WorldWideScience

Sample records for operating pwr vis-a-vis

  1. Technical Support to an Operating PWR vis-a-vis Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, Subhan; Khan, M.; Chughtai, M. Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Currently a PWR of 300 MWe capacity CHASNUPP-I is in operation since the year 2000. Technical support being provided includes in-core fuel management and corresponding safety analysis for the reshuffled core for the next cycle. Currently calculation and analysis were performed for Cycle 6 to achieve the safe and economical loading pattern. The technique used is designated as out in mode (modified). In this technique, most of the fresh fuel assemblies are not directly located at the periphery of the core, but near the boundary. This technique has the advantage that without using burnable absorber we can design a low leakage core with extended cycle and maximum batch averaged burnup. (author)

  2. Detecting changes in rainfall pattern and seasonality index vis-`a-vis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    index vis-`a-vis increasing water scarcity in Maharashtra ... in the district scale are identified by trend analysis of rainfall time series. ... for better disaster management and water resource ..... productivity and irrigation water supply in the con-.

  3. Energy conservation opportunities: audit vis-a-vis mine productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, G.H.

    2009-07-01

    Mining operation, whether opencast or underground, with modern equipment is highly energy intensive, needing energy conservation and management to ensure efficiency, cost effectiveness, and overall productivity. Exhaustible primary energy resources such as coal, lignite, oil, and nuclear fuels are being mined out to meet our energy needs. An attempt has been made in this paper to highlight the energy conservation opportunities, energy audit, the relevant Energy Conservation Act 2001 and certain energy saving measures leading to higher productivity followed by a few case study examples. 3 refs.

  4. Migratory Trends in the Czech Republic: “Divergence or Convergence” vis-a-vis the Developed World?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Drbohlav

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to analyse whether the geopolitical and socio-economic integration and “harmonisation” of the Czech Republic with Western Europe is accompanied by a divergence or convergence of the Czech migratory reality vis-a-vis the developed western world. When testing resemblance two kinds of measurements are used: 1 quantitative – (in terms of the numbers of international migrants, and 2 “qualitative” – a in terms of regularities linked with the migration itself and those that tackle mutual relationships among immigration, the socio-economic development of the destination country and subjective attitudes of the majority population towards minority groups: 3 hypotheses are tested in this regard; b in terms of migratory policies and practices. The results clearly show us that convergence rather than divergence is characteristic of the current migratory trends in the Czech Republic as compared to the developed world, mainly Western Europe.

  5. Geospatial technology perspectives for mining vis-a-vis sustainable forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goparaju Laxmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Forests, the backbone of biogeochemical cycles and life supporting systems, are under severe pressure due to varied anthropogenic activities. Mining activities are one among the major reasons for forest destruction questioning the survivability and sustainability of flora and fauna existing in that area. Thus, monitoring and managing the impact of mining activities on natural resources at regular intervals is necessary to check the status of their depleted conditions, and to take up restoration and conservative measurements. Geospatial technology provides means to identify the impact of different mining operations on forest ecosystems and helps in proposing initiatives for safeguarding the forest environment. In this context, the present study highlights the problems related to mining in forest ecosystems and elucidates how geospatial technology can be employed at various stages of mining activities to achieve a sustainable forest ecosystem. The study collates information from various sources and highlights the role of geospatial technology in mining industries and reclamation process.

  6. EFFECTS OF AZADIRACHTIN ON CUTICULAR PROTEINS OF SPODOPTERA LITURA (LEPIDOPTERA: NOCTUIDAE) VIS-A-VIS THE MODES OF APPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yooboon, T; Pluempanupat, W; Koul, Opender; Bullangpoti, V

    2015-01-01

    Azadirachtin is a known botanical insecticide with multiple modes of action. Whether these effects have any relation with the modes of application, specifically during ecdysis process, has been the objective of the present study and accordingly the impairment, if any, among cuticular proteins of Spodoptera litura (Fab.) was determined. Azadirachtin was applied topically, via injection or oral administration. Azadirachtin administered via injection and topical applications severely impaired the ecdysis by 86.67 and 80.0%, respectively. However, this impairment via oral administration was significantly lower (73.33%). Using SDS-PAGE, the cuticular proteins were determined for treated insects under all the three modes of application. In all cases 6 protein bands (MW 9-34 kDa) were identified using markers as standard. In all treatments 3 induced proteins (MW. ~16, 20 and 23 kDa) and 1 reduced protein (~19 kDa) were observed. In case of the topical treatment a different induced protein of ~18 kDa was identified. The change in cuticular proteins, their possible role in ecdysis impairment vis-a-vis the mode of application of azadirachtin is being correlated. This will help in understanding the mode-of-action at cuticular level and also will allow developing a suitable application strategy under field conditions in insect pest management.

  7. Materials performance in operating PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The Inconel-600 tubing in operating PWR steam generators has developed leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking or a general wastage attack, originating from the secondary side of the tubing. Corrosion has been limited to those areas of the steam generators where limited coolant circulation and high heat flux have caused impurities to concentrate. Wastage or pitting attack has always been associated with local concentration of sodium hydrogen phosphates, whereas stress corrosion has been associated with local concentration of sodium or potassium hydroxides. The only instance of stress corrosion originating from the primary side occurred on cold-worked tubing when hydrogen was not added to getter oxygen, and LiOH was not added to raise the pH of the primary coolant. All PWR manufacturers are now recommending that the phosphate treatment of the secondary coolant be abandoned in favor of an all-volatile treatment. Experience in operating plants has shown, however, that removal of phosphate-rich sludge deposits is difficult, and that further wastage and/or intergranular stress corrosion may develop; the residual sodium phosphates gradually convert by reaction with corrosion product hydroxides to sodium hydroxide, which remains concentrated in the limited flow areas. Improvements in circulation patterns have been achieved by inserting flow baffles in some PWR steam generators. Inservice monitoring by eddy current techniques is useful for detecting corrosion-induced defects in the tubing, but irreproducibility in field examinations can lead to uncertainties interpreting the results. (U.S.)

  8. Special features of nuclear waste repository ventilation system VIS-A-VIS experiences at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethi, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis and discussion of the underground ventilation system at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Particular emphasis is placed on specific repository-related requirements and the gradual evolution of engineering designs relative to the WIPP Project scope. The ventilation system for a nuclear waste facility similar to WIPP is designed to provide a suitable environment for personnel and equipment during normal activities. It is also designed to provide confinement and channeling of potential airborne radioactive material in the event of an accidental release. It is desirable to identify and design all parallel activities and the required process equipment prior to completion of the repository mine final design. Such factors as ventilation requirements, drift sizes, bulkhead sizes, and placement are dependent on these items. Mine creep closure properties must be factored into the mine and ventilation equipment design considerations. Effects of natural ventilation pressures deserve due consideration in the design. Mine ventilation requirements are dominated by the diesel equipment to be operated in the underground horizon. WIPP engineers have also found it extremely desirable to have automated real-time monitoring and control for the underground ventilation air. Final testing and balancing of the ventilation system is an extremely important startup requirement. 3 refs., 2 figs

  9. Insects vis a vis radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Meera

    2014-01-01

    Insects have turned out to be much more radiation resistant. For most insects a dose of about 500-700 Gy is required to kill them within a few weeks of exposure; although cockroaches require 900-1000 Gy. Killing insects in less than a few days requires much higher doses. These doses are for mature insects, the immature stages of some insects can be killed by doses as low as 40 Gy. Some insects can be sterilized at even lower doses, and this has application in insect control. Screw-worms, for example, can be sterilized with doses of 25-50 Gy. By contrast, doses as low as 3 Gy caused death of humans in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and doses of about 6 Gy caused death of fire fighters in the Chernobyl accident. It is not exactly certain what the basis is for the resistance of insects to ionizing radiation. It is not animal size by itself, nor lack of penetration. It is also not because of few dividing cells as these are more radiosensitive than non-dividing ones. The speculation that insects might have lower oxygen tensions, and the lack of oxygen is known to protect cells from radiation also does not work. Insect cells might have an enhanced capacity to repair radiation damage also could not be proven. The number of chromosomes influenced radio-sensitivity, and that insects had fewer chromosomes could be true. The radiation resistance is inherent to the cells, since cells derived from insects are also radiation resistant when grown in cell culture. For example, a dose of 60 Gy is required to produce a 80% kill of insect cells, while doses of 1-2 Gy are sufficient to generate this level of killing in mammalian cells. But, nevertheless, according to recent researches, radiation from Japan's leaking Fukushima nuclear plant has caused mutations in some butterflies. It is therefore clear that insects are resistant to ionizing radiation and that this resistance is an inherent property of their cells. But it is not clear exactly what the basis of this cellular resistance is, although the dominant theory is that it relates to the relatively small amount of DNA in insect cells. One of the difficulties is assessing possible mechanisms is that very little work on insect radiobiology is being carried out?

  10. Operation and maintenance in Genkai PWR Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shojiro

    1984-01-01

    The No.1 PWR plant with 559 MW capacity in the Genkai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., required about 115 days for the regular inspection in fiscal 1982 and thereafter, although more maintenance work was done. But No.2 plant of the same type required not more than 80 days. In most cases, the period of one operation cycle was from 10 to 12 months, but in the third operation cycle of No.2 plant, it is expected to be 13 months. The capacity ratio of the whole power station was 75.2% at the end of fiscal 1983. These operational records all exceeded the Japanese average. The plants are two-loop Westinghouse type PWRs, and No.1 plant started the commercial operation of anti h and the increment of P 0 + . (author) apacity ratio of No.1 plant was 71.6%, and that of No.2 plant was 85.5%. The intergranular attack on steam generator tubes was found first in the fifth regular inspection, and also in the sixth and seventh inspections, and the faulty tubes were plugged. The prevention of its spread is the largest problem. The in-service quality assurance activity, the personnel training program and the effort of upgrading the plant availability are reported. (Kako, I.)

  11. Load-following operation of PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jong Hwa; Oh, Soo Yul; Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-01

    The load-following operation of nuclear power plants will become inevitable due to the increased nuclear share in the total electricity generation. As a groundwork for the load-following capability of the Korean next generation PWRs, the state-of-the-art has been reviewed. The core control principles and methods are the main subject in this review as well as the impact of load-following operations on the fuel performance and on the mechanical integrity of components. To begin with, it was described what the load-following operation is and in what view point the technology should be reviewed. Afterwards the load-following method, performance and problems in domestic 900 MWe class PWRs were discussed, and domestic R and D works were summarized. Foreign technologies were also reviewed. They include Mode G and Mode X of Foratom, D and L bank method of KWU, the method using PSCEA of ABB-CE, and MSHIM of Westinghouse. The load-following related special features of Foratom`s N4 plant, KWU`s plants, ABB-CE`s Systems 80+, and Westinghouse`s AP600 were described in each technology review. The review concluded that the capability of N4 plant with Mode X is the best and the methods in System, 80+ and AP600 would require verifications for the continued and usual load-following operation. It was recommended that the load-following operation experiences in domestic PWRs under operation be required to settle down the capability for the future. In addition, a more enhanced technology is required for the Korean next generation PWR regardless what the reference plant concept is. 30 figs., 19 tabs., 75 refs. (Author).

  12. A Comparative Analysis of the Impact of the IAEA Cooperation Instruments in the Field of Nuclear Safety to Deal with the Fukushima Daiichi Accident vis-a-vis the Chernobyl Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Simões, V.

    2016-01-01

    entrenched among nuclear power plant operators, governments and regulators.” This work intends to make a comparative analysis of the impact of the IAEA cooperation instruments in the field of nuclear safety to deal with the Fukushima Daiichi accident vis-a-vis the Chernobyl accident. (author)

  13. BEACON TSM application system to the operation of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J. A.; Mildrum, C.; Serrano, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    BEACON-TSM is an advanced core monitoring system for PWR reactor cores, and also offers the possibility to perform a wide range of predictive calculation in support of reactor operation. BEACON-TSM is presently installed and licensed in the 5 Spanish PWR reactors of standard Westinghouse design. the purpose of this paper is to describe the features of this software system and to show the advantages obtainable by a nuclear power plant from its use. To illustrate the capabilities and benefits of BEACON-TSM two real case reactor operating situations are presented. (Author)

  14. Leak before break application in French PWR plants under operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faidy, C. [EDF SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-01

    Practical applications of the leak-before break concept are presently limited in French Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) compared to Fast Breeder Reactors. Neithertheless, different fracture mechanic demonstrations have been done on different primary, auxiliary and secondary PWR piping systems based on similar requirements that the American NUREG 1061 specifications. The consequences of the success in different demonstrations are still in discussion to be included in the global safety assessment of the plants, such as the consequences on in-service inspections, leak detection systems, support optimization,.... A large research and development program, realized in different co-operative agreements, completes the general approach.

  15. PWR auxiliary systems, safety and emergency systems, accident analysis, operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1976-01-01

    The author presents a description of PWR auxiliary systems like volume control, boric acid control, coolant purification, -degassing, -storage and -treatment system and waste processing systems. Residual heat removal systems, emergency systems and containment designs are discussed. As an accident analysis the author gives a survey over malfunctions and disturbances in the field of reactor operations. (TK) [de

  16. Irradiation behavior of German PWR RPV steels under operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.; Hein, H. [AREVA NP Gmbh (Germany); Ganswind, J. [VGB PowerTech e.V. (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power AG (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In 2007, the last standard surveillance capsule of the original RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) surveillance programs of the 11 currently operating German PWR has been evaluated. With it the standard irradiation surveillance programs of these plants was completed. In the present paper, irradiation data of these surveillance programs will be presented and a final assessment of the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels with respect to current standards KTA 3203 and Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 will be given. Data from two units which are currently under decommissioning will also be included, so that data from all 13 German PWR manufactured by the former Siemens/KWU company (now AREVA NP GmbH) are shown. It will be shown that all surveillance data within the approved area of chemical composition verify the limit curve RT(limit) of the KTA 3203, which is the relevant safety standard for these plants. An analysis of the data shows, that the prediction formulas of Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 Pos. 1 or from the TTS model tend to overestimate the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed. Additionally, the data will be compared to data from the research project CARISMA to demonstrate that these data are representative for the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Since the data of these research projects cover a larger neutron fluence range than the original surveillance data, they offer a future outlook into the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels under long term conditions. In general, as a consequence of the relatively large and beneficial water gap between core and RPV, especially in all Siemens/KWU 4-loop PWR, the EOL neutron fluence and therefore the irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties of the German PWR RPV materials are rather low. Moreover the irradiation data indicate that the optimized RPV materials specifications that have been applied in particular for the

  17. Modifications needed to operate PWR's plants in G-Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stainman, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The production of electricity from PWR nuclear plants represents 44% of the total production of electricity in France for 1984, and 68% of the electricity produced by Thermal power plants (127 TWh over 187 TWh). These data show clearly that the French PWR plants do not work in ''base mode'' anymore but have to fit production with consumption, in other words to assume the frequency control. To participate permanently to the load follow and frequency control, it appeared that some improvements in the field of pressurizer level and pressure control were necessary as well as in the field of operator aids computer. It should be noted that these improvements are useful even without taking into account the constraints due to load follow and frequency control because of the mechanical stress in the CVCS piping, for instance. Some additional tests are planned to better identify this specific problem. The need of a more flexible operating mode than ones given by the initial system (black control rods), significantly reduced in 1973 due to the application of the ECCS criterion, led EDF and Framatome to develop a new operating mode (G. Mode) allowing a faster power escalation (5% PN/mn) whatever the fuel burn-up. This new operating mode improves significantly also the flexibility of operation when the frequency control is needed, and helps a lot the operators in such cases. All the 900 MWe Nuclear plants will be able to operate in ''G mode'' before the end of 1984

  18. BWR and PWR chemistry operating experience and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Garcia, S.; Lynch, N.; Reid, R.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that proper control of water chemistry plays a critical role in ensuring the safe and reliable operation of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce general and localized corrosion of reactor coolant system, steam cycle equipment, and fuel cladding materials; ensure continued integrity of cycle components; and reduce radiation fields. Once a particular nuclear plant component has been installed or plant system constructed, proper water chemistry provides a global tool to mitigate materials degradation problems, thereby reducing the need for costly repairs or replacements. Recognizing the importance of proper chemistry control and the value in understanding the relationship between chemistry guidance and actual operating experience, EPRI continues to collect, monitor, and evaluate operating data from BWRs and PWRs around the world. More than 900 cycles of valuable BWR and PWR operating chemistry data has been collected, including online, startup and shutdown chemistry data over more than 10 years (> 20 years for BWRs). This paper will provide an overview of current trends in BWR and PWR chemistry, focusing on plants in the U.S.. Important chemistry parameters will be highlighted and discussed in the context of the EPRI Water Chemistry Guidelines requirements (i.e., those parameters considered to be of key importance as related to the major goals identified in the EPRI Guidelines: materials integrity; fuel integrity; and minimizing plant radiation fields). Perspectives will be provided in light of recent industry initiatives and changes in the EPRI BWR and PWR Water Chemistry Guidelines. (author)

  19. MOX and UOX PWR fuel performances EDF operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provost, Jean-Luc; Debes, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Based on a large program of experimentations implemented during the 90s, the industrial achievement of new FAs designs with increased performances opens up new prospects. The currently UOX fuels used on the 58 EDF PWR units are now authorized up to a maximum FA burn-up of 52 GWd/t with a large experience from 45 to 50 GWd/t. Today, the new products, along with the progress made in the field of calculation methods, still enable to increase further the fuel performances with respect to the safety margins. Thus, the conditions are met to implement in the next years new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet with increased enrichment (up to 4.5%) and irradiation limits (up to 62 GWd/t). The recycling of plutonium is part of EDF's reprocessing/recycling strategy. Up to now, 20 PWR 900 MW reactors are managed in MOX hybrid management. The feedback experience of 18 years of PWR operation with MOX is satisfactory, without any specific problem regarding manoeuvrability or plant availability. EDF is now looking to introduce MOX fuels with a higher plutonium content (up to 8.6%) equivalent to natural uranium enriched to 3.7%. It is the goal of the MOX Parity core management which achieve balance of MOX and UOX fuel performance with a significant increase of the MOX average discharge burn-up (BU max: 52 GWd/t for MOX and UOX). The industrial maturity of new FAs designs, with increased performances, allows the implementation in the next years of new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet. The scheduling of the implementation of the new fuel managements on the PWRs fleet is a great challenge for EDF, with important stakes: the nuclear KWh cost decrease with the improvement of the plant operation performance. (author)

  20. High power pulsed/microwave technologies for electron accelerators vis a vis 10MeV, 10kW electron LINAC for food irradiation at CAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Mulchandani, J.; Mohania, P.; Baxy, D.; Wanmode, Y.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Use of electron accelerators for irradiation of food items is gathering momentum in India. The various technologies for powering the electron LINAC were needed to be developed in the country due to embargo situations as well as reservations of the developers worldwide to share the information related to this development. Centre for Advanced Technology, CAT, Indore, is engaged in the development of particle accelerators for medical industrial and scientific applications. Amongst other electron accelerators developed in CAT, a 10MeV, 10kW LINAC for irradiation of food items has been commissioned and tested for full rated 10kW beam power. The high power pulsed microwave driver for the LINAC was designed, developed and commissioned with full indigenous efforts, and is right now operational at CAT. It consists of a 6MW, 25kW S-band pulsed klystron, 15MW peak power pulse modulator system for the klystron, microwave driver amplifier chain, stabilized generator, protection and control electronics, waveguide system to handle the high peak and average power, gun modulator electronics, grid electronics etc. The present paper highlights various technologies like the pulsed power systems and components, microwave circuits and systems etc. Also the performance results of the high power microwave driver for the 10MeV LINAC at CAT are discussed. Future strategies for developing the state of art technologies are highlighted. (author)

  1. Dissociated reality vis-a-vis integrative planning of AYUSH in Maternal Health Program: A situational analysis in Jaleswar block of Balasore district of Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehury, Ranjit Kumar; Chatterjee, Suhita Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Mainstreaming of AYUSH and revitalization of local health traditions is one of the innovative components of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in the state of Odisha, India. In this study, an attempt was made to assess the potential of collocating AYUSH to improve maternal health services in tribal dominated Jaleswar block of the Balasore district. In addition, the study aimed at unearthing the underlying challenges and constraints in mainstreaming AYUSH and linking it with the Maternal Health Program. Review of the policy documents and guidelines, both central and state government, was made to assess the implementation of AYUSH in Odisha. Primary data were collected through interviews with AYUSH doctors, district and block level health administrators, and tribal women. The study revealed the inadequacy of basic amenities, infrastructure, drugs, and consumables in the health centers for integrating AYUSH in the delivery of maternal health services. Analysis of the job chart and work pattern of AYUSH doctors showed underutilization of their specialized knowledge to treat patients. Lack of continued medical education, standard operating procedures for treatment and spatial marginalization made suboptimal utilization of AYUSH services. This is unfortunate given the fact that such regions are economically underdeveloped and already have a distinct orientation toward indigenous health systems. AYUSH, on account of its holistic approach and proven cost-effectiveness, could be a viable option for improving maternal health in the region. The study concluded that although there is huge scope for integrating AYUSH in Maternal Health Program under the ongoing NRHM, the full potential is yet to be exploited. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Internet vis-a-vis marine biology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chavan, V.S.

    Internet is an amalgum of networks which reaches to more than 100 million people across the globe. The satellite-telecommunication based computer network web hosts information on every aspect of life. Marine biology related information too is being...

  3. Integrated training support system for PWR operator training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Junichi; Komatsu, Yasuki

    1999-01-01

    The importance of operator training using operator training simulator has been recognized intensively. Since 1986, we have been developing and providing many PWR simulators in Japan. We also have developed some training support systems connected with the simulator and the integrated training support system to improve training effect and to reduce instructor's workload. This paper describes the concept and the effect of the integrated training support system and of the following sub-systems. We have PES (Performance Enhancement System) that evaluates training performance automatically by analyzing many plant parameters and operation data. It can reduce the deviation of training performance evaluation between instructors. PEL (Parameter and Event data Logging system), that is the subset of PES, has some data-logging functions. And we also have TPES (Team Performance Enhancement System) that is used aiming to improve trainees' ability for communication between operators. Trainee can have conversation with virtual trainees that TPES plays automatically. After that, TPES automatically display some advice to be improved. RVD (Reactor coolant system Visual Display) displays the distributed hydraulic-thermal condition of the reactor coolant system in real-time graphically. It can make trainees understand the inside plant condition in more detail. These sub-systems have been used in a training center and have contributed the improvement of operator training and have gained in popularity. (author)

  4. Effect of water chemistry on deposition for PWR plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Calvar, Marc; Bretelle, J. L.; Cailleaux, J. P.; Lacroix, R.; Guivarch, M.; Gay, N.; Taunier, S.; Gressier, F.; Varry, P.; Corredera, G.; Alos-Ramos, O.; Dijoux, M.

    2012-09-01

    For Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) operation, water chemistry guidelines, specifications and associated surveillance programs are key to avoid deposition of oxides. Deposition of oxides can be detrimental by disrupting results of flow measurements, decreasing the thermal exchange capacity, or even by impairing safety. This paper describes the most important cases of deposition, their consequences for operation, and the implemented improvements to avoid their reoccurrence. Deposition that led to a Crud Induced Power Shift (CIPS) is also described. In the primary and in the secondary sides, orifice plates are typically used for measuring feedwater flow rate in nuclear power plants. Feedwater flow rates are used for control purposes and are important safety parameters as they are used to determine the plant's operating power level. Fouling of orifice plates in the primary side has been found during surveillance testing. For reactor coolant pumps, the formation of deposits on the seal No.1 can cause abnormally high or low leak rates through the seal. The leak rate through this seal must be carefully maintained within a prescribed range during plant operation. In the secondary side, orifice plate fouling has been the cause of feedwater flow/reference thermal power drift. For the steam generators (SG), magnetite deposition has led to fouling of the tube bundle, clogging of the quadri-foiled support plate holes and hard sludge formation on the base plate. For the generators, copper hollow conductors are widely used. Buildup of copper oxides on the interior walls of copper conductors has caused insufficient heat transfer. All these deposition cases have received adequate attention, understanding and response via improvement of our surveillance programs. (authors)

  5. On site PWR fuel inspection measurements for operational and design verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The on-site inspection of irradiated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel and Non-Fuel Bearing Components (NFBC) is typically limited to visual inspections during refuelings using underwater TV cameras and is intended primarily to confirm whether the components will continue in operation. These inspections do not normally provide data for design verification nor information to benefit future fuel designs. Japanese PWR utilities and Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. designed, built, and performed demonstration tests of on-site inspection equipment that confirms operational readiness of PWR fuel and NFBC and also gathers data for design verification of these components. 4 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Method of stopping operation of PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Takashi; Tsuge, Ayao; Kawanishi, Yasuhira; Onimura, Kichiro; Kadokami, Akira.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors after long period of l00 % power operation, since boiling is caused in heat conduction pipes and water is depleted within the intergranular corrosion fracture face in the crevis portion to result in a dry-out state, impregnation and concentration of corrosion inhibitors into the intergranular corrosion fracture face are insufficient. In view of the above, the corrosion inhibitor at a high concentration is impregnated into the intergranular corrosion fracture face by keeping to inject the corrosion inhibitor from l00 % thermal power load by way of the thermal power reduction to the zero power state upon operatioin shutdown. That is, if the thermal power is reduced to or near the 0 power upon reactor shutdown, feedwater in the crevis portion is put to subcooled state, by which the steam present in the intergranular corrosion fracture face are condensated and the corrosion inhibitor at high concentration impregnated into the crevis portion are penetrated into the intergranular corrosion fracture face. (K.M.)

  7. PWR plant operator training used full scope simulator incorporated MAAP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Tabuchi, T.; Yamashita, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Tsubouchi, K.; Banka, T.; Mochizuki, T.; Nishimura, K.; Iizuka, H.

    2015-01-01

    NTC makes an effort with the understanding of plant behavior of core damage accident as part of our advanced training. For the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident, we introduced the MAAP model into PWR operator training full scope simulator and also made the Severe Accident Visual Display unit. From 2014, we will introduce new training program for a core damage accident with PWR operator training full scope simulator incorporated the MAAP model and the Severe Accident Visual Display unit. (author)

  8. Operating experience with an on-line vibration control system for PWR main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, J.; Stegemann, D.; Vortriede, A.

    1996-01-01

    The main circulation pumps are key components of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors, because the availability of the main circulation pumps has a direct influence on the availability and electrical output of the entire plant. The on-line automatic vibration control system ASMAS was developed for early failure detection during the normal operation of the main circulation pumps in order to avoid unexpected outages and to establish the possibility of preventive maintenance of the pumps. This system is permanently and successfully operating in three German 1300 MW el NPP's with PWR and has been successfully tested in a 350 MW el NPP with a PWR. (orig.)

  9. Operating experience with an on-line vibration control system for PWR main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, J.; Stegemann, D.; Vortriede, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main circulation pumps are key components of nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors (PWRs), because the availability of the main circulation pumps has a direct influence on the availability and electrical output of the entire plant. The on-line automatic vibration control system ASMAS was developed for early failure detection during the normal operation of the main circulation pumps in order to avoid unexpected outages and to establish the possibility of preventive maintenance of the pumps. This system is permanently and successfully operating in three German 1300 MW e1 NPP's with PWR and has been successfully tested in a 350 MW e1 NPP with a PWR. (orig.)

  10. Recent development for improving of PWR flexibility to load follow and frequency control operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1983-08-01

    In order to adjust the PWR electricity generation to the consumption network, new operating conditions were established. Those new conditions generate additional mechanical and thermal sollicitations due to the frequent motion of control rod banks, consisting of mechanical fatigue cycling and wear at the level of control rode drive mechanisms, control rods and guide tubes, wear and thermal fatigue cycling at the level of fuel assemblies. This paper presents the various aspects of this program including identification of the most critical areas of components, basic research in laboratories for resolving wear problems in PWR environment, improvement of local hydraulics for reducing loads, and endurance testing of full scale components on testing facilities

  11. Application of the BEACON-TSM system to the operation of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, J. A.; Mildrum, C.; Serrano, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    BEACON-TSM is an advanced system of the operation support of PWR reactors that combines the capabilities of an advanced nodal neutronic model and the measures of the instrumentation available in plant to determine, accurately and continuously, the distribution of power in the core and the available margins to the limits of the beak factors.

  12. Operating experience with PWR in the FRG (Federal Republic of Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, H.

    1980-01-01

    Operating experiences with PWR's in the Federal Republic of Germany has been exclusively with KWU turnkey power plants with U tube steam generators. Such experience started with the 345 MW Obrigheim plant in 1968 and includes the 670 MW Stade plant, the 1200/1300 MW Biblis plants, The 900 MW Neckarwestheim and the 1300 MW Unterweser plants. (E.G.) [pt

  13. CFD simulation of a four-loop PWR at asymmetric operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian-Ping; Yan, Li-Ming; Li, Feng-Chen, E-mail: lifch@hit.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A CFD numerical simulation procedure was established for simulating RPV of VVER-1000. • The established CFD approach was validated by comparing with available data. • Thermal hydraulic characteristics under asymmetric operation condition were investigated. • Apparent influences of the shutdown loop on its neighboring loops were obtained. - Abstract: The pressurized water reactor (PWR) with multiple loops may have abnormal working conditions with coolant pumps out of running in some loops. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical study of the four-loop VVER-1000 PWR pressure vessel model was presented. Numerical simulations of the thermohydrodynamic characteristics in the pressure vessel were carried out at different inlet conditions with four and three loops running, respectively. At normal stead-state condition (four-loop running), different parameters were obtained for the full fluid domain, including pressure losses across different parts, pressure, velocity and temperature distributions in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and mass flow distribution of the coolant at the inlet of reactor core. The obtained results for pressure losses matched with the experimental reference values of the VVER-1000 PWR at Tianwan nuclear power plant (NPP). For most fuel assemblies (FAs), the inlet flow rates presented a symmetrical distribution about the center under full-loop operation conditions, which accorded with the practical distribution. These results indicate that it is now possible to study the dynamic transition process between different asymmetric operation conditions in a multi-loop PWR using the established CFD method.

  14. Development of emergency operator support system for next Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, K.; Hanada, S.; Yoshida, Y.; Sugino, K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of main control room improvement is to reduce operator workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. Japanese PWR utilities and Mitsubishi have developed an operator support system entitled Emergency Operator Support System (EOSS). The system supports operators in incidental/accidental situations which may be worsened by human errors. In order to confirm the validity of the system, a proto type was built, and was evaluated by operator crews. The consequence showed good result of effectiveness in avoiding potential human errors and decreasing workload of operators. (authors)

  15. Comparison of problems and experience of core operation with distorted fuel element assemblies in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.

    1999-01-01

    The main reactors leading to distortion of fuel element assemblies during reactor operation were studied. A series of actions which compensate this effect was proposed. Criteria of operation limitation in VVER-1000 and PWR reactors are described

  16. Study on B-10 consumption of PWR primary coolant during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    B-10 consumption under PWR primary coolant conditions has been analyzed. The result indicates its time-dependent change reacting with neutron in the normal operation. In this work, neutron energy assumed to be 4 eV; thermal neutron flux is in the range of 3 x 10 13 to 3 x 10 14 n/sec - cm 2 and the time of cycling of the primary coolant through the RCS is 8 sec. and its retention time in the core region is about 1 sec. Under this condition investigated, B-10 consumption is less than 5% at 3 x 10 13 n/sec - cm 2 thermal neutron flux, and closes to 27% at 3 x 10 14 n/sec - cm 2 by calculation at the 16th month of continuous operation. The effect of B-10 consumption on PWR primary water chemistry is also investigated. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 4 refs

  17. Influence of probabilistic safety analysis on design and operation of PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastl, W.; Hoertner, H.; Kafka, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper gives a comprehensive presentation of the connections and influences of probabilistic safety analysis on design and operation of PWR plants. In this context a short historical retrospective view concerning probabilistic reliability analysis is given. In the main part of this paper some examples are presented in detail, showing special outcomes of such probabilistic investigations. Additional paragraphs illustrate some activities and issues in the field of probabilistic safety analysis

  18. Sizewell B PWR: safety implications for operating staff. A report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    A report given on the safety implications for the staff who would be involved in the commissioning and operating of Sizewell B reactor, looking in particular detail at the following aspects of the plant and its proposed operation: operator access to the containment whilst the reactor is on-load and the reasons for and means of restricting this, the use of robotics to minimise routine access to high radiation areas, circuit chemistry in relation to its effect on minimising the coolant activity, the handling and storage of the radioactive waste arisings on-site, including the use of robotics and the integrity of the pressure vessel as considered by the Cottrell/Marshall dialogue.

  19. Steam generator tube rupture risk impact on design and operation of French PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depond, G.; Sureau, H.

    1984-01-01

    The experience of steam generator tube leaks incidents in PWR plants has resulted in an increase of EDF analysis leading to improvements in design and post-accidental operation for new projects and operating plants. The accident consequences are minimized for each of the NSSS three barriers: first barrier: safeguard systems design and operating procedures relying upon core safety allow to maintain a low level of primary radioactivity, second barrier: steam generator design and periodic inspection allow to reduce tube ruptures risks and third barrier: atmospheric releases are reduced as a result of optimal recovery procedures, detection improvements and atmospheric steam valves design improvements. (orig.)

  20. Operating procedures for emergency situations in EDF PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depond, G.; Resse, L.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of incidents and accidents occurring at French and foreign power plants - particularly the TMI accident - and the commissioning of many units in France, as well as tests on simulators, have all demonstrated that an improvement of safety in nuclear power units depends largely on the improvement of the man-machine interface and particularly of emergency operating procedures (EOP). EDF has taken numerous actions in this direction, especially since 1979. First of all, in improving the classical approach based on event-oriented procedures: Rewriting of initial accident operating procedures with regard to their technical contents their form, and the organization of the operating team (procedures I and A); Extension of initial procedures into areas at the limits of design basis and beyond the design basis limits (procedures H). Nevertheless, this approach is subject to several weaknesses. Dependence on a precise initial diagnosis, impossibility to take into account all the conceivable accidental situations, discrepancies between the predicted pattern and the reality. These drawbacks of the event approach have led us to revise the technical conception of the EOPs, and to develop a new approach based on a continuous monitoring of the physical states of the plant and the ability to define a relationship between the physical state of the plant and the operator actions. (author). 4 figs

  1. Estimation of fire frequency from PWR operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, R.; Bonneval, F.; Barrachin, G.; Bonino, F.

    1998-01-01

    In the framework of a fire probabilistic safety assessment (Fire PSA), the French Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) has developed a method for estimating the frequency of fire in a nuclear power plant room. This method is based on the analysis of French Pressurized Water Reactors operating experience. The method adopted consists is carrying out an in-depth analysis of fire-related incidents. A database has been created including 202 fire events reported in 900 MWe and 1300 MWe reactors from the start of their commercial operation up to the first of March 1994, which represents a cumulated service life of 508 reactor-years. For each reported fire, several data were recorded among which: The operating state of the reactor in the stage preceding the fire, the building in which the fire broke out, the piece of equipment or the human intervention which caused the fire. Operating experience shows that most fires are initiated by electrical problems (short-circuits, arcing, faulty contacts, etc.) and that human intervention also plays an important role (grinding, cutting, welding, cleaning, etc.). A list of equipment and of human interventions which proved to be possible fire sources was therefore drawn up. the items of this list were distributed in 19 reference groups defined by taking into account the nature of the potential ignition source (transformers, electrical cabinets, pumps, fans, etc.). The fire frequency assigned to each reference group was figured out using the operating experience information of the database. The fire frequency in a room is considered to be made out of two contributions: one due to equipment which is proportional to the number of pieces of equipment from each reference group contained in the room, and a second one which is due to human interventions and assumed to be uniform throughout the reactor. Formulas to assess the fire frequencies in a room, the reactor being in a shutdown state or at power, are then proposed

  2. An expert system for PWR core operation management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Toshio; Masuda, Masahiro; Nishioka, Hiromasa

    1988-01-01

    Planning for restartup after planned or unplanned reactor shutdown and load-follow operations is an important task in the core operation management of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These planning problems have been solved by planning experts using their expertise and the computational prediction of core behavior. Therefore, the quality of the plan and the time consumed in the planning depend heavily on the skillfulness of the planning experts. A knowledge engineering approach has been recently considered as a promising means to solve such complicated planning problems. Many knowledge-based systems have been developed so far, and some of them have already been applied because of their effectiveness. The expert system REPLEX has been developed to aid core management engineers in making a successful plan for the restartup or the load-follow operation of PWRs within a shorter time. It can maintain planning tasks at a high-quality level independent of the skillfulness of core management engineers and enhance the efficiency of management. REPLEX has an explanation function that helps user understanding of plans. It could be a useful took, therefore, for the training of core management engineers.

  3. An expert system for PWR core operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Toshio; Masuda, Masahiro; Nishioka, Hiromasa.

