plant environments will also be shown to illustrate the ability of MCSA to ''see'' the detailed inner workings of the valve and operator and thus to detect degraded performance at an incipient stage. (Set of 18 vugraphs)

  4. Operational readiness decisions at nuclear power plants. Which factors influence the decisions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kecklund, Lena; Petterson, Sara

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this project has been to propose a model for how operational readiness decisions are made and to identify important factors influencing these decisions. The project has also studied the support from the management system for decision making, and made a comparison to how decisions are made in practice. This is mainly an explorative study, but it also deals with relevant research and theories about decision making. The project consists of several parts. The first part is composed of descriptions of important notations and terms, and a summary of relevant research about decision making and its relation to the management system. The project proposes a model for the decision making process. The second part consists of analyses of reports from SKI about operational readiness decisions. The last part is a case study at a nuclear power plant. The case study describes the support from work method theories at the nuclear power plant to the decision maker. Decision makers with different roles in the safety management system were interviewed to give a description of the decision making process and of factors influencing the decisions made in practice. The case study also consists of an analysis of decisions in some real events at the nuclear power plant, as well as of making interviews in connection with these. To sum up, this report presents a model for the decision process and describes the work method theories that support the different parts in the process, how the different parts are applied in practice and circumstances that influence the decision process. The results of the project give an understanding for decision making in operational readiness decisions and the factors that influence the decision. The results are meant to be used as a basis for further studies in other nuclear power plants. The results indicate that the decision process is facilitated if there are clear criteria and work methods, if the work methods are well established and if the

  5. Cognitive Readiness Assessment and Reporting: An Open Source Mobile Framework for Operational Decision Support and Performance Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heric, Matthew; Carter, Jenn

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive readiness (CR) and performance for operational time-critical environments are continuing points of focus for military and academic communities. In response to this need, we designed an open source interactive CR assessment application as a highly adaptive and efficient open source testing administration and analysis tool. It is capable…

  6. Application of diagnostics to determine operational readiness of aged motor-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been carrying out an aging assessment of motor-operated valves (MOVs) with the primary objective of recommending diagnostic methods for detecting and trending aging. As a result of experimental investigations at ORNL, it was discovered that the motor current during a valve stroke was a very useful diagnostic parameter for detecting and trending many MOV drive train load variations. The motor current signatures were analyzed at four levels: mean value for a stroke, gross trends during a stroke, transients, and noise frequency spectra. Examples illustrating the use of this technique are presented. The use of motor current signature analysis was also shown to apply to other electric motor driven equipment. Future work includes developing a data base of MOV diagnostics, including criteria for determining the extent of degradation and application of the technique to other LWR motor driven safety equipment

  7. Application of diagnostics to determine motor-operated valve operational readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    ORNL has been carrying out an aging assessment of motor-operated valves (MOVs) with the primary objective of recommending diagnostic methods for detecting and trending aging. As a result of experimental investigations at ORNL, it was discovered that the motor current during a valve stroke was a very useful diagnostic parameter for detecting and trending many MOV drive train load variations. The motor curent signatures were analyzed at four levels: mean value for a stroke, gross trends during a stroke, transients, and noise frequency spectra. Examples illustrating the use of this technique are presented. The use of motor current signature analysis was also shown to apply to other electric motor driven equipment. Future work includes developing a data base of MOV diagnostics, including criteria for determining the extent of degradation and application of the technique to other LWR motor driven safety equipment

  8. First Commercial US Mixed Waste Vitrification Facility: Permits, Readiness Reviews, and Delisting of Final Wasteform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, J.B.; Norford, S.W.; Diener, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) contracted GTS Duratek (Duratek) to construct and operate the first commercial vitrification facility to treat an F-006 mixed (radioactive/hazardous) waste in the United States. The permits were prepared and submitted to the South Carolina state regulators by WSRC - based on a detailed design by Duratek. Readiness Assessments were conducted by WSRC and Duratek at each major phase of the operation (sludge transfer, construction, cold and radioactive operations, and a major restart) and approved by the Savannah River Department of Energy prior to proceeding. WSRC prepared the first 'Upfront Delisting' petition for a vitrified mixed waste. Lessons learned with respect to the permit strategy, operational assessments, and delisting from this 'privatization' project will be discussed

  9. Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative 'all modes' failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

  10. Safety review of experiments at Albuquerque Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, K.

    1984-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office is responsible for the safety overview of nuclear reactor and critical assembly facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Rocky Flats Plant. The important safety concerns with these facilities involve the complex experiments that are performed, and that is the area emphasized. A determination is made by the Albuquerque Office (AL) with assistance from DOE/OMA whether or not a proposed experiment is an unreviewed safety question. Meetings are held with the contractor to resolve and clarify questions that are generated during the review of the proposed experiment. The AL safety evaluation report is completed and any recommendations are discussed. Prior to the experiment a preoperational appraisal is performed to assure that personnel, procedures, and equipment are in readiness for operations. During the experiment, any abnormal condition is reviewed in detail to determine any safety concerns

  11. Management of Ready-to-Use Parenteral Nutrition in Newborns: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Karen Daniela Romero; Espitia, Olga Lucia Pinzón; Vergara, José Alejandro Daza

    2018-04-27

    Parenteral support has increased the possibility of neonatal recovery. However, complications associated with its use have been documented. One commercial method developed to decrease the complications of this type of support is the ready-to-use parenteral nutrition (PN), a 3-chamber bag that provides a complete nutrient mix. This systematic review seeks, through the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology, to establish the benefits in newborns. Seven databases and gray literature were used. The search was limited to publications from 2007-2017 and to articles written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria and studies with low quality evaluated with the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines, which were without information about the study or analytical methods, were excluded. A total of 24,193 articles were obtained, which were initially evaluated by title and abstract according to the inclusion criteria. A total of 24,167 articles were discarded, obtaining 27 eligible for follow-up evaluation. After a detailed evaluation of the full text, 13 articles were selected. It was found that ready-to-use PN has the potential benefit to reduce the risks for infections, provide an adequate supply of nutrients, generate growth within the expected range, provide ease of use, decrease prescription errors, and potentially reduce costs. It is necessary to evaluate the short- and long-term impact of its use. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  12. Cost and Information Effectiveness Analysis (CIEA): A Methodology for Evaluating a Training Device Operational Readiness Assessment Capability (DORAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    Report 528 COST AIND I*FO•?JidTH ?i EFFECT•• ES1BS ANALYSIS (CDEA): A METiBLOBU Y FOR EVALUATIN1G A TRAINING DEMCE OPERATMDN1AL MAEA3 ],SE 3SSESS$ iElT ...8217, N. Within a military setting, the uses of training devices in performance evaluation have generally mirrored civilian uses and primarily...Technical Report 528 COST AND INFORMATION EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS (CIEA): A METHODOLOGY FOR EVALUATING A TRAINING DEVICE OPERATIONAL READINESS

  13. The Psychological Adaptation of CF Augmentees: Effects of Personality, Situational Appraisals, Social Support, and Prior Stressors on Operational Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    operational readiness Megan M. Thompson DRDC Toronto Monique A. M. Gignac Division of Population Health, University of Toronto Donald R. McCreary DRDC...support are related to increased mortality rates in population health studies (Berkman & Syme, 1994; House, Landis , & Umberson, 2003). Interestingly...of Personality and Social Psychology, 4, 1146-1163. 55. House, J. S., Landis , K. R., & Umberson, D. (2003). Social relationships and health. In P

  14. A Systematic Review of Instruments to Assess Organizational Readiness for Knowledge Translation in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Attieh, Randa; Ghandour, El Kebir; Légaré, France; Ouimet, Mathieu; Estabrooks, Carole A.; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Background The translation of research into practices has been incomplete. Organizational readiness for change (ORC) is a potential facilitator of effective knowledge translation (KT). However we know little about the best way to assess ORC. Therefore, we sought to systematically review ORC measurement instruments. Methods We searched for published studies in bibliographic databases (Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Web of Science, etc.) up to November 1st, 2012. We included publications that developed ORC measures and/or empirically assessed ORC using an instrument at the organizational level in the health care context. We excluded articles if they did not refer specifically to ORC, did not concern the health care domain or were limited to individual-level change readiness. We focused on identifying the psychometric properties of instruments that were developed to assess readiness in an organization prior to implementing KT interventions in health care. We used the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing to assess the psychometric properties of identified ORC measurement instruments. Findings We found 26 eligible instruments described in 39 publications. According to the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 18 (69%) of a total of 26 measurement instruments presented both validity and reliability criteria. The Texas Christian University –ORC (TCU-ORC) scale reported the highest instrument validity with a score of 4 out of 4. Only one instrument, namely the Modified Texas Christian University – Director version (TCU-ORC-D), reported a reliability score of 2 out of 3. No information was provided regarding the reliability and validity of five (19%) instruments. Conclusion Our findings indicate that there are few valid and reliable ORC measurement instruments that could be applied to KT in the health care sector. The TCU-ORC instrument presents the best evidence in terms of validity testing. Future studies using this instrument could

  15. A systematic review of instruments to assess organizational readiness for knowledge translation in health care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pierre Gagnon

    Full Text Available The translation of research into practices has been incomplete. Organizational readiness for change (ORC is a potential facilitator of effective knowledge translation (KT. However we know little about the best way to assess ORC. Therefore, we sought to systematically review ORC measurement instruments.We searched for published studies in bibliographic databases (Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Web of Science, etc. up to November 1st, 2012. We included publications that developed ORC measures and/or empirically assessed ORC using an instrument at the organizational level in the health care context. We excluded articles if they did not refer specifically to ORC, did not concern the health care domain or were limited to individual-level change readiness. We focused on identifying the psychometric properties of instruments that were developed to assess readiness in an organization prior to implementing KT interventions in health care. We used the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing to assess the psychometric properties of identified ORC measurement instruments.We found 26 eligible instruments described in 39 publications. According to the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, 18 (69% of a total of 26 measurement instruments presented both validity and reliability criteria. The Texas Christian University -ORC (TCU-ORC scale reported the highest instrument validity with a score of 4 out of 4. Only one instrument, namely the Modified Texas Christian University - Director version (TCU-ORC-D, reported a reliability score of 2 out of 3. No information was provided regarding the reliability and validity of five (19% instruments.Our findings indicate that there are few valid and reliable ORC measurement instruments that could be applied to KT in the health care sector. The TCU-ORC instrument presents the best evidence in terms of validity testing. Future studies using this instrument could provide more knowledge on its

  16. Readiness for hospital discharge: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Eileen Catherine; Wills, Teresa; Coffey, Alice

    2017-11-01

    To report on an analysis on the concept of 'readiness for hospital discharge'. No uniform operational definition of 'readiness for hospital discharge' exists in the literature; therefore, a concept analysis is required to clarify the concept and identify an up-to-date understanding of readiness for hospital discharge. Clarity of the concept will identify all uses of the concept; provide conceptual clarity, an operational definition and direction for further research. Literature review and concept analysis. A review of literature was conducted in 2016. Databases searched were: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, PsycINFO, Social Sciences Full Text (H.W. Wilson) and SocINDEX with Full Text. No date limits were applied. Identification of the attributes, antecedents and consequences of readiness for hospital discharge led to an operational definition of the concept. The following attributes belonging to 'readiness for hospital discharge' were extracted from the literature: physical stability, adequate support, psychological ability, and adequate information and knowledge. This analysis contributes to the advancement of knowledge in the area of hospital discharge, by proposing an operational definition of readiness for hospital discharge, derived from the literature. A better understanding of the phenomenon will assist healthcare professionals to recognize, measure and implement interventions where necessary, to ensure patients are ready for hospital discharge and assist in the advancement of knowledge for all professionals involved in patient discharge from hospital. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Rapid Assessment of Individual Soldier Operational Readiness Final Report CRADA No. TC02104.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mapes, J. [Rules Based Medicine, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-09-08

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security (LLNS) (formerly The Regents of the University of California), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rules Based Medicine, Inc. {RBM), to identify markers in blood that would be candidates for determining the combat readiness of troops.

  18. Impact of Birth Preparedness and Complication Readiness Interventions on Birth with a Skilled Attendant : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltenburg, Andrea Solnes; Roggeveen, Yadira; Shields, Laura; van Elteren, Marianne; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle; Portela, Anayda

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased preparedness for birth and complications is an essential part of antenatal care and has the potential to increase birth with a skilled attendant. We conducted a systematic review of studies to assess the effect of birth preparedness and complication readiness interventions on

  19. Experimental methods to validate measures of emotional state and readiness for duty in critical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weston, Louise Marie

    2007-01-01

    A recent report on criticality accidents in nuclear facilities indicates that human error played a major role in a significant number of incidents with serious consequences and that some of these human errors may be related to the emotional state of the individual. A pre-shift test to detect a deleterious emotional state could reduce the occurrence of such errors in critical operations. The effectiveness of pre-shift testing is a challenge because of the need to gather predictive data in a relatively short test period and the potential occurrence of learning effects due to a requirement for frequent testing. This report reviews the different types of reliability and validity methods and testing and statistical analysis procedures to validate measures of emotional state. The ultimate value of a validation study depends upon the percentage of human errors in critical operations that are due to the emotional state of the individual. A review of the literature to identify the most promising predictors of emotional state for this application is highly recommended

  20. Demonstration of AIRS Total Ozone Products to Operations to Enhance User Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Cyclogenesis is a key forecast challenge at operational forecasting centers such as WPC and OPC, so these centers have a particular interest in unique products that can identify key storm features. In some cases, explosively developing extratropical cyclones can produce hurricane force, non-convective winds along the East Coast and north Atlantic as well as the Pacific Ocean, with the potential to cause significant damage to life and property. Therefore, anticipating cyclogenesis for these types of storms is crucial for furthering the NOAA goal of a "Weather Ready Nation". Over the last few years, multispectral imagery (i.e. RGB) products have gained popularity among forecasters. The GOES-R satellite champion at WPC/OPC has regularly evaluated the Air Mass RGB products from GOES Sounder, MODIS, and SEVIRI to aid in forecasting cyclogenesis as part of ongoing collaborations with SPoRT within the framework of the GOES-R Proving Ground. WPC/OPC has used these products to identify regions of stratospheric air associated with tropopause folds that can lead to cyclogenesis and hurricane force winds. RGB products combine multiple channels or channel differences into multi-color imagery in which different colors represent a particular cloud or air mass type. Initial interaction and feedback from forecasters evaluating the legacy Air Mass RGBs revealed some uncertainty regarding what physical processes the qualitative RGB products represent and color interpretation. To enhance forecaster confidence and interpretation of the Air Mass RGB, NASA SPoRT has transitioned a total column ozone product from AIRS retrievals to the WPC/OPC. The use of legacy AIRS demonstrates future JPSS capabilities possible with CrIS or OMPS. Since stratospheric air can be identified by anomalous potential vorticity and warm, dry, ozone-rich air, hyperspectral infrared sounder ozone products can be used in conjunction with the Air Mass RGB for identifying the role of stratospheric air in explosive

  1. Proceedings of the Canadian Gas Association's western operations workshop : readiness : reduce the risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The natural gas industry is now facing a number of challenges related to energy infrastructure security and new regulations regarding pipeline and employee safety. Organized by the Canadian Gas Association (CGA), this workshop provided a forum for gas distribution companies, transmission companies, and service providers to discuss issues related to the delivery of natural gas in Canada. While the workshop also included tours and descriptions of specific natural gas facilities and operational centres, several of the breakout sessions during the workshop were used to discuss natural gas technologies and planning procedures related to safety and security. Planning process improvements using risk analysis for operations were discussed. Safety strategies for the 2010 Olympics relating to critical infrastructure protection were reviewed. Issues concerning emergency response preparedness were examined, as well as threats to energy infrastructure from acts of terrorism. Recent innovations in fire retardant clothing were presented. Technological innovations presented at the workshop included a cold weather technology line heater, and new technologies in underground pipe manufacturing. Human resources issues included new approaches to stress management and employee support and safety. The workshop featured 12 breakout sessions, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  2. Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR): The United States Marine Corps Initiative to Deliver Mental Health Services to Operating Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nash, William P

    2006-01-01

    Combat/operational stress control, defined as programs and policies to prevent, identify, and manage adverse combat/operational stress reactions, is the primary responsibility of military commanders...

  3. Technologies and mechanisms for safety control of ready-to-eat muscle foods: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiang; Xiong, Youling L

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-eat (RTE) muscle foods refer to a general category of meat and poultry products that are fully cooked and consumable without reheating. These products, including whole and sliced pork, beef, turkey, chicken, and variety of meats, in the forms of ham, roast, rolls, sausage, and frankfurter, are widely available in the delicatessen section of retail stores or various food service outlets. However, difficulties in avoidance of contamination by foodborne pathogens, notably Listeria monocytogenes, during product postlethality repackaging render RTE meats labile to outbreaks. Accordingly, the USDA-FSIS has established processing guidelines and regulations, which are constantly updated, to minimize foodborne pathogens in RTE products. Technologies that complement good manufacturing practice have been developed to control RTE meat safety. Among them, various antimicrobial product formulations, postpackaging pasteurization (thermal and nonthermal), and antimicrobial packaging are being used. Through these efforts, outbreaks linked to RTE meat consumption have substantially reduced in recent years. However, the pervasive and virulent nature of L. monocytogenes and the possible presence of other cold-tolerant pathogens entail continuing developments of new intervention technologies. This review updates existing and emerging physical and chemical methods and their mode of action to inactivate or inhibit threatening microorganisms in RTE muscle foods.

  4. A review of the incidence and transmission of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat products in retail and food service environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianou, Alexandra; Sofos, John N

    2007-09-01

    Contamination of ready-to-eat products with Listeria monocytogenes may occur at several stages before consumption. Accessibility to the public and relatively limited control interventions at retail and food service establishments (compared with the processing sector of the food industry) and the lack of a specific regulatory framework increase the likelihood of introduction of this pathogen into some foods in these establishments. This review is a compilation of available information on the incidence and transmission of L. monocytogenes through ready-to-eat products at the retail and food service level. The potential transmission of L. monocytogenes within retail and food service operations has been indicated in epidemiological investigations and by survey data. Potential sources of the organism in these operations include the environment, food handlers, and incoming raw ingredients or processed products that have become contaminated after the lethality treatment at the manufacturing facility. L. monocytogenes may be present at retail and food service establishments in various ready-to-eat products, both prepackaged and those packaged in the store, and occasionally at high concentrations. This issue dictates the need for development and application of effective control measures, and potential control approaches are discussed here. Good manufacturing practices, appropriate cleaning, sanitation and hygiene programs, and temperature control required for prevention or inhibition of growth of the pathogen to high levels are critical for control of L. monocytogenes in the retail and food service sector. A comprehensive food safety system designed to be functional in retail and food service operations and based on the philosophy of hazard analysis and critical control point systems and a series of sound prerequisite programs can provide effective control of L. monocytogenes in these environments. However, competent delivery of food safety education and training to retail

  5. Readiness of ethics review systems for a changing public health landscape in the WHO African Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motari, Marion; Ota, Martin Okechukwu; Kirigia, Joses Muthuri

    2015-12-02

    The increasing emphasis on research, development and innovation for health in providing solutions to the high burden of diseases in the African Region has warranted a proliferation of studies including clinical trials. This changing public health landscape requires that countries develop adequate ethics review capacities to protect and minimize risks to study participants. Therefore, this study assessed the readiness of national ethics committees to respond to challenges posed by a globalized biomedical research system which is constantly challenged by new public health threats, rapid scientific and technological advancements affecting biomedical research and development, delivery and manufacture of vaccines and therapies, and health technology transfer. This is a descriptive study, which used a questionnaire structured to elicit information on the existence of relevant national legal frameworks, mechanisms for ethical review; as well as capacity requirements for national ethics committees. The questionnaire was available in English and French and was sent to 41 of the then 46 Member States of the WHO African Region, excluding the five Lusophone Member States. Information was gathered from senior officials in ministries of health, who by virtue of their offices were considered to have expert knowledge of research ethics review systems in their respective countries. Thirty three of the 41 countries (80.5 %) responded. Thirty (90.9 %) of respondent countries had a national ethics review committee (NEC); 79 % of which were established by law. Twenty-five (83.3 %) NECs had secretarial and administrative support. Over 50 % of countries with NECs indicated a need for capacity strengthening through periodic training on international guidelines for health research (including clinical trials) ethics; and allocation of funds for administrative and secretariat support. Despite the existing training initiatives, the Region still experiences a shortage of professionals

  6. Criteria for operator review of workplace changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davey, E.

    2000-01-01

    A set of criteria for reviewing workplace changes has been developed for use by plant Operations staff. The criteria were developed to provide Operations staff with a practical framework for structuring assessments and subsequent review comments with regard to control room modifications and innovations that impact their work environment. The criteria were assembled from design, operations and human factors engineering principles, and system review experiences with plant Operations staff over the past ten years. Operations staff at several CANDU stations helped shape the emphasis for initial criteria definition and have assisted with criteria refinement through trial applications. Use of the criteria is expected to lead to more effective and task relevant equipment evaluations by Operations staff, and ultimately lead to system modifications and innovations that better serve plant operation needs. The paper begins with a discussion of the rationale for criteria development and the attributes of 'good' design. The balance of the paper outlines the project objectives, describes the approach applied in assembling, structuring, and refining the review criteria, and illustrates the application of the criteria in the review of a proposed control room innovation. (author)

  7. Peer Review: Promoting Efficient School District Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Jason S.

    2010-01-01

    Many professions recognize the benefits of peer reviews to assess processes and operations because peers can more easily identify one another's inefficiencies and provide some kind of intervention. Generally, the goal of the peer review process is to verify whether the work satisfies the standards set by the industry. A number of states have begun…

  8. Magnet operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1991-11-01

    This report presents a review of magnet operating experiences for normal-conducting and superconducting magnets from fusion, particle accelerator, medical technology, and magnetohydrodynamics research areas. Safety relevant magnet operating experiences are presented to provide feedback on field performance of existing designs and to point out the operational safety concerns. Quantitative estimates of magnet component failure rates and accident event frequencies are also presented, based on field experience and on performance of similar components in other industries

  9. Mental readiness for maritime international operation: procedures developed by Norwegian navy

    OpenAIRE

    Sanden, Sverre; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Eid, Jarle; Pettersen, Jan Sommerfelt; Koefoed, Vilhelm F; Størksen, Roar; Røsseland, Atle; Neteland, Hans Olav; Wetteland, Per Inge; Wilhelmsen, Eirik Veum

    2014-01-01

    Seafarer’s mental health is vital for a well-functioning organisation. Neglecting mental health status on board could be extremely costly for both the crew affected as well as the company. The present article outlines an extensive programme implemented in the Royal Norwegian Navy for personnel deployed in international operations. The challenges involved in international operations bare similarities to onboard personnel in civilian maritime operations. The program utilised by the Royal Norweg...

  10. Operational readiness decisions at nuclear power plants. Which factors influence the decisions?; Driftklarhetsbeslut i kaernkraftanlaeggningar. Vilka faktorer paaverkar beslutsfattandet?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kecklund, Lena; Petterson, Sara (MTO Psykologi, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this project has been to propose a model for how operational readiness decisions are made and to identify important factors influencing these decisions. The project has also studied the support from the management system for decision making, and made a comparison to how decisions are made in practice. This is mainly an explorative study, but it also deals with relevant research and theories about decision making. The project consists of several parts. The first part is composed of descriptions of important notations and terms, and a summary of relevant research about decision making and its relation to the management system. The project proposes a model for the decision making process. The second part consists of analyses of reports from SKI about operational readiness decisions. The last part is a case study at a nuclear power plant. The case study describes the support from work method theories at the nuclear power plant to the decision maker. Decision makers with different roles in the safety management system were interviewed to give a description of the decision making process and of factors influencing the decisions made in practice. The case study also consists of an analysis of decisions in some real events at the nuclear power plant, as well as of making interviews in connection with these. To sum up, this report presents a model for the decision process and describes the work method theories that support the different parts in the process, how the different parts are applied in practice and circumstances that influence the decision process. The results of the project give an understanding for decision making in operational readiness decisions and the factors that influence the decision. The results are meant to be used as a basis for further studies in other nuclear power plants. The results indicate that the decision process is facilitated if there are clear criteria and work methods, if the work methods are well established and if the

  11. Effects of Ready-to-Eat-Cereals on Key Nutritional and Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Marion G; McMonagle, Jolene R

    2016-01-01

    In many countries breakfast cereals are an important component of breakfast. This systematic review assesses the contribution of consumption of ready-to eat cereal (RTEC) to the recommended nutrient intake. Furthermore, the effects of RTEC consumption on key health parameters are investigated as well as health promoting properties of RTEC. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL have been searched up till 16th of June 2015. Randomized controlled trials were excluded if RTEC were used during hypocaloric diets, if RTEC were eaten at other times than breakfast and if breakfasts included other products than RTEC, milk and fruit. Observational studies were excluded when "breakfast cereals" were not defined or their definition included cooked cereals. From cross-sectional studies only data concerning energy and nutrient intake as well as micronutrient status were used. From 4727 identified citations 64 publications met the inclusion criteria of which 32 were cross-sectional studies, eight prospective studies and 24 randomized controlled trials. Consumption of RTEC is associated with a healthier dietary pattern, concerning intake of carbohydrates, dietary fiber, fat and micronutrients, however total sugar intake is higher. Persons consuming RTEC frequently (≥ 5 times/week) have a lower risk of inadequate micronutrient intake especially for vitamin A, calcium, folate, vitamin B 6, magnesium and zinc. Evidence from prospective studies suggests that whole grain RTEC may have beneficial effects on hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Consumption of RTEC with soluble fiber helps to reduce LDL cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic men and RTEC fortified with folate can reduce plasma homocysteine. One of the review's strengths is its thorough ex/inclusion of studies. Limitations are that results of observational studies were based on self-reported data and that many studies were funded by food-industry. Consumption of RTEC, especially of fiber

  12. High Performance Computing Operations Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupps, Kimberly C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-19

    The High Performance Computing Operations Review (HPCOR) meeting—requested by the ASC and ASCR program headquarters at DOE—was held November 5 and 6, 2013, at the Marriott Hotel in San Francisco, CA. The purpose of the review was to discuss the processes and practices for HPC integration and its related software and facilities. Experiences and lessons learned from the most recent systems deployed were covered in order to benefit the deployment of new systems.

  13. 1987 DOE review: First collider run operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, S.; Crawford, J.; Dugan, G.

    1987-05-01

    This review covers the operations of the first run of the 1.8 TeV superconducting super collider. The papers enclosed cover: PBAR source status, fixed target operation, Tevatron cryogenic reliability and capacity upgrade, Tevatron Energy upgrade progress and plans, status of the D0 low beta insertion, 1.8 K and 4.7 K refrigeration for low-β quadrupoles, progress and plans for the LINAC and booster, near term and long term and long term performance improvements

  14. Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR): The United States Marine Corps Initiative to Deliver Mental Health Services to Operating Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nash, William P

    2006-01-01

    .... The role of military mental health professionals in combat/operational stress control is to adapt scientific tools for prevention, identification, and treatment for use by military leaders at all levels...

  15. Application of signature analysis for determining the operational readiness of motor-operated valves under blowdown test conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    In support of the NRC-funded Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has carried out a comprehensive aging assessment of motor-operated valves (MOVs). As part of this work, ORNL participated in the gate valve flow interrruption blowdown (GVFIB) tests carried out in Huntsville, Alabama. The tests provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate signature analysis methods for determining the operability of MOVs under accident conditions. ORNL acquired motor current and torque switch shaft angular position signatures on two test MOVs during several GVFIB tests. The reduction in operating ''margin'' of both MOVs due to the presence of additional valve running loads imposed by high flow was clearly observed in motor current and torque switch angular position signatures. In addition, the effects of differential pressure, fluid temperature, and line voltage on MOV operations were observed and more clearly understood as a result of utilizing the signature analysis techniques. (orig.)

  16. Ready, Reliable, and Relevant: The Army Reserve Component as an Operational Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Arrival Date METL Mission Essential Task List MFO Multinational Force and Observers MOS Military Occupational Specialty NATO North Atlantic ...containing the total number of USAR Soldiers activated in Somalia is unavailable. Although US Military operations as part of the North Atlantic ...DC), the territories of Guam and the US Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, mobilized to the Gulf Coast states of

  17. Citizen ’Cyber’ Airmen: Maintaining Ready and Proficient Cyberspace Operators in the Reserve Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Cisco bring the most unique and current expertise.40 Even if Air Force RC personnel do not work for those companies but work in places that implore...labor market .46 Air Force RC members who are employed in industries related to cyber operations can be tapped to provide current knowledge, tools, and

  18. Occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in raw and ready-to-eat foods and in a Canadian food service operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Diane T; Sattar, Syed A; Farber, Jeffrey M; Carrillo, Catherine D

    2008-10-01

    The occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in a variety of foods from Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and raw milk samples from across Canada was determined over a 2-year period. The samples consisted of 55 raw foods (chicken, pork, and beef), 126 raw milk samples from raw milk cheese manufacturers, and 135 ready-to-eat foods (meat products, salads, and raw milk cheeses). Campylobacter jejuni was detected in 4 of the 316 samples analyzed: 1 raw beef liver sample and 3 raw chicken samples. An isolation rate of 9.7% was observed among the raw chicken samples tested. This study also investigated the role of cross-contamination in disseminating Campylobacter from raw poultry within a food service operation specializing in poultry dishes. Accordingly, kitchen surfaces within a restaurant in Ottawa, Ontario, were sampled between March and August 2001. Tests of the sampling method indicated that as few as 100 Campylobacter cells could be detected if sampling was done within 45 min of inoculation; however, Campylobacter spp. were not detected in 125 swabs of surfaces within the kitchens of this food service operation. Despite the reported high prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in raw poultry, this organism was not detected on surfaces within a kitchen of a restaurant specializing in poultry dishes.

  19. Review of operating room ventilation standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melhado, M.D.A.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews standards applied to operating room ventilation design used by European, South and North American countries. Required environmental parameters are compared with regard to type of surgery, and ventilation system. These requirements as well as their relation to infection control

  20. The Impact of Divorce Among Marines, E-5 and Below, on Unit Operational Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    convinced that their relationship is already wonderful. They are equally assured that marriage will simply be a continuation of their present bliss ...Business Review, (November, 2007): 1-9. Call, Vaughn R. A. and Tim B. Heaton, “Religious Influence on Marital Stability,” Journal for the Scientific...bv.1355534169,d.dmQ&fp=facdc1ee60048919&bpcl=40096503 &biw=1024&bih=564. lxvi Vaughn R. A. Call and Tim B. Heaton, “Religious Influence on Marital

  1. WANO ready to begin 'multi-year effort' to expand operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-01-15

    Ten of the 12 major projects established by the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) following the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011 have been completed. WANO chief executive officer Ken Ellis said that the closure of the projects means WANO had correct shortfalls that contributed to its inability to identify and direct the global industry support necessary to have prevented the Fukushima-Daiichi accident.

  2. Application-Ready Expedited MODIS Data for Operational Land Surface Monitoring of Vegetation Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesslyn F. Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring systems benefit from high temporal frequency image data collected from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS system. Because of near-daily global coverage, MODIS data are beneficial to applications that require timely information about vegetation condition related to drought, flooding, or fire danger. Rapid satellite data streams in operational applications have clear benefits for monitoring vegetation, especially when information can be delivered as fast as changing surface conditions. An “expedited” processing system called “eMODIS” operated by the U.S. Geological Survey provides rapid MODIS surface reflectance data to operational applications in less than 24 h offering tailored, consistently-processed information products that complement standard MODIS products. We assessed eMODIS quality and consistency by comparing to standard MODIS data. Only land data with known high quality were analyzed in a central U.S. study area. When compared to standard MODIS (MOD/MYD09Q1, the eMODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI maintained a strong, significant relationship to standard MODIS NDVI, whether from morning (Terra or afternoon (Aqua orbits. The Aqua eMODIS data were more prone to noise than the Terra data, likely due to differences in the internal cloud mask used in MOD/MYD09Q1 or compositing rules. Post-processing temporal smoothing decreased noise in eMODIS data.

  3. Factors related to self-directed learning readiness of students in health professional programs: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Craig E; Cusick, Anne

    2017-05-01

    Academic and professional drivers have stimulated interest in self-directed learning of students in pre-certification health professional programs. Particular attention has focussed on factors which may influence a students' readiness for self-directed learning. A five stage structured scoping review of published literature was conducted to identify measures of self-directed learning readiness used with students in pre-certification health professional programs and those factors that have been investigated as potential determinants. Relevant articles were identified in six databases using key search terms and a search strategy. Two independent reviewers used criteria to cull irrelevant sources. Articles which met eligibility criteria were charted. The final analysis included 49 articles conducted in nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, pharmacy, occupational therapy and dentistry cohorts. Twenty-one potential determinants had been investigated with gender, year level, age program delivery and previous education level the most common. Self-directed learning readiness has been of interest globally, mostly in medicine and nursing, and studies have nearly exclusively used one of two instruments. There is nascent evidence that age, year level and previous education level may have positive influence. These factors have in common the passing of time and may in fact be proxy for more encompassing developmental or social constructs. Further research is needed particularly in the allied health professions where there is limited research in very few disciplines. Studies in interprofessional contexts may be an efficient approach to increasing the knowledge base. Further work is also warranted to determine appropriate use of the two instruments across the range of health disciplines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.; Bruyere, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average 'all modes' failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment

  5. Individual motivation and threat indicators of collaboration readiness in scientific knowledge producing teams: a scoping review and domain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano R. Lotrecchiano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies a gap in the team science literature that considers intrapersonal indicators of collaboration as motivations and threats to participating in collaborative knowledge producing teams (KPTs. Through a scoping review process, over 150 resources were consulted to organize 6 domains of motivation and threat to collaboration in KPTs: Resource Acquisition, Advancing Science, Building Relationships, Knowledge Transfer, Recognition and Reward, and Maintenance of Beliefs. Findings show how domains vary in their presentation of depth and diversity of motivation and threat indicators as well as their relationship with each other within and across domains. The findings of 51 indicators resulting from the review provide a psychosocial framework for which to establish a hierarchy of collaborative reasoning for individual engagement in KPTs thus allowing for further research into the mechanism of collaborative engagement. The indicators serve as a preliminary step in establishing a protocol for testing of the psychometric properties of intrapersonal measures of collaboration readiness.

  6. How operational issues impact science peer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacker, Brett S.; Golombek, Daniel; Macchetto, Duccio

    2006-06-01

    In some eyes, the Phase I proposal selection process is the most important activity handled by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). Proposing for HST and other missions consists of requesting observing time and/or archival research funding. This step is called Phase I, where the scientific merit of a proposal is considered by a community based peer-review process. Accepted proposals then proceed thru Phase II, where the observations are specified in sufficient detail to enable scheduling on the telescope. Each cycle the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Telescope Allocation Committee (TAC) reviews proposals and awards observing time that is valued at $0.5B, when the total expenditures for HST over its lifetime are figured on an annual basis. This is in fact a very important endeavor that we continue to fine-tune and tweak. This process is open to the science community and we constantly receive comments and praise for this process. In this last year we have had to deal with the loss of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and move from 3-gyro operations to 2-gyro operations. This paper will outline how operational issues impact the HST science peer review process. We will discuss the process that was used to recover from the loss of the STIS instrument and how we dealt with the loss of 1/3 of the current science observations. We will also discuss the issues relating to 3-gyro vs. 2-gyro operations and how that changes impacted Proposers, our in-house processing and the TAC.

  7. The Daily Operational Brief: Fostering Daily Readiness, Care Coordination, and Problem-Solving Accountability in a Large Pediatric Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lane F; Basta, Kathryne C; Dykes, Anne M; Zhang, Wei; Shook, Joan E

    2018-01-01

    At a pediatric health system, the Daily Operational Brief (DOB) was updated in 2015 after three years of operation. Quality and safety metrics, the patient volume and staffing assessment, and the readiness assessment are all presented. In addition, in the problem-solving accountability system, problematic issues are categorized as Quick Hits or Complex Issues. Walk-the-Wall, a biweekly meeting attended by hospital senior administrative leadership and quality and safety leaders, is conducted to chart current progress on Complex Issues. The DOB provides a daily standardized approach to evaluate readiness to provide care to current patients and improvement in the care to be provided for future patients. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

    2008-09-01

    Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

  9. Proposal of performance indicators/model for Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) at restart after a planned shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollnagel, Erik; Nygren, Magnus

    2005-12-01

    the 323-event. This leads to a proposal of an ORV-model based on the concept of maintaining control. According to this, it is essential that an organisation (a system) knows how to respond (reaction), knows what to look for (observation, attention), and knows what to anticipate (prediction). While an organisation must possess those qualities to respond to an incident in the short term, a regulator must assess the organisation possesses those qualities in the long term. In terms of performance indicators, ten Common Performance Conditions are proposed. Each is assessed with regard to whether it can be the basis of practical measurements and whether it can be used concretely to induce an improvement to operational readiness. The re-analysis of the nine ORV events suggested that adequacy of organisation, adequacy of training and experience, availability of procedures and plans, and available time would be the most important performance indicators. Further work should look into detailed measurement methods, evaluation criteria, and means of intervention all based on an explicit model of safety as an organisational function

  10. Operational readiness verification, phase 1: A study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, E. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Computer and Information Science; Gauthereau, V. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    2001-06-01

    This report contains the findings from the first phase of a study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants. Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) - in Swedish called Driftklarhetsverifiering (DKV) - refers to the test and verification activities that are necessary to ensure that plant systems are able to provide their required functions when needed - more concretely that all plant systems are in their correct functional state when the plant is restarted after an outage period. The concrete background for this work is that nine ORV related incidents were reported in Sweden between July 1995 and October 1998. The work reported here comprised a literature survey of research relevant for ORV issues, and an assessment of the present situation at Swedish NPPs with respect to ORV. The literature survey was primarily aimed at research related to NPPs, but also looked at domains where similar problems have occurred, such as maintenance in commercial aviation. The survey looked specifically for organisational and MTO aspects relevant to the present situation in Swedish NPPs. One finding was that ORV should be seen as an integral part of maintenance, rather than as a separate activity. Another, that there is a characteristic distribution of error modes for maintenance and ORV, with many sequence errors and omissions, rather than a set of unique error modes. An international study further showed that there are important differences in how procedures are used, and in the balance between decentralisation and centralisation. Several studies also suggested that ORV could usefully be described as a barrier system in relation to the flow of work, for instance using the following five stages: (1) preventive actions during maintenance/outage, (2) post-test after completion of work, (3) pre-test before start-up, (4) the start-up sequence itself, and (5) preventive actions during power operation - possibly including automatic safety systems. In the field survey

  11. Operational readiness verification, phase 1: A study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollnagel, E.; Gauthereau, V.

    2001-06-01

    This report contains the findings from the first phase of a study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants. Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) - in Swedish called Driftklarhetsverifiering (DKV) - refers to the test and verification activities that are necessary to ensure that plant systems are able to provide their required functions when needed - more concretely that all plant systems are in their correct functional state when the plant is restarted after an outage period. The concrete background for this work is that nine ORV related incidents were reported in Sweden between July 1995 and October 1998. The work reported here comprised a literature survey of research relevant for ORV issues, and an assessment of the present situation at Swedish NPPs with respect to ORV. The literature survey was primarily aimed at research related to NPPs, but also looked at domains where similar problems have occurred, such as maintenance in commercial aviation. The survey looked specifically for organisational and MTO aspects relevant to the present situation in Swedish NPPs. One finding was that ORV should be seen as an integral part of maintenance, rather than as a separate activity. Another, that there is a characteristic distribution of error modes for maintenance and ORV, with many sequence errors and omissions, rather than a set of unique error modes. An international study further showed that there are important differences in how procedures are used, and in the balance between decentralisation and centralisation. Several studies also suggested that ORV could usefully be described as a barrier system in relation to the flow of work, for instance using the following five stages: (1) preventive actions during maintenance/outage, (2) post-test after completion of work, (3) pre-test before start-up, (4) the start-up sequence itself, and (5) preventive actions during power operation - possibly including automatic safety systems. In the field survey

  12. Operational readiness verification, phase 1: A study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, E [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Computer and Information Science; Gauthereau, V [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    2001-06-01

    This report contains the findings from the first phase of a study on safety during outage and restart of nuclear power plants. Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) - in Swedish called Driftklarhetsverifiering (DKV) - refers to the test and verification activities that are necessary to ensure that plant systems are able to provide their required functions when needed - more concretely that all plant systems are in their correct functional state when the plant is restarted after an outage period. The concrete background for this work is that nine ORV related incidents were reported in Sweden between July 1995 and October 1998. The work reported here comprised a literature survey of research relevant for ORV issues, and an assessment of the present situation at Swedish NPPs with respect to ORV. The literature survey was primarily aimed at research related to NPPs, but also looked at domains where similar problems have occurred, such as maintenance in commercial aviation. The survey looked specifically for organisational and MTO aspects relevant to the present situation in Swedish NPPs. One finding was that ORV should be seen as an integral part of maintenance, rather than as a separate activity. Another, that there is a characteristic distribution of error modes for maintenance and ORV, with many sequence errors and omissions, rather than a set of unique error modes. An international study further showed that there are important differences in how procedures are used, and in the balance between decentralisation and centralisation. Several studies also suggested that ORV could usefully be described as a barrier system in relation to the flow of work, for instance using the following five stages: (1) preventive actions during maintenance/outage, (2) post-test after completion of work, (3) pre-test before start-up, (4) the start-up sequence itself, and (5) preventive actions during power operation - possibly including automatic safety systems. In the field survey

  13. Cluff Lake mill operations - a historical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, H.A.; Doell, E.; Corpus, E.