    1988-01-01

    Planning for restartup after planned or unplanned reactor shutdown and load-follow operations is an important task in the core operation management of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These planning problems have been solved by planning experts using their expertise and the computational prediction of core behavior. Therefore, the quality of the plan and the time consumed in the planning depend heavily on the skillfulness of the planning experts. A knowledge engineering approach has been recently considered as a promising means to solve such complicated planning problems. Many knowledge-based systems have been developed so far, and some of them have already been applied because of their effectiveness. The expert system REPLEX has been developed to aid core management engineers in making a successful plan for the restartup or the load-follow operation of PWRs within a shorter time. It can maintain planning tasks at a high-quality level independent of the skillfulness of core management engineers and enhance the efficiency of management. REPLEX has an explanation function that helps user understanding of plans. It could be a useful took, therefore, for the training of core management engineers

  4. Regulatory Monitoring of Human Performance in PWR Operation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LESOT, Jean Pascal; BALLOFFET, Yves

    1998-01-01

    The authors present the main components of an action initiated by the French Safety Authority to assess and possibly correct the way in which EDF takes the human factor into account in its power plants. After a description of the operation of the French Safety Authority, they recall the interest of the authority in human factors, the first steps taken on this issue in the 1990's, briefly describe the response made by EDF on three main themes: man/machine interface, training, changes in work methods and involvement and behaviour of players. They evoke the tools used by EDF to implement the third theme on site, the structures set up by EDF to develop this policy, outline the prerequisites required by the Safety Authority, and indicate the means used by ths authority. They give examples of incidents and associated reactive inspection

  5. Application of LBB to high energy piping systems in operating PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swamy, S.A.; Bhowmick, D.C. [Westinghouse Nuclear Technology Division, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The amendment to General Design Criterion 4 allows exclusion, from the design basis, of dynamic effects associated with high energy pipe rupture by application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology. This new approach has resulted in substantial financial savings to utilities when applied to the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary loop piping and auxiliary piping systems made of stainless steel material. To date majority of applications pertain to piping systems in operating plants. Various steps of evaluation associated with the LBB application to an operating plant are described in this paper.

  6. An intelligent pedagogic tool for teaching the operators of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, B.; Guillermard, M.

    1990-01-01

    A tool was developed for assisting the instruction of the operators of a PWR type nuclear power plant. For achieving the objectives, an expert system and a simulator were combined. The main objective of the system is to improve the work of the operators in performing remedial actions in case of accident. The simulator applies two IBM PC AT3 and a MC 680 20 microprocessor. The use and the validation of the expert system are presented. The perspectives for the system, implanted on the Tricastin nuclear power plant, are analyzed [fr

  7. Improved identification to prevent transposition during operation of 900 MWe PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leckner, J.M.; Dien, Y.; Cernes, A.

    1986-04-01

    Detailed human factors analysis of 900 MWe PWR control room identification systems was carried out by the Nuclear and Fossil Generation Division of Electricite de France (EDF) consequent to a series of incidents where personnel confused one plant unit, room or piece of equipment for another. Preliminary analysis uncovered coding inadequacies and suggested possible remedies. This data was used to prepare specifications for identification redesign at a pilot plant on which detailed investigations could be carried out. Recommended solutions were submitted to pilot plant operators and their opinion sollicited. Operator recommendations will be tried out on the pilot plant and adopted on a grid-wide basis if trials prove satisfactory

  8. Representing Operational Knowledge of PWR Plant by Using Multilevel Flow Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2014-01-01

    situation and support operational decisions. This paper will provide a general MFM model of the primary side in a standard Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor ( PWR ) system including sub - systems of Reactor Coolant System, Rod Control System, Chemical and Volume Control System, emergency heat removal......The aim of this paper is to explore the capability of representing operational knowledge by using Multilevel Flow Modelling ( MFM ) methodology. The paper demonstrate s how the operational knowledge can be inserted into the MFM models and be used to evaluate the plant state, identify the current...... systems. And the sub - systems’ functions will be decomposed into sub - models according to different operational situations. An operational model will be developed based on the operating procedure by using MFM symbols and this model can be used to implement coordination rules for organize the utilizati...

  9. Recent development for improving the PWR flexibility to load follow and frequency control operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1983-01-01

    The increasing production of nuclear electricity generated by PWR in the French network will modify the operating conditions of these plants for adjusting the electricity generation to the consumption. For assessing the adequacy of main components, FRAMATOME, in conjunction with Electricite de France and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has undertaken a large R and D effort and initiated significant design changes for sustaining the new operating modes including. Daily load follow and frequency remote dispatch operation (+- 5% random fluctuation load around a present value). These new operating conditions generate additional mechanical and thermal sollicitations due to the frequent motion of control rod banks, consisting of: a) Mechanical fatigue cycling and wear at the level of control rod drive mechanisms (CRDM), control rods and guides tubes. b) Wear and thermal fatigue cycling at the level of fuel assemblies. This paper will present the various aspects of this program including: Identification of the most critical areas of components; Basic research in laboratories for resolving wear problems in PWR environment; Improvement of local hydraulics for reducing loads; Endurance testing of full scale components on testing facilities. (orig./GL)

  10. Balance and behavior of gaseous radionuclides released during initial PWR fuel reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leudet, A.; Miquel, P.; Goumondy, P.J.; Charrier, G.

    1982-08-01

    Five fuel pins, taken from a PWR fuel assembly with 32000 MWD/t burn-up were chopped and dissolved in leak-proof equipment designed for accurate determination of the composition and quantity of gaseous elements released in these operations. Analytical methods were specially developped to determine directly the noble gases, tritium and gaseous carbon compounds in the gas phase. Volatile iodine was kept as close as possible to the source by cold traps, then transferred to a caustic solution for quantitative analysis. The quantities and activities of gaseous fission products thus determined were compared with predicted values obtained through computation. Very good agreement was generally observed

  11. Balance and behavior of gaseous radionuclides released during initial PWR fuel reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leudet, A.; Miquel, P.; Goumondy, P.J.; Charrier, G.

    1983-01-01

    Five fuel pins, taken from a PWR fuel assembly with 32,000 MwD/t burn-up were chopped and dissolved in leak-proof equipment designed for accurate determination of the composition and quantity of gaseous elements released in these operations. Analytical methods were specially developed to determine directly the noble gases, tritium and gaseous carbon compounds in the gas phase. Volatile iodine was kept as close as possible to the source by cold traps, then transferred to a caustic solution for quantitative analysis. The quantities and activities of gaseous fission products thus determined were compared with predicted values obtained through computation. Very good agreement was generally observed

  12. Development of automated generation system of accidental operating procedures for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, J.L.

    1991-06-01

    The aim of the ACACIA project is to develop an automated generation system of accident operating procedures for a PWR. This research and development study, common at CEA and EDF, has two objectives: at mean-dated the realization of a validation tool and a procedure generation; at long-dated the dynamic generation of real time procedures. This work is consecrated at the realization of 2 prototypes. These prototypes and the technics used are described in detail. The last chapter explores the perspectives given by this type of tool [fr

  13. PWR water chemistry controls: a perspective on industry initiatives and trends relative to operating experience and the EPRI PWR water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, K.; Choi, S.; Haas, C.; Pender, M.; Perkins, D.

    2010-01-01

    An effective PWR water chemistry control program must address the following goals: Minimize materials degradation (e.g., PWSCC, corrosion of fuel, corrosion damage of steam generator (SG) tubes); Maintain fuel integrity and good performance; Minimize corrosion product transport (e.g., transport and deposition on the fuel, transport into the SGs where it can foul tube surfaces and create crevice environments for the concentration of corrosive impurities); Minimize dose rates. Water chemistry control must be optimized to provide overall improvement considering the sometimes variant constraints of the goals listed above. New technologies are developed for continued mitigation of materials degradation, continued fuel integrity and good performance, continued reduction of corrosion product transport, and continued minimization of plant dose rates. The EPRI chemistry program, in coordination with other EPRI programs, strives to improve these areas through application of chemistry initiatives, focusing on these goals. This paper highlights the major initiatives and issues with respect to PWR primary and secondary system chemistry and outlines the recent, on-going, and proposed work to effectively address them. These initiatives are presented in light of recent operating experience, as derived from EPRI's PWR chemistry monitoring and assessment program, and EPRI's water chemistry guidelines. (author)

  14. Macromolecules Vis-a-Vis the Traditions of Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, Paul J.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the history of concepts concerning the molecular nature of polymers, involving the carbon chain theory, graphic formula, polycondensation, colloidal properties, polypeptide hypothesis, secondary aggregation, and Watson-Crick model. Indicates that macromolecular science should be accommodated within the discipline of molecular science…

  15. Issues and prospects vis a vis Indian PV commercialization programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deambi, Suneel

    1994-01-01

    Following a large scale demonstration of photovoltaic systems attending to the important requirements of lighting, water pumping, television and battery charging etc. in the remote surroundings of India, serious efforts are being made to promote the commercial use of these systems. A recently launched World Bank-supported project on PV market development has provided the much needed boost to the Indian PV programme. This paper tries to analyse the issues and prospects with respect to the National PV Commercialization Programme in view of the changing PV scenario in the country. (author)

  16. Mega-geomorphology: Mars vis a vis Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The areas of chaotic terrain, the giant chasma of the Valles Marineris region, the complex linear and circular depressions of Labyrinthus Noctis on Mars all suggest the possibility of large scale collapse of parts of the martian crust within equatorial and sub equatorial latitudes. It seems generally accepted that the above features are fossil, being perhaps, more than a billion years old. It is possible that parts of Earth's crust experienced similar episodes of large scale collapse sometime early in the evolution of the planet.

  17. Relasi Antagonistik Barat-Timur: Orientalisme vis a vis Oksidentalisme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Fudholi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Encounter of the East and the West due to such various interests as economic, political, scientific, cultural has been a major factor in the study of western scientists (Orientalists about the East that produces a variety of works in the fields of archeology, history, literature, environment, customs, and Islamic studies. Meanwhile, resistance against Orientalism in the form of Occidentalism, as initiated by Hasan Hanafî, seems to be closely related to ‘obsession’ and hopes of someone who frustrated and dissatisfied with the condition of the world he has dealt with as the project of civilization he offered seemed to be too theoretical to be applied into the form of well established science. This is a fact that, unlike Orientalism that has born from strength, power, and has been then smoothly formed, Occidentalism was created by the East that was defeated and suffered from weakness and at the same time merely has an obsession. In spite of the impression, apparently, what has been attempted in Occidentalism is dismantling the text, another interpretation, and building a new, more proportional context.

  18. EMERALD, Radiation Release and Dose after PWR Accident for Design Analysis and Operation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunot, W.K.; Fray, R.R.; Gillespie, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The EMERALD program is designed for the calculation of radiation releases and exposures resulting from abnormal operation of a large pressurized water reactor (PWR). The approach used in EMERALD is similar to an analog simulation of a real system. Each component or volume in the plant which contains a radioactive material is represented by a subroutine which keeps track of the production, transfer, decay and absorption of radioactivity in that volume. During the course of the analysis of an accident, activity is transferred from subroutine to subroutine in the program as it would be transferred from place to place in the plant. For example, in the calculation of the doses resulting from a loss-of-coolant accident the program first calculates the activity built up in the fuel before the accident, then releases some of this activity to the containment volume. Some of this activity is then released to the atmosphere. The rates of transfer, leakage, production, cleanup, decay, and release are read in as input to the program. Subroutines are also included which calculate the on-site and off-site radiation exposures at various distances for individual isotopes and sums of isotopes. The program contains a library of physical data for the twenty-five isotopes of most interest in licensing calculations, and other isotopes can be added or substituted. Because of the flexible nature of the simulation approach, the EMERALD program can be used for most calculations involving the production and release of radioactive materials during abnormal operation of a PWR. These include design, operational, and licensing studies. 2 - Method of solution - Explicit solutions of first-order linear differential equations are included. In addition, a subroutine is provided which solves a set of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem - Maxima of: 25 isotopes, 7 time periods, 15 volumes or components, 10

  19. Instrumentation and control system upgrade plan for operating PWR plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Hirofumi

    1993-01-01

    Digital technology has been applied to all non-safety grade instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in the latest Japanese PWR plants, and has achieved more reliable and operable systems, easier maintenance and cable reductions. In the next stage APWR plants, the digital technology will be also applied to all the I ampersand C systems including safety grade systems. Parallel to the above efforts, many backfitting programs in which the digital technology is applied to operating plants are under way to improve reliability and operability. The backfitting programs for operating plants are proceeded in two phases, synthesizing various utility's needs to improve plant availability and operability, improvement of digital technology, and complexity of the practicable replacement procedures. Phase 1 is a partial application of digital technology, while Phase 2 is a complete application of digital technology. Phase 1 has been implemented in a number of operation plants, while Phase 2 studies are in the design stage, but have not been implemented at this point. This paper presents examples of the partial application of digital technology to operating plants, and the contents of basic design for the complete application of digital technology

  20. Continuous improvement of operation and maintenance conditions of french PWR nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitsch, D.

    1985-05-01

    Improvement of the nuclear island design, to facilitate maintenance and working conditions during plant shutdown, has been a subject of particular attention within the French PWR program. Standardization and industrial concentration created an unusually favourable context for approaching this objective. Progress efforts supported by the feedback of actual operating experience were pursued in the areas of plant layout-equipment installation, and on the design and technology of the component themselves. The progress efforts on the design and technology of the components were pursued along several paths including: - the resistance increase of specific parts submitted to various forms of in-service damage, - the reduction of the extent and duration of work during plant outages and - the reduction of the Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE), one of the most important axes of development, through the appropriate selection of less releasing materials, the implementation of more efficient decontamination systems and by the use of robots

  1. Study on virtual simulation technology for operation and control of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Baoguo; Zhang Dafa; Lin Yajun

    2006-01-01

    The way to build graphical models of PWR with MultiGen Creator is discussed, and the three-dimensional model used in the virtual simulation is built. The mathematical simulation model for PWR based on the platform of MFC and Vega is built through the analysis of the mathematical simulation of PWR. The way to perform the virtual effect is introduced associating with the Pressurizer. And, all above parts are connected in one with VC++ to perform the whole virtual simulation of PWR. (authors)

  2. Simulation of steam generator plugging tubes in a PWR to analyze the operating impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.pla-freixa@ec.europa.eu [Nuclear Reactor Safety Assessment Unit, Institute for Energy and Transport, Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Reventos, Francesc, E-mail: francesc.reventos@upc.edu [Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona (Spain); Martin Ramos, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.martin-ramos@ec.europa.eu [Nuclear Safety and Security Coordination Unit, Policy Support Coordination, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Brussels (Belgium); Sol, Ismael, E-mail: isol@anacnv.com [Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellós-II (ANAV), Tarragona (Spain); Strucic, Miodrag, E-mail: miodrag.strucic@ec.europa.eu [Nuclear Reactor Safety Assessment Unit, Institute for Energy and Transport, Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, Petten (Netherlands)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Plugging a fraction of the SG tubes does not affect power output of the plant. • There is a limit to SG plugging in the range of 10–15%. • The rupture of a SG tube in a 12% plugged SG has shown no significant differences in operator actions. • A SBLOCA in a 12% plugged SG has shown no significant differences in operator actions. - Abstract: A number of nuclear power plants (NPPs) with pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the world have replaced their steam generators (SG) due to degradation of the SG tubes caused by different problems. Several methods were attempted to correct the defects of the tubes, but eventually the only permanent solution was to plug them. The consequences of plugging the tubes are the decrease of heat transfer surface, the reduction of the flow area and subsequent reduction of the primary system mass flow and for a fraction of plugged tubes higher than a given value, the reduction of reactor output and economic losses. The objective of this paper is to analyze whether steam generator tube plugging has an impact in the effectiveness of accident management actions. An analysis with Relap5 Mod 3.3 patch03 for the Spanish reactor Ascó-2, a 3-loop 2940.6 MWth Westinghouse PWR, in which plugging of steam generator tubes are simulated, is presented in order to find the limit for the adequate operation of the plant. Several steady state calculations were performed with different fractions of plugged SG tubes, by modeling the reduction of the primary to secondary heat transfer surface and the reduction of the primary coolant mass flow area in the tubes as well. The results of the analysis yield that plugging 12% of the SG tubes is around the limit for optimal reactor operation. To complete the study two events, in which the steam generators are used to cooldown the plant, were simulated to find out if the plugging of SGs tubes could influence the efficiency of the operator actions described in the emergency operating

  3. Simple analysis of very long term proceses without operational and emergency energy supply in the PWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedek, S.

    1983-01-01

    Published calculational methods are cited and used for examination of PWR transients after a loss-of-coolant accident. For different sizes of breaks and breakdown of the pumps the long term transients - without operational and emergency power supply - were calculated. The results show the critical time interval until the operational or emergency/safety water pump/supply should be made into operation to avoid the core heat-up, melt down and the large radioactive issue. (orig.)

  4. Safety aspects in decontamination operations: Lessons learned during the decommissioning of a small PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Ponnet, M.; Emond, O.

    2002-01-01

    Decontamination operations are generally executed during the decommissioning of nuclear installations for different objectives: decontamination of loops or large pieces to reduce the dose rate inside a contaminated plant or decontamination to minimize the amount of radioactive waste. These decontamination operations raise safety issues such as radiological exposure, classical safety, environmental releases, production and management of secondary waste, management of primary resources, etc. This paper presents the return of experience from decontamination operations performed during the dismantling of the BR3 PWR reactor. The safety issues are discussed for 3 types of decontamination operations: full system decontamination of the primary loop with a chemical process to reduce the dose rate by a factor of 10; thorough decontamination with an aggressive chemical process of dismantled pieces to reach the unconditional clearance values; and thorough decontamination processes with physical processes of metals and of concrete to reach the unconditional clearance values. For the protection of the workers, we must consider the ALARA aspects and the classical safety issues. During the progress of our dismantling operations, the dose rate issue was becoming less important but the classical safety issues were becoming preponderant due to the use of very aggressive techniques. For the protection of the environment, we must take all the precautions to avoid any leakages from the plant and we must use processes which minimize the use of toxic products and which minimize the production of secondary wastes. We therefore promote the use of regenerative processes. (author)

  5. Operating experience with steam generator water chemistry in Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimura, K.; Hattori, T.

    1991-01-01

    Since the first PWR plant in Japan started its commercial operation in 1970, seventeen plants are operating as of the end of 1990. First three units initially applied phosphate treatment as secondary water chemistry control and then changed to all volatile treatment (AVT) due to phosphate induced wastage of steam generator tubing. The other fourteen units operate exclusively under AVT. In Japan, several corrosion phenomena of steam generator tubing, resulted from secondary water chemistry, have been experienced, but occurrence of those phenomena has decreased by means of improvement on impurity management, boric acid treatment and high hydrazine operation. Recently secondary water chemistry in Japanese plants are well maintained in every stage of operation. This paper introduces brief summary of the present status of steam generators and secondary water chemistry in Japan and ongoing activities of investigation for future improvement of reliability of steam generator. History and present status of secondary water chemistry in Japanese PWRs were introduced. In order to get improved water chemistry, the integrity of secondary system equipments is essential and the improvement in water chemistry has been achieved with the improvement in equipments and their usage. As a result of those efforts, present status of secondary water is excellent. However, further development for crevice chemistry monitoring technique and an advanced water chemistry data management system is desired for the purpose of future improvement of reliability of steam generator

  6. Design of the control room of the N4-type PWR: main features and feedback operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouton, J.M.; Guillas, J.; Nougaret, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents the design, specificities and innovating features of the control room of the N4-type PWR. A brief description of control rooms of previous 900 MW and 1300 MW -type PWR allows us to assess the change. The design of the first control room dates back to 1972, at that time 2 considerations were taken into account: first the design has to be similar to that of control rooms for thermal plants because plant operators were satisfied with it and secondly the normal operating situation has to be privileged to the prejudice of accidental situations just as it was in a thermal plant. The turning point was the TMI accident that showed the weight of human factor in accidental situations in terms of pilot team, training, procedures and the ergonomics of the work station. The impact of TMI can be seen in the design of 1300 MW-type PWR. In the beginning of the eighties EDF decided to launch a study for a complete overhaul of the control room concept, the aim was to continue reducing the human factor risk and to provide a better quality of piloting the plant in any situation. The result is the control room of the N4-type PWR. Today the cumulated feedback experience of N4 control rooms represents more than 20 years over a wide range of situations from normal to incidental, a survey shows that the N4 design has fulfilled its aims. (A.C.)

  7. Influence of hydrogen on metals behavior. 1 - Mechanical behavior of Ti 6 pc Al 6 pc V 2 pc Sn titanium alloy versus hydrogen: influence of heat treatment and of oxygen content; Influence de l'hydrogene sur le comportement des metaux. 1 - comportement mecanique de l'alliage de titane T A6 V6 E2 vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene: influence du traitement thermique et de la teneur en oxygene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, Bernard

    1972-06-26

    The mechanical behavior of Ti 6 pc Al 6 pc V Sn alloy during dynamic testing has been investigated versus hydrogen and oxygen content. The hydrogen susceptibility depends only slightly on its microstructure, acicular or equi-axed: it depends much more on conditions of hydrogen contamination and on the thermal history afterward. When the alloy has been stabilized by annealing in {alpha} - {beta} and provided hydrogen absorption does not induce phase transformations, hydrogen sensitivity is relatively low: brittleness occurs suddenly but at a high concentration threshold (2000 ppm H), which coincides with hydrogen saturation of {beta} phase. When the alloy includes unstabilized phases, its response to hydrogen changes whether it has been finally annealed or not, in the 300 - 500 C temperature area, prone to {omega} phase formation. In the absence of such an annealing, a reduction in ductility only occurs at high concentrations (> 1500 ppm H). In the other and, after annealing at 400 C, alloy hardening and a ductility decrease start even at the lowest hydrogen amounts: then hydrogen susceptibility is very high. Low oxygen concentration (up to 2000 ppm) do not sensibly affect the good hydrogen tolerance of this alloy. Beyond 2500 ppm, oxygen, while improving tensile strength, yet severely decreases ductility. [French] Le comportement mecanique de l'alliage TA6-V6-E2 lors d'un essai dynamique a ete etudie en fonction de la teneur en hydrogene et en oxygene. La sensibilite vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene ne depend que tres faiblement de sa structure migrographique, aciculaire ou equiaxe; elle depend bien plus des conditions de contamination par l'hydrogene et de son histoire thermique apres contamination. Lorsque l'alliage a ete stabilise par un recuit dans le domaine biphase, et a condition que l'absorption d'hydrogene n'entraine pas de modification structurale, la sensibilite vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene est relativement faible: la fragilite apparait brutalement mais pour un

  8. Determination of uncertainties of PWR spent fuel radionuclide inventory based on real operational history data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, Ivan; Bosbach, Dirk; Aksyutina, Yuliya; Tietze-Jaensch, Holger

    2015-01-01

    A requisite for the official approval of the safe final disposal of SNF is a comprehensive specification and declaration of the nuclear inventory in SNF by the waste supplier. In the verification process both the values of the radionuclide (RN) activities and their uncertainties are required. Burn-up (BU) calculations based on typical and generic reactor operational parameters do not encompass any possible uncertainties observed in real reactor operations. At the same time, the details of the irradiation history are often not well known, which complicates the assessment of declared RN inventories. Here, we have compiled a set of burnup calculations accounting for the operational history of 339 published or anonymized real PWR fuel assemblies (FA). These histories were used as a basis for a 'SRP analysis', to provide information about the range of the values of the associated secondary reactor parameters (SRP's). Hence, we can calculate the realistic variation or spectrum of RN inventories. SCALE 6.1 has been employed for the burn-up calculations. The results have been validated using experimental data from the online database - SFCOMPO-1 and -2. (authors)

  9. Determination of uncertainties of PWR spent fuel radionuclide inventory based on real operational history data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Ivan; Bosbach, Dirk [Institute of Energy- and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Research, IEK-6, Forschungszentrum, Julich GmbH, (Germany); Aksyutina, Yuliya; Tietze-Jaensch, Holger [German Product Control Office for Radioactive Waste (PKS), Institute of Energy- and Climate Research, Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety Research, IEK-6, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    A requisite for the official approval of the safe final disposal of SNF is a comprehensive specification and declaration of the nuclear inventory in SNF by the waste supplier. In the verification process both the values of the radionuclide (RN) activities and their uncertainties are required. Burn-up (BU) calculations based on typical and generic reactor operational parameters do not encompass any possible uncertainties observed in real reactor operations. At the same time, the details of the irradiation history are often not well known, which complicates the assessment of declared RN inventories. Here, we have compiled a set of burnup calculations accounting for the operational history of 339 published or anonymized real PWR fuel assemblies (FA). These histories were used as a basis for a 'SRP analysis', to provide information about the range of the values of the associated secondary reactor parameters (SRP's). Hence, we can calculate the realistic variation or spectrum of RN inventories. SCALE 6.1 has been employed for the burn-up calculations. The results have been validated using experimental data from the online database - SFCOMPO-1 and -2. (authors)

  10. Research on Operation and Control Strategy of 600MW PWR in Load Follow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Bing Yang; Cao, Xin Rong [Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China); Li, Han Chen [China Nuclear Power Engineering Co., Beijing (China)

    2014-08-15

    600MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is designed to operate in Constant Axial Offset Control (CAOC) strategy with base load originally. By calculations over a typical load follow scenario '12-3-6-3 {sup (}100-50-100%FP) via the CASMO-4E and SIMULATE-3 package, values of core operating parameter have been examined. With the progress of the nuclear power industry, advanced reactors are considered to have a good performance in load follow, economy and flexibility. Under the premise of fuel loading and structural dimensions unchanged, two independent control rod groups M and AO are used in 600MW pressurized water reactor to provide fine control of both the core reactivity and axial power distribution, which is named ' Improved G strategy .' The influences of different control rod distributions, composition materials, and overlap steps had in power changes have been examined in a comparative study to choose the optimal one.Then we simulate a range of load follow scenarios of the redesigned 600MW core without adjusting soluble boron concentration in the begin, middle and end of first cycle. This paper additionally demonstrated the moderator temperature coefficient and shutdown margin values of the reactor in Improved G strategy to compare with the thermal safety design criteria. It's demonstrated that adequate adjustment of control rod groups enable the core to perform load follow through Improved G strategy in 80% of cycle and save a large volume of liquid effluent particularly toward the end of cycle.

  11. PWR: 10 years after and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings of the SFEN days on PWR (Ten years after and perspectives) comprise 13 conferences bearing on: - From the occurential approach to the state approach - Evolution of calculating tools - Human factors and safety - Reactor safety in the PWR 2000 - The PWR and the electrical power grid load follow - Fuel aspect of PWR management - PWR chemistry evolution - Balance of radiation protection - PWR modifications balance and influence on reactor operation - Design and maintenance of reactor components: 4 conferences [fr

  12. ASTM standards associated with PWR and BWR power plant licensing, operation and surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; McElroy, R.J.; Gold, R.; Lippincott, E.P.; Lowe, A.L. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper considers ASTM Standards that are available, under revision, and are being considered in support of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) licensing, regulation, operation, surveillance and life attainment. The current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and current activities of ASTM Committee E10 and its Subcommittees E10.02 and E10.05 and their Task Groups (TG) are described. A very important aspect of these efforts is the preparation, revision, and balloting of standards identified in the ASTM E706 Standard on Master Matrix for Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessel (PV) Surveillance Standards. The current version (E706-87) of the Master Matrix identifies 21 ASTM LWR physics-dosimetry-metallurgy standards for Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Support Structure (SS) surveillance programs, whereas, for the next revision 34 standards are identified. The need for national and international coordination of Standards Technology Development, Transfer and Training (STDTT) is considered in this and other Symposium papers that address specific standards related physics-dosimetry-metallurgy issues. 69 refs

  13. EMERALD-NORMAL, Routine Radiation Release and Dose for PWR Design Analysis and Operation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, S.G.; Brunot, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: EMERALD-NORMAL is designed for the calculation of radiation releases and exposures resulting from normal operation of a large pressurized water reactor. The approach used is similar to an analog simulation of a real system. Each component or volume in the plant which contains a radioactive material is represented by a subroutine which keeps track of the production, transfer, decay, and absorption of radioactivity in that volume. During the course of the analysis, activity is transferred from subroutine to subroutine in the program as it would be transferred from place to place in the plant. Some of this activity is then released to the atmosphere and to the discharge canal. The rates of transfer, leakage, production, cleanup, decay, and release are read as input to the program. Subroutines are also included which calculate the off-site radiation exposures at various distances for individual isotopes and sums of isotopes. The program contains a library of physical data for the forty isotopes of most interest in licensing calculations, and other isotopes can be added or substituted. Because of the flexible nature of the simulation approach, the EMERALD-NORMAL program can be used for most calculations involving the production and release of radioactive material. These include design, operation, and licensing studies. 2 - Method of solution: Explicit solutions of first-order linear differential equations are included. In addition, a subroutine is provided which solves a set of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Many parameters and systems included in the program, particularly the radiation waste-treatment system, are unique to the PG and E Diablo Canyon PWR plant. Maxima of: 50 isotopes, 9 distances, 16 angular sectors, 1 operating period, 1 reactor power level

  14. Effect of operating conditions and environment on properties of materials of PWR type nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.

    1987-01-01

    Operating reliability and service life of PWR type nuclear power plants are discussed with respect to the material properties of the plant components. The effects of the operating environment on the material properties and the methods of their determination are characterized. Discussed are core materials, such as fuel, its cladding and regulating rod materials, and the materials of pipes, steam generators and condensers. The advances in the production of pressure vessel materials and their degradation during operation are treated in great detail. (Z.M.)

  15. Operation results of the secondary circuits of the French PWR type power plant park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Global results of performances realized since 1981 by the French PWR 900 MW power plants (installed power, availability, casual or planned shutdowns); analysis of the behaviour (casual unavailability) comparing together the performances of the different components in the secondary circuit; behaviour of the principal materials of the secondary circuit and their weight in the unavailabilities of the whole French nuclear park [fr

  16. New long-cycle small modular PWR cores using particle type burnable poisons for low boron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hoseong; Hwang, Dae Hee [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ser Gi, E-mail: sergihong@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Choel [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI), Daejon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • New advanced burnable poison rods (BPR) are suggested for low boron operation in PWR. • The new SMR cores have long cycle length of ∼4.5 EFPYs with low boron concentration. • The SMR core satisfies all the design targets and constraints. - Abstract: In this paper, new small long-cycle PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) cores for low boron concentration operation are designed by employing advanced burnable poison rods (BPRs) in which the BISO (Bi-Isotropic) particles of burnable poison are distributed in a SiC matrix. The BPRs are designed by adjusting the kernel diameter, the kernel material and the packing fraction to effectively reduce the excess reactivity in order to reduce the boron concentration in the coolant and achieve a flat change in excess reactivity over a long operational cycle. In addition, axial zoning of the BPRs was suggested to improve the core performances, and it was shown that the suggested axial zoning of BPRs considerably extends the cycle length compared to a core with no BPR axial zoning. The results of the core physics analyses showed that the cores using BPRs with a B{sub 4}C kernel have long cycle lengths of ∼4.5 EFPYs (Effective Full Power Years), small maximum CBCs (Critical Boron Concentration) lower than 370 ppm, low power peaking factors, and large shutdown margins of control element assemblies.

  17. Security of nuclear power in operation. Results from the first PWR 900 MWe stages of Electricity of France (EDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capel, R; Chaubaron, J F [Electricite de France, 93 - Saint-Denis. Service de la Production Thermique

    1980-06-01

    The security and reliability objectives of the PWR 900 MWe stages are acquiring particular importance in the present energetic and nuclear context. This article presents the general framework wherein the superintendence and maintenance of plant equipment are situated. E.D.F. applies to all of its activities, the assurance of quality principles. The General Rules of Operating constitute the basic document. The Operating Technical Specifications specify the conditions for the correct operating and safety of the installations. The Organization of Quality handbook sets the rules to be obeyed in the management of all operations. Examples from Fessenhein and Bugey illustrate the subject and elucidate the practical dimension of security. Lastly, the lessons of experience are recalled.

  18. Operating function tests of the PWR type RHR pump for engineering safety system under simulated strong ground excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uga, Takeo; Shiraki, Kazuhiro; Homma, Toshiaki; Inazuka, Hisashi; Nakajima, Norifumi.

    1979-08-01

    Results are described of operating function verification tests of a PWR RHR pump during an earthquake. Of the active reactor components, the PWR residual heat removal pump was chosen from view points of aseismic classification, safety function, structural complexity and past aseismic tests. Through survey of the service conditions and structure of this pump, seismic test conditions such as acceleration level, simulated seismic wave form and earthquake duration were decided for seismicity of the operating pump. Then, plans were prepared to evaluate vibration chracteristics of the pump and to estimate its aseismic design margins. Subsequently, test facility and instrumentation system were designed and constructed. Experimental results could thus be acquired on vibration characteristics of the pump and its dynamic behavior during different kinds and levels of simulated earthquake. In conclusion: (1) Stiffeners attached to the auxiliary system piping do improve aseismic performance of the pump. (2) The rotor-shaft-bearing system is secure unless it is subjected to transient disturbunces having high frequency content. (3) The motor and pump casing having resonance frequencies much higher than frequency content of the seismic wave show only small amplifications. (4) The RHR pump possesses an aseismic design margin more than 2.6 times the expected ultimate earthquake on design basis. (author)

  19. Corrosion in PWR steam generator tubes made of alloy 600TT: overview of operating experience, NDE and safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curieres, I. de; Sollier, T.; Delaval, C.

    2015-01-01

    About 60 PWR plants worldwide are operating with steam generator tubes made of alloy 600TT, among which 27 are located in France. This alloy is susceptible to corrosion, both on the primary and secondary side in every fleet, though with different kinetics or extent. It is noteworthy that many of the primary side corrosion issues can be clearly explained by design or operating conditions. However, studies show that all the secondary side issues are much hardly explained by simple considerations. This paper will give an overview of the international operating experience of this alloy and indicate the associated controllability and safety-related issues. An emphasis will be put on the manufacturing, chemistry and specificities of the different fleets. The French situation will be reviewed in this frame. (authors)

  20. Operation of pumps in two-phase steam-water flow. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, P; Lauro, J F [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou

    1978-01-01

    Determining the two-phase flow (critical or not) through a pump is an esential element for a complete description of loss of coolant accident in a PWR reactor. This article descibes the theoretical and experimental research being done on this subject in France. The model of the pump is first described and its behaviour is examined in different possible cases, particularly that of critical flow. The analysis of the behaviour of the pump is then used to define the experimental conditions for the tests. Two test loops, EVA and EPOPEE, were built. The experimental results are then compared with the theoretical forecasts.

  1. Dispositions taken in France to limit gaseous releases from PWR power plants in abnormal operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collinet, J.; Guieu, S.; Mulcey, P.

    1989-12-01

    The implementation of France's major nuclear programme - 56 PWR units in service or under construction - has gone hand in hand with the development of an original philosophy in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core of deterministic safety philosophy current in the seventies, which has been wholly retained and, in some instances, refined, a range of complements has been made to include consideration of a number of additional situations based on a probabilistic approach. This has resulted in a better coherence for safety and a reduction of the severe accident probability. Furthermore, the establishment of emergency plans has enabled the Safety Authorities and the utility to adopt a coherent and logical approach to severe accidents, with the aim of better achieving defence in depth. This has resulted in the provision of certain additional measures intended to further reduce the consequences of severe accidents. In a accordance with the safety philosophy, adopted in France for nuclear PWR power stations, filtration systems have been specified and installed to limit the radiological consequences of consecutive gaseous emissions, on the one hand, in accidents taken into account in the design and, on the other hand, in accidents liable to jeopardize the integrity of the containment

  2. Criteria for safety-related nuclear-power-plant operator actions: 1982 pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) simulator exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, D.S.; Beare, A.N.; Kozinsky, E.J.; Haas, P.M.

    1983-06-01

    The primary objective of the Safety-Related Operator Action (SROA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to provide a data base to support development of criteria for safety-related actions by nuclear power plant operators. When compared to field data collected on similar events, a base of operator performance data developed from the simulator experiments can then be used to establish safety-related operator action design evaluation criteria, evaluate the effects of performance shaping factors, and support safety/risk assessment analyses. This report presents data obtained from refresher training exercises conducted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant control room simulator. The 14 exercises were performed by 24 teams of licensed operators from one utility, and operator performance was recorded by an automatic Performance Measurement System. Data tapes were analyzed to extract operator response times (RTs) and error rate information. Demographic and subjective data were collected by means of brief questionnaires and analyzed in an attempt to evaluate the effects of selected performance shaping factors on operator performance

  3. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  4. Risk evaluation for motor operated valves in an Inservice Testing Program at a PWR nuclear power plant in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.C.; Chen, K.T.; Su, Y.L.; Ting, K.; Chien, F.T.; Li, G.D.; Huang, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Safety related valves such as Motor Operated Valves (MOV), Air Operated Valves (AOV) or Check Valves (CV) play an important role in nuclear power plant. Functioning of these valves mainly aim at emergency reactivity control, post-accident residue heat removal, post-accident radioactivity removal and containment isolation when a design basis accident occurred. In order to maintain these valves under operable conditions, an Inservice Testing Program (IST) is defined for routine testing tasks based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code section XI code requirements. Risk based Inservice Testing Programs have been studied and developed extensively in the nuclear energy industry since the 1990s. Risk Based evaluations of IST can bring positive advantages to the licensee such as identifying the vulnerability of the system, reducing unnecessary testing burden, concentrating testing resources on the critical pass oriented valves and saving plant’s personnel dose exposure. This risk evaluation is incorporated with quantitative and qualitative analyses to the Motor Operated Valves under current Inservice Testing Program for PWR nuclear power plant in Taiwan. With the outcome of the risk classifications for the safety related MOVs through numerical or deterministic analyses, a risk based testing frequency relief is suggested to demonstrate the benefits received from the risk based Inservice Testing Program. The goal made of this study, it could be as a reference and cornerstone for the licensee to perform overall scope Risk-Informed Inservice Testing Program (RI-IST) evaluation by referring relevant methodologies established in this study.

  5. Boron mixing transients in a 900 MW PWR vessel for a reactor start-up operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, D.; Martin, A.; Schneider, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    In 1991 a R and D action, based on numerical simulations and experiments on PWRs'S primary coolant temperature or boron mixing capabilities, was initiated. This paper presents the test facility BORA-BORA (a 1/5th scaled mock-up of a 900 MW PWR vessel) and the Thermalhydraulic Finite Element Code N3S used for 3D calculations performed on the accurate geometry of the plant. As a validation test case of these experimental and numerical tools, we present the results obtained on the primary coolant mixing capabilities in the vessel with the three loops balanced in mass flow rate. The second part of this report deals with the mixing of a clear water plug in the vessel when a primary coolant pump start-up. The results are obtained in the mock-up in terms of boron concentration at the core inlet for several clear water plug volumes. The numerical results give the complete fluid flow and boron concentration patterns but comparisons were made at the core inlet. (author). 15 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  6. FSD for operating NPPs as part of sustainable dose reduction - recontamination evaluation for the German PWR Grafenrheinfeld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stellwag, Bernhard; Hoffmann-Wankerl, Stephan; Schuetz, Sigrid; Jacob, Astrid

    2012-09-01

    Full-system decontamination (FSD) or replacement of steam generators (SG) and other large components in mature PWR plants results in large bare metal surfaces in the reactor system. The AREVA chemistry concept for sustainable dose rate reduction at such plants includes a passivation treatment for formation of high-quality oxide films in the reactor system and high pH operation in combination with zinc injection during subsequent power operation. The effectiveness of these measures has been proven by plant operation experience. The systematic evaluation of plant-specific experience is used for further optimization of the concept. These measures were also applied at the 1350 MW-class 4-loop PWR Grafenrheinfeld after an FSD with the AREVA decontamination process HP/CORD R UV in 28 th outage. The passivation treatment consisted of zinc injection during plant heat-up and parallel adjustment of a high pH value. It was carried out in the plant operation condition 'subcritical hot' for 200 hours and a pH (300 deg. C) of 7.1. During the cycle, the pH value was increased to 7.4 and zinc injection was continued. This paper evaluates the recontamination of the plant inclusive the first refueling outage since the FSD. The evaluation is based on routine chemistry and dose rate surveillance data and on the results of special measurement programs conducted at the plant before and after the FSD. Results of surface gamma activity measurements and fuel crud analyses are also described. Data is evaluated with regard to release, transport and deposition of corrosion products and nuclides in the reactor system. The plant-specific contamination sources and their pathways are outlined. Compared to the first refueling outage of the plant in 1983, the dose rate level at the main loops could be more than halved in spite of already activated core internals and crud on fuel assemblies, the in-core instrumentation and the control rods including guide assemblies and drive rods. The FSD

  7. MTR and PWR/PHWR in-pile loop safety in integration with the operation of multipurpose reactor - GAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suharno; Aji, Bintoro; Sugiyanto; Rohman, Budi; Zarkasi, Amin S.; Giarno

    1998-01-01

    MTR and PWR/PHWR In-Pile Loop safety analysis in integration with the operation of Multipurpose Reactor - Gas has been carried out and completed. The assessment is emphasized on the function of the interface systems from the dependence of the operation and the evaluation to the possibility of leakage or failure of the in-pile part inside the reactor pool and reactor core. The analysis is refers to the logic function of the interface system and the possibility of leakage or failure of the in-pile part inside reactor pool and reactor core to consider the integrity of the core qualitatively. The results show that in normal and in transient conditions , the interface system meet the function requirement in safe integrated operation of in-pile loop and reactor. And the results of the possibility analysis of the leakage shows that the possibility based on mechanically assessment is very low and the impact to core integrity is nothing or can be eliminated. The possible position for leakage is on the flen on which one meter above the top level of the core, therefore no influence of leakage to the core

  8. Level 1 probabilistic risk assessment of low power and shutdown operations at a PWR: Phase 2 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Bozoki, G.; Kohut, P.; Musicki, Z.; Wong, S.M.; Yang, J.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Su, R.F.; Holmes, B.; Siu, N.; Bley, D.; Lin, J.

    1992-01-01

    As a result of the Chernobyl accident and other precursor events (e.g., Diablo Canyon), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) initiated an extensive project during 1989 to carefully examine the potential risks during Low Power and Shutdown (LP ampersand S) operations. Shortly after the program began, an event occurred at the Vogtle plant during shutdown, which further intensified the effort of the LP ampersand S program. In the LP ampersand S program, one pressurized water reactor (PWR), Surry, and one boiling water reactor (BWR), Grand Gulf, were selected, mainly because they were previously analyzed in the NUREG-1150 Study. The Level-1 Program is being performed in two phases. Phase 1 was dedicated to performing a coarse screening level-1 analysis including internal fire and flood. A draft report was completed in November, 1991. In the phase 2 study, mid-loop operations at the Surry plant were analyzed in detail. The objective of this paper is to present the approach of the phase 2 study and the preliminary results and insights

  9. Evaluation of PWR's operating experience. Significant events which influenced French nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.C.

    1986-10-01

    This report discusses developments or changes in safety policy (whether statutory or otherwise) and in plant design and operation, which, in many cases, correlate. When considering these events, it is important to bear in mind the standardization policy characterizing the French nuclear power program, and implying central decision-making, both for the safety authorities and the operating utility [fr

  10. Development of a dynamic operation permission system to support operations in an anomalous situation of PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Nishio, Takuya; Ohi, Tadashi; Ito, Koji

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a proto-type dynamic operation permission system to avoid commission errors of operators. The system lies between CRT-based operation panels and plant control systems and checks an operation by operators if it follows typical operation procedure described in operation manuals and it has suitable effects on plant condition. The applicability of the proto-type system is demonstrated through the application to the recovery operations of a steam generator tube rupture accident of a three-loop pressurized water reactor plant

  11. Load follow operation in nuclear power plants and its influence on PWR fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagino, Y.; Miyazaki, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contribution of nuclear power generation to our company's grid system is becoming greater each year, which makes it necessary to operate nuclear power plants with load follow mode in the near future. (author)

  12. Main indicators used in french PWR units for safety, operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guio, J.M. de

    1990-01-01

    The development of analyses aimed at improving nuclear plant operations through an optimum use of experience feedback naturally leads to the implementation of trend indicators in the fields of safety, operation and maintenance. This process, part of the more general framework of promoting safety culture, facilitates collective thinking on these matters at the local site level, and, at the national level, allows a clearer definition of the main lines of strategy and helps coordinate the resulting actions

  13. Welding repair during maintenance operations on EDF's PWR plants. Some considerations on French code RSEM and feedback from operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnus, M.; Bonan, C.; Ould, P.

    2015-01-01

    When utilities have to repair components or equipment using weld process it is often not possible to comply with requirements which have been used for original design and manufacturing. French code RSEM (In service inspection rules for mechanical components of PWR nuclear islands) for maintenance operations includes specific requirements for such situations. A quick overview of some of these requirements is given in this paper. Several cases are discussed. First, requirements have been included in RSEM code for partial or full repair of austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel Pressure Vessel components. These include recommendations for weld repair and operation. Such repairs may be encountered on steam generator channel head cladding, or internals core junction cladding. An example of such a repair is given in this paper. Secondly, the state of the art is to eliminate HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) of previous weld before maintenance operation to avoid multiple affectation of HAZ at same location. This is not always possible. Weld tests have been carried out on Carbon Steel plates in order to evaluate effect of multiple affectations on HAZ at same location. Test results show that carbon steel weld properties remain acceptable under test conditions. Thirdly, before operations, RSEM code requires testing to prove that weldability of materials whose properties have been drastically degraded after a long service period is acceptable. The weldability of austenitic ferritic casting under simulated aging conditions, has been evaluated on different mockups by AREVA NP, results show that the weldability remains acceptable

  14. Implementation of high fidelity models for the conditions of operation in stop in PWR simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Sevillano, I.; Jimenez Bogarin, R.; Ortega Pascual, F.

    2014-01-01

    The operation in stop cold conditions and in particular the States of operation with reduced inventory, the call of half loop or half nozzle, is becoming increasingly more important. These States of operation are characterized by having the coolant level approximately on the generatrix of the branches, so that any deviation in the level or malfunction of the system for the disposal of waste heat could lead to compromising situations. The importance of this type of situation is reflected in the APS in other modes (APSOM), which show that the risk in these conditions may be comparable to the power. Hence the importance that the simulator training programmes include scenarios that cover these States of operation. The article describes on the one hand, the difficulties encountered in the simulation of situations characterized by low pressure and presence of Non-Condensable and, on the other hand, its implementation, not only in the field of training of plant personnel, but also in the field of review/validation of operating procedures. (Author)

  15. Diagnosis techniques of the computerized operator support system (COSS) for PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Tokuji; Morimoto, Haruki; Fujiwara, Toshitaka; Okamoto, Yoshizo; Masui, Takao.

    1985-01-01

    Aiming at the enhancement of abnormal plant operation reliability, COSS has been developed through the support of the Japanese ministry of International Trade and Industry. The validation test was performed by the plant operators using a plant simulator and the result shows that COSS is useful as operator support aids during abnormal plant conditions. This paper presents two methods of diagnosis used in the COSS. (1) Cause-Consequence Tree: This is a logical treewise expression between cause and it's effect to plant variables. When plant variables exceed the predetermined values of alarm, diagnosis is performed by CCT. (2) Model reference method: In this method, the plant dynamic model is applied as a reference. Diagnosis is performed by comparing the measured values with the output values of the corresponding model. (author)

  16. Essential severe accident mitigation measures for operating and future PWR's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittermann, Dietmar; Eckardt, Bernd A.; Lechleuthner, Michael [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Severe Accident mitigation measures are a constituent of the safety concept in Europe not only for operating but also for future light water reactors. While operating reactors mainly have been backfitted with such measure, for future reactors Severe Accident mitigation measures already have to be considered in the design phase. Severe Accident measures are considered as the 4{sup th} level of defense for future reactors. This difference has consequences also on the kind of measures proposed to be introduced. While in operating plants Severe Accident mitigation measures are considered for further risk reduction, in future reactors an explicit higher level of safety is required resulting in additional design measures. This higher safety level is expressed in the requirement that there must be no need for evacuation of surrounding populations except in the immediate vicinity of the plant and for long-term restrictions with regard to the consumption of locally grown food. Because of the potential hazard posed by radioactive releases to the environment in the event of an Severe Accident situation depends largely on the airborne material in the containment atmosphere and on the containment integrity, new system features to prevent loss of containment integrity have been introduced in the design of the NPP's. For these tasks it has been necessary to develop and qualify new system technologies and implement them finally into NPP's, e.g. like systems for containment atmosphere H{sub 2}-control, filtered venting, core retention devices and atmosphere sampling. The following systems are introduced for operating as well as for future plants: {center_dot} The Hydrogen Control System is based on the Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner (PAR) technology. There is no need for any operator actions because of the self-starting feature of the catalyst if hydrogen is released. {center_dot} In situ Post Accident Sampling System (In situ-PASS) are introduced for the purpose of

  17. Emergency diesel generating sets for the 900 MW PWR units operation and maintenance policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, A.; Lallier, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to improve the reliability of the emergency diesel generating EDF has taken steps to ensure that: - sets are only started up when they are really needed, in order to reduce the thermal cycles and the mechanical stresses associated with start-up. - the maintenance policy is adapted to the conditions of use, by including the notion of a start-up being equivalent to a predetermined number of hours of operation. (authors)

  18. Emotional learning based intelligent controller for a PWR nuclear reactor core during load following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorramabadi, Sima Seidi; Boroushaki, Mehrdad; Lucas, Caro

    2008-01-01

    The design and evaluation of a novel approach to reactor core power control based on emotional learning is described. The controller includes a neuro-fuzzy system with power error and its derivative as inputs. A fuzzy critic evaluates the present situation, and provides the emotional signal (stress). The controller modifies its characteristics so that the critic's stress is reduced. Simulation results show that the controller has good convergence and performance robustness characteristics over a wide range of operational parameters

  19. Emergency diesel generating sets for the 900 MW PWR units operation and maintenance policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillon, A.; Lallier, M. [Electricite de France - EDF, Service de la Production Thermique, 3 rue de Messine, 75384 Paris Cedex 08 (France)

    1986-02-15

    In order to improve the reliability of the emergency diesel generating EDF has taken steps to ensure that: - sets are only started up when they are really needed, in order to reduce the thermal cycles and the mechanical stresses associated with start-up. - the maintenance policy is adapted to the conditions of use, by including the notion of a start-up being equivalent to a predetermined number of hours of operation. (authors)

  20. Operational experience with PWR secondary water chemistry: a panel presentation San Onofre Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britt, R.D.; Millard, R.E.; DiFilippo, M.N.

    1975-01-01

    The three steam generators have been on phosphate chemistry since startup except for one brief period when volatile chemistry was attempted. Initially, coordinated pH-phosphate control was recommended by Westinghouse for the steam generators; however, after one year of operation, Westinghouse recommended changing to congruent control. From startup in 1967 until the end of 1970, the Na/PO 4 molar ratio was generally maintained in the 2.6 to 2.8 range, with a 5 to 10 ppM phosphate residual. A summary of steam generator chemistry from initial startup to the present is presented

  1. Design study of a PWR of 1.300 MWe of Angra-2 type operating in the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, E.P.; Carneiro, F.A.N.; Schlosser, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of the thorium-highly enriched uranium and thorium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels in an unmodified PWR is analysed. The PWR of 1300 MWe from KWU (Angra-2 type) is taken as the reference reactor for the study. Reactor core design calculations for both types of fuels considering once-through and recycle fuels. The calculations were performed with the KWU design codes FASER-3 and MEDIUM 2.2 after introduction of the thorium chain and some addition of nuclide data in FASER-3. A two-energy group scheme and a two-dimensional (XY) representation of the reactor core were utilized. (Author) [pt

  2. Corrosion in PWR stainless steel components: a TSO perspective based on operating experience and expertises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curieres, I. de

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steels are used commonly in many circuits of a nuclear power plant. Particularly, they are the prime materials for the inside surface of the primary circuit. Their operating experience has been good, though a number of cases of degradations due to corrosion have been reported the last ten years. This number of events is increasing and many studies of damaged parts become available. Based on the operating experience and these studies, IRSN will provide its perspective on the safety-related issues associated with the corrosion of stainless steel components. It appears that today's knowledge is not sufficient to define relevant criteria or to determine the exact set of parameters which leads to SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) of stainless steels. As a consequence, the best strategy remains an inspection and repair/replacement one. Moreover many cases show the influence of pollutants in the SCC events. This emphasizes the fact that chemistry parameters are strongly connected to safety issues, with respect to the stainless steels integrity

  3. The LG-bank control concept: An improved method for PWR load-following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Won Seok; Christenson, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors present the results of an investigation of a new pressurized water reactor load-following control concept that utilizes light gray (LG) banks in combination with a single high-worth bank. The investigation determined a control strategy and a set of nuclear design parameters for the control banks that permits unrestricted load-following operation over a wide power range at both beginning-of-cycle and end-of-cycle conditions. Advantages of the LG-bank control concept are that flexible load-following maneuvers can be performed without either making changes in the boron concentration or requiring the continuous insertion of a high-worth control bank. These features remove both of the disadvantages of current gray-bank load-following designs, which generally require the continuous insertion of a high-worth bank and in some cases also involve changes in the boron concentration

  4. The application of ALARA to the design and operation of the U.K. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, R.B.; Dutton, L.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    When operating a nuclear establishment, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) is required to conform with all the requirements of national legislation. In term of radiological protection, this essentially means that the requirements of ICRP 26 must be met. The three main precepts of ICRP 26 are: (i) no practice shall be adopted unless its introduction produce a positive net benefit; (ii) all exposure shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account; and (iii) the effective dose-equivalent to individuals shall not exceed the limits recommended for the appropriate circumstances by the Commission. This paper is concerned with compliance with the second of the above requirements

  5. Next generation PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Usui, Shuji

    2001-01-01

    Development of LWR for power generation in Japan has been intended to upgrade its reliability, safety, operability, maintenance and economy as well as to increase its capacity in order, since nuclear power generation for commercial use was begun on 1970, to steadily increase its generation power. And, in Japan, ABWR (advanced BWR) of the most promising LWR in the world, was already used actually and APWR (advanced PWR) with the largest output in the world is also at a step of its actual use. And, development of the APWR in Japan was begun on 1980s, and is at a step of plan on construction of its first machine at early of this century. However, by large change of social affairs, economy of nuclear power generation is extremely required, to be positioned at an APWR improved development reactor promoted by collaboration of five PWR generation companies and the Mitsubishi Electric Co., Ltd. Therefore, on its development, investigation on effect of change in social affairs on nuclear power stations was at first carried out, to establish a design requirement for the next generation PWR. Here were described on outline, reactor core design, safety concept, and safety evaluation of APWR+ and development of an innovative PWR. (G.K.)

  6. Expert system for assisting the repair operations on the control racks of the control rods assembly in a 900 MW PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, B.; Doutre, J.L.; Franco, A.

    1990-01-01

    The expert system presented was developed for assisting the repair operations on the control equipment of the control rod assembly in a PWR type reactor. The expert system allows the representation of expert knowledge and diagnostic reasoning. The objective of the expert system is to achieve the most precise diagnostic and localizing of the breakdown elements, by processing the data acquired during breakdown. The development steps, the structure and the applications of the expert system are summarized. The expert system operates in an IBM PC equipped with a AMAIA 8 Mo card. A time schedule of 18 months is predicted [fr

  7. Reactor control system. PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At present, 23 units of PWR type reactors have been operated in Japan since the start of Mihama Unit 1 operation in 1970 and various improvements have been made to upgrade operability of power stations as well as reliability and safety of power plants. As the share of nuclear power increases, further improvements of operating performance such as load following capability will be requested for power stations with more reliable and safer operation. This article outlined the reactor control system of PWR type reactors and described the control performance of power plants realized with those systems. The PWR control system is characterized that the turbine power is automatic or manually controlled with request of the electric power system and then the nuclear power is followingly controlled with the change of core reactivity. The system mainly consists of reactor automatic control system (control rod control system), pressurizer pressure control system, pressurizer water level control system, steam generator water level control system and turbine bypass control system. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Engineering development of a digital replacement protection system at an operating US PWR nuclear power plant: Installation and operational experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.H. [Duke Power Co., Seneca, SC (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The existing Reactor Protection Systems (RPSs) at most US PWRs are systems which reflect 25 to 30 year-old designs, components and manufacturing techniques. Technological improvements, especially in relation to modern digital systems, offer improvements in functionality, performance, and reliability, as well as reductions in maintenance and operational burden. The Nuclear power industry and the US nuclear regulators are poised to move forward with the issues that have slowed the transition to modern digital replacements for nuclear power plant safety systems. The electric utility industry is now more than ever being driven by cost versus benefit decisions. Properly designed, engineered, and installed digital systems can provide adequate cost-benefit and allow continued nuclear generated electricity. This paper describes various issues and areas related to an ongoing RPS replacement demonstration project which are pertinant for a typical US nuclear plant to consider cost-effective replacement of an aging analog RPS with a modern digital RPS. The following subject areas relative to the Oconee Nuclear Station ISAT{trademark} Demonstrator project are discussed: Operator Interface Development; Equipment Qualification; Validation and Verification of Software; Factory Testing; Field Changes and Verification Testing; Utility Operational, Engineering and Maintenance; Experiences with Demonstration System; and Ability to operate in parallel with the existing Analog RPS.

  9. Engineering development of a digital replacement protection system at an operating US PWR nuclear power plant: Installation and operational experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    The existing Reactor Protection Systems (RPSs) at most US PWRs are systems which reflect 25 to 30 year-old designs, components and manufacturing techniques. Technological improvements, especially in relation to modern digital systems, offer improvements in functionality, performance, and reliability, as well as reductions in maintenance and operational burden. The Nuclear power industry and the US nuclear regulators are poised to move forward with the issues that have slowed the transition to modern digital replacements for nuclear power plant safety systems. The electric utility industry is now more than ever being driven by cost versus benefit decisions. Properly designed, engineered, and installed digital systems can provide adequate cost-benefit and allow continued nuclear generated electricity. This paper describes various issues and areas related to an ongoing RPS replacement demonstration project which are pertinant for a typical US nuclear plant to consider cost-effective replacement of an aging analog RPS with a modern digital RPS. The following subject areas relative to the Oconee Nuclear Station ISAT trademark Demonstrator project are discussed: Operator Interface Development; Equipment Qualification; Validation and Verification of Software; Factory Testing; Field Changes and Verification Testing; Utility Operational, Engineering and Maintenance; Experiences with Demonstration System; and Ability to operate in parallel with the existing Analog RPS

  10. The integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the integrated reactors concepts by a presentation of four reactors: PIUS, SIR, IRIS and CAREM. The core conception, the operating, the safety, the economical aspects and the possible users are detailed. From the performance of the classical integrated PWR, the necessity of new innovative fuels utilization, the research of a simplified design to make easier the safety and the KWh cost decrease, a new integrated reactor is presented: SCAR 600. (A.L.B.)

  11. PWR Fuel licensing in France - from design to reprocessing: licensing of nuclear PWR fuel rod design to satisfy with criteria for normal and abnormal fuel operation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, R.

    1999-01-01

    In this lecture are presented: French regulatory context; Current fuel management methods; Request from the french operator EdF; Most recent actions of the french Nuclear safety authority; Fuel assemblies deformations (impact of high burn-up; investigations during reactor's exploitation; control rods drop off times)

  12. An homogeneous model of steam generator to simulate operational transiento and accidents in PWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.L. de.

    1981-07-01

    GEVAP - A digital computer code was developed to simulate the thermodynamic transient behaviour of steam generators. The steam generator is divided in heating sections. In each section, the conservation equations of mass and energy are integrated numerically, using a predictor-corrector method. As good reslts where obtained, as compared to transients simulated using more detainled codes, it is concluded that GEVAP can be included as the steam generator module of a more complete systems simulation code for PWR's. (E.G.) [pt

  13. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines: Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurie, S.; Bucci, G.; Johnson, L.; King, M.; Lamanna, L.; Morgan, E.; Bates, J.; Burns, R.; Eaker, R.; Ward, G.; Linnenbom, V.; Millet, P.; Paine, J.P.; Wood, C.J.; Gatten, T.; Meatheany, D.; Seager, J.; Thompson, R.; Brobst, G.; Connor, W.; Lewis, G.; Shirmer, R.; Gillen, J.; Kerns, M.; Jones, V.; Lappegaard, S.; Sawochka, S.; Smith, F.; Spires, D.; Pagan, S.; Gardner, J.; Polidoroff, T.; Lambert, S.; Dahl, B.; Hundley, F.; Miller, B.; Andersson, P.; Briden, D.; Fellers, B.; Harvey, S.; Polchow, J.; Rootham, M.; Fredrichs, T.; Flint, W.

    1993-05-01

    An effective, state-of-the art secondary water chemistry control program is essential to maximize the availability and operating life of major PWR components. Furthermore, the costs related to maintaining secondary water chemistry will likely be less than the repair or replacement of steam generators or large turbine rotors, with resulting outages taken into account. The revised PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines in this report represent the latest field and laboratory data on steam generator corrosion phenomena. This document supersedes Interim PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Recommendations for IGA/SCC Control (EPRI report TR-101230) as well as PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines--Revision 2 (NP-6239)

  14. French PWR safety philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.

    1986-05-01

    Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach, each of them having possibilities and limits. As a consequence of the global risk objective set in 1977 for nuclear reactors, safety analysis was extended to the evaluation of events more complex than the conventional ones, and later to the evaluation of the feasibility of the offsite emergency plans in case of severe accidents

  15. Water chemistry in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    This article outlines major features and basic concept of the secondary system of PWR's and water properties control measures adopted in recent PWR plants. The secondary system of a PWR consists of a condenser cooling pipe (aluminum-brass, titanium, or stainless steel), low-pressure make-up water heating pipe (aluminum-brass or stainless steel), high-ressure make-up water heating pipe (cupro-nickel or stainless steel), steam generator heat-transfer pipe (Inconel 600 or 690), and bleed/drain pipe (carbon steel, low alloy steel or stainless steel). Other major pipes and equipment are made of carbon steel or stainless steel. Major troubles likely to be caused by water in the secondary system include reduction in wall thickness of the heat-transfer pipe, stress corrosion cracking in the heat-transfer pipe, and denting. All of these are caused by local corrosion due to concentration of purities contained in water. For controlling the water properties in the secondary system, it is necessary to prevent impurities from entering the system, to remove impurities and corrosion products from the system, and to prevent corrosion of apparatus making up the system. Measures widely adopted for controlling the formation of IGA include the addition of boric acid for decreasing the concentration of free alkali and high hydrazine operation for providing a highly reducing atmospere. (Nogami, K.)

  16. ROX PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H.

    1999-01-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO 2 , ThO 2 and Er 2 O 3 , and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO 2 assemblies. As a result, the additives UO 2 + Er 2 O 3 are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO 2 heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  17. Soviet Language Policy vis-a-vis Minority Languages: The Road to Disintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Alok Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The present linguistic situation in Russia, however much it may have been affected by political and economic considerations, is overwhelmingly the consequence of what people have made of their geographical conditions, their history and their long-standing language and ethnic contacts over many centuries. The present linguistic complexity of Russia…

  18. Russian Energy Policy vis-a-vis Europe: Natural Resources as a Means of Foreign Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Charter stipulates,58 Russia would have to give up its almost monopolistic control over the transit routes by making the energy market open, transparent...Russian monopolistic control over energy flow to Europe might be converted into a regional political dominance. Threatening the possibility of abrupt... monopolistic control over energy flow to Europe might be converted into a regional political dominance. Threatening the possibility of abrupt energy

  19. Changes of vegetation vis-a-vis Climate since last several thousand ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IPSITA

    ... since last several thousand years at North-East India ... of agricultural practices showed the presence of cereal and other cultural pollen taxa. Later, a more humid ... research in southeast Asia, and also to trace the migratory route of flora.

  20. Examining Deaf Students' Equitable Access to Science vis-a-vis Contemporary Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Annemarie D.

    As a Deaf individual, it is important to ensure the growth of the Deaf community as science-literate members of society. While many predecessors have contributed to the body of research in Deaf pedagogy, there is still much to be done in safeguarding Deaf learners' equitable access to science education. One area of concern is in narrowing the statistically significant gap in Climate Change knowledge between Deaf students' and Hearing students' at the Rochester Institute of Technology. It is within this topic that the writing-to-learn-science framework is practiced and Deaf students in the Laboratory Science Technology program at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf participate in a study to assess whether or not the use of writing-to-learn-science strategies help them become better scientists, writers and learners. In this study, the social constructivist framework (Vygotsky, 1987) is used to study the impact of the use of the Berland and Reiser (2009) argumentation framework, so that they write-to-learn-science through the steps of sense-making, articulation and persuasion.

  1. Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon context analysis of three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To understand the variation in genomic composition and its effect on codon usage, we performed the comparative analysis of codon usage and nucleotide usage in the genes of three dicots, Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula. The dicot genes were found to be A/T rich and have predominantly ...

  2. Environmental challenge vis a vis opportunity: the case of water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Anushree

    2007-01-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) is a noxious weed that has attracted worldwide attention due to its fast spread and congested growth, which lead to serious problems in navigation, irrigation, and power generation. On the other hand, when looked from a resource angle, it appears to be a valuable resource with several unique properties. As a result, research activity concerning control (especially biological control) and utilization (especially wastewater treatment or phytoremediation) of water hyacinth has boomed up in the last few decades. Investigations on biogas/compost production from water hyacinth have also come up very well mainly from few research groups in India. This review presents a comprehensive view of the research related to water hyacinth with special emphasis on the recent investigations on water hyacinth control and utilization technologies conducted in the last 2-3 decades. Based on these significant research achievements, now it is desirable to identify a management strategy so that the excessive growth can be controlled and the plant can be used in beneficial ways. In the rural areas, water hyacinth could be used in an integrated manner for decentralized wastewater treatment systems coupled to biogas and compost production from the resulting biomass. There is a need to work out the techno-economic viability of such integrated model systems.

  3. First evidence of denitrification vis-a-vis monsoon in the Arabian Sea since late Miocene

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripathi, S.; Tiwari, M.; Lee, J.; Khim, B.-K.; Pandey, D.K.; Clift, P.D.; Kulhanek, D.K.; Ando, S.; Bendle, J.A.P.; Aharonovich, S.; Griffith, E.M.; Gurumurthy, G.P.; Hahn, A.; Iwai, M.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.G.; Liddy, H.M.; Lu, H.; Lyle, M.W.; Mishra, R.; Radhakrishna, T.; Routledge, C.M.; Saraswat, R.; Saxena, R.; Scardia, G.; Sharma, G.K.; Singh, A.D.; Steinke, S.; Suzuki, K.; Tauxe, L.; Xu, Z.; Yu, Z.

    of Earth Sciences, University of Southern California, 3651 Trousdale Parkway Los Angeles CA 90089, USA. 15School of Geographical and Oceanographical Sciences, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023, China. 16College of Earth, Ocean...

  4. The Problem of Scientific Realism Vis-a-Vis the Probabilistic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientific realism holds that the objects of scientific knowledge exist independently of the minds or activities of scientists and those scientific theories are true of that objective world. This is antithetical to the posits of quantum physics, a body of knowledge taken as the seal of the sciences because of its incredible feat, which ...

  5. Stability of extended scalar diquark stars vis-`a-vis soliton stars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    50.7 km) obtained for an extended scalar diquark star within the framework of ... ing its stability) within the framework of an effective φ 4-theory described [4,5] by the ..... an award of the Research Scientist Scheme by UGC, New Delhi during the ...

  6. Biomass status vis-a-vis bioenergy prospects and options for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panigrahhi, M.R.; Overend, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    India has a large biomass energy potential if its underutilized resources are used in modernized biofuels and bioenergy conversion systems. India uses about half traditional and half commercial energy sources. However, with a fast-growing population, a relatively slow-growing economy, and few fossil energy resources, the need to use indigenous resources more efficiency is becoming more pressing. Currently, about 400 million tonnes of biomass (fuel wood, crop residues, and cattle dung) is burnt in millions of traditional cooking stoves, especially in the rural sector. The net energy loss could be as much as 5 EJ. Converting only a fraction of this biomass to biogas, a much cleaner and more efficient fuel, could meet the total cooking requirements of the rural sector. The remainder of the biomass could be converted for use as producer of gas and ethanol. Nearly 15 percent of about 0.6 million villages are unelectrified. Modular power generation using biomass-fueled producer gas-fired generators could meet the rural needs at less cost than grid extensions. Ethanol is already proven in Brazil and the U.S. as a gasoline substitute and extender that mitigates air pollution in urban areas. (author)

  7. Public-Private Partnerships: an International Development vis a vis Indonesia Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal Yaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For more than two decades, Public Private Partnerships (PPP had developed worldwide as an instrument to procure public infrastructure where government funds are limited. This practice supports the covergent theory of the public and private sector. Indonesia experience with PPP follows most of what had been done by countries overseas with some deviations. The main reasons for going for PPP for Indonesia government is to fill the gap in finance and capability in procuring the infrastructure. Unofficial reason such as for off-balance sheet and ideological is not relevant. Up to now, the Government only allow investment in hard economic infrastructure. Instead of using pure private finance, Indonesia Government facilitates public funds either from Central Government or Local Governments to finance PPP projects. In most cases, this involvement is because of marginality of the project. This results in the condition where the Government still has dominant role in the existing PPP projects. Compared to the PPP framework in other countries like in the UK, Indonesia PPP lacks of attention on output specification and risk transfer. This may be because of lacking of experiences as well as due to high degree of Government involvement. Rigorous policy is needed in this area to ensure Government to achieve better value for money.

  8. The Achuar People of the Corrientes Basin: The State vis a vis its own Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Chirif

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the events leading to the 2006 uprising of theAchuar people of the Corrientes basin (Loreto, who have sufferedfour decades of contamination due to oil exploitation. It also examinesthe Peruvian State’s and the oil company´s attitudes throughoutthe protest and after signing an agreement aiming to stop contaminationand remedy environmental and social havoc. Materials usedinclude interviews conducted with different stake holders and a widerange of written records, such as political declarations, reports onlocal people´s health´s and remediation work, agreement documentsand letters exchanged between stake holders, as well as historicaland socio economic background information. Findings highlight thestrength of organized indigenous people´s claiming for their rights;the greater commitment to assuming responsibility shown by the oilcompany´s as compared to the Peruvian State; and the weakness ofa political discourse equating development with the extraction ofnatural resources. The main conclusion is that the Peruvian Statedoes not fulfill the paradigm set in the first article of the Constitution:that the defense of the human person and the respect of its dignityare its supreme aim.

  9. Personal vis-a-vis social responsibility for disparities in health status: An issue of justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ayan; Dobe, Madhumita

    2016-01-01

    Health inequities are disparities which can be avoided through rational actions on the part of policymakers. Such inequalities are unnecessary and unjust and may exist between and within nations, societies, and population groups. Social determinants such as wealth, income, occupation, education, gender, and racial/ethnic groups are the principal drivers of this inequality since they determine the health risks and preventive behaviors, access to, and affordability of health care. Within this framework, there is a debate on assigning a personal responsibility factor over and above societal responsibility to issues of ill health. One school of philosophy argues that when individuals are worse-off than others for no fault of their own, it is unjust, as opposed to health disparities that arise due to avoidable personal choices such as smoking and drug addiction for which there should (can) be a personal responsibility. Opposing thoughts have pointed out that the relative socioeconomic position of an individual dictates how his/her life may progress from education to working conditions and aging, susceptibility to diseases and infirmity, and the consequences thereof. The existence of a social gradient in health outcomes across populations throughout the world is a testimony to this truth. It has been emphasized that assuming personal responsibility for health in public policy-making can only have a peripheral place. Instead, the concept of individual responsibility should be promoted as a positive concept of enabling people to gain control over the determinants of health through conscious, informed, and healthy choices.

  10. Shad Garbhakara Bhavas vis-a-vis congenital and genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Kamini; Kumar, Abhimanayu; Dhiman, K S

    2010-04-01

    Despite the advancements in diagnostic techniques and therapeutic interventions, medical science has failed to keep the incidence of congenital malformations under control. Ayurveda, the ancient Indian medical system has given due emphasis on this and postulated various measures to minimize the risks. These measures start well before conception. According to Ayurvedic principles, proper preparation of the parents is an essential prerequisite for a healthy progeny. Pre-conception care is a set of interventions that identifies biomedical behavioral and social risks to the health of the mother and the baby. It includes both-prevention and management, emphasizing health issues that require action before conception, very early in pregnancy, for maximal impact. For meeting the objective of healthy progeny, Ayurveda scholars felt the importance of six procreative factors (Shadgarbhkarabhavas) such as Matrija, Pitrija, Aatmaja, Rasaja, Satmyaja, and Sattvaja. The conglomeration of these procreative factors is must for healthy progeny. The physical, mental, social, and spiritual well-being of the person, proper nutrition of the mother during pregnancy, and practice of a wholesome regimen, play a prime role in achieving a healthy offspring, thus structuring a healthy family, society, and nation. Negligence toward any of these factors becomes a cause for unhealthy and defective child birth. The present literary / conceptual study, thus focuses mainly on interpreting these observations, on the basis of modern scientific knowledge.

  11. Trading Behavior of Foreign Vis a Vis Local Investors in The Indonesian Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soemarso Slamet Rahardjo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the behavior of foreign, local investors and total market in a stock trading. The analysis is focused on their implementation of positive feedback strategy, the existence of mean reverting process and their sensitivity toward expected capital gain and losses. The result reveals that both of these two investors apply the positive feedback strategy, at a different degree. The investment horizon of the foreign investors is shorter than the local investors. There is a mean reverting pattern in the price volatilities. The convergence period for local investor is 2.4. The market needs 1.8 month. No convergence period for foreign investors. The local investors and total market are neutral toward expected gain and losses. The foreign investors are more sensitive to capital loss. Previous price and volume changes have a leverage effect to the current demand of foreign investors. The local investors are affected by changes in price only.