    2000-01-01

    The Cluff Lake operation started uranium production in 1980 and has produced over 50 million pounds of uranium since that time. The plant started with high grade ore (+30% U) processing and went through a series of modifications to its present operating status: Phase 1 - High-grade ore (+30% U) processing with acid leach and iron cake precipitation followed by direct yellowcake precipitation. Lower grade ore was concentrated in a gravity circuit to +30% U; Phase 1 1/2 - Reprocessing Phase 1 gravity tailings (+1% U) in an acid leach circuit with solvent extraction purification prior to yellowcake precipitation; Reprocessing of the Phase 1 leach tails (58 g/t Au) to recover gold in a Cyanide/CIP circuit followed by additional uranium recovery, and destruction and recycle of cyanide by volatilization; and Phase 2 - Treatment of the lower grade ore (0.5 to 1% U) at an increased tonnage with an acid leach, CCD, SX circuit as it is found in the existing plant. This paper will review the various processing circuits used during the phases of the Cluff Lake Mill from first uranium production to the present operation. (author)

  14. Review of operational aids for nuclear plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many approaches are being explored to improve the safety of nuclear plant operations. One approach is to supply high-quality, relevant information by means of computer-based diagnostic systems to assist plant operators in performing their operational and safety-related roles. The evaluation of operational aids to ensure safe plant operations is a necessary function of NRC. This work has two purposes: to collect limited data on a diversity of operational aids, and to provide a method for evaluating the safety implications of the functions of proposed operational aids. After a discussion of the method evaluation now under study, this paper outlines this data collection to date

  15. Operational Readiness Verification, Phase 2: A Field Study at a Swedish NPP during a Productive-Outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollnagel, Erik; Gauthereau, Vincent

    2002-11-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of a study on Operational Readiness Verification (ORV), and was carried out from October 2001 to September 2002. The work comprised a field study of ORV activities at a Swedish NPP during a planned productive outage, which allowed empirical work to be conducted in an appropriate environment with good accessibility to technical staff. One conclusion from Phase I of this project was the need to look more closely at the differences between three levels or types of tests that occur in ORV: object (component) test, system level test and (safety) function test, and to analyse the different steps of testing in order to understand the nontrivial relations between tests and safety. A second conclusion was the need to take a closer look at the organisation's ability to improvise in the sense of adjusting pre-defined plans to the actual conditions under which they are to be carried out. One outcome of Phase II is that there is no clear distinction between the three types of tests in the way they are carried out, and that they are used according to need rather than according to an internal logic or structure. In order better to understand the complexity of ORV, it was found useful to introduce concepts such as: (1) Community of Practice, defined as a small groups of people who through extensive communication developed a common sense of purpose, work-related knowledge and experience; (2) embedding, which means that all tasks and activities take place in an environment or context that may be physical, social, or historical (cultural); and (3) the Efficiency-Thoroughness Trade-Off (ETTO) principle, which characterises how people try to adjust what they do to the local conditions of work (temporal, physical and organisational). By using these terms to understand the practice of ORV, it becomes easier to understand how actions at times can be carried out in such a manner that the outcomes differ significantly from what was desired. It

  16. Operational Readiness Verification, Phase 2: A Field Study at a Swedish NPP during a Productive-Outage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, Erik [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Cognitive Systems Engineering Laboratory; Gauthereau, Vincent [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Quality Management

    2002-11-01

    This report describes the results from Phase II of a study on Operational Readiness Verification (ORV), and was carried out from October 2001 to September 2002. The work comprised a field study of ORV activities at a Swedish NPP during a planned productive outage, which allowed empirical work to be conducted in an appropriate environment with good accessibility to technical staff. One conclusion from Phase I of this project was the need to look more closely at the differences between three levels or types of tests that occur in ORV: object (component) test, system level test and (safety) function test, and to analyse the different steps of testing in order to understand the nontrivial relations between tests and safety. A second conclusion was the need to take a closer look at the organisation's ability to improvise in the sense of adjusting pre-defined plans to the actual conditions under which they are to be carried out. One outcome of Phase II is that there is no clear distinction between the three types of tests in the way they are carried out, and that they are used according to need rather than according to an internal logic or structure. In order better to understand the complexity of ORV, it was found useful to introduce concepts such as: (1) Community of Practice, defined as a small groups of people who through extensive communication developed a common sense of purpose, work-related knowledge and experience; (2) embedding, which means that all tasks and activities take place in an environment or context that may be physical, social, or historical (cultural); and (3) the Efficiency-Thoroughness Trade-Off (ETTO) principle, which characterises how people try to adjust what they do to the local conditions of work (temporal, physical and organisational). By using these terms to understand the practice of ORV, it becomes easier to understand how actions at times can be carried out in such a manner that the outcomes differ significantly from what was

  17. Metal losses in pyrometallurgical operations - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemans, Inge; De Wilde, Evelien; Moelans, Nele; Verbeken, Kim

    2018-05-01

    Nowadays, a higher demand on a lot of metals exists, but the quantity and purity of the ores decreases. The amount of scrap, on the other hand, increases and thus, recycling becomes more important. Besides recycling, it is also necessary to improve and optimize existing processes in extractive and recycling metallurgy. One of the main difficulties of the overall-plant recovery are metal losses in slags, in both primary and secondary metal production. In general, an increased understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing these losses could help further improve production efficiencies. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the current scientific knowledge concerning metal losses and pinpoints the knowledge gaps. First, the industrial importance and impact of metal losses in slags will be illustrated by several examples from both ferrous and non-ferrous industries. Throughout the remainder of this review, the main focus will be put on the particular issues in copper industry. In a second section, the different types of metal losses in slags will be discussed. Generally, metal losses in slags can be subdivided into two types: chemical losses and physical losses. The fundamental insights concerning the responsible mechanisms will be discussed for each type. Subsequently, an overview of the most frequently used techniques for research investigations of the losses will be given. In a fourth section, a more detailed overview will be given on the post-processing treatment of metal-containing slags, i.e. performing slag cleaning operations. The most frequently applied methods will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Whole dietary patterns to optimize cognitive function for military mission-readiness: a systematic review and recommendations for the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Lynn; Crawford, Cindy; Yehuda, Rachel; Jaghab, Danny; Bingham, John J; Gallon, Matthew D; O'Connell, Meghan L; Chittum, Holly K; Arzola, Sonya M; Berry, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Optimizing cognitive performance, particularly during times of high stress, is a prerequisite to mission-readiness among military personnel. It has been of interest to determine whether such performance could be enhanced through diet. This systematic review assesses the quality of the evidence for whole dietary patterns across various outcomes related to cognitive function in healthy adult populations to develop research recommendations for the military. PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library were searched. Peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials published in the English language were eligible. Fifteen included trials were assessed for methodological quality, and descriptive data were extracted. Of the 6 acceptable-quality studies, 1 demonstrated statistically nonsignificant results, whereas the other 5 showed conflicting results across the cognitive outcomes assessed. Due to the heterogeneity across the included studies, no recommendations could be reached concerning whether certain whole dietary patterns have an effect on cognitive outcomes in healthy populations. Specific recommendations for future research are offered. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Phytochemicals to optimize cognitive function for military mission-readiness: a systematic review and recommendations for the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Lynn; Crawford, Cindy; Snow, James; Deuster, Patricia A; Bingham, John J; Gallon, Matthew D; O'Connell, Meghan L; Chittum, Holly K; Arzola, Sonya M; Berry, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Optimizing cognitive performance and preventing cognitive impairments that result from exposure to high-stress situations are important to ensure mission-readiness for military personnel. This systematic review assesses the quality of the evidence for plant-based foods and beverages, or their phytochemical constituents, across various outcomes related to cognitive function in healthy adult populations to develop research recommendations for the military. PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library were searched. Peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials published in the English language were eligible. Twenty-five trials were included and assessed for methodological quality, and descriptive data were extracted. The acceptable (n = 16) to high-quality (n = 4) studies produced either no statistically significant effect or mixed results for enhancing cognitive function. The evidence suggested that healthy populations do not experience significant changes in cognitive performance when consuming soy- and non-soy-sourced isoflavones or cocoa. Heterogeneity among other interventions precluded reaching formal conclusions surrounding the evidence. Research recommendations are offered, including conducting more studies on the effect of plant-based interventions on populations reflective of military populations when exposed to military-like situations. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Operational Readiness Verification, Phase 3. A Field Study at a Swedish NPP during a Productive Outage (Safety-train Outage)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollnagel, Erik; Gauthereau, Vincent; Persson, Bodil

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of a study on Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) that was carried out from December 2002 to November 2003. The work comprised a field study of ORV activities at a Swedish NPP during a planned productive outage [subavstaellning], which allowed empirical work to be conducted in an appropriate environment with good accessibility to technical staff. One conclusion from Phase I of this project was the need to look more closely at the differences between three levels or types of tests that occur in ORV: object (component) test, system level test and (safety) function test, and to analyse the different steps of testing in order to understand the nontrivial relations between tests and safety. A second conclusion was the need to take a closer look at the organisation's ability to improvise in the sense of adjusting pre-defined plans to the actual conditions under which they are to be carried out. Phase II of the project found that although all three types of test occurred, they were rather used according to need rather than to a predefined arrangement or procedure. The complexity of ORV could be understood and described by using the concepts of Community of Practice, embedding, and Efficiency-Thoroughness Trade-Off. In addition, organisation and the different communities of practice improvise by adjusting pre-defined plans or work orders to the existing conditions. Such improvisations take place both on the levels of individual actions, on the level of communities of practice, and on the organisational level. The ability to improvise is practically a necessity for work to be carried out, but is also a potential risk. Phase III of the project studied how tasks are adapted relative to the different types of embedding and the degree of correspondence between nominal and actual ORV. It also looked further at the different Communities of Practice that are part of maintenance and ORV, focusing on the coordination and

  1. Operational Readiness Verification, Phase 3. A Field Study at a Swedish NPP during a Productive Outage (Safety-train Outage)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, Erik [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Computer and Information Science; Gauthereau, Vincent; Persson, Bodil [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Industrial Engineering

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of a study on Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) that was carried out from December 2002 to November 2003. The work comprised a field study of ORV activities at a Swedish NPP during a planned productive outage, which allowed empirical work to be conducted in an appropriate environment with good accessibility to technical staff. One conclusion from Phase I of this project was the need to look more closely at the differences between three levels or types of tests that occur in ORV: object (component) test, system level test and (safety) function test, and to analyse the different steps of testing in order to understand the nontrivial relations between tests and safety. A second conclusion was the need to take a closer look at the organisation's ability to improvise in the sense of adjusting pre-defined plans to the actual conditions under which they are to be carried out. Phase II of the project found that although all three types of test occurred, they were rather used according to need rather than to a predefined arrangement or procedure. The complexity of ORV could be understood and described by using the concepts of Community of Practice, embedding, and Efficiency-Thoroughness Trade-Off. In addition, organisation and the different communities of practice improvise by adjusting pre-defined plans or work orders to the existing conditions. Such improvisations take place both on the levels of individual actions, on the level of communities of practice, and on the organisational level. The ability to improvise is practically a necessity for work to be carried out, but is also a potential risk. Phase III of the project studied how tasks are adapted relative to the different types of embedding and the degree of correspondence between nominal and actual ORV. It also looked further at the different Communities of Practice that are part of maintenance and ORV, focusing on the coordination and communication between

  2. Ready, set,...quit exclamation point A review of the controlled-air incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) has had a long and productive past as a research and development tool. It now appears that use of the CAI to treat LANL legacy and other wastes under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act is no longer viable due to numerous programmatic problems. This paper will review the history of the CAI. Various aspects associated with the CAI and how those aspects resulted in the loss of this Department of Energy asset as a viable waste treatment option will also be discussed. Included are past missions and tests-CAI capabilities, emissions, and permits; Federal Facility Compliance Act and associated Agreement; National Environmental Policy Act coverage; cost; budget impacts; public perception; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Combustion Strategy; Independent Technical Review open-quotes Redclose quotes Team review; waste treatment alternative technologies; the New Mexico Environment Department; and future options and issues

  3. [Physical and chemical stability of fortified ophtalmic ready-to-use solutions: review of literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourdeau, P; Evrard, J-M; Remy, G; Hecq, J-D

    2012-03-01

    Ophtalmic infections and inflammations are often encountered during hospitalization. They require the preparation of "fortified" ophtalmic solutions, i.e. pharmaceutical ophtalmic solutions which are hyperconcentrated in active substance. The data of physicochemical stabilities are modified and it is therefore essential to gather the results of the various publications devoted to this subject. In 2006, an initial literature review was undertaken to identify the molecules mostly used in the preparation of fortified ophtalmic solutions in hospital. A second review of the literature in 2010 has enriched the knowledge about it. Two new drugs have entered the summary table: amikacin and ticarcillin disodium. Date on 12 molecules already known in 2006 were updated to improve clinical practices. A review of the literature was undertaken in order to collect the results of the molecules mostly used for the preparation of the fortified ophtalmic solutions in hospitals. A summary table, indicating the active substance, its concentration, the assay method, the storage temperature and physicochemical modifications, presents all the results. This review of literature makes it possible to match stability and validity period to these preparations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Abattoir operations and waste management in Nigeria: A review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abattoir operations and waste management in Nigeria: A review of challenges ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... militating against the establishment, operations and management of abattoirs are not given attention.

  5. A systematic review of peri-operative melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L P H; Werner, M U; Rosenberg, J

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed randomised controlled trials of peri-operative melatonin. We included 24 studies of 1794 participants that reported eight peri-operative outcomes: anxiety; analgesia; sleep quality; oxidative stress; emergence behaviour; anaesthetic requirements; steal induction......%, respectively. Qualitative reviews suggested the melatonin improved sleep quality and emergence behaviour, and might be capable of reducing oxidative stress and anaesthetic requirements....

  6. Decentralization of operating reactor licensing reviews: NRR Pilot Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1984-07-01

    This report, which has incorporated comments received from the Commission and ACRS, describes the program for decentralization of selected operating reactor licensing technical review activities. The 2-year pilot program will be reviewed to verify that safety is enhanced as anticipated by the incorporation of prescribed management techniques and application of resources. If the program fails to operate as designed, it will be terminated

  7. Readiness of Sub-Saharan Africa Healthcare Systems for the New Pandemic, Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Nuche-Berenguer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Effective health systems are needed to care for the coming surge of diabetics in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. Objective. We conducted a systematic review of literature to determine the capacity of SSA health systems to manage diabetes. Methodology. We used three different databases (Embase, Scopus, and PubMed to search for studies, published from 2004 to 2017, on diabetes care in SSA. Results. Fifty-five articles met the inclusion criteria, covering the different aspects related to diabetes care such as availability of drugs and diagnostic tools, the capacity of healthcare workers, and the integration of diabetes care into HIV and TB platforms. Conclusion. Although chronic care health systems in SSA have developed significantly in the last decade, the capacity for managing diabetes remains in its infancy. We identified pilot projects to enhance these capacities. The scale-up of these pilot interventions and the integration of diabetes care into existing robust chronic disease platforms may be a feasible approach to begin to tackle the upcoming pandemic in diabetes. Nonetheless, much more work needs to be done to address the health system-wide deficiencies in diabetes care. More research is also needed to determine how to integrate diabetes care into the healthcare system in SSA.

  8. Transfer operations with tritium: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkers, C.L.; Gede, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve pumping operations with tritium that may involve pressures ranging from submillipascals to megapascals. A variety of pumps are available that can cover portions of this range, and these can be staged to cover the entire pressure range. Some of these pumps can be adapted to virtually any size requirement currently anticipated. Special attention must be paid to operating features and construction materials. (U.S.)

  9. Review of operating history at the Palisades Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    the Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. A portion of the SEP includes the compilation and interpretation of operational occurrences at these plants. This summary describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review of Palisades Nuclear Plant. The review includes a detailed examination of the operating experience in two segments - plant shutdowns and power reductions, and reportable events

  10. Caffeine to optimize cognitive function for military mission-readiness: a systematic review and recommendations for the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Cindy; Teo, Lynn; Lafferty, Lynn; Drake, Angela; Bingham, John J; Gallon, Matthew D; O'Connell, Meghan L; Chittum, Holly K; Arzola, Sonya M; Berry, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    In 2001 the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a report on the use of caffeine during sustained military operations in which recommendations for research and practice were made. This systematic review serves as an update on the current quality of the evidence and addresses gaps in the current literature surrounding the effects of caffeinated foods and beverages on cognitive functioning in healthy adult populations exposed to military-like moderators. PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library were searched. Peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials published in the English language since 1998 were eligible. Twenty-five trials were included and assessed for methodological quality, and descriptive data were extracted according to each military-like moderator identified. Moderators included sleep deprivation (n = 17), physical or mental exertion (n = 4), sleep deprivation combined with a sustained military operation (n = 3), and physical exertion combined with low ambient temperature (n = 1). The effects of caffeine supplementation on cognitive functioning in sleep-deprived subjects included improvements in attention and vigilance, complex reaction time, and problem solving and reasoning in the trials reviewed. These findings are consistent with the conclusions reached in the 2001 IOM report. This review contributes to the field by addressing gaps outlined in the IOM report. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Stabilisation and stability operations : a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fitz-Gerald, AM; Blair, S

    2010-01-01

    ‘Stabilisation’, ‘stability operations’ and ‘instability’ are relatively new terms in the conflict transformation lexicon and the literature on these areas has grown significantly over a fairly short time period. For better or for worse, knowledge in this area has been shaped predominantly by the formative experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq. These operations are based on a view that weak and failing states pose a direct threat to wider international and national security. T...

  12. Operating experience review for the AP1000 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaney, T. E.; Lipner, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    Westinghouse is performing an update to the Operating Experience Review (OER) Report for the AP1000 project to account for operating experience since December 1996. Significant Operating Experience Reports, Significant Event Reports, Significant Event Notifications, Operations and Maintenance Reminders, Topical Reports, Event Analysis Reports and Licensee Event Reports were researched for pertinent input to the update. As a part of the OER, Westinghouse has also conducted operator interviews and observations during simulated plant operations and after operating events. The main purpose of the OER is to identify Human Factors Engineering (HFE) related safety issues from existing operating plant experience and to ensure that these issues are addressed in the new design. The issues and lessons learned regarding operating experience provide a basis for improving the plant design. (authors)

  13. Managing Military Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    These metrics contain critical information and have their place in readiness management. However, they have never been sufficient to fully...demand signals along with simultaneity assumptions form the es- sence of the operational requirements in national strategy. This section briefly... places demands on the capability and capacity of the Air Force that consume its resources in today’s fight and exceed our capacity to address

  14. ALARA Review of the SHAARS Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kekana, R.M.T.

    2010-01-01

    The SHARS mobile hot cell was designed and manufactured by Necsa intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) from teletherapy units, gamma irradiators and brachytherapy units. This unit is to be used in countries with no remote infrastructure to handle SHARS. The hot cell was designed for a 3.7E+13Bq (1000Ci) activity although it was demonstrated that it can handle even more than 7.4E+13Bq (2000Ci). The unit has a biological shield which consists of river sand sandwiched between metal plates and a viewing window filled with 50% zinc bromide solution. The unit was designed to provide sufficient shielding to ensure that doses are kept ALARA (As low As Reasonably Achieved). This paper compares the modelled dose rates with the actual measured doses during operations conducted in Sudan, Tanzania and Uruguay. It also presents the key lessons learned in the application of the ALARA principle during the SHARS missions. The new working practices and additional methods are proposed in order to reduce doses in accordance with the ALARA principle. (author)

  15. National culture and operations management : a structured literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boscari, Stefania; Bortolotti, Thomas; Netland, Torbjorn; Rich, Nicholas

    2018-01-01

    National culture has received a substantial amount of interest in the operations management literature. We present the first structured review of articles studying national culture in operations management. Our search returned 51 papers published in ten leading journals between 2000 and 2017. We

  16. A review of healthy condition for reactor operators of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Yang Di; Zhu Lixin; Zhou Limin

    2008-01-01

    Physical health is one of fundamental elements and the necessary qualification for holding operator license or senior operator license of a nuclear power plant issued by NNSA. Based upon requirements for healthy qualification of reactor operators in nuclear safety regulations and some new issued regulations, especially some involved national standard (GB), review direction, relevant contents and criteria were described, and some suggestions were provided in this paper. (authors)

  17. Review of decision aids for nuclear-plant operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to various computer-based operational aids varied widely in detail, thus forcing distillation of the salient features of many operational aids from information sources other than the initial questionnaire. These sources included technical and management presentations, technical papers and reports, personal discussions, taped responses, sales brochures, system specifications and schematics, and other documents. The data base is dynamic, not static, owing to the nature of current trends in operational aid development. The information contained in it is subject to review and revision by the developing organizations. More systems are pending review and entry into the data base; hence the list is incomplete

  18. Constellation Mission Operation Working Group: ESMO Maneuver Planning Process Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Earth Science Mission Operation (ESMO) Project created an Independent Review Board to review our Conjunction Risk evaluation process and Maneuver Planning Process to identify improvements that safely manages mission conjunction risks, maintains ground track science requirements, and minimizes overall hours expended on High Interest Events (HIE). The Review Board is evaluating the current maneuver process which requires support by multiple groups. In the past year, there have been several changes to the processes although many prior and new concerns exist. This presentation will discuss maneuver process reviews and Board comments, ESMO assessment and path foward, ESMO future plans, recent changes and concerns.

  19. British Columbia Power Export Corporation: Operational review for operating year, October 1989 to September 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The British Columbia Power Export Corporation (POWEREX) is a wholly owned subsidiary of British Columbia Hydro, established in 1988 as the single agency responsible for implementing the provincial policy of international electricity trade. POWEREX objectives are to conduct long term firm electricity trade utilizing private sector financing, operating capabilities, and generating sources. Short term electricity transactions are handled by the part of POWEREX called the Powerex Pool Operation. An operational review of POWEREX for 1989-90 is presented, giving information on export contracts, license approvals, export sales negotiations, pool operation revenues and sales, British Columbia Hydro generation and integrated system performance, and operational planning. 15 figs

  20. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids to optimize cognitive function for military mission-readiness: a systematic review and recommendations for the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Lynn; Crawford, Cindy; Yehuda, Rachel; Jaghab, Danny; Bingham, John J; Chittum, Holly K; Gallon, Matthew D; O'Connell, Meghan L; Arzola, Sonya M; Berry, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    There has been interest in identifying whether nutrients might help optimize cognitive performance, especially for the military tasked with ensuring mission-readiness. This systematic review assesses the quality of the evidence for n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) across various outcomes related to cognitive function in healthy adult populations in order to develop research recommendations concerning n-3 PUFAs for mission-readiness. PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library were searched. Peer-reviewed randomized controlled trials published in the English language were eligible. Thirteen included trials were assessed for methodological quality, and descriptive data were extracted. Of the acceptable-quality (n = 8) and high-quality (n = 1) studies, 2 produced no statistically significant results, 5 produced mixed results, and 2 did not report between-group results. Results indicate that ingestion of n-3 PUFAs does not significantly alter cognitive performance in cognitively healthy persons. Studies exposing subjects to adverse circumstances that would be most relevant for drawing conclusions specifically for the military population are lacking. Several research recommendations are offered to enhance understanding of the role of fatty acids on cognitive functioning. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A Primer on Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis and Diagnostic Efficiency Statistics for Pediatric Psychology: We Are Ready to ROC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objective To offer a practical demonstration of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, diagnostic efficiency statistics, and their application to clinical decision making using a popular parent checklist to assess for potential mood disorder. Method Secondary analyses of data from 589 families seeking outpatient mental health services, completing the Child Behavior Checklist and semi-structured diagnostic interviews. Results Internalizing Problems raw scores discriminated mood disorders significantly better than did age- and gender-normed T scores, or an Affective Problems score. Internalizing scores 30 had a diagnostic likelihood ratio of 7.4. Conclusions This study illustrates a series of steps in defining a clinical problem, operationalizing it, selecting a valid study design, and using ROC analyses to generate statistics that support clinical decisions. The ROC framework offers important advantages for clinical interpretation. Appendices include sample scripts using SPSS and R to check assumptions and conduct ROC analyses. PMID:23965298

  2. The work of the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hide, K.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme was set up by the IAEA in 1982 to assist Member States to enhance the operational safety of nuclear power plants. Each team is staffed by senior experts in the relevant fields. The review team discusses with plant staff the existing operational programmes for plant which may be under construction, being commissioned or already operating. Following a detailed examination of a safety programme, the OSART team lists strengths and weaknesses and makes recommendations on how to overcome the latter. Since their conclusions are based on the best prevailing international practice, they may be more stringent than those based on national criteria. The results of the 77 missions conducted at 62 plants in 28 countries by the end of 1994 are summarised. (UK)

  3. Operating System Concepts for Reconfigurable Computing: Review and Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Marcel Eckert; Dominik Meyer; Jan Haase; Bernd Klauer

    2016-01-01

    One of the key future challenges for reconfigurable computing is to enable higher design productivity and a more easy way to use reconfigurable computing systems for users that are unfamiliar with the underlying concepts. One way of doing this is to provide standardization and abstraction, usually supported and enforced by an operating system. This article gives historical review and a summary on ideas and key concepts to include reconfigurable computing aspects in operating systems. The arti...

  4. Operations and Maintenance Cost for Stratified Buildings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Ghani Nor Zaimah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Building maintenance is essential in preserving buildings’ appearance and performance. It needs to upkeep the building performance to prolong its value and building life cycle. Malaysia is still lacking in managing cost for building operation and maintenance. It has been found that the cost for housing maintenance is high due to poor maintenance practices. In order to get better understanding on how to manage the cost, this study reviews the contributing factors that affecting operation and maintenance cost of stratified buildings in Malaysia. The research first identified the factors through extensive literature review and scrutinize on factors that affecting and can minimize operation and maintenance cost. This literature review offers insight into building maintenance scenario in Malaysia focusing on the issues and challenges. The study also finds that operation and maintenance cost for housing in Malaysia is still in poor state. Interestingly, this paper revealed that operation and maintenance cost is also influenced by three significant factors like expectation of tenants, building characteristics and building defects. Measures to reduce the housing operation and maintenance cost are also highlighted so that this study can be a stepping stone towards proposing efficient and effective facilities management strategies for affordable housing in future.

  5. Individual Ready Reserve: It's Relevance in Supporting the Long War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chisholm, Shelley A

    2008-01-01

    ... in sustaining personnel readiness while supporting on going operations. In response to meeting these personnel readiness concerns, the Army Reserve will require the call-up of Soldiers currently serving in the IRR...

  6. Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  7. Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  8. A Practical Review of Studies on Operator's Supervisory Monitoring Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Su; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Correct situation awareness (SA) has been considered a crucial key to improving performance and reducing error in NPPs. There are a lot of information sources that should be monitored in NPPs, but operators have only limited capacity of attention and memory. Operators in NPPs selectively attend to important information sources to effectively develop SA when an abnormal or accidental situation occurs. Selective attention to important information sources is continued while maintaining SA as well. In this work, various models of operator's visual sampling behavior are reviewed for the use in human factors studies in NPPs

  9. Review on Islanding Operation of Distribution System with Distributed Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahat, Pukar; Chen, Zhe; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    The growing environmental concern and various benefits of distributed generation (DG) have resulted in significant penetration of DG in many distribution systems worldwide. One of the major expected benefits of DG is the improvement in the reliability of power supply by supplying load during power...... outage by operating in an island mode. However, there are many challenges to overcome before islanding operation of a distribution system with DG can become a viable solution in future. This paper reviews some of the major challenges with islanding operation and explores some possible solutions...

  10. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROCs) in Recognition Memory: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Parks, Colleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is being used increasingly to examine the memory processes underlying recognition memory. The authors discuss the methodological issues involved in conducting and analyzing ROC results, describe the various models that have been developed to account for these results, review the behavioral empirical…

  11. Peer Reviews: a voluntary means of enhancing operating culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella, R.

    1996-01-01

    In the nuclear energy industry, and also in other fields, excellent experience has been gained from the regular accumulation of expert evidence of power station operation through external organizations or teams. In 1991, the World Association of Nuclear Operations (WANO) initiated a pilot programme for voluntary 'Peer Reviews'. The success of this first exercise in gathering expert evidence led to the introduction of the 'Peer Review' programme in 1993 as one of the standard programmes of WANO. The object was to increase the safety and reliability of nuclear power stations throughout the world. WANO Peer Reviews are voluntary and are carried out at the request of a member. They are oriented towards special WANO performance objectives and criteria, which have been established by the management of WANO. (orig.) [de

  12. Universal School Readiness Screening at Kindergarten Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Matthew; Dowdy, Erin; Dever, Bridget; Carnazzo, Katherine; Bolton, Courtney

    2018-01-01

    Researchers examined the concurrent and predictive validity of a brief (12-item) teacher-rated school readiness screener, the Kindergarten Student Entrance Profile (KSEP), using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to examine associations between (N = 78) children's social-emotional (SE) and cognitive (COG) readiness with…

  13. Market readiness report : status of preparation for Ontario's competitive retail electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) assumes a leadership role in the electricity sector to ensure the readiness of retail participants in Ontario's competitive electricity market. The Market Readiness Project Team is instrumental in this activity. The team, led by the Independent Electricity Market Operator, provides information and advice regarding the technical readiness of the retail industry, with particular focus on the readiness of distributors to carry out their important functions in a competitive market. This report provides an assessment of the team regarding the industry's technical readiness based on information as of December 14, 2001. The status of retail market readiness was reviewed in terms of the viability of the design of the new competitive market and on the status of Ontario distributors in enabling a competitive market. The workplan for the remaining industry activities needed to achieve market opening were then summarized along with the contingency arrangements for any distributors that are not ready for market opening. Based on several projections, an estimated 88 per cent of Ontario contracts will be served by a distributor starting on a May 1, 2002 market opening. tabs., figs., appendices

  14. Inspection-Class Remotely Operated Vehicles—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Capocci

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of inspection-class Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs. The review divides the classification of inspection-class ROVs; categorising the vehicles in order of size and capability. A state of the art technology review is undertaken, discussing various common subsystems of the ROV. Standard and novel ROV shapes and designs are reviewed, with emphasis on buoyancy, frame materials and hydrodynamics. Several power considerations and designs are discussed, accounting for battery fed and mains fed systems. ROV telemetry is split into a discussion on the various transmission hardware systems and the communication protocols that are most widely used in industry and research today. A range of thruster technologies is then introduced with consideration taken of the various thruster architectures available. Finally, the navigation and positioning sensors employed for ROV navigation and control are reviewed. The author has also created a number of comparison tables throughout the review; tables include comparison of wired data transmission technology, comparison of common ROV communication protocols and comparisons of various inertial navigation systems. By the end of the review the reader will have clearer understanding on the fundamentals of inspection-class ROV technologies and can use this as an introduction to further paper investigation.

  15. Cryogenic system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a review of cryogenic system operating experiences, from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space research, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of cryogenic component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with cryogenic systems are discussed, including ozone formation, effects of spills, and modeling spill behavior. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design

  16. C-Division annual review and operating plan, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, N.R.

    1990-11-01

    The Computing and Communications Division is responsible for the Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network as well as Laboratory-wide communications. Our computing network, used by 8000 people distributed throughout the nation, constitutes one of the most powerful scientific computing facilities in the world. The purpose of this publication is to inform our clients of our strategic and operating plans. We review major accomplishments since early 1989 and describe our strategic planning goals and specific projects that will guide our operations over the next couple of years. Our mission statement, planning considerations, and management policies and practices are also included.

  17. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix A: River Operation Simulation (ROSE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The River Operation Simulation Experts (ROSE) work group is comprised of representatives of the Corps, BPA, Reclamation, NMFS, Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC), and Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). ROSE was responsible for using computer hydroregulation models to simulate the operation of the river system for all of the alternatives evaluated in screening and full scale analysis in SOR. These models are complex computer programs which sequentially route streamflows through each dam in the system, calculating the streamflows, reservoir elevations, spill, power generation and other information at each project and pertinent locations on the river system. ROSE first reviewed specifications of proposed alternatives to determine whether such alternatives were formulated adequately to be run on hydroregulation models

  18. Developmental Readiness of Normal Full Term Infants To Progress from Exclusive Breastfeeding to the Introduction of Complementary Foods: Reviews of the Relevant Literature Concerning Infant Immunologic, Gastrointestinal, Oral Motor and Maternal Reproductive and Lactational Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Audrey J., Ed.; Morrow, Ardythe L., Ed.

    This review of the developmental readiness of normal, full-term infants to progress from exclusive breastfeeding to the introduction of complementary foods is the result of the international debate regarding the best age to introduce complementary foods into the diet of the breastfed human infant. After a list of definitions, four papers focus on:…

  19. Transferring Knowledge from Building Operation to Design: A literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Helle Lohmann; Jensen, Per Anker; Gregg, Jay Sterling

    . Knowing that the list lacks inputs from cultural and organizational theory, the paper suggests that further research should focus on taking these suggestions to an operational level for the benefit of FM, building clients and design teams. Furthermore, it is found that major concepts that could......As a solution to the previously identified gap between expected and actual building performance, this paper investigates how knowledge can be transferred from operation to design. This is assumed to help bridge the gap and increase the performance of new built facilities. By conducting a systematic...... literature review, it is found, that the theoretical approach in the reviewed articles has a significant impact on the level of how applicable the recommendations are in practice. Furthermore, a list of identified tools to enable knowledge transfer is provided, including POE, PPP and building commissioning...

  20. Research on the NPP human factors engineering operating experience review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiangchen; Miao Hongxing; Ning Zhonghe

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the importance of the human factors engineering (HFE) for the design of nuclear power plant (NPP), especially for the design of human-machine interface in the NPP. It also summarizes the scope and content of the NPP HFE. The function, scope, content and process of the NPP human factors engineering operating experience review (OER) are mainly focused on, and significantly discussed. Finally, it briefly introduces the situation of the studies on the OER in China. (authors)

  1. Mortuary operations following mass fatality natural disasters: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Madelyn; Leditschke, Jodie; Bassed, Richard; Cordner, Stephen M; Drummer, Olaf H

    2017-03-01

    This is a critical review to discuss the best practice approaches to mortuary operations in preparation for and the response to natural, mass fatality, disaster events, as identified by a review of published articles. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) Statement guided the identification of potential articles to use in this critical review. Subsequent searches were also conducted to identify articles relating to heat wave, and flood mortality. All identified peer-reviewed studies published in English which discussed the preparation and response of mortuaries to mass fatality natural disasters occurring in developed countries were included. Using the PRISMA-P method of identifying articles, 18 articles were selected for inclusion in this review. Although there are numerous articles which describe the mortuary response to mass fatality incidents, few articles analyzed the response, or discussed the roles which supported and enabled the organization to undertake the task of identifying disaster victims. It is thus difficult to determine objectively if the actions and activities outlined in the articles represent best-practice.

  2. Operating experience review in development of SMART MMIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, S. M.; Jang, G. S.; Lee, J. G.; Park, G. O.; Ko, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed HFE(Human Factors Engineering) program plan for the purpose of implementing man-machine interface system in SMART plant systematically. Elements of the plan are compatible to those of NUREG-0711, Rev.1, and OER(Operating Experience Review) is one of them. The main purpose of conducting an OER as part of HFE review is to identify HFE-related safety issues. If identified, design alternatives are carefully reviewed and selected as the way of resolution for those issues. The performing model of OER is described in this paper, showing a series of works must be done to identify and resolve HFE-related issues within the scope of SMART HFE works. Then two key issues and design alternatives resolving them are presented for examples

  3. Magnetic fusion: Environmental Readiness Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    Environmental Readiness Documents are prepared periodically to review and evaluate the environmental status of an energy technology during the several phases of development of that technology. Through these documents, the Office of Environment within the Department of Energy provides an independent and objective assessment of the environmental risks and potential impacts associated with the progression of the technology to the next stage of development and with future extensive use of the technology. This Environmental Readiness Document was prepared to assist the Department of Energy in evaluating the readiness of magnetic fusion technology with respect to environmental issues. An effort has been made to identify potential environmental problems that may be encountered based upon current knowledge, proposed and possible new environmental regulations, and the uncertainties inherent in planned environmental research

  4. Configuration control during plant outages. A review of operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinador Veira, Miguel; El Kanbi, Semir [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Petten (Netherlands). Inst. for Energy and Transport; Stephan, Jean-Luc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Martens, Johannes [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    After the occurrence of several significant events in nuclear power plants during shut-down modes of operation in the eighties, and from the results of probabilistic safety assessments completed in the nineties, it was clear that risk from low power and shutdown operational modes could not be neglected and had to be addressed by appropriate safety programs. A comprehensive review of operating experience from the last ten years has been conducted by the Joint Research Centre with the objective of deriving lessons learned and recommendations useful for nuclear regulatory bodies and utilities alike. This paper is focused on one particular challenge that any nuclear plant faces whenever it plans its next outage period: how to manage the configuration of all systems under a complex environment involving numerous concurrent activities, and how to make sure that systems are returned to their valid configuration before the plant resumes power operation. This study highlights the importance of conveying accurate but synthesized information on the status of the plant to the operators in the main control room. Many of the lessons learned are related to the alarm display in the control room and to the use of check lists to control the status of systems. Members of the industry and safety authorities may now use these recommendations and lessons learned to feed their own operating experience feedback programs, and check their applicability for specific sites.

  5. Military Readiness: DODs Readiness Rebuilding Efforts May Be at Risk without a Comprehensive Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    specific elements that are to be in strategic plans. 8Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Guide 3401D, CJCS Guide to the Chairman’s Readiness ...all its major functions and operations. DOD strategic guidance makes it clear that rebuilding readiness is a priority that supports the... readiness recovery efforts. Evaluations of the plan to monitor goals and objectives Assessments, through objective measurement and systematic

  6. Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection

  7. Operating System Concepts for Reconfigurable Computing: Review and Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Eckert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key future challenges for reconfigurable computing is to enable higher design productivity and a more easy way to use reconfigurable computing systems for users that are unfamiliar with the underlying concepts. One way of doing this is to provide standardization and abstraction, usually supported and enforced by an operating system. This article gives historical review and a summary on ideas and key concepts to include reconfigurable computing aspects in operating systems. The article also presents an overview on published and available operating systems targeting the area of reconfigurable computing. The purpose of this article is to identify and summarize common patterns among those systems that can be seen as de facto standard. Furthermore, open problems, not covered by these already available systems, are identified.

  8. IAEA Operational Safety Team Reviews Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear installation safety experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reviewed operational safety at France's Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) noting a series of good practices as well as recommendations and suggestions to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled an international team of experts at the request of the Government of France to conduct an Operational Safety Review (OSART) of Cattenom NPP. Under the leadership of the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety in Vienna, the OSART team performed an in-depth operational safety review of the plant from 14 November to 1 December 2011. The team was made up of experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Russia, Slovakia, South Africa, Sweden, Ukraine, the United Kingdom and the IAEA. The team at Cattenom conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the NPP, which is largely under the control of the site management. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training and Qualification; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry; Emergency Planning and Preparedness; and Severe Accident Management. Cattenom is the first plant in Europe to voluntarily undertake a Severe Accident Management review during an OSART review. The OSART team has identified good plant practices, which will be shared with the rest of the nuclear industry for consideration of their application. Examples include: Sheets are displayed in storage areas where combustible material is present - these sheets are updated readily and accurately by the area owner to ensure that the fire limits are complied with; A simple container is attached to the neutron source handling device to ensure ease and safety of operations and reduce possible radiation exposure during use

  9. Some Thoughts on Systematic Reading Readiness Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palardy, J. Michael

    1984-01-01

    Examines four specific areas of reading readiness--visual discrimination, visual memory, auditory discrimination, and auditory comprehension--and reviews teaching strategies in each of the four areas. (FL)

  10. Review and updates of the risk assessment for advanced test reactor operations for operating events and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Annual or biannual reviews of the operating history of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been conducted for the purpose of reviewing and updating the ATR probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for operating events and operating experience since the first compilation of plant- specific experience data for the ATR PSA which included data for operation from initial power operation in 1969 through 1988. This technical paper briefly discusses the means and some results of these periodic reviews of operating experience and their influence on the ATR PSA

  11. Columbia River system operation review. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930's, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D'Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

  12. Independent technical review of the Hanford Tank Farm Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Independent Technical Assessment of the Hanford Tank Farm Operations was commissioned by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management on November 1, 1991. The Independent Technical Assessment team conducted on-site interviews and inspections during the following periods: November 18 to 22,1991; April 13 to 17; and April 27 to May 1, 1992. Westinghouse Hanford Company is the management and operating contractor for the Department of Energy at the Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Farm Operations consists of 177 underground storage tanks containing 61 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed wastes from the chemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The Tank Farm Operations also includes associated transfer lines, ancillary equipment, and instrumentation. The Independent Technical Assessment of the Hanford Tank Farm Operations builds upon the prior assessments of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System and the Hanford Site Tank Waste Disposal Strategy.The objective of this technical assessment was to determine whether an integrated and sound program exists to manage the tank-waste storage and tankfarm operations consistent with the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management's guidance of overall risk minimization. The scope of this review includes the organization, management, operation, planning, facilities, and mitigation of the safety-concerns of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System. The assessments presented in the body of this report are based on the detailed observations discussed in the appendices. When the assessments use the term ''Hanford'' as an organizational body it means DOE-RL and Westinghouse Hanford Company as a minimum, and in many instances all of the stake holders for the Hanford site

  13. Review of trends in computerized systems for operator support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cain, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The major trends shaping the development of computerized operator support systems in nuclear power plants are reviewed. These trends are the result of prior research in disturbance analysis systems that provided the technology base, and the SPDS requirement, which has been the impetus for change. The process is expected to result in hybrid control rooms with computer-driven supervisory workstations that complement conventional control board lay-outs. In the next three to five year period substantial upgrading of computer hardware will allow new and more sophisticated applications routines to be developed for operator support. Greater attention is being given to on-line validation of input signals for computer applications. A general movement towards operating strategies that are not based upon pre-analyzed event sequences is expected to influence the development of operator aids. The integration of displays with operating procedures will enable the computer system to a better coupling between problem detection and its resolution. Improved design methodology will assure that computer applications are accepted and used by operations personnel. Greater on-line analysis capability is stimulating the trend towards more on-site analysis and decision-making at nuclear power plants. Software standardization reflects the high cost of software development and the desire by utilities to gain greater independence from suppliers. There is growing realization that control rooms are beset by many of the demands and limitations of other office settings and that some of these may be addressed by the burgeoning office automation technology. Trends beyond the next five years are difficult to predict; however, there will be a trend towards more intelligent software. Artificial intelligence technology may play a pivotal role in future applications. Taking these trends into perspective, the author concludes that a promising future exists for computerized operator support in nuclear

  14. Vacuum system operating experience review for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents a review of vacuum system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, space simulation chamber, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of vacuum system component failure rates and accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with vacuum systems are discussed, including personnel safety, foreign material intrusion, and factors relevant to vacuum systems being the primary confinement boundary for tritium and activated dusts. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  15. A modern review of the operative management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan C; Abeywardina, Shannon; Farrell, James J; Reber, Howard A; Hines, O Joe

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating disease resulting in pain, intestinal malabsorption, endocrine dysfunction, and poor quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to analyze surgical outcomes for patients with chronic pancreatitis. Data for patients undergoing operations for chronic pancreatitis between 1990 and 2009 were reviewed. Demographics, operative and perioperative data, and survival were catalogued. QoL was determined (Short Form 36 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire + PAN-26) and compared with historical controls. The mean age was 51 +/- 2 years, 38 patients were male (53%), the most common indication was pain (71%), the etiology of pancreatitis often was alcohol, and most patients underwent a Whipple procedure (56%). Operative time was 316 +/- 17 minutes and blood loss was 363 +/- 75 mL. There were 34 complications in 30 patients (42%) and one death. QoL surveys were administered for 25 of 55 (45%) surviving patients at a mean follow-up of 72 +/- 16 months. Mean survival was 99 +/- 9 months, whereas 5- and 10-year survival were 86 and 75 per cent. QoL scores were uniformly better than historical controls. Our data demonstrate that operations for chronic pancreatitis can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Patients have excellent survival and improved QoL compared with historical controls. Surgery is an effective and durable treatment option for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Getting a technology-based diabetes intervention ready for prime time: a review of usability testing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Courtney R; Sarkar, Urmimala; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2014-10-01

    Consumer health technologies can educate patients about diabetes and support their self-management, yet usability evidence is rarely published even though it determines patient engagement, optimal benefit of any intervention, and an understanding of generalizability. Therefore, we conducted a narrative review of peer-reviewed articles published from 2009 to 2013 that tested the usability of a web- or mobile-delivered system/application designed to educate and support patients with diabetes. Overall, the 23 papers included in our review used mixed (n = 11), descriptive quantitative (n = 9), and qualitative methods (n = 3) to assess usability, such as documenting which features performed as intended and how patients rated their experiences. More sophisticated usability evaluations combined several complementary approaches to elucidate more aspects of functionality. Future work pertaining to the design and evaluation of technology-delivered diabetes education/support interventions should aim to standardize the usability testing processes and publish usability findings to inform interpretation of why an intervention succeeded or failed and for whom.

  17. Design/Operations review of core sampling trucks and associated equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, H.P.

    1996-01-01

    A systematic review of the design and operations of the core sampling trucks was commissioned by Characterization Equipment Engineering of the Westinghouse Hanford Company in October 1995. The review team reviewed the design documents, specifications, operating procedure, training manuals and safety analysis reports. The review process, findings and corrective actions are summarized in this supporting document

  18. Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

  19. THE STUDY OF INDONESIA’S READINESS TO COPE WITH DEMOGRAPHIC BONUS: A REVIEW OF POPULATION LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edie Toet Hendratno

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The shift from a population mapping to investigate the population bonus on demographic aspect enhances the economic value this study might contribute for. Indonesian population as the fourth largest number requires some policies to cope with the millennium challenges. Improving nationwide database maintains government on-going strategy to manage its population that is expected to serve all stakeholders for any quest towards economic development. The study uses mixed method with the explanatory sequential strategy. The qualitative approach is used, using social network analysis, supported by desk study, in-depth interview, focus group discussion, and literature studies. This study attempts to provide for improvement to the extant regulations on identity card, mostly electronic-KTP. Demographic bonus is an interesting topic given that the younger the population, the higher the employment demand rate will be. Having systematic database bank and access is expected to alleviate the challenge on high population growth rate in Indonesia. Besides, recommendations are addressed to the policy maker (the Government, mostly on the review or amendment of the extant regulations that might not in line with the database systematic improvements. The study is a primary thesis from a review of population law, using multidisciplinary approach, i.e. population economics (demography, legal study, and public policy that can be used as a testing basis to answer further demographic bonus from an exploration of other scientific inquiries.

  20. Operating room use of hypertonic solutions: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Azoubel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperosmotic-hyperoncotic solutions have been widely used during prehospital care of trauma patients and have shown positive hemodynamic effects. Recently, there has been a growing interest in intra-operative use of hypertonic solutions. We reviewed 30 clinical studies on the use of hypertonic saline solutions during surgeries, with the majority being cardiac surgeries. Reduced positive fluid balance, increased cardiac index, and decreased systemic vascular resistance were the main beneficial effects of using hypertonic solutions in this population. Well-designed clinical trials are highly needed, particularly in aortic aneurysm repair surgeries, where hypertonic solutions have shown many beneficial effects. Examining the immunomodulatory effects of hypertonic solutions should also be a priority in future studies.

  1. Case review analysis of operating room decisions to cancel surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ju-Hsin; Chen, Ke-Wei; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Poon, Kin-Shing; Liu, Shih-Kai

    2014-07-23

    Cancellation of surgery close to scheduled time causes a waste of healthcare resources. The current study analyzes surgery cancellations occurring after the patient has been prepared for the operating room, in order to see whether improvements in the surgery planning process may reduce the number of cancellations. In a retrospective chart review of operating room surgery cancellations during the period from 2006 to 2011, cancellations were divided into the following categories: inadequate NPO; medical; surgical; system; airway; incomplete evaluation. The relative use of these reasons in relation to patient age and surgical department was then evaluated. Forty-one percent of cancellations were for other than medical reasons. Among these, 17.7% were due to incomplete evaluation, and 8.2% were due to family issues. Sixty seven percent of cancelled cases eventually received surgery. The relative use of individual reasons for cancellation varied with patient age and surgical department. The difference between cancellations before and after anesthesia was dependent on the causes of cancellation, but not age, sex, ASA status, or follow-up procedures required. Almost half of the cancellations were not due to medical reasons, and these cancellations could be reduced by better administrative and surgical planning and better communication with the patient and/or his family.

  2. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System Operation Review (SOR) is being conducted jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bonneville Power Administration. This summary of the SOR story begins where the Draft EIS summary left off. It is divided into seven parts, each of which reports some aspect of the study's outcome: Part 1 is a history. The SOR was not a simple study on any level, and to understand the EIS alternatives, some background is necessary. Part 2 reports the major findings of the technical analysis of alternative system operating strategies, and presents the agencies' Preferred Alternative. Part 3 explains actions the agencies may take with respect to the Columbia River Regional Forum, the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement, and the Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements. Part 4 presents the Purpose and Need, elements at the core of any Federal EIS. It includes a map showing the Columbia River Basin and information on the affected Federal projects. Part 5 describes the substantial public participation and outreach that occurred during the SOR, and Part 6 summarizes efforts to incorporate the Tribal perspective into the study. Part 7 describes other activities that will be taking place in the next few years, which are related to and build upon the SOR

  3. International military operations and mental health--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Noora M; Laukkala, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Volunteering in international military missions has been scrutinized for its effects on mental health. Different kinds of exposures to traumatic events are associated with a variety of mental disorders, mainly heightened rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol abuse. Based on the literature we discuss risk and protective factors concerning the psychological well-being of soldiers attending to international military operations. A systematic literature search was carried out using relevant search terms to identify the articles for this review. The ability to recognize and treat acute stress reactions during deployments is important. Post-deployment psychosocial support and services have a role in lowering barriers to care, diminishing stigma and also in recognizing individuals who suffer from psychological distress or psychiatric symptoms, to connect them with appropriate care. Further investigation of gender differences and the role of stigmatization is warranted. Most of those participating in international military operations are repatriated without problems, but repeated exposure to combat situations and other stressors may affect mental health in various ways. Stigmatization is still a barrier to care.

  4. Analyses of odours from concentrated animal feeding operations: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, P.; Pifferi, V.; Falciola, L.; Ferrante, V.

    2018-02-01

    Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) are widely present all over the world due to the high population demand for food and products of animal origin. However, they have generated several environmental concerns, including odour nuisance, which affects people health and quality of life. Odours from livestock are a very complex mixtures of molecules and their analytical investigation is highly demanding. Many works have been published regarding the study of odours from CAFOs, using different techniques and technologies to face the issue. Thus, the aim of this review paper is to summarize all the ways to study odours from CAFOs, starting from the sampling methods and then treating in general the principles of Dynamic Olfactometry, Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Noses. Finally, a deep literature summary of Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Noses applied to odours coming from poultry, dairy and swine feeding operations is reported. This work aims to make some order in this field and it wants to help future researchers to deal with this environmental problem, constituting a state-of-the-art in this field.

  5. Methodological frontier in operational analysis for roundabouts: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Giuffre'

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies and researches have shown that modern roundabouts are safe and effective as engineering countermeasures for traffic calming, and they are now widely used worldwide. The increasing use of roundabouts and, more recently, turbo and flower roundabouts, has induced a great variety of experiences in the field of intersection design, traffic safety and capacity modelling. As for unsignalized intersections which represent the starting point to extend knowledge about the operational analysis to roundabouts, the general situation in capacity estimation is still characterized by the discussion between gap acceptance models and empirical regression models. However, capacity modelling must contain both the analytical construction and then solution of the model, and the implementation of driver behavior. Thus, issues on a realistic modelling of driver behavior by the parameters that are included into the models are always of interest for practioners and analysts in transportation and road infrastructure engineering. Based on these considerations, this paper presents a literature review about the key methodological issues in the operational analysis of modern roundabouts. Focus is made on the aspects associated with the gap acceptance behavior, the derivation of the analytical-based models and the calculation of parameters included into the capacity equations, as well as steady state and non-steady state conditions and uncertainty in entry capacity estimation. At last, insights on future developments of the research in this field of investigation will be also outlined.

  6. A systematic review of the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational readiness to change and the process of innovation adoption in substance misuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Hegarty, Josephine; Barry, Joe; Dyer, Kyle R; Horgan, Aine

    2017-09-01

    Translating innovation, such as contemporary research evidence, into policy and practice is a challenge, not just in substance misuse treatment programs, but across all spheres of healthcare. Organizational readiness to change (ORC) has been described as a fundamental concept, and an important determinant of the process of innovation adoption. The aim of this review was to describe the relationship between staff perceptions of ORC and the process of innovation adoption: exposure, adoption, implementation and integration into practice, in substance misuse treatment programs. This systematic review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines and fourteen papers were identified as being eligible for inclusion. This review was designed to include all constructs of ORC, but only one tool was used in all of the included papers. Despite this, the heterogeneity of studies in this review made a direct comparison of ORC related variables challenging. None of the included papers clearly related to one stage of the process of innovation adoption, and all of the included papers related to the early stages of the process. Only one paper attempted to measure the sustained integration of an innovation into practice. Overall, the papers were assessed as being low in terms of evidential hierarchy and the quality of the papers was assessed as being on average fair. ORC measurements provide us with a measure of organizational functioning which can be important in terms of predicting how successfully new innovations are adopted. Motivation for change was high in programs where staff identified more program deficits and these staff could also identify more specific needs, but were less likely to have exposure to new innovations. Better program resources and specific staff attributes, increase the likely hood of successful innovation adoption. A good organizational climate is potentially the strongest predictor for the adoption of new practices. It may be beneficial to measure ORC

  7. Are project managers ready for the 21th challenges? A review of problem structuring methods for decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Mateo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous contemporary problems that project managers face today can be considered as unstructured decision problems characterized by multiple actors and perspectives, incommensurable and/or conflicting objectives, and important intangibles. This work environment demands that project managers possess not only hard skills but also soft skills with the ability to take a management perspective and, above all, develop real leadership capabilities. In this paper, a family of problem structured methods for decision support aimed at assisting project managers in tackling complex problems are presented. Problem structured methods are a family of soft operations research methods for decision support that assist groups of diverse composition to agree a problem focus and make commitments to consequential action. Project management programs are challenged to implement these methodologies in such a way that it is organized around the key competences that a project manager needs in order to be more effective, work efficiently as members of interdisciplinary teams and successfully execute even a small project.

  8. LHCf: ready to go

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Reinstalled in the tunnel at the end of 2014, the two detectors of the LHCf experiment are now ready for operation. The first data should be taken in May.   LHCf’s Arm1 detector. The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment measures neutral particles emitted at nearly zero degrees from the proton beam direction. Because these "very forward" particles carry a large fraction of the collision energy, they are important for understanding the development of atmospheric air-shower phenomena produced by high-energy cosmic rays. To measure these particles, two detectors, Arm1 and Arm2, sit along the LHC beamline, at 140 metres either side of the ATLAS collision point. In July 2010, after a 9-month operation, the LHCf collaboration removed the two detectors from the tunnel to avoid severe radiation damage. The Arm2 detector was reinstalled in the tunnel for data-taking with proton–lead collisions in 2013, while Arm1 was being upgraded to be a radiation-ha...

  9. Readiness for Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a comparative analysis between workers in healthcare with high and low degree of readiness for living technology such as robotics. To explore the differences among workers’ readiness for robotics in healthcare, statistical analysis was conducted in the data set obtained from 200...

  10. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  11. Electricity market readiness plan : Ontario Energy Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    This document informs electric power market participants of the Ontario Energy Board's newly developed market readiness plan and target timelines that local distribution companies (LDCs) must meet for retail marketing. The Ontario Energy Board's plan incorporates relevant independent market operator (IMO)-administered market milestones with retail market readiness targeted for September 2001. The market readiness framework involves a self-certification process for LDCs by August 10, 2001, through which the Board will be able to monitor progress and assess the feasibility of meeting the target timelines. For retail market readiness, all LDCs will have to calculate settlement costs, produce unbundled bills, provide standard supply service, change suppliers and accommodate retail transactions. LDCs must be either authorized participants in the IMO-administered market or become retail customers of their host LDC. Unbundled bills will include itemized charges for energy price, transmission, distribution and debt retirement charge. 1 tab., 1 fig

  12. Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

  13. 7 CFR 3415.10 - Establishment and operation of peer review groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment and operation of peer review groups... ASSESSMENT RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Scientific Peer Review of Research Grant Applications § 3415.10 Establishment and operation of peer review groups. Subject to § 3415.5, the Administrator shall adopt procedures...

  14. 7 CFR 3400.10 - Establishment and operation of peer review groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment and operation of peer review groups... GRANTS PROGRAM Scientific Peer Review of Research Grant Applications § 3400.10 Establishment and operation of peer review groups. Subject to § 3400.5, the Administrator will adopt procedures for the...

  15. 7 CFR 3401.12 - Establishment and operation of peer review groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment and operation of peer review groups... GRANTS PROGRAM Scientific Peer Review of Research Applications for Funding § 3401.12 Establishment and operation of peer review groups. Subject to § 3401.7, the Administrator will adopt procedures for the...

  16. 7 CFR 3411.10 - Establishment and operation of peer review groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment and operation of peer review groups... INITIATIVE COMPETITIVE GRANTS PROGRAM Scientific Peer Review of Research Grant Applications § 3411.10 Establishment and operation of peer review groups. Subject to § 3411.5, the Administrator shall adopt procedures...

  17. 42 CFR 52h.3 - Establishment and operation of peer review groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Establishment and operation of peer review groups... GRANTS SCIENTIFIC PEER REVIEW OF RESEARCH GRANT APPLICATIONS AND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTRACT PROJECTS § 52h.3 Establishment and operation of peer review groups. (a) To the extent applicable, the...

  18. SALTO Peer Review Guidelines. Guidelines for Peer Review of Safety Aspects of Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    International peer review is a useful tool for Member States to exchange experiences, learn from each other and apply good practices in the long term operation (LTO) of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The peer review is also an important mechanism through which the IAEA supports Member States in enhancing the safety of NPPs. The IAEA has conducted various types of safety review that indirectly address aspects of LTO, including safety reviews for design, engineering, operation and external hazards. Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) services include review of ageing management programmes. In addition, several Member States have requested Ageing Management Assessment Team (AMAT) missions. Through these experiences, it was recognized that a comprehensive peer review on LTO would be very useful to Member States. The Safety Aspects of Long Term Operation (SALTO) peer review addresses strategy and key elements for the safe LTO of NPPs, which includes AMAT objectives and complements OSART reviews. The SALTO peer review is designed to assist operating organizations in adopting a proper approach to LTP including implementing appropriate activities to ensure that plant safety will be maintained during the LTO period. The SALTO peer review can be tailored to focus on ageing management programmes (AMPs) or on other activities related to LTO to support the Member State in enhancing the safety of its NPPs. The SALTO peer review can also support regulators in establishing or improving regulatory and licensing strategies for the LTO of NPPs. The guidelines in this publication are primarily intended for members of a SALTO review team and provide a basic structure and common reference for peer reviews of LTO. Additionally, the guidelines also provide useful information to the operating organizations of NPPs (or technical support organizations) for carrying out their own self-assessments or comprehensive programme reviews. The guidelines are intended to be generic, as there are

  19. Protective lung ventilation in operating room: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futier, E; Constantin, J M; Jaber, S

    2014-06-01

    Postoperative pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications adversely affect clinical outcomes and healthcare utilization, so that prevention has become a measure of the quality of perioperative care. Mechanical ventilation is an essential support therapy to maintain adequate gas exchange during general anesthesia for surgery. Mechanical ventilation using high tidal volume (VT) (between 10 and 15 mL/kg) has been historically encouraged to prevent hypoxemia and atelectasis formation in anesthetized patients undergoing abdominal and thoracic surgery. However, there is accumulating evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that mechanical ventilation, especially the use of high VT and plateau pressure, may potentially aggravate or even initiate lung injury. Ventilator-associated lung injury can result from cyclic alveolar overdistension of non-dependent lung tissue, and repetitive opening and closing of dependent lung tissue resulting in ultrastructural damage at the junction of closed and open alveoli. Lung-protective ventilation, which refers to the use of lower VT and limited plateau pressure to minimize overdistension, and positive end-expiratory pressure to prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration, was shown to improve outcome in critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been recently suggested that this approach might also be beneficial in a broader population, especially in critically ill patients without ARDS at the onset of mechanical ventilation. There is, however, little evidence regarding a potential beneficial effect of lung protective ventilation during surgery, especially in patients with healthy lungs. Although surgical patients are frequently exposed to much shorter periods of mechanical ventilation, this is an important gap in knowledge given the number of patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the operating room. This review developed the benefits of lung protective ventilation during surgery

  20. 75 FR 49943 - New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Pipeline System Operator Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Joanna Johnson, Office of Information Technology, TSA-11, Transportation Security... Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Pipeline System Operator Security Information AGENCY: Transportation... System Operator Security Information. Type of Request: New collection. OMB Control Number: Not yet...

  1. Ready-to-eat cereals and the burden of obesity in the context of their nutritional contribution: are all ready-to-eat cereals equally healthy? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosti, Rena I; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Zampelas, Antonis

    2010-12-01

    A significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has occurred worldwide and the importance of considering the role of diet in the prevention and treatment of obesity is widely acknowledged. A growing body of evidence encourages the consumption of ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) as part of a healthful diet. Research has shown an inverse association between the consumption of RTEC and the rate of obesity. However, other findings claim that this association was only attributed to the consumption of whole-grain cereals and not the refined-grain ones. Although meta-analyses of clinical trials support the use of a low-glycaemic index diet on weight loss, findings from other studies on the effect of the dietary glycaemic index on body weight have not been consistent. Thus, further research into the role of glycaemic index in the prevention and management of obesity and chronic disease is needed. Moreover, significant differences have been observed in composition among the marketed RTEC. In light of the revealing protective role of whole-grain, fibre-rich, low-energy-dense and low-glycaemic index/glycaemic load foods against obesity, public health professionals could drive their efforts towards the promotion of even more healthier RTEC when issuing advice on weight management. It seems, however, that despite any differences in their composition, the frequent consumption of RTEC due to their nutritional contribution is recommended in moderation and under the current recommendations in the context of a healthy balanced diet.

  2. Technology Readiness Level Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This guidebook provides the necessary information for conducting a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Assessment. TRL Assessments are a tool for determining the maturity of technologies and identifying next steps in the research process. This guidebook...

  3. Preparing for success: Readiness models for rural telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennett P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Readiness is an integral and preliminary step in the successful implementation of telehealth services into existing health systems within rural communities. Methods and Materials: This paper details and critiques published international peer-reviewed studies that have focused on assessing telehealth readiness for rural and remote health. Background specific to readiness and change theories is provided, followed by a critique of identified telehealth readiness models, including a commentary on their readiness assessment tools. Results: Four current readiness models resulted from the search process. The four models varied across settings, such as rural outpatient practices, hospice programs, rural communities, as well as government agencies, national associations, and organizations. All models provided frameworks for readiness tools. Two specifically provided a mechanism by which communities could be categorized by their level of telehealth readiness. Discussion: Common themes across models included: an appreciation of practice context, strong leadership, and a perceived need to improve practice. Broad dissemination of these telehealth readiness models and tools is necessary to promote awareness and assessment of readiness. This will significantly aid organizations to facilitate the implementation of telehealth.

  4. Review of Operation and Maintenance Support Systems for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Kyungho; Heo, Gyunyoung; Park, Jaekwan

    2014-01-01

    Operation support systems do not directly control the plant but it can aid decision making itself by obtaining and analyzing large amounts of data. Recently, the demand of research reactor is growing and the need for operation support systems is increasing, but it has not been applied for research reactors. This study analyzes operation and maintenance support systems of NPPs and suggests appropriate systems for research reactors based on analysis. In this paper, operation support systems for research reactors are suggested by comparing with those of power reactors. Currently, research reactors do not cover special systems in order to improve safety and operability in comparison with power reactors. Therefore we expect to improve worth to use by introducing appropriate systems for research reactors. In further research, we will develop an appropriate system such as applications or tools that can be applied to the research reactor

  5. 30 CFR 773.9 - Review of applicant, operator, and ownership and control information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operator's organizational structure and ownership or control relationships. (b) We must conduct the review... and control information. 773.9 Section 773.9 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION....9 Review of applicant, operator, and ownership and control information. (a) We, the regulatory...

  6. Systems security and functional readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    In Protective Programming Planning, it is important that every facility or installation be configured to support the basic functions and mission of the using organization. This paper addresses the process of identifying the key functional operations of our facilities in Europe and providing the security necessary to keep them operating in natural and man-made threat environments. Functional Readiness is important since many of our existing facilities in Europe were not constructed to meet the demands of today's requirements. There are increased requirements for real-time systems with classified terminals and stringent access control, tempest and other electronic protection devices. One must prioritize the operations of these systems so that essential functions are provided even when the facilities are affected by overt or covert hostile activities

  7. Independent Quality Control Review of EPA OIG Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The review considers selected audit work performed by EPA OIG, Office of Audit, Congressional and Public Liaison, Mission Systems, and Program Evaluation, during the period for 1 October 2006 through 30 September 2007 .

  8. Operational Risk Management in Financial Institutions: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suren Pakhchanyan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Following the three-pillar structure of the Basel II/III framework, the article categorises and surveys 279 academic papers on operational risk in financial institutions, covering the period from 1998 to 2014. In doing so, different lines of both theoretical and empirical directions for research are identified. In addition, this study provides an overview of existing consortia databases and other publicly available sources on operational loss that may be incorporated into empirical research, as well as in risk measurement processes by financial institutions. Finally, this paper highlights the research gaps in operational risk and outlines recommendations for further research.

  9. Operational risk management in financial institutions: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Pakhchanyan, Suren

    2016-01-01

    Following the three-pillar structure of the Basel II/III framework, the article categorises and surveys 279 academic papers on operational risk in financial institutions, covering the period from 1998 to 2014. In doing so, different lines of both theoretical and empirical directions for research are identified. In addition, this study provides an overview of existing consortia databases and other publicly available sources on operational loss that may be incorporated into empirical research, ...

  10. Operational stressors on physical performance in special operators and countermeasures to improve performance: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Reginald; Henry, Amy; Serres, Jennifer; Russell, Dawn; Locke, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Military training in elite warfighters (e.g., U.S. Army Rangers, Navy SEALs, and U.S. Air Force Battlefield Airmen) is challenging and requires mental and physical capabilities that are akin to that of professional athletes. However, unlike professional athletes, the competitive arena is the battlefield, with winning and losing replaced by either life or death. The rigors of both physical training and prolonged deployments without adequate rest and food intake can compromise physical performance. Therefore, the primary purpose of this effort was to identify occupational stressors on the physical performance of Special Operators during training and while on missions. The secondary purpose was to suggest specific countermeasures to reduce or prevent significant decrements in physical performance and reduce musculoskeletal injuries. A search of the literature for 2000?2012 was performed using the Air Force Institute of Technology search engines (i.e., PubMed and ProQuest). There were 29 articles located and selected that specifically addressed the primary and secondary purposes of this literature review. The remaining 32 of 61 referenced articles were reviewed after initial review of the primary literature. This review indicates that operational stress (e.g., negative energy balance, high-energy expenditure, sleep deprivation, environmental extremes, heavy load carriage, etc.) associated with rigorous training and sustained operations negatively affects hormonal levels, lean muscle mass, and physical performance of Special Operators. The number of musculoskeletal injuries also increases as a result of these stressors. Commanders may use simple field tests to assess physical decrements before and during deployment to effectively plan for missions. Specific countermeasures for these known decrements are lacking in the scientific literature. Therefore, future researchers should focus on studying specific physical training programs, equipment, and other methods to

  11. Capture ready study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minchener, A.

    2007-07-15

    There are a large number of ways in which the capture of carbon as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can be integrated into fossil fuel power stations, most being applicable for both gas and coal feedstocks. To add to the choice of technology is the question of whether an existing plant should be retrofitted for capture, or whether it is more attractive to build totally new. This miscellany of choices adds considerably to the commercial risk of investing in a large power station. An intermediate stage between the non-capture and full capture state would be advantageous in helping to determine the best way forward and hence reduce those risks. In recent years the term 'carbon capture ready' or 'capture ready' has been coined to describe such an intermediate stage plant and is now widely used. However a detailed and all-encompassing definition of this term has never been published. All fossil fuel consuming plant produce a carbon dioxide gas byproduct. There is a possibility of scrubbing it with an appropriate CO{sub 2} solvent. Hence it could be said that all fossil fuel plant is in a condition for removal of its CO{sub 2} effluent and therefore already in a 'capture ready' state. Evidently, the practical reality of solvent scrubbing could cost more than the rewards offered by such as the ETS (European Trading Scheme). In which case, it can be said that although the possibility exists of capturing CO{sub 2}, it is not a commercially viable option and therefore the plant could not be described as ready for CO{sub 2} capture. The boundary between a capture ready and a non-capture ready condition using this definition cannot be determined in an objective and therefore universally acceptable way and criteria must be found which are less onerous and less potentially contentious to assess. 16 refs., 2 annexes.

  12. Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

  13. E-health readiness assessment framework in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well.

  14. E-Health Readiness Assessment Framework in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. Methods: The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. Results: The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). Conclusion: The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well. PMID:23304661

  15. Cooperation between information system development and operations: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erich, Floris; Amrit, Chintan Amrit; Daneva, Maia; Torchiano, M.

    2014-01-01

    Software development can profit from improvements in the deployment and maintenance phases. DevOps improves these phases through a collection of principles and practices, centered around close collaboration between Development and Operations personnel. Both sides have paid little attention to issues

  16. Report on the Payroll System. MORE: Management Operations Review & Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Robert J.; And Others

    Designed to improve the long-term operational efficiency of the Montgomery County, Maryland, Public Schools (MCPS) payroll system, this study begins with an executive summary, including a set of recommendations and a chapter-by-chapter synopsis. Following an introduction to the study and a general description of the payroll system in chapters 1…

  17. Operability design review of prototype large breeder reactor (PLBR) designs. Final report, September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beakes, J.H.; Ehman, J.R.; Jones, H.M.; Kinne, B.V.T.; Price, C.M.; Shores, S.P.; Welch, J.K.

    1981-09-01

    Prototype Large Breeder Reactor (PLBR) designs were reviewed by personnel with extensive power plant operations experience. Fourteen normal and off-normal events, such as startup, shutdown, refueling, reactor scram and loss of feedwater, were evaluated using an operational evaluation methodology which is designed to facilitate talk-through sessions on operational events. Human factors engineers participated in the review and assisted in developing and refining the review methodologies. Operating experience at breeder reactor facilities such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant - Unit 1, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was gathered, analyzed, and used to determine whether lessons learned from operational experience had been incorporated into the PLBR designs. This eighteen month effort resulted in approximately one hundred specific recommendations for improving the operability of PLBR designs

  18. Review of environmental aspects of uranium mill operations: industry's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverly, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Problems faced by uranium mill operators in complying with new environmental regulations and guidelines are discussed. It is pointed out that valid data must be available in order to evaluate impacts on the environment, to determine background radiation levels, to measure the effectiveness of control techniques, and to determine compliance with standards and regulations. Specific problem areas facing mill operators today and some of the unresolved questions include: sampling methods and equipment for radon in ambient air, measurements of radon and radon daughter exposures of people, radon emanation rate meaurements applicable to monitoring mill tailings, the calibration of γ counters, measurements of population doses, regulations concerning mill tailings reclamation nd stabilization, and the comparative value of in-vivo counting and uranium urinary excretion measurements for monitoring personnel

  19. Review of human factors in operator aids development at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sides, W.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Three related Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) projects in the area of human factors in diagnostic aids are described. The goal of the first, sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI RP2184), is to provide guidance to nuclear-utility engineers in the selection and retrofit of computer-generated display systems in nuclear-plant control rooms. The goal of the second, sponsored by the Office of Research of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is to provide the NRC with a preview of some of the operator aids currently under development by industry for the purpose of assessing the applicability of current requirements. The goal of the third, also sponsored by the NRC, is to develop a methodology to determine the proper allocation of function between an operator and an automated system. The status of each project is given, together with the current and expected findings

  20. Review of BNFL's operational experience of wet type flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliam, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL International Transport's operational experience includes shipping 6000te of spent fuel from Japan to Sellafield, through its dedicated terminal at Barrow, and to Cogema La Hague. This fuel was shipped under the PNTL (Pacific Nuclear Transport Ltd) banner for which BNFL is responsible. PNTL owned and operated a fleet of 5 ships for Japanese business and a fleet of 80 wet and 58 dry flasks, for the transport of Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel, from both Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). ''Wet'' or ''dry'' flask is the common terminology used to distinguish between spent fuel flasks transporting fuel where the fuel is immersed in water, or spent fuel flasks that have been drained of water and dried. This paper concentrates on the wet type of flask utilised to transport fuel to Sellafield, that is the Excellox type (including similar type NTL derivatives). It aims to provide a summary of operational experience during handling at power stations, shipment, unloading at reprocessors and from scheduled maintenance

  1. School Readiness Factor Analyzed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Anton; Scott, Leland H.

    This paper is an empirical statistical analysis and interpretation of data relating to school readiness previously examined and reported on a theoretical basis. A total of 118 white, middle class children from six consecutive kindergarten groups in Dearborn, Michigan were tested with seven instruments, evaluated in terms of achievement, ability,…

  2. GIS Readiness Survey 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Lise; Hvingel, Line Træholt; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2014-01-01

    The GIS Readiness Survey 2014 is a follow-up to the corresponding survey that was carried out among public institutions in Denmark in 2009. The present survey thus provides an updated image of status and challenges in relation to the use of spatial information, the construction of the com- mon...

  3. Operating experience review for nuclear power plants in the Systematic Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. This paper describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review portion of the SEP evaluation. SEPB will combine the results from these operational reviews with other safety topic evaluations to perform an integrated assessment of the SEP plants

  4. Review on open source operating systems for internet of things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengmin; Li, Wei; Dong, Huiliang

    2017-08-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) is an environment in which everywhere and every device became smart in a smart world. Internet of Things is growing vastly; it is an integrated system of uniquely identifiable communicating devices which exchange information in a connected network to provide extensive services. IoT devices have very limited memory, computational power, and power supply. Traditional operating systems (OS) have no way to meet the needs of IoT systems. In this paper, we thus analyze the challenges of IoT OS and survey applicable open source OSs.

  5. Long term operation of nuclear power plants – IAEA SALTO peer review service and its results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivanek, Robert, E-mail: r.krivanek@iaea.org

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • SALTO peer review service is designed for reviewing of ageing management and NPPs’ preparedness LTO. • It has been established as an effective tool to review the compliance with IAEA safety standards. • The important issues for safe LTO are being identified by SALTO missions. • Analysis of those issues is provided in the paper. • This peer review service is strongly recommended for NPPs prior to entering LTO period. - Abstract: This paper presents main IAEA activities for safe long term operation (LTO) which includes establishment of IAEA Safety Standards and other LTO related documents, fostering information exchange and establishing databases and provision of SALTO (Safety Aspects of Long Term Operation) peer review service. This paper provides insights into IAEA SALTO peer review service objectives, scope and methodology. The SALTO peer review service was designed to assist nuclear power plant (NPP) operators in adopting a proper approach to LTO of their plants and in implementing complete and appropriate activities to ensure that plant safety will be maintained during the LTO period. The SALTO peer review service can also support regulators in establishing or improving regulatory and licensing strategies for LTO of NPPs. Issues derived from 19 SALTO missions and 2 LTO modules of OSART (Operational Safety Review Team) missions conducted during the period of 2005 to March 2014 are also analyzed in this paper.

  6. Electric fuses operation, a review: 2. Arcing period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussière, W

    2012-01-01

    In the electric fuse operation the arcing period follows immediately the pre-arcing period depicted in Part 1 (Part 1. Pre-arcing period). The transition between these two operation steps is not fully understood at this time. To simplify the beginning of the arcing period can be identified with the electric arc ignition i.e. with the electrodes voltage drop. The consecutive plasma is of metallic type at the beginning of the arcing period and of metallic plus silica type with varying mixture up to the end of the arcing period. The energy brought by the fault current is withdrawn by means of the interaction between the electric arc and the arc quenching material (usually silica sand) whose morphometric properties influence the properties of the plasma column: composition, thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of the plasma column depend on the porosity (and other morphometric properties) of the filler. The fuse element erosion also known as burn-back is responsible for the lengthening of the plasma column and the variations of the electric field. The whole of these processes is depicted by means of experimental results or modellings when possible.

  7. 78 FR 77484 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Pipeline System Operator...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... Officer, Office of Information Technology (OIT), TSA-11, Transportation Security Administration, 601 South... Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Pipeline System Operator Security Information AGENCY... Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has forwarded the Information Collection Request (ICR), Office of...

  8. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix T: Comments and responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. This appendix documents the public and agency review of the SOR Draft EIS and how the SOR agencies used the review to formulate the FINAL EIS. The appendix includes a summary of the review process, a discussion of the nature of the comments, a list of all commentors, reproductions of comment letters, and responses to all comments. Changes in the EIS text in response to comments are noted in the responses

  9. NSSS aging review: critical systems operating measures and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quero, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    How long the nuclear plants can get. In this question we can find three main aspects: Economic - Licensing - and Technical ones. The final answer to this question will include compulsory elements coming from these three areas, each of them being a deciding factor. The presentation is focused on the technical aspect; but before a few comments are done on economic and licensing factors. Then, some particular technical items dealing with aging or life time of our nuclear plants are reviewed: electrical equipment, heat exchangers (steam generators), wear: primary pump, embrittlement: Reactor Pressure Vessel (Austeno-ferritic parts), fatigue (Thermo-hydraulic transients). By the way, some information about how this problem is handled, at the present time, explicitely or implicitely in France are given

  10. Analyzing International Readiness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hamidizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization has different connotations for different social sciences and its social, economic and cultural impacts have been examined by a number of studies. While firms’ internationalization processes have been understood as being dynamic, the concept of international readiness has rarely been the main focus of research efforts, which until a decade ago, focused principally on explaining sequences of entry modes and choices of markets. The emergence of the study of international entrepreneurship has enhanced the role of readiness. This study reviews the concept of international readiness by experimental and theoretical studies. Axioms in this research are based on content analysis. The framework incorporates measures to evaluate SMEs’ international readiness. The paper concludes with a research agenda as a guide for future work on considering the readiness as a critical phase before the internationalization process.

  11. A review of IAEA's technical co-operation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samiei, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Technical Co-operation (TC) Programme is part of the Agency's mandate 'to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' The IAEA's role under this Programme is that of a scientific and technical agency making a discrete but significant contribution to sustainable development goals through the transfer of nuclear science and technology. TC is a high impact programme focusing on development needs with about 800 active projects annually with a budget of over $70M, 30% of which is targeted on training and capacity building in over 100 Member States. Since 1970, over 80,000 scientists and specialists from developing countries have been trained in nuclear science and technology and in nuclear power and safety. A number of trends in the world at large will be likely to influence the Agency's TC programme in the next several years: The use of nuclear technologies in developing countries is growing as local infrastructures improve and technology transfer increases, especially among developing countries; Some countries and institutions are becoming more self-reliant as viable markets develop for nuclear technology, based on an increased awareness of their benefits; As facilities age, safe strategies for life extension and for decommissioning are assuming increasing importance, while there is some renewed positive attention to nuclear power in several parts of the world. Concern is increasing related to the potential for malicious acts involving nuclear facilities or unsecured nuclear and other radioactive material. As the nuclear workforce ages, the management of nuclear knowledge is gaining increasing importance, including the need to maintain the safety and security of nuclear installations and their continued reliable operation. It is difficult to forecast precisely how these trends will influence the assistance requested by Member States, but it is already clear that there will be increased

  12. Dimensions of community and organizational readiness for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Holscher, Jessica; Mumman, Manpreet K; Salgado, Hugo; Keir, Katherine B; Foster-Fishman, Pennie G; Talavera, Gregory A

    2012-01-01

    Readiness can influence whether health interventions are implemented in, and ultimately integrated into, communities. Although there is significant research interest in readiness and capacity for change, the measurement of these constructs is still in its infancy. The purpose of this review was to integrate existing assessment models of community and organizational readiness. The database PubMed was searched for articles; articles, book chapters, and practitioner guides identified as references cited in the list of core articles. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) Empirical research, (2) identified community or organizational readiness for innovative health programming in the study's title, purpose, research questions, or hypotheses, and (3) identified methods to measure these constructs. Duplicate articles were deleted and measures published before 1995 were excluded. The search yielded 150 studies; 13 met all criteria. This article presents the results of a critical review of 13 community and organizational readiness assessment models, stemming from articles, chapters, and practitioner's guides focusing on assessing, developing, and sustaining community and organizational readiness for innovative public health programs. Readiness is multidimensional and different models place emphasis on different components of readiness, such as (1) community and organizational climate that facilitates change, (2) attitudes and current efforts toward prevention, (3) commitment to change, and (4) capacity to implement change. When initiating the program planning process, it is essential to assess these four domains of readiness to determine how they apply to the nuances across different communities. Thus, community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships, in efforts to focus on public health problems, may consider using readiness assessments as a tool for tailoring intervention efforts to the needs of the community.

  13. 40 CFR 26.1603 - Operation of the Human Studies Review Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... appropriate for the scientific and ethical review of human research, including research ethics, biostatistics... scientific and ethical aspects of research proposals and reports of completed research with human subjects... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation of the Human Studies Review...

  14. Bohunice V-1. Review of safety upgrading and operating experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korec, J.; Kuschel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Bohunice site in the Slovak Republic has two Russian-designed twin-unit nuclear power plants, one equipped with reactors of the WWER 440/230 type, the other with type WWER 440/213 reactors. Two older units (V-1) started commercial operation in late 1978 and 1980 respectively and have been supplying electricity to the national grid since that time without any events that could have degraded plant safety level. In the period prior to 1990 the utility Slovenske Elektrarne (S.E.) performed extensive modifications and upgrades to the original design of the two older units V-1 NPP. Furthermore, significant steps in safety improvement for Bohunice NPP V-1 have been made since 1990. Following the political restructuring of the former Czechoslovakia and the country's new open-door policy towards western organizations, several international expert missions were focused on evaluation of Bohunice NPP safety status level and operational reliability, particularly targeting the two older units. Based on recommendations of individual expert missions and complementary deterministic and probabilistic safety analyses performed by S.E., the Czechoslovak Nuclear Regulatory Authority issued the Resolution No. 5/91 defining 81 measures concerning further safety and reliability improvement of Bohunice V1 .A range of short-term and long-term upgrades was prioritised in terms of importance to plant safety and work to implement these measures commenced in the early nineties. During the 'Small Reconstruction' from 1991 to 1993 some of the short term upgrading measures were realized to eliminate the most serious safety deficits, thus to achieve a significant reduction in core damage frequency and a major improvement in confinement integrity. In this paper and presentation the goals of the gradual reconstruction project, basic engineering, detailed engineering and realization, last major stage of Unit 2 upgrade, as well as final stage of Unit 1 upgrade in early 2000 are presented

  15. Systematic review of nonoperative versus operative treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Ramon R; The, Sarah-May M L; Gorter-Stam, Marguerite A W; Eker, Hasan H; Bakx, Roel; van der Lee, Johanna H; Heij, Hugo A

    2017-08-01

    To compare the risk of complications between initial nonoperative treatment and appendectomy of uncomplicated (simple) appendicitis in children. Systematic literature search. Eligible for inclusion were both and randomized controlled trials and cohort studies including children in which the outcome of nonoperative treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis was reported with a minimum follow-up period of one year. Two authors extracted data independently and assessed quality. Primary outcome parameter was the percentage of children experiencing complications. Secondary outcomes were early failures, recurrent appendicitis and appendectomies, for all indications and on request. Five of the 2051 articles screened were eligible for inclusion, including 147 children (nonoperative treatment) and 173 children (appendectomy) with one year follow-up. Percentage of children experiencing complications ranged from 0 to 13% versus 0-17% for nonoperative and appendectomy, respectively. Nonoperative treatment avoided an appendectomy in 62-81% of the children after one year follow-up. The evidence base for initial nonoperative treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis in children is by far insufficient. It suggests that the percentage of patients experiencing complications in the initial nonoperative treatment group is comparable to the appendectomy group, and it may avoid an appendectomy in the large majority of children after one year follow-up. Systematic review. 1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Teenage employment and career readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kaylin M; Staff, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Most American youth hold a job at some point during adolescence, but should they work? This article presents a broad overview of teenage employment in the United States. It begins by describing which teenagers work and for how long and then focuses attention on the consequences (both good and bad) of paid work in adolescence. It then presents recent nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future Study suggesting that limited hours of paid work do not crowd out developmentally appropriate after-school activities. A review of the literature also supports the idea that employment for limited hours in good jobs can promote career readiness and positive development. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of youth work for practitioners and policymakers who are delivering career-related programming. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  17. Review of Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Tools for Verifying Command and Control Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Michael L.; Bonanne, Kevin H.; Favretto, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Maddalena M.; Jones, Stephanie L.; Mackey, Ryan M.; Sarrel, Marc A.; Simpson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Standing Review Board (SRB) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conduct an independent review of the plan developed by Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) for identifying models and emulators to create a tool(s) to verify their command and control software. The NESC was requested to identify any issues or weaknesses in the GSDO plan. This document contains the outcome of the NESC review.