  12. Usable Security and E-Banking: ease of use vis-a-vis security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Hertzum

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic banking must be secure and easy to use. An evaluation of six Danish web-based electronic banking systems indicates that the systems have serious weaknesses with respect to ease of use. Our analysis of the weaknesses suggests that security requirements are among their causes and that the weaknesses may in turn cause decreased security. We view the conflict between ease of use and security in the context of usable security, a concept that is intended to match security principles and demands against user knowledge and motivation. Automation, instruction, and understanding can be identified as different approaches to usable security. Instruction is the main approach of the systems evaluated; automation relieves the user from involvement in security, as far as possible; and understanding goes beyond step-by-step instructions, to enable users to act competently and safely in situations that transcend preconceived instructions. We discuss the pros and cons of automation and understanding as alternative approaches to the design of web-based e-banking systems.

  13. Comparing Conventional Bank Credit Vis A Vis Shariah Bank Musharakah: Experimental Economic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Abduh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Bank of Indonesia with dual banking system – i.e Shariah and Conventional Bank – keep on developing system that considered as an answer to generate the national economic growth. One of the banking activities that emphasized by the Central Bank of Indonesia is fund distribution through either conventional bank credit or shariah bank fi nancing. Having the Experimental Economic Approach based on Induced Value Theory and employing ANOVA, this paper found that shariah bank musharakah fi nancing system would come up with higher profi t opportunity compare to conventional credit system. One main reason is that musharakah fi nancing in shariah bank applies profi t and lost sharing (PLS scheme so that will not be a burden to the customer when he fi nd low profi t.Keywords: Credit Loan, Musharakah Financing, Induced Value Theory, Experimental Economic Approach, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA.

  14. Chemical characterization of meltwater from East Rathong glacier vis-a-vis Western Himalayan glaciers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, B.M.; Tayal, S.; Chakraborty, P.; Bharat, G.K.

    of (Ca2+ + Mg2+) to the total cations and high value of [(Ca2+ + Mg2+)/(Na+ + K+)] ratio suggests that the major source of dissolved ions in the meltwater is carbonate weathering...

  15. A Look at Technologies Vis-a-vis Information Handling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Rowena W.

    The paper examines several ideas for information handling implemented with new technologies that suggest directions for future development. These are grouped under the topic headings: Handling Large Data Banks, Providing Personalized Information Packages, Providing Information Specialist Services, and Expanding Man-Machine Interaction. Guides in…

  16. [Agreement and asymmetry. Population and wages vis vis a vis the globalization of the economy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusidman, C

    1991-01-01

    The free flow of labor and services across national borders will be 1 of the most difficult problems of future negotiations for integration of the markets of the US, Mexico, and Canada. The free flow of products and increasingly of capital have been accepted in general terms, and land and natural resources are entering the globalization process through external investment. In the trilateral free trade treaty between Mexico, the US, and Canada, the US is particularly interested in access to the service markets of Canada and Mexico. Mexico would like freer access to the other markets, and to protect its migrant workers. Canada needs foreign labor for its agricultural production. All 3 countries would potentially benefit from more flexible population movement. Mexico, Canada, and the US have very different structures, population dynamics, and labor markets. Mexico's population growth rate is the highest and its active population is increasing the most rapidly. Mexico must generate 1 million new jobs annually, the US requires 2.1 million, and Canada around 230,000. The 3 countries, with about 360 million inhabitants in 1991, must create 3.4 million new jobs annually. Because of differences in occupational and activity structures, levels of skill, salaries, productivity, and cultures of work in the 3 countries, it is clear that the new jobs correspond to different labor markets, making predictions about average salaries difficult. The 1990 average minimum wage in the US was about 10 times that of Mexico, while the average minimum in the manufacturing sector as about 7 times greater. The degree to which the trilateral treaty can contribute to reducing the differential is an important question. 3 possible scenarios suggest themselves. If current restrictions on mobility of workers are maintained, wage disparities will probably continue unless there is a very great foreign investment in activities throughout Mexico that require significant labor inputs. This would probably have a positive effect on unskilled wages. If Mexico does not open its service market, foreign companies would need to train and advance Mexican workers. A 2nd scenario assumes a general easing of restrictions for high-tech services while restrictions remain for unskilled workers. Unemployment among Mexican professionals and technicians in service industries might increase if they were unable to compete. The final scenario represents the longterm possibility of eliminating all restrictions on labor mobility between the 3 countries, which would result in improving the quality of life and working conditions of a large number of persons. Regardless of the outcome, Mexico faces the task of increasing the productivity of its labor force.

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosen

    codon usage at start and stop site showed variation in codon selection in ..... pressure is 8.3%, 0.5% and 18.5% while the influence of other factors, for example natural ..... The codon Adaptation Index--a measure of directional synonymous.

  18. Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon context analysis of three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosenjit Paul

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... Keywords. codon; dinucleotide; selection; mutation; genome. Introduction ..... influence of other factors, for example natural selection, is 91.7%, 99.5% ..... measure of directional synonymous codon usage bias, and its potential ...

  19. Bromination vis-a-vis chlorination as a biocide feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, S.K.; Nagaigh, N.; Mittal, S.

    2000-01-01

    Water is used extensively as a cooling medium in various heat transfer equipment's of a power industry such as condenser, heat exchangers and cooling towers. At elevated temperature, the breeding of microbiological growth can form slimes, underneath of this, accelerated corrosion can take place resulting into sudden and catastrophic failure of equipment's. The microbiological growth unchecked in the various systems especially in low velocity areas can lead to large growth of micro organisms such as algae which can even reduce the flow of the fluid thus affecting the efficiency of plant equipment's. Therefore, chlorination is a mandatory requirement in industrial cooling water to reduce biofouling in heat transfer equipment's. The chlorination in drinking water produces germicidal effect and thus reduces the bacterial counts. At NAPS the water quality is good and mild doses of chlorine (5 ppm) two times a day, as envisaged in design is noticed to be satisfactory. The chlorination of recirculating condenser cooling water presently is being done with the established doses for a fixed time twice a day. Some of the problems noticed with the chlorination process are : Corrosion of constructional material of chlorination plant and equipment's and pipelines causing large input of efforts on maintenance for keeping high availability of the chlorination plant. In addition to this, the leakages in the equipment could be a potential safety hazard. The effectiveness of chlorine is observed to be less in alkaline pH (above 9.0) as encountered at NAPS. This results is large quantities of chlorine injection for extended periods. The cost of chlorine and bleaching powder keeps fluctuating in the market as noticed in past few years. Many a times this results in scarcity of chlorine/bleaching powder causing interruption in biofouling control programme. Hence it was felt prudent to work on the alternative biocides which could be cost effective, non-polluting and nature and user friendly. This paper highlights the brief details on the feasibility studies carried out on bromination. (author)

  20. ROX PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akie, H.; Yamashita, T.; Shirasu, N.; Takano, H.; Anoda, Y.; Kimura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    For an efficient burnup of excess plutonium from nuclear reactors spent fuels and dismantled warheads, plutonium rock-like oxide(ROX) fuel has been investigated. The ROX fuel is expected to provide high Pu transmutation capability, irradiation stability and chemical and geological stability. While, a zirconia-based ROX(Zr-ROX)-fueled PWR core has some problems of Doppler reactivity coefficient and power peaking factor. For the improvement of these characteristics, two approaches were considered: the additives such as UO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a heterogeneous core with Zr-ROX and UO{sub 2} assemblies. As a result, the additives UO{sub 2}+ Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} are found to sufficiently improve the reactivity coefficients and accident behavior, and to flatten power distribution. On the other hand, in the 1/3Zr-ROX + 2/3UO{sub 2} heterogeneous core, further reduction of power peaking seems necessary. (author)

  1. Design study of a PWR of 1300 MWe of Angra-2 type operating in the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, E.P.; Carneiro, F.A.N.; Schlosser, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of the thorium-highly enriched uranium and of the thorium-plutonium mixed oxide fuels in an unmodified PWR is analysed. Reactor core design calculations were performed for both types of fuels considering once-through and recycle fuels. The calculations were performed with the KWU design codes FASER-3 and MEDIUM-2.2 after introduction of the thorium chain and some addition of nuclide data in FASER-3. A two-energy group scheme and a two-dimensional (XY) representation of the reactor core were utilized. No technical problem that precluded the utilization of any of the options analyzed was found. The savings in uranium ore introduced by the thorium cycle with fuel recycling ranges from 13% to 52% as compared with the usual uranium once-through cycle; the SWU savings goes from 13% to 22%. (Author) [pt

  2. Relative merits of travelling-wave and resonant operation of linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoffstall, D.R.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of the relative merits of so-called standing wave vis-a-vis travelling wave operation of linear accelerator waveguides is complicated by various considerations. In the first instance, standing wave should be distinguished from resonant operation. Standing wave operation is exactly the same as travelling wave, excepting that the waveguide is terminated by a total reflection of power instead of a matched load. In resonant operation a length of slow wave structure is terminated, theoretically at reflection planes of symmetry; the discrete modes of resonance consist of two oppositely directed travelling wave ensembles, one of which will provide a space harmonic of an intended phase velocity

  3. Design of the control room of the N4-type PWR: main features and feedback operating experience; La salle de commande du palier N4: principales caracteristiques et retour d'experience d'exploitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouton, J.M.; Guillas, J.; Nougaret, Ch. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN/CAPE), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2004-07-01

    This article presents the design, specificities and innovating features of the control room of the N4-type PWR. A brief description of control rooms of previous 900 MW and 1300 MW -type PWR allows us to assess the change. The design of the first control room dates back to 1972, at that time 2 considerations were taken into account: first the design has to be similar to that of control rooms for thermal plants because plant operators were satisfied with it and secondly the normal operating situation has to be privileged to the prejudice of accidental situations just as it was in a thermal plant. The turning point was the TMI accident that showed the weight of human factor in accidental situations in terms of pilot team, training, procedures and the ergonomics of the work station. The impact of TMI can be seen in the design of 1300 MW-type PWR. In the beginning of the eighties EDF decided to launch a study for a complete overhaul of the control room concept, the aim was to continue reducing the human factor risk and to provide a better quality of piloting the plant in any situation. The result is the control room of the N4-type PWR. Today the cumulated feedback experience of N4 control rooms represents more than 20 years over a wide range of situations from normal to incidental, a survey shows that the N4 design has fulfilled its aims. (A.C.)

  4. PWR systems transient analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, M.F.; Peeler, G.B.; Abramson, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of transients in pressurized water reactor (PWR) systems involves the assessment of the response of the total plant, including primary and secondary coolant systems, steam piping and turbine (possibly including the complete feedwater train), and various control and safety systems. Transient analysis is performed as part of the plant safety analysis to insure the adequacy of the reactor design and operating procedures and to verify the applicable plant emergency guidelines. Event sequences which must be examined are developed by considering possible failures or maloperations of plant components. These vary in severity (and calculational difficulty) from a series of normal operational transients, such as minor load changes, reactor trips, valve and pump malfunctions, up to the double-ended guillotine rupture of a primary reactor coolant system pipe known as a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA). The focus of this paper is the analysis of all those transients and accidents except loss of coolant accidents

  5. Safety considerations of PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.H. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The safety of the central station pressurized water reactor is well established and substantiated by its excellent operating record. Operating data from 55 reactors of this type have established a record of safe operating history unparalleled by any modern large scale industry. The 186 plants under construction require a continuing commitment to maintain this outstanding record. The safety of the PWR has been further verified by the recently completed Reactor Safety Study (''Rasmussen'' Report). Not only has this study confirmed the exceptionally low risk associated with PWR operation, it has also introduced a valuable new tool in the decision making process. PWR designs, utilizing the philosophy of defense in depth, provide the bases for evaluating margins of safety. The design of the reactor coolant system, the containment system, emergency core cooling system and other related systems and components provide substantial margins of safety under both normal and postulated accident conditions even considering simultaneous effects of earthquakes and other environmental phenomena. Margins of safety in the assessment of various postulated accident conditions, with emphasis on the postulated loss of reactor coolant accident (LOCA), have been evaluated in depth as exemplified by the comprehensive ECCS rulemaking hearings followed by imposition of very conservative Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. When evaluated on an engineering best estimate approach, the significant margins to safety for a LOCA become more apparent. Extensive test programs have also substantiated margins to safety limits. These programs have included both separate effects and systems tests. Component testing has also been performed to substantiate performance levels under adverse combinations of environmental stress. The importance of utilizing past experience and of optimizing the deployment of incremental resources is self evident. Recent safety concerns have included specific areas such

  6. Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Coolant Concentration on Sub-Cooled Boiling and Crud Deposition on Reactor Cladding at Prototypical PWR Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultis, J., Kenneth; Fenton, Donald, L.

    2006-10-20

    Increasing demand for energy necessitates nuclear power units to increase power limits. This implies significant changes in the design of the core of the nuclear power units, therefore providing better performance and safety in operations. A major hindrance to the increase of nuclear reactor performance especially in Pressurized Deionized water Reactors (PWR) is Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA)--the unexpected change in the core axial power distribution during operation from the predicted distribution. This problem is thought to be occur because of precipitation and deposition of lithiated compounds like boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) and lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) on the fuel rod cladding. Deposited boron absorbs neutrons thereby affecting the total power distribution inside the reactor. AOA is thought to occur when there is sufficient build-up of crud deposits on the cladding during subcooled nucleate boiling. Predicting AOA is difficult as there is very little information regarding the heat and mass transfer during subcooled nucleate boiling. An experimental investigation was conducted to study the heat transfer characteristics during subcooled nucleate boiling at prototypical PWR conditions. Pool boiling tests were conducted with varying concentrations of lithium metaborate (LiBO{sub 2}) and boric acid (H{sub 2}BO{sub 3}) solutions in deionized water. The experimental data collected includes the effect of coolant concentration, subcooling, system pressure and heat flux on pool the boiling heat transfer coefficient. The analysis of particulate deposits formed on the fuel cladding surface during subcooled nucleate boiling was also performed. The results indicate that the pool boiling heat transfer coefficient degrades in the presence of boric acid and lithium metaborate compared to pure deionized water due to lesser nucleation. The pool boiling heat transfer coefficients decreased by about 24% for 5000 ppm concentrated boric acid solution and by 27% for 5000 ppm

  7. Implementation of ICRP recommendation in nuclear fuel cycle operations: challenges and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    The operating experience with regard to occupational exposure and environmental releases in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities are described. The achievements of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in adhering to the revised radiological protection standards are highlighted, with particular reference to Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). The downward trend of occupational and public doses due to nuclear power plant operation is emphasised. Some of the important radiologically significant jobs executed at NPPs are listed. With the vast experiences in the field of radiological protection, vis-a-vis stringent regulatory requirements, and design modifications envisaged in future facilities the radiological impact, both in the occupational and public domain is bound to be minimum. (author)

  8. Maturity of the PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.; Rapin, M.; Aboudarham, L.; Bitsch, D.

    1983-03-01

    Figures illustrating the predominant position of the PWR system are presented. The question is whether on the basis of these figures the PWR can be considered to have reached maturity. The following analysis, based on the French program experience, is an attempt to pinpoint those areas in which industrial maturity of the PWR has been attained, and in which areas a certain evolution can still be expected to take place

  9. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  10. Steam generators in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1974-01-01

    The steam generator of the PWR operates according to the principle of natural circulation. It consists of a U-shaped tube bundle whose free ends are welded to a bottom plate. The tube bundle is surrounded by a cylinder jacket which has slots closely above the bottom or tube plate. The feed water mixed with boiling water enters the tube bundle through these slots. Because of its buoyancy, the steam-water mixture flows upwards. Below the tube plate there are chambers for distributing and collecting pressurized water separated by means of a partition wall. By omitting some tubes, a free alloy is created so that the tubes in the center get sufficient water, too. By asymmetrical arrangement of the partition wall it is further possible to limit the tube alloy only to the inlet side for pressurized water. The flow over the tube plate is thus improved on the inlet side. (DG) [de

  11. Results and insights of a level-1 internal event PRA of a PWR during mid-loop operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M.; Holmes, B.; Su, R.F.; Dang, V.; Siu, N.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Lin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analysis that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by BNL and SNL. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. The objective of this paper is to present the approach utilized in the level-1 PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A comparison of the results with those of other shutdown studies is provided. Relevant safety issues such as plant and hardware configurations, operator training, and instrumentation and control is discussed

  12. A prototype expert system for fault analysis, alarm handling and operator advising in a PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondran, M.; Ancelin, J.; Hery, J.F.; Laleuf, J.C.; Legaud, P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper successively describes the methodological advantages of the expert-systems approach and then two major applications of it that are under development in Electricite de France: assistance in alarms and operational management, and computer-assisted reliability. Topics considered include man-machine systems, human factors engineering, reactor operation, artificial intelligence, and decision making

  13. Results and insights of a level-1 internal event PRA of a PWR during mid-loop operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analysis that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. The objective of this paper is to present the approach utilized in the level-1 PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A comparison of the results with those of other shutdown studies is provided. Relevant safety issues such as plant and hardware configurations, operator training, and instrumentation and control is discussed

  14. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  15. Comprehensive exergetic and economic comparison of PWR and hybrid fossil fuel-PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayyaadi, Hoseyn; Sabzaligol, Tooraj

    2010-01-01

    A typical 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant and two similar hybrid 1000 MW PWR plants operate with natural gas and coal fired fossil fuel superheater-economizers (Hybrid PWR-Fossil fuel plants) are compared exergetically and economically. Comparison is performed based on energetic and economic features of three systems. In order to compare system at their optimum operating point, three workable base case systems including the conventional PWR, and gas and coal fired hybrid PWR-Fossil fuel power plants considered and optimized in exergetic and exergoeconomic optimization scenarios, separately. The thermodynamic modeling of three systems is performed based on energy and exergy analyses, while an economic model is developed according to the exergoeconomic analysis and Total Revenue Requirement (TRR) method. The objective functions based on exergetic and exergoeconomic analyses are developed. The exergetic and exergoeconomic optimizations are performed using the Genetic Algorithm (GA). Energetic and economic features of exergetic and exergoeconomic optimized conventional PWR and gas and coal fired Hybrid PWR-Fossil fuel power plants are compared and discussed comprehensively.

  16. Buckling resistance calculation of Guide Thimbles for the mechanical design of fuel assembly type PWR under normal reactor operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, C.B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The calculations demonstrate the fulfillment of one of the mechanical design criteria for the Fuel Assembly Structure under normal reactor operating conditions. The calculations of stresses in the Guide Thimbles are performed with the aid of the program ANSYS. This paper contains program parameters and modelling of a typical Fuel Assembly for a Reactor similar to ANGRA II. (author)

  17. Development of a feed-and-bleed operation strategy with hybrid-SIT under low pressure condition of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, In Seop, E-mail: jeoni@rpi.edu [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States); Han, Sang Hoon, E-mail: shhan2@kaeri.re.kr [Advanced Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 70 Daedeok-daero 989 Beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sang Hee, E-mail: sanghee.kang@khnp.co.kr [NSSS Design Group, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Central Research Institute, 70, 1312-beongil, Yuseongdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook, E-mail: hyungook@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The novel F&B operation strategy with H-SIT and LPSI is developed. • The effectiveness of the H-SITs is verified using thermo-hydraulic simulations. • Success criteria considered for the new F&B operation strategy is identified. • A PSA model of APR+ reflecting the new F&B strategy with H-SIT is developed. • A risk analysis of the proposed F&B operation strategy is performed. - Abstract: While safety functions in current nuclear power plants are mainly provided by active safety systems, recently passive safety systems are being combined with the active systems to strengthen accident mitigation capability and therefore enhance overall plant safety. To this end, securing long-term cooling of the core is of particular importance. This study considers the hybrid safety injection tank (H-SIT), a passive injection system, as a target component to develop a long-term cooling strategy using active and passive systems concurrently. In the feed-and-bleed (F&B) operation, one of the important long-term cooling strategies to maintain core safety in pressurized water reactors, low pressure safety injection (LPSI) pumps are typically considered inoperable as depressurization is first required, which leads to core dry-out before reaching LPSI operable pressure. This study investigates whether H-SITs, with the important design feature of passive coolant injection under any pressure condition of the primary coolant system, can make up the core during depressurization thereby allowing LPSI pumps to be used in F&B operation as an additional means of long-term cooling. The effectiveness of the H-SITs is verified using thermal-hydraulic simulations, and based on the results a novel F&B operation strategy with H-SITs and LPSI pumps is developed. A probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) model is then developed in order to assess the risk effect of the suggested strategy. PSA results demonstrate that the proposed strategy lowers core damage frequency in the target

  18. French PWR Safety Philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    The first 900 MWe units, built under the American Westinghouse licence and with reference to the U. S. regulation, were followed by 28 standardized units, C P1 and C P2 series. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from starting and operating experience of French nuclear power plants, completed by the experience learned from the operation of foreign reactors, has contributed to the improvement of French PWR design and safety philosophy. As early as 1976, this experience was taken into account by French Safety organisms to discuss, with Electricite de France, the safety options for the planned 1300 MWe units, P4 and P4 series. In 1983, the new reactor scheduled, Ni4 series 1400 MWe, is a totally French design which satisfies the French regulations and other French standards and codes. Based on a deterministic approach, the French safety analysis was progressively completed by a probabilistic approach each of them having possibilities and limits. Increasing knowledge and lessons learned from operating experience have contributed to the French safety philosophy improvement. The methodology now applied to safety evaluation develops a new facet of the in depth defense concept by taking highly unlikely events into consideration, by developing the search of safety consistency of the design, and by completing the deterministic approach by the probabilistic one

  19. Impact of UO{sub 2} Enrichment of Fuel Zoning Rods in Long Cycle Operation of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ho Cheol; Lee, Deokjung [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Eun; Choe, Jiwon [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Extending the cycle length can not only increase the energy production, but also bring down outage costs by reducing the number of refueling outages during the lifetime of a nuclear power plant. It is reasonable that more fresh fuels are loaded for long cycle operation. However, minimizing the number of fresh fuels is essential in aspect of fuel economics. This can cause high power peaking near the water holes, due to increased thermalization of neutrons in those regions. To prevent this, special fuel zoning rods are used and surround the water holes. These rods use lower-enriched uranium (they have an enrichment rate lower than the other fuel rods). If we adjust the enrichment rate of fuel zoning rods, we can reduce power peaking and moreover increase cycle length. In this paper, we designed a core suitable for long cycle operation and we conducted sensitivity tests of fuel cycle length on UO2 enrichment rate in fuel zoning region in order to extend the cycle length while using the same number of fresh fuels. The correlations between the fuel zoning enrichment and cycle length, peaking factor, CBC and shutdown margin were analyzed. The more the enrichment rate in fuel zoning region increases, the more the fuel cycle length increases. At the same time, CBC, Fq and shutdown margin do not change significantly. Increasing the fuel zoning enrichment rate presents the right property of increasing the fuel cycle length without causing a large change to CBC, Fq and shutdown margin. In conclusion, by increasing the uranium enrichment rate in fuel zoning region, fuel cycle length can be increased and the safety margins can be maintained for long cycle operation of cores.

  20. ABB advanced BWR and PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkrans, S.; Helmersson, S.; Andersson, S.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel designed and fabricated by ABB is now operating in 40 PWRs and BWRs in Europe, the United States and Korea. An excellent fuel reliability track record has been established. High burnups are proven for both BWR and PWR. Thermal margin improving features and advanced burnable absorber concepts enable the utilities to adopt demanding duty cycles to meet new economic objectives. In particular we note the excellent reliability record of ABB PWR fuel equipped with Guardian TM debris filter, proven to meet the -6 rod-cycles fuel failure goal, and the out-standing operating record of the SVEA 10x10 BWR fuel, where ABB is the only vendor to date with multi batch experience to high burnup. ABB is dedicated to maintain high fuel reliability as well as continually improve and develop a broad line of BWR and PWR products. ABB's development and fuel follow-up activities are performed in close co-operation with its customers. (orig.)

  1. Experience feedback examination in PWR type reactors operating for the 1997-1999 period; Examen du retour d'experience en exploitation des reacteurs a eau sous pression pour la periode 1997-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The present report is relative to the examination that the permanent group has made on the experience feedback in operation for PWR type reactors for the period 1997-1999 that was on eleven themes chosen by the Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Authority. It used analysis reports made by I.R.S.N. in support of four meetings of the permanent group devoted to this examination from April 2001 to June 2002. The different themes were operating uncertainties, machining to vibrations, analysis of incidents and gaseous releases, circuits, human factors, behaviour of electric batteries, risk of cold source loss. (N.C.)

  2. Highlights of the French program on PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pages, J P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires

    1997-12-01

    The presentation reviews the French programme on PWR fuel including the overall results of the year 1996 for nuclear operation; fuel management and economy; French nuclear electricity generation sites; production of nuclear generated electricity; energy availability of the 900 and 1,300 Mw PWR units; average radioactive liquid releases excluding tritium per unit; plutonium recycling experience.

  3. Assessment of subcriticality during PWR-type reactor refueling; Evaluation de la sous-criticite lors des operations de chargement d'un reacteur nucleaire REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdier, A

    2005-04-15

    During the core loading period of a PWR, any fuel assembly misplacements may significantly reduce the existing criticality margin. The Dampierre 4-18 event showed the present monitoring based on the variations of the outside-core detector counting rate cannot detect such misplacements. In order to circumvent that, a more detailed analysis of the available signal was done. We particularly focused on the neutronic noise analysis methods such as MSM (modified source multiplication), MSA (amplified source multiplication), Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman-{alpha} methods. The experimental part of our work was dedicated to the application of those methods to a research reactor. Finally, our results showed that those methods cannot be used with the present PWR instrumentation. Various detector positions were then studied using Monte Carlo calculations capable of following the neutron origin. Our results showed that the present technology does not allow us to use any solution based on neutron detection for monitoring core loading. (author)

  4. Operation of a direct current transformer used as a 'flux pump'; Fonctionnement du transformateur a courant continu utilise en 'pompe a flux'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschanels, J L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The author derives the equations governing the operation of a flux pump with a superconducting transformer. He shows that these exists a limiting value of the current in the charge coil and that the limit is independent of this coil. (author) [French] L'auteur etablit les equations de fonctionnement d'une pompe a flux a transformateur supraconducteur, il montre l'existence d'une limite, du courant dans la self de charge et l'independance de cette limite vis-a-vis de cette self. (auteur)

  5. Improvement of PWR reliability by corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    Since first PWR in Japan started commercial operation in 1970, we have encountered the various modes of corrosion on primary and secondary side components. We have paid much efforts for resolving these corrosion problems, that is, investigating the causes of corrosion and establishing the countermeasures for these corrosion. We summarize these efforts in this article. (author)

  6. Status of developing advanced PWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Yotaro

    1982-01-01

    During past eleven years since the first PWR power plant, Mihama Unit 1 of Kansai Electric Power Co., started the commercial operation in 1970, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has endeavored to improve PWR technologies on the basis of the advice from electric power companies and the technical information to overcome difficulties in PWR power plants. Now, the main objective is to improve the overall plant performance, and the rate of operation of Japanese PWR power plants has significantly risen. The improvement of the reliability, the shortening of regular inspection period and the reduction of radioactive waste handling were attempted. In view of the satisfactory operational experience of Westinghouse type PWRs, the basic reactor concept has not been changed so far. Mitsubishi and Westinghouse reached basic agreement in August, 1981, to develop a spectral shift type large capacity reactor as the advanced PWRs for Japan. This type of PWRs hab higher degree of freedom for extended fuel cycle operation and enhances the advantage of entire fuel cycle economy, particularly the significant reduction of uranium use. The improved neutron economy is attainable by reducing neutron loss, and the core design with low power density and the economical use of plutonium are advantageous for the fuel cycle economy. (Kako, I.)

  7. Conceptual design of simplified PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Hiroaki

    1996-01-01

    The limited availability for location of nuclear power plant in Japan makes plants with higher power ratings more desirable. Having no intention of constructing medium-sized plants as a next generation standard plant, Japanese utilities are interested in applying passive technologies to large ones. So, Japanese utilities have studied large passive plants based on AP600 and SBWR as alternative future LWRs. In a joint effort to develop a new generation nuclear power plant which is more friendly to operator and maintenance personnel and is economically competitive with alternative sources of power generation, JAPC and Japanese Utilities started the study to modify AP600 and SBWR, in order to accommodate the Japanese requirements. During a six year program up to 1994, basic concepts for 1000 MWe class Simplified PWR (SPWR) and Simplified BWR (SBWR) were developed, though there still remain several areas to be improved. These studies have now stepped into the phase of reducing construction cost and searching for maximum power rating that can be attained by reasonably practical technology. These results also suggest that it is hopeful to develop a large 3-loop passive plant (∼1200 MWe). Since Korea mainly deals with PWR, this paper summarizes SPWR study. The SPWR is jointly studied by JAPC, Japanese PWR Utilities, EdF, WH and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry. Using the AP-600 reference design as a basis, we enlarged the plant size to 3-loops and added engineering features to conform with Japanese practice and Utilities' preference. The SPWR program definitively confirmed the feasibility of a passive plant with an NSSS rating about 1000 MWe and 3 loops. (J.P.N.)

  8. Clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter vis a vis non-Acinetobacter infections in an Indian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyendu Asim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acinetobacter infections are a major nosocomial infection causing epidemics of infection in the Intensive Care Units (ICU. Aims: This study estimates the clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter infections and compares them with those of non-Acinetobacter bacterial infections. Settings and Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study carried out for 6 months in the medicine ICU of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided in two groups, one group with Acinetobacter infections and the other with non-Acinetobacter infections. The data was collected for infection, length of stay (LOS, mortality and cost along with patient demographics from the hospital records for analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 15.0. The LOS and cost of treatment (COT for the two groups were compared using the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 220 patients were studied out of which 91 had Acinetobacter infections. The median LOS was 20 days in Group-A and 12 days in Group-B (P < 0.0001. The median COT was INR 125,862 in Group-A and INR 68,228 in the Group-B (P < 0.0001. Mortality in Group-A and Group-B was 32.97 and 32.56 (P = 0.949 respectively. Conclusion: The burden of Acinetobacter infections in ICUs is increasing with the increase in LOS and COT for the patients. The infection control team has to play a major role in reducing the rate of nosocomial infections.

  9. Global end-diastolic volume an emerging preload marker vis-a-vis other markers - Have we reached our goal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Kapoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable estimation of cardiac preload is helpful in the management of severe circulatory dysfunction. The estimation of cardiac preload has evolved from nuclear angiography, pulmonary artery catheterization to echocardiography, and transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD. Global end-diastolic volume (GEDV is the combined end-diastolic volumes of all the four cardiac chambers. GEDV has been demonstrated to be a reliable preload marker in comparison with traditionally used pulmonary artery catheter-derived pressure preload parameters. Recently, a new TPTD system called EV1000™ has been developed and introduced into the expanding field of advanced hemodynamic monitoring. GEDV has emerged as a better preload marker than its previous conventional counterparts. The advantage of it being measured by minimum invasive methods such as PiCCO™ and newly developed EV1000™ system makes it a promising bedside advanced hemodynamic parameter.

  10. Reassessment of Business Courses in Foreign Languages: The European Union vis-a-vis Its Individual Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schmidt, Wolff

    The need for advanced (fourth-year) college business courses taught in foreign languages by foreign language teachers, and the design of such courses, are discussed. It is proposed that such courses be offered more often, generally in French, German, and Spanish and preferably over two semesters or three quarters, with a minimum of 3 contact hours…

  11. Spirituality vis-a-vis Islam as prerequisite to Arab American well being: the implications of Eurocentrism for mainstream psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ronald E; Breland-Noble, Alfiee

    2011-01-01

    Due to the historical preponderance of racial and/or intellectual homogeneity in the field of psychology, Eurocentrism set the "gold standard" for its method of intervention. As such, it might be argued that psychology remains a bastion of Eurocentric thought despite the globalization of knowledge and the influx of racially and ethnically diverse scientists into the research endeavor. At the same time and the significant increase in the immigrant Arab population, Arab Americans remain a less familiar component of society. Among the various Arab populations, spirituality through Islam is fundamental. Thus, psychologists would be remiss to exclude a critical aspect of Arab American life from intervention when it is essential to well-being.

  12. Assessing thermochromatography as a separation method for nuclear forensics. Current capability vis-a-vis forensic requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.E.; Garrison, J.R.; Hall, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear forensic science has become increasingly important for global nuclear security. However, many current laboratory analysis techniques are based on methods developed without the imperative for timely analysis that underlies the post-detonation forensics mission requirements. Current analysis of actinides, fission products, and fuel-specific materials requires time-consuming chemical separation coupled with nuclear counting or mass spectrometry. High-temperature gas-phase separations have been used in the past for the rapid separation of newly created elements/isotopes and as a basis for chemical classification of that element. We are assessing the utility of this method for rapid separation in the gas-phase to accelerate the separations of radioisotopes germane to post-detonation nuclear forensic investigations. The existing state of the art for thermo chromatographic separations, and its applicability to nuclear forensics, will be reviewed. (author)

  13. Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: Indirect neutrino signals vis-a-vis direct detection recoil rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct-detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particles. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velocity dispersion of dark matter particles, we show that the uncertainty on the relative strength of the neutrino and direct-detection signal is as large as a factor of 2 for typical values of the parameters, but can be even larger in some circumstances.

  14. INAA of trace elements in Indian vegetarian diet and its adequacy vis-a-vis Recommended Dietary Allowances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.; Garg, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    There has been an increasing awareness concerning the adequacy of trace elements in diet as their deficiency or excess may cause abnormal changes in the biochemical processes. Typical Indian vegetarian diet and dietary components such as cereals, grains, pulses, vegetables and spices have been analysed for 19 elements (Br, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mn, Mo, Na, P, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sr, Th and Zn) by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Several Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) were analysed for quality assurance. Based on the elemental contents, the daily dietary intake has been calculated and the data compared with those from other countries, Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) and permissible body burden. It has been observed that, although vegetarian, the Indian diet has an adequate content of essential trace elements compared to non-vegetarian oriental (Japan and Taiwan) and western (Germany, Denmark and USA) diets. (author)

  15. Heterozygosity and Fixation Index for ABO Gene in Barak Valley Populations vis-a-vis a Few Exotic Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In a genetic study of 26 human populations including 2 major endogamous populations (Hindus and Muslims of Barak Valley in Assam and 24 exotic populations, observed heterozygosity (Ho, fixation index (F and Panmictic index (P for ABO gene were estimated from gene frequency data to reveal the extent of inbreeding that has taken place in each population during evolution. Observed heterozygosity, a measure of genetic variation, ranged from 0.3254 to 0.6086 in these populations. Expected Hardy-Weinberg heterozygosity of ABO gene was estimated as 0.6666 assuming the occurrence of all the three alleles in equal frequency. Fixation index was the highest in the population of Sudan (51.18% followed by Australia (48.51% and Iceland (38.28% indicating the occurrence of high inbreeding and the presence of more homozygosity in these populations during evolution. But the fixation index was the lowest in the population of South China (8.70% followed by Central Asia (11.82% and Russia (12.96%. It suggested the occurrence of low inbreeding and hence more outbreeding in these populations resulting in the existence of more heterozygosity (high genetic variation in these populations. Panmictic index, a measure of outbreeding, is the opposite of fixation index and it varied from 48.82 (Sudan to 91.30% (South China. The population showing the highest fixation index recorded the lowest panmictic index and vice-versa. In evolutionary context, outbreeding in human populations would be more desirable to reduce the incidence of genetic diseases caused by recessive genes and to enhance heterozygosity for those loci for better adaptation of future generations, possibly at the cost of gradually increasing genetic load in the population.

  16. Onset of local ordering in some copper-based alloys: critical solute concentration vis-a-vis various solutionhardening parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Muhammad Zakria; Noshi, Mozina; Bashir, Farooq

    2008-12-01

    The mode of planar distribution of solute atoms in Cu single crystals alloyed with 0.5 to 8.0 at.%Ge has been investigated via the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress of these alloys. It is found that there exists a critical solute concentration c m ≈ 5 at.%Ge below which the distribution of solute atoms in the crystal is random, and above which some local ordering occurs. This together with such data available in the literature for Cu-Zn, Cu-Al and Cu-Mn alloys, i.e. c m ≈7 at. %Zn, 7 at.%Al and 1 at.%Mn, when examined as a function of the size-misfit factor δ = (1/ b)(d b/d c)of a given binary alloy system, shows that the value of c m strongly depends on δ; the smaller the magnitude of δ, the greater the value of c m and vice versa. Also, the value of c m is found to correlate well with the electron-to-atom ratio ( e/a)of the Cu-Zn, Cu-Al, Cu-Ge and Cu-Mn alloys with the solute concentration c = c m . However, no systematic correlation exists between the critical solute concentration c m for the onset of local ordering and the modulus-mismatch parameter η = (1/ G)(d G/d c).

  17. What Perspectives for Crisis Resolution? Which European Diplomacy vis-a-vis Iran's Nuclear Ambitions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovici, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The conduct of European diplomacy on the Iranian dossier raises many geopolitical issues. What are the strategic possibilities for the European Union? Its credibility is at stake and it must now demonstrate that its alternative approach is more efficient than American policy, which seeks to use the Iranian nuclear dispute as an element of struggle against the Iranian regime. However, the multiplicity of decision-making structures of the EU foreign policy make more complex its action and the implementation of its policies, that are articulated between diplomatic efforts and threats of sanctions. Where the United States has chosen containment, the EU chooses the commitment and sees the return to dialogue and stabilization possible

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on chickpea seeds vis-a-vis total seed storage proteins, antioxidant activity and protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagyawant, S S; Gupta, N; Shrivastava, N

    2015-10-23

    The present work describes radiation—induced effects on seed composition vis—à—vis total seed proteins, antioxidant levels and protein profiling employing two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D—GE) in kabuli and desi chickpea varities. Seeds were exposed to the radiation doses of 1,2,3,4 and 5 kGy. The total protein concentrations decreased and antioxidant levels were increased with increasing dose compared to control seed samples. Radiation induced effects were dose dependent to these seed parameters while it showed tolerance to 1 kGy dose. Increase in the dose was complimented with increase in antioxidant levels, like 5 kGy enhanced % scavenging activities in all the seed extracts. Precisely, the investigations reflected that the dose range from 2 to 5 kGy was effective for total seed storage proteins, as depicted quantitatively and qualitative 2D—GE means enhance antioxidant activities in vitro.

  19. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  20. Establishing operational stability--developing human infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Max A; Byers, Ernest J; Stingley, Preston; Sheridan, Robert M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2010-12-01

    Over the past year, Toyota has come under harsh scrutiny as a result of several recalls. These well publicized mishaps have not only done damage to Toyota's otherwise sterling reputation for quality but have also called into question the assertions from a phalanx of followers that Toyota's production system (generically referred to as TPS or Lean) is the best method by which to structure one's systems of operation. In this article, we discuss how Toyota, faced with the pressure to grow its business, did not appropriately cadence this growth with the continued development and maintenance of the process capabilities (vis a vis the development of human infrastructure) needed to adequately support that growth. We draw parallels between the pressure Toyota faced to grow its business and the pressure neurointerventional practices face to grow theirs, and offer a methodology to support that growth without sacrificing quality.

  1. The verification of PWR-fuel code for PWR in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian Pinem; Tagor M Sembiring; Tukiran

    2015-01-01

    In-core fuel management for PWR is not easy because of the number of fuel assemblies in the core as much as 192 assemblies so many possibilities for placement of the fuel in the core. Configuration of fuel assemblies in the core must be precise and accurate so that the reactor operates safely and economically. It is necessary for verification of PWR-FUEL code that will be used in-core fuel management for PWR. PWR-FUEL code based on neutron transport theory and solved with the approach of multi-dimensional nodal diffusion method many groups and diffusion finite difference method (FDM). The goal is to check whether the program works fine, especially for the design and in-core fuel management for PWR. Verification is done with equilibrium core search model at three conditions that boron free, 1000 ppm boron concentration and critical boron concentration. The result of the average burn up fuel assemblies distribution and power distribution at BOC and EOC showed a consistent trend where the fuel with high power at BOC will produce a high burn up in the EOC. On the core without boron is obtained a high multiplication factor because absence of boron in the core and the effect of fission products on the core around 3.8 %. Reactivity effect at 1000 ppm boron solution of BOC and EOC is 6.44 % and 1.703 % respectively. Distribution neutron flux and power density using NODAL and FDM methods have the same result. The results show that the verification PWR-FUEL code work properly, especially for core design and in-core fuel management for PWR. (author)

  2. Metallurgical examinations update of baffle bolts removed from operating French PWR. Microstructural investigations of a baffle to former bolt located on a high level of the internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait, C.; Fargeas, E.; Miloudi, S.; Moulart, P.; Tommy-Martin, M.; Monteil, N.; Pokor, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the microstructural investigations conducted on a cracked baffle to former bolt extracted from an upper former level of the internal structures of a French Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Extensive microstructural investigations using Light Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) have been conducted to understand the degradation mechanisms of this bolt. TEM investigations have revealed neutron irradiation damage in the microstructure of the bolt such as Frank loops and cavities and/or bubbles. The number of features per unit volume as a function of diameter was determined in the head and in the shank of the bolt. The obtained results are relatively similar to those obtained for other damaged bolts extracted from PWR-type reactors and irradiated in similar conditions (dose and temperature). The irradiation damage has induced an evolution of the mechanical properties (hardening of the material), as revealed by the hardness measurements along the bolt, with a higher average value in the head (400 HV), compared to the shank (15 mm under the head), about 340 HV. The metallurgical investigations have confirmed that this bolt was damaged by Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC)

  3. PWR standardization: The French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    After a short historical review of the French PWR programme with 45000 MWe in operation and 15000 MWe under construction, the paper first develops the objectives and limits of the standardizatoin policy. Implementation of standardization is described through successive reactor series and feedback of experience, together with its impact on safety and on codes and standards. Present benefits of standardization range from low engineering costs to low backfitting costs, via higher quality, reduction in construction times and start-up schedules and improved training of operators. The future of the French programme into the 1990's is again with an advanced standardized series, the N4-1400 MW plant. There is no doubt that the very positive experience with standardization is relevant to any country trying to achieve self-reliance in the nuclear power field. (author)

  4. PWR fuel behavior: lessons learned from LOFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the experience with the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) fuel during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), operational and overpower transient tests and steady-state operation is presented. LOFT provides unique capabilities for obtaining pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel behavior information because it features the representative thermal-hydraulic conditions which control fuel behavior during transient conditions and an elaborate measurement system to record the history of the fuel behavior

  5. EDF/CIDEN - ONECTRA: PWR decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, P.; Orcel, H.; Wertz, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the context of PWR circuit renewal (expected in 2011) and their decontamination, an analysis of data coming from cartography and on site decontamination measurements as well as from premise modelling by means of the PANTHERE radioprotection code, is presented. Several French PWRs have been studied. After a presentation of code principles and operation, the authors discuss the radiological context of a workstation, and give an assessment of the annual dose associated with maintenance operations with or without decontamination

  6. RSK-guidelines for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The RSK guidelines for PWA reactors of April 24, 1974, have been revised and amended in this edition. The RSK presents a summary of safety requirements to be observed in the design, construction, and operation of PWR reactors in the form of guidelines. From January 1979 onwards these guidelines will be the basis of siting and safety considerations for new PWR reactors, and newly built nuclear power plants will have to form these guidelines. They are not binding for existing nuclear power plants under construction or in operation. It will be a matter of individual discussion whether or not the guidelines will be applied in these plants. The main purpose of the guidelines is to facilitate discussion among RSK members and to give early information on necessary safety requirements. If the guidelines are observed by producers and operators, the RSK will make statements on individual projects at short notice. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Minor actinide transmutation on PWR burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Wenchao; Liu, Bin; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Tu, Jing; Liu, Fang; Huang, Liming; Fu, Juan; Meng, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Key issues associated with MA transmutation are the appropriate loading pattern. • Commercial PWRs are the only choice to transmute MAs in large scale currently. • Considerable amount of MA can be loaded to PWR without disturbing k eff markedly. • Loading MA to PWR burnable poison rods for transmutation is an optimal loading pattern. - Abstract: Minor actinides are the primary contributors to long term radiotoxicity in spent fuel. The majority of commercial reactors in operation in the world are PWRs, so to study the minor actinide transmutation characteristics in the PWRs and ultimately realize the successful minor actinide transmutation in PWRs are crucial problem in the area of the nuclear waste disposal. The key issues associated with the minor actinide transmutation are the appropriate loading patterns when introducing minor actinides to the PWR core. We study two different minor actinide transmutation materials loading patterns on the PWR burnable poison rods, one is to coat a thin layer of minor actinide in the water gap between the zircaloy cladding and the stainless steel which is filled with water, another one is that minor actinides substitute for burnable poison directly within burnable poison rods. Simulation calculation indicates that the two loading patterns can load approximately equivalent to 5–6 PWR annual minor actinide yields without disturbing the PWR k eff markedly. The PWR k eff can return criticality again by slightly reducing the boric acid concentration in the coolant of PWR or removing some burnable poison rods without coating the minor actinide transmutation materials from PWR core. In other words, loading minor actinide transmutation material to PWR does not consume extra neutron, minor actinide just consumes the neutrons which absorbed by the removed control poisons. Both minor actinide loading patterns are technically feasible; most importantly do not need to modify the configuration of the PWR core and

  8. Scaling studies - PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonneck, G.

    1983-05-01

    A RELAP 4/MOD 6 study was made based on the blowdown phase of the intermediate break experiment LOFT L5-1. The method was to set up a base model and to vary parametrically some areas where it is known or suspected that LOFT differs from a commercial PWR. The aim was not to simulate LOFT or a PWR exactly but to understand the influence of the following parameters on the thermohydraulic behaviour of the system and the clad temperature: stored heat in the downcomer (LOFT has rather large filler blocks in this part of the pressure vessel); bypass between downcomer and upper plenum; and core length. The results show that LOFT is prototypical for all calculated blowdowns. As the clad temperatures decrease with decreasing stored energy in the downcomer, increased bypass and increased core length, LOFT results seem to be realistic as long as realistic bypass sizes are considered; they are conservative in the two other areas. (author)

  9. Plutonium recycling in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youinou, G.; Girieud, R.; Guigon, B.

    2000-01-01

    Two concepts of 100% MOX PWR cores are presented. They are designed such as to minimize the consequences of the introduction of Pu on the core control. The first one has a high moderation ratio and the second one utilizes an enriched uranium support. The important design parameters as well as their capabilities to multi recycle Pu are discussed. We conclude with the potential interest of the two concepts. (author)

  10. AGR v PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1986-01-01

    When the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) invited tenders and placed a contract for the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) at Dungeness B in 1965 -preferring it to the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) -the AGR was lamentably ill developed. The effects of the decision were widely felt, for it took the British nuclear industry off the light water reactor highway of world reactor business and up and idiosyncratic private highway of its own, excluding it altogether from any material export business in the two decades which followed. Yet although the UK may have made wrong decisions in rejecting the PWR in 1965, that does not mean that it can necessarily now either correct them, or redeem their consequence, by reversing the choice in 1985. In the 20 years since 1965 the whole world economic and energy picture has been transformed and the national picture with it. Picking up the PWR now could prove as big a disaster as rejecting it may have been in 1965. (author)

  11. PWR thermocouple mechanical sealing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qiuping; He Youguang

    1991-08-01

    The PWR in-core temperature detection device, which is one of measures to insure reactor safety operation, is to monitor and diagnose reactor thermal power output and in-core power distribution. The temperature detection device system uses thermocouples as measuring elements with stainless steel protecting sleeves. The thermocouple has a limited service time and should be replaced after its service time has reached. A new sealing device for the thermocouples of reactor in-core temperature detection system has been developed to facilitate replacement. The structure is complete tight under high temperature and pressure without any leakage and seepage, and easy to be assembled or disassembled in radioactive environment. The device is designed to make it possible to replace the thermocouple one by one if necessary. This is a new, simple and practical structure

  12. Upgrading of PWR plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Tomonori; Sasaki, Kazunori; Nakaishi, Hirokazu.

    1989-01-01

    For the education and training of operators in electric power plants, simulators have been employed, and it is well known that their effect is great. There are operation training simulators which simulate the dynamic characteristics of plants and all the machinery and equipment that operators handle, and train the procedure of restoration at the time of abnormality in plants, education simulators which can analyze the dynamic characteristics of plants efficiently in a short time, and offer information by visualizing phenomena with three-dimensional display and others so as to be easily understandable, and forecast simulators which do the analysis forecasting plant behavior at the time of abnormality in plants, and investigate the necessity of the guide for operation procedure and the countermeasures at the time of emergency. In this explanation, the upgrading of operation training simulators which have been put already in training is discussed. The constitution of simulator system and the instructor function, the outline of PWR plant simulation models comprising thermal flow model, pump model, leak model and so on, the techniques of increasing simulator speed, and the example of analysis using the NUPAC code are reported. (K.I.)

  13. Optimum fuel use in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubauer, W.

    1979-07-01

    An optimization program was developed to calculate minimum-cost refuelling schedules for PWR reactors. Optimization was made over several cycles, without any constraints (equilibrium cycle). In developing the optimization program, special consideration was given to an individual treatment of every fuel element and to a sufficiently accurate calculation of all the data required for safe reactor operation. The results of the optimization program were compared with experimental values obtained at Obrigheim nuclear power plant. (orig.) [de

  14. Shielding design for PWR in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, G.; Charransol; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding calculation scheme used in France for PWR is presented here for 900 MWe and 1300 MWe plants built by EDF the French utility giving electricity. Neutron dose rate at areas accessible by personnel during the reactor operation is calculated and compared with the measurements which were carried out in 900 MWe units up to now. Measurements on the first French 1300 MWe reactor are foreseen at the end of 1983

  15. Organization patterns of PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leicman, J.

    1980-01-01

    Organization patterns are shown for the St. Lucia 1, North Anna, Sequoyah, and Beaver Valley nuclear power plants, for a typical PWR power plant in the USA, for the Biblis/RWE-KWU nuclear power plants and for a four-unit nuclear power plant operated by Electricite de France as well as for the Loviisa power plant. Organization patterns are also shown for relatively independent and non-independent nuclear power plants according to IAEA recommendations. (J.P.)

  16. Implementation in free software of the PWR type university nucleo electric simulator (SU-PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle H, J.; Hidago H, F.; Morales S, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Presently work is shown like was carried out the implementation of the University Simulator of Nucleo-electric type PWR (SU-PWR). The implementation of the simulator was carried out in a free software simulation platform, as it is Scilab, what offers big advantages that go from the free use and without cost of the product, until the codes modification so much of the system like of the program with the purpose of to improve it or to adapt it to future routines and/or more advanced graphic interfaces. The SU-PWR shows the general behavior of a PWR nuclear plant (Pressurized Water Reactor) describing the dynamics of the plant from the generation process of thermal energy in the nuclear fuel, going by the process of energy transport toward the coolant of the primary circuit the one which in turn transfers this energy to the vapor generators of the secondary circuit where the vapor is expanded by means of turbines that in turn move the electric generator producing in this way the electricity. The pressurizer that is indispensable for the process is also modeled. Each one of these stages were implemented in scicos that is the Scilab tool specialized in the simulation. The simulation was carried out by means of modules that contain the differential equation that mathematically models each stage or equipment of the PWR plant. The result is a series of modules that based on certain entrances and characteristic of the system they generate exits that in turn are the entrance to other module. Because the SU-PWR is an experimental project in early phase, it is even work and modifications to carry out, for what the models that are presented in this work can vary a little the being integrated to the whole system to simulate, but however they already show clearly the operation and the conformation of the plant. (Author)

  17. PWR vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinski, S.T.; Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Kinsman, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on PWR pressure vessels which operate under NRC rules and regulatory guides intended to prevent failure of the vessels. Plants failing to meet the operating criteria specified under these rules and regulations are required to analytically demonstrate fitness for service in order to continue operation. The initial flaw size or distribution of initial vessel flaws is a key input to the required vessel integrity analyses. However, the flaw distribution assumed in the development of the NRC Regulations and recommended for the plant specific analyses is potentially over-conservative. This is because the distribution is based on the limited amount of vessel inspection data available at the time the criteria were being developed and does not take full advantage of the more recent and reliable domestic vessel inspection results. The U.S. Department of Energy is funding an effort through Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of developing a new flaw distribution based on the increased amount and improved reliability of domestic vessel inspection data. Results of Phase I of the program indicate that state-of-the-art NDE systems' capabilities are sufficient for development of a new flaw distribution that could ultimately provide life extension benefits over the presently required operating practice

  18. PWR secondary water chemistry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1977-02-01

    Several types of corrosion damage are currently chronic problems in PWR recirculating steam generators. One probable cause of damage is a local high concentration of an aggressive chemical even though only trace levels are present in feedwater. A wide variety of trace chemicals can find their way into feedwater, depending on the sources of condenser cooling water and the specific feedwater treatment. In February 1975, Nuclear Water and Waste Technology Corporation (NWT), was contracted to characterize secondary system water chemistry at five operating PWRs. Plants were selected to allow effects of cooling water chemistry and operating history on steam generator corrosion to be evaluated. Calvert Cliffs 1, Prairie Island 1 and 2, Surry 2, and Turkey Point 4 were monitored during the program. Results to date in the following areas are summarized: (1) plant chemistry variations during normal operation, transients, and shutdowns; (2) effects of condenser leakage on steam generator chemistry; (3) corrosion product transport during all phases of operation; (4) analytical prediction of chemistry in local areas from bulk water chemistry measurements; and (5) correlation of corrosion damage to chemistry variation

  19. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  20. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  1. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  2. The Conceptual Design of Innovative Safe PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Han-Gon [Centural Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Sun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Most of countries operating NPPs have been performed post-Fukushima improvements as short-term countermeasure to enhance the safety of operating NPPs. Separately, vendors have made efforts on developing passive safety systems as long-term and ultimate countermeasures. AP1000 designed by Westinghouse Electric Company has passive safety systems including the passive emergency core cooling system (PECCS), the passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS), and the passive containment cooling system (PCCS). ESBWR designed by GE-Hitachi also has passive safety systems consisting of the isolation condenser system, the gravity driven cooling system and the PCCS. Other countries including China and Russia have made efforts on developing passive safety systems for enhancing the safety of their plants. In this paper, we summarize the design goals and main design feature of innovative safe PWR, iPOWER which is standing for Innovative Passive Optimized World-wide Economical Reactor, and show the developing status and results of research projects. To mitigate an accident without electric power and enhance the safety level of PWR, the conceptual designs of passive safety system and innovative safe PWR have been performed. It includes the PECCS for core cooling and the PCCS for containment cooling. Now we are performing the small scale and separate effect tests for the PECCS and the PCCS and preparing the integral effect test for the PECCS and real scale test for the PCCS.

  3. EPRI PWR primary water chemistry guidelines revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElrath, Joel; Fruzzetti, Keith

    2014-01-01

    EPRI periodically updates the PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines as new information becomes available and as required by NEI 97-06 (Steam Generator Program Guidelines) and NEI 03-08 (Guideline for the Management of Materials Issues). The last revision of the PWR water chemistry guidelines identified an optimum primary water chemistry program based on then-current understanding of research and field information. This new revision provides further details with regard to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), fuel integrity, and shutdown dose rates. A committee of industry experts, including utility specialists, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) and fuel vendor representatives, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) representatives, consultants, and EPRI staff collaborated in reviewing the available data on primary water chemistry, reactor water coolant system materials issues, fuel integrity and performance issues, and radiation dose rate issues. From the data, the committee updated the water chemistry guidelines that all PWR nuclear plants should adopt. The committee revised guidance with regard to optimization to reflect industry experience gained since the publication of Revision 6. Among the changes, the technical information regarding the impact of zinc injection on PWSCC initiation and dose rate reduction has been updated to reflect the current level of knowledge within the industry. Similarly, industry experience with elevated lithium concentrations with regard to fuel performance and radiation dose rates has been updated to reflect data collected to date. Recognizing that each nuclear plant owner has a unique set of design, operating, and corporate concerns, the guidelines committee has retained a method for plant-specific optimization. Revision 7 of the Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines provides guidance for PWR primary systems of all manufacture and design. The guidelines continue to emphasize plant

  4. PWR secondary water chemistry guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Blomgren, J.C.; Fackelmann, J.M.

    1982-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants have experienced tubing degradation by a variety of corrosion-related mechanisms which depend directly on secondary water chemistry. As a result of this experience, the Steam Generator Owners Group and EPRI have sponsored a major program to provide solutions to PWR steam generator problems. This report, PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines, in addition to presenting justification for water chemistry control parameters, discusses available analytical methods, data management and surveillance, and the management philosophy required to successfully implement the guidelines

  5. Safety aspects of the using Gd as burnable poison in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenberg, C.; Bonet, H.; Charlier, A.

    1978-01-01

    The experience of BELGONUCLEAIRE in using Gd in LWR's has indicated the safety related advantages of this burnable poison. The successfully operation of the BR3 PWR power plant with 5% of Gd rods is presented and extrapolated to large PWR's. (authro)

  6. Advancing PWR fuel to meet customer needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, F W

    1987-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Optimized Fuel Assembly (OFA) for PWRs in the late 1970s, Westinghouse has continued to work with the utility customers to identify the greatest needs for further advance in fuel performance and reliability. The major customer requirements include longer fuel cycle at lower costs, increased fuel discharge burn-up, enhanced operating flexibility, all accompanied by even greater reliability. In response to these needs, Westinghouse developed Vantage 5 PWR fuel. To optimize reactor operations, Vantage 5 fuel features distinct advantages: integral fuel burnable absorbers, axial and radial blankets, intermediate flow mixers, a removable top nozzle, and assembly modifications to accommodate increased discharge burn-up.

  7. Modelling activity transport behavior in PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, Jim; McGurk, John; Dickinson, Shirley; Burrows, Robert; Hinds, Kelvin; Hussey, Dennis; Deshon, Jeff; Barrios Figueras, Joan Pau; Maldonado Sanchez, Santiago; Fernandez Lillo, Enrique; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    The activation and transport of corrosion products around a PWR circuit is a major concern to PWR plant operators as these may give rise to high personnel doses. The understanding of what controls dose rates on ex-core surfaces and shutdown releases has improved over the years but still several questions remain unanswered. For example the relative importance of particle and soluble deposition in the core to activity levels in the plant is not clear. Wide plant to plant and cycle to cycle variations are noted with no apparent explanations why such variations are observed. Over the past few years this group have been developing models to simulate corrosion product transport around a PWR circuit. These models form the basis for the latest version of the BOA code and simulate the movement of Fe and Ni around the primary circuit. Part of this development is to include the activation and subsequent transport of radioactive species around the circuit and this paper describes some initial modelling work in this area. A simple model of activation, release and deposition is described and then applied to explain the plant behaviour at Sizewell B and Vandellos II. This model accounts for activation in the core, soluble and particulate activity movement around the circuit and for activity capture ex-core on both the inner and outer oxides. The model gives a reasonable comparison with plant observations and highlights what controls activity transport in these plants and importantly what factors can be ignored. (authors)

  8. PWR burnable absorber evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciapouti, R.J.; Weader, R.J.; Malone, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relative neurotic efficiency and fuel cycle cost benefits of PWR burnable absorbers. Establishment of reference low-leakage equilibrium in-core fuel management plans for 12-, 18- and 24-month cycles. Review of the fuel management impact of the integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA), erbium and gadolinium. Calculation of the U 3 O 8 , UF 6 , SWU, fuel fabrication, and burnable absorber requirements for the defined fuel management plans. Estimation of fuel cycle costs of each fuel management plan at spot market and long-term market fuel prices. Estimation of the comparative savings of the different burnable absorbers in dollar equivalent per kgU of fabricated fuel. (author)

  9. Advanced ion exchange resins for PWR condensate polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, B.; Tsuzuki, S.

    2002-01-01

    The severe chemical and mechanical requirements of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) condensate polishing plant (CPP) present a major challenge to the design of ion exchange resins. This paper describes the development and initial operating experience of improved cation and anion exchange resins that were specifically designed to meet PWR CPP needs. Although this paper focuses specifically on the ion exchange resins and their role in plant performance, it is also recognized and acknowledged that excellent mechanical design and operation of the CPP system are equally essential to obtaining good results. (authors)

  10. The advanced main control console for next japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, A.; Ito, K.; Yokoyama, M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the improvement of main control room designing in a nuclear power plant is to reduce operators' workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. In order to satisfy such requirements, the design of main control board applied to Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type nuclear power plant has been continuously modified and improved. the Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Utilities (Electric Power Companies) and Mitsubishi Group have developed an advanced main control board (console) reflecting on the study of human factors, as well as using a state of the art electronics technology. In this report, we would like to introduce the configuration and features of the Advanced Main Control Console for the practical application to the next generation PWR type nuclear power plants including TOMARI No.3 Unit of Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc. (author)

  11. PWR fuel performance and future trend in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Y.

    1987-01-01

    Since the first PWR power plant Mihama Unit 1 initiated its commercial operation in 1970, Japanese utilities and manufacturers have expended much of their resources and efforts to improve PWR technology. The results are already seen in significantly improved performance of 16 PWR plants now in operation. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (MHI) has been supplying them with nuclear fuel assemblies, which are over 5700. As the reliability of the current design fuel has been achieved, the direction of R and D on nuclear fuel has changed to make nuclear power more competitive to the other power generation methods. The most important R and D targets are the burnup extension, Gd contained fuel, Pu utilizatoin and the load follow capacility. (author)

  12. Valve testing for UK PWR safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, P.T.; Bryant, S.

    1989-01-01

    Extensive testing and development has been done by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) to support the design, construction and operation of Sizewell B, the UK's first PWR. A Blowdown Rig for the Assessment of Valve Operability - (BRAVO) has been constructed at the CEGB Marchwood Engineering Laboratory to reproduce PWR Pressurizer fluid conditions for the full scale testing of Pressurizer Relief System (PRS) valves. A full size tandem pair of Pilot Operated Safety Relief Valves (POSRVs) is being tested under the full range of pressurizer fluid conditions. Tests to date have produced important data on the performance of the valve in its Cold Overpressure protection mode of operation and on methods for the in-service testing of the valve. Also, a full size pressurizer safety valve has been tested under full PRS fluid conditions to develop a methodology for the pre-service testing of the Sizewell valves. Further work will be carried out to develop procedures for the in-service testing of the valve. In the Main Steam Safety Valve test program carried out at the Siemens-KWU Test Facilities, a single MSSV from three potential suppliers was tested under full secondary system conditions. The test results have been analyzed and are reflected in the CEGB's arrangements for the pre-service and in-service testing of the Sizewell MSSVs. Valves required to interrupt pipebreak flow must be qualified for this duty by testing or a combination of testing and analysis. To obtain guidance on the performance of such tests gate and globe valves have been subjected to simulated pipebreaks under PWR primary circuit conditions. In the light of problems encountered with gate valve closure under these conditions, further tests are currently being carried out on the BRAVO facility on a gate valve, in preparation for the full scale flow interruption qualification testing of the Sizewell main steam isolation valve

  13. Seismic qualification of PWR plant auxiliary feedwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Tsai, N.C.

    1983-08-01

    The NRC Standard Review Plan specifies that the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a safeguard system that functions in the event of a Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) to remove the decay heat via the steam generator. Only recently licensed PWR plants have an AFW system designed to the current Standard Review Plan specifications. The NRC devised the Multiplant Action Plan C-14 in order to make a survey of the seismic capability of the AFW systems of operating PWR plants. The purpose of this survey is to enable the NRC to make decisions regarding the need of requiring the licensees to upgrade the AFW systems to an SSE level of seismic capability. To implement the first phase of the C-14 plan, the NRC issued a Generic Letter (GL) 81-14 to all operating PWR licensees requesting information on the seismic capability of their AFW systems. This report summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's efforts to assist the NRC in evaluating the status of seismic qualification of the AFW systems in 40 PWR plants, by reviewing the licensees' responses to GL 81-14

  14. 1. Safety in operation: The challenges and the fields of action. 2. Incident and accident management in PWR plants ''The French approach''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, M.

    1992-01-01

    The French standardization pressurized water reactor facilities currently consist of 51 standardized units, 34 of 900 MW and 17 of 1300 MW. For EDF, safety and quality in operation constitute a unique challenge: An economic challenge: the nuclear facilities account for 75% of the power generated in France and ensure the competitiveness of its price, both for domestic consumers and on the international markets, an environmental challenge: both to limit actual and potential radioactive releases associated with operation of the nuclear facilities, and to avoid releases of combustion gases associated with the use of fossil fuels, a public relations challenge: to improve the image and the confidence of the public associated with nuclear generation. Safety in operation dependence primarily on the quality of the design and construction of the nuclear units. But it also depends on technical, human and organizational factors specific to the operation of the units, which play an essential role in maintaining and increasing operating safety. After a brief review of the safety results of the facilities and of the main themes which contribute to safety in operation, a description is given of the principal fields involved and of the main current orientations

  15. Industrywide survey of PWR organics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, J.E.; Byers, W.A.

    1986-07-01

    Thirteen Pressurized Water reactor (PWR) secondary cycles were sampled for organic acids, total organic carbon, and inorganic anions. The distribution and removal of organics in a makeup water treatment system were investigted at an additional plant. TOC analyses were used for the analysis of makeup water systems; anion ion chromatography and ion exclusion chromatography were used for the analysis of secondary water systems. Additional information on plant operation and water chemistry was collected in a survey. The analytical and survey data were compared and correlations made

  16. Minimization of PWR reactor control rods wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, Pedro; Moura Angelkorte, Gunther de

    1995-01-01

    The Rod Cluster Control Assemblies (RCCA's) of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's) have experienced a continuously wall cladding wear when Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) are running. Fretting wear is a result of vibrational contact between RCCA rodlets and the guide cards which provide lateral support for the rodlets when RCCA's are withdrawn from the core. A procedure is developed to minimize the rodlets wear, by the shuffling and axial reposition of RCCA's every operating cycle. These shuffling and repositions are based on measurement of the rodlet cladding thickness of all RCCA's. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  17. PWR life time: the EDF project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, R.; Reynes, L.; Mercier, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Operating a very large number of standardized PWR units which supply today 70% of French power generation, Electricite de France is highly interested in getting the best estimate of the safe and economical life of these plants. An extensive program of work has been undertaken in this respect. The studies have first to go through all available data on aging process, survey and maintenance of a limited number of major components. This review will lead to recommendation of complementary work in these fields. The first conclusions are that these units are able to perform a long service time, under provision of careful survey and maintenance [fr

  18. Environmental surveillance of PWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The action of Electricite de France with respect to the environment of PWR nuclear power stations is essentially centred on prevention. Controls are carried out at two levels: - before the power station goes on stream (radioecological study), - when the power station is operational. The purpose of the controls effected on the radioactive effluents and the environment is to check that the maximum discharge rate stipulated in the corresponding orders is complied with and to ensure that there are no anomalies in the environment [fr

  19. Recent development in PWR zinc injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocken, H.; Fruzzetti, K.; Frattini, P.; Wood, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    Zinc injection to the reactor coolant system (RCS) of PWRs holds the promise to alleviate two key challenges facing PWR plant operators: (1) reducing degradation of coolant system materials, including nickel-base alloy tubing and lower alloy penetrations due to stress corrosion cracking, and (2) lowering shutdown dose rates. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is a dominant tube failure mode at many plants. This paper summarizes recent observations from U. S. and international PWRs that have implemented zinc injection, focusing primarily on coolant chemistry and dose rate issues. It also provides a look at the future direction of EPRI-sponsored projects on this topic. (authors)

  20. Development of Cost Estimation Methodology of Decommissioning for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae; Lim, Yong Kyu; Chang, Hyeon Sik; Song, Geun Ho

    2013-01-01

    The permanent closure of nuclear power plant should be conducted with the strict laws and the profound planning including the cost and schedule estimation because the plant is very contaminated with the radioactivity. In Korea, there are two types of the nuclear power plant. One is the pressurized light water reactor (PWR) and the other is the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) called as CANDU reactor. Also, the 50% of the operating nuclear power plant in Korea is the PWRs which were originally designed by CE (Combustion Engineering). There have been experiences about the decommissioning of Westinghouse type PWR, but are few experiences on that of CE type PWR. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to develop the cost estimation methodology and evaluate technical level of decommissioning for the application to CE type PWR based on the system engineering technology. The aim of present study is to develop the cost estimation methodology of decommissioning for application to PWR. Through the study, the following conclusions are obtained: · Based on the system engineering, the decommissioning work can be classified as Set, Subset, Task, Subtask and Work cost units. · The Set and Task structure are grouped as 29 Sets and 15 Task s, respectively. · The final result shows the cost and project schedule for the project control and risk management. · The present results are preliminary and should be refined and improved based on the modeling and cost data reflecting available technology and current costs like labor and waste data

  1. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10 −6 on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure

  2. The latest full-scale PWR simulator in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimuru, Y.; Tagi, H.; Nakabayashi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The latest MHI Full-scale Simulator has an excellent system configuration, in both flexibility and extendability, and has highly sophisticated performance in PWR simulation by the adoption of CANAC-II and PRETTY codes. It also has an instructive character to display the plant's internal status, such as RCS condition, through animation. Further, the simulation has been verified to meet a functional examination at model plant, and with a scale model test result in a two-phase flow event, after evaluation for its accuracy. Thus, the Simulator can be devoted to a sophisticated and broad training course on PWR operation. (author)

  3. Two optimal control methods for PWR core control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karppinen, J.; Blomsnes, B.; Versluis, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Multistage Mathematical Programming (MMP) and State Variable Feedback (SVF) methods for PWR core control are presented in this paper. The MMP method is primarily intended for optimization of the core behaviour with respect to xenon induced power distribution effects in load cycle operation. The SVF method is most suited for xenon oscillation damping in situations where the core load is unpredictable or expected to stay constant. Results from simulation studies in which the two methods have been applied for control of simple PWR core models are presented. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Transient performance of flow in circuits of PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.; Carajilescov, P.

    1988-09-01

    Generally, PWR's are designed with several primary loops, each one provided with a pump to circulate the coolant through the core. If one or more of these pumps fail, there would be a decrease in reactor flow rate which could cause coolant phase change in the core and components overheating. The present work establishes a simulation model for pump failure in PWR's and the SARDAN-FLOW computes code was developed, considering any combination of such failures. Based on the data of Angra I, several accident and operational transient conditions were simulated. (author) [pt

  5. Transient performance of flow in PWR reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.T.R.; Carajilescov, P.

    1988-12-01

    Generally, PWR's are designed with several primary loops, each one provided with a pump to circulate the coolant through the core. If one or more of these pumps fail, there would be a decrease in reactor flow rate which cause coolant phase change in the core and components overheating. The present work establishes a simulation model for pump failure in PWR's and the SARDAN-FLOW computes code was developed, considering any combination of such failures. Based on the data of Angra I, several accident and operational transient conditions were simulated. (author) [pt

  6. Stock-taking of the safety design of the nuclear power plant with PWR type Biblis B and the radiation exposure connected with its operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drescher, H.P.; Geiser, H.; Roedder, P.; Dagbjartsson, S.; Ernst, H.; Ledermann, H.; Hecke, R. van.

    1976-06-01

    The study comprises: 1) Environmental pollution due to radioactive emissions; 2) personnel exposure during operation, maintenance, inspection, and repair; 3) environmental pollution due to the closing of the fuel cycle; 4) safety requirements; 5) state of the art of safety design; 6) reliability analysis; 7) the importance of the testability of systems and components relevant for safety. (HP) 891 HP [de

  7. Dissolution process for advanced-PWR-type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.E.; Decker, L.A.; Pearson, L.G.

    1979-01-01

    The new Fluorinel Dissolution Process and Fuel Storage (FAST) Facility at ICPP will provide underwater storage of spent PWR fuel and a new head-end process for fuel dissolution. The dissolution will be two-stage, using HF and HNO 3 , with an intermittent H 2 SO 4 dissolution for removing stainless steel components. Equipment operation is described

  8. Design of a PWR emergency core cooling simulator loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, C.A. de.

    1982-12-01

    The preliminary design of a PWR Emergency Core Cooling Simulator Loop for investigations of the phenomena involved in a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident, during the Reflooding Phase, is presented. The functions of each component of the loop, the design methods and calculations, the specification of the instrumentation, the system operation sequence, the materials list and a cost assessment are included. (Author) [pt

  9. Performance of PWR Nuclear power plants, up to 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of PWR nuclear power plants is studied, based on operational data up to 1985. The availability analysis was made with 793 unit-year and the reliability analysis was made with 5851 unit x month. The results were discussed and the availability of those nuclear power plants were estimated. (E.G.) [pt

  10. Part-load operation of the boiler feedwater pumps for the new French PWR 1400 MW nuclear plants - a challenge for the designer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.; Canavelis, R.; Guilloiseau, P.