  18. Columbia River system operation review. Final environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes

  19. 78 FR 46255 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear... nuclear power plant. Compliance with the provisions of the rule is required by June 20, 2014. This... environmental effect of renewing the operating license of a nuclear power plant. This document is necessary to...

  20. MIBS breadboard ready for testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijtens, Johan; de Goeij, Bryan; Boslooper, Erik

    2017-11-01

    MIBS is a spectrometer operating in the thermal infrared wavelength region, designed in frame of the phase A study for the ESA EarthCARE mission as part of the multispectral Imaging instrument MSI, which uses a 2D microbolometer array detector in stead of the more common MCT detectors. Utilization of a microbolometer and using an integrated calibration system, results in a sensor with a size and mass reduction of at least an order of magnitude when compared to currently flying instruments with similar spectral resolution. In order to demonstrate feasiblity a breadboard has been designed, which will be build and aligned in 2006 and will be ready for testing the forth quarter of 2006.

  1. Post-operative telephone review is cost-effective and acceptable to patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gray, R T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing selective minor emergency and elective procedures are followed up by a nurse-led structured telephone review six weeks post-operatively in our hospital. Our study objectives were to review patients\\' satisfaction, assess cost-effectiveness and compare our practice with other surgical units in Northern Ireland (NI). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Completed telephone follow-up forms were reviewed retrospectively for a three-year period and cost savings calculated. Fifty patients were contacted prospectively by telephone using a questionnaire to assess satisfaction of this follow-up. A postal questionnaire was sent to 68 general and vascular surgeons in NI, assessing individual preferences for patient follow-up. RESULTS: A total of 1378 patients received a telephone review from September 2005 to September 2008. One thousand one hundred and seventy-seven (85.4%) were successfully contacted, while 201 (14.6%) did not respond despite multiple attempts. One hundred and forty-seven respondents (10.7%) required further outpatient follow-up, thereby saving 1231 outpatient reviews, equivalent to pound41,509 per annum. Thirty-nine (78%) patients expected post-operative follow-up, with 29 (58%) expecting this in the outpatient department. However, all patients were satisfied with the nurse-led telephone review. Fifty-three (78%) consultants responded. Those who always, or occasionally, review patients post-operatively varies according to the operation performed, ranging from 2.2% appendicectomy patients to 40.0% for varicose vein surgery. CONCLUSION: Current practice in NI varies, but a significant proportion of patients are not routinely reviewed. This study confirmed that patients expect post-operative follow-up. A nurse-led telephone review service is acceptable to patients, cost-effective and reduces the number of unnecessary outpatient reviews.

  2. K-Reactor readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.D.

    1991-01-01

    This document describes some of the more significant accomplishments in the reactor restart program and details the magnitude and extent of the work completed to bring K-Reactor to a state of restart readiness. The discussion of restart achievements is organized into the three major categories of personnel, programs, and plant. Also presented is information on the scope and extent of internal and external oversight of the efforts, as well as some details on the startup plan

  3. The impact of interventions to promote healthier ready-to-eat meals (to eat in, to take away or to be delivered) sold by specific food outlets open to the general public: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier-Brown, F C; Summerbell, C D; Moore, H J; Routen, A; Lake, A A; Adams, J; White, M; Araujo-Soares, V; Abraham, C; Adamson, A J; Brown, T J

    2017-02-01

    Ready-to-eat meals sold by food outlets that are accessible to the general public are an important target for public health intervention. We conducted a systematic review to assess the impact of such interventions. Studies of any design and duration that included any consumer-level or food-outlet-level before-and-after data were included. Thirty studies describing 34 interventions were categorized by type and coded against the Nuffield intervention ladder: restrict choice = trans fat law (n = 1), changing pre-packed children's meal content (n = 1) and food outlet award schemes (n = 2); guide choice = price increases for unhealthier choices (n = 1), incentive (contingent reward) (n = 1) and price decreases for healthier choices (n = 2); enable choice = signposting (highlighting healthier/unhealthier options) (n = 10) and telemarketing (offering support for the provision of healthier options to businesses via telephone) (n = 2); and provide information = calorie labelling law (n = 12), voluntary nutrient labelling (n = 1) and personalized receipts (n = 1). Most interventions were aimed at adults in US fast food chains and assessed customer-level outcomes. More 'intrusive' interventions that restricted or guided choice generally showed a positive impact on food-outlet-level and customer-level outcomes. However, interventions that simply provided information or enabled choice had a negligible impact. Interventions to promote healthier ready-to-eat meals sold by food outlets should restrict choice or guide choice through incentives/disincentives. Public health policies and practice that simply involve providing information are unlikely to be effective. © 2016 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  4. Quality and Operations Management in Food Supply Chains: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a literature review on quality and operations management problems in food supply chains. In food industry, the quality of the food products declines over time and should be addressed in the supply chain operations management. Managing food supply chains with operations management methods not only generates economic benefit, but also contributes to environmental and social benefits. The literature on this topic has been burgeoning in the past few years. Since 2005, more than 100 articles have been published on this topic in major operations research and management science journals. In this literature review, we concentrate on the quantitative models in this research field and classify the related articles into four categories, that is, storage problems, distribution problems, marketing problems, and food traceability and safety problems. We hope that this review serves as a reference for interested researchers and a starting point for those who wish to explore it further.

  5. Periodic safety review of operational nuclear power plants. A publication within the NUSS programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide which supplements the IAEA Safety Fundamentals: The Safety of Nuclear Installations and the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, forms part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes and Guides relating to nuclear power plants. A list of NUSS publications is given at the end of this book. This Guide was drafted on the basis of a systematic review approach that was endorsed by the IAEA Conference on the Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on the conduct of Periodic Safety Reviews (PSRs) for an operational nuclear power plant. The Guide is directed at both owners/operators and regulators. This Safety Guide deals with the PSR of an operational nuclear power plant. A PSR is a comprehensive safety review addressing all important aspects of safety, carried out at regular intervals. 22 refs, 4 figs

  6. Operational safety review programmes for nuclear power plants. Guidelines for assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA has been offering the Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme to provide advice and assistance to Member States in enhancing the operational safety of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Simultaneously, the IAEA has encouraged self-assessment and review by Member States of their own nuclear power plants to continuously improve nuclear safety. Currently, some utilities have been implementing safety review programmes to independently review their own plants. Corporate or national operational safety review programmes may be compliance or performance based. Successful utilities have found that both techniques are necessary to provide assurance that (i) as a minimum the NPP meets specific corporate and legal requirements and (ii) management at the NPP is encouraged to pursue continuous improvement principles. These programmes can bring nuclear safety benefits to the plants and utilities. The IAEA has conducted two pilot missions to assess the effectiveness of the operational review programme. Based on these missions and on the experience gained during OSART missions, this document has been developed to provide guidance on and broaden national/corporate safety review programmes in Member States, and to assist in maximizing their benefits. These guidelines are intended primarily for the IAEA team to conduct assessment of a national/corporate safety review programme. However, this report may also be used by a country or utility to establish its own national/corporate safety review programme. The guidelines may likewise be used for self-assessment or for establishing a baseline when benchmarking other safety review programmes. This report consists of four parts. Section 2 addresses the planning and preparation of an IAEA assessment mission and Sections 3 and 4 deal with specific guidelines for conducting the assessment mission itself

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix L: Soils, geology and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. This appendix addresses the study of geology, soils, and groundwater concerns relative to the System Operation Review (SOR). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the study, scope, and process for this resource area. In order, the respective sections of this chapter discuss the relevant issues for the study, and the means by which the SOR team carried out the study

  8. Operating experience review -- Conduct of operations at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This research examined human error related occurrences, reported in the ORPS database, for the purpose of identifying weaknesses in the implementation of the guidance regarding the Conduct of Operations contained in DOE 5480.19. Specifically, this research examined three separate samples of occurrence reports from Defense Program facilities, which cited human error as a direct or contributing cause. These reports were evaluated using a coding scheme which incorporated the guidelines present in 5480.19, as well as a number of generic human factors concerns. The second chapter of this report summarizes the coding scheme which was used to evaluate the occurrence reports. Since the coding scheme is quite lengthy, only the parts of the scheme needed to make the remainder of the report clear are included in this chapter. Details on the development and content of the coding scheme are reported in Appendices A, B, and C. Chapter 3 presents the analysis of three different data sets. This chapter demonstrates that similar results were obtained across different data sets, collected at different points in time, and coded by different raters. The implications of the results obtained in Chapter 3 are discussed in Chapter 4. This chapter makes a number of suggestions for reducing the problems found in the occurrence reports. Chapter 5 applies the methodology that has been developed in this report to two facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Finally, Chapter 6 reiterates the major findings of this report. Several additional analyses appear in appendices at the end of this report

  9. Readiness to proceed: Characterization planning basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes characterization requirements, data availability, and data acquisition plans in support of the Phase 1 Waste Feed Readiness to Proceed Mid-Level Logic. It summarizes characterization requirements for the following program planning documents: Waste Feed Readiness Mid-Level Logic and Decomposition (in development); Master blue print (not available); Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Operations and Utilization Plan and Privatization Contract; Enabling assumptions (not available); Privatization low-activity waste (LAW) Data Quality Objective (DQO); Privatization high-level waste (HLW) DQO (draft); Problem-specific DQOs (in development); Interface control documents (draft). Section 2.0 defines the primary objectives for this report, Section 3.0 discusses the scope and assumptions, and Section 4.0 identifies general characterization needs and analyte-specific characterization needs or potential needs included in program documents and charts. Section 4.0 also shows the analyses that have been conducted, and the archive samples that are available for additional analyses. Section 5.0 discusses current plans for obtaining additional samples and analyses to meet readiness-to-proceed requirements. Section 6.0 summarizes sampling needs based on preliminary requirements and discusses other potential characterization needs. Many requirements documents are preliminary. In many cases, problem-specific DQOs have not been drafted, and only general assumptions about the document contents could be obtained from the authors. As a result, the readiness-to-proceed characterization requirements provided in this document are evolving and may change

  10. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS 'B' operation for the year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The operation of the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'B' is monitored and licensing requirements are enforced by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), which observes operation of the reactors, conducts audits, witnesses important activities, reviews station documentation and reports, and issue approvals, where appropriate, in accordance with licence conditions. This report records the conclusions of the AECB staff assessment of Bruce NGS 'B' during 1989. In general, the station operated within acceptable safety standards. Quality improvement initiatives started in 1989 should lead to improved station maintenance and operation in coming years. Ontario Hydro still needs to improve the administration of operating memos, deficiency reports and call-ups. Station management must ensure that shift supervisors and reactor first operators operate the station in a conservative manner at all times and put safety interests first when responding to a unit upset. (2 tabs.)

  11. Measuring readiness for entrepreneurship: An information tool proposal

    OpenAIRE

    Alicia Coduras; José Manuel Saiz-Alvarez; Jesús Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    A profound review of the literature on entrepreneurship reveals that it does not exist a specific information tool to measure the individuals’ readiness for entrepreneurship. The purpose of this research has been building such kind of instrument to estimate the individuals’ readiness for entrepreneurship. Its design takes in consideration the inclusion of the main variables identified by the literature as those most associated with entrepreneurial profiles. These variables have been grouped i...

  12. Defensive Operations in a Decisive Action Training Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Operations in a Decisive Action Training Environment Christopher L. Vowels W. Anthony Scroggins U.S. Army Research Institute Captain Kyle T...Daniels Master Sergeant Paul M. Volino Joint Readiness Training Center July 2017 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...for distribution: MICHELLE SAMS Director Technical review by Dr. William R. Bickley, U.S. Army Research

  13. Prolonged Operative Duration Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Chen, Brian Po-Han; Soleas, Ireena M; Ferko, Nicole C; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) across surgical procedures, specialties, and conditions is reported to vary from 0.1% to 50%. Operative duration is often cited as an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for SSI. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an in-depth understanding of the relation between operating time and SSI. This review included 81 prospective and retrospective studies. Along with study design, likelihood of SSI, mean operative times, time thresholds, effect measures, confidence intervals, and p values were extracted. Three meta-analyses were conducted, whereby odds ratios were pooled by hourly operative time thresholds, increments of increasing operative time, and surgical specialty. Pooled analyses demonstrated that the association between extended operative time and SSI typically remained statistically significant, with close to twice the likelihood of SSI observed across various time thresholds. The likelihood of SSI increased with increasing time increments; for example, a 13%, 17%, and 37% increased likelihood for every 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min of surgery, respectively. On average, across various procedures, the mean operative time was approximately 30 min longer in patients with SSIs compared with those patients without. Prolonged operative time can increase the risk of SSI. Given the importance of SSIs on patient outcomes and health care economics, hospitals should focus efforts to reduce operative time.

  14. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready.…

  15. Proposal of performance indicators/model for Operational Readiness Verification (ORV) at restart after a planned shutdown; Framtagning av bedoemningsfaktorer/modell foer utvaerdering av driftklarhetsverifiering (DKV) infoer uppstart efter revisionsavstaellning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollnagel, Erik; Nygren, Magnus [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Computer and Information Science

    2005-12-15

    analysis of the 323-event. This leads to a proposal of an ORV-model based on the concept of maintaining control. According to this, it is essential that an organisation (a system) knows how to respond (reaction), knows what to look for (observation, attention), and knows what to anticipate (prediction). While an organisation must possess those qualities to respond to an incident in the short term, a regulator must assess the organisation possesses those qualities in the long term. In terms of performance indicators, ten Common Performance Conditions are proposed. Each is assessed with regard to whether it can be the basis of practical measurements and whether it can be used concretely to induce an improvement to operational readiness. The re-analysis of the nine ORV events suggested that adequacy of organisation, adequacy of training and experience, availability of procedures and plans, and available time would be the most important performance indicators. Further work should look into detailed measurement methods, evaluation criteria, and means of intervention all based on an explicit model of safety as an organisational function.

  16. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix P: Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The purpose of this technical appendix is to provide the environmental review necessary to enter into agreements regarding the distribution between Federal and non-Federal project owners with respect to delivery of the Canadian Entitlement obligation to Canada for the period 1998 through 2024

  17. Review of operating experience at the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Facility, 1963-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    This report reviews the operation of the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Plant at Technical Area 21 for the period 1964 through 1977. During that period, approximately 1568 kg of plutonium metal, > 99.95% pure, was produced in 653 runs from 1930 kg of metal fabrication scrap, 99% pure. General considerations of the electrorefining process and facility operation and recommendations for further improvement of the process are discussed

  18. Importance of safety review to the safe operation of a nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkerhoff, L.C.

    1978-01-01

    Widely differing standards of construction of nuclear reactors are employed in different countries. Although the reactor vendors, including designers and construction contractors, have a vested interest in safety, the ultimate responsibility for safety rests with the reactor facility operator. Even though governmental agencies, either directly or indirectly, must take a strong lead in developing policies and practices of safe operation, the reactor facility operator must recognize and accept the full responsibility for safe operation of the facility. The policies and practices of safe operation imposed by governmental agencies must help assure the prudent operation and the adequate maintenance of those structures, systems, and components of importance to safety. Since each country has a slightly different philosophy for achieving safety and each vendor utilizes different structures, systems, and components to fulfil this philosophy, it is imperative that the facility operator adequately maintain those engineered safety features and those plant protective systems which have been engineered into achieving the desired levels of safety. An additional method of helping to assure that those structures, systems, and components of importance to safety are prudently operated and adequately maintained is to assign the full safety responsibility for the overall operations of the reactor facility to the operating organization, i.e. assigning a 'line of responsibility' within the reactor facility operator. This assurance can be further strengthened by requiring that the facility operator establish a safety review body that overviews the operation and assures that the operating organization complies with those policies and practices of safe operation which have been imposed on the reactor facility. (author)

  19. PV ready roofing systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The integration of PV technology into roofs of houses has become very popular in the United States, Japan, Germany and The Netherlands. There could be a considerable market in the UK for these systems, given the large number of houses that are projected to be built in the next 10 years, and taking account of increased awareness of energy issues. A significant proportion of the market share of annual installed PV is for solar PV systems installed into homes (currently 15%), this is expected to rise to 23% (900MW) by 2010. The grid connected roof and building mounted facade systems represent the fastest growing market for PV systems in Europe. In conclusion, therefore, innovative approached for fixing PV technology onto roofs have been identified for both domestic roofs and for the commercial sector. With reference to production methodologies within the roofing industry, both approaches should be capable of being designed with PV-ready connections suitable for fixing PV modules at a later date. This will help overcome the key barriers of cost of installation, skills required and the lack of retrofit potential. Based on the results of this project, Sustainable Energy together with PV Systems are keen to take forward the full research and development of PV-ready systems for both the domestic and commercial sectors.

  20. Partnership readiness for community-based participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jeannette O; Newman, Susan D; Meadows, Otha; Cox, Melissa J; Bunting, Shelia

    2012-08-01

    The use of a dyadic lens to assess and leverage academic and community partners' readiness to conduct community-based participatory research (CBPR) has not been systematically investigated. With a lack of readiness to conduct CBPR, the partnership and its products are vulnerable. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the dimensions and key indicators necessary for academic and community partnership readiness to conduct CBPR. Key informant interviews and focus groups (n = 36 participants) were conducted with academic and community participants who had experiences with CBPR partnerships. A 'framework analysis' approach was used to analyze the data and generate a new model, CBPR Partnership Readiness Model. Antecedents of CBPR partnership readiness are a catalyst and mutual interest. The major dimensions of the CBPR Partnership Readiness Model are (i) goodness of fit, (ii) capacity, and (iii) operations. Preferred outcomes are sustainable partnership and product, mutual growth, policy and social and health impact on the community. CBPR partnership readiness is an iterative and dynamic process, partnership and issue specific, influenced by a range of environmental and contextual factors, amenable to change and essential for sustainability and promotion of health and social change in the community.

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix G: Land use and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. The SOR began in early 1990, prior to the filing of petitions for endangered status for several salmon species under the Endangered Species Act. The comprehensive review of Columbia River operations encompassed by the SOR was prompted by the need for Federal decisions to (1) develop a coordinated system operating strategy (SOS) for managing the multiple uses of the system into the 21st century; (2) provide interested parties with a continuing and increased long-term role in system planning (Columbia River Regional Forum); (3) renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA), a contractual arrangement among the region's major hydroelectric-generating utilities and affected Federal agencies to provide for coordinated power generation on the Columbia River system; and (4) renew or develop new Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements. The review provides the environmental analysis required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR

  2. Review of Issues Associated with Safe Operation and Management of the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Paul M.; Blomberg, Richard D.; Gleghorn, George J.; Krone, Norris J.; Voltz, Richard A.; Dunn, Robert F.; Donlan, Charles J.; Kauderer, Bernard M.; Brill, Yvonne C.; Englar, Kenneth G.; hide

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the President of the United States through the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the NASA Administrator tasked the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel with the responsibility to identify and review issues associated with the safe operation and management of the Space Shuttle program arising from ongoing efforts to improve and streamline operations. These efforts include the consolidation of operations under a single Space Flight Operations Contract (SFOC), downsizing the Space Shuttle workforce and reducing costs of operations and management. The Panel formed five teams to address the potentially significant safety impacts of the seven specific topic areas listed in the study Terms of Reference. These areas were (in the order in which they are presented in this report): Maintenance of independent safety oversight; implementation plan for the transition of Shuttle program management to the Lead Center; communications among NASA Centers and Headquarters; transition plan for downsizing to anticipated workforce levels; implementation of a phased transition to a prime contractor for operations; Shuttle flight rate for Space Station assembly; and planned safety and performance upgrades for Space Station assembly. The study teams collected information through briefings, interviews, telephone conversations and from reviewing applicable documentation. These inputs were distilled by each team into observations and recommendations which were then reviewed by the entire Panel.

  3. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  4. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  5. Product variety, product complexity and manufacturing operational performance: A systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trattner, Alexandria Lee; Hvam, Lars; Herbert-Hansen, Zaza Nadja Lee

    Manufacturing in the twenty-first century has been wrought with the struggle to satisfy the rising demand for greater product variety and more complex products while still maintaining efficient manufacturing operations. However, the literature lacks an overview of which operational performance...... measures are most affected by increased variety and complexity. This study presents a systematic literature review of the recent scholarly literature on variety, complexity and manufacturing operational performance (MOP). Results show that product variety has a consistently negative relationship with MOP...... across different time, cost, quality and flexibility measures while product complexity lacks evidence of strong relationships with MOP measures....

  6. Operational experience review and methods to enhance safety and reliability in the NPP-Leibstadt (KKL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusermann, R [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, Leibstadt (Switzerland)

    1997-10-01

    In the nuclear community it became clear that an integrated feedback system of operating experience must also include the unsuccessful results. The deviations, expected to achieved performance are analysed to the failure mode and its effect. KKL has lowered the number of safety significant events since commercial operation started. The thoroughness of the review/analysis of the events has increased with high priority set to human factor induced events in operation and maintenance. Since the participation of the author in the ASSET-Mission in Smolensk in 1993, KKL introduced the ASSET-Root-Cause method and has supplemented it by the HPES (Human Performance Enhancement System). 4 refs, 6 figs.

  7. Operational experience review and methods to enhance safety and reliability in the NPP-Leibstadt (KKL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusermann, R.

    1997-01-01

    In the nuclear community it became clear that an integrated feedback system of operating experience must also include the unsuccessful results. The deviations, expected to achieved performance are analysed to the failure mode and its effect. KKL has lowered the number of safety significant events since commercial operation started. The thoroughness of the review/analysis of the events has increased with high priority set to human factor induced events in operation and maintenance. Since the participation of the author in the ASSET-Mission in Smolensk in 1993, KKL introduced the ASSET-Root-Cause method and has supplemented it by the HPES (Human Performance Enhancement System). 4 refs, 6 figs

  8. From initial application to routine operation: Reviewing the Applications for Power Uprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garis, Ninos; Skaanberg, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Current plans for power uprates in Swedish nuclear power plants will lead to significant increases in seven units and a lesser increase in one unit. To date SKI has received six applications, and two more are due in 2007. A power uprate process is initiated by the application to the Government by a licensee for approval to increase the thermal output of a reactor unit. This request is addressed to the Government and is forwarded to SKI for a preliminary safety review. The result of the review is then provided by SKI as a basis for a governmental decision. Six applications have been taken through the first stage of the process; of these, three have received governmental approval and three are currently awaiting a decision. If the licensee's application is approved by the Government, deeper analyses and studies are required in order to modify the plant and update the safety analysis report and the associated technical specifications. SKI reviews this material on a continuous basis prior to test and routine operation at the increased power level. There are four stages that require attention and review by SKI; 1. Review of the application to the Government for approval to operate at increased power levels, and preparation of a suitable answer. 2. Review and approval of the preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) 3. Review and approval of the application for testing at the higher power level 4. Review and approval of routine operation at the higher power level. A thorough description of the handling of a power uprate process can be found in the SKI PM (SKI-PM 04:11) that is available on the SKI website (in Swedish)

  9. Types of Motivating Operations in Interventions with Problem Behavior: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo-Pinatella, David; Font-Roura, Josep; Planella-Morato, Joaquima; McGill, Peter; Alomar-Kurz, Elisabeth; Gine, Climent

    2013-01-01

    A motivating operation (MO) alters both the effectiveness of a stimulus as a reinforcer and the current frequency of all behavior that has been reinforced by that particular stimulus. This article reviews studies that have manipulated a MO during interventions with school-age participants with intellectual disabilities and problem behavior. A…

  10. Preparations for the 1994 OSART [operational safety review] at Hunterston Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, I.A.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency have accepted an invitation from the Scottish Office to carry out an Operational Safety Review at Hunterston Power Station in April 1994. This paper outlines the preparations being undertaken by Scottish Nuclear Limited to ensure the standards set by the International Atomic Energy Agency are met. (author)

  11. Learning from aviation to improve safety in the operating room - a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S.G.L. Wauben; J.F. Lange (Johan); R.H.M. Goossens (Richard)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLessons learned from other high-risk industries could improve patient safety in the operating room (OR). This review describes similarities and differences between high-risk industries and describes current methods and solutions within a system approach to reduce errors in the OR. PubMed

  12. Independent Review of Elemental Phosphorus Remediation at the Eastern Michaud Flats FMC Operable Unit near Pocatello, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, L. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kimmell, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quinn, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    If, despite risks to workers and these potential impacts, stakeholders decide that P4 wastes need to be excavated and treated, the Review Team determined that a number of the ETTs examined warrant further consideration for the treatment of P4 waste that has been characterized (for example, P4 waste present in the historical ponds). Nevertheless, concerns about the health and safety of site investigation workers using then-available investigation approaches prevented the collection of subsurface samples containing P4 from large areas of the site (e.g., the railroad swale, the vadose zone beneath the Furnace Building, and the abandoned railcars), As a result, the contaminant CSM in those particular areas was not refined enough to allow the Review Team to draw conclusions about using some of the ETTs to treat P4 waste in those areas. The readiness of an ETT for implementation varies depending on many factors, including stakeholder input, permitting, and remedial action construction requirements. Technologies that could be ready for use in the near term (within 1 year) include the following: mechanical excavation, containment technologies, off-site incineration, and drying and mechanical mixing under a tent structure. Technologies that could be ready for use in the mid-term (1 to 2 years) include cutter suction dredging, thermal-hydraulic dredging, and underground pipeline cleaning technologies. Technologies requiring a longer lead time (2 to 5 years) include on-site incineration, a land disposal restriction waste treatment system, an Albright & Wilson batch mud still, post-treatment on-site disposal, and post-treatment off-site disposal.

  13. Technology Readiness for the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkham, Harold; Marinovici, Maria C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Lindsey, K.; McBride, James; Clark, G. L.

    2013-06-30

    Reluctance to adopt new technology into a utility application is understandable, given the critical nature of the infrastructure and the less-than-ideal experiences of some power companies. The authors of this paper have considered adapting the NASA approach of classifying technology readiness, but find it not quite appropriate because NASA was both the developer and the eventual user of the new technology it was evaluating, whereas a utility is ordinarily in the mode of a customer, acquiring a new product from a manufacturer. Instead of a generic scale of technology readiness, a scale of readiness is proposed specifically for the smart grid, based on the many standards that exist for the relevant technologies. In this paper we present an overall structure for organization those standards. The acceptance of new technology is organized into five SGL (Smart Grid Level) steps, numbered five through 9 to correspond approximately to the last five numbers of the NASA TRL scale. SGL 5 is a certification that the hardware and software of the technology is safe for the system into which is intended to be placed. SGL 6 is documentation that the system is safe for itself, and will have adequate reliability. It is thus clear that the steps differ from NASA’s TRL in that technology development is not required, the transition is more one of documenting already existing system readiness. Since SGL 6 describes a system that is safe for the power system and for itself, it should not be restricted from being in a pilot-scale study, and achieving SGL 7. A larger-scale demonstration in a realistic environment will demonstrate interoperability and achieve SGL 8. Only when systems are installed and operating, and when disposal plans are in place will the designation of fully operable at SGL 9 be granted.

  14. Non-operative treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas: a review of the literature and a comparison with operative cases : a review of the literature and a comparison with operative cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J M

    OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that favour spontaneous recovery in patients who suffered a spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). METHODS: The literature was reviewed regarding non-operative cases of SSEH (SSEH(cons)). Sixty-two cases from the literature and 2 of our own cases were collected,

  15. OSART Guidelines. 2015 Edition. Reference Report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The IAEA works to provide a global nuclear safety and security framework for the protection of people and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, the minimization of the likelihood of accidents that could endanger life and property, and effective mitigation of the effects of any such events, should they occur. The strategic approach to achieving such a framework involves continual improvement in four areas: national and international safety infrastructures; the establishment and global acceptance of IAEA safety standards; an integrated approach to the provision for the application of the safety standards; and a global network of knowledge and experience. The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants during commissioning and operation. The OSART programme, initiated in 1982, is available to all Member States with nuclear power plants under commissioning or in operation. Conservative design, careful manufacture and sound construction are all prerequisites for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the safety of the plant also depends ultimately on: sound management, policies, procedures, processes and practices; the capability and reliability of commissioning and operating personnel; comprehensive instructions; sound accident management and emergency preparedness; and adequate resources. Finally, a positive attitude and conscientiousness on the part of all staff in discharging their responsibilities is important to safety. The OSART programme is based on the safety standards applicable to nuclear power plants. IAEA safety standards reflect the consensus of Member States on nuclear safety matters. The reports of the International Nuclear Safety Group identify important current nuclear safety issues and also serve as references during an OSART review. The publication OSART Guidelines provides overall guidance on the conduct of OSART

  16. What Are the Costs of Trauma Center Readiness? Defining and Standardizing Readiness Costs for Trauma Centers Statewide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Dennis W; Mullins, Robert F; Dente, Christopher J; Garlow, Laura; Medeiros, Regina S; Atkins, Elizabeth V; Solomon, Gina; Abston, Dena; Ferdinand, Colville H

    2017-09-01

    Trauma center readiness costs are incurred to maintain essential infrastructure and capacity to provide emergent services on a 24/7 basis. These costs are not captured by traditional hospital cost accounting, and no national consensus exists on appropriate definitions for each cost. Therefore, in 2010, stakeholders from all Level I and II trauma centers developed a survey tool standardizing and defining trauma center readiness costs. The survey tool underwent minor revisions to provide further clarity, and the survey was repeated in 2013. The purpose of this study was to provide a follow-up analysis of readiness costs for Georgia's Level I and Level II trauma centers. Using the American College of Surgeons Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient guidelines, four readiness cost categories were identified: Administrative, Clinical Medical Staff, Operating Room, and Education/Outreach. Through conference calls, webinars and face-to-face meetings with financial officers, trauma medical directors, and program managers from all trauma centers, standardized definitions for reporting readiness costs within each category were developed. This resulted in a survey tool for centers to report their individual readiness costs for one year. The total readiness cost for all Level I trauma centers was $34,105,318 (avg $6,821,064) and all Level II trauma centers was $20,998,019 (avg $2,333,113). Methodology to standardize and define readiness costs for all trauma centers within the state was developed. Average costs for Level I and Level II trauma centers were identified. This model may be used to help other states define and standardize their trauma readiness costs.

  17. Stochastic Methods Applied to Power System Operations with Renewable Energy: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Liu, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), Austin, TX (United States); Botterud, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Renewable energy resources have been rapidly integrated into power systems in many parts of the world, contributing to a cleaner and more sustainable supply of electricity. Wind and solar resources also introduce new challenges for system operations and planning in terms of economics and reliability because of their variability and uncertainty. Operational strategies based on stochastic optimization have been developed recently to address these challenges. In general terms, these stochastic strategies either embed uncertainties into the scheduling formulations (e.g., the unit commitment [UC] problem) in probabilistic forms or develop more appropriate operating reserve strategies to take advantage of advanced forecasting techniques. Other approaches to address uncertainty are also proposed, where operational feasibility is ensured within an uncertainty set of forecasting intervals. In this report, a comprehensive review is conducted to present the state of the art through Spring 2015 in the area of stochastic methods applied to power system operations with high penetration of renewable energy. Chapters 1 and 2 give a brief introduction and overview of power system and electricity market operations, as well as the impact of renewable energy and how this impact is typically considered in modeling tools. Chapter 3 reviews relevant literature on operating reserves and specifically probabilistic methods to estimate the need for system reserve requirements. Chapter 4 looks at stochastic programming formulations of the UC and economic dispatch (ED) problems, highlighting benefits reported in the literature as well as recent industry developments. Chapter 5 briefly introduces alternative formulations of UC under uncertainty, such as robust, chance-constrained, and interval programming. Finally, in Chapter 6, we conclude with the main observations from our review and important directions for future work.

  18. Ready to Implement? How the Out-of-School Time Workforce Can Support Character Development through Social and Emotional Learning: A Review of the Literature and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, Deborah A.; Devaney, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence on staff practices and quality programs that foster character development through social and emotional learning. The paper describes the state of the OST workforce, and barriers and opportunities to adding social and emotional learning to their job description. Specifically, the paper provides an overview of the…

  19. Countermeasures (iRED, ARED CEVIS, MEC, TVIS, T2, Periodic Fitness Evaluation, BP-ECG, HRM). Critical Readiness Review Increment 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toder, Carly; Gipson, Iona; Conly, Danielle; Nieschwitz, Linda; Perk, Austin

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews attempts to counteract the effects of being in space. It includes information on the Resistive Exercise Device (RED), the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (CEVIS), Treadmill with Vibration Isolation and Stabilization (TVIS) and periodic fitness evaluation with specific information on BP/ECG, heart rate monitor 2 and data distribution.

  20. Review of Fire-Induced Multiple Spurious Operation Scenarios for a Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Hong; Lee, Jai Ho; Lee, Do Hwan [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It was preliminarily reviewed that 41 scenarios of 63 scenarios of NEI's generic list could be applicable to design of SKN3. And 22 scenario of NEI's generic list were evaluated not applicable to SKN3. During the review of the scenario contained in NEI 00-01, no additional MSO scenarios specific to SKN3 were identified. For the further study, the final review will be determined and then detailed circuit analysis will be performed by fire zone and area based on the exact location contained the cable and raceway. With the enhancement of fire safety regulation requirements in nuclear power industry, multiple spurious operation (MSO) identification and treatments should be included in post fire safe shutdown analysis (PFSSA). In this study, the MSO scenario reviews are performed for Shin Kori Unit 3(SKN3) which is the first nuclear power plant of the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 constructed in Korea.

  1. Leveraging Advanced Technology in Army and Air Force Readiness and Sustainment Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindsey, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    Operational readiness and sustainment training allow military forces to be prepared for various types of contingency operations and provide for the primary means of protection and defense of United...

  2. Columbia River system operation review: Final environmental impact statement. Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement

  3. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.); United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  4. Improving the review of standard operating procedures: a novel electronic system for compounding pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brensel, Robert; Brensel, Scott; Ng, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Since the New England Compounding Center disaster in 2012, the importance of following correct procedures during every phase of customized pharmacy has been a focus of governmental interest and action as well as public scrutiny. Many pharmacies rely on the rote review of standard operating procedures to ensure that staff members understand and follow protocols that ensure the safety and potency of all compounds prepared, but that approach to continuing education can be cumbersome and needlessly time-consuming. In addition, documenting and retrieving evidence of employee competence can be difficult. In this article, we describe our use of online technology to improve our methods of educating staff about the full range of standard operating procedures that must be followed in our pharmacy. The system we devised and implemented has proven to be effective, easy to update and maintain, very inexpensive, and user friendly. Its use has reduced the time previously required for a read-over review of standard operating procedures from 30 or 40 minutes to 5 or 10 minutes in weekly staff meetings, and we can now easily document and access proof of employees' comprehension of that content. It is our hope that other small compounding pharmacies will also find this system of online standard operating procedure review helpful.

  5. Review of biomass fired space heating/domestic hot water boilers' application, operation and design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Monitoring exercises have been carried out for ETSU, by a number of contractors, on a number of wood fired heating schemes; feasibility studies on proposed schemes have also been carried out. Monitoring reports and feasibility studies have been reviewed to try and establish the suitability and economic viability of the various types of plant used (or proposed) and their application. Of the sixteen schemes reviewed just over 30% showed a reasonable return on the incremental capital cost of plant compared to gas oil fired plant. These schemes had one or more of the following attributes: - Low wood fuel cost -Long operating hours -Relatively low incremental capital cost of wood plant over gas oil plant. Small systems with low operating hours (e.g. short weekday occupancy premises, like schools) and relatively high incremental operating and maintenance costs and capital costs exhibited no advantage over equivalent fossil fuel fired plant. The unit fuel cost advantage to wood, in these cases, was insufficient to outweigh the increased O and M and capital costs, because of the comparatively low annual fuel consumption. Most of the plants reviewed had low thermal efficiencies due to the simplicity of the fuel to air control systems and the wide range of heating demand over which they had to operate. The former can be increased by improved combustion control systems and the latter by correct sizing of boilers and/or the installation of hybrid systems. (Author)

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix E: Flood control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The Corps of Engineers, Bonneville Power Administration, and Bureau of Reclamation conducted a scoping process consisting of a series of regionwide public meetings and solicitation of written comments in the summer of 1990. Comments on flood control issues were received from all parts of the Columbia river basin. This appendix includes issues raised in the public scoping process, as well as those brought for consideration by members of the Flood Control Work Group

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix M: Water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. Analysis of water quality begins with an account of the planning and evaluation process, and continues with a description of existing water quality conditions in the Columbia River Basin. This is followed by an explanation how the analysis was conducted. The analysis concludes with an assessment of the effects of SOR alternatives on water quality and a comparison of alternatives

  8. The motivating operation and negatively reinforced problem behavior: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter; Oliver, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The concept of motivational operations exerts an increasing influence on the understanding and assessment of problem behavior in people with intellectual and developmental disability. In this systematic review of 59 methodologically robust studies of the influence of motivational operations in negative reinforcement paradigms in this population, we identify themes related to situational and biological variables that have implications for assessment, intervention, and further research. There is now good evidence that motivational operations of differing origins influence negatively reinforced problem behavior, and that these might be subject to manipulation to facilitate favorable outcomes. There is also good evidence that some biological variables warrant consideration in assessment procedures as they predispose the person's behavior to be influenced by specific motivational operations. The implications for assessment and intervention are made explicit with reference to variables that are open to manipulation or that require further research and conceptualization within causal models.

  9. IAEA Operational Safety Team Reviews Saint-Alban Nuclear Power Plant, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear installation safety experts, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has reviewed safety practices at France's Saint-Alban Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and has highlighted a set of strong practices as well as a series of recommendations to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled the team at the request of the Government of France to conduct an Operational Safety Review (OSART) of the Saint-Alban NPP. Under the leadership of the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety in Vienna, the OSART team performed an in-depth operational safety review from 20 September to 6 October 2010. The team was made up of experts from Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Germany, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Slovakia, Sweden and the USA. An OSART mission is designed to review programmes and activities essential to operational safety. It is not a regulatory inspection, nor is it a design review or a substitute for an exhaustive assessment of the plant's overall safety status. The team at Saint-Alban conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the NPP, which largely are under the control of the site management. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training and Qualification; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry; and Emergency Planning and Preparedness. The OSART team has identified good plant practices, which will be shared with the rest of the nuclear industry for consideration of their application. Examples include: A safety guideline for outages; The use of remote video surveillance of fuel inspection and handling activities; A motivational tool for plant staff regarding the benefits of operating experience and associated corrective actions; and Use of a sophisticated key control system

  10. IAEA Operational Safety Team Review Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant, Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear installation safety experts, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has reviewed Slovakia's Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) for its safety practices and has noted a series of good practices as well as recommendations to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled an international team of experts at the request of the Government of Slovak Republic to conduct an Operational Safety Review (OSART) of Bohunice NPP. Under the leadership of the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, the OSART team performed an in-depth operational safety review from 1 to 18 November 2010. The team was made up of experts from Belgium, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, France, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the IAEA. An OSART mission is designed as a review of programmes and activities essential to operational safety. It is not a regulatory inspection, nor is it a design review or a substitute for an exhaustive assessment of the plant's overall safety status. The team at BNPP conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the NPP, which largely is under the control of the site management. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry and Emergency Planning and Preparedness. Long Term Operation assessment has been requested by the plant in addition to the standard OSART program. The OSART team has identified good plant practices which will be shared with the rest of the nuclear industry for consideration of their application. Examples include: BNPP has implemented a comprehensive set of technical and organizational measures which have significantly reduced the production of liquid radioactive waste; BNPP has developed an automatic transfer of dosimetry data

  11. Managed Readiness Simulator (MARS) V2: Implementation of the Managed Readiness Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The SRDB architecture is described in detail in [6]. Database VBA VBA Runtime Data Sub run() SQL (“UPDATE Table SET Rank = 5”) Run_query_obj...FilterResources”) Algorithms ( VBA & SQL ) End Sub Arena Process Logic Figure 5: MARS V2 simulation architecture. The MARS managed readiness...database layer below it. Using VBA blocks, the algorithm layer can execute complex data operations on the database layer using SQL and can return

  12. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

  13. AECB staff review of Pickering NGS operations for the year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The operation of Pickering NGS-A Units 1-4 and Pickering NGS-B Units 5-8 are monitored to ensure compliance with licensing requirements by the AECB Pickering project office staff. This report presents AECB staff's review of major licensing issues and of the operational performance of Pickering NGS during 1988. The report is limited to those aspects that AECB staff considers to have particular safety significance. More detailed information on routine performance is contained in Ontario Hydro's 1988 Quarterly Technical Reports for Pickering NGS-A and Pickering NGS-B

  14. Columbia River system operation review: Final environmental impact statement. Main report exhibits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d' Alene tribe

  15. Change readiness research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling

    2006-01-01

    the ”Basic Structure for The Electronic Health Record” (B-EHR) using prototypes. http://medinfo.dk/epj/proj/gepka/). In the Gepka project the participation varied from 33.3% to 78.9%. The objective of this study is to set out themes by which this variation can be studied. A qualitative explorative research...... of participation – it is to suggest a qualitative relationship between the two. Neither does this study try to generalize the results, as further research on more wards would be needed to do so. This study does, however, set out themes that can be a useful tool in future CRR projects in order to maximize......The Change readiness research method (CRR) has become a wellknown method in Denmark to identify issues needed to be discussed on a hospital ward before implementation of a new IT-system and to start a dialogue. A precondition for a constructive dialogue, however, is a high degree of participation...

  16. Smoke Ready Toolbox for Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site provides an online Smoke Ready Toolbox for Wildfires, which lists resources and tools that provide information on health impacts from smoke exposure, current fire conditions and forecasts and strategies to reduce exposure to smoke.

  17. Checklist for clinical readiness published

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists from NCI, together with collaborators from outside academic centers, have developed a checklist of criteria to evaluate the readiness of complex molecular tests that will guide decisions made during clinical trials. The checklist focuses on tes

  18. IAEA-led Operational Safety Team Reviews Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant, Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear installation safety experts, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has commended the Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in the Czech Republic for its safety practices and has also made a series of recommendations to reinforce them. The IAEA assembled an international team of experts at the request of the Government of the Czech Republic to conduct an Operational Safety Review (OSART) of Dukovany NPP. Under the leadership of the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety in Vienna, the OSART team performed an in-depth operational safety review of the plant from 6 to 23 June 2011. The team was made up of experts from Armenia, Germany, Hungary, Romania, Slovenia, Sweden, the UK and the USA. An OSART mission is designed as a review of programmes and activities essential to operational safety. It is not a regulatory inspection, nor is it a design review or a substitute for an exhaustive assessment of the plant's overall safety status. The team at Dukovany conducted an in-depth review of the aspects essential to the safe operation of the NPP, which is largely under the control of the site management. The conclusions of the review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training and Qualification; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry; and Emergency Planning and Preparedness. The OSART team has identified good plant practices, which will be shared with the rest of the nuclear industry for consideration of their application. Examples include: The plant uses an integrated approach to recruit, select, psychologically assess and train new employees. This approach has resulted in consistently high success rates for licensed operator examinations and the identification of potential candidates for various plant departments; The performance

  19. Quality assurance of pre-operative assessment--a review of quality assurance activities related to pre-operative assessment in nine hospitals in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, N. S.; Helsloot, R.