    1988-01-01

    The Boiler feedwater pumps in Electricite de France Power Stations have to work reliably for all flow rates between 33% and 134% of the flow corresponding to the best efficiency point (Q BEP ). Under transient conditions associated with load changing these limits increase to 33% to 147% Q BEP . Due to the high specific power of these pumps, the operating conditions heavily influence the hydraulic and mechanical dimensioning. This paper presents some particular aspects of their design and test results obtained on a pump model as well as on a full scale prototype concerning suction performance, head capacity curve stability, pressure pulsations and structural excitations. (author)

  11. 14C Behaviour in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, Howard; Dickinson Shirley; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    Although 14 C is produced in relatively small amounts in PWR coolant, it is important to know its fate, for example whether it is released by gaseous discharge, removed by absorption on ion exchange (IX) resins or deposited on the fuel pin surfaces. 14 C can exist in a range of possible chemical forms: inorganic carbon compounds (probably mainly CO 2 ), elemental carbon, and organic compounds such as hydrocarbons. This paper presents results from a preliminary survey of the possible reactions of 14 C in PWR coolant. The main conclusions of the study are: - A combination of thermal and radiolytic reactions controls the chemistry of 14 C in reactor coolant. A simple chemical kinetic model predicts that CH 3 OH would be the initial product from radiolytic reactions of 14 C following its formation from 17 O. CH 3 OH is predicted to arise as a result of reactions of OH . with CH 4 and CH 3 , and it persists because there is no known radiation chemical reduction mechanism. - Thermodynamic considerations show that CH 3 OH can be thermally reduced to CH 4 in PWR conditions, although formation of CO 2 from small organics is the most thermodynamically favourable outcome. Such reactions could be catalysed on active nickel surfaces in the primary circuit. - Limited plant data would suggest that CH 4 is the dominant form in PWR and CO 2 in BWR. This implies that radiation chemistry may be important in determining the speciation. - Addition of acetate does not affect the amount of 14 C formed, but the addition of large amounts of stable carbon would lead to a large range of additional products, some of which would be expected to deposit on fuel pin surfaces as high molecular weight hydrocarbons. However, the subsequent thermal decomposition reactions of these products are not known. - Acetate addition may represent a small input of 12 C compared with organic material released from CVCS resins, although the importance of this may depend on whether that is predominantly soluble

  12. Spain's nuclear industry achieves maturity with its third generation of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Juan

    1986-01-01

    The Vandellos II PWR is under construction at present, and commercial operation is scheduled for December 1987. Details of the planning and construction of the reactor are given. Technical data and a cutaway drawing are included. (UK)

  13. Sizewell 'B' PWR reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The reference design for a PWR power station to be constructed as Sizewell 'B' is presented in 3 volumes containing 14 chapters and in a volume of drawings. The report describes the proposed design and provides the basis upon which the safety case and the Pre-Construction Safety Report have been prepared. The station is based on a 3425MWt Westinghouse PWR providing steam to two turbine generators each of 600 MW. The layout and many of the systems are based on the SNUPPS design for Callaway which has been chosen as the US reference plant for the project. (U.K.)

  14. Data assimilation and PWR primary measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Thibaud

    2015-01-01

    A Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS) is a highly complex physical process: heterogeneous power, flow and temperature distributions are difficult to be accurately measured, since instrumentations are limited in number, thus leading to the relevant safety and protection margins. EDF R and D is seeking to assess the potential benefits of applying Data Assimilation to a PWR's RCS (Reactor Coolant System) measurements, in order to improve the estimators for parameters of a reactor's operating setpoint, i.e. improving accuracy and reducing uncertainties and biases of measured RCS parameters. In this thesis, we define a 0D semi-empirical model for RCS, satisfying the description level usually chosen by plant operators, and construct a Monte-Carlo Method (inspired from Ensemble Methods) in order to use this model with Data Assimilation tools. We apply this method on simulated data in order to assess the reduction of uncertainties on key parameters: results are beyond expectations, however strong hypothesis are required, implying a careful preprocessing of input data. (author)

  15. Chemical decontamination solutions: Effects on PWR equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezze, C.M.; Colvin, E.R.; Aspden, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical objective for the nuclear industry is the reduction of personnel exposure to radiation. Reductions have been achieved through industry's radiation management programs including training and radiation awareness concepts. Increased plant maintenance and higher radiation fields at many sites continue to raise concerns. To alleviate the radiation exposure problem, the sources of radiation which contribute to personnel exposure must be removed from the plant. A feasible was of significantly reducing these sources from a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is to chemically decontaminate the entire reactor coolant system (RCS). A program was conducted to determine the technical acceptability of using certain dilute chemical solvent processes for full RCS chemical decontamination. The two processes evaluated were CAN-DEREM and LOMI. The purpose of the program was to define and complete a systematic evaluation of the major issues that need to be addressed for the successful decontamination of the entire RCS and affected portions of the auxiliary systems of a four-loop PWR system. A test program was designed to evaluate the corrosion effects of the two decontamination processes under expected plant conditions. Materials and sample configurations dictated by generic PWR components were evaluated. The testing also included many standard corrosion coupons. The test data were then used to assess the impact of chemical decontamination on the physical condition and operability of the components, equipment and mechanical systems that make up the RCS. An overview of the test program, sample configurations, data and engineering evaluations is presented. The data demonstrate that through detailed engineering evaluations of corrosion data and equipment function, the impact of full RCS chemical decontamination on plant equipment is established

  16. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Material Samples: Tensile and SSRT Testing (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs requires detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel (internals) subjected to such conditions. This project studied the effects of reactor service on the mechanical and corrosion properties of samples of baffle plate, former plate, and core barrel from a decommissioned PWR

  17. Prevention against fragile fracture in PWR pressure vessel in the presence of pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, E.G.D. do; Oliveira, L.F.S. de; Roberty, N.C.

    1984-01-01

    A method for the determination of operational limit curves (primary pressure versus temperature) for PWR is presented. Such curves give the operators indications related to the safety status of the plant concerning the possibility of a pressurized thermal shock. The method begins by a thermal analysis for several postulated transients, followed by the determination of the thermomechanical stresses in the vessel and finally it makes use of the linear elasticity fracture mechanics. Curves are shown for a typical PWR. (Author) [pt

  18. Characterization of Decommissioned PWR Vessel Internals Materials Samples: Material Certification, Fluence, and Temperature (Nonproprietary Version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, M.; Shogan, R.; Fero, A.; Snyder, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores, operate under extreme environmental conditions due to coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and neutron exposure. Extending the life of PWRs require detailed knowledge of the changes in mechanical and corrosion properties of the structural austenitic stainless steel components adjacent to the fuel. This report contains basic material characterization information of the as-installed samples of reactor internals material which were harvested from a decommissioned PWR

  19. Implementation in free software of the PWR type university nucleo electric simulator (SU-PWR); Implementacion en software libre del simulador universitario de nucleoelectrica tipo PWR (SU-PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Hidago H, F.; Morales S, J.B. [UNAM, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares DEPFI, Campus Morelos, en IMTA Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    Presently work is shown like was carried out the implementation of the University Simulator of Nucleo-electric type PWR (SU-PWR). The implementation of the simulator was carried out in a free software simulation platform, as it is Scilab, what offers big advantages that go from the free use and without cost of the product, until the codes modification so much of the system like of the program with the purpose of to improve it or to adapt it to future routines and/or more advanced graphic interfaces. The SU-PWR shows the general behavior of a PWR nuclear plant (Pressurized Water Reactor) describing the dynamics of the plant from the generation process of thermal energy in the nuclear fuel, going by the process of energy transport toward the coolant of the primary circuit the one which in turn transfers this energy to the vapor generators of the secondary circuit where the vapor is expanded by means of turbines that in turn move the electric generator producing in this way the electricity. The pressurizer that is indispensable for the process is also modeled. Each one of these stages were implemented in scicos that is the Scilab tool specialized in the simulation. The simulation was carried out by means of modules that contain the differential equation that mathematically models each stage or equipment of the PWR plant. The result is a series of modules that based on certain entrances and characteristic of the system they generate exits that in turn are the entrance to other module. Because the SU-PWR is an experimental project in early phase, it is even work and modifications to carry out, for what the models that are presented in this work can vary a little the being integrated to the whole system to simulate, but however they already show clearly the operation and the conformation of the plant. (Author)

  20. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B andW 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001)

  1. Realistic bandwidth estimation in the theoretically predicted radionuclide inventory of PWR-UO2 spent fuel derived from reactor design and operating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear energy for power generation produces heat-generating high- and intermediate level radioactive waste (HLW and ILW) for which a safe solution for the handling and disposal has to be found. Currently, many European countries consider the final disposal of HLW and ILW in deep geological formations as the most preferable option. In Germany the main stream of HLW and ILW include spent fuel assemblies from nuclear power plants (NPPs), the vitrified waste and compacted metallic waste of the fuel assembly structural parts originate from reprocessing plants. An important task that occurs within the framework of the Product Quality Control (PQC) of nuclear waste is the assessment of the compliance of any reprocessed waste product inventory with the prescribed limits for each relevant radionuclide (RN). The PQC task is to verify the required quality and safety of nuclear waste prior to transportation to a German repository and to avert the disposal of non-conform waste packages. The verification is usually based on comparing the declared radionuclide inventory of the waste with the presumed or expected composition, which is estimated, based on the known history of the waste and its processing. The difficulty of such estimations for radioactive components from nuclear fuel assemblies is that reactor design parameters and operating histories can have a significant influence on the nuclide inventory of any individual fuel assembly. Thus, knowledge of these parameters is a key issue to determine the realistic concentration ranges, or bandwidths, of the radionuclide inventory. As soon as a governmental decision on the construction of a high-level waste repository will be made, comprehensive radionuclide inventories of the wastes assigned for the deposition will be required. The list of final repository relevant radionuclide is based on the safety assessment for this particular repository, thus it is likely to comprise more-or-less the same radionuclides that need to be

  2. Realistic bandwidth estimation in the theoretically predicted radionuclide inventory of PWR-UO2 spent fuel derived from reactor design and operating data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, Ivan

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear energy for power generation produces heat-generating high- and intermediate level radioactive waste (HLW and ILW) for which a safe solution for the handling and disposal has to be found. Currently, many European countries consider the final disposal of HLW and ILW in deep geological formations as the most preferable option. In Germany the main stream of HLW and ILW include spent fuel assemblies from nuclear power plants (NPPs), the vitrified waste and compacted metallic waste of the fuel assembly structural parts originate from reprocessing plants. An important task that occurs within the framework of the Product Quality Control (PQC) of nuclear waste is the assessment of the compliance of any reprocessed waste product inventory with the prescribed limits for each relevant radionuclide (RN). The PQC task is to verify the required quality and safety of nuclear waste prior to transportation to a German repository and to avert the disposal of non-conform waste packages. The verification is usually based on comparing the declared radionuclide inventory of the waste with the presumed or expected composition, which is estimated, based on the known history of the waste and its processing. The difficulty of such estimations for radioactive components from nuclear fuel assemblies is that reactor design parameters and operating histories can have a significant influence on the nuclide inventory of any individual fuel assembly. Thus, knowledge of these parameters is a key issue to determine the realistic concentration ranges, or bandwidths, of the radionuclide inventory. As soon as a governmental decision on the construction of a high-level waste repository will be made, comprehensive radionuclide inventories of the wastes assigned for the deposition will be required. The list of final repository relevant radionuclide is based on the safety assessment for this particular repository, thus it is likely to comprise more-or-less the same radionuclides that need to be

  3. Advanced high conversion PWR: preliminary analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, H.; Bellanger, V.; Bergeron, A.; Dolci, F.; Gastaldi, B.; Koberl, O.; Mignot, G.; Thevenot, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, physical aspects of a HCPWR (High Conversion Light Water Reactor), which is an innovative PWR fuelled with mixed oxide and having a higher conversion ratio due to a lower moderation ratio. Moderation ratios lower than unity are considered which has led to low moderation PWR fuel assembly designs. The objectives of this parametric study are to define a feasibility area with regard to the following neutronic aspects: moderation ratio, Pu loading, reactor spectrum, irradiation time, and neutronic coefficients. Important thermohydraulic parameters are the pressure drop, the critical heat flux, the maximum temperature in the fuel rod and the pumping power. The thermohydraulic analysis shows that a range of moderation ratios from 0.8 to 1.2 is technically possible. A compromise between improved fuel utilization and research and development effort has been found for the moderation ration of about 1. The parametric study shows that there are 2 ranges of interest for the moderation ratio: -) moderation ratio between 0.8 and 1.2 with reduced fissile heights (> 3 m), hexagonal arrangement fuel assembly and square arrangement fuel assembly are possible; and -) moderation between 0.6 and 0.7 with a modification of the reactor operating conditions (reduction of the primary flow and of the thermal power), the fuel rods could be arranged inside a hexagonal fuel rod assembly. (A.C.)

  4. Workers doses in central European PWR NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2003-01-01

    As is stated, the ISOE database which was established in 1992 forms an excellent basis for studies and comparisons of occupational exposure data between nuclear power plants. In the year 2001, 69% of all participating reactors were pressurised water reactors. The ISOE database presents workers' exposure from 213 participating pressurised reactors (PWR) from 27 countries in that year. Among these 32 PWRs belong to six Central European Countries. The analysis of the exposure of workers based on radiation protection performance indicators (collective dose, average dose etc.) in these PWRs could be related to some nuclear safety performance indicators for recent years using ISOE database. The comparison is made to ISOE world - wide data. In the six Central European Countries altogether 32 PWR operated in the year 2001.The international databases of performance indicators related to radiation protection as for example the ISOE or the UNSCEAR database can be use as an efficient tool in the management of radiation protection of workers in a nuclear facilities and regulatory bodies. The databases enable the study of performance trends and the improvement of radiation protection. (authors)

  5. Chemical cleaning of nuclear (PWR) steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welty, C.S. Jr.; Mundis, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on a significant research program sponsored by a group of utilities (the Steam Generator Owners Group), which was undertaken to develop a process to chemically remove corrosion product deposits from the secondary side of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant steam generators. Results of this work have defined a process (solvent system and application methods) that is capable of removing sludge and tube-to-tube support plate crevice corrosion products generated during operation with all-volatile treatment (AVT) water chemistry. Considers a plant-specific test program that includes all materials in the steam generator to be cleaned and accounts for the physical locations (proximity and contact) of those materials. Points out that prior to applying the process in an operational unit, the utility, with the participation of the NSSR vendor, must define allowable total corrosion to the materials of construction of the unit

  6. Improvement on main control room for Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumiya, Masayuki

    1996-01-01

    The main control room which is the information center of nuclear power plant has been continuously improved utilizing the state of the art ergonomics, a high performance computer, computer graphic technologies, etc. For the latest Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant, the CRT monitoring system is applied as the major information source for facilitating operators' plant monitoring tasks. For an operating plant, enhancement of monitoring and logging functions has been made adopting a high performance computer

  7. Fuel rod behavior of a PWR during load following

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, J.A.; Andrade, G.G. de

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of a PWR fuel rod when operating in normal power cycles, excluding in case of accidents, is analysed. A computer code, that makes the mechanical analysis of the cladding using the finite element method was developed. The ramps and power cycles were simulated suposing the existence of cracks in pellets when the cladding-pellet interaction are done. As a result, an operation procedure of the fuel rod in power cycle is recommended. (E.G.) [pt

  8. PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model using dry process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Jeong, Chang Joon; Rho, Gyu Hong

    2002-03-01

    PWR-to-PWR fuel cycle model has been developed to recycle the spent fuel using the dry fabrication process. Two types of fuels were considered; first fuel was based on low initial enrichment with low discharge burnup and second one was based on more initial enrichment with high discharge burnup in PWR. For recycling calculations, the HELIOS code was used, in which all of the available fission products were considered. The decay of 10 years was applied for reuse of the spent fuel. Sensitivity analysis for the fresh feed material enrichment has also been carried out. If enrichment of the mixing material is increased the saving of uranium reserves would be decreased. The uranium saving of low burned fuel increased from 4.2% to 7.4% in fifth recycling step for 5 wt% to 19.00wt% mixing material enrichment. While for high burned fuel, there was no uranium saving, which implies that higher uranium enrichment required than 5 wt%. For mixing of 15 wt% enriched fuel, the required mixing is about 21.0% and 37.0% of total fuel volume for low and high burned fuel, respectively. With multiple recycling, reductions in waste for low and high burned fuel became 80% and 60%, for first recycling, respectively. In this way, waste can be reduced more and the cost of the waste disposal reduction can provide the economic balance

  9. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virpi Kouhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  10. PACTEL and PWR PACTEL Test Facilities for Versatile LWR Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virpi Kouhia, V.; Purhonen, H.; Riikonen, V.; Puustinen, M.; Kyrki-Rajamaki, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes construction and experimental research activities with two test facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL. The PACTEL facility, comprising of reactor pressure vessel parts, three loops with horizontal steam generators, a pressurizer, and emergency core cooling systems, was designed to model the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of VVER-440-type reactors. The facility has been utilized in miscellaneous applications and experiments, for example, in the OECD International Standard Problem ISP-33. PACTEL has been upgraded and modified on a case-by-case basis. The latest facility configuration, the PWR PACTEL facility, was constructed for research activities associated with the EPR-type reactor. A significant design basis is to utilize certain parts of PACTEL, and at the same time, to focus on a proper construction of two new loops and vertical steam generators with an extensive instrumentation. The PWR PACTEL benchmark exercise was launched in 2010 with a small break loss-of-coolant accident test as the chosen transient. Both facilities, PACTEL and PWR PACTEL, are maintained fully operational side by side.

  11. Proposal for a advanced PWR core with adequate characteristics for passive safety concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrotta, Jose Augusto

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a discussion upon the suitable from an advanced PWR core, classified by the EPRI as 'Passive PWR' (advanced reactor with passive safety concept to power plants with less than 600 MW electrical power). The discussion upon the type of core is based on nuclear fuel engineering concepts. Discussion is made on type of fuel materials, structural materials, geometric shapes and manufacturing process that are suitable to produce fuel assemblies which give good performance for this type of reactors. The analysis is guided by the EPRI requirements for Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR). By means of comparison, the analysis were done to Angra 1 (old type of 600 MWe PWR class), and the design of the Westinghouse Advanced PWR-AP600. It was verified as a conclusion of this work that the modern PWR fuels are suitable for advanced PWR's Nevertheless, this work presents a technical alternative to this kind of fuel, still using UO 2 as fuel, but changing its cylindrical form of pellets and pin type fuel element to plane shape pallets and plate type fuel element. This is not a novelty fuel, since it was used in the 50's at Shippingport Reactor and as an advanced version by CEA of France in the 70's. In this work it is proposed a new mechanical assembly design for this fuel, which can give adequate safety and operational performance to the core of a 'Passive PWR'. (author)

  12. Measurement of the residual stresses in a PWR Control Rod Drive Mechanism nozzle

    OpenAIRE

    Coules, Harry; Smith, David

    2018-01-01

    Residual stress in the welds that attach Control Rod Drive Mechanism nozzles into the upper head of a PWR reactor vessel can influence the vessel's structural integrity and initiate Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking. PWSCC at Alloy 600 CRDM nozzles has caused primary coolant leakage in operating PWRs. We have used Deep Hole Drilling to characterise residual stresses in a PWR vessel head. Measurements of the internal cladding and nozzle attachment weld showed that although modest tensile...

  13. PWR plant construction in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Toshifumi

    2002-01-01

    The construction methods based on the experiences on the Nuclear Island, which is a critical path in the total construction schedule, have been studied and reconsidered in order to construct by more reliable and economical method. So various improved construction method are being applied and the duration of construction is being reduced continuously. So various improved construction method are being applied and the duration of construction is being reduced continuously. In this paper, the history of construction of twenty-three (23) PWR Plant, the actual construction methods and schedule of Ohi-3/4, to which the many improved methods were applied during their construction, are introduced mainly with the improved points for previously constructed plants. And also the situation of construction method for the next PWR Plant is simply explained

  14. PWR system reliability improvement activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Yuichiro

    1985-01-01

    In Japan lacking in energy resources, it is our basic energy policy to accelerate the development program of nuclear power, thereby reducing our dependence. As referred to in the foregoing, every effort has been exerted on our part to improve the PWR system reliability by dint of the so-called 'HOMEMADE' TQC activities, which is our brain-child as a result of applying to the energy industry the quality control philosophy developed in the field of manufacturing industry

  15. Full MOX high burn-up PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu; Kugo, Teruhiko; Shimada, Shoichiro; Araya, Fumimasa; Ochiai, Masaaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    As a part of conceptual investigation on advanced light water reactors for the future, a light water reactor with the high burn-up of 100 GWd/t, the long cycle operation of 3 years and the full MOX core is being studied, aiming at the improvement on economical aspects, the reduction of the spent fuel production, the utilization of Plutonium and so forth. The present report summarizes investigation on PWR-type reactors. The core with the increased moderation of the moderator-to-fuel volume ratio of 2.6 {approx} 3.0 has been proposed be such a core that accomplishes requirements mentioned above. Through the neutronic and the thermo-hydrodynamic evaluation, the performances of the core have been evaluated. Also, the safety designing is underway considering the reactor system with the passive safety features. (author)

  16. PWR fuel thermomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traccucci, R.; Leclercq, J.

    1986-01-01

    Fuel thermo-mechanics means the studies of mechanical and thermal effects, and more generally, the studies of the behavior of the fuel assembly under stresses including thermal and mechanical loads, hydraulic effects and phenomena induced by materials irradiation. This paper describes the studies dealing with the fuel assembly behavior, first in normal operating conditions, and then in accidental conditions. 43 refs [fr

  17. Application of digital control in Japanese PWR Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, S.; Kondo, Y.; Teranishi, S.; Matsumiya, M.; Takashima, M.; Nagai, T.

    1986-01-01

    More reliable and flexible control system to improve the plant availability and operability is constantly demanded. In order to answer the demands, digital control systems are being applied to Japanese PWR plants. Microprocessor-based digital control systems are widely used in other industries and show good performance. The digital control system has been already applied to the chemical and volume control system and the radioactive waste disposal system in the operating plants. These systems have been working as expected and demonstrating good performances. The digital control system for the reactor control system, which is the main control system of the PWR plants, is being developed. The design of the system has been already finished and the verification/validation process is now in progress

  18. PWR accident management realated tests: some Bethsy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, P.; Chataing, T.; Deruaz, R.

    1993-01-01

    The BETHSY integral test facility which is a scaled down model of a 3 loop FRAMATOME PWR and is currently operated at the Nuclear Center of Grenoble, forms an important part of the French strategy for PWR Accident Management. In this paper the features of both the facility and the experimental program are presented. Two accident transients: a total loss of feedwater and a 2'' cold leg break in case of High Pressure Safety Injection System failure, involving either Event Oriented - or State Oriented-Emergency Operating Procedures (EO-EOP or SO-EOP) are described and the system response analyzed. CATHARE calculation results are also presented which illustrate the ability of this code to adequately predict the key phenomena of these transients. (authors). 13 figs., 11 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Condensate polishing guidelines for PWR and BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, P.; Crinigan, P.; Graham, B.; Kohlmann, R.; Crosby, C.; Seager, J.; Bosold, R.; Gillen, J.; Kristensen, J.; McKeen, A.; Jones, V.; Sawochka, S.; Siegwarth, D.; Keeling, D.; Polidoroff, T.; Morgan, D.; Rickertsen, D.; Dyson, A.; Mills, W.; Coleman, L.

    1993-03-01

    Under EPRI sponsorship, an industry committee, similar in form and operation to other guideline committees, was created to develop Condensate Polishing Guidelines for both PWR and BWR systems. The committee reviewed the available utility and water treatment industry experience on system design and performance and incorporated operational and state-of-the-art information into document. These guidelines help utilities to optimize present condensate polisher designs as well as be a resource for retrofits or new construction. These guidelines present information that has not previously been presented in any consensus industry document. The committee generated guidelines that cover both deep bed and powdered resin systems as an integral part of the chemistry of PWR and BWR plants. The guidelines are separated into sections that deal with the basis for condensate polishing, system design, resin design and application, data management and performance and management responsibilities

  20. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  1. Computer aided information system for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidian, T.A.; Karmakar, G.; Rajagopal, R.; Shankar, V.; Patil, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    The computer aided information system (CAIS) is designed with a view to improve the performance of the operator. CAIS assists the plant operator in an advisory and support role, thereby reducing the workload level and potential human errors. The CAIS as explained here has been designed for a PWR type KLT- 40 used in Floating Nuclear Power Stations (FNPS). However the underlying philosophy evolved in designing the CAIS can be suitably adopted for other type of nuclear power plants too (BWR, PHWR). Operator information is divided into three broad categories: a) continuously available information b) automatically available information and c) on demand information. Two in number touch screens are provided on the main control panel. One is earmarked for continuously available information and the other is dedicated for automatically available information. Both the screens can be used at the operator's discretion for on-demand information. Automatically available information screen overrides the on-demand information screens. In addition to the above, CAIS has the features of event sequence recording, disturbance recording and information documentation. CAIS design ensures that the operator is not overburdened with excess and unnecessary information, but at the same time adequate and well formatted information is available. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs

  2. Measured performance of four PWR liquid radioactive waste treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Mandler, J.W.; Stalker, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the liquid radwaste treatment and boron recovery systems of four operating PWR power plants. The performance of a given system was determined from measurements of radionuclide inventories in samples drawn from demineralizers, evaporators, filters, and gaseous cleanup systems. The plants at which measurements were made are Fort Calhoun, Zion 1 and 2, Turkey Point 3 and 4, and Rancho Seco

  3. Natural circulation in a scaled PWR integral test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiang, R.L.; Jeuck, P.R. III

    1987-01-01

    Natural circulation is an important mechanism for cooling a nuclear power plant under abnormal operating conditions. To study natural circulation, we modeled a type of pressurized water reactor (PWR) that incorporates once-through steam generators. We conducted tests of single-phase natural circulations, two-phase natural circulations, and a boiler condenser mode. Because of complex geometry, the natural circulations observed in this facility exhibit some phenomena not commonly seen in a simple thermosyphon loop

  4. A comparison of fuzzy logic-PID control strategies for PWR pressurizer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavaklioglu, K.; Ikonomopoulos, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained from a comparison performed between classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic (FL) controlling the pressure in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The two methodologies have been tested under various transient scenarios, and their performances are evaluated with respect to robustness and on-time response to external stimuli. One of the main concerns in the safe operation of PWR is the pressure control in the primary side of the system. In order to maintain the pressure in a PWR at the desired level, the pressurizer component equipped with sprayers, heaters, and safety relief valves is used. The control strategy in a Westinghouse PWR is implemented with a PID controller that initiates either the electric heaters or the sprayers, depending on the direction of the coolant pressure deviation from the setpoint

  5. Validating Westinghouse atom 16 x 16 and 18 x 18 PWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Gustafson, J.; Jourdain, P.; Lindstroem, L.; Hallstadius, L.; Hofling, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Atom designs and fabricates PWR fuel for all major European fuel types: 17 x 17 standard (12 ft) and 17 x 17 XL (14 ft) for Westinghouse type PWRs, and 16 x 16 and 18 x 18 fuel for Siemens type PWRs. The W Atom PWR fuel designs are based on the extensive Westinghouse CE PWR fuel experience from combustion engineering type PWRs. The W atom designs utilise basic design features from the W CE fuel tradition, such as all-Zircaloy mid grids and the proven ( 6 rod years) Guardian TM debris catcher, which is integrated in the bottom Inconel grid. Several new features have been developed to meet with stringent European requirements originating from requirements on very high burnup, in combination with low-leakage core operating strategies and high coolant temperatures. The overall reliability of the Westinghouse Atom PWR fuel is very high; no fuel failure has been detected since 1997. (orig.)

  6. Maintenance service for major component of PWR plant. Replacement of pressurizer safe end weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Ueda, Takeshi; Suda, Naoki; Shintani, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016, MHI completed the replacement of safe end weld of pressurizer (Pz) of Ringhals unit 3, which was the first maintenance work for main component of pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant in Europe. For higher reliability and longer lifetime of PWR plant, MHI has conducted many kinds of maintenance works of main components of PWR plants in Japan against stress corrosion cracking due to aging degradation. Technical process for replacement of Pz safe end weld were established by MHI. MHI has experienced the work for 21 PWR units in Japan. That of Ringhals unit 3 was planned and conducted based on the experiences. In this work, Alloy 600 used for welds of nozzles of Pz was replaced with Alloy 690. Alloy 690 is more corrosive-resistant than Alloy 600. Specially designed equipment and technical process were developed and established by MHI to replace safe end weld of Pz and applied for the Ringhals unit 3 as a first application in Europe. The application had been performed in success and achieved the planned replacement work duration and total radiation dose by using sophisticated machining and welding equipment designed to meet the requirements to be small, lightweight and remote-controlled and operating by well skilled MHI personnel experienced in maintenance activities for major components of PWR plant in Japan. The success shows that the experience, activities and technology developed in Japan for main components of PWR plant shall be applicable to contribute reliable operations of nuclear power plants in Europe and other countries. (author)

  7. PWR: nuclear islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Framatome and its partners have produced this glossary of technical terms that can be used in writing English language documents relating to power plants (nuclear islands, individual components, nuclear services, etc.) with the hope of improving the quality of the documents intended for their clients, suppliers and partners and for others. This glossary will be particularly useful to the translators and authors of technical proposals, design documents, manufacturing documents, construction and operating documents concerning Pressurized Water Reactors written in English or French. It can also be useful as a reference document for students, researchers, journalists, etc., having to write on this subject. We would like to thank all those individuals working at the Ministere de la Recherche et de la Technologie, Electricite de France, Jeumont Schneider and Framatome who have contributed to this glossary. We would also appreciate any comments or sugestions intended to improve subsequent editions of this glossary [fr

  8. Simulation model and methodology for calculating the damage by internal radiation in a PWR reactor; Modelo de simulacion y metodologia para el calculo del dano por irradiacion en los internos de un reactor PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadenas Mendicoa, A. M.; Benito Hernandez, M.; Barreira Pereira, P.

    2012-07-01

    This study involves the development of the methodology and three-dimensional models to estimate the damage to the vessel internals of a commercial PWR reactor from irradiation history of operating cycles.

  9. Effects of tritiated water ingestion on mice: II. Damage at cellular vis-a-vis subcellular level monitored up to four generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.N.; Sharan, R.N.; Pozzi, L.

    1983-01-01

    Damage at cellular level is measured using colony forming units in spleen (CFU-S) technique while that at subcellular level by DNA unwinding technique. The damage is monitored up to four generations in Swiss albino mice. The results show drastically reduced colony forming ability in mice bone marrow cells (BMC). On plotting survival fractions (percent of control) for BMC against generations of mice, the plateau is found around 50% survival. The role of DNA in colony forming ability of BMC is tested. The results indicate that, at least, initial impairment of colony ability is not DNA dependent but related to some other factor(s)

  10. Globalização vis-a-vis a história do nacionalismo na América Latina: o caso do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céli Regina Jardim Pinto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article has as start point a central question: Is it possible to identify a reaction to the globalization of capitalism, in term of a globalized movement that involves an alternative to the system or to the north hegemony in relation to the south countries, many of them in conditions of complete miserably and deep social inequality? To examine this question the article is divided in to four small sections: 1.The Internationalism and nationalism; 2. The Nationalism in Brazil; 3. The global civil society; 4. A conclusion. This article concludes that we are far away from a global civil society able to propose a way of life that problematize the capitalist system and all forms of exploitation and class, gender and race dominations.

  11. EVOLUTION OF FIAT AUTOMÓVEIS S.AS STRATEGY VIS-A-VIS COMPETITIVE CHANGES IN THE BRAZILIAN AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY ENVIRONMENT: A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    SERGIO MOLINA MICAELO

    2003-01-01

    A Fiat Automóveis S.A. se destacou na indústria automobilística nacional ao atingir, em 2001, a liderança do mercado de automóveis e comerciais leves. A análise desta trajetória avaliou a variação do ambiente competitivo e as estratégias seguidas em dois momentos relevantes determinados por questionário estruturado, que foram 1994 e 2001. A caracterização do ambiente da indústria e das estratégias usaram, respectivamente, o modelo das cinco forças e a tipologia...

  12. Perception of Employers' in Transforming Technical and Vocational Education and Training vis-a-vis Emerging Technology Tools for Sustainable Workforce Development in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladiran Stephen Olabiyi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Economic competitiveness of a country depends to a large extent on the skills of its workforce. The skills and the competencies of the workforce, in turn, are dependent upon the quality of the country’s education and training. Education and training are undergoing continuous change, and this change poses more challenges to the 21st-century workforce, and to training institutions. Despite the importance of TVET in transforming economic development, of any nation, Nigeria still has different perspectives about the competency of its TVET graduates. Therefore, the paper aims at determining the perceptions of Organized Private Sector (OPS employers’ regarding the competency of TVET graduates and the role of emerging technology tools in transforming TVET for a sustainable workforce development. Using a descriptive survey research design and a sample of 80 OPS employers. A validated and piloted questionnaire based on a 5-point Likert scale used as the data collection instrument for the study. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics including means, standard deviation and ANOVA. Data analysis was facilitated using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS. Findings revealed that employers were not satisfied with the competency level of TVET graduates as it is showed that they are not well prepared to enter the competitive workforce and to be self-reliant. Given the nature and complexity of the field of TVET for a sustainable workforce, it was recommended that the utilization of adequate planning and management of emerging technology tools and resources in teaching TVET programs could contribute enormously to the quality and sustainability of the Nigerian workforce.

  13. Dissociated reality vis-a-vis integrative planning of AYUSH in Maternal Health Program: A situational analysis in Jaleswar block of Balasore district of Odisha, India

    OpenAIRE

    Dehury, Ranjit Kumar; Chatterjee, Suhita Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Mainstreaming of AYUSH and revitalization of local health traditions is one of the innovative components of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in the state of Odisha, India. In this study, an attempt was made to assess the potential of collocating AYUSH to improve maternal health services in tribal dominated Jaleswar block of the Balasore district. In addition, the study aimed at unearthing the underlying challenges and constraints in mainstreaming AYUSH and linking it with the Maternal...

  14. Histological vis-a-vis biochemical assessment on the toxic level and antineoplastic efficacy of a synthetic drug Pt-ATP on experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shipra; Sadhu, Arpita Sengupta; Patra, Swarup; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2008-11-12

    Cisplatin, a platinum based anticancer drug has played a vital role in the treatment of cancers by chemical agents, but in view of the serious toxicity including nephrotoxicity of cisplatin, various other platinum based drugs have been synthesized and screened to overcome its toxicity. A Pt-ATP compound was prepared in our laboratory hoping to have reduced or no toxicity along with the potentiality of reducing neoplasm growth. A Pt-ATP compound was prepared. It was first screened for its antineoplastic efficacy. Confirming that, subsequent experiments were carried on to test its toxicity on animals, viz. Albino Swiss mice. The animals were randomly divided into four sets--Set I: Erhlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) challenged mice; Set II: Normal mice; Set III: Drug treated mice, Set IVA Cisplatin (CDDP) treated mice, Set IV B EAC challenged Cisplatin treated mice. Set I was used to test antineoplasticity of the drug, Set II and Set III for studying drug toxicity and Set IV was treated with CDDP. Set II was used as a control. Animals were sacrificed after 5 days, 10 days 15 days and 20 days of drug administration on the 6th, 11th, 16th and 21st days respectively for Set I, II and III. Set IVA was sacrificed only on the 16th day and Set IV B on 6th and 11th days. For Set I only tumor cell count and packed cell volume (PCV) of tumor cells were recorded. For Set II and III, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) assays were done using serum while blood creatinine and creatine were assayed from blood filtrate. For cytotoxicity assessment liver, spleen and kidney tissues were collected and subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after extensive treatment. Set IV A was only studied for the biochemical parameters viz. aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) assays were done using serum while blood creatinine and creatine were assayed from blood filtrate. Set IV B was studied for tumor cell count after treatment with CDDP for 10 days. Our comparative studies with normal and drug treated animals reveal that the drug does not affect the body weight of the drug treated animals significantly. The biochemical parameters like ALT and AST levels are also within normal limits which rules out hepatotoxicity. The detailed histological studies by SEM reveal that the hepatic, kidney and spleen tissues are not adversely affected by the drug. Comparison of biochemical parameters with the CDDP treated animals show that Pt-ATP is not at all toxic like the CDDP. The Kaplan-Meier analysis of the survival data of Set I has shown promising results with a significance of p < 0.0001. Set I results are promising and indicating antineoplastic efficacy of the synthesized drug with increased life span of the animals. Biochemical analysis, hematological and SEM studies revealed that the drug was neither nephrotoxic nor hepato-spleeno-toxic under the experimental set up.

  15. Valuation of Strength of Structural Steel Angle Sections, under IS Code: 800-1984--A Case Study with Equal vis-a-vis Unequal Angles

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Kumar Varshaney

    2015-01-01

    International Journal of Engineering Research and Applications (IJERA) is an open access online peer reviewed international journal that publishes research and review articles in the fields of Computer Science, Neural Networks, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering, Information Technology, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Plastic Engineering, Food Technology, Textile Engineering, Nano Technology & science, Power Electronics, Electronics & Communication Engineering, Computa...

  16. An insight into the complexation of trivalent americium vis-a-vis lanthanides with bis(1,2,4-triazinyl)bipyridine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Mohapatra, Manoj; Mohapatra, Prasanta K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.; Gadly, Trilochan; Ghosh, Sunil K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Bioorganic Div.; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Theoretical Chemistry Section; Rawat, Neetika; Tomar, Bhupendra S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radioanalytical Chemistry Div.