    1989-01-01

    Pre-operative assessment of patients for surgery is one of the most prevalent topics for quality assurance by peer-review in Dutch hospitals. This article describes the experiences with pre-operative assessment in nine hospitals. It is discussed why preoperative assessment is performed, what tests

  20. UNIVERSITY TEACHERS’ READINESS TO APPLY THE MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina O. Kotlyarova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to investigate the readiness of the university teachers to apply the modern educational technologies. Methods. The methods include theoretical: analysis of existing modern educational technologies, the concept «readiness» and its components, abstraction of signs and kinds of modern educational technologies based on the scientific literature and in the Federal State Educational Standards (FSES; empirical: questionnaires and testing methods for detecting levels of university teachers’ skills and readiness to use modern educational technology. Results. The main features of modern educational technologies are identified and justified that are to comply with modern methodology of the theory and practice of education study and the latest FSES requirements; the level of science, manufacturing, and modern rules of human relations. The components of readiness of university teachers to use modern educational technology are structured. The linguistic component is included along with the cognitive, psychological, operational, connotative components; its necessity is proved. The average level of readiness for the use of modern educational technology by university teachers is identified. Scientific novelty. The author specifies the features of the modern educational technology. The most significant components of higher-education teaching personnel readiness to use technological innovations are identified. As a whole, these results form the indicative framework for the development and measurement of readiness of the university teachers to use the modern educational technology. The development of the readiness of the university teachers to apply the modern educational technologies is proved to be an issue of current interest. Practical significance. The research findings can be used as the basis of techniques and methods designing for its further development and measurement of the training, retraining and advanced training of

  1. A review of start-up operations on the first units of the 1300 MWe generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meclot, B.; Lemagny Boc Lonlaygue, C.; Lavogiez, M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes and offers comments on the different phases of start-up on power stations of the P4 series. Then, one reviews incidents which occurred in the course of these start-up phases and, having highlighted the lessons to be learnt from the commissioning of these power stations, goes on to make a comparative study of 1300 and 900 MWe availability in the initial year of operation [fr

  2. Safety and health in forest harvesting operations. Diagnosis and preventive actions. A review.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Albizu-Urionabarrenetxea; E. Tolosana-Esteban; E. Roman-Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Aim of study: to review the present state of the art in relation to the main labour risks and the most relevant results of recent studies evaluating the safety and health conditions of the forest harvesting work and better ways to reduce accidents.Area of study: It focuses mainly on developed Countries, where the general concern about work risks prevention, together with the complex idiosyncrasy of forest work in forest harvesting operations, has led to a growing interest from the forest scie...

  3. Isokinetic muscle strength and readiness to return to sport following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: is there an association? A systematic review and a protocol recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undheim, Marit Baste; Cosgrave, Ciaran; King, Enda; Strike, Siobhán; Marshall, Brendan; Falvey, Éanna; Franklyn-Miller, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), strength is a key variable in regaining full function of the knee. Isokinetic strength is commonly used as part of the return to sport (RTS) criteria. We systematically reviewed the isokinetic strength evaluation protocols that are currently being used following ACLR. A secondary aim was to suggest an isokinetic protocol that could meet RTS criteria. Articles were searched using ScienceDirect, PubMed and Sage Journals Online, combined with cross-checked reference lists of the publications. Protocol data and outcome measurements and RTS criteria were extracted from each article included in the review. 39 studies met the inclusion criteria and reported their isokinetic strength evaluation protocol following ACLR. The variables that were most commonly used were concentric/concentric mode of contraction (31 studies), angular velocity of 60°/s (29 studies), 3-5 repetitions (24 studies), range of motion of 0-90° (6 studies), and using gravity correction (9 studies). 8 studies reported strength limb symmetry index scores as part of their RTS criteria. There was no standardised isokinetic protocol following ACLR; isokinetic strength measures have not been validated as useful predictors of successful RTS. We propose a standard protocol to allow consistency of testing and accurate comparison of future research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Brain readiness and the nature of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    To identify the neural components that make a brain ready for language, it is important to have well defined linguistic phenotypes, to know precisely what language is. There are two central features to language: the capacity to form signs (words), and the capacity to combine them into complex structures. We must determine how the human brain enables these capacities. A sign is a link between a perceptual form and a conceptual meaning. Acoustic elements and content elements, are already brain-internal in non-human animals, but as categorical systems linked with brain-external elements. Being indexically tied to objects of the world, they cannot freely link to form signs. A crucial property of a language-ready brain is the capacity to process perceptual forms and contents offline, detached from any brain-external phenomena, so their "representations" may be linked into signs. These brain systems appear to have pleiotropic effects on a variety of phenotypic traits and not to be specifically designed for language. Syntax combines signs, so the combination of two signs operates simultaneously on their meaning and form. The operation combining the meanings long antedates its function in language: the primitive mode of predication operative in representing some information about an object. The combination of the forms is enabled by the capacity of the brain to segment vocal and visual information into discrete elements. Discrete temporal units have order and juxtaposition, and vocal units have intonation, length, and stress. These are primitive combinatorial processes. So the prior properties of the physical and conceptual elements of the sign introduce combinatoriality into the linguistic system, and from these primitive combinatorial systems derive concatenation in phonology and combination in morphosyntax. Given the nature of language, a key feature to our understanding of the language-ready brain is to be found in the mechanisms in human brains that enable the unique

  5. Brain readiness and the nature of language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eBouchard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To identify the neural components that make a brain ready for language, it is important to have well defined linguistic phenotypes, to know precisely what language is. There are two central features to language: the capacity to form signs (words, and the capacity to combine them into complex structures. We must determine how the human brain enables these capacities.A sign is a link between a perceptual form and a conceptual meaning. Acoustic elements and content elements, are already brain-internal in non-human animals, but as categorical systems linked with brain-external elements. Being indexically tied to objects of the world, they cannot freely link to form signs. A crucial property of a language-ready brain is the capacity to process perceptual forms and contents offline, detached from any brain-external phenomena, so their representations may be linked into signs. These brain systems appear to have pleiotropic effects on a variety of phenotypic traits and not to be specifically designed for language.Syntax combines signs, so the combination of two signs operates simultaneously on their meaning and form. The operation combining the meanings long antedates its function in language: the primitive mode of predication operative in representing some information about an object. The combination of the forms is enabled by the capacity of the brain to segment vocal and visual information into discrete elements. Discrete temporal units have order and juxtaposition, and vocal units have intonation, length, and stress. These are primitive combinatorial processes. So the prior properties of the physical and conceptual elements of the sign introduce combinatoriality into the linguistic system, and from these primitive combinatorial systems derive concatenation in phonology and combination in morphosyntax.Given the nature of language, a key feature to our understanding of the language-ready brain is to be found in the mechanisms in human brains that

  6. Radioactive Operations Committee Review of the Intermediate-Level Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 2531 February 17, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, B.; Brooksbank, R.E.

    1972-01-01

    A subcommittee of the Radioactive Operations Committee met with the Operators of the Intermediate Level Waste Evaporator Facility on February 17, 1972, to discuss the status of the facility and its operations since the review of October 7, 1970, and reported in ORNL-CF-70-11-12. This review was made to determine the status of the ILWEF since the last review, to discuss compliance with previously recommended changes, and to review any new items of safety significance. Several recommendations were made.

  7. A review of the National pharmacovigilance system in Malta - implementing and operating a pharmacovigilance management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanti, Amy; Micallef, Benjamin; Serracino-Inglott, Anthony; Borg, John-Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory authorities have a legal mandate to implement and maintain a Pharmacovigilance System designed to monitor the safety of authorised medicinal products and detect any change to their risk-benefit balance. Areas covered: This review maps the implementation of pharmacovigilance activities in Malta since accession in the EU in mid 2004 and discusses the challenges the Maltese Regulator encountered while setting up adequate and effective systems to fulfil its legal mandate. Areas reviewed are those around ADR reporting, promotion and safety communications including rapid alerts and recalls, direct healthcare professional communications, risk minimisation measures and safety circulars and quality systems. Expert opinion: Within a ten year period, 3 EU directives on pharmacovigilance were implemented by our agency. Despite limitations to resources, based on a prioritised implementation, the legislation provisions are now fully operational with a good level of sustainability. Lessons learnt from this process are discussed in this review. The coming years will involve strengthening and consolidation of existing processes.

  8. Memo of Readiness to Proceed with Phase 1 Privatization for the Tank Farm Contractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HONEYMAN, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    This Readiness to Proceed Memorandum provides the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. formal certification of readiness to proceed with provision of the waste feed and infrastructure to handle the products from the privatization contractor's waste processing plant. Summary information is included from the integrated scope-cost-schedule baseline, the analyses of the baseline, management systems, and systems reviews

  9. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix K: Resident fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. In this appendix the Resident Fish Work Group (RFWG) has attempted to characterize and evaluate impacts of dam operation on an extremely complex and diverse integrated resource. Not only is this required under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for SOR, there are resident fish populations that have status under the Federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) or equivalent state regulations (Kootenai River white sturgeon, Snake River white sturgeon, sandroller, shorthead and torrent sculpins, bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, redband trout, and burbot). The RFWG has also attempted to develop operating alternatives that benefit not only resident fish, but anadromous fish, wildlife, and other human interests as well. The authors have recognized the co-evolution of resident fish, anadromous fish, and other integrated resources in the basin

  10. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS 'A' operation for the year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    AECB project staff believes that overall performance of the station in 1988 was generally satisfactory and better than in 1987. However, this assessment is not supported by some of the key performance indicators, although the indicators in areas where AECB staff had specific concerns do support it. For example, the percentage of reported significant events attributable to human error, the number of operating memos beyond the review date, scheduled emergency drills completed, the number of completed reactor trips all show a significant improvement over the 1987 value. In addition, AECB staff has been encouraged by the licensee's implementation of effective review processes for operator and maintenance call-ups, routines and deficiencies, and the establishment of supervisor inspection tours and operator rounds programs. Nevertheless, it is the opinion of AECB staff that to achieve standards of operation which would be considered fully satisfactory, the backlog of maintenance work must be reduced, the quality of work performed in the plant improved, and assurance provided that the required quality standards are being consistently achieved and maintained

  11. Influences of environmental and operational factors on dark fermentative hydrogen production: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Parviz; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Ghafari, Shahin; Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad; Vikineswary, Sabaratnam; Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen (H 2 ) is one of renewable energy sources known for its non-polluting and environmentally friendly nature, as its end combustion product is water (H 2 O). The biological production of H 2 is a less energy intensive alternative where processes can be operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Dark fermentation by bacterial biomass is one of multitude of approaches to produce hydrogen which is known as the cleanest renewable energy and is thus receiving increasing attention worldwide. The present study briefly reviews the biohydrogen production process with special attention on the effects of several environmental and operational factors towards the process. Factors such as organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time, temperature, and pH studied in published reports were compared and their influences are discussed in this work. This review highlights the variations in examined operating ranges for the factors as well as their reported optimum values. Divergent values observed for the environmental/operational factors merit further exploration in this field. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Influences of environmental and operational factors on dark fermentative hydrogen production: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Parviz [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ibrahim, Shaliza; Ghafari, Shahin [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Annuar, Mohamad Suffian Mohamad; Vikineswary, Sabaratnam [Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zinatizadeh, Ali Akbar [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Water and Wastewater Research Center (WWRC), Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) is one of renewable energy sources known for its non-polluting and environmentally friendly nature, as its end combustion product is water (H{sub 2}O). The biological production of H{sub 2} is a less energy intensive alternative where processes can be operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Dark fermentation by bacterial biomass is one of multitude of approaches to produce hydrogen which is known as the cleanest renewable energy and is thus receiving increasing attention worldwide. The present study briefly reviews the biohydrogen production process with special attention on the effects of several environmental and operational factors towards the process. Factors such as organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time, temperature, and pH studied in published reports were compared and their influences are discussed in this work. This review highlights the variations in examined operating ranges for the factors as well as their reported optimum values. Divergent values observed for the environmental/operational factors merit further exploration in this field. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Energy and water quality management systems for water utility's operations: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherchi, Carla; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Oppenheimer, Joan; Bros, Christopher M; Jacangelo, Joseph G

    2015-04-15

    Holistic management of water and energy resources is critical for water utilities facing increasing energy prices, water supply shortage and stringent regulatory requirements. In the early 1990s, the concept of an integrated Energy and Water Quality Management System (EWQMS) was developed as an operational optimization framework for solving water quality, water supply and energy management problems simultaneously. Approximately twenty water utilities have implemented an EWQMS by interfacing commercial or in-house software optimization programs with existing control systems. For utilities with an installed EWQMS, operating cost savings of 8-15% have been reported due to higher use of cheaper tariff periods and better operating efficiencies, resulting in the reduction in energy consumption of ∼6-9%. This review provides the current state-of-knowledge on EWQMS typical structural features and operational strategies and benefits and drawbacks are analyzed. The review also highlights the challenges encountered during installation and implementation of EWQMS and identifies the knowledge gaps that should motivate new research efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix Q: Regional forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The SOR is currently developing a System Operating Strategy (SOS) that will guide the physical operations of the Columbia River system. The SOR is also addressing the institutional arrangements that must be in place to make needed changes to the SOS in the future, or make interpretations of the strategy in the light of changing water conditions or river needs. For convenience, this future institutional arrangement is referred to as ''The Columbia River Regional Forum,'' or simply ''the Forum,'' even though the nature of this institution is still to be determined. This appendix and the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) identify the Forum as an administrative process that will not result in impacts to the environment and will not require analysis in a NEPA context. The composition of and procedures followed by a decision making body cannot--in and of themselves--be used to predict a particular decision with definable impacts on the environment. Nevertheless, because of the relationship to the other SOR actions, the SOR lead agencies have prepared this Technical Appendix to provide opportunities for review and comment on the Forum alternatives

  15. A survey on the measure of combat readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Kwong Fook; Nor, Norazman Mohamad; Soon, Lee Lai

    2014-09-01

    Measuring the combat readiness in military forces involves the measures of tangible and intangible elements of combat power. Though these measures are applicable, the mathematical models and formulae used focus mainly on either the tangible or the intangible elements. In this paper, a review is done to highlight the research gap in the formulation of a mathematical model that incorporates tangible elements with intangible elements to measure the combat readiness of a military force. It highlights the missing link between the tangible and intangible elements of combat power. To bridge the gap and missing link, a mathematical model could be formulated that measures both the tangible and intangible aspects of combat readiness by establishing the relationship between the causal (tangible and intangible) elements and its effects on the measure of combat readiness. The model uses multiple regression analysis as well as mathematical modeling and simulation which digest the capability component reflecting its assets and resources, the morale component reflecting human needs, and the quality of life component reflecting soldiers' state of satisfaction in life. The results of the review provide a mean to bridge the research gap through the formulation of a mathematical model that shows the total measure of a military force's combat readiness. The results also significantly identify parameters for each of the variables and factors in the model.

  16. The role of organizational structure in readiness for change: A conceptual integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzer, Justin K; Charns, Martin P; Hamdan, Sami; Afable, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to extend extant conceptualizations of readiness for change as an individual-level phenomenon. This review-of-reviews focuses on existing conceptual frameworks from the dissemination, implementation, quality improvement, and organizational transformation literatures in order to integrate theoretical rationales for how organization structure, a key dimension of the organizational context, may impact readiness for change. We propose that the organization structure dimensions of differentiation and integration impact readiness for change at the individual level of analysis by influencing four key concepts of relevance, legitimacy, perceived need for change, and resource allocation. We identify future research directions that focus on these four key concepts.

  17. Non-technical skills of the operating theatre scrub nurse: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lucy; Flin, Rhona

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a report of a review to identify the non-technical (cognitive and social) skills used by scrub nurses. Recognition that failures in non-technical skills contributed to accidents in high-risk industries led to the development of research programmes to study the role of cognition and social interactions in operational safety. Recently, psychological research in operating theatres has revealed the importance of non-technical skills in safe and efficient performance. Most of the studies to date have focused on anaesthetists and surgeons. On-line sources and university library catalogues, publications of the Association for Perioperative Practice, National Association of Theatre Nurses and Association of Peri-Operative Registered Nurses were searched in 2007. Studies were included in the review if they presented data from scrub nurses on one or more of their non-technical skills. These findings were examined in relation to an existing medical non-technical skills framework with categories of communication, teamwork, leadership, situation awareness and decision-making. Of 424 publications retrieved, 13 were reviewed in detail. Ten concerned communication and eight of those also had data on teamwork. In 11 papers teamwork was examined, and one focused on nurses' situation awareness, teamwork and communication. None of the papers we reviewed examined leadership or decision-making by scrub nurses. Further work is needed to identify formally the non-technical skills which are important to the role of scrub nurse and then to design training in the identified non-technical skills during the education and development of scrub nurses.

  18. OSART guidelines - 2005 edition. Reference report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has put forward the vision of a global nuclear safety regime that provides for the protection of people and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation from nuclear facilities, the minimization of the likelihood of accidents that could endanger life and property and effective mitigation of the effects of any such events should they occur. The strategic approach for achieving the vision of enhancing this regime involves four elements and aims at ensuring that the overall nuclear safety level in Member States continues to improve: - Improvement of national and international safety infrastructures: - Establishment and global acceptance of IAEA safety standards; - Integrated approach to the provision for the application of safety standards; and - Global network of knowledge and experience. The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants during commissioning and operation. The OSART programme, initiated in 1982, is available to all Member States with nuclear power plants under commissioning or in operation. The OSART methodology and its safety services may also be applied to other nuclear installations (e.g. fuel cycle facilities, research reactors). Conservative design, careful manufacture and sound construction are all prerequisites for safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the safety of the plant depends ultimately on sound policies, procedures, processes and practices; on the capability and reliability of the commissioning and operating personnel; on comprehensive instructions; and on adequate resources. A positive attitude and conscientiousness on the part of the management and staff in discharging their responsibilities is important to safety. OSART missions consider these aspects in assessing a facility's operational practices in comparison with those used successfully in other countries and

  19. OSART guidelines - 2005 edition. Reference report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has put forward the vision of a global nuclear safety regime that provides for the protection of people and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation from nuclear facilities, the minimization of the likelihood of accidents that could endanger life and property and effective mitigation of the effects of any such events should they occur. The strategic approach for achieving the vision of enhancing this regime involves four elements and aims at ensuring that the overall nuclear safety level in Member States continues to improve: - Improvement of national and international safety infrastructures: - Establishment and global acceptance of IAEA safety standards. - Integrated approach to the provision for the application of safety standards. And - Global network of knowledge and experience. The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants during commissioning and operation. The OSART programme, initiated in 1982, is available to all Member States with nuclear power plants under commissioning or in operation. The OSART methodology and its safety services may also be applied to other nuclear installations (e.g. fuel cycle facilities, research reactors). Conservative design, careful manufacture and sound construction are all prerequisites for safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the safety of the plant depends ultimately on sound policies, procedures, processes and practices. On the capability and reliability of the commissioning and operating personnel. On comprehensive instructions. And on adequate resources. A positive attitude and conscientiousness on the part of the management and staff in discharging their responsibilities is important to safety. OSART missions consider these aspects in assessing a facility's operational practices in comparison with those used successfully in other countries and

  20. OSART guidelines - 2005 edition. Reference report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has put forward the vision of a global nuclear safety regime that provides for the protection of people and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation from nuclear facilities, the minimization of the likelihood of accidents that could endanger life and property and effective mitigation of the effects of any such events should they occur. The strategic approach for achieving the vision of enhancing this regime involves four elements and aims at ensuring that the overall nuclear safety level in Member States continues to improve: - Improvement of national and international safety infrastructures: - Establishment and global acceptance of IAEA safety standards. - Integrated approach to the provision for the application of safety standards. And - Global network of knowledge and experience. The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants during commissioning and operation. The OSART programme, initiated in 1982, is available to all Member States with nuclear power plants under commissioning or in operation. The OSART methodology and its safety services may also be applied to other nuclear installations (e.g. fuel cycle facilities, research reactors). Conservative design, careful manufacture and sound construction are all prerequisites for safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the safety of the plant depends ultimately on sound policies, procedures, processes and practices. On the capability and reliability of the commissioning and operating personnel. On comprehensive instructions. And on adequate resources. A positive attitude and conscientiousness on the part of the management and staff in discharging their responsibilities is important to safety. OSART missions consider these aspects in assessing a facility's operational practices in comparison with those used successfully in other countries and

  1. Revision Hip Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review of Diagnoses, Operative Findings, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Harris, Joshua D; Erickson, Brandon J; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J

    2015-07-01

    To determine indications for, operative findings of, and outcomes of revision hip arthroscopy. A systematic review was registered with PROSPERO and performed based on PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Therapeutic clinical outcome studies reporting the indications for, operative findings of, and outcomes of revision hip arthroscopy were eligible for inclusion. All study-, patient-, and hip-specific data were extracted and analyzed. The Modified Coleman Methodology Score was used to assess study quality. Five studies were included (348 revision hip arthroscopies; 333 patients; mean age, 31.4 ± 4.2 years; 60% female patients). All 5 studies were either Level III or IV evidence. The surgeon performing revision hip arthroscopy was the same as the primary hip surgeon in only 25% of cases. The mean time between primary and revision hip arthroscopy was 27.8 ± 7.0 months (range, 2 to 193 months). Residual femoroacetabular impingement was the most common indication for and operative finding of revision hip arthroscopy (81% of cases). The most commonly reported revision procedures were femoral osteochondroplasty (24%) and acetabuloplasty (18%). The modified Harris Hip Score was used in all 5 analyzed studies, with significant (P arthroscopy, subsequent reported operations were hip arthroplasty in 11 patients and re-revision hip arthroscopy in 8 patients (5% total reoperation rate). Revision hip arthroscopy is most commonly performed for residual femoroacetabular impingement, with statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements shown in multiple patient-reported clinical outcome scores at short-term follow-up. The reoperation rate after revision hip arthroscopy is 5% within 2 years, including further arthroscopy or conversion to hip arthroplasty. Level IV, systematic review of Level III and IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Physician Engagement in Improving Operative Supply Chain Efficiency Through Review of Surgeon Preference Cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Lara F B; Smith, Katherine A; Curlin, Howard

    To reduce operative costs involved in the purchase, packing, and transport of unnecessary supplies by improving the accuracy of surgeon preference cards. Quality improvement study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Gynecologic surgery suite of an academic medical center. Twenty-one specialized and generalist gynecologic surgeons. The preference cards of up to the 5 most frequently performed procedures per surgeon were selected. A total of 81 cards were distributed to 21 surgeons for review. Changes to the cards were communicated to the operating room charge nurse and finalized. Fourteen surgeons returned a total of 48 reviewed cards, 39 of which had changes. A total of 109 disposable supplies were removed from these cards, at a total cost savings of $767.67. The cost per card was reduced by $16 on average for disposables alone. Three reusable instrument trays were also eliminated from the cards, resulting in savings of approximately $925 in processing costs over a 3-month period. Twenty-two items were requested by surgeons to be available on request but were not routinely placed in the room at the start of each case, at a total cost of $6,293.54. The rate of return of unused instruments to storage decreased after our intervention, from 10.1 to 9.6 instruments per case. Surgeon preference cards serve as the basis for economic decision making regarding the purchase, storing, packing, and transport of operative instruments and supplies. A one-time surgeon review of cards resulted in a decrease in the number of disposable and reusable instruments that must be stocked, transported, counted in the operating room, or returned, potentially translating into cost savings. Surgeon involvement in preference card management may reduce waste and provide ongoing cost savings. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A review on the sustainability of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment: Design and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiming; Zhang, Jian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Hu, Zhen; Liang, Shuang; Fan, Jinlin; Liu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) have been used as a green technology to treat various wastewaters for several decades. CWs offer a land-intensive, low-energy, and less-operational-requirements alternative to conventional treatment systems, especially for small communities and remote locations. However, the sustainable operation and successful application of these systems remains a challenge. Hence, this paper aims to provide and inspire sustainable solutions for the performance and application of CWs by giving a comprehensive review of CWs' application and the recent development on their sustainable design and operation for wastewater treatment. Firstly, a brief summary on the definition, classification and application of current CWs was presented. The design parameters and operational conditions of CWs including plant species, substrate types, water depth, hydraulic load, hydraulic retention time and feeding mode related to the sustainable operation for wastewater treatments were then discussed. Lastly, future research on improving the stability and sustainability of CWs were highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix I: Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. This appendix discusses the work performed by the SOR Power Work Group. The Power Work Group (PWG) had several major responsibilities: first, to determine the effects of each of the various system operating strategies (SOS) on the Northwest regional power system; second, given these effects, to determine what, if any, actions are required to meet forecasted regional energy consumption; and finally, to estimate the cost for serving the forecasted regional energy consumption. The Northwest regional power system consists of Federal and non-Federal hydroelectric power projects (hydropower or hydro projects) on the main stem of the Columbia and Snake Rivers, numerous smaller hydro projects on other river reaches, and a number of thermal plants (coal, nuclear and combustion turbines)

  5. ACR: Licensing and design readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text The Canadian nuclear technology has a long history dating back to the 1940s. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), then called AECB, was established in 1946. CNSC focuses on nuclear security, nuclear safety, establishing health and safety regulations, and has also played an instrumental role in the formation of the IAEA. CNSC has provided assistance to the establishment of regulatory authorities in AECL's client countries such as Korea, Argentina, China and Romania. AECL has developed the Gen III+ ACR 1000 as evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. ACR-1000 has evolved from AECL's in depth experience with CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR-1000 design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance. ACR-1000 has completed its Basic Engineering, has advanced in the licensing process in Canada, and is ready for deployment in Canadian and world markets. EC6 is an evolution of CANDU 6 and is a Gen III natural uranium fuelled reactor. Its medium size and potential for fuel localization and advanced fuel cycles is an optimal strategic solution in many markets.AECL's reactor products are shown to be compliant with a variety of licensing and regulatory requirements. These include the new CNSC DRD-337, IAEA NS-R1, and EUR. This allows the countries interested in CANDU reactor products to be confident of its licensing in their own regulatory regimes.

  6. An Exploratory Analysis of Readiness for Environmental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, N. Paul; And Others

    Contained in this monograph is a review and synthesis of developmental psychology and learning theory, with major emphasis upon applications of the developmental perspective to environmental education curriculum and instruction. Based upon a summary of the work of Piaget and his followers, a learning readiness axis is proposed. Also examined are…

  7. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  8. Clinical research. Acute appendicitis in children. Review of 324 operated cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Furuta, Yasuhiko; Kamei, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective review was made of 324 operated cases of acute appendicitis for sixteen years from 1989 to 2005. For seven years from 1999 to 2005, an additional review was made of 63 cases where patients visited our department on suspicion of acute appendicitis and received medical treatment without operation. Cases of hospitalization on suspicion of appendicitis averaged 18 a year for 1999 to 2005, with half these being appendicitis or peritonitis due to perforated appendicitis. The number of cases by age groups for those with acute appendicitis reached 25 per year in 1997 but fell off from 1998 onwards. Out of the total 324 cases, 179 were boys, 145 were girls, and there were 188 cases of acute appendicitis and 136 cases of perforated appendicitis. There were 23 cases of catarrhal appendicitis, with three cases out of the 63 cases overall of the last seven years. There were 66 cases for ages 0 to 6, 168 cases for ages 7 to 11, and 90 cases for ages 12 to 20, the peak age group being 7 to 11. Perforated appendicitis occurred in 65.2% of cases involving infants under six, which is relatively high compared to the 36.0% of the over seven age grouping. There were 112 cases of fecalith out of the 324 overall cases, 24.5% of acute appendicitis cases and 48.5% of perforated appendicitis cases. Over the last seven years ultrasound examination made visible the inflamed appendix in 41 cases of 46 (89.1%) for acute appendicitis and in 16 cases of 17 (94.1%) for perforated appendicitis. CT scans were used in five cases of acute appendicitis/perforated appendicitis out of the 324 overall cases. Five of the 63 cases of surgical operations from 1999 to 2005 involved surgery made after diagnosis of acute appendicitis after follow-up hospitalization. Types of operations involved 11 cases of laparoscopic appendectomy, the remaining 313 operations involving classical open appendectomy. (author)

  9. Operative Versus Non-operative Treatment of Grade III Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations and the Use of SurgiLig: a Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Fizan; Ajwani, Sanil; Bibi, Asia; Riley, Eleanor; Hughes, Peter J

    2017-12-30

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are common shoulder girdle injuries. The treatment of grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocations is controversial. Furthermore, the literature on the use of the Sur-giligTM synthetic ligament for reconstruction of dislocations is sparse. This retrospective review aimed to establish whether operative treatment was superior to non-operative treatment in grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated at our institute over a 5-year period. We also reviewed the effectiveness of reconstruction with SurgiligTM after acute and chronic dislocations across all grades of acromioclavicular joint dislocations. Twenty-five patients completed full follow-up with grade III dislocations. The mean follow-up in the operated group was 3.56 years and in the non-operated group this was 3.29 years. The mean Oxford Shoul-der Score (OSS) in the operated group was 39.8, whereas the mean OSS in the non-operated group was 45.9 (p=0.01). The mean pain score in the operated group was 2.2, and in the non-operated group this was 1.6. The mean satisfaction score in the operated group was 8.2 and that in the non-operated group was 7.8. There was no statistically significant difference in pain or satisfaction scores. In respect to the cohort treated with Surg-iligTM synthetic ligament, 22 patients across all grades of dislocations had this procedure performed. The mean post-operative Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) was 40. 1. Non-operative treatment is not inferior to operative treatment for grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocations. The data from this study demonstrat-ed that the non-operated group had superior Ox-ford Shoul-der Scores that were statistically significant. 2. Additionally, the use of the SurgiligTM ligament appears to be effective in treating both chronic and acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

  10. ORSERG resource book. Operational reactor safety engineering and review group. Final report, March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    EPRI has prepared this resource book to help utilities with their Self-Assessment Programs at nuclear power plants. Self-assessments are reviews performed by nuclear power plant utilities to monitor plant performance status and adequacy, identify trends in operational activities important to safety, and assess the impact of these trends on plant safety. Activities performed as self-assessments include reviews and evaluations of plant performance and abnormal events, technical evaluations of plant activities to identify potential problem areas, and reviews of other sources of plant design and operating experience for applicability to safety. This resource book is based on information obtained from utilities and includes examples of activities and methods that have proven effective. The resource book includes a summary of NRC requirements, guidelines for self-assessment program planning, descriptions and examples of investigative techniques, and key references that can be consulted for additional information. It can serve as a training guide for plant staff members who are assigned to self-assessment activities. (author)

  11. Factors of children's school readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM; Raven, Raven, & Court, 1999, language competence using the Lestvice splošnega govornegarazvoja–LJ (LSGR–LJ, Scales of General Language Development; Marjanovič Umek, Kranjc, Fekonja in Bajc, 2004, and school readiness with the Preizkus pripravljenosti za šolo (PPŠ, Test of School Readiness; Toličič, 1986. The results indicate that children's intellectual ability and language competence have a high predictive value for the school readiness — they explained 51% of the variance in children's scores on the PPŠ. Preschool enrollment has a positive effect on school readiness for children whose parents have a low level of education, but not for those whose parents are highly educated.

  12. Operations research for resource planning and -use in radiotherapy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Bruno; Hans, Erwin W; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; van de Kamer, Jeroen; van Harten, Wim

    2016-11-25

    The delivery of radiotherapy (RT) involves the use of rather expensive resources and multi-disciplinary staff. As the number of cancer patients receiving RT increases, timely delivery becomes increasingly difficult due to the complexities related to, among others, variable patient inflow, complex patient routing, and the joint planning of multiple resources. Operations research (OR) methods have been successfully applied to solve many logistics problems through the development of advanced analytical models for improved decision making. This paper presents the state of the art in the application of OR methods for logistics optimization in RT, at various managerial levels. A literature search was performed in six databases covering several disciplines, from the medical to the technical field. Papers included in the review were published in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2015. Data extraction includes the subject of research, the OR methods used in the study, the extent of implementation according to a six-stage model and the (potential) impact of the results in practice. From the 33 papers included in the review, 18 addressed problems related to patient scheduling (of which 12 focus on scheduling patients on linear accelerators), 8 focus on strategic decision making, 5 on resource capacity planning, and 2 on patient prioritization. Although calculating promising results, none of the papers reported a full implementation of the model with at least a thorough pre-post performance evaluation, indicating that, apart from possible reporting bias, implementation rates of OR models in RT are probably low. The literature on OR applications in RT covers a wide range of approaches from strategic capacity management to operational scheduling levels, and shows that considerable benefits in terms of both waiting times and resource utilization are likely to be achieved. Various fields can be further developed, for instance optimizing the coordination between the available

  13. Types of motivating operations in interventions with problem behavior: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó-Pinatella, David; Font-Roura, Josep; Planella-Morató, Joaquima; McGill, Peter; Alomar-Kurz, Elisabeth; Giné, Climent

    2013-01-01

    A motivating operation (MO) alters both the effectiveness of a stimulus as a reinforcer and the current frequency of all behavior that has been reinforced by that particular stimulus. This article reviews studies that have manipulated a MO during interventions with school-age participants with intellectual disabilities and problem behavior. A systematic review was conducted using the following major electronic databases: PsychInfo, Education Resources Information Center, Science Direct, Blackwell, SAGE, and Medline. A total of 31 published articles representing 55 participants was examined. Findings from this study suggest that the modification of a MO usually has an effect on the problem behavior by either establishing or abolishing its motivation. Furthermore, a relationship was found between the type of MO and the behavioral function identified. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings, limitations of this study and potential issues for future research are discussed.

  14. A Review of Fusion and Tokamak Research Towards Steady-State Operation: A JAEA Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Providing a historical overview of 50 years of fusion research, a review of the fundamentals and concepts of fusion and research efforts towards the implementation of a steady state tokamak reactor is presented. In 1990, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR best utilizing the bootstrap current was developed. Since then, significant efforts have been made in major tokamaks, including JT-60U, exploring advanced regimes relevant to the steady state operation of tokamaks. In this paper, the fundamentals of fusion and plasma confinement, and the concepts and research on current drive and MHD stability of advanced tokamaks towards realization of a steady-state tokamak reactor are reviewed, with an emphasis on the contributions of the JAEA. Finally, a view of fusion energy utilization in the 21st century is introduced.

  15. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  16. The association between proximity to animal feeding operations and community health: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette M O'Connor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A systematic review was conducted for the association between animal feeding operations (AFOs and the health of individuals living near AFOs.The review was restricted to studies reporting respiratory, gastrointestinal and mental health outcomes in individuals living near AFOs in North America, European Union, United Kingdom, and Scandinavia. From June to September 2008 searches were conducted in PUBMED, CAB, Web-of-Science, and Agricola with no restrictions. Hand searching of narrative reviews was also used. Two reviewers independently evaluated the role of chance, confounding, information, selection and analytic bias on the study outcome. Nine relevant studies were identified. The studies were heterogeneous with respect to outcomes and exposures assessed. Few studies reported an association between surrogate clinical outcomes and AFO proximity. A negative association was reported when odor was the measure of exposure to AFOs and self-reported disease, the measure of outcome. There was evidence of an association between self-reported disease and proximity to AFO in individuals annoyed by AFO odor.There was inconsistent evidence of a weak association between self-reported disease in people with allergies or familial history of allergies. No consistent dose response relationship between exposure and disease was observable.

  17. Operation management for a low-carbon economy: a literature review on stakeholders, barriers and motivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Andriani Ribeiro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify stakeholders acting as barriers and/or motivations for the adoption of low- -carbon operation management practices through the lens of the stakeholder theory. Stakeholders have a strong influence on companies to adopt environmental practices due to the climate change context and its consequences on the economic, environmental and social scenario. Thus, this study conducts a literature review in the Scopus database with searches that relate stakeholder theory and low-carbon practices to identify stakeholders. As a result, Customers and Government are the most active stakeholders as drivers or barriers to the adoption of environmental practices. Therefore, it is important to understand the different attributes of each stakeholder and their demands in order to trace hierarchy strategies of adopting any low-carbon operation management practices and creating mechanisms of collaboration with those stakeholders who drive the adoption of those practices.

  18. Review of Regulatory Quality Assurance Requirements for the Operation of Nuclear R and D Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Il; Lim, Nam Jin

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has many R and D facilities in operation, including HANARO research reactor, radioactive waste treatment facility (RWTF), post-irradiation examination facility (PIEF) and irradiated material test facility (IMEF). Recently, nation-wide interest is focused on the safety and security of major industrial facilities. Safe operation of nuclear facilities is imperative because of the consequence of public disaster by radiological release/ contamination, in case of an accident. Recently, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of the Korean government announced amendments of Atomic Energy laws to enforce requirements of the physical protection and radiological emergency. In this paper, the context of amended Atomic Energy laws were reviewed to confirm quality assurance measures and identify additional QA activities, if any, that is required by the amendment

  19. Critical review on non-operative management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M S; Liu, W C

    2003-12-01

    There are a number of different non-operative interventions which aim to control moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) from progression. Clinicians may find difficulties in the selection of appropriate interventions for AIS. A comprehensive literature review was carried out to study all contemporary non-operative interventions, it was noted that rigid spinal orthoses apparently give more curve control; however, it would compromise the patient's quality of life via those inevitable factors--physical constraint, poor acceptance and psychological disturbance. There is a trend to develop more effective, acceptable and user-friendly interventions. Under such an aspiration, the theories and clinical evidence of different interventions should be developed along the clinical pathway of early intervention with reliable indicators/predictors, patient's active participation, dynamic control mechanism, holistic psychological and psychosocial considerations, and effective and long-lasting outcome.

  20. A Review of Quantitative Situation Assessment Models for Nuclear Power Plant Operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Situation assessment is the process of developing situation awareness and situation awareness is defined as 'the perception of the elements in the environment within a volume of time and space, the comprehension of their meaning and the projection of their status in the near future.' Situation awareness is an important element influencing human actions because human decision making is based on the result of situation assessment or situation awareness. There are many models for situation awareness and those models can be categorized into qualitative or quantitative. As the effects of some input factors on situation awareness can be investigated through the quantitative models, the quantitative models are more useful for the design of operator interfaces, automation strategies, training program, and so on, than the qualitative models. This study presents the review of two quantitative models of situation assessment (SA) for nuclear power plant operators

  1. Zebrafish housing systems: a review of basic operating principles and considerations for design and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Christian; Mason, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The strategies for housing zebrafish used in biomedical research have evolved considerably over the past three decades. To keep pace with the rapid expansion and development of the zebrafish model system, the field has generally moved from keeping fish at the level of aquarium hobbyist to that of industrialized, recirculating aquaculture. Numerous commercial system vendors now offer increasingly sophisticated housing systems based on design principles that maximize the number of animals that can be housed in a given space footprint, and they are thus able to support large and diverse research programs. This review is designed to provide managers, lab animal veterinarians, investigators, and other parties responsible for care and use of these animals with a comprehensive overview of the basic operating and design principles of zebrafish housing systems. This information can be used to help plan the construction of new facilities and/or the upgrade and maintenance of existing operations.

  2. Technical Review of Operator's Destructive Analyses at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant: Strengthening the Transparency of the Operator's Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, N.; Katchi, T.; Niitsu, Y.; Duhamel, G.; Decaillon, J.-G.; Toervenyi, A.; Sayama, H.; Hara, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant is a large-scale nuclear facility in Japan. For the purposes of process control, product management and nuclear material accountancy for safeguards purposes, the laboratory of the facility operator analyzes thousands of samples from various process streams and with a multitude of matrices. Transparency of operational procedures, quality control measures and sample analytical results among the facility operator and state and international safeguards authorities are required to assess the facility operator's measurement system, and thus to assure a credible safeguards approach. The facility operator, Japan Nuclear Fuel, Limited (JNFL), is engaged in continuous improvement of its nuclear material analyzes. For the declarations to the inspectorates, it is important that JNFL and the safeguards authorities be able to confirm that the analytical methods used by JNFL are reliable and meet the latest version of the International Target Values. Since 2012 JNFL, the IAEA and the SSAC have carried out several technical reviews of the destructive analysis (DA) processes as a means of strengthening the transparency of the DA measurement systems. The goal of the DA technical reviews is to (1) assess past commitments of the JNFL plan for analytical improvement, (2) review the JNFL Quality System by means of documentation reviews and in-field demonstrations, and (3) review the analytical performance of the JNFL lab through its own results or from inter-laboratory comparison exercises. Throughout this process, subject-matter experts from all organizations met with JNFL laboratory staff and discussed analytical concerns and solutions. The outcome of these technical reviews was a series of recommendations to JNFL for strengthening its plan for continuous improvement. This paper presents the methodology of the DA technical reviews, the communication scheme and some examples of the outcome for JNFL to improve its DA methods and analytical

  3. Review on Malaysian Rail Transit Operation and Management System: Issues and Solution in Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masirin, Mohd Idrus Mohd; Salin, Aminah Mohd; Zainorabidin, Adnan; Martin, David; Samsuddin, Norshakina

    2017-08-01

    In any context, operation and management of transportation systems are key issues which may affect both life quality and economic development. In large urban agglomerations, an efficient public transportation system may help abate the negative externalities of private car use such as congestion, air and noise pollution, accident and fuel consumption, without excessively penalizing user travel times or zone accessibility. Thus, this study is conducted to appraise the Malaysian rural rail transit operation and management system, which are considered important as there are many issues and solution in integration of the services that need to be tackled more conscientiously. The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the most important issues on integration of services and rail transit system in Malaysian and how to solve or reduce these problems and conflicts. In this paper, it consists of the historical development of rail transit construction in Malaysia. This paper also attempts to identify the important issues related to rail transit services and integration in Malaysian rural rail operation and management system. Comparison is also conducted with other countries such as UK, France, and Japan. Finally, a critical analysis is presented in this paper by looking at the possible application for future Malaysian rail transit operation system and management, especially focusing on enhancing the quality of Malaysian rural rail transit. In conclusion, this paper is expected to successfully review and appraise the existing Malaysian rural rail transit operation and management system pertaining to issues & solution in integration. It is also hoped that reformation or transformation of present service delivery quality of the rail transit operation and management will enable Malaysia to succeed in transforming Malaysian transportation system to greater heights.

  4. Idaho National Laboratory Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan - Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, Carl J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 151.1C, Comprehensive Emergency Management System requires that each Department of Energy field element documents readiness assurance activities, addressing emergency response planning and preparedness. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, as prime contractor at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has compiled this Emergency Readiness Assurance Plan to provide this assurance to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office. Stated emergency capabilities at the INL are sufficient to implement emergency plans. Summary tables augment descriptive paragraphs to provide easy access to data. Additionally, the plan furnishes budgeting, personnel, and planning forecasts for the next 5 years.

  5. Columbia River System Operation Review final environmental impact statement. Appendix H: Navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) is a study and environmental compliance process being used by the three Federal agencies to analyze future operations of the system and river use issues. The goal of the SOR is to achieve a coordinated system operation strategy for the river that better meets the needs of all river users. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The Navigation Technical Appendix presents the analysis of the various SOR alternatives in terms of their potential affects on the congressionally authorized navigation system within the Columbia and Snake river waterways. The focus of the study, impacts to the authorized navigation, improvements/developments, reflects on one of the continuing historical missions of the US Army Corps of Engineers: to promote safe commercial navigation of the nation's waterways benefiting the development of commerce within the US. The study and evaluation process involved Scoping, Screening and Full Scale Evaluation. During screening two models were developed; one was used to evaluate the effects of the various alternatives on navigation through the Snake River Projects and the other the effects on the Dworshak Pool. Full Scale Analysis was expanded to included a study of effects throughout the system

  6. Operated DeBakey type III dissecting aortic aneurysm: review of 12 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Hi Eun; Lee, Ghi Jai; Oh, Sang Joon; Yoon, Sei Ra; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Ho Kyun; Han, Chang Yul

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the indications of operation and radiologic findings in 12 operated DeBakey type III aortic dissections. We retrospectively reviewed radiologic findings of 12 operated DeBakey type III aortic dissections, using CT, MRI, or aortography, and correlations were made with clinical course of the patients. Three cases were uncomplicated dissections. There were aneurysm rupture in 4 cases, impending rupture in 4 cases, occlusion of common iliac artery in 2 cases, occlusion of renal artery in 1 case, and compression of bronchus and esophagus by dilated aorta in 1 case. Associated clinical sign and symptoms were chest and back pain in 12 cases, claudication in 3 cases, dyspnea and dysphagia in 1 case, hoarseness in 1 case, and hemoptysis in 1 case. Post-operative complications were death from aneurysm rupture in 1 case, paraplegia in 2 cases, acute renal failure in 3 cases, and hemopericardium in 1 case. Although medical therapy is preferred in management of DeBakey type III aortic dissection, surgical treatment should be considered in patients with radiological findings of aortic rupture, impending rupture, occlusion of aortic major branches

  7. Demining Dogs in Colombia - A Review of Operational Challenges, Chemical Perspectives, and Practical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Paola A; Chávez Rodríguez, Mario

    2016-07-01

    Within the framework of an internal armed conflict in Colombia, the use of antipersonnel mines by revolutionary armed forces represents a strategic factor for these groups. Antipersonnel mines are used by these revolutionary forces as a mean to hinder the advancement of the national armed forces in the recovery of territory and to protect tactical natural resources and illegal economies within a given area. These antipersonnel mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are not of industrial manufacturing, and have a variety of activating mechanisms as well as non-metal materials which make them difficult for successful detection. The Colombian experience strongly represents the current need for advanced research and development of effective field operations within its affected territory. Current efforts are focused on a more operational demining perspective in coca cultivation sites in charge of mobile squadrons of eradication (EMCAR) from the National Police of Colombia working towards a future humanitarian demining upon an eventual peace process. The objectives of this review are not only to highlight already existing mine detection methods, but present a special emphasis on the role of mine detection canine teams in the context of this humanitarian issue in Colombia. This review seeks to bring together a description of chemical interactions of the environment with respect to landmine odor signatures, as well as mine detection dog operational perspectives for this specific detection task. The aim is to highlight that given the limited knowledge on the subject, there is a research gap that needs to be attended in order to efficiently establish optimal operating conditions for the reliable performance of mine detection dogs in Colombian demining field applications. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Review of the total system related to operation of nuclear-powered ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Miyashita, Kunio

    2000-01-01

    It is essential to establish a marine reactor having excellent safety and reliability, which is capable of competing economically with conventional ships, and which can be accepted by international society, in order to be prepared for practical application of future nuclear-powered ships. For this purpose, it is important not only to demonstrate a marine reactor using a model or test device to simulate actual operation, but also to establish the environmental requirements for operation of a nuclear-powered ship, such as safety standards that are operationally and internationally common for ships, and to establish a repair base for nuclear-powered ships. Systems research for the practical application of nuclear-powered ships was conducted for five years, fiscal years 1992 through 1996, by a group in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), under the project title 'Review of the total system related to operation of nuclear-powered ships.' The project sought to summarize requirements for the practical application of nuclear-powered ships from the standpoint of the need side, e.g., what nuclear-powered ships will be requested, and what functions will be provided under the expected future social environment; to show a complete system concept for the operation of nuclear-powered ships; and to clarify the situations creating demand for nuclear-powered ships, as well as the system and environmental conditions to be established for operation of practical nuclear-powered ships. Study considerations included the size of the operation system for a nuclear-powered ship, a scenario for introducing a nuclear-powered container ship, and economic evolution from the effects on the whole shipping system, based on container ships, of introducing a nuclear-powered ship. The results of these considerations were made the framework for constructing an entire system and evaluating its economy. The treatment and disposal of radioactive waste from a nuclear-powered ship, and the

  9. Measuring readiness for entrepreneurship: An information tool proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Coduras

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A profound review of the literature on entrepreneurship reveals that it does not exist a specific information tool to measure the individuals’ readiness for entrepreneurship. The purpose of this research has been building such kind of instrument to estimate the individuals’ readiness for entrepreneurship. Its design takes in consideration the inclusion of the main variables identified by the literature as those most associated with entrepreneurial profiles. These variables have been grouped into three categories: sociological, psychological and managerial-entrepreneurial. Each group provides batteries of items which are evaluated thanks to a specific scoring system. The final objective is to provide a system to calculate individual scores of readiness for entrepreneurship and, at the same time, partial scores on concrete aspects of it. The information tool is presented at this paper and will be tested and refined in the near future.

  10. System analysis for technology transfer readiness assessment of horticultural postharvest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayuningtyas, M.; Djatna, T.

    2018-04-01

    Availability of postharvest technology is becoming abundant, but only a few technologies are applicable and useful to a wider community purposes. Based on this problem it requires a significant readiness level of transfer technology approach. This system is reliable to access readiness a technology with level, from 1-9 and to minimize time of transfer technology in every level, time required technology from the selection process can be minimum. Problem was solved by using Relief method to determine ranking by weighting feasible criteria on postharvest technology in each level and PERT (Program Evaluation Review Technique) to schedule. The results from ranking process of post-harvest technology in the field of horticulture is able to pass level 7. That, technology can be developed to increase into pilot scale and minimize time required for technological readiness on PERT with optimistic time of 7,9 years. Readiness level 9 shows that technology has been tested on the actual conditions also tied with estimated production price compared to competitors. This system can be used to determine readiness of technology innovation that is derived from agricultural raw materials and passes certain stages.

  11. Ready and Able

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, John E.

    2005-01-01

    School districts operate under bidding laws that, in many cases, restrict the flexibility they have in pre-qualifying contractors and limit choices in project-delivery methods. Because the legal impediments imposed on school districts are not likely to change, it is essential that institutions focus on more effective planning and troubleshooting.…

  12. Predicting ready biodegradability of premanufacture notice chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boethling, Robert S; Lynch, David G; Thom, Gary C

    2003-04-01

    Chemical substances other than pesticides, drugs, and food additives are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), but the United States does not require that new substances be tested automatically for such critical properties as biodegradability. The resulting lack of submitted data has fostered the development of estimation methods, and the BioWIN models for predicting biodegradability from chemical structure have played a prominent role in premanufacture notice (PMN) review. Until now, validation efforts have used only the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) test data and have not included all models. To assess BioWIN performance with PMN substances, we assembled a database of PMNs for which ready biodegradation data had been submitted over the period 1995 through 2001. The 305 PMN structures are highly varied and pose major challenges to chemical property estimation. Despite the variability of ready biodegradation tests, the use of at least six different test methods, and widely varying quality of submitted data, accuracy of four of six BioWIN models (MITI linear, MITI nonlinear, survey ultimate, survey primary) was in the 80+% range for predicting ready biodegradability. Greater accuracy (>90%) can be achieved by using model estimates only when the four models agree (true for 3/4 of the PMNs). The BioWIN linear and nonlinear probability models did not perform as well even when classification criteria were optimized. The results suggest that the MITI and survey BioWIN models are suitable for use in screening-level applications.

  13. Y2K compliance readiness and contingency planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, S; Cohan, D

    1999-09-01

    As the millennium approaches, discussion of "Y2K compliance" will shift to discussion of "Y2K readiness." While "compliance" focuses on the technological functioning of one's own computers, "readiness" focuses on the operational planning required in a world of interdependence, in which the functionality of one's own computers is only part of the story. "Readiness" includes the ability to cope with potential Y2K failures of vendors, suppliers, staff, banks, utility companies, and others. Administrators must apply their traditional skills of analysis, inquiry and diligence to the manifold imaginable challenges which Y2K will thrust upon their facilities. The SPICE template can be used as a systematic tool to guide planning for this historic event.

  14. EPA's Review of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) Permits and Nutrient Management Plans in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starting in 2013, EPA conducted reviews of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) permits and nutrient management plans (NMPs) in six of the Bay jurisdictions (Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia).

  15. Post-operative ventricular flow dynamics following atrioventricular valve surgical and device therapies: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yen Ngoc; Ismail, Munirah; Kabinejadian, Foad; Tay, Edgar Lik Wui; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2018-04-01

    Intra-ventricular flow dynamics has recently emerged as an important evaluation and diagnosis tool in different cardiovascular conditions. The formation of vortex pattern during the cardiac cycle has been suggested to play important epigenetic and energy-modulation roles in cardiac remodelling, adaptations and mal-adaptations. In this new perspective, flow alterations due to different cardiovascular procedures can affect the long-term outcome of those procedures. Especially, repairs and replacements performed on atrioventricular valves are likely to exert direct impact on intra-ventricular flow pattern. In this review, current consensus around the roles of vortex dynamics in cardiac function is discussed. An overview of physiological vortex patterns found in healthy left and right ventricles as well as post-operative ventricular flow phenomenon owing to different atrioventricular valvular procedures are reviewed, followed by the summary of different vortex identification schemes used to characterise intraventricular flow. This paper also emphasises on future research directions towards a comprehensive understanding of intra-cardiac flow and its clinical relevance. The knowledge could encourage more effective pre-operative planning and better outcomes for current clinical practices. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The ALICE Data Quality Monitoring: qualitative and quantitative review of three years of operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Barthélémy von; Telesca, Adriana; Bellini, Francesca; Foka, Yiota

    2014-01-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter produced in heavy-ion collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Due to the complexity of ALICE in terms of number of detectors and performance requirements, Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) plays an essential role in providing online feedback on the data being recorded. It intends to provide shifters with precise and complete information to quickly identify problems, and as a consequence to ensure acquisition of high quality data. This paper presents a review of the ALICE DQM system during the first three years of LHC operations from a quantitative and qualitative point of view. We start by presenting the DQM software and tools before moving on to the various analyses carried out. An overview of the produced monitoring quantities is given, presenting the diversity of usage and flexibility of the DQM. Well-prepared shifters and experts, in addition to a precise organisation, were required to ensure smooth and successful operations. The description of the measures taken to ensure both aspects and an account of the DQM shifters' job are followed by a summary of the evolution of the system. We then give a quantitative review of the final setup of the system used during the whole year 2012. We conclude the paper with use cases where the DQM proved to be very valuable, scalable and efficient and with the plans for the coming years.

  17. Exploring the psychological health of emergency dispatch centre operatives: a systematic review and narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Golding

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The study objective was to investigate and synthesize available evidence relating to the psychological health of Emergency Dispatch Centre (EDC operatives, and to identify key stressors experienced by EDC operatives. Methods Eight electronic databases (Embase, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, The Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, and Google Scholar were searched. All study designs were included, and no date limits were set. Studies were included if they were published in English, and explored the psychological health of any EDC operatives, across fire, police, and emergency medical services. Studies were excluded if they related solely to other emergency workers, such as police officers or paramedics. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using checklists adapted from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A narrative synthesis was conducted, using thematic analysis. Results A total of 16 articles were included in the review. Two overarching themes were identified during the narrative synthesis: ‘Organisational and Operational Factors’ and ‘Interactions with Others’. Stressors identified included being exposed to traumatic calls, lacking control over high workload, and working in under-resourced and pressured environments. Lack of support from management and providing an emotionally demanding service were additional sources of stress. Peer support and social support from friends and family were helpful in managing work-related stress. Discussion EDC operatives experience stress as a result of their work, which appears to be related to negative psychological health outcomes. Future research should explore the long-term effects of this stress, and the potential for workplace interventions to alleviate the negative impacts on psychological health. PROSPERO Registration Number CRD42014010806.

  18. Exploring the psychological health of emergency dispatch centre operatives: a systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Sarah E; Horsfield, Claire; Davies, Annette; Egan, Bernadette; Jones, Martyn; Raleigh, Mary; Schofield, Patricia; Squires, Allison; Start, Kath; Quinn, Tom; Cropley, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate and synthesize available evidence relating to the psychological health of Emergency Dispatch Centre (EDC) operatives, and to identify key stressors experienced by EDC operatives. Eight electronic databases (Embase, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, The Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, and Google Scholar) were searched. All study designs were included, and no date limits were set. Studies were included if they were published in English, and explored the psychological health of any EDC operatives, across fire, police, and emergency medical services. Studies were excluded if they related solely to other emergency workers, such as police officers or paramedics. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using checklists adapted from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A narrative synthesis was conducted, using thematic analysis. A total of 16 articles were included in the review. Two overarching themes were identified during the narrative synthesis: 'Organisational and Operational Factors' and 'Interactions with Others'. Stressors identified included being exposed to traumatic calls, lacking control over high workload, and working in under-resourced and pressured environments. Lack of support from management and providing an emotionally demanding service were additional sources of stress. Peer support and social support from friends and family were helpful in managing work-related stress. EDC operatives experience stress as a result of their work, which appears to be related to negative psychological health outcomes. Future research should explore the long-term effects of this stress, and the potential for workplace interventions to alleviate the negative impacts on psychological health. CRD42014010806.

  19. Cold and compression in the management of musculoskeletal injuries and orthopedic operative procedures: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon E Block

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jon E BlockJon E Block, PhD., Incorporated, San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Cold and compression are routinely applied immediately after acute injury or ­following surgery to alleviate pain, reduce swelling and speed functional recovery. The objective of this literature review is to describe the published clinical findings regarding combined cold and compression therapy in the management of musculoskeletal injuries and after orthopedic operative procedures. Of 33 potential articles triaged, the findings of 21 randomized controlled trials were assessed and summarized. The findings reported by these 21 studies were largely subjective pain outcomes and, to a lesser degree, swelling and range of motion, and were inconsistent and divergent, making it difficult to recommend the most appropriate, effective clinical application of cold and compression. Further, 18 of the 21 reported studies evaluated cold and static compression, where the extent and duration of the compression was not uniform within or across studies. Operative procedures may offer a more controlled environment for rigorous investigations. However, such studies must be powered sufficiently to account for variations in surgical procedure that could affect outcomes. More uniform operative procedures, such as total knee arthroplasty, represent a well circumscribed intervention for studying the clinical utility of cold compression therapy because the operative technique is standardized, surgical tissue damage is extensive, intraoperative blood loss is high, and post-operative edema and pain are severe. Findings from randomized controlled trials of knee arthroplasty generally showed cold compression therapy provides better outcomes such as pain relief than alternative interventions. While the effects of cold and static compression are clearly better than no treatment, they do not appear to be directly additive.Keywords: cryotherapy, injury

  20. Ready to crown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McReynolds, David

    2017-04-01

    When multiple teeth or localised segments of the mouth require crowns, the restorative interventions involved can be psychologically and physically demanding for the operator, patient and dental technician alike.1,2 It is important that all parties involved in restorations of this nature hold a shared understanding of the expected outcome of treatment, with a realistic, common end goal in mind right from the very beginning. Such clarity of thought and communication is key to avoiding biological, mechanical and aesthetic failures in the planning and execution of advanced restorative treatments. Biomechanically stable and aesthetically pleasing provisional restorations are an essential aspect of treatment, which allow teeth to be prepared and provisionalised over multiple appointments within the comfort zone of the operator and patient.3

  1. Ready for the plunge!

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Herman Ten Kate, Project Leader for the ATLAS magnet system, standing in front of the truck transporting the magnet across the Route de Meyrin.Every time any part of the ATLAS detector is moved, it’s quite a spectacle! On Tuesday 29 May, the first end-cap of the ATLAS toroid magnet left Building 180, bound for Point 1. The 240-ton behemoth covered the two short kilometres in no less than five hours. Traffic was interrupted on the Route de Meyrin while the exceptional load was wheeled to its final destination. One of the technical challenges was to keep the magnet horizontal throughout the operation and, to achieve this, computers permanently monitored the magnet’s angles of displacement and hydraulic jacks rectified any tilt. But the most hazardous part of operation remains the 80-m plunge into the ATLAS cavern.

  2. IAEA Operational Safety Team (OSART) Reviews Progress at Fessenheim Nuclear Power Plant, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear installation safety experts, led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has evaluated the French Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) at Fessenheim to assess how the facility has followed up on an Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) mission undertaken in 2009. The IAEA assembled a team of experts at the request of the Government of France to conduct the mission. Follow-up missions are standard components of the OSART programme and are conducted 18-24 months after the initial OSART mission. Under the leadership of the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, the team performed its review from 7 to 11 February 2011. The team assessed how the Fessenheim NPP has addressed the recommendations and suggestions made during the 2009 OSART mission. The team was made up of experts from Slovakia, Switzerland and the IAEA. The review covered the areas of Management, Organization and Administration; Training and Qualifications; Operations; Maintenance; Technical Support; Operating Experience; Radiation Protection; Chemistry and Emergency Planning and Preparedness. The conclusions of the follow-up review are based on the IAEA's Safety Standards and proven good international practices. There were 21 issues raised by the 2009 mission. During the follow-up mission, the team assessed that six issues had been resolved, thirteen had made satisfactory progress to date and two had made insufficient progress to date. 'Resolved' describes action plans for improvement that have been fully implemented; 'satisfactory progress to date' describes action plans that have been developed but are not yet fully implemented; and 'insufficient progress to date' describes situations where additional consideration or strengthening of improvement plans is necessary. Examples of issues falling into different resolution categories include: The plant has resolved the suggestion to establish a process to review initial training materials on a regular basis

  3. The Social Context of Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Regena Fails

    This study examined how kindergarten teachers' views of readiness (maturational, learning, or school) are influenced by students from urban, suburban, and rural areas; by minority and non-minority students; and by students from lower and middle class backgrounds. The framework for the study was the social constructivist theory, the theory that all…

  4. Readiness for Solving Story Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, William F.

    1982-01-01

    Readiness activities are described which are designed to help learning disabled (LD) students learn to perform computations in story problems. Activities proceed from concrete objects to numbers and involve the students in devising story problems. The language experience approach is incorporated with the enactive, iconic, and symbolic levels of…

  5. Consequence Management - Ready or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-07

    Defense will have sufficient capability and be ready to respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects attack. An effective consequence management...Defense adopts the National Military Strategy and its consequence management approach, it must identify Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects threats...that the Department of Defense: develop Weapons of Mass Destruction/ Effects performance standards for response assets; implement a consequence

  6. Onderzoek online readiness modezaken 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, Han; Weltevreden, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van modezaken in 2012 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 124 (voornamelijk zelfstandige) modezaken deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de

  7. Onderzoek online readiness rijscholen 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weltevreden, Jesse; Boels, Han

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van rijscholen in 2013 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 115 rijscholen deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de Hogeschool van Amsterdam.

  8. Workplace Readiness for Communicating Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Clive

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a model for communicating change about diversity using a workplace-readiness approach. Discusses ways organizational change agents can assess the company's current interpersonal and social dynamics, use appropriate influence strategies, and create effective messages that will appeal to employees and help to achieve the desired acceptance…

  9. Human Resources Readiness as TSO for Deterministic Safety Analysis on the First NPP in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sony Tjahyani, D. T.

    2010-01-01

    In government regulation no. 43 year 2006 it is mentioned that preliminary safety analysis report and final safety analysis report are one of requirements which should be applied in construction and operation licensing for commercial power reactor (NPPs). The purpose of safety analysis report is to confirm the adequacy and efficiency of provisions within the defence in depth of nuclear reactor. Deterministic analysis is used on the safety analysis report. One of the TSO task is to evaluate this report based on request of operator or regulatory body. This paper discusses about human resources readiness as TSO for deterministic safety analysis on the first NPP in Indonesia. The assessment is done by comparing the analysis step on SS-23 and SS-30 with human resources status of BATAN currently. The assessment results showed that human resources for deterministic safety analysis are ready as TSO especially to review preliminary safety analysis report and to revise final safety analysis report in licensing on the first NPP in Indonesia. Otherwise, to prepare the safety analysis report is still needed many competency human resources. (author)

  10. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS'A' operation for the year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents AECB project staff's review of major licensing issues and of the operational performance of the station during 1987. Ontario Hydro reports and official correspondence and observations on AECB staff at site have been taken into consideration. The report is limited to aspects of the station performance that AECB staff considers to have a safety significance. Where significant developments associated with issues addressed in the report occurred in the early part of 1988 (up to the time of writing), these are mentioned where appropriate. Ontario Hydro's Quarterly Reports for 1987 contain detailed technical information on the performance of the station, individual units and unit systems. It is the opinion of AECB project staff that despite a number of commendable actions and achievements which are identified in this report, the performance of the station in 1987 was only marginally satisfactory and less satisfactory than in 1986. This assessment is supported by key performance indicators such as the number of reportable significant events, the number of events caused by or influenced by human error and the reactor trip frequency, all of which exceeded 1986 levels, and also by the lack of satisfactory progress made during the year on actions to address the findings of the Fall '86 AECB Assessment of Operating Practices. AECB staff considers that the outstanding operations and maintenance problems that were identified in the 1986 Assessment are due, in part, to an ineffective quality assurance program, and in part to a shortage of resources

  11. From a Systematic Literature Review to a Classification Framework: Sustainability Integration in Fashion Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Karaosman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability management in global fashion operations is an area of growing concern. This can be seen by the number of research articles and industrial reports published. To establish a further debate, this study pursues two objectives. Firstly, it provides a systematic literature review pertaining to environmental and social sustainability management in fashion operations by encompassing 38 research articles indexed in Scopus from 2006 to 2016. Secondly, it presents a classification framework in which sustainability practices are categorized according to a three-dimensional concurrent engineering framework by focusing on product, process and supply chain levels. Results address that the breakdown of environmental and social sustainability practices identified in earlier research is not homogenous. For instance, some critical social aspects such as human rights are not widely covered in production processes. Similarly, serious environmental aspects such as biodiversity are not entirely focused on at the chain level. Last, this study concludes with a framework illustrating strategic priorities to be taken to advance sustainability in fashion operations.

  12. Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Donna E.

    2006-01-01

    "Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators" presents a set of baseline measurements that gauge how well a statewide system of school readiness supports is addressing issues that affect Arizona children's readiness for school. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the system, rather…

  13. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  14. Remedial action and waste disposal project -- 300-FF-1 remedial action readiness assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Carlson, R.A.; Greif, A.A.; Johnson, C.R.; Orewiler, R.I.; Perry, D.M.; Plastino, J.C.; Roeck, F.V.; Tuttle, B.G.

    1997-04-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan presents the methodology used to assess the readiness of the 300-FF-1 Remedial Action Project. Remediation involves the excavation, treatment if applicable, and final disposal of contaminated soil and debris associated with the waste sites in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. The scope of the 300-FF-1 remediation is to excavate, transport, and dispose of contaminated solid from sites identified in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit

  15. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a... Production and Process Control System: Requirements for Quality Control § 111.113 What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? (a) Quality control personnel must...

  16. Is non-operative management safe and effective for all splenic blunt trauma? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Boselli, Carlo; Corsi, Alessia; Farinella, Eriberto; Listorti, Chiara; Trastulli, Stefano; Renzi, Claudio; Desiderio, Jacopo; Santoro, Alberto; Cagini, Lucio; Parisi, Amilcare; Redler, Adriano; Noya, Giuseppe; Fingerhut, Abe

    2013-09-03

    The goal of non-operative management (NOM) for blunt splenic trauma (BST) is to preserve the spleen. The advantages of NOM for minor splenic trauma have been extensively reported, whereas its value for the more severe splenic injuries is still debated. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available published evidence on NOM in patients with splenic trauma and to compare it with the operative management (OM) in terms of mortality, morbidity and duration of hospital stay. For this systematic review we followed the "Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses" statement. A systematic search was performed on PubMed for studies published from January 2000 to December 2011, without language restrictions, which compared NOM vs. OM for splenic trauma injuries and which at least 10 patients with BST. We identified 21 non randomized studies: 1 Clinical Controlled Trial and 20 retrospective cohort studies analyzing a total of 16,940 patients with BST. NOM represents the gold standard treatment for minor splenic trauma and is associated with decreased mortality in severe splenic trauma (4.78% vs. 13.5% in NOM and OM, respectively), according to the literature. Of note, in BST treated operatively, concurrent injuries accounted for the higher mortality. In addition, it was not possible to determine post-treatment morbidity in major splenic trauma. The definition of hemodynamic stability varied greatly in the literature depending on the surgeon and the trauma team, representing a further bias. Moreover, data on the remaining analyzed outcomes (hospital stay, number of blood transfusions, abdominal abscesses, overwhelming post-splenectomy infection) were not reported in all included studies or were not comparable, precluding the possibility to perform a meaningful cumulative analysis and comparison. NOM of BST, preserving the spleen, is the treatment of choice for the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grades I and II

  17. Maintenance Action Readiness Assessment Plan for Waste Area Grouping 1 inactive Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan has been prepared to document operational readiness for the maintenance action consisting of remediation of four inactive liquid low-level radioactive tanks in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The four tanks to be remediated are Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 will be removed from the ground. Because of logistical issues associated with excavation and site access, Tank 3013 will be grouted in place and permanently closed. This project is being performed as a maintenance action rather than an action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, because the risk to human health and environment is well below the US Environmental Protection Agency's level of concern. The decision to proceed as a maintenance action was documented by an interim action proposed plan, which is included in the administrative record. A Readiness Assessment Team has been assembled to review the criteria deemed necessary to conduct the remediation tasks. These criteria include approval of all plans, acquisition of needed equipment, completion of personnel training, and coordination with plant health and safety personnel. Once the criteria have been met and documented, the task will begin. The readiness assessment is expected to be completed by late July 1995, and the task will begin thereafter

  18. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves: review of methods with applications in diagnostic medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchowski, Nancy A.; Bullen, Jennifer A.

    2018-04-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is a tool used to describe the discrimination accuracy of a diagnostic test or prediction model. While sensitivity and specificity are the basic metrics of accuracy, they have many limitations when characterizing test accuracy, particularly when comparing the accuracies of competing tests. In this article we review the basic study design features of ROC studies, illustrate sample size calculations, present statistical methods for measuring and comparing accuracy, and highlight commonly used ROC software. We include descriptions of multi-reader ROC study design and analysis, address frequently seen problems of verification and location bias, discuss clustered data, and provide strategies for testing endpoints in ROC studies. The methods are illustrated with a study of transmission ultrasound for diagnosing breast lesions.

  19. A Review of the Ergonomic Issues in the Laparoscopic Operating Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang D. Choi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review paper discusses the ergonomic challenges associated with laparoscopy in the operating room (OR and summarizes the practical ergonomic solutions. The literature search was conducted in the fields of laparoscopy and applied ergonomics. Findings indicated that laparoscopic OR staff (surgeons, perioperative nurses and technicians commonly experienced physical and mental ergonomic risks while working in prolonged static and awkward body positions. This study highlighted the need for more ergonomic interventions in OR environment in order to improve the efficiency of laparoscopy. Ergonomic solutions included utilizing adjustable equipment, placing computer peripherals in optimal locations, providing ergonomic instruments, and improving communication. Understanding the job- or task-related ergonomic risks and hazards could help identify intervention requirements to meet the challenges associated with increased dependency on advanced high technology in the OR.

  20. Operation variables in transesterification of vegetable oil: an enzymatic catalysis review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Rojas González

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a literature review regarding how operating conditions influence vegetable oil enzymatic transesterification yield. The following parameters were studied: temperature and time reaction, alcohol: oil molar ratio, alcohol type, biocatalyst type and concentration, solvent, mixed intensity, reagent purity and free fatty acid and moisture concentration. Yields greater than 90% can be achieved in the enzymatic catalyst of vegetable oil using 35-50°C temperatures, long time reactions (7- 90h and a 3:1alcohol: vegetable oil molar ratio; however, such values would intrinsically depend on the type of lipase and oil u- sed. It was also found that free fatty acid and moisture concentration were parameters which did not require rigorous control due to high enzyme specificity. Lipases immobilised from Pseudomona cepacia bacteria and Rhizopus orizae fungi were most used in vegetable oil enzymatic transesterification.

  1. Development of regulatory guide for review of aging management of the operating NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Tae Myung; Lee, Jae Kyung [Cheongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ryul [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    This is the final report of the second year study. Based on the first year study, proposal of revised guidelines, analysis of revised or newly issued IAEA safety guides and reference guidelines of developed countries, and proposal of detailed guidelines of aging management in PSR have been performed in the second year study. The summary of results in the study so far can be summarized as below, overall view on PSR and idea of effective domestic application were leaded through additional investigation and comparison of legal basis, experiences and current status of PSR implementation among the countries having operating NPPs including Korea. Strategies of adequate application of PSR are roughly reevaluated and totally reestablished in summary from the analysis in factor by factor basis of PSR implementation experience in foreign countries and background of IAEA guidelines. Models and draft framework of PSR report in the first year study were summarized and reevaluated, and structure and outline options of PSR guidelines for judging the PSR report are newly proposed with comparison of their strengths and weaknesses based on the first year study. Among the opt ions, guidelines framework equivalent to the PSR report was picked up as the best. For the judgement of aging management, the most appropriate one was chosen for the detailed judgement of aging management review in our PSR being based on the Standard Review Plan for License Renewal (SRP-LR) in United States considering potential future usage in the judgement for continued operation of old NPP at the time of expiration of its design life. A draft PSR guidelines is prepared and attached by revision of basic guidelines issued in 2000, considering the issues discussed for the draft revision of IAEA PSR guide, the draft IAEA document about 'experience of PSR implementation of member states', and the characteristics of Hungarian PSR Guidelines.

  2. Surgeons' and surgical trainees' acute stress in real operations or simulation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Konstantinos; Larentzakis, Andreas; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2017-12-01

    Acute stress in surgery is ubiquitous and has an immediate impact on surgical performance and patient safety. Surgeons react with several coping strategies; however, they recognise the necessity of formal stress management training. Thus, stress assessment is a direct need. Surgical simulation is a validated standardised training milieu designed to replicate real-life situations. It replicates stress, prevents biases, and provides objective metrics. The complexity of stress mechanisms makes stress measurement difficult to quantify and interpret. This systematic review aims to identify studies that have used acute stress estimation measurements in surgeons or surgical trainees during real operations or surgical simulation, and to collectively present the rationale of these tools, with special emphasis in salivary markers. A search strategy was implemented to retrieve relevant articles from MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases. The 738 articles retrieved were reviewed for further evaluation according to the predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thirty-three studies were included in this systematic review. The methods for acute stress assessment varied greatly among studies with the non-invasive techniques being the most commonly used. Subjective and objective tests for surgeons' acute stress assessment are being presented. There is a broad spectrum of acute mental stress assessment tools in the surgical field and simulation and salivary biomarkers have recently gained popularity. There is a need to maintain a consistent methodology in future research, towards a deeper understanding of acute stress in the surgical field. Copyright © 2017 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Safety and health in forest harvesting operations. Diagnosis and preventive actions. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albizu-Urionabarrenetxea, P. M.; Tolosana-Esteban, E.; Roman-Jordan, E.

    2013-07-01

    Aim of study: to review the present state of the art in relation to the main labour risks and the most relevant results of recent studies evaluating the safety and health conditions of the forest harvesting work and better ways to reduce accidents. Area of study: It focuses mainly on developed Countries, where the general concern about work risks prevention, together with the complex idiosyncrasy of forest work in forest harvesting operations, has led to a growing interest from the forest scientific and technical community. Material and Methods: The main bibliographic and Internet references have been identified using common reference analysis tools. Their conclusions and recommendations have been comprehensively summarized. Main results: Collection of the principal references and their most important conclusions relating to the main accident risk factors, their causes and consequences, the means used towards their prevention, both instrumental as well as in the aspects of training and business management, besides the influence of the growing mechanization of logging operations on those risks. Research highlights: Accident risk is higher in forest harvesting than in most other work sectors, and the main risk factors such as experience, age, seasonality, training, protective equipment, mechanization degree, etc. have been identified and studied. The paper summarizes some relevant results, one of the principal being that the proper entrepreneurial risk management is a key factor leading to the success in minimizing labour risks. (Author)

  4. The indications and timing for operative management of spinal epidural abscess: literature review and treatment algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchman, Alexander; Pham, Martin; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2014-08-01

    Delayed or inappropriate treatment of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can lead to serious morbidity or death. It is a rare event with significant variation in its causes, anatomical locations, and rate of progression. Traditionally the treatment of choice has involved emergency surgical evacuation and a prolonged course of antibiotics tailored to the offending pathogen. Recent publications have advocated antibiotic treatment without surgical decompression in select patient populations. Clearly defining those patients who can be safely treated in this manner remains in evolution. The authors review the current literature concerning the treatment and outcome of SEA to make recommendations concerning what population can be safely triaged to nonoperative management and the optimal timing of surgery. A PubMed database search was performed using a combination of search terms and Medical Subject Headings, to identify clinical studies reporting on the treatment and outcome of SEA. The literature review revealed 28 original case series containing at least 30 patients and reporting on treatment and outcome. All cohorts were deemed Class III evidence, and in all but two the data were obtained retrospectively. Based on the conclusions of these studies along with selected smaller studies and review articles, the authors present an evidence-based algorithm for selecting patients who may be safe candidates for nonoperative management. Patients who are unable to undergo an operation, have a complete spinal cord injury more than 48 hours with low clinical or radiographic concern for an ascending lesion, or who are neurologically stable and lack risk factors for failure of medical management may be initially treated with antibiotics alone and close clinical monitoring. If initial medical management is to be undertaken the patient should be made aware that delayed neurological deterioration may not fully resolve even after prompt surgical treatment. Patients deemed good surgical

  5. Operative management versus non-operative management of rib fractures in flail chest injuries: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, Jaap; Goslings, J. C.; Schepers, T.

    2017-01-01

    Flail chest is a life-threatening complication of severe chest trauma with a mortality rate of up to 15 %. The standard non-operative management has high comorbidities with pneumonia and often leads to extended Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay, due to insufficient respiratory function and

  6. Achieving year 2000 readiness: basic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This document provides an approach or addressing safety and operability concerns related to Year 2000 (Y2K). Although it was prepared for nuclear power plants the methods described are applicable to other nuclear installations and to other industrial concerns. The basic goal was to provide a brief but comprehensive approach that may be used to discover, understand and correct the Y2K related problems. The document relies on certain basic expectations of the facility that would apply to any programme: ownership, management, knowledgeable participants, thorough application of the approach, documentation of efforts, quality assurance of products and compliance with all regulatory requirements. The IAEA has and will continue to be involved with Member States to assist them in implementing this document and achieving Y2K Readiness

  7. Ready to regulate small reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herstead, S.; Cook, S.; De Vos, M.; Howden, B.D. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The success of any new build project is reliant upon all stakeholders - applicants, vendors, contractors and regulatory agencies - being ready to do their part. Over the past several years, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has been working to ensure that it has the appropriate regulatory framework and internal processes in place for the timely and efficient licensing of all types of reactor, regardless of size. The CNSC's general nuclear safety objective requires that nuclear facilities be designed and operated in a manner that will protect the health, safety and security of persons and the environment from unreasonable risk, and to implement Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. For smaller facilities, this has traditionally allowed for the use of a graded approach to achieving safety.

  8. Achieving year 2000 readiness: basic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This document provides an approach or addressing safety and operability concerns related to Year 2000 (Y2K). Although it was prepared for nuclear power plants the methods described are applicable to other nuclear installations and to other industrial concerns. The basic goal was to provide a brief but comprehensive approach that may be used to discover, understand and correct the Y2K related problems. The document relies on certain basic expectations of the facility that would apply to any programme: ownership, management, knowledgeable participants, thorough application of the approach, documentation of efforts, quality assurance of products and compliance with all regulatory requirements. The IAEA has and will continue to be involved with Member States to assist them in implementing this document and achieving Y2K Readiness 12 refs, 3 figs

  9. GRENADA. Renewables Readiness Assessment 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Grenada, like many Caribbean islands, is dependent on costly oil imports for its energy needs, including the generation of electricity. The transition to renewable energy could potentially support price reductions and improve the overall competitiveness of key sectors of the economy, particularly tourism. This report provides facts and analysis to support the country's discussion on ways to move forward with the renewable energy agenda. IRENA is ready to provide support in the implementation of the actions identified in this report.

  10. Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition with ready-to-use supplementary food results in higher overall recovery rates compared with a corn-soya blend in children in southern Ethiopia: an operations research trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakochuk, Crystal; van den Briel, Tina; Stephens, Derek; Zlotkin, Stanley

    2012-10-01

    Moderate and severe acute malnutrition affects 13% of children malnutrition affects fewer children but is associated with higher rates of mortality and morbidity. Supplementary feeding programs aim to treat moderate acute malnutrition and prevent the deterioration to severe acute malnutrition. The aim was to compare recovery rates of children with moderate acute malnutrition in supplementary feeding programs by using the newly recommended ration of ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF) and the more conventional ration of corn-soya blend (CSB) in Ethiopia. A total of 1125 children aged 6-60 mo with moderate acute malnutrition received 16 wk of CSB or RUSF. Children were randomly assigned to receive one or the other food. The daily rations were purposely based on the conventional treatment rations distributed at the time of the study in Ethiopia: 300 g CSB and 32 g vegetable oil in the control group (1413 kcal) and 92 g RUSF in the intervention group (500 kcal). The higher ration size of CSB was provided because of expected food sharing. The HR for children in the CSB group was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.99), which indicated that they had 15% lower recovery (P = 0.039). Recovery rates of children at the end of the 16-wk treatment period trended higher in the RUSF group (73%) than in the CSB group (67%) (P = 0.056). In comparison with CSB, the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition with RUSF resulted in higher recovery rates in children, despite the large ration size and higher energy content of the conventional CSB ration.

  11. Operation Poorman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.; Tsitouras, J.

    1981-01-01

    The objectives of Operation Poorman were to design and build a portable seismic system and to set up and use this system in a cold-weather environment. The equipment design uses current technology to achieve a low-power, lightweight system that is configured into three modules. The system was deployed in Alaska during wintertime, and the results provide a basis for specifying a mission-ready seismic verification system

  12. Pre-operative planning and intra-operative guidance in modern neurosurgery: a review of 300 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadley, J.; Dorward, N.; Kitchen, N.; Thomas, D.

    1999-01-01

    Operative neurosurgery has recently entered an exciting era of image guided surgery or neuronavigation and application of this novel technology is beginning to have a significant impact in many ways in a variety of intracranial procedures. In order to fully assess the advantages of image guided techniques over conventional planning and surgery in selected cases, detailed prospective evaluation has been carried out during the advanced development of an optically tracked neuronavigation system. Over a 2-year period, 300 operative neurosurgical procedures have been performed with the assistance of interactive image guidance, as well as the development of new software applications and hardware tools. A broad range of intracranial neurosurgical procedures were seen to benefit from image guidance, including 163 craniotomies, 53 interactive stereotactic biopsies, 7 tracked neuroendoscopies and 37 complex skull base procedures. The most common pathological diagnoses were cerebral glioma in 98 cases, meningioma in 64 and metastasis in 23. Detailed analysis of a battery of postoperative questions revealed benefits in operative planning, appreciation of anatomy, lesion location, safety of surgery and greatly enhanced surgical confidence. The authors believe that image guided surgical technology, with new developments such as those described, has a significant role to play in contemporary neurosurgery and its widespread adoption in practice will be realised in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:10615186

  13. Use of technology to support information needs for continuity of operations planning in public health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Blaine; Turner, Anne; Demiris, George

    2010-01-01

    Continuity of operations planning focuses on an organization's ability to deliver essential services before, during and after an emergency. Public health leaders must make decisions based on information from many sources and their information needs are often facilitated or hindered by technology. The aim of this study is to provide a systematic review of studies of technology projects that address public health continuity of operations planning information needs and to discuss patterns, themes, and challenges to inform the design of public health continuity of operations information systems. To return a comprehensive results set in an under-explored area, we searched broadly in the Medline and EBSCOHost bibliographic databases using terms from prior work in public health emergency management and continuity of operations planning in other domains. In addition, we manually searched the citation lists of publications included for review. A total of 320 publications were reviewed. Twenty studies were identified for inclusion (twelve risk assessment decision support tools, six network and communications-enabled decision support tools, one training tool and one dedicated video-conferencing tool). Levels of implementation for information systems in the included studies range from proposed frameworks to operational systems. There is a general lack of documented efforts in the scientific literature for technology projects about public health continuity of operations planning. Available information about operational information systems suggest inclusion of public health practitioners in the design process as a factor in system success.