    2017-01-26

    Complexation of Am{sup 3+} and Ln{sup 3+} (La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, and Er{sup 3+}) with two bis(1,2,4-triazinyl)bipyridine (C{sub 2}BTBP, C{sub 5}BTBP) derivatives has been studied in acetonitrile medium with use of various experimental techniques such as electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS), UV/Vis spectrophotometry, and solution calorimetry. Metal-ligand stoichiometries and conditional stability constants of these complexes were determined. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the complexation of Am{sup 3+} with any of the BTBP derivatives with use of UV/Vis spectrophotometric titration to determine the conditional stability constants. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out on the An{sup 3+} (U{sup 3+} and Am{sup 3+}) and Ln{sup 3+} (La{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, and Lu{sup 3+}) complexes of BTBP in order to understand the difference between the bonding in actinide and lanthanide complexes. The results indicate a stronger covalent interaction in the An-N bonds as compared to the Ln-N bonds, which leads to an actinide selectivity of this class of ligands. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Analysis of the determining factors in the attitude of an organ of information vis-a-vis the development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagnani, F.

    1978-09-01

    The report is devoted to the study of the role of the media, in France, confronted with the nuclear debate. It has been developed through two distinct and complementary approaches, which are illustrative of the possible attitudes towards the research on media impacts. The first approach deals with a systematic qualitative and quantitative review of the various French newspapers (national and regional). With the help of a sample of events running from January 68 to August 76, this study aims at a classification of the periodicals according to their behaviour towards the nuclear issues. It also tries to make assumptions on the role of the press in the public opinion regarding that matter. The second approach follows an inverse scope. By using the result of a survey on a representative sample of French adult population, regarding the nuclear debate, this study concentrates on the individuals as readers of different newspapers. On an other side, individuals are characterized according to their answers to a series of arguments about nuclear energy. In order to precise the impact of the press, this study puts into emphasis the degree of coherence between the general ideological position and the arguments on nuclear. It is proposed to interpret the discrepancies observed in terms of differential media impacts

  18. Visualization and co-occurrence of journals in the area of information science in vis-a-vis the Qualis/Capes system in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Luiz Pinto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at qualifying scientific journals that are part of the listing Qualis/Capes Brazil. The site of Capes only lists a few influential international titles. Included in this list are “Information Processing & Management, Organization Knowledge and Library” but several other important titles in Information Science are not covered. Our study describes 27 scientific worldwide journals, representing the world stage in Information Science, and which for some reason are not well respected in Brazil. The influence of these international journals (which are part of Web of Science is evidenced by measuring the power they have in the scientific field of Information Science as well as the power of major authors (Salton, Spink, Nicholas, Belkin, Saracevic, Dervin, Garfield and others. Citation index comparison with the other journals in the area and index of impact factor are also analyzed. The results highlight the importance of JASIST, Information Processing & Management, College Research Library, Journal of Documentation, ARIST, Journal Information Sciences, Information Retrieval and Library Trends, both in the matter of world representativeness and in the number of citations.

  19. Aging effects in PWR power plants components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the study of aging process of components in commercial plants of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The analysis is made through application of the Fault Trees Method, Monte Carlo Method and Fussell-Vesely Importance Measure. The approach of the study of aging in nuclear power plants, besides giving attention to the economic factors involved directly with the extent of their operational life, also provide significant data on security issues. The latest case involving process of life extension of a PWR could be seen in Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant through investing of $27 million for the installation of a new reactor lid. The corrective action has generated an estimated operating life extension of Angra I in twenty years, offering great economy compared with building cost of a new plant and anterior decommissioning, if it had reached the time operating limit of forty years. The Extension of the operating life of a nuclear power plant must be accompanied by a special attention to the components of the systems and their aging process. After the application of the methodology (aging analysis of the injection system of the containment spray) proposed in this work, it can be seen that 'the increase in the rate of component failure, due the aging process, generates the increase in the general unavailability of the system that containing these basic components'. The final results obtained were as expected and may contribute to the maintenance policy, preventing premature aging process in Nuclear Plant Systems. (author)

  20. Analysis of reactivity accidents in PWR'S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camous, F.; Chesnel, A.

    1989-12-01

    This note describes the French strategy which has consisted, firstly, in examining all the accidents presented in the PWR unit safety reports in order to determine for each parameter the impact on accident consequences of varying the parameter considered, secondly in analyzing the provisions taken into account to restrict variation of this parameter to within an acceptable range and thirdly, in checking that the reliability of these provisions is compatible with the potential consequences of transgression of the authorized limits. Taking into consideration violations of technical operating specifications and/or non-observance of operating procedures, equipment failures, and partial or total unavailability of safety systems, these studies have shown that fuel mechanical strength limits can be reached but that the probability of occurrence of the corresponding events places them in the residual risk field and that it must, in fact, be remembered that there is a wide margin between the design basis accidents and accidents resulting in fuel destruction. However, during the coming year, we still have to analyze scenarios dealing with cumulated events or incidents leading to a reactivity accident. This program will be mainly concerned with the impact of the cases examined relating to dilution incidents under normal operating conditions or accident operating conditions

  1. Improvement in PWR flexibility the french program 1975-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, A.; Miossec, C.

    1985-12-01

    Between 1975 and 1985, a substantial effort was launched in France to greatly improve PWR's flexibility, resulting in the current situation where both frequency control and load follow are now routinely performed on most plants in operation. Based on rapidly accumulating operational experience and on all expertise acquired in the past decade, a second-generation core control strategy is now being finalized for application on all future 1400 MW plants (with commercial operation scheduled in 1992 for first unit). This 20-year program is discussed

  2. Material property changes of stainless steels under PWR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, Koji; Nishioka, Hiromasa; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Kamaya, Masayuki; Miura, Terumitsu; Torimaru, Tadahiko

    2009-01-01

    Structural integrity of core structural materials is one of the key issues for long and safe operation of pressurized water reactors. The stainless steel components are exposed to neutron irradiation and high-temperature water, which cause significant property changes and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in some cases. Understanding of irradiation induced material property changes is essential to predict integrity of core components. In the present study, microstructure and microchemistry, mechanical properties, and IASCC behavior were examined in 316 stainless steels irradiated to 1 - 73 dpa in a PWR. Dose-dependent changes of dislocation loops and cavities, grain boundary segregation, tensile properties and fracture mode, deformation behavior, and their interrelation were discussed. Tensile properties and deformation behavior were well coincident with microstructural changes. IASCC susceptibility under slow strain rate tensile tests, IASCC initiation under constant load tests in simulated PWR primary water, and their relationship to material changes were discussed. (author)

  3. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de

    2015-01-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  4. Industrial assessment of nonbackfittable PWR design modifications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Daleas, R.S.; Miller, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Reactor Design Study, various nonbackfittable PWR design modifications were evaluated to determine their potential for improved uranium utilization and commercial viability. Combustion Engineering, Inc. contributed to this effort through participation in the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory industrial assessment of such design modifications. Seven modifications, including the use of higher primary system temperatures and pressures, rapid-frequent refueling, end-of-cycle stretchout, core periphery modifications, radial blankets, low power density cores, and small PWR assemblies, were evaluated with respect to uranium utilization, economics, technical and operational complexity, and several other subjective considerations. Rapid-frequent refueling was judged to have the highest potential although it would probably not be economical for the majority of reactors with the design assumptions used in this assessment

  5. Electrical and control aspects of the Sizewell B PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The pressurized water reactor, Sizewell-B, which is being built in Suffolk is well on in its construction schedule. This conference looked at the electrical and control aspects of the first PWR to be built in the United Kingdom. Although based on the standard Westinghouse PWR design, modifications have been made to meet the particular requirements of the site and the UK licensing regulations. There are 11 papers on all aspects of the electrical systems, 5 papers on the cables and cable installation, 5 on the main control rooms and auxiliary shutdown room, 5 on the integrated system and centralised operation, 6 on the monitoring and protection systems and 9 on the reactor protection systems. All 41 are indexed separately. (UK)

  6. The plutonium recycle for PWR reactors from brazilian nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. The study starts with the calculation of a reference reactor and has flexibility to evaluate the demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): Without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5% U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the fifth operation cycle of the thermal reactors. (author)

  7. A concept of PWR using plate and shell heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Luciano Ondir; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de, E-mail: luciano.ondir@gmail.com, E-mail: delvonei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous work it was verified the physical possibility of using plate and shell heat exchangers for steam generation in a PWR for merchant ships. This work studies the possibility of using GESMEX commercial of the shelf plate and shell heat exchanger of series XPS. It was found it is feasible for this type of heat exchanger to meet operational and accidental requirements for steam generation in PWR. Additionally, it is proposed an arrangement of such heat exchangers inside the reactor pressure vessel. Such arrangement may avoid ANSI/ANS51.1 nuclear class I requirements on those heat exchangers because they are contained in the reactor coolant pressure barrier and play no role in accidental scenarios. Additionally, those plates work under compression, preventing the risk of rupture. Being considered non-nuclear safety, having a modular architecture and working under compression may turn such architectural choice a must to meet safety objectives with improved economics. (author)

  8. Surveillance of vibrations in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espefaelt, R.; Lorenzen, J.; Aakerhielm, F.

    1980-07-01

    The core of a PWR - including fuel elements, internal structure, control rods and core support structure inside the pressure vessel - is subjected to forces which can cause vibrations. One sensitive means to detect and analyse such vibrations is by means of the noise from incore and excore neutron detector signals. In this project noise recordings have been made on two occasions in the Ringhals 2 plant and the obtained data been analysed using the Studsvik Noise Analysis Program System (SNAPS). The results have been intepreted and a detailed description of the vibrational status of the core and pressure vessel internals has been produced. On the basis of the obtained results it is proposed that neutron signal noise analysis should be performed at each PWR plant in the beginning, middle and end of each fuel cycle and an analysis be made using the methods developed in the project. It would also provide a contribution to a higher degree of preparedness for diagnostic tasks in case of unexpected and abnormal events. (author)

  9. Gadolinia experience and design for PWR fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe Siemens Power Corporation's (SPC) current experience with the burnable absorber gadolinia in PWR fuel assemblies, including optimized features of SPC's PWR gadolinia designs, and comparisons with other burnable absorbers. Siemens is the world leader in PWR gadolinia experience. More than 5,900 Siemens PWR gadolinia-bearing fuel assemblies have been irradiated. The use of gadolinia-bearing fuel provides significant flexibility in fuel cycle designs, allows for low radial leakage fuel management and extended operating cycles, and reduces BOC (beginning-of-cycle) soluble boron concentrations. The optimized use of an integral burnable neutron absorber is a design feature which provides improved economic performance for PWR fuel assemblies. This paper includes a comparison between three different types of integral burnable absorbers: gadolinia, Zirconium diboride and erbia. Fuel cycle design studies performed by Siemens have shown that the enrichment requirements for 18-24 month fuel cycles utilizing gadolinia or zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorbers can be approximately the same. Although a typical gadolinia residual penalty for a cycle design of this length is as low as 0.02-0.03 wt% U-235, the design flexibility of gadolinia allows for very aggressive low-leakage core loading plans which reduces the enrichment requirements for gadolinia-bearing fuel. SPC has optimized its use of gadolinia in PWR fuel cycles. Typically, low (2-4) weight percent Gd 2 O 3 is used for beginning to middle of cycle reactivity hold down as well as soluble boron concentration holddown at BOC. Higher concentrations of Gd 2 O 3 , such as 6 and 8 wt%, are used to control power peaking in assemblies later in the cycle. SPC has developed core strategies that maximize the use of lower gadolinia concentrations which significantly reduces the gadolinia residual reactivity penalty. This optimization includes minimizing the number of rods with

  10. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong.

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs

  11. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs.

  12. Explicit treatment of spectral history effects in PWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral history effects in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are a consequence of spatially distributed and/or time-dependent quantities such as power, moderator temperature, soluble boron concentration, control rod position, etc., defining open-quotes operating conditions.close quotes Operating conditions, global and local, affect neutron spectrum and isotopic reaction rates and thus the evolution of the fuel composition. Any effect that hardens the neutron spectrum, such as elevated temperature or high soluble boron concentration, will increase the fuel conversion ratio and result in more reactive fuel. This paper describes history effects for an 18-month equilibruim cycle of an ABB CE system 80 PWR

  13. Transfer of chemicals in PWR systems: secondary side

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, O.

    1978-01-01

    Transfer of chemicals in the secondary side of pressurized water reactor systems with recirculating and once-through steam generators is considered. Chemical data on water, steam and deposit chemistry of twenty-six operating units are given and major physical-chemical processes and differences between the two systems and between fossil and PWR systems are discussed. It is concluded that the limited available data show the average water and steam chemistry to be within recommended limits, but large variations of impurity concentrations and corrosion problems encountered indicate that our knowledge of the system chemistry and chemical thermodynamics, system design, sampling, analysis and operation need improvement. (author)

  14. The N4 plant: culmination of French PWR experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellet, J.; Houyez, A.; Journet, J.; Pierrard, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The model N4 series of 1400MWe class PWR plants has been developed in France from a unique base of technical and operating experience. It meets the French government's requirement for a reactor free of constraints due to licensing agreements with overseas companies, with enhanced safety features and incorporating the lessons of Three Mile Island. In particular, improvements have been made to the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the primary pumps and control systems. The units are capable of daily load following and extended operation between refuelling. The N4 plant includes a new design of turbine-generator. (author)

  15. Vibration behavior of PWR reactor internals Model experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assedo, R.; Dubourg, M.; Livolant, M.; Epstein, A.

    1975-01-01

    In the late 1971, the CEA and FRAMATOME decided to undertake a comprehensive joint program of studying the vibration behavior of PWR internals of the 900 MWe, 50 cycle, 3 loop reactor series being built by FRAMATOME in France. The PWR reactor internals are submitted to several sources of excitation during normal operation. Two main sources of excitation may effect the internals behavior: the large flow turbulences which could generate various instabilities such as: vortex shedding: the pump pressure fluctuations which could generate acoustic noise in the circuit at frequencies corresponding to shaft speed frequencies or blade passing frequencies, and their respective harmonics. The flow induced vibrations are of complex nature and the approach selected, for this comprehensive program, is semi-empirical and based on both theoretical analysis and experiments on a reduced scale model and full scale internals. The experimental support of this program consists of: the SAFRAN test loop which consists of an hydroelastic similitude of a 1/8 scale model of a PWR; harmonic vibration tests in air performed on full scale reactor internals in the manufacturing shop; the GENNEVILLIERS facilities which is a full flow test facility of primary pump; the measurements carried out during start up on the Tihange reactor. This program will be completed in April 1975. The results of this program, the originality of which consists of studying separately the effects of random excitations and acoustic noises, on the internals behavior, and by establishing a comparison between experiments and analysis, will bring a major contribution for explaining the complex vibration phenomena occurring in a PWR

  16. The comparison of available data on PWR assembly thermal behavior with analytical predictions. Topical report (final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.; Todreas, N.

    1979-02-01

    The comparison of available data with analytical predictions has been illustrated in this report. Since few data on the cross flow are available, a study of parameters in the transverse momentum equation was performed to assess the sensitivity of results to their assumed values. It is confirmed that effects of these parameters on the overall results are not significant under PWR operating conditions. Data on subchannel properties of quality and mass flux were also assessed. From the data comparisons, it is evident that COBRA can successfully predict the PWR normal operating conditions but cannot predict the trend under bulk quality conditions

  17. Babcock and Wilcox advanced PWR development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulynych, G.E.; Lemon, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Babcock and Wilcox 600 MWe PWR design is discussed. Main features of the new B-600 design are improvements in reactor system configuration, glandless coolant pumps, safety features, core design and steam generators

  18. Hydrogen production in a PWR during LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information on hydrogen generation during LOCA in French 900 MW PWR power plants. The design basis accident is taken into account as well as more severe accidents assuming failure of emergency systems

  19. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  20. Study on advanced nuclear fuel cycle of PWR/CANDU synergism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zhongsheng; Huo Xiaodong

    2002-01-01

    According to the concrete condition that China has both PWR and CANDU reactors, one of the advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategy of PWR/CANDU synergism ws proposed, i.e. the reprocessed uranium of spent PWR fuel was used in CANDU reactor, which will save the uranium resource, increase the energy output, decrease the quantity of spent fuels to be disposed and lower the cost of nuclear power. Because of the inherent flexibility of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactor, the transition from the natural uranium to the recycled uranium (RU) can be completed without any changes of the structure of reactor core and operation mode. Furthermore, because of the low radiation level of RU, which is acceptable for CANDU reactor fuel fabrication, the present product line of fuel elements of CANDU reactor only need to be shielded slightly, also the conditions of transportation, operation and fuel management need not to be changed. Thus this strategy has significant practical and economical benefit

  1. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: gdjaime@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  2. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: gdjaime@ien.gov.b, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  3. Methodology for the LABIHS PWR simulator modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaime, Guilherme D.G.; Oliveira, Mauro V.

    2011-01-01

    The Human-System Interface Laboratory (LABIHS) simulator is composed by a set of advanced hardware and software components whose goal is to simulate the main characteristics of a Pressured Water Reactor (PWR). This simulator serves for a set of purposes, such as: control room modernization projects; designing of operator aiding systems; providing technological expertise for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) designing; control rooms and interfaces evaluations considering both ergonomics and human factors aspects; interaction analysis between operators and the various systems operated by them; and human reliability analysis in scenarios considering simulated accidents and normal operation. The simulator runs in a PA-RISC architecture server (HPC3700), developed nearby 2000's, using the HP-UX operating system. All mathematical modeling components were written using the HP Fortran-77 programming language with a shared memory to exchange data from/to all simulator modules. Although this hardware/software framework has been discontinued in 2008, with costumer support ceasing in 2013, it is still used to run and operate the simulator. Due to the fact that the simulator is based on an obsolete and proprietary appliance, the laboratory is subject to efficiency and availability issues, such as: downtime caused by hardware failures; inability to run experiments on modern and well known architectures; and lack of choice of running multiple simulation instances simultaneously. This way, there is a need for a proposal and implementation of solutions so that: the simulator can be ported to the Linux operating system, running on the x86 instruction set architecture (i.e. personal computers); we can simultaneously run multiple instances of the simulator; and the operator terminals run remotely. This paper deals with the design stage of the simulator modernization, in which it is performed a thorough inspection of the hardware and software currently in operation. Our goal is to

  4. Development and application of methods and computer codes of fuel management and nuclear design of reload cycles in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Corella, M.R.; Esteban, A.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Minguez, E.; Perlado, J.M.; Pena, J.; Matias, E. de; Llorente, A.; Navascues, J.; Serrano, J.

    1976-01-01

    Description of methods and computer codes for Fuel Management and Nuclear Design of Reload Cycles in PWR, developed at JEN by adaptation of previous codes (LEOPARD, NUTRIX, CITATION, FUELCOST) and implementation of original codes (TEMP, SOTHIS, CICLON, NUDO, MELON, ROLLO, LIBRA, PENELOPE) and their application to the project of Management and Design of Reload Cycles of a 510 Mwt PWR, including comparison with results of experimental operation and other calculations for validation of methods. (author) [es

  5. Maintenance technologies for SCC of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okimura, Koji; Hori, Nobuyuki; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Tokuhisa, Kiichi; Kamo, Kazuhiko; Kurokawa, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    The recent technologies of test, relaxation of deterioration, repairing and change of materials are explained for safe and stable operation of pressurized water reactor (PWR). Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is originated by three factors such as materials, stress and environment. The eddy current test (ECT) method for the stream generator pipe and the ultrasonic test method for welding part of pipe were developed as the test technologies. Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Inconel 600 in the welding part is explained. The shot peening of instrument in the gas, the water jet peening of it in water, and laser irradiation on the surface are illustrated as some examples of improvement technology of stress. The cladding of Inconel 690 on Inconel 600 is carried out under the condition of environmental cut. Total or some parts of the upper part of reactor, stream generator and structure in the reactor are changed by the improvement technologies. Changing Inconel 600 joint in the exit pipe of reactor with Inconel 690 is illustrated. (S.Y.)

  6. MELCOR/VISOR PWR desktop simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With, Anka de; Wakker, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, there is a need for a learning support and training tool for nuclear engineers, utilities and students in order to broaden their understanding of advanced nuclear plant characteristics, dynamics, transients and safety features. Nuclear system analysis codes like ASTEC, RELAP5, RETRAN and MELCOR provide calculation results of and visualization tools can be used to graphically represent these results. However, for an efficient education and training a more interactive tool such as a simulator is needed. The simulator connects the graphical tool with the calculation tool in an interactive manner. A small number of desktop simulators exist [1-3]. The existing simulators are capable of representing different types of power plants and various accident conditions. However, they were found to be too general to be used as a reliable plant-specific accident analysis or training tool. A desktop simulator of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been created under contract of the Dutch nuclear regulatory body (KFD). The desktop simulator is a software package that provides a close to real simulation of the Dutch nuclear power plant Borssele (KCB) and is used for training of the accident response. The simulator includes the majority of the power plant systems, necessary for the successful simulation of the KCB plant during normal operation, malfunctions and accident situations, and it has been successfully validated against the results of the safety evaluations from the KCB safety report. (orig.)

  7. Economic optimization of PWR cores with ROSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhagen, F.C.M.; Wakker, P.H.

    2005-01-01

    The core-loading pattern is decisive for fuel cycle economics, fuel safety parameters and economic planning for future cycles. ROSA, NRG's loading pattern optimization code system for PWRs, has proven for over a decade to be a valuable tool to reactor operators for improving their fuel management economics. ROSA uses simulated annealing as loading pattern optimization technique, in combination with an extremely fast 3-D neutronics code for loading pattern calculations. The code is continuously extended with new optimization parameters and rules. This paper outlines recent developments of the ROSA code system and discusses results of PWR specific applications of ROSA. Core designs with a large variety of challenging constraints have been realized with ROSA. As a typical example, for the 193 assembly, Vantage 5H/RFA-2 fueled TVA's Watts Bar unit 1, a cycle 4 core with 76 feed assemblies was designed. This was followed by a high-energy cycle 5 with only 77 feed assemblies and approximately 535 days of natural cycle length. Subsequently, an economical core using 72 bundles was designed for cycle 6. This resulted in considerable savings in the cost of feed assemblies for reloads. The typical accuracy of ROSA compared to results of license codes in within ±0.02 for normalized assembly powers, ±0.03 for maximum enthalpy rise hot channel factor (F ΔH ), and ±3 days for natural cycle length. (author)

  8. ABB PWR fuel design for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Jourdain, P.; Limback, M.; Garde, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion, hydriding and irradiation induced growth of a based materials are important factors for the high burnup performance of PWR fuel. ABB has developed a number of Zr based alloys to meet the need for fuel that enables operation to elevated burnups. The materials include composition and processing optimised Zircaloy 4 (OPTIN TM ) and Zircaloy 2 (Zircaloy 2P), as well as advanced Zr based alloys with chemical compositions outside the composition specified for Zircaloy. The advanced alloys are either used as Duplex or as single component claddings. The Duplex claddings have an inner component of Zircaloy and an outer layer of Zr with small additions of alloying elements. ABB has furthermore improved the dimensional stability of the fuel assembly by developing stiffer and more bow resistant guide tubes while debris related fuel failures have been eliminated from ABB fuel by introducing the Guardian TM grid. Intermediate flow mixers that improve the thermal hydraulic performance and the dimensional stability of the fuel has also been developed within ABB. (author)

  9. VALIDATION OF SIMBAT-PWR USING STANDARD CODE OF COBRA-EN ON REACTOR TRANSIENT CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Darwis Isnaini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The validation of Pressurized Water Reactor typed Nuclear Power Plant simulator developed by BATAN (SIMBAT-PWR using standard code of COBRA-EN on reactor transient condition has been done. The development of SIMBAT-PWR has accomplished several neutronics and thermal-hydraulic calculation modules. Therefore, the validation of the simulator is needed, especially in transient reactor operation condition. The research purpose is for characterizing the thermal-hydraulic parameters of PWR1000 core, which be able to be applied or as a comparison in developing the SIMBAT-PWR. The validation involves the calculation of the thermal-hydraulic parameters using COBRA-EN code. Furthermore, the calculation schemes are based on COBRA-EN with fixed material properties and dynamic properties that calculated by MATPRO subroutine (COBRA-EN+MATPRO for reactor condition of startup, power rise and power fluctuation from nominal to over power. The comparison of the temperature distribution at nominal 100% power shows that the fuel centerline temperature calculated by SIMBAT-PWR has 8.76% higher result than COBRA-EN result and 7.70% lower result than COBRA-EN+MATPRO. In general, SIMBAT-PWR calculation results on fuel temperature distribution are mostly between COBRA-EN and COBRA-EN+MATPRO results. The deviations of the fuel centerline, fuel surface, inner and outer cladding as well as coolant bulk temperature in the SIMBAT-PWR and the COBRA-EN calculation, are due to the value difference of the gap heat transfer coefficient and the cladding thermal conductivity.

  10. The increase in fatigue crack growth rates observed for Zircaloy-4 in a PWR environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Kammenzind, B. F.

    2018-02-01

    Cyclic stresses produced during the operation of nuclear reactors can result in the extension of cracks by processes of fatigue. Although fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) data for Zircaloy-4 in air are available, little testing has been performed in a PWR primary water environment. Test programs have been performed by Gee et al., in 1989 and Picker and Pickles in 1984 by the UK Atomic Energy Authority, and by Wisner et al., in 1994, that have shown an enhancement in FCGR for Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 in high-temperature water. In this work, FCGR testing is performed on Zircaloy-4 in a PWR environment in the hydrided and non-hydrided condition over a range of stress-intensity. Measurements of crack extension are performed using a direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The cyclic rate in the PWR primary water environment is varied between 1 cycle per minute to 0.1 cycle per minute. Faster FCGR rates are observed in water in comparison to FCGR testing performed in air for the hydrided material. Hydrided and non-hydrided materials had similar FCGR values in air, but the non-hydrided material exhibited much lower rates of FCGR in a PWR primary water environment than for hydrided material. Hydrides are shown to exhibit an increased tendency for cracking or decohesion in a PWR primary water environment that results in an enhancement in FCGR values. The FCGR in the PWR primary water only increased slightly with decreasing cycle frequency in the range of 1 cycle per minute to 0.1 cycle per minute. Comparisons between the FCGR in water and air show the enhancement from the PWR environment is affected by the applied stress intensity.

  11. Degradation of fastener in reactor internal of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Ryu, W. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, W. G.; Chung, M. K.; Han, C. H

    2000-03-01

    Main component degraded in reactor internal structure of PWR is fastener such as bolts, stud, cap screw, and pins. The failure of these components may damage nuclear fuel and limits the operation of nuclear reactor. In foreign reactors operated more than 10 years, an increasing number of incidents of degraded thread fasteners have been reported. The degradation of these components impair the integrity of reactor internal structure and limit the life extension of nuclear power plant. To solve the problem of fastener failure, the incidents of failure and main mechanisms should be investigated. the purpose of this state-of-the -art report is to investigate the failure incidents and mechanisms of fastener in foreign and domestic PWR and make a guide to select a proper materials. There is no intent to describe each event in detail in this report. This report covers the failures of fastener and damage mechanisms reported by the licensees of operating nuclear power plants and the applications of plants constructed after 1964. This information is derived from pertinent licensee event report, reportable occurrence reports, operating reactor event memoranda, failure analysis reports, and other relevant documents. (author)

  12. A new approach to PWR power control using intelligent techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroushaki, M.; Ghofrani, M.B.; Lucas, C.; Yazdanpanah, M.J.; Sadati, N.

    2004-01-01

    Improved load following capability is one of the main technical performances of advanced PWR(APWR). Controlling the nuclear reactor core during load following operation encounters some difficulties. These difficulties mainly arise from nuclear reactor core limitations in local power peaking, while the core is subject to large and sharp variation of local power density during transients. Axial offset (A.O) is the parameter usually used to represent of core power peaking, in form of a practical parameter. This paper, proposes a new intelligent approach to A.o control of PWR nuclear reactors core during load following operation. This method uses a neural network model of the core to predict the dynamic behavior of the core and a fuzzy critic based on the operator knowledge and experience for the purpose of decision-making during load following operations. Simulation results show that this method can use optimum control rod groups maneuver with variable overlapping and may improve the reactor load following capability

  13. A digital control and monitoring system for PWR waste-disposal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Toshiharu; Fuchigami, Kazuyuki; Shimozato, Masao; Takazawa, Kazuo

    1982-01-01

    Mitsubishi Electric has developed a digital control and monitoring system for PWR waste-disposal systems. This novel system has improved operability due to its automated operations and control, and integrated supervisory functions. The system includes other features to improve operability: sequence control by a control computer, direct-digital process control, integrated supervision of operation states by a supervisory computer and a high-speed dataway, and CRT interfacing between the computer and dataway. (author)

  14. Fatigue crack growth analysis of a 450 PWR - lateral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taupin, P.; Flamand, F.

    1988-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth analysis of a 5 mm deep surface crack in the crotch region of a 45 0 Lateral (12 inch diameter) was performed on a 3-Loop 900 MWe PWR Plant under Normal and upset loading conditions. Stress Intensity factors were computed using the weight-function technique. The latter were obtained for a polynomial stress distribution at the corner of the lateral under contract with the Pressure Vessel Research Committee of the WRC. The study shows that after 40 years of normal operation the size of the end of life crack is limited to about 25 mm for the chosen lateral with a thickness of 300 mm

  15. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-01-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  16. Conversion ratio in epithermal PWR, in thorium and uranium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, D.E.G.

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained for the conversion ratio in PWR reactors with close lattices, operating in thorium and uranium cycles, are presented. The study of those reactors is done in an unitary fuel cell of the lattices with several ratios V sub(M)/V sub(F), considering only the equilibrium cycles and adopting a non-spatial depletion calculation model, aiming to simulate mass flux of reactor heavy elements in the reactor. The neutronic analysis and the cross sections generation are done with Hammer computer code, with one critical apreciation about the application of this code in epithermal systems and with modifications introduced in the library of basic data. (E.G.) [pt

  17. For sale: 7 AGR stations and a brand new PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Britain's seven AGR stations and the Sizewell B PWR will pass to private ownership under the UK government's plan to privatise the two nuclear generators, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear, sometime next year. Under the new set-up, the two generators will become operating subsidiaries of a holding company which will be headquartered in Scotland. The companies' ageing Magnox gas-cooled reactors will remain in a separate public sector company before being transferred to British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) at the time of privatisation. (author)

  18. Modified ADS molten salt processes for back-end fuel cycle of PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In-Kyu; Yeon, Jei-Won; Kim, Won-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The back-end fuel cycle concept for PWR spent fuel is explained. This concept is adequate for Korea, which has operated both PWR and CANDU reactors. Molten salt processes for accelerator driven system (ADS) were modified both for the transmutation of long-lived radioisotopes and for the utilisation of the remained fissile uranium in PWR spent fuels. Prior to applying molten salt processes to PWR fuel, hydrofluorination and fluorination processes are applied to obtain uranium hexafluoride from the spent fuel pellet. It is converted to uranium dioxide and fabricated into CANDU fuel. From the remained fluoride compounds, transuranium elements can be separated by the molten salt technology such as electrowinning and reductive extraction processes for transmutation purpose without weakening the proliferation resistance of molten salt technology. The proposed fuel cycle concept using fluorination processes is thought to be adequate for our nuclear program and can replace DUPIC (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor) fuel cycle. Each process for the proposed fuel cycle concept was evaluated in detail

  19. Preliminary safety analysis of the PWR with accident-tolerant fuels during severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng; Liu, Tong; Deng, Yongjun; Huang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of severe accident scenarios for a PWR fueled with ATF system is performed. • A large-break LOCA without ECCS is analyzed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • Extended SBO cases are discussed for the PWR fueled with ATF system. • The accident-tolerance of ATF system for application in PWR is illustrated. - Abstract: Experience gained in decades of nuclear safety research and previous nuclear accidents direct to the investigation of passive safety system design and accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) system which is now becoming a hot research point in the nuclear energy field. The ATF system is aimed at upgrading safety characteristics of the nuclear fuel and cladding in a reactor core where active cooling has been lost, and is preferable or comparable to the current UO 2 –Zr system when the reactor is in normal operation. By virtue of advanced materials with improved properties, the ATF system will obviously slow down the progression of accidents, allowing wider margin of time for the mitigation measures to work. Specifically, the simulation and analysis of a large break loss of coolant accident (LBLOCA) without ECCS and extended station blackout (SBO) severe accident are performed for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with ATF candidates, to reflect the accident-tolerance of ATF

  20. Mathematical modelling of plant transients in the PWR for simulator purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartel, K.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter presents the results of the testing of anticipated and abnormal plant transients in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) of the type WWER 440 by means of the numerical simulation of 32 different, stationary and nonstationary, operational regimes. Topics considered include the formation of the PWR mathematical model, the physical approximation of the reactor core, the structure of the reactor core model, a mathematical approximation of the reactor model, the selection of numerical methods, and a computerized simulation system. The necessity of a PWR simulator in Czechoslovakia is justified by the present status and the outlook for the further development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power complex

  1. Assessment of options for the treatment of Sizewell PWR liquid effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornby, J.; Allam, J.; Knibbs, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the origins of PWR liquid waste streams, their composition and rates of arising. Data has been collected from operational PWRs and estimates obtained for Sizewell B PWR liquid waste streams. Current liquid waste treatment practices are reviewed and assessments made of established and novel treatment techniques which could be applicable to Sizewell B. A short list of treatment options is given and recommendations are made relating to established treatment technologies suitable for Sizewell B and also to development work on more novel treatments which could lead to a reduction in waste disposal volumes. (author)

  2. Evaluation of PWR steam generator water hammer. Final technical report, June 1, 1976--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.J.; Rothe, P.H.; Wallis, G.B.; Young, L.R.

    1977-05-01

    An investigation of waterhammer in the main feedwater piping of PWR steam generators due to water slugs formed in the steam generator feedring is reported. The relevant evidence from PWR operation and testing is compiled and summarized. The state-of-the-art of analysis of related phenomena is reviewed. Original exploratory modeling experiments at 1 / 10 and 1 / 4 scale are reported. Bounding analyses of the behavior are performed and several key phenomena have been identified for the first time. Recommendations to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are made

  3. Prevention and mitigation of steam-generator water-hammer events in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Anderson, N.

    1982-11-01

    Water hammer in nuclear power plants is an unresolved safety issue under study at the NRC (USI A-1). One of the identified safety concerns is steam generator water hammer (SGWH) in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) plants. This report presents a summary of: (1) the causes of SGWH; (2) various fixes employed to prevent or mitigate SGWH; and (3) the nature and status of modifications that have been made at each operating PWR plant. The NRC staff considers that the issue of SGWH in top feedring designs has been technically resolved. This report does not address technical findings relevant to water hammer in preheat type steam generators. 10 figures, 2 tables

  4. Electrical systems design applications on Japanese PWR plants in light of the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    After the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (1F-NPP) accident (i.e. Station Blackout), several design enhancements have been incorporated or are under considering to Mitsubishi PWR plants' design of not only operational plants' design but also new plants' design. Especially, there are several important enhancements in the area of the electrical system design. In this presentation, design enhancements related to following electrical systems/equipment are introduced; - Offsite Power System; - Emergency Power Source; - Safety-related Battery; - Alternative AC Power Supply Systems. In addition, relevant design requirements/conditions which are or will be considered in Mitsubishi PWR plants are introduced. (authors)

  5. Simplified analysis of passive residual heat removal systems for small size PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The function and general objectives of a passive residual heat removal system for small size PWR's are defined. The characteristic configuration, the components and the operation modes of this system are concisely described. A preliminary conceptual specification of this system, for a small size PWR of 400 MW thermal, is made analogous to the decay heat removal system of the AP-600 reactor. It is shown by analytic models that such passive systems can dissipate 2% of nominal power within the thermal limits allowed to the reactor fuel elements. (author)

  6. Analysis of the alternatives for the chemical treatment of the secondary circuit of PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.P.G.; Silva Neto, A.J. da; Braganca Junior, A.; Dominguez, D.

    1990-01-01

    The operational experiences within PWR power plants shows that the major problems which affect the plant availability occurs in the secondary side, mainly in the steam generators and condenser. The aim of this report is to perform an evaluation of the main chemical treatment processes, which are applied to the secondary side of PWR power plants in order to reduce the corrosion problems to which are exposed the system equipment, minimizing in this way the shut down and maintenance cost for repairs and replacement of damaged components. (author)

  7. Analysis of dynamic behavior of a PWR utilizing the computer program SARDAN 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessanha, J.A.O.