  14. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The concept of readiness to change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Cindy C; Gottlieb, Laurie N

    2003-04-01

    Readiness is associated with change, yet there is little understanding of this construct. The purpose of this study was to examine readiness; its referents, associated factors and the resulting consequences. In the course of nursing five clients living with multiple sclerosis over a 7-month period using a Reflective Practice Model, data were systematically gathered using open-ended and then more focused questioning. Data collected during 42 client encounters (28 face-to-face encounters; 14 telephone contacts) were analysed using Chinn and Kramer's concept analysis technique. Findings. The concept of readiness was inductively derived. Readiness is both a state and a process. Before clients can create change they need to become ready to change. A number of factors trigger readiness. These include when: (a) clients perceive that a health concern is not going to resolve, (b) a change in a client's physical condition takes on new significance, (c) clients feel better able to manage their stress, (d) clients have sufficient energy, (e) clients perceive that they have adequate support in undertaking change. When one or more of these factors is present clients become ready to consider change. The process of readiness involves recognizing the need to change, weighing the costs and benefits and, when benefits outweigh costs, planning for change. The desire to change and to take action determines clients' degree of readiness. When they experience a high degree of readiness they report less anger, less depression, and view their condition in a more positive light. In contrast, when they experience a low degree of readiness they report feeling depressed, afraid and vulnerable in the face of change. Nursing has an important role to play in creating conditions to support change. To fulfil this role, nurses need to be able to assess readiness for change and the factors that enable it and then to intervene in ways that facilitate readiness.

  16. Maintenance action readiness assessment plan for White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Weir Stilling Pool cleanout at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan has been prepared to document operational readiness for the following maintenance action: (1) removal of sediment from the White Oak Creek and Melton Branch Weir Stilling Pools and (2) disposal of the radiologically contaminated sediment in another location upstream of the weirs in an area previously contaminated by stream overflow from Melton Branch in Waste Area Grouping 2 (WAG) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This project is being performed as a maintenance action rather than an action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act because the risk to human health and environment is well below the US Environmental Protection Agency's level of concern. The decision to proceed as a maintenance action was documented by an interim action proposed plan, which is included in the administrative record. The administrative record is available for review at the US Department of Energy Information Resource Center, 105 Broadway Avenue, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830

  17. Pre-operative Predictive Factors of Post-operative Pain in Patients With Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Clara; Díaz-Heredia, Jorge; Berraquero, María Luisa; Crespo, Pablo; Loza, Estíbaliz; Ruiz Ibán, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    To analyze pre-surgical predictive factors of post-surgical pain in patients undergoing hip or knee arthoplasty. A systematic literature review was performed. We defined a sensitive strategy on Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library up to May 2013. The inclusion criteria were: patients undertaking knee and/or hip arthroplasty, adults with moderate or severe pain (≥4 on a Visual Analog Scale) in whom predictive factors of post-surgical pain were evaluated before surgery. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, controlled trials and observational studies were selected. We excluded animals and basic science articles, reviews of prosthesis, prosthesis due to fractures, patients with rheumatic diseases or studies with mixed population in which disaggregated data was not possible to obtain. A total 37 articles of moderate quality were selected. The articles included representative patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty in our country; most of them were aged 60 years or above, with osteoarthritis, and with a high rate of obesity and comorbidities. We found great variability regarding the type of studies and predictive factors. There was a strong association between post-surgical pain and the following pre-surgical factors: female gender, low socio-economic status, higher pain, comorbidities, low back pain, poor functional status, and psychological factors (depression, anxiety or catastrophic pain). There are pre-surgical factors that might influence post-surgical pain in patients undergoing a knee or hip arthroplasty. Therefore, they should be taken into account when considering an arthroplasty. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  18. 33 CFR 150.531 - How many fire pumps must be kept ready for use at all times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How many fire pumps must be kept ready for use at all times? 150.531 Section 150.531 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Specialty Equipment Miscellaneous Operations § 150.531 How many fire pumps must be kept ready for use at all...

  19. Using Positive Behavior Support Procedures in Head Start Classrooms to Improve School Readiness: A Group Training and Behavioral Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Edward G.; Walker, Hill; Severson, Herbert; Golly, Annemieke; Seeley, John R.; Small, Jason W.

    2009-01-01

    Social-emotional competence is an important determinant of school readiness. School readiness, in turn, sets the stage for school success. There is clear longitudinal evidence that school success, attachment and bonding to the schooling process, and full engagement of schooling can, in combination, operate as a protective factor against a host of…

  20. Post-operative adhesions after digestive surgery: their incidence and prevention: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouaïssi, M; Gaujoux, S; Veyrie, N; Denève, E; Brigand, C; Castel, B; Duron, J J; Rault, A; Slim, K; Nocca, D

    2012-04-01

    Post-operative adhesions after gastrointestinal surgery are responsible for significant morbidity and constitute an important public health problem. The aim of this study was to review the surgical literature to determine the incidence, consequences and the variety of possible countermeasures to prevent adhesion formation. A systematic review of English and French language surgical literature published between 1995 and 2009 was performed using the keywords "adhesion" and "surgery". Peritoneal adhesions are reported as the cause of 32% of acute intestinal obstruction and 65-75% of all small bowel obstructions. It is estimated that peritoneal adhesions develop after 93-100% of upper abdominal laparotomies and after 67-93% of lower abdominal laparotomies. Nevertheless, only 15-18% of these adhesions require surgical re-intervention. The need for re-intervention for adhesion-related complications varies depending on the initial type of surgery, the postoperative course and the type of incision. The laparoscopic approach appears to decrease the risk of adhesion formation by 45% and the need for adhesion-related re-intervention to 0.8% after appendectomy and to 2.5% after colorectal surgery. At the present time, only one product consisting of hyaluronic acid applied to a layer of carboxymethylcellulose (Seprafilm(®)) has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of postoperative adhesion formation; but this product is also associated with a significant increase in the incidence of anastomotic leakage when the membrane is applied in direct contact with the anastomosis. The use of this product has not been shown to decrease the risk of re-intervention for bowel obstruction. The prevention of postoperative adhesions is an important public health goal, particularly in light of the frequency of this complication. The routine use of anti-adhesion products is not recommended given the lack of studies with a high level of evidence concerning their efficacy and safety of

  1. PROSPER guidelines: Guidelines for peer review and for plant self-assessment of operational experience feedback process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Effective use of operational performance information is an important element in any plant operator's arrangements for enhancing the operational safety of a nuclear power plant (NPP). This has been recognized in the IAEA Safety Fundamental, The Safety of Nuclear Installations (Safety Series No. 110). Under the technical aspects of safety, one of the principles of operation and maintenance is that the operating organization and the regulatory body shall establish complementary programmes to analyse operating experience to ensure that lessons are learned and acted upon. Such experience shall be shared with relevant national and international bodies. The Convention on Nuclear Safety, which entered into force in July 1996, also recognized the importance of operational experience feedback as a tool of high importance for the safety of nuclear plant operation and its further enhancement. It follows that the arrangements and results achieved under the operation experience feedback process in Member States will be covered by the national report under the Convention and will be subject to periodical review. These principles are further expanded in the IAEA Safety Standards Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation (Safety Standard Series No. NS-R-2, year 2000) under the Feedback of The IAEA-led Peer Review of the effectiveness of the Operational Safety Performance Experience Review process (PROSPER) and associated guidelines have been developed to provide advice and assistance to utilities or individual power plants to strengthen and enhance the effectiveness of operational experience programmes in achieving these fundamental objectives. The objectives of the former IAEA Assessment of Significant Safety Events Team (ASSET) service have been expanded to include an evaluation of the effective use of all operating performance information available to the plant (e.g. external operating experience, internal low-level and near miss event reports and other relevant operating

  2. Do safety checklists improve teamwork and communication in the operating room? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Stephanie; Rout, Shantanu; Sevdalis, Nick; Moorthy, Krishna; Darzi, Ara; Vincent, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the impact of surgical safety checklists on the quality of teamwork and communication in the operating room (OR). Safety checklists have been shown to impact positively on patient morbidity and mortality following surgery, but it is unclear whether this clinical improvement is related to an improvement in OR teamwork and communication. A systematic search strategy of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Database for Systematic Reviews was undertaken to obtain relevant articles. After de-duplication and the addition of limits, 315 articles were screened for inclusion by 2 researchers and all articles meeting a set of prespecified inclusion criteria were retained. Information regarding the type of checklist, study design, assessment tools used, outcomes, and study limitations was extracted. Twenty articles formed the basis of this systematic review. All articles described an empirical study relating to a case-specific safety checklist for surgery as the primary intervention, with some measure of change/improvement in teamwork and/or communication relating to its use. The methods for assessing teamwork and communication varied greatly, including surveys, observations, interviews, and 360° assessments. The evidence suggests that safety checklists improve the perceived quality of OR teamwork and communication and reduce observable errors relating to poor team skills. This is likely to function through establishing an open platform for communication at the start of a procedure: encouraging the sharing of critical case-related information, promoting team coordination and decision making, flagging knowledge gaps, and enhancing team cohesion. However, the evidence would also suggest that when used suboptimally or when individuals have not bought in to the process, checklists may conversely have a negative impact on the function of the team. Safety checklists are beneficial for OR teamwork and

  3. Design review report: 200 East upgrades for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boes, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    This Design Review Report (DRR) documents the contractor design verification methodology and records associated with project W-314's 200 East (200E) Upgrades design package. The DRR includes the documented comments and their respective dispositions for this design. Acceptance of the comment dispositions and closure of the review comments is indicated by the signatures of the participating reviewers. Project W-314 is a project within the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Tank Waste Retrieval Program. This project provides capital upgrades for the existing Hanford tank farm waste transfer, instrumentation, ventilation, and electrical infrastructure systems. To support established TWRS programmatic objectives, the project is organized into two distinct phases. The initial focus of the project (i.e., Phase 1) is on waste transfer system upgrades needed to support the TWRS Privatization waste feed delivery system. Phase 2 of the project will provide upgrades to support resolution of regulatory compliance issues, improve tank infrastructure reliability, and reduce overall plant operating/maintenance costs. Within Phase 1 of the W-314 project, the waste transfer system upgrades are further broken down into six major packages which align with the project's work breakdown structure. Each of these six sub-elements includes the design, procurement, and construction activities necessary to accomplish the specific tank farm upgrades contained within the package. The first design package (AN Valve Pit Upgrades) was completed in November 1997, and the associated design verification activities are documented in HNF-1893. The second design package, 200 East (200E) Upgrades, was completed in March 1998. This design package identifies modifications to existing valve pits 241-AX-B and 241-A-B, as well as several new waste transfer pipelines to be constructed within the A Farm Complex of the 200E Area. The scope of the valve pit modifications includes new pit cover blocks, valve

  4. StormReady in a Box: Enhancing NOAA's Presence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, N. S.; Franks, C.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service StormReady Supporter program exists to give schools, companies, TV stations, and other facilities the opportunity to earn recognition for their weather preparedness and awareness. Requirements to earn StormReady Supporter status include having a facility warning point, use of NOAA Weather Radios, and weather hazard Emergency Operation Plans. Despite the increasing importance of weather preparedness in schools, only 1.2% of Minnesota schools are deemed StormReady by the National Weather Service. It was determined that the major impedance for schools becoming StormReady Supporters is the lack of time for administrators to engage in anything "extra" beyond their listed duties. As part of a 2015 Hollings Scholar project, the StormReady in a Box concept was developed to remedy this, by empowering teachers and students to take charge and complete the StormReady Supporter application for their school. StormReady in a Box is a project developed for Junior High School students to learn about weather preparedness and to help their school acquire StormReady status. The project was designed to be relevant to the Minnesota State Education Standards in Science, be simple for teachers to do with their students, and most importantly, to be enjoyable for Junior High School age students to do. The project was also designed to enhance critical thinking skills and logical reasoning abilities, as they relate to the StormReady Supporter application. This presentation will present the overall rationale for the undertaking of this project, the creation of, and the logical next steps for the StormReady in a Box project.

  5. Lean Six Sigma for reduced cycle costs and improved readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Apte, Uday; Kang, Keebom

    2006-01-01

    Sponsored Report (for Acquisition Research Program) In general, during the lifecycle of a weapon system a significantly larger amount of money gets spent in operating and maintaining the system than acquiring it. Hence, efficient logistics systems, including transportation, inventory management, modifications and maintenance activities, are critically important for containing the lifecycle costs of weapon systems and for maintaining the highest level of military readiness given the extant ...

  6. A maturity model to assess organisational readiness for change

    OpenAIRE

    Zephir, Olivier; Minel, Stéphanie; Chapotot, Emilie

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The presented model which is developed in a European project allows project management teams to assess the organisational maturity to integrate new practices under structural or technological change. Maturity for change is defined here as workforce capability to operate effectively in transformed processes. This methodology is addressed to tackle organisational readiness to fulfil business objectives through technological and structural improvements. The tool integrate...

  7. Readiness to change criminal women and men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Biel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The readiness of offenders to social rehabilitation is a new category in our country. Meanwhile, the research conducted in many countries indicates its usefulness in the diagnosis and selection of participants of rehabilitation programmes. This entails more effective interaction with convicted persons and greater responsibility on the part of convicted people for their own social rehabilitation process. The aim of this article is to present the main assumptions and models of readiness for change and their usefulness in social rehabilitation practice and to present pilot studies of readiness for change among criminal women and men in Kraków. Application of the Polish adaptation of the CVTRQ questionnaire made it possible to determine the level of convicted persons’ readiness, taking into account deficits in particular scales of the questionnaire and variables differentiating the group of ready and not ready people. At the end, guidelines for further research will be presented.

  8. SALTO guidelines. Guidelines for peer review of long term operation and ageing management of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The average age of nuclear power plants (NPPs) connected to the grid worldwide is increasing. About 20% of all the power reactors operating worldwide have been in operation for more than 30 years, and almost 50% have been in operation for 20 to 30 years, while a rather limited number of new NPPs are being put into operation. In view of this trend, many countries are giving a high priority to continuing the operation of NPPs beyond the time frame originally anticipated (e.g. 30 or 40 years). Long term operation (LTO) for NPPs is operation beyond the established time frame originally set forth by the license term, design limits, standards or regulations. LTO needs to be justified by a safety assessment considering life limiting processes and features for structures, systems and components. Proper and safe LTO is based on the experience and practices of various countries in areas such as plant license renewal, life extension, continued operation and life management. Other activities, including periodic safety review, ageing management and plant modification, are also relevant to LTO. Ageing management of an NPP is an important activity that must be considered before and in conjunction with the decision to enter LTO. Ageing management of NPPs deals with the physical ageing of structures, systems and components (SSCs) that can result in the degradation of their performance characteristics. Thus ageing management helps ensure that SSCs important to safety remain capable of performing their required safety functions. An effective ageing management programme (AMP) is a key element of the safe and reliable operation of NPPs during the originally planned time frame originally planned for their operation, as well as for the period of LTO. In order to assist Member States in managing ageing effectively, the IAEA is developing related safety standards and guidance publications. International peer review is a useful tool for Member States to exchange experience, learn from each

  9. Review of the ASDEX upgrade data acquisition environment - present operation and future requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behler, K.; Blank, H.; Buhler, A.; Drube, R.; Friedrich, H.; Foerster, K.; Hallatschek, K.; Heimann, P.; Hertweck, F.; Maier, J.; Heimann, R.; Hertweck, F.; Maier, J.; Merkel, R.; Pacco-Duechs, M.-G.; Raupp, G.; Reuter, H.; Schneider-Maxon, U.; Tisma, R.; Zilker, M.

    1999-01-01

    The data acquisition environment of the ASDEX upgrade fusion experiment was designed in the late 1980s to handle a predicted quantity of 8 Mbytes fo data per discharge. After 7 years of operation a review of the whole data acquisition and analysis environment shows what remains of the original design ideas. Comparing the original 15 diagnostics with the present set of 250 diagnostic datasets generated per shot shows how the system has grown. Although now a vast accumulation of functional parts, the system still works in a stable manner and is maintainable. The underlying concepts affirming these qualities are modularity and compatibility. Modularity ensures that most parts of the system can be modified without affecting others. Standards for data structures and interfaces between components and methods are the prerequisites which make modularity work. The experience of the last few years shows that, besides the standards achieved, new, mainly real-time, features are needed: real-time event recognition allowing reaction to complex changing conditions; real-time wavelet analysis allowing adapted sampling rates; real-time data exchange between diagnostics and control; real-time networks allowing flexible computer coupling to permit interplay between different components; object-oriented programming concepts and databases are required for readily adaptable software modules. A final assessment of our present data processing situation and future requirements shows that modern information technology methods have to be applied more intensively to provide the most flexible means to improve the interaction of all components on a large fusion device. (orig.)

  10. Operational Water Withdrawal and Consumption Factors for Electricity Generation Technology in China—A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjing Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As two indispensable resources for human development, energy and water are closely related. China, as the world’s largest consumer of electricity, is also experiencing very serious water shortages. Understanding the water consumption intensity in various types of electric power production technologies according to China’s national conditions is a prerequisite for understanding the potential impact of electrical power production on water resources. Therefore, following the steps of a meta-analysis, this paper provides a literature review on operational water withdrawal and consumption factors for electricity generation technology in China. We observed that 50% of water consumption for electricity generation was for coal power, whereas there was no research on the water consumption intensity of natural gas power generation, and a shortage of studies on water intake during electrical power production. The average water consumption intensity of hydropower is the largest. The results indicate that compared with other fuel types, hydropower is not a sustainable energy with respect to water conservation, and the study of hydropower applications should be improved in China.

  11. Non-safety piping operability review case study -- Today and tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flensburg, W.C.; Adams, T.M.

    1995-01-01

    During a 1993 Outage at the Perry Nuclear Power Station, a condition report was issued which identified potential intersystem loss of water between the Emergency Closed Cooling Water System and the Nuclear Closed Cooling Water System during a design basis event. The review of this condition report indicated that if a SSE (safe shutdown earthquake) event were to occur during a design basis event components important to plant safety could potentially be adversely affected if non-seismic/non-safety portions of the Nuclear Closed Cooling Water System could not maintain pressure boundary integrity as a result of the seismic loadings. Presented in this paper are steps, criteria, and methodology used to demonstrate the seismic acceptability of the affected portion of the Nuclear Closed Cooling Water System Piping. Also discussed are the potential benefits and applicability of a recently developed EPRI non-safety, non-seismic operability procedure. This discussion includes the potential cost savings which could have arisen from application of this recently developed procedure

  12. Learning from Aviation to Improve Safety in the Operating Room - a Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. G. L. Wauben

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lessons learned from other high-risk industries could improve patient safety in the operating room (OR. This review describes similarities and differences between high-risk industries and describes current methods and solutions within a system approach to reduce errors in the OR. PubMed and Scopus databases were systematically searched for relevant articles written in the English language published between 2000 and 2011. In total, 25 articles were included, all within the medical domain focusing on the comparison between surgery and aviation. In order to improve safety in the OR, multiple interventions have to be implemented. Additionally, the healthcare organization has to become a ‘learning organization’ and the OR team has to become a team with shared responsibilities and flat hierarchies. Interpersonal and technical skills can be trained by means of simulation and can be supported by implementing team briefings, debriefings and cross-checks. However, further development and research is needed to prove if these solutions are useful, practical, and actually increase safety.

  13. Is clinical virtual reality ready for primetime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Albert Skip; Koenig, Sebastian Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Since the mid-1990s, a significant scientific literature has evolved regarding the outcomes from the use of what we now refer to as clinical virtual reality (VR). This use of VR simulation technology has produced encouraging results when applied to address cognitive, psychological, motor, and functional impairments across a wide range of clinical health conditions. This article addresses the question, "Is clinical VR ready for primetime?" After a brief description of the various forms of VR technology, we discuss the trajectory of clinical VR over the last 20 years and summarize the basic assets that VR offers for creating clinical applications. The discussion then addresses the question of readiness in terms of the theoretical basis for clinical VR assets, the research to date, the pragmatic factors regarding availability, usability, and costs of clinical VR content/systems, and the ethical issues for the safe use of VR with clinical populations. Our review of the theoretical underpinnings and research findings to date leads to the prediction that clinical VR will have a significant impact on future research and practice. Pragmatic issues that can influence adoption across many areas of psychology also appear favorable, but professional guidelines will be needed to promote its safe and ethical use. Although there is still much research needed to advance the science in this area, we strongly believe that clinical VR applications will become indispensable tools in the toolbox of psychological researchers and practitioners and will only grow in relevance and popularity in the future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Remedial action and waste disposal project: 100-B/C remedial action readiness evaluation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    April, J.G.; Bryant, D.L.; Cislo, G.B.

    1996-06-01

    The Readiness Evaluation Plan presents the methodology used to assess the readiness of the 100-B/C Remedial Action Project. The 100 Areas Remedial Action Project will remediate the 100 Areas liquid waste site identified in the Interim Action Record of Decision for the 100- BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-HR-1 Operable Units. These sites are located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington

  15. Librarian readiness for research partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, Emily S; Alpi, Kristine M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated health sciences librarians' knowledge and skill-based readiness to partner on sponsored research involving human participants. The authors developed and deployed, at two time points, a web-based survey on nine indicators of research activities with response choices reflecting the transtheoretical model of stages of behavior change. Librarians with research experience or membership in the Medical Library Association Research Section reported higher levels of having completed indicators. Our results suggest that creating awareness in precontemplation responders could encourage skill development. Mentoring and continuing education could support librarians who are contemplating or preparing to perform indicator activities.

  16. NASA Technology Readiness Level Definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnamara, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will cover the basic Technology Readiness Level (TRL) definitions used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and their specific wording. We will discuss how they are used in the NASA Project Life Cycle and their effectiveness in practice. We'll also discuss the recent efforts by the International Standards Organization (ISO) to develop a broadly acceptable set of TRL definitions for the international space community and some of the issues brought to light. This information will provide input for further discussion of the use of the TRL scale in manufacturing.

  17. Readiness for banking technologies in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professor in the Department of Marketing Management, University of Johannesburg. ... From the organisation's perspective, it has been suggested ... technological readiness of developing countries' consumers, in an urban environment,.

  18. Regulatory instrument review: Aging management of LWR cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, E.V.; Somasundaram, S.

    1995-09-01

    The results of Stage 2 of the Regulatory Instrument Review are presented in this volume. Selected regulatory instruments, such as the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Regulatory Guides, and ASME Codes, were investigated to determine the extent to which these regulations apply aging management to selected safety-related components in nuclear power plants. The Regulatory Instrument Review was funded by the NRC under the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program. Stage 2 of the review focused on four safety-related structures and components; namely, cables, containment and basemat, reactor coolant pumps, and motor-operated valves. The review suggests that the primary-emphasis of the regulatory instruments was on the design, construction, start-up, and operation of a nuclear power plant, and that aging issues were primarily addressed after an aging-related problem was recognized. This Stage 2 review confirms the results of the prior review; (see Regulatory Instrument Review: Management of Aging of LWR Major Safety-Related Components NUREG/CR-5490. The observations indicate that the regulations generally address management of age-related degradation indirectly. Specific age-related degradation phenomena frequently are dealt with in bulletins and notices or through generic issues, letters, etc. The major recommendation of this report, therefore, is that the regulatory instruments should more directly and explicitly address the aging phenomenon and the management of the age-related degradation process

  19. Current applications and future directions for the CDISC Operational Data Model standard: A methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Sam; Aerts, Jozef; Sarnikar, Surendra; Huser, Vojtech

    2016-04-01

    In order to further advance research and development on the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) Operational Data Model (ODM) standard, the existing research must be well understood. This paper presents a methodological review of the ODM literature. Specifically, it develops a classification schema to categorize the ODM literature according to how the standard has been applied within the clinical research data lifecycle. This paper suggests areas for future research and development that address ODM's limitations and capitalize on its strengths to support new trends in clinical research informatics. A systematic scan of the following databases was performed: (1) ABI/Inform, (2) ACM Digital, (3) AIS eLibrary, (4) Europe Central PubMed, (5) Google Scholar, (5) IEEE Xplore, (7) PubMed, and (8) ScienceDirect. A Web of Science citation analysis was also performed. The search term used on all databases was "CDISC ODM." The two primary inclusion criteria were: (1) the research must examine the use of ODM as an information system solution component, or (2) the research must critically evaluate ODM against a stated solution usage scenario. Out of 2686 articles identified, 266 were included in a title level review, resulting in 183 articles. An abstract review followed, resulting in 121 remaining articles; and after a full text scan 69 articles met the inclusion criteria. As the demand for interoperability has increased, ODM has shown remarkable flexibility and has been extended to cover a broad range of data and metadata requirements that reach well beyond ODM's original use cases. This flexibility has yielded research literature that covers a diverse array of topic areas. A classification schema reflecting the use of ODM within the clinical research data lifecycle was created to provide a categorized and consolidated view of the ODM literature. The elements of the framework include: (1) EDC (Electronic Data Capture) and EHR (Electronic Health Record

  20. Ready or Not...? Teen Sexuality and the Troubling Discourse of Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I explore how talk about being "ready" or "not ready" for sex shapes teen and adult understandings of sexuality. I argue that this "discourse of readiness" poses serious threats to teens' identity development, sexual decision making, and educators efforts to help them through these processes. To illustrate, I draw from my…

  1. Mitigation of methane and nitrous oxide emissions from animal operations: II. A review of manure management mitigation options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montes, F.; Meinen, R.; Dell, C.; Rotz, A.; Hristov, A.N.; Oh, J.; Waghorn, G.; Gerber, P.J.; Henderson, B.L.; Makkar, H.P.S.; Dijkstra, J.

    2013-01-01

    This review analyzes published data on manure management practices used to mitigate methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from animal operations. Reducing excreted nitrogen (N) and degradable organic carbon (C) by diet manipulation to improve the balance of nutrient inputs with production

  2. Oral Nutrition as a Form of Pre-Operative Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, Emma R. J.; Argillander, Tanja E.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Buskens, Christianne J.; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Winkels, Renate M.; Kalf, Annette; van der Zaag, Edwin S.; Wassenaar, Eelco B.; Bemelman, Willem A.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutritional status has major impacts on the outcome of surgery, in particular in patients with cancer. The aim of this review was to assess the merit of oral pre-operative nutritional support as a part of prehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: A

  3. EU stress test: Swiss national report. ENSI review of the operators' reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-12-01

    The earthquake on 11 March 2011 and the resultant tsunami led to severe accidents with core melt in three nuclear power plants (NPP) units at the Fukushima Dai-ichi site. These events were classified by the Japanese authorities as 'major accident' (INES 7). The EU stress test is part of the review process which Switzerland initiated immediately after the reactor accident. The Swiss Nuclear Safety Authority (ENSI) required from the operators of the Swiss NPPs to implement immediate measures and to conduct additional re-assessments. The immediate measures comprised the establishment of an external emergency storage facility for the Swiss NPPs, including the necessary plant specific connections, and back-fittings to provide external injection into the spent fuel pools. The additional re-assessments, which were to be carried out immediately, focused on the design of the Swiss NPPs against earthquakes, external flooding and a combination thereof, as well as investigations on the coolant supply for the safety systems and the spent fuel pool cooling. ENSI carried out an analysis of the events at Fukushima and published the results providing detailed descriptions of the causes, consequences and radiological impacts of the accident. The purpose of the EU stress test is to examine the robustness of the NPPs in case of impacts beyond the design basis due to earthquakes, external flooding and extreme weather conditions, loss of power supply and heat sink, and severe accident management. As the first step, it was necessary to present the hazard assumptions and design bases for the NPPs, and to assess their adequacy. In the second step, the objective was to identify and evaluate the protective measures implemented and their safety margins as compared to the design. Improvement measures were to be derived. The review by ENSI confirmed that the Swiss NPPs display a very high level of protection against the impacts of earthquakes, flooding and other natural hazards, as well as loss

  4. DOE EERE Standard Operating Procedure Peer Review Best Practice and Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Objective review and advice from peers - peer review - provides managers, staff, and researchers with a powerful and effective tool for enhancing the management, relevance, effectiveness, and productivity of all of the EERE research, development

  5. Human factors review of electric power dispatch control centers. Volume 4. Operator information needs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.J.; Najaf-Zadeh, K.; Darlington, H.T.; McNair, H.D.; Seidenstein, S.; Williams, A.R.

    1982-10-01

    Human factors is a systems-oriented interdisciplinary specialty concerned with the design of systems, equipment, facilities and the operational environment. An important aspect leading to the design requirements is the determination of the information requirements for electric power dispatch control centers. There are significant differences between the system operator's actions during normal and degraded states of power system operation, and power system restoration. This project evaluated the information the operator requires for normal power system and control system operations and investigates the changes of information required by the operator as the power system and/or the control system degrades from a normal operating state. The Phase II study, published in two volumes, defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related. This volume presents detailed data concerning operator information needs that identify the needs for and the uses of power system information by a system operator in conditions ranging from normal through degraded operation. The study defines power system states and control system conditions to which operator information content can be related, and it identifies the requisite information as consistent with current industry practice so as to aid control system designers. Training requirements are also included for planning entry-level and follow-on training for operators.

  6. Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress Test in Scientific Ocean Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Moore

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific ocean drilling’s first in situ stress measurement was made at Site C0009A during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 319 as part of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2. The Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT, Schlumbergerwireline logging tool was deployed in riser Hole C0009A to measure in situ formation pore pressure, formation permeability (often reported as mobility=permeability/viscosity, and the least principal stress (S3 at several isolated depths (Saffer et al., 2009; Expedition 319 Scientists, 2010. The importance of in situ stress measurements is not only for scientific interests in active tectonic drilling, but also for geomechanical and well bore stability analyses. Certain in situ tools were not previously available for scientific ocean drilling due to the borehole diameter and open hole limits of riserless drilling. The riser-capable drillship, D/V Chikyu,now in service for IODP expeditions, allows all of the techniques available to estimate the magnitudes and orientations of 3-D stresses to be used. These techniques include downhole density logging for vertical stress, breakout and caliper log analyses for maximum horizontal stress, core-based anelastic strain recovery (ASR, used in the NanTroSEIZE expeditions in 2007–2008, and leak-off test (Lin et al., 2008 and minifrac/hydraulic fracturing (NanTroSEIZE Expedition319 in 2009. In this report, the whole operational planning process related to in situ measurements is reviewed, and lessons learned from Expedition 319 are summarized for efficient planning and testing in the future.

  7. Psychophysiological and psychological criteria for professional selection of reactor operators - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkova, A.

    1992-01-01

    The professional activity of reactor operators is determined according to some modern classification schemes. The NPP operation staff's classification containing groups of operators-supervisors, operators-manipulators and operators-managers (Zinchenko and Munipov) is discussed. The author specifies the functions of the operators-supervisors in more detail. The requirements for selection of operators are given and the significance of mind, memory, attention, differentiative sensomotorics, emotional and stress-stability is emphasized. An own set of criteria for professional selection of reactor operators is proposed based on the definition of reliability concepts -adequacy, timeliness and lack of outages. The requirements for psychological structure of personality are well-grounded also by the collective character of this kind of professional activity also. 28 refs., 1 fig. (A.B.)

  8. July 2011 Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order, July 21, 2011

  9. From Readiness to Action: How Motivation Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruglanski Arie W.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new theoretical construct labeled motivational readiness. It is defined as the inclination, whether or not ultimately implemented, to satisfy a desire. A general model of readiness is described which builds on the work of prior theories, including animal learning models and personality approaches, and which aims to integrate a variety of research findings across different domains of motivational research. Components of this model include the Want state (that is, an individual’s currently active desire, and the Expectancy of being able to satisfy that Want. We maintain that the Want concept is the critical ingredient in motivational readiness: without it, readiness cannot exist. In contrast, some motivational readiness can exist without Expectancy. We also discuss the role of incentive in motivational readiness. Incentive is presently conceived of in terms of a Match between a Want and a Perceived Situational Affordance. Whereas in classic models incentive was portrayed as a first order determinant of motivational readiness, here we describe it as a second order factor which affects readiness by influencing Want, Expectancy, or both. The new model’s relation to its theoretical predecessors, and its implications for future research, also are discussed.

  10. Overview: Texas College and Career Readiness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Texas College and Career Readiness Standards define what students should know and be able to accomplish in order to succeed in entry-level college courses or skilled workforce opportunities upon graduation from high school. This paper answers the following questions: (1) Who developed the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards?; (2) What…

  11. Understanding Early Educators' Readiness to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Shira M.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in the fields of humanistic psychology, counseling, organizational change, and implementation science have been asking a question that is at the heart of today's early care and education quality improvement efforts: When it comes to changing one's behavior, what makes a person ready to change? Although the concept of readiness to…

  12. NCEP Central Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ) NCO Organizational Chart NOAA's Weather and Climate Operational Supercomputing System is known as Climate Climate Prediction Climate Archives Weather Safety Storm Ready NOAA Central Library Photo Library NCO's MISSION * Execute the NCEP operational model suite - Create climate, weather, ocean, space and

  13. Copernicus POD Service: Ready for Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H.; Fernández, J.; Escobar, D.; Féménias, P.; Flohrer, C.; Otten, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Copernicus POD Service is part of the Copernicus PDGS Ground Segment of the Sentinel missions. A GMV-led consortium is operating the Copernicus POD Service being in charge of generating precise orbital products and auxiliary data files for their use as part of the processing chains of the respective Sentinel PDGS. The Sentinel-1, -2 & -3 missions have different but very demanding requirements in terms of orbital accuracy and timeliness. Orbital products in Near Real Time (latency: 30 min), Short Time Critical (1.5 days) and Non-time Critical (20-30 days) are required. The accuracy requirements are very challenging, targeting 5 cm in 3D for Sentinel-1 and 2-3 cm in radial direction for Sentinel-3. Sentinel-3A carries, in addition to a GPS receiver a laser retro reflector and a DORIS receiver. On the one hand, the three different techniques GPS, SLR and DORIS make POD more complex but, on the other hand, it is very helpful to have independent techniques available for validation of the orbit results. The successful POD processing for Sentinel-1A is a good preparation for Sentinel-3A due to the similar demanding orbit accuracy requirements. The Copernicus POD Service is ready for Sentinel-3A and the service will process GPS and SLR data routinely and has the capacity to process DORIS in NTC and reprocessing campaigns. The three independent orbit determination techniques on Sentinel-3 offer big potential for scientific exploitation. Carrying all three techniques together makes the satellite, e.g., very useful for combining all the techniques on observation level as it could only be done for Jason-2 until now. The Sentinel POD Quality Working Group strongly supporting the CPOD Service delivers additional orbit solutions to validate the CPOD results independently. The recommendations from this body guarantee that the CPOD Service is updated following state-of-the-art algorithms, models and conventions. The QWG also focuses on the scientific exploitation of the

  14. How Satellites Have Contributed to Building a Weather Ready Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, W.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA's primary mission since its inception has been to reduce the loss of life and property, as well as disruptions from, high impact weather and water-related events. In recent years, significant societal losses resulting even from well forecast extreme events have shifted attention from the forecast alone toward ensuring societal response is equal to the risks that exist for communities, businesses and the public. The responses relate to decisions ranging from coastal communities planning years in advance to mitigate impacts from rising sea level, to immediate lifesaving decisions such as a family seeking adequate shelter during a tornado warning. NOAA is committed to building a "Weather-Ready Nation" where communities are prepared for and respond appropriately to these events. The Weather-Ready Nation (WRN) strategic priority is building community resilience in the face of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather, water, climate and environmental threats. To build a Weather-Ready Nation, NOAA is enhancing Impact-Based Decision Support Services (IDSS), transitioning science and technology advances into forecast operations, applying social science research to improve the communication and usefulness of information, and expanding its dissemination efforts to achieve far-reaching readiness, responsiveness and resilience. These four components of Weather-Ready Nation are helping ensure NOAA data, products and services are fully utilized to minimize societal impacts from extreme events. Satellite data and satellite products have been important elements of the national Weather Service (NWS) operations for more than 40 years. When one examines the uses of satellite data specific to the internal forecast and warning operations of NWS, two main applications are evident. The first is the use of satellite data in numerical weather prediction models; the second is the use of satellite imagery and derived products for mesoscale and short-range weather warning and

  15. Self-perceived readiness to perform at the attending level following surgical specialist training in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Rasmus; Sillesen, Martin; Hansen, Morten Sejer

    2017-01-01

    not previously been studied. In the present study, we aim to investigate the role of supervision in the national surgical residency programme and the self-perceived readiness to undertake the role of a specialist doctor in gastrointestinal surgery in a cohort of gastrointestinal surgeons graduating in 2012......: A total of 30 graduated residents (55%) responded to the Danish survey. Among those, 14 (47%) felt ready to be a specialist in surgery. A total of 25 (83%) answered that increased supervision would have increased their selfperceived competencies to serve as a surgical specialist. Self -perceived readiness...... was significantly associated with level of supervision during surgical training (p = 0.02), whereas no association with operative volume could be established. CONCLUSIONS: A worryingly high number of graduates did not feel ready to undertake their role as a gastrointestinal surgical specialist. Adequate supervision...

  16. Lightning Arrestor Connectors Production Readiness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, Steve; Linder, Kim; Emmons, Jim; Gomez, Antonio; Hasam, Dawud; Maurer, Michelle

    2008-10-20

    The Lightning Arrestor Connector (LAC), part “M”, presented opportunities to improve the processes used to fabricate LACs. The A## LACs were the first production LACs produced at the KCP, after the product was transferred from Pinnellas. The new LAC relied on the lessons learned from the A## LACs; however, additional improvements were needed to meet the required budget, yield, and schedule requirements. Improvement projects completed since 2001 include Hermetic Connector Sealing Improvement, Contact Assembly molding Improvement, development of a second vendor for LAC shells, general process improvement, tooling improvement, reduction of the LAC production cycle time, and documention of the LAC granule fabrication process. This report summarizes the accomplishments achieved in improving the LAC Production Readiness.

  17. Defense Treaty Inspection Readiness Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, J.J.; Kohen, M.D.; Rivers, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Treaty Inspection Readiness Program (DTIRP) was established by the Department of Defense in 1990 to assist defense facilities in preparing for treaty verification activities. Led by the On-Site Inspection Agency (OSIA), an element of the Department of Defense, DTIRP''s membership includes representatives from other Department of Defense agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Commerce, and others. The Office of Safeguards and Security has a significant interest in this program, due to the number of national defense facilities within its purview that are candidates for future inspections. As a result, the Office of Safeguards and Security has taken a very active role in DTIRP. This paper discusses the Office of Safeguards and Security''s increasing involvement in various elements of the DTIRP, ranging from facility assessments to training development and implementation

  18. Utility shopping: are consumers ready?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrados, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides an overview of public readiness to deal with deregulation of the electric power industry , based on an analysis of public reaction to the deregulation of the transportation, telecommunications and natural gas industries which already have taken place. The report also examines the reasons why residential consumers have reason to be wary of deregulation. These include the likelihood of slow development of the intended competition, the consequent limits on consumer choices, the possibility of increased prices, decreased quality of service and erosion of social values such as affordability and accessibility. The report concludes with a number of recommendations aimed at ensuring the existence of workable competition for residential consumers, that reliable and meaningful information is available as competition in deregulated markets gets underway, that independent sources of information are widely available, and that basic consumer protection against deceptive and borderline marketing practices, a regulatory oversight mechanism and public reporting mechanisms are in place before competition begins. 33 refs

  19. Final Report for the Restart of the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Gregory Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or Laboratory) Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) required for restart of the Technical Area (TA) 50 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) for remediated nitrate salt (RNS) waste operations was performed in compliance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities, and LANL procedure FSD-115-001, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart LANL Nuclear Facilities, Activities, and Operations.

  20. A review of operational risk in banks and its role in the financial crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika de Jongh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of operational risk in the 2007/2008 financial crisis is explored. The factors that gave rise to the crisis are examined and it is found that although the event is largely regarded as a credit crisis, operational risk factors played a significant role in fuelling its duration and severity. It is concluded that, from an operational risk perspective, 2008 was the worst on record. Considering the extensive role of operational risk in global financial calamities, suggestions are made to improve the management of this risk type.

  1. A review of the Z2-FET 1T-DRAM memory: Operation mechanisms and key parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristoloveanu, S.; Lee, K. H.; Parihar, M. S.; El Dirani, H.; Lacord, J.; Martinie, S.; Le Royer, C.; Barbe, J.-Ch.; Mescot, X.; Fonteneau, P.; Galy, Ph.; Gamiz, F.; Navarro, C.; Cheng, B.; Duan, M.; Adamu-Lema, F.; Asenov, A.; Taur, Y.; Xu, Y.; Kim, Y.-T.; Wan, J.; Bawedin, M.

    2018-05-01

    The band-modulation and sharp-switching mechanisms in Z2-FET device operated as a capacitorless 1T-DRAM memory are reviewed. The main parameters that govern the memory performance are discussed based on detailed experiments and simulations. This 1T-DRAM memory does not suffer from super-coupling effect and can be integrated in sub-10 nm thick SOI films. It offers low leakage current, high current margin, long retention, low operating voltage especially for programming, and high speed. The Z2-FET is suitable for embedded memory applications.

  2. Review of selected cost drivers for decisions on continued operation of older nuclear reactors. Safety upgrades, lifetime extension, decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    Lately, the approach to the operation of relatively old NPPs has become an important issue for the nuclear industry for several reasons. First, a large part of operating NPPs will reach the planned end of their lives relatively soon. Replacing these capacities can involve significant investment for the concerned countries and utilities. Second, many operating NPPs while about 30 years old are still in very good condition. Their continued safe operation appears possible and may bring about essential economic gains. Finally, with the costs of new NPPs being rather high at present, continued operation of existing plants and eventually their lifetime extension are viable options for supporting the nuclear share in power generation. This is becoming especially important in view of the growing attention to the issue of global warming and the role of nuclear energy in greenhouse gas mitigation. This report is a review of information related to three cost categories that are part of such cost-benefit analysis: costs of safety upgrades for continued operation of a nuclear unit, costs of lifetime extension and costs of decommissioning. It can serve as a useful reference source for experts and decision makers involved in the economics of operating NPPs

  3. Connected Operators : A review of region-based morphological image processing techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salembier, Philippe; Wilkinson, Michael H. F.

    2009-01-01

    Connected operators are filtering tools that act by merging elementary regions called flat zones. Connecting operators cannot create new contours nor modify their position. Therefore, they have very good contour preservation properties and are capable of both low-level filtering and higher-level

  4. 75 FR 29568 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aircraft Operator Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... all passengers. The passenger watch list checks currently conducted by aircraft operators will soon be.... These programs require aircraft operators to maintain and update records to ensure compliance with... information collected to determine compliance with 49 CFR part 1544 and to ensure the freedom of movement for...