    1982-07-01

    In the design of a PWR nuclear plant it is necessary to verify if the design limits are respected, even under abnormal operation condition. An evolution of SARDAN code, developed to simulate transients in PWR, are presented. The new aspects incorporeted in SARDAN 2 are: the fuel ROD analysis in finite-diference, an open channel model for the critic subchannel analysis and the introduction of a simplified model for the automatic control system. The program has been tested in accident condition II, in special, uncontrolled ROD cluster assembly bank withoraw, dropped full-length assembly group, uncontrolled Boron dilution, and the results obtained were considered satisfactory. (Author) [pt

  8. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR; Planes de gestion de vida en centrales nucleares PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-10-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  9. Assessment of PWR Steam Generator modelling in RELAP5/MOD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putney, J.M.; Preece, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    An assessment of Steam Generator (SG) modelling in the PWR thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD2 is presented. The assessment is based on a review of code assessment calculations performed in the UK and elsewhere, detailed calculations against a series of commissioning tests carried out on the Wolf Creek PWR and analytical investigations of the phenomena involved in normal and abnormal SG operation. A number of modelling deficiencies are identified and their implications for PWR safety analysis are discussed -- including methods for compensating for the deficiencies through changes to the input deck. Consideration is also given as to whether the deficiencies will still be present in the successor code RELAP5/MOD3

  10. Hydrodynamical tests with an original PWR heat removal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wietstock, P.

    1984-01-01

    GKSS-Forschungszentrum performes hydrodynamical tests with an original PWR heat removal pump to analyse the influences of fluid parameters on the capacity and cavitation behavior of the pump in order to get further improvements of the quantification of the reached safety-level. It can be concluded, that in case of the tested heat removal pump the additional loads during transition from cavitation free operation into fully cavitation for the investigated operation point with 980 m 3 /h will be smaller than the alteration of loads during passing through the total characteristic. The results from cavitation tests for other operation points indicate, that this very important consequence especially for accident operation will be valid for the total specified pump flow area. (orig.)

  11. Identification of dose-reduction techniques for BWR and PWR repetitive high-dose jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    As a result of concern about the apparent increase in collective radiation dose to workers at nuclear power plants, this project will provide information to industry in preplanning for radiation protection during maintenance operations. This study identifies Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) repetitive jobs, and respective collective dose trends and dose reduction techniques. 3 references, 2 tables

  12. SIVAR - Computer code for simulation of fuel rod behavior in PWR during fast transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, A.F.V.

    1980-10-01

    Fuel rod behavior during a stationary and a transitory operation, is studied. A computer code aiming at simulating PWR type rods, was developed; however, it can be adapted for simulating other type of rods. A finite difference method was used. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Parallel GPU implementation of PWR reactor burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimlich, A.; Silva, F.C.; Martinez, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Three GPU algorithms used to evaluate the burn-up in a PWR reactor. • Exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential. • The C++ container is expansible to accept new nuclides chains. - Abstract: This paper surveys three methods, implemented for multi-core CPU and graphic processor unit (GPU), to evaluate the fuel burn-up in a pressurized light water nuclear reactor (PWR) using the solutions of a large system of coupled ordinary differential equations. The reactor physics simulation of a PWR reactor spends a long execution time with burnup calculations, so performance improvement using GPU can imply in better core design and thus extended fuel life cycle. The results of this study exhibit speed improvement exceeding 200 times over the sequential solver, within 1% accuracy.

  14. Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

  15. PWR-GALE, Radioactive Gaseous Release and Liquid Release from PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The PWR-GALE (Boiling Water Reactor Gaseous and Liquid Effluents) Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the release of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The calculations are based on data generated from operating reactors, field tests, laboratory tests, and plant-specific design considerations incorporated to reduce the quantity of radioactive materials that may be released to the environment. 2 - Method of solution: GALE calculates expected releases based on 1) standardized coolant activities derived from ANS Standards 18.1 Working Group recommendations, 2) release and transport mechanisms that result in the appearance of radioactive material in liquid and gaseous waste streams, 3) plant-specific design features used to reduce the quantities of radioactive materials ultimately released to the environs, and 4) information received on the operation of nuclear power plants. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The liquid release portion of GALE uses subroutines taken from the ORIGEN (CCC-217) to calculate radionuclide buildup and decay during collection, processing, and storage of liquid radwaste. Memory requirements for this part of the program are determined by the large nuclear data base accessed by these subroutines

  16. Beta and gamma dose calculations for PWR and BWR containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.B.

    1989-07-01

    Analyses of gamma and beta dose in selected regions in PWR and BWR containment buildings have been performed for a range of fission product releases from selected severe accidents. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that safety-related equipment could experience during the selected severe accident sequences. The resulting dose calculations demonstrate the extent to which design basis accident qualified equipment could also be qualified for the severe accident environments. Surry was chosen as the representative PWR plant while Peach Bottom was selected to represent BWRs. Battelle Columbus Laboratory performed the source term release analyses. The AB epsilon scenario (an intermediate to large LOCA with failure to recover onsite or offsite electrical power) was selected as the base case Surry accident, and the AE scenario (a large break LOCA with one initiating event and a combination of failures in two emergency cooling systems) was selected as the base case Peach Bottom accident. Radionuclide release was bounded for both scenarios by including spray operation and arrested sequences as variations of the base scenarios. Sandia National Laboratories used the source terms to calculate dose to selected containment regions. Scenarios with sprays operational resulted in a total dose comparable to that (2.20 x 10 8 rads) used in current equipment qualification testing. The base case scenarios resulted in some calculated doses roughly an order of magnitude above the current 2.20 x 10 8 rad equipment qualification test region. 8 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Development of MHI PWR fuel assembly with high thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasushi Makino; Masaya Hoshi; Masaji Mori; Hidetoshi Kido; Kazuo Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been developing a PWR fuel assembly to meet the needs of Japanese fuel market with mainly improving its reliability such as a mechanical strength, a seismic strength and endurance. For burn-up extension of the fuel to 55 GWd/t, MHI has introduced a Zircaloy spacer grid with better neutron economics with retaining the reliability in an operating core. However, for a future power up-rating and a longer cycle operation, a higher thermal performance is required for PWR fuel assembly. To meet the needs of fuel market, MHI has developed an advanced type of Zircaloy spacer grid with a greater DNB performance while retaining the reliability of a fuel and a relatively low pressure drop. For the greater DNB performance, MHI optimized geometrical shape of mixing vane to promote a fluid mixing performance. In this report, higher DNB performance provided by the advanced Zircaloy spacer grid is presented. The results of 3D simulation for the flow behavior in 5 x 5 partial assembly, a mixing test and a water DNB test were compared between the current and the advanced spacer grids. Consequently, it was confirmed that a crossover vane enhanced a fluid mixing and the advanced spacer grid could significantly improve DNB performance compared with the current design of spacer grids. (authors)

  18. Operating the plant, quality assurance, and the job of the operating staff, Volume Twelve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Subject matter includes operating the plant (the role of the operator, the control room, plant technical specifications, plant operating procedures, initial startup program, BWR/PWR plant startup, BWR/PWR steady state power operation, BWR/PWR transient operation, emergency operation), quality assurance (what is quality, what is quality control, quality assurance includes quality control, government regulation and quality assurance, administrative controls for nuclear power plants, the necessity of reviews and audits, practical quality assurance), and the job of the operating staff (the plant operating staff, plant safety, first aid and resuscitation, general plant hazards, personnel protective equipment, handling chemicals, handling compressed gas, equipment repair and maintenance, communicating with others

  19. Development of the vacuum drying process for the PWR spent nuclear fuel dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeg, Chagn Yeal; Cho, Chun Hyung [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This paper describes the development of a dry operation process for PWR spent nuclear fuel, which is currently stored in the domestic NPP's storage pool, using a dual purpose metal cask. Domestic NNPs have had experience with wet type transportation of PWR spent nuclear fuel between neighboring NPPs since the early 1990s, but no experience with dry type operation. For this reason, we developed a specific operation process and also confirmed the safety of the major cask components and its spent nuclear fuel during the dual purpose metal cask operation process. We also describe the short term operation process that was established to be completed within 21 hours and propose the allowable working time for each step (15 hours for wet process, 3 hours for drain process and 3 hours for vacuum drying process)

  20. Integral type small PWR with stand-alone safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makihara, Yoshiaki

    2001-01-01

    A feasibility study is achieved on an integral type small PWR with stand-alone safety. It is designed to have the following features. (1) The coolant does not leak out at any accidental condition. (2) The fuel failure does never occur while it is supposed on the large scale PWR at the design base accident. (3) At any accidental condition the safety is secured without any support from the outside (stand-alone safety secure). (4) It has self-regulating characteristics and easy controllability. The above features can be satisfied by integrate the steam generator and CRDM in the reactor vessel while the pipe line break has to be considered on the conventional PWR. Several counter measures are planned to satisfy the above features. The economy feature is also attained by several simplifications such as (1) elimination of main coolant piping and pressurizer by the integration of primary cooling system and self-pressurizing, (2) elimination of RCP by application of natural circulating system, (3) elimination of ECCS and accumulator by application of static safety system, (4) large scale volume reduction of the container vessel by application of integrated primary cooling system, (5) elimination of boric acid treatment by deletion of chemical shim. The long operation period such as 10 years can be attained by the application of Gd fuel in one batch refueling. The construction period can be shortened by the standardizing the design and the introduction of modular component system. Furthermore the applicability of the reduced modulation core is also considered. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  1. Plutonium recycle in PWR reactors (Brazilian Nuclear Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.

    1978-02-01

    An evaluation is made of the material requirements of the nuclear fuel cycle with plutonium recycle. It starts from the calculation of a reference reactor and allows the evaluation of demand under two alternatives of nuclear fuel cycle for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR): without plutonium recycle; and with plutonium recycle. Calculations of the reference reactor have been carried out with the CELL-CORE codes. For plutonium recycle, the concept of uranium and plutonium homogeneous mixture has been adopted, using self-produced plutonium at equilibrium, in order to get minimum neutronic perturbations in the reactor core. The refueling model studied in the reference reactor was the 'out-in' scheme with a constant number of changed fuel elements (approximately 1/3 of the core). Variations in the material requirements were studied considering changes in the installed nuclear capacity of PWR reactors, the capacity factor of these reactors, and the introduction of fast breeders. Recycling plutonium produced inside the system can reach economies of about 5%U 3 O 8 and 6% separative work units if recycle is assumed only after the 5th operation cycle of the thermal reactors. The cumulative amount of fissile plutonium obtained by the Brazilian Nuclear Program of PWR reactors by 1991 should be sufficient for a fast breeder with the same capacity as Angra 2. For the proposed fast breeder programs, the fissile plutonium produced by thermal reactors is sufficient to supply fast breeder initial necessities. Howewer, U 3 O 8 and SWU economy with recycle is not significant when the proposed fast breeder program is considered. (Author) [pt

  2. A Feasibility Study on Core Cooling of Reduced-Moderation PWR for the Large Break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroyuki Yoshida; Akira Ohnuki; Hajime Akimoto

    2002-01-01

    A design study of a reduced-moderation water reactor (RMWR) with tight lattice core is being carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as one candidate for future reactors. The concept is developed to achieve a conversion ratio greater than unity using the tight lattice core (volume ratio of moderator to fuel is around 0.5 and the gap spacing between the fuel rods is remarkably narrower than in a reactor currently operated). Under such tight configuration, the core thermal margin becomes smaller and should be evaluated in a normal operation and also during the reflood phase in a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) for PWR type reactors. In this study, we have performed a feasibility evaluation on core cooling of reduced moderation PWR for the LBLOCA (200% break). The evaluation was performed for the primary system after the break by the REFLA/TRAC code. The core thermal output of the reduced moderation PWR is 2900 MWt, the gap between adjacent fuel rods is 1 mm, and heavy water is used as the moderator and coolant. The present design adopts seed fuel assemblies (MOX fuel) and several blanket fuel assemblies. In the blanket fuel assemblies, power density is lower than that of the seed fuel assemblies. Then, we set a channel box to each fuel assembly in order to adjust the flow rate in each assembly, because the possibility that the coolant boils in the seed fuel assemblies is very high. The pressure vessel diameter is bigger in comparison with a current PWR and core height is smaller than the current one. The current 4-loop PWR system is used, and, however, to fit into the bigger pressure vessel volume (about 1.5 times), we set up the capacity of the accumulator (1.5 times of the current PWR). Although the maximum clad temperature reached at about 1200 K in the position of 0.6 m from the lower core support plate, it is sufficiently lower than the design criteria of the current PWR (1500 K). The core cooling of the reduced moderation

  3. PWR primary system chemistry control during hot functional testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Richard D.; Little, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Hot Functional Testing (HFT) involves a number of pre-operational exercises performed to confirm the operability of plant systems at conditions expected during both normal and off-normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), including operability of safety systems. While the primary purposes of HFT are to demonstrate operability of plant systems and satisfy regulatory requirements, chemistry control during HFT is important to long-term integrity and performance of plant systems. Specifically, HFT is the first time plant equipment is exposed to high temperature water and the chemistry maintained during HFT can impact the passivation layers that form on wetted surfaces and long-term release of metals from these surfaces. Metals released from the inner surfaces of steam generator tubing and reactor coolant loop piping become activated in the core and can redeposit on ex-core surfaces. Because HFT is performed before fuel is loaded in the core, HFT provides an opportunity to produce a passive layer on primary surfaces that is free of activated corrosion products, resistant to metals release during subsequent plant operation, and also resistant to incorporation of activated corrosion products (once fuel is loaded in the core). Thus, maintaining desirable primary chemistry control during HFT is important for source term management, minimization of future shutdown activity releases, minimization of dose rates, and asset preservation. This paper presents an overview of passive film formation in the austenitic stainless steel and high nickel alloys that make up the majority of the primary circuit in advanced PWR designs. Based on this information, a summary is provided of the effects on passive film formation of key chemistry parameters that may be controlled during HFT. (author)

  4. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  5. PWR reactors for BBR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure and functioning of the nuclear steam generator system developed by BBR and its components are described. Auxiliary systems, control and load following behaviour and fuel management are discussed and the main data of PWR given. The brochure closes with a perspective of the future of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power plant. (GL) [de

  6. Thermohydraulic calculations of PWR primary circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Some mathematical and numerical models from Retran computer codes aiming to simulate reactor transients, are presented. The equations used for calculating one-dimensional flow are integrated using mathematical methods from Flash code, with steam code to correlate the variables from thermodynamic state. The algorithm obtained was used for calculating a PWR reactor. (E.G.) [pt

  7. Reliability of PWR type nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, A.A.T.; Muniz, A.A.

    1978-12-01

    Results of the analysis of factors influencing the reliability of international nuclear power plants of the PWR type are presented. The reliability factor is estimated and the probability of its having lower values than a certain specified value is discussed. (Author) [pt

  8. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  9. Secondary systems of PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, N.

    1981-01-01

    The secondary systems of a nuclear power plant comprises the steam, condensate and feedwater cycle, the steam plant auxiliary or ancillary systems and the cooling water systems. The presentation gives a general review about the main systems which show a high similarity of PWR and BWR plants. (orig./RW)

  10. Simulation model of a PWR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, N.

    1987-03-01

    A simulation model of a hypothetical PWR power plant is described. A large number of disturbances and failures in plant function can be simulated. The model is written as seven modules to the modular simulation system for continuous processes DYSIM and serves also as a user example of this system. The model runs in Fortran 77 on the IBM-PC-AT. (author)

  11. Utilization of thorium in PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium 235 consumption is comparatively evaluated with thorium cycle for a PWR type reactor. Modifications are only made in fuels components. U-235 consumption is pratically unchanged in both cycles. Some good results are promised to the mixed U-238/Th-232 fuel cycle in 1/1 proportion [pt

  12. An evaluation of tight - pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.

    1980-01-01

    The subtask of a project carried out at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) for DOE (Department of Energy) as part of their NASAP/INFCE - related effects involving the optimization of PWR lattices in the recycle model is summarized. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Reactor analysis support package (RASP). Volume 7. PWR set-point methodology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, S.M.; Robbins, T.R.

    1986-09-01

    This report provides an overview of the basis and methodology requirements for determining Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) technical specifications related setpoints and focuses on development of the methodology for a reload core. Additionally, the report documents the implementation and typical methods of analysis used by PWR vendors during the 1970's to develop Protection System Trip Limits (or Limiting Safety System Settings) and Limiting Conditions for Operation. The descriptions of the typical setpoint methodologies are provided for Nuclear Steam Supply Systems as designed and supplied by Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, and Westinghouse. The description of the methods of analysis includes the discussion of the computer codes used in the setpoint methodology. Next, the report addresses the treatment of calculational and measurement uncertainties based on the extent to which such information was available for each of the three types of PWR. Finally, the major features of the setpoint methodologies are compared, and the principal effects of each particular methodology on plant operation are summarized for each of the three types of PWR

  14. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  15. Fracture toughness behavior of irradiated stainless steel in PWR systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Fyfitch, S. [AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg, Pennsylvania (United States); Tang, H.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Data from available research programs were collected and evaluated by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Reliability Program (MRP) to determine the relationship between fracture toughness and neutron fluence for conditions representative of pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions. It is shown that the reduction of fracture toughness with increasing neutron dose in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and PWRs is consistent with that observed in fast reactors. The lower bound fracture toughness observed for irradiated stainless steels in PWRs is 38 MPa{radical}m (34.6 ksi{radical}in) at neutron exposures greater than 6.7 X 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1.0 MeV) or approximately 10 dpa. For such levels of fracture toughness, it is recommended that linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analyses be considered for design and operational analyses. The results from this study can be used by the nuclear industry to assess the effects of irradiation on stainless steels in PWR systems. (author)

  16. Improved liquid waste processing system of PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suehiro, Kazuyasu

    1977-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. has engaged in the improvement and enhancement of waste-processing facilities for PWR power stations, and recently established the improved processing system. With this system, it becomes possible to contain radioactive waste gas semi-permanently within plants and to recycle waste liquid after the treatment, thus to make the release of radioactive wastes practically zero. The improved system has the following features, namely the recycling system is adopted, drain is separated and each separated drain is treated by specialized process, the reboiler type evaporator and the reverse osmosis equipment are used, and the leakless construction is adopted for the equipments. The radioactive liquid wastes in PWR power stations are classified into coolant drain, drain from general equipments, chemical drain and cleaning water. The outline of the improved processing system and the newly developed equipments such as the reboiler type evaporator and the reverse osmosis equipment are explained. With the evaporator, the concentration rate of waste liquid can be raised to about three times, and foaming waste can be treated efficiently. The decontamination performance is excellent. The reverse osmosis treatment is stable and reliable method, and is useful for the treatment of cleaning water. It is also effective for concentrating treatment. The unmanned automatic operation is possible. (Kako, I.)

  17. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    There is a possibility that extension of pre-existing flaws in the reactor pressure vessel of a pressurised water reactor (PWR) may occur by environmentally assisted cracking, in particular by corrosion fatigue under cyclic transient loading. Crack growth predictions have usually been carried out using cyclic crack growth rate (da/dN) versus stress intensity range (δK) curves, such as those given in Section XI, Appendix A of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. However, the inherent time dependent nature of environmental cracking processes renders such an approach unrealistic. The present paper describes the development of an alternative time based assessment methodology. Illustrative calculations of expected crack growth of assumed defects made using the cyclic (ASME XIA) and time-based approaches are compared. The results illustrate that crack growth predicted by the time-based approach can be greater or less than that calculated by the traditional method. For a PWR operated with good control of water chemistry, actual crack growth rates are expected to be well below those predicted by the ASME code. (Author)

  18. Design and Development of Virtual Reactivity System for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M. I.

    2012-01-01

    The reactivity monitoring and investigation is an important mean to ensure the safety operation of a nuclear power plant. But the reactivity of the nuclear reactor usually cannot be directly measured. It should be computed with certain estimation method. In this thesis, an effort has been made using an artificial neural network and highly fluctuating experimental data for predicting the total reactivity of the nuclear reactor based on all components of net reactivity. This virtual reactivity system is designed by taking advantage of neural network's nonlinear mapping capability. Based on analysis of the reactivity contributing factors, several neural network models are built separately for control rod, boron, poisons, fuel Doppler Effect and moderator effect. Extensive simulation and validation tests for PWR show that satisfied results have been obtained with the proposed approach. It presents a new idea to estimate the PWR's reactivity using artificial intelligence. All the design and simulation work is carried out in MATLAB and a real time programming environment is chosen for the computation and prediction of reactivity. (author)

  19. A comprehensive in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang Rixin; Zhang Shucheng; Chen Dianshan (Academia Sinica, Beijing (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy)

    1991-02-01

    An in-pile test of PWR fuel bundle has been conducted in HWRR at IAE of China. This paper describes the structure of the test bundle (3x3-2), fabrication process and quality control of the fuel rod, irradiation conditions and the main Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results. The test fuel bundle was irradiated under the PWR operation and water chemistry conditions with an average linear power of 381 W/cm and reached an average burnup of 25010 MWd/tU of the fuel bundle. After the test, destructive and non-destructive examination of the fuel rods was conducted at hot laboratories. The fission gas release was 10.4-23%. The ridge height of cladding was 3 to 8 {mu}m. The hydrogen content of the cladding was 80 to 140 ppm. The fuel stack height was increased by 2.9 to 3.3 mm. The relative irradiation growth was about 0.11 to 0.17% of the fuel rod length. During the irradiation test, no fuel rod failure or other abnormal phenomena had been found by the on-line fuel failure monitoring system of the test loop and water sampling analysis. The structure of the test fuel assembly was left undamaged without twist and detectable deformation. (orig.).

  20. Gamma and Neutron Radiolysis in the 21-PWR Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S. Tang

    2001-05-03

    The objective of this calculation is to compute gamma and neutron dose rates in order to determine the maximum radiolytic production of nitric acid and other chemical species inside the 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) waste package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the time period between 5,000 and 100,000 years after emplacement. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the type of WP considered in this calculation. The results of this calculation will be used to evaluate nitric acid corrosion of fuel cladding from radiolysis in the 21-PWR WP. This calculation was performed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) 2000a). AP-3.124, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. This calculation is associated with the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of which the spent fuel cladding integrity is to be evaluated.

  1. Gamma and Neutron Radiolysis in the 21-PWR Waste Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.S. Tang

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to compute gamma and neutron dose rates in order to determine the maximum radiolytic production of nitric acid and other chemical species inside the 21-PWR (pressurized-water reactor) waste package (WP). The scope of this calculation is limited to the time period between 5,000 and 100,000 years after emplacement. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the type of WP considered in this calculation. The results of this calculation will be used to evaluate nitric acid corrosion of fuel cladding from radiolysis in the 21-PWR WP. This calculation was performed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) 2000a). AP-3.124, Calculations, is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. This calculation is associated with the total system performance assessment (TSPA) of which the spent fuel cladding integrity is to be evaluated

  2. An integrated PWR for marine propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letouze, A.; Marecaux, A.; Rollason, J.; Heap, S.; Foster, A.; Jewer, S.; Thompson, A. C.; Williams, A. M.; Beeley, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Results from a design study for a nuclear propulsion plant utilising a small integrated PWR using many of the inherent safety features of the IRIS design. The design consists of a single pass, low enrichment core housed, together with all associated primary circuit components, within a reactor pressure vessel 10.3 m high and 4.1 m in diameter. Reactor physics calculations were conducted with the codes WIMS9a and MONK8b. The core design contains 21 fuel assemblies each containing 264 UO 2 fuel pins. Each fuel module has a cluster of 24 boron carbide control rods and a central instrumentation channel. The fuel enrichment was 9% in order to achieve the core lifetime requirement of 3000 EFPD at a reactor power of 120 MWth. This gives a discharge burnup of 51,000 MWd/t. To control excess reactivity, two forms of burnable poison are employed: a zirconium dibromide (ZrB 2 ) coating on the fuel compacts, and gadolinium oxide homogeneously mixed in the fuel. Thermal hydraulic calculations were performed using TRAC-P(ND) for steady-state operation and for a number of fault transients. The helical once through steam generators were modelled using heat structure and pipe components and their performance compared to independent calculations including heat transfer correlations for the helical coiled geometry. Intact circuit calculations for steady state were followed by a small break LOCA calculation including the effect of a containment volume which reproduced the gain of coolant effect reported for IRIS. It was demonstrated that the thermal limits were not exceeded for the identified key transients. The dynamic response of the reactor plant to typical power demands was modelled using AcslXtreme software. Several schemes for limiting the power overshoot that was found on rapid increase to full power were examined. It was concluded that the SG must be operated with variable secondary pressure and the best means of reducing power overshoot is to step back the throttle opening

  3. Reduced scale PWR passive safety system designing by genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Joao J. da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos M.; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of 'Design by Genetic Algorithms (DbyGA)', applied to a new reduced scale system problem. The design problem of a passive thermal-hydraulic safety system, considering dimensional and operational constraints, has been solved. Taking into account the passive safety characteristics of the last nuclear reactor generation, a PWR core under natural circulation is used in order to demonstrate the methodology applicability. The results revealed that some solutions (reduced scale system DbyGA) are capable of reproducing, both accurately and simultaneously, much of the physical phenomena that occur in real scale and operating conditions. However, some aspects, revealed by studies of cases, pointed important possibilities to DbyGA methodological performance improvement

  4. B ampersand W PWR advanced control system algorithm development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winks, R.W.; Wilson, T.L.; Amick, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses algorithm development of an Advanced Control System for the B ampersand W Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. The paper summarizes the history of the project, describes the operation of the algorithm, and presents transient results from a simulation of the plant and control system. The history discusses the steps in the development process and the roles played by the utility owners, B ampersand W Nuclear Service Company (BWNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Foxboro Company. The algorithm description is a brief overview of the features of the control system. The transient results show that operation of the algorithm in a normal power maneuvering mode and in a moderately large upset following a feedwater pump trip

  5. Optimization of the decontamination in EDF PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, P.; Dupin, M.; Buisine, D.; Buet, J.F.; Brunel, V.

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation of decontamination in EDF PWR power plants is the result of a permanent collaborative work between the plant operators, the subcontractors, central services of nuclear power division of EDF. This collaborative work enables the saving of all the feedback experience. The main operations carried out on nuclear sites like mechanical decontamination of valves, use of the ''EMMAC'' process on big components (replacement of steam generator, hydraulic parts of the reactor coolant pumps), use of foam on pools walls and divers in highly contaminated pools have been discussed. This paper shows that the choice of decontamination processes is very dependant on the components, on the dose rate reduction to be aimed and on the possibility to treat the waste on site. (authors)

  6. System for stress corrosion conditions tests on PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Andre Cesar de Jesus

    2007-01-01

    The study of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) involves the consideration and evaluation of the inherent compatibility between a material and the environment under conditions of either applied or residual stress. EAC is a critical problem because equipment, components and structure are subject to the influence of mechanical stress, water environment of different composition, temperature and different material history. Testing for resistance to EAC is one of the most effective ways to determine the interrelationships among this variables on the process of EAC. Up to now, several experimental techniques have been developed worldwide, which address different aspects of environmental caused damage. Constant loading of CT specimens test is a typical example of test, which is used for the estimation of parameters of stress corrosion cracking. To assess the initiation stages and kinetics of crack growth, the testing facility should allow active loading of specimens in the environment that is close to the actual operation conditions of assessed component. This paper presents a testing facility for stress corrosion cracking to be installed at CDTN, which was designed and developed at CDTN. The facility is used to carry out constant load tests under simulated PWR environment, where temperature, water pressure and chemistry are controlled, which are considered the most important factors in SCC. Also, the equipment operational conditions, its applications, and restrictions are presented. The system was developed to operate at temperature until 380 degree C and pressure until 180 bar. It consists in a autoclave stuck at a mechanical system, responsible of producing load , a water treatment station, and a data acquisition system. This testing facility allows the evaluation of cracking progress, especially at PWR reactor. (author) operational conditions. (author)

  7. The empirical intensity of PWR primary coolant pumps failure and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevicj, S.; Riznicj, J.

    1988-01-01

    The wealth of operating experience concerning PWR type and nuclear reactors that has been regularly monitored and systematically processes since 1971, enabled an analysis of the PWR primary coolant pumps operation. Failure intensity α and repair intensity μ of the pump during its working life were calculated, as these values are necessary in order to determine the reliability and availability of the pump as the basis for analyzing its effect on the safety and efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The trend of failure intensity α follows the theoretically expected changes in α over time, and this is around 10 -5 in the majority of life-time. Repair intensity μ indicates a slow rise during life-time, i.e. its faster return to operation. (author).7 refs.; 5 figs

  8. AP1000. The PWR revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaio, P.

    2006-01-01

    The distinguishing features of Westinghouse's AP1000 advanced passive pressurized water reactor are highlighted. In particular, the AP1000's passive safety features are described as well as their implications for simplifying the design, construction, and operation of this design compared to currently operating plants, and significantly increasing safety margins over current plants as well. The AP1000 design specifically incorporates the knowledge acquired from the substantial accumulation of power reactor operating experience and benefits from the application of the Probabilistic Risk Assessment in the design process itself. The AP1000 design has been certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission under its new rules for licensing new nuclear plants, 10 CFR Part 52, and is the subject of six combined Construction and Operating License applications now being developed. Currently the AP1000 design is being assessed against the EUR Rev C requirements for new nuclear power plants in Europe. (author)

  9. Development and application of integrated digital I and C system in Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaga, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Integrated Digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) System has been developed and applied to non-safety grade I and C systems in the latest 5 Japanese PWR plants in 1990's. Based on the experience in these plants, the Integrated Digital I and C System will be planned to apply also to safety grade I and C systems in Advanced PWR (APWR) as the overall application of digital technology. The basic design task has been just started for APWR which is to be in commercial operation in early 2000's and under the development about various issues of safety grade digital I and C systems. On the other hand, in conventional Japanese PWR plants, digital I and C systems have been applied step by step since 1980's. For example, digital I and C systems for radio-active waste processing system have been adopted to 13 units, and dedicated digital I and C systems for Local loop control system to 8 units. The trend and status of development and application of the digital I and C systems, especially the Integrated Digital I and C System in Japanese PWR plants are presented. (5 refs., 4 figs.)

  10. Development and validation process of the advanced main control board for next Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, M.; Ito, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Imase, M.; Okamoto, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of main control room improvement is to reduce operator workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. Japanese pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities and Mitsubishi group have developed a touch -screen-based main control console (i.e. advanced main control room) the next generation PWRs to further improve the plant operability using a state of the art electronics technology. The advanced main control room consists of an operator console, a supervisor console and large display panels. The functional specifications were evaluated by utility operators using a prototype main control console connected to a plant simulator. (author)

  11. Zinc injection in German PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, K.

    2004-01-01

    Operating experience acquired at PWR NNPs shows that zinc injection at low concentrations of 5 ppb is a very effective source term reduction measure. This method does not lead to any operating restrictions or other negative effects on plant systems and components. The nuclear industry has been very successful in reducing radiation exposures within the past two decades. Annual exposures could be significantly decreased and are now at a level of around 1 man-Sv per plant and year. This great success can mainly be attributed to the general commitment of plant operators to maintaining radiation exposures of workers in the controlled access area as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA principle). The ALARA principle, of course, also implies evaluation of the economic benefit of radiation protection measures. Radiation source term reduction has drawn increasing attention of plant operators in recent years. For the new PWRs cobalt-based alloys in the primary system have successively been eliminated already at the design and construction phase within the last decade. Use of wear-resistant cobalt-free substitute materials in combination with the general use of advanced alloys for the steam generator tubing of PWRs resulted in low values for the two most common sources of plant radiation fields, namely 58 Co and 60 Co. Investigations showed that the beneficial effect of zinc can be related to its high affinity for mixed spinel oxide phases, resulting in the following two basic effects: -Zinc is incorporated preferentially into the oxide layer on primary system surfaces and thus reduces pickup of 58 Co and 60 Co and - Zinc can displace cobalt isotopes from existing oxide layers. In German PWRs with Incoloy 800 steam generator tubing material (Ni-content -32%), the observed reductions correspond to a decrease in dose rates of around 10 to 15% per year and thus follow, as predicted, the half-life time of 60 Co. Overall reductions in high radiation areas are now in the range of

  12. Study of PWR reactor efficiency as a function of turbine steam extractions; Estudo da otimizacao da eficiencia de reator PWR em funcao das extracoes de vapor da turbina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Martinez, Aquilino Senra [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this work is to optimize the extractions of the low-pressure turbine of a PWR nuclear reactor, in order to obtain the best thermodynamic cycle efficiency. We have analyzed typical data of a 1300 MW PWR reactor, operating at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% capacities, respectively. The first stage of this study consists of generating a mathematical model capable of describing the reactor behavior and efficiency at any power level. The second stage of this study consists of to combine the generated mathematical model in an optimization computer program that optimize the extractions flow of the low-pressure turbine until it finds the optimal system efficiency. This work does not alter the nuclear facility project in any way. (author)

  13. The PWR spectral code GELS. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penndorf, K.; Schult, F.; Schulz, G.

    1976-01-01

    The code procedures group constant libraries for the static PWR design of whatever fuel cycle - Uranium, Thorium, or Plutonium. The whole reach of temperatures is covered and the treatment of strong lumped absorbers as control or burnable poison pins is included. The main features are: 1) Good accuracy in spite of not fitting the material data to critical experiments; 2) speed and relatively low computer equipment; 3) restriction to PWR's only. In case of demands for higher accuracy there is a further restriction concerning the library data of the epithermal resonance absorbers: They are strictly valid only for several special lattice geometrics. Three samples are given each representing a typical application of the code. Two of them likewise are demonstrations of recalculated experiments. (orig.) [de

  14. Fuel management optimization for a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumas, M.; Robeau, D.

    1981-04-01

    This study is aimed to optimize the refueling pattern of a PWR. Two methods are developed, they are based on a linearized form of the optimization problem. The first method determines a feasible solution in two steps; in the first one the original problem is replaced by a relaxed one which is solved by the Method of Approximation Programming. The second step is based on the Branch and Bound method to find the feasible solution closest to the solution obtained in the first step. The second method starts from a given refueling pattern and tries to improve this pattern by the calculation of the effects of 2 by 2, 3 by 3 and 4 by 4 permutations on the objective function. Numerical results are given for a typical PWR refueling using the two methods

  15. Optimization of reload core design for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Wei; Xie Zhongsheng; Yin Banghua

    1995-01-01

    A direct efficient optimization technique has been effected for automatically optimizing the reload of PWR. The objective functions include: maximization of end-of-cycle (EOC) reactivity and maximization of average discharge burnup. The fuel loading optimization and burnable poison (BP) optimization are separated into two stages by using Haling principle. In the first stage, the optimum fuel reloading pattern without BP is determined by the linear programming method using enrichments as control variable, while in the second stage the optimum BP allocation is determined by the flexible tolerance method using the number of BP rods as control variable. A practical and efficient PWR reloading optimization program based on above theory has been encoded and successfully applied to Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNP) cycle 2 reloading design

  16. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersor, C.K.; Harris, R.P.; Crump, M.W.; Fuhrman, N.

    1987-01-01

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  17. Chemical and radiochemical specifications - PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutzmann, A.

    1997-01-01

    Published by EDF this document gives the chemical specifications of the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plants. Among the chemical parameters, some have to be respected for the safety. These parameters are listed in the STE (Technical Specifications of Exploitation). The values to respect, the analysis frequencies and the time states of possible drops are noticed in this document with the motion STE under the concerned parameter. (A.L.B.)

  18. GAIA: AREVAs New PWR fuel assembly design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmert, N.; Gentet, G.; Louf, P.H.; Mindt, M.; O' Brian, J.; Peucker, J.

    2015-07-01

    GAIA is the label of a new PWR Fuel Assembly design developed by AREVA with the objective to provide its customers an advanced fuel assembly design regarding both robustness and performance. Since 2012 GAIA lead fuel assemblies are under irradiation in a Swedish reactor and since 2015 in a U.S. reactor. Visual inspections and examinations carried out so far during the outages confirmed the intended reliability, robustness and the performance enhancement of the design. (Author)

  19. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruel, Renata Nunes

    1997-01-01

    A sensitivity analysis relative to the parameters and modelling of the physical process in a PWR pressurizer has been performed. The sensitivity analysis was developed by implementing the key parameters and theoretical model lings which generated a comprehensive matrix of influences of each changes analysed. The major influences that have been observed were the flashing phenomenon and the steam condensation on the spray drops. The present analysis is also applicable to the several theoretical and experimental areas. (author)

  20. T Plant removal of PWR Chiller Subsystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dana, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    The PWR Pool Chiller System is not longer required for support of the Shippingport Blanket Fuel Assemblies Storage. The Engineering Work Plan will provide the overall coordination of the documentation and physical changes to deactivate the unneeded subsystem. The physical removal of all energy sources for the Chiller equipment will be covered under a one time work plan. The documentation changes will be covered using approved Engineering Change Notices and Procedure Change Authorizations as needed

  1. Survey of PWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, J.

    1989-02-01

    This report surveys available information regarding primary and secondary water chemistries of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and the impact of these water chemistries on reactor operation. The emphasis of the document is on aspects of water chemistry that affect the integrity of the primary pressure boundary and the radiation dose associated with maintenance and operation. The report provides an historical overview of the development of primary and secondary water chemistries, and describes practices