  5. 76 FR 4993 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Financial and Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... for Small Aircraft Operators AGENCY: Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice... continuing need for and usefulness of BTS collecting financial, traffic and operating statistics from small... address whether BTS accurately estimated the reporting burden and if there are other ways to enhance the...

  6. Wind energy and power system operations: a review of wind integration studies to date

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesaro, Jennifer de; Porter, Kevin; Milligan, Michael

    2009-12-15

    Wind integration will not be accomplished successfully by doing ''more of the same.'' It will require significant changes in grid planning and operations, continued technical evolution in the design and operation of wind turbines, further adoption and implementation of wind forecasting in the control room, and incorporation of market and policy initiatives to encourage more flexible generation. (author)

  7. Connected Operators : A review of region-based morphological image processing techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salembier, Philippe; Wilkinson, Michael H. F.

    Connected operators are filtering tools that act by merging elementary regions called flat zones. Connecting operators cannot create new contours nor modify their position. Therefore, they have very good contour preservation properties and are capable of both low-level filtering and higher-level

  8. Maintenance-Ready Web Application Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper tackles the subject of developing maintenance-ready web applications. Maintenance is presented as a core stage in a web application’s lifecycle. The concept of maintenance-ready is defined in the context of web application development. Web application maintenance tasks types are enunciated and suitable task types are identified for further analysis. The research hypothesis is formulated based on a direct link between tackling maintenance in the development stage and reducing overall maintenance costs. A live maintenance-ready web application is presented and maintenance related aspects are highlighted. The web application’s features, that render it maintenance-ready, are emphasize. The cost of designing and building the web-application to be maintenance-ready are disclosed. The savings in maintenance development effort facilitated by maintenance ready features are also disclosed. Maintenance data is collected from 40 projects implemented by a web development company. Homogeneity and diversity of collected data is evaluated. A data sample is presented and the size and comprehensive nature of the entire dataset is depicted. Research hypothesis are validated and conclusions are formulated on the topic of developing maintenance-ready web applications. The limits of the research process which represented the basis for the current paper are enunciated. Future research topics are submitted for debate.

  9. The WIPP transportation system: Demonstrated readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, T.R.; Spooner, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an integrated transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely-dispersed generator sites to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The system consists of a Type B container, a specially- designed trailer, a lightweight tractor, the DOE ''TRANSCOM'' vehicle tracking system, and uniquely qualified and highly-trained drivers. In June of 1989, the National Academy of Sciences reviewed the transportation system and concluded that: ''The system proposed for transportation of TRU waste to WIPP is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the United States today and will reduce risk to very low levels'' (emphasis added). The next challenge facing the DOE was demonstrating that this system was ready to transport the TRU waste to the WIPP site efficiently and in the safest manner possible. Not only did the DOE feel that is was necessary to convince itself that the system was safe, but also representatives of the 20 states through which it would travel

  10. The WIPP transportation system: Demonstrated readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, T.R.; Spooner, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed an integrated transportation system to transport transuranic (TRU) waste from ten widely-dispersed generator sites to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The system consists of a Type B container, a specially-designed trailer, a lightweight tractor, the DOE ''TRANSCOM'' vehicle tracing system, and uniquely qualified and highly-trained drivers. In June of 1989, the National Academy of Sciences reviewed the transportation system and concluded that: ''The system proposed for transportation of TRU waste to WIPP is safer than that employed for any other hazardous material in the United States today and will reduce risk to very low levels.'' The next challenge facing the DOE was demonstrating that this system was ready to transport the TRU waste to the WIPP site in the safest manner possible. Not only did the DOE feel that it was necessary to convince itself that the system was safe, but also representatives of the 23 states through which it traveled

  11. Air scrubbing techniques for ammonia and odor reduction at livestock operations : review of on-farm research in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Melse, R.W.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Acid scrubbers and biotrickling filters have been developed for ammonia (NH3) removal at pig and poultry houses in The Netherlands over the last 20 years to prevent acidification and eutrophication of soils. Because of growing suburbanization, odor removal is increasingly considered important as well. In this review, we report the results of the on-farm research on full-scale operated scrubbers for treatment of exhaust air from animal houses with regard to NH3 and odor removal in The Netherla...

  12. Common issues found in operating safety peer review of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Meijing; Zhang Fengping

    2004-01-01

    The 3rd stage of the safety culture promotion in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is characterized by establishing learning organization and continuous self-improvement. Peer Review was used as an effective tool by a lot of NPPs to improve the overall management and performance. This Paper provided the WANO Peer Review Methodology, the common issues found, the recommendation or suggestions to correct the area for improvement. It may be beneficial to other NPP which planning to have Peer Review or Self Evaluation. (authors)

  13. Cultural Responsive Teaching Readiness Scale Validity and Reliability Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasım KARATAŞ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a measurement instrument that will determine the cultural responsive teaching readiness level of teacher candidates. The study group consisted of a total of 231 candidate teachers, of which 83 were males and 148 were females, who were attending their final year of class teacher education programs at various Turkish universities during the 2016-2017 education year. In the first phase, a 33-item draft form was presented to experts to be reviewed. Based on the feedback received, revisions were made and the final scale was applied to a group of 231 candidate teachers. In the analysis of the data obtained as the result of the application, Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA was performed. The EFA produced 21 items within a two-factor structure as, “Personal Readiness” and “Professional Readiness.” It was observed that the sub-factors were components of the “cultural responsive teaching readiness” dimension, and that the goodness of fit measures obtained as a result of the First and Second Level Confirmatory Factor Analyzes (CFA were high. In addition, reliability coefficients were found to be high as a result of reliability measurements. With the help of these findings, this study concludes that the Cultural Responsive Teaching Readiness scale is both valid and reliable.

  14. A theory of organizational readiness for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiner Bryan J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Change management experts have emphasized the importance of establishing organizational readiness for change and recommended various strategies for creating it. Although the advice seems reasonable, the scientific basis for it is limited. Unlike individual readiness for change, organizational readiness for change has not been subject to extensive theoretical development or empirical study. In this article, I conceptually define organizational readiness for change and develop a theory of its determinants and outcomes. I focus on the organizational level of analysis because many promising approaches to improving healthcare delivery entail collective behavior change in the form of systems redesign--that is, multiple, simultaneous changes in staffing, work flow, decision making, communication, and reward systems. Discussion Organizational readiness for change is a multi-level, multi-faceted construct. As an organization-level construct, readiness for change refers to organizational members' shared resolve to implement a change (change commitment and shared belief in their collective capability to do so (change efficacy. Organizational readiness for change varies as a function of how much organizational members value the change and how favorably they appraise three key determinants of implementation capability: task demands, resource availability, and situational factors. When organizational readiness for change is high, organizational members are more likely to initiate change, exert greater effort, exhibit greater persistence, and display more cooperative behavior. The result is more effective implementation. Summary The theory described in this article treats organizational readiness as a shared psychological state in which organizational members feel committed to implementing an organizational change and confident in their collective abilities to do so. This way of thinking about organizational readiness is best suited for

  15. Final Report: Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowsell, David Leon [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This report documents the Contractor Readiness Assessment (CRA) for TREAT Fuel Movement and Control Rod Drives Isolation. The review followed the approved Plan of Action (POA) and Implementation Plan (IP) using the identified core requirements. The activity was limited scope focusing on the control rod drives functional isolation and fuel element movement. The purpose of this review is to ensure the facility's readiness to move fuel elements thus supporting inspection and functionally isolate the control rod drives to maintain the required shutdown margin.

  16. Design and operation of nitrifying trickling filters in recirculating aquaculture: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eding, E.H.; Kamstra, A.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Huisman, E.A.; Klapwijk, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review deals with the main mechanisms and parameters affecting design and performance of trickling filters in aquaculture. Relationships between nitrification rates and easily accessible process parameters, like bulk phase concentration of TAN, O2, organic matter (COD), nitrite, temperature,

  17. What Is Lean Management in Health Care? Development of an Operational Definition for a Cochrane Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Thomas; Plishka, Christopher; Lawal, Adegboyega; Harrison, Liz; Sari, Nazmi; Goodridge, Donna; Flynn, Rachel; Chan, James; Fiander, Michelle; Poksinska, Bonnie; Willoughby, Keith; Kinsman, Leigh

    2018-01-01

    Industrial improvement approaches such as Lean management are increasingly being adopted in health care. Synthesis is necessary to ensure these approaches are evidence based and requires operationalization of concepts to ensure all relevant studies are included. This article outlines the process utilized to develop an operational definition of Lean in health care. The literature search, screening, data extraction, and data synthesis processes followed the recommendations outlined by the Cochrane Collaboration. Development of the operational definition utilized the methods prescribed by Kinsman et al. and Wieland et al. This involved extracting characteristics of Lean, synthesizing similar components to establish an operational definition, applying this definition, and updating the definition to address shortcomings. We identified two defining characteristics of Lean health-care management: (1) Lean philosophy, consisting of Lean principles and continuous improvement, and (2) Lean activities, which include Lean assessment activities and Lean improvement activities. The resulting operational definition requires that an organization or subunit of an organization had integrated Lean philosophy into the organization's mandate, guidelines, or policies and utilized at least one Lean assessment activity or Lean improvement activity. This operational definition of Lean management in health care will act as an objective screening criterion for our systematic review. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence-based operational definition of Lean management in health care.

  18. Improving Reliability of Service Operation Using FMEA Review and New Opportunity for Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Agung; Gunawan, Indra

    2016-01-01

    Despite its growing contribution to the global economy, investigation on the application status of service FMEA study to support realization of reliable service operation is very limited in literature. Motivated by such situation, the paper presented an initial survey on the status and research gaps in developing and applying FMEA in service sectors. Systematic preliminary survey using specific criteria are undertaken. Our study indicated that development and application of service FMEA are partially addressing the characteristics of service operations and it is still applied into the good deed and profit oriented operations. Opportunities for further investigation pertaining to advancement of its decision supporting tool for service risk appraisal, its modification to cope with sustainability related requirements and application of service FMEA in not for profit oriented operations are presented as new avenues for further investigation

  19. Review and critique of April 10, 1985 exercise at the new NRC Operations Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.; Charlton, T.R.; Bryan, G.R.; Beelman, R.J.; Bray, M.A.; Bethke, G.A.; King, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    An emergency preparedness training exercise was conducted. Objectives of the exercise addressed how well the new Operations Center was utilized when responding to an incident at a nuclear power plant. The simulated accident portrayed a small (approx.75 gpm) leak from the Turkey Point Unit 3 primary coolant system, that led to radionuclide release that exceeded EPA guidelines at the site boundary. The Operation Center response was led by NRC Chairman Nunzio J. Palladino and the roles of the simulated power plant and other outside organizations were jointly portrayed by EG and G Idaho, COMEX Corporation and the NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement. Overall, the exercise was successful. The new Operations Center facility provided capabilities and services never before available, which significantly aided the performance of the Operations Center staff. The various teams that manned the Center performed credibly. Substantial improvement in team performance was noted over the past several exercises

  20. Critical analysis of e-health readiness assessment frameworks: suitability for application in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauco, Kabelo Leonard; Scott, Richard E; Mars, Maurice

    2018-02-01

    Introduction e-Health is an innovative way to make health services more effective and efficient and application is increasing worldwide. e-Health represents a substantial ICT investment and its failure usually results in substantial losses in time, money (including opportunity costs) and effort. Therefore it is important to assess e-health readiness prior to implementation. Several frameworks have been published on e-health readiness assessment, under various circumstances and geographical regions of the world. However, their utility for the developing world is unknown. Methods A literature review and analysis of published e-health readiness assessment frameworks or models was performed to determine if any are appropriate for broad assessment of e-health readiness in the developing world. A total of 13 papers described e-health readiness in different settings. Results and Discussion Eight types of e-health readiness were identified and no paper directly addressed all of these. The frameworks were based upon varying assumptions and perspectives. There was no underlying unifying theory underpinning the frameworks. Few assessed government and societal readiness, and none cultural readiness; all are important in the developing world. While the shortcomings of existing frameworks have been highlighted, most contain aspects that are relevant and can be drawn on when developing a framework and assessment tools for the developing world. What emerged is the need to develop different assessment tools for the various stakeholder sectors. This is an area that needs further research before attempting to develop a more generic framework for the developing world.

  1. Market readiness update : updated status of preparations for Ontario's competitive retail electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Market Readiness Project Team of the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) is instrumental in ensuring the readiness of retail participants in Ontario's competitive electricity market. The team, led by the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO), provides information and advice regarding the technical readiness of the retail industry, with particular focus on the readiness of distributors to carry out their roles in a competitive market. This report provides an assessment of the team regarding the industry's technical readiness based on information as of April 24, 2002. In January 2002, the Ontario Government announced that it would open the electricity industry to competition on May 1, 2002. 54 of Ontario's 94 licensed electricity distributors claimed they were ready to offer retail choice by May 1. As of March 2002, about 858,000 customers (or 20 per cent of Ontario's 4.2 million customers) had signed a retail electricity contract with one of 9 active electricity retailers. By April 2002, 73 distributors, representing 93 per cent of Ontario's customers signed a contract with a retailer. Those customers who choose not to sign a contract will continue to receive service from their distributor but at energy prices set hourly by the IMO. It is expected that after May 1, the transition to a competitive market will proceed for several weeks as distributors progress through their billing cycles. 7 tabs., 2 figs

  2. Information Assurance and Forensic Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, Georgios; Katos, Vasilios

    Egalitarianism and justice are amongst the core attributes of a democratic regime and should be also secured in an e-democratic setting. As such, the rise of computer related offenses pose a threat to the fundamental aspects of e-democracy and e-governance. Digital forensics are a key component for protecting and enabling the underlying (e-)democratic values and therefore forensic readiness should be considered in an e-democratic setting. This position paper commences from the observation that the density of compliance and potential litigation activities is monotonically increasing in modern organizations, as rules, legislative regulations and policies are being constantly added to the corporate environment. Forensic practices seem to be departing from the niche of law enforcement and are becoming a business function and infrastructural component, posing new challenges to the security professionals. Having no a priori knowledge on whether a security related event or corporate policy violation will lead to litigation, we advocate that computer forensics need to be applied to all investigatory, monitoring and auditing activities. This would result into an inflation of the responsibilities of the Information Security Officer. After exploring some commonalities and differences between IS audit and computer forensics, we present a list of strategic challenges the organization and, in effect, the IS security and audit practitioner will face.

  3. Enhancing Mental Readiness in Military Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Megan M; McCreary, Donald R

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we explore how the psychological literature on stress and coping might inform military training programs to enhance "mental readiness" as a method to develop the baseline psychological...

  4. University Research Initiative Program for Combat Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    microscope image of one of the lenses. This array was selected for testing because it is fabricated in a relatively inexpensive polyacrylic material, the...potent analogues of the potassium -sparing diuretic, amiloride. However, our results 179 University Reasearch Initiative for Combat Readiness Annual Report...for Combat Readiness Annual Report for the period June 1, 1998 - June 30, 1999 Roger H. Sawyer University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 May

  5. Solar Training Network and Solar Ready Vets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalstrom, Tenley Ann

    2016-09-14

    In 2016, the White House announced the Solar Ready Vets program, funded under DOE's SunShot initiative would be administered by The Solar Foundation to connect transitioning military personnel to solar training and employment as they separate from service. This presentation is geared to informing and recruiting employer partners for the Solar Ready Vets program, and the Solar Training Network. It describes the programs, and the benefits to employers that choose to connect to the programs.

  6. Remote operation: a selective review of research into visual depth perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt-Rutland, A H

    1996-07-01

    Some perceptual motor operations are performed remotely; examples include the handling of life-threatening materials and surgical procedures. A camera conveys the site of operation to a TV monitor, so depth perception relies mainly on pictorial information, perhaps with enhancement of the occlusion cue by motion. However, motion information such as motion parallax is not likely to be important. The effectiveness of pictorial information is diminished by monocular and binocular information conveying flatness of the screen and by difficulties in scaling: Only a degree of relative depth can be conveyed. Furthermore, pictorial information can mislead. Depth perception is probably adequate in remote operation, if target objects are well separated, with well-defined edges and familiar shapes. Stereoscopic viewing systems are being developed to introduce binocular information to remote operation. However, stereoscopic viewing is problematic because binocular disparity conflicts with convergence and monocular information. An alternative strategy to improve precision in remote operation may be to rely on individuals who lack binocular function: There is redundancy in depth information, and such individuals seem to compensate for the lack of binocular function.

  7. SKI - ASAR - O3. As operated Safety Analysis Report. Recurring safety review 1996 Oskarshamn 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    According to Swedish law, the reactor owner is responsible for performing a safety review and writing a ''ASAR''-report. The Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) examines this report, and reports the findings to the government (the ''SKI-ASAR'' report). Each Swedish reactor should pass through three full ASAR reviews during its life-time, similar to the licensing inspection before start-up of the reactor. The first series ASAR was delivered by OKG to SKI in December 1996, and forms the basis for the SKI analysis in the present report

  8. SKI - ASAR - F3. As operated Safety Analysis Report. Recurring safety review 1996 Forsmark 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    According to Swedish law, the reactor owner is responsible for performing a safety review and writing a ''ASAR''-report. The Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) examines this report, and reports the findings to the government (the ''SKI-ASAR'' report). Each Swedish reactor should pass through three full ASAR reviews during its life-time, similar to the licensing inspection before start-up of the reactor. The first series ASAR was delivered by FKA to SKI in December 1996, and forms the basis for the SKI analysis in the present report

  9. SKI - ASAR - R1. As operated Safety Analysis Report. Recurring safety review 1995 Ringhals 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    According to Swedish law, the reactor owner is responsible for performing a safety review and writing a so called ASAR-report. The Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) examines this report, and reports the findings to the government (the so called SKI-ASAR-report). Each Swedish reactor should pass through three full ASAR reviews during its lifetime, similar to the licensing inspection before start-up of the reactor. The second series ASAR was delivered by the Ringhals utility to SKI in September 1995, and forms the basis for the SKI analysis in the present report

  10. TMI-2 core-examination program: INEL facilities readiness study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, T.B.

    1983-02-01

    This report reviews the capability and readiness of remote handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to receive, and store the TMI-2 core, and to examine and analyze TMI-2 core samples. To accomplish these objectives, the facilities must be able to receive commercial casks, unload canisters from the casks, store the canisters, open the canisters, handle the fuel debris and assemblies, and perform various examinations. The report identifies documentation, including core information, necessary to INEL before receiving the entire TMI-2 core. Also identified are prerequisites to INEL's receipt of the first canister: costs, schedules, and a preliminary project plan for the tasks

  11. Retrospective analysis of the quality of reports by author-suggested and non-author-suggested reviewers in journals operating on open or single-blind peer review models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Maria K; Dudbridge, Frank; Nanda, Shreeya; Harriman, Stephanie L; Patel, Jigisha; Moylan, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-29

    To assess whether reports from reviewers recommended by authors show a bias in quality and recommendation for editorial decision, compared with reviewers suggested by other parties, and whether reviewer reports for journals operating on open or single-blind peer review models differ with regard to report quality and reviewer recommendations. Retrospective analysis of the quality of reviewer reports using an established Review Quality Instrument, and analysis of reviewer recommendations and author satisfaction surveys. BioMed Central biology and medical journals. BMC Infectious Diseases and BMC Microbiology are similar in size, rejection rates, impact factors and editorial processes, but the former uses open peer review while the latter uses single-blind peer review. The Journal of Inflammation has operated under both peer review models. Two hundred reviewer reports submitted to BMC Infectious Diseases, 200 reviewer reports submitted to BMC Microbiology and 400 reviewer reports submitted to the Journal of Inflammation. For each journal, author-suggested reviewers provided reports of comparable quality to non-author-suggested reviewers, but were significantly more likely to recommend acceptance, irrespective of the peer review model (previewer reports measured by the Review Quality Instrument was 5% higher than for BMC Microbiology (p=0.042). For the Journal of Inflammation, the quality of reports was the same irrespective of the peer review model used. Reviewers suggested by authors provide reports of comparable quality to non-author-suggested reviewers, but are significantly more likely to recommend acceptance. Open peer review reports for BMC Infectious Diseases were of higher quality than single-blind reports for BMC Microbiology. There was no difference in quality of peer review in the Journal of Inflammation under open peer review compared with single blind. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  12. Qualification of control room operators for nuclear power plants. A review of practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitalnik, J.; Hurley, F.I.

    1983-01-01

    The increasing complexity of nuclear power plants has increased the demands on operators and several countries have made a break with their traditional practice and made professional engineers available on operating shifts. Engineers are incorporated in differing organizational arrangements which require differing competence of all the members of the shift team. Analysis of the elements of competence shows that all the organizational arrangements can be made to work satisfactorily, provided attention is given to ensuring certain requirements. Analysis also enables some general requirements for the shift operating team to be defined. However, these requirements are ideal, since conditions in some countries prevent their attainment in the short term; the main difficulties stem from the attitudes of professional engineers to shift work and career development. (author)

  13. The Final Count Down: A Review of Three Decades of Flight Controller Training Methods for Space Shuttle Mission Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittermore, Gary; Bertels, Christie

    2011-01-01

    Operations of human spaceflight systems is extremely complex; therefore, the training and certification of operations personnel is a critical piece of ensuring mission success. Mission Control Center (MCC-H), at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, manages mission operations for the Space Shuttle Program, including the training and certification of the astronauts and flight control teams. An overview of a flight control team s makeup and responsibilities during a flight, and details on how those teams are trained and certified, reveals that while the training methodology for developing flight controllers has evolved significantly over the last thirty years the core goals and competencies have remained the same. In addition, the facilities and tools used in the control center have evolved. Changes in methodology and tools have been driven by many factors, including lessons learned, technology, shuttle accidents, shifts in risk posture, and generational differences. Flight controllers share their experiences in training and operating the space shuttle. The primary training method throughout the program has been mission simulations of the orbit, ascent, and entry phases, to truly train like you fly. A review of lessons learned from flight controller training suggests how they could be applied to future human spaceflight endeavors, including missions to the moon or to Mars. The lessons learned from operating the space shuttle for over thirty years will help the space industry build the next human transport space vehicle.

  14. Influence of P-Reactor operation on the aquatic ecology of Par Pond: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.; Tilly, L.J.

    1985-02-01

    Par Pond is a 1012 hectare reservoir that was constructed in 1958 to provide cooling water for Savannah River nuclear reactors. The purpose of this report is to summarize all known studies on the Par Pond system and point out demonstrable or probable effects that can be correlated with reactor operations. Reactor operation effects the Par Pond ecosystem through: (1) pumping, (2) thermal alteration, and (3) the addition of Savannah River makeup water. The influence of each of these factors is discussed. 108 references, 24 figures, 34 tables. (MF)

  15. 77 FR 18304 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Financial and Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... current financial position of the carrier. Financial trend lines are extended into the future to analyze... RITA 2008-0002] Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Report of Financial and... Desk Officer. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OMB Approval No. 2138-0013 Title: Report of Financial and...

  16. A review on the importance of metals and metalloids in atmospheric dust and aerosol from mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Taylor, Mark P; Gao, Song; Landázuri, Andrea; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    Contaminants can be transported rapidly and over relatively long distances by atmospheric dust and aerosol relative to other media such as water, soil and biota; yet few studies have explicitly evaluated the environmental implications of this pathway, making it a fundamental but understudied transport mechanism. Although there are numerous natural and anthropogenic activities that can increase dust and aerosol emissions and contaminant levels in the environment, mining operations are notable with respect to the quantity of particulates generated, the global extent of area impacted, and the toxicity of contaminants associated with the emissions. Here we review (i) the environmental fate and transport of metals and metalloids in dust and aerosol from mining operations, (ii) current methodologies used to assess contaminant concentrations and particulate emissions, and (iii) the potential health and environmental risks associated with airborne contaminants from mining operations. The review evaluates future research priorities based on the available literature and suggest that there is a particular need to measure and understand the generation, fate and transport of airborne particulates from mining operations, specifically the finer particle fraction. More generally, our findings suggest that mining operations play an important but underappreciated role in the generation of contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosol and the transport of metal and metalloid contaminants, and highlight the need for further research in this area. The role of mining activities in the fate and transport of environmental contaminants may become increasingly important in the coming decades, as climate change and land use are projected to intensify, both of which can substantially increase the potential for dust emissions and transport. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Review on the Importance of Metals and Metalloids in Atmospheric Dust and Aerosol from Mining Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Taylor, Mark P.; Gao, Song; Landázuri, Andrea; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Contaminants can be transported rapidly and over relatively long distances by atmospheric dust and aerosol relative to other media such as water, soil and biota; yet few studies have explicitly evaluated the environmental implications of this pathway, making it a fundamental but understudied transport mechanism. Although there are numerous natural and anthropogenic activities that can increase dust and aerosol emissions and contaminant levels in the environment, mining operations are notable with respect to the quantity of particulates generated, the global extent of area impacted, and the toxicity of contaminants associated with the emissions. Here we review (i) the environmental fate and transport of metals and metalloids in dust and aerosol from mining operations, (ii) current methodologies used to assess contaminant concentrations and particulate emissions, and (iii) the potential health and environmental risks associated with airborne contaminants from mining operations. The review evaluates future research priorities based on the available literature and suggest that there is a particular need to measure and understand the generation, fate and transport of airborne particulates from mining operations, specifically the finer particle fraction. More generally, our findings suggest that mining operations play an important but underappreciated role in the generation of contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosol and the transport of metal and metalloid contaminants, and highlight the need for further research in this area. The role of mining activities in the fate and transport of environmental contaminants may become increasingly important in the coming decades, as climate change and land use are projected to intensify, both of which can substantially increase the potential for dust emissions and transport. PMID:22766428

  18. What are the risk factors for post-operative infection after hip hemiarthroplasty? Systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noailles, Thibaut; Brulefert, Kévin; Chalopin, Antoine; Longis, Pierre Marie; Gouin, François

    2016-09-01

    Femoral neck fractures are frequent in the elderly population and lead to high morbidity and mortality. Hemiarthroplasty is an established surgical procedure for displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures. Post-operative infection is frequent and is potentially devastating for the patient and the healthcare services. The goal of this study was to identify the risk factors of infection after hemiarthroplasty and help adapt our surgical practice. A systematic review of the literature was performed in July 2015 by two authors using the MedLine, PubMed and Cochrane databases. We used the MeSH keywords "hip hemiarthroplasty" AND "infection" to identify risk factors and methods of prevention for surgical site infection after hemiarthroplasty. Following the search, two authors independently performed the first stage based on titles and abstracts. Thirty-seven articles were selected. Review and analysis of the references was performed to find other articles of interest. Thirteen articles were selected to analyse. According to literature, the surgical site infection (SSI) rate after hip hemiarthroplasty (HHA) is between 1.7 and 7.3 %. Pre-operative comorbidities (obesity, liver disease, advanced age), operative conditions (junior surgeon, uncemented stems, time of surgery) and post-operative management (length of hospitalisation, haematoma, prolonged wound drainage and two urinary catheterisations) were identified as risk factors of surgical site infection. Authors describe conditions to decrease the incidence of these complications and underline the importance of "a specialised hip team" that provides fast care and helps decrease the duration of hospitalisation. Careful patient management for hemiarthroplasty is vital and may decrease the incidence of surgical site infection, which is associated with high morbidity and high procedure cost. Our review suggests that there are specific correctable risk factors for SSIs after HHA. Being able to identify these risk factors

  19. Regulatory analysis for amendments to regulations for the environmental review for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This regulatory analysis provides the supporting information for a proposed rule that will amend the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental review requirements for applications for renewal of nuclear power plant operating licenses. The objective of the proposed rulemaking is to improve regulatory efficiency by providing for the generic evaluation of certain environmental impacts associated with nuclear plant license renewal. After considering various options, the staff identified and analyzed two major alternatives. With Alternative A, the existing regulations would not be amended. This option requires that environmental reviews be performed under the existing regulations. Alternative B is to assess, on a generic basis, the environmental impacts of renewing the operating license of individual nuclear power plants, and define the issues that will need to be further analyzed on a case-by-case basis. In addition, Alternative B removes from NRC's review certain economics-related issues. The findings of this assessment are to be codified in 10 CFR 51. The staff has selected Alternative B as the preferred alternative

  20. A review of recent advances in data analytics for post-operative patient deterioration detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Clemence; Bezemer, Rick; Atallah, Louis

    2018-06-01

    Most deaths occurring due to a surgical intervention happen postoperatively rather than during surgery. The current standard of care in many hospitals cannot fully cope with detecting and addressing post-surgical deterioration in time. For millions of patients, this deterioration is left unnoticed, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. Postoperative deterioration detection currently relies on general scores that are not fully able to cater for the complex post-operative physiology of surgical patients. In the last decade however, advanced risk and warning scoring techniques have started to show encouraging results in terms of using the large amount of data available peri-operatively to improve postoperative deterioration detection. Relevant literature has been carefully surveyed to provide a summary of the most promising approaches as well as how they have been deployed in the perioperative domain. This work also aims to highlight the opportunities that lie in personalizing the models developed for patient deterioration for these particular post-surgical patients and make the output more actionable. The integration of pre- and intra-operative data, e.g. comorbidities, vitals, lab data, and information about the procedure performed, in post-operative early warning algorithms would lead to more contextualized, personalized, and adaptive patient modelling. This, combined with careful integration in the clinical workflow, would result in improved clinical decision support and better post-surgical care outcomes.

  1. Forest operations, extreme flooding events, and considerations for hydrologic modeling in the Appalachians--A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.A. Eisenbies; W.M. Aust; J.A. Burger; M.B. Adams

    2007-01-01

    The connection between forests and water resources is well established, but the relationships among controlling factors are only partly understood. Concern over the effects of forestry operations, particularly harvesting, on extreme flooding events is a recurrent issue in forest and watershed management. Due to the complexity of the system, and the cost of installing...

  2. A review of operational, regional-scale, chemical weather forecasting models in Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kukkonen, J.; Olsson, T.; Schultz, D.M.; Baklanov, A.; Klein, T.; Miranda, A.I.; Monteiro, A.; Hirtl, M.; Tarvainen, V.; Boy, M.; Peuch, V.H.; PoupKou, A.; Kioutsioukis, I.; Finardi, S.; Sofiev, M.; Sokhi, R.; Lehtinen, K.E.J.; Karatzas, K.; San José, R.; Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Schaap, M.; Reimer, E.; Jakobs, H.; Eben, Kryštof

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2012), s. 1-87 ISSN 1680-7316 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : chemical weather * numerical models * operational forecasting * air Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 5.510, year: 2012

  3. 78 FR 37281 - Revisions to Environmental Review for Renewal of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Licenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... factors: (1) License renewal will involve nuclear power plants for which the environmental impacts of...) Changes in the environment around nuclear power plants are gradual and predictable. The 1996 GEIS improved... environmental impacts that may occur from renewing commercial nuclear power plant operating licenses; (2...

  4. Review of droop-controlled bi-directional inverter in conducting islanded operation of photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaw, Ace Lin Yi; Wong, Jianhui; Lim, Yun Seng

    2017-04-01

    Global warming due to the excessive greenhouse gas emissions has led to the emergence of green technologies in Malaysia, particularly photovoltaic (PV) systems. Under the current regulatory framework, islanded operation of the PV system is not permissible. As a result, any renewable energy sources will be disconnected immediately in the event of grid outages. This practice is to ensure the safety of working personnel, as well as the customer equipment connected within the distribution networks. In addition, there is no synchronizing equipment to aid the reconnection of the islanded network to the grid. However, with the shutdown of the Distributed Generator (DG) during islanded operation, the customers are not able to utilize the available renewable energy and the number of power interruption is not improved with the renewable energy sources. Therefore, the main objective of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of the PV system in conducting islanding operation with the use of Energy Storage System (ESS). This paper also proposes a control algorithm to maintain the voltage and frequency excursion within the statutory limit by manipulating the real and reactive power flow of the ESS within the transition period between grid connected and islanding operation.

  5. A review of the peri-operative management of paediatric burns ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reasons include peri-operative sepsis, bleeding, issues around thermoregulation, the hypermetabolic state, nutritional and electrolyte issues, inhalation injuries and the amount of movement during procedures to wash patients, change drapes and access different anatomical sites. The appropriate execution of surgery is ...

  6. A review of procedures available to seismically requalify operating nuclear plant structures, equipment and distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    It is well known that the loads and procedures used to seismically qualify nuclear power plant structures and components have changed dramatically during the past 15 to 20 years. In this paper, the various methods available to seismically qualify or requalify structures and components in operating nuclear power plants are identified and the advantages and disadvantages of each briefly summarized. (orig.)

  7. Experience with Periodic Safety Review (PSR) at Kozloduy NPP after 20 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Measures in the long-term Programs for improving safety and radiation protection of unit 5&6, based on PSR outcome and addressed on the units’ operation licence renewal are under way. • NPP Kozloduy intends to fulfils requirements on modern nuclear power plants which occasionally exceeds limits of the effective national nuclear legislation

  8. Contemporary Management and Operations Research Graduate Programs: A Review, Recommendations, and Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Joseph A.; Polak, George G.; Scherer, Robert F.; Munoz, Carmen Gloria

    2001-01-01

    Criticisms of graduate management education have led to changes in the balance between business and academic standards, strategic leadership, curriculum, faculty performance incentives, graduate proficiencies, and relations with the business community. Operations management/management sciences have similarly changed in terms of curricular…

  9. Surgical Fires and Operative Burns: Lessons Learned From a 33-Year Review of Medical Litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Asad J; Haddad, Nadeem N; Khasawneh, Mohammad A; Cullinane, Daniel C; Zielinski, Martin D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to understand the setting and litigation outcomes of surgical fires and operative burns. Westlaw, an online legal research data-set, was utilized. Data were collected on patient, procedure, and case characteristics. One hundred thirty-nine cases were identified; 114 (82%) operative burns and 25 (18%) surgical fires. Median plaintiff (patient) age was 46 (IQR:28-59). Most common site of operative burn was the face (26% [n = 36]). Most common source of injury was a high energy device (43% [n = 52]). Death was reported in 2 (1.4%) cases. Plaintiff age <18 vs age 18-50 and mention of a non-surgical physician as a defendant both were shown to be independently associated with an award payout (OR = 4.90 [95% CI, 1.23-25.45]; p = .02) and (OR = 4.50 [95% CI, 1.63-13.63]; p = .003) respectively. Plaintiff award payment (settlement or plaintiff verdict) was reported in 83 (60%) cases; median award payout was $215,000 (IQR: $82,000-$518,000). High energy devices remain as the most common cause of injury. Understanding and addressing pitfalls in operative care may mitigate errors and potentially lessen future liability. III. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  11. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  12. The Component Operational Experience Degradation and Ageing Program (CODAP). Review and lessons learned (2011-2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragea, Tudor; Riznic, Jovica R.

    2015-01-01

    The structural integrity of piping systems is crucial to continuous and safe operation of nuclear power plants. Across all designs, the pressure boundary and its related piping and components, form one of the many levels of defense in the continuous and safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It is therefore necessary to identify, understand, evaluate and catalogue all of the various degradation mechanisms and failures that affect various piping systems and components across all nuclear power plants (NPP's). This need was first recognized in 1994 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) which launched a five-year Research and Development (R and D) project to explore the viability of creating an international pipe failure database (SKI-PIPE) (Riznic, 2007). The project was considered to be very successful and in 2002, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Pipe Failure Data Exchange (OPDE) was created. OPDE was operated under the umbrella of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and was created in order to produce an international database on the piping service experience applicable to commercial nuclear power plants. After the successful completion of OPDE, the OECD, as well as other international members, agreed to participate in OPDE's successor: the Component Operational Experience Degradation and Ageing Program (CODAP). The objective of CODAP is to collect information on all possible events related to the failure and degradation of passive metallic components in NPP's. With CODAP winding down to the completion of its first phase in December 2014, this report will focus on the conclusions and the lessons learned throughout the many years of CODAP's implementation. There are currently 14 countries participating in CODAP, many of whom are industry leaders (France, Canada, U.S.A., Germany, Japan, Korea etc.). This cooperation on an international scale provides a library of OPerational EXperience (OPEX) for all participating NPP

  13. A mechanistic review on vermifiltration of wastewater: Design, operation and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajneesh; Bhunia, Puspendu; Dash, Rajesh R

    2017-07-15

    With global population explosion, the available water resources are slowly being polluted due to the excessive human interference. To encounter this, it is the need of this hour to find out sustainable pollution remediating technologies to meet the stringent discharge standards for domestic as well as industrial wastewaters. In addition, those techniques should have the capabilities for effective implementation even in developing countries. Based on the available literatures, one such technique, named vermifilter, has been identified which takes care of almost all the sustainable and economical criteria for its effective implementation even in developing countries. The aim of this meta-analysis is to provide a comprehensive review on assessment mechanisms involved, factors affecting the process and performance of vermifiltration under different scenarios. The present review envisages the current state of the knowledge regarding physical, chemical and biological aspects related to the treatment mechanisms and effective functioning of earthworms. This review has also proposed several suggestive plans on its application at any proposed site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment.

  15. Review of operational experience with the gas-cooled Magnox reactors of the United Kingdom Central Electricity Generating Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Clarke, A.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper provides a review, which is mainly of a statistical nature, of 260 reactor years of operating experience which the (United Kingdom) Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has obtained with its gas-cooled, graphite moderated Magnox reactors. The main emphasis in the review is on safety rather than on availability. Data are provided on the overall incidence and frequencies of faults and it is shown that the plant items which are predominantly responsible for recorded faults are the gas circulators and the turbo-alternators. Analysis of the reactor trip experience shows that the incidence of events which necessitate an automatic shutdown of the reactor has been about one per reactor year and that of other events leading to a reactor trip has not been much higher (1.4 per reactor year). As would be expected from the length of the operating experience, some relatively rare events have occurred (expected frequency 10 -2 per reactor year, or less) but on each occasion the reactor shutdown system and decay heat removal systems functioned satisfactorily. No overheating of, or damage to, the fuel occurred as a result of these rare events or of other, more frequent, faults. Analysis of the trend of failure rates has shown an improvement with time in nearly all safety-related items and external inspection of the primary coolant circuits has shown no significant deterioration with time. However, some derating of the reactors has been necessary to reduce the effects of oxidation of mild steel in CO 2 , in order to obtain optimum service lives. In spite of major differences between the systems, a comparison of the failure rates of analogous systems and plant items in PWRs and the Magnox reactors show a considerable similarity. Overall, the review of CEGB's operational experience with its Magnos reactors has shown that the frequencies of faults in systems and plant items has been satisfyingly low. (author)

  16. A review of the radiation exposure of transport personnel during the radioactive waste sea disposal operations from 1977-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mairs, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    The period of the review was chosen to give an account of the recent radiation exposures of transport personnel, which may serve as an indicator of possible future exposures associated with sea disposal operations. The annual radiation exposure of transport personnel has shown a significant reduction during the period of the review. These dose savings have been achieved despite a general increase in the quantities of wastes dumped. This is probably due to the improved shielding of packages and radiologically improved working procedures. If ocean disposal of solid or solidified radioactive waste was to be resumed the exposure of transport personnel might be expected to be comparable to the low doses received in the early 1980s. However, changes in packaging, handling procedures and frequency of movements would have major effects on radiation exposure. (author)

  17. Traffic in the operating room: a review of factors influencing air flow and surgical wound contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrywka, Marian; Byers, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Surgical wound contamination leading to surgical site infection can result from disruption of the intended airflow in the operating room (OR). When personnel enter and exit the OR, or create unnecessary movement and traffic during the procedure, the intended airflow in the vicinity of the open wound becomes disrupted and does not adequately remove airborne contaminants from the sterile field. An increase in the bacterial counts of airborne microorganisms is noted during increased activity levels within the OR. Researchers have studied OR traffic and door openings as a determinant of air contamination. During a surgical procedure the door to the operating room may be open as long as 20 minutes out of each surgical hour during critical procedures involving implants. Interventions into limiting excessive movement and traffic in the OR may lead to reductions in surgical site infections in select populations.

  18. THE OPERATIONS OF THE MEXICAN ARMY AGAINST DRUG TRAFFICKING, REVIEW AND PRESENT SITUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Palom Mendoza Cortés

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available legal po ers, responsibilities and impact across space and time. This paper is a report of the MA thesis “The Mexican Secretariat of National Defense SEDENA , organizational changes: 1937C2010”. The object of this article is to propose a descriptive analysis and conduct a revie of the increase of the Mexican military operations background and history, from the moment drug trafficking as conceived as a Mexico s national security threat. This derived in the fact of the deployment of the Army nation ide to perform high impact military operations to counter it, under an internal security environment characterized by the lack of strong and not corrupt internal security institutions that finally ended endorsing the military intervention and alongside the negative consequences for the civilCmilitary relations.

  19. Tank waste remediation system retrieval and disposal mission readiness-to-proceed responses to internal independent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaus, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to make critical decisions during fiscal year (FY) 1998 regarding privatization contracts for the treatment of Hanford tank waste. Specifically, DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL), will make decisions related to proceeding with Phase 1 Privatization. In support of these decisions, the management and integration (M+I) contractor must be able to meet the requirements to support the Phase 1 privatization contractors. As part of the assessment of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) Readiness-To-Proceed (RTP), an independent review of their process and products was required by the RL letter of August 8, 1997. The Independent Review Team reviewed the adequacy of the planning that has been done by the M+I contractor to validate that, if the plans are carried out, there is reasonable assurance of success. Overall, the RTP Independent Review Team concluded that, if the planning by the M+I contractor team is carried out with adequate funding, there is reasonable assurance that the M+I contractor will be able to deliver waste to the privatization contractor for the duration of Phase 1. This conclusion was based on addressing the recommendations contained in the Independent Review Team's Final Report and in the individual Criteria and Review Approach (CRA) forms completed during the assessment. The purpose of this report is to formally document the independent assessment and the RTP team responses to the Independent Review Team recommendations. It also provides closure logics for selected recommendations from a Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) internal assessment of the Technical Basis Review (TBR) packages. This report contains the RTP recommendation closure process (Section 2.0); the closure tables (Section 3.0) which provide traceability between each review team recommendation and its corresponding Project Hanford Management Contract closure logic; and two attachments that formally document the Independent Review Team

  20. Bike sharing: A review of evidence on impacts and processes of implementation and operation

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of bike sharing, there is a lack of in-depth impact and process evaluations of existing schemes, especially with regard to measuring the ‘success’ of a scheme against its original objectives. This paper is concerned with identifying and critically interpreting the available evidence on bike sharing to date, on both impacts and processes of implementation and operation. The growing yet limited evidence base suggests that bike sharing can increase cycling levels b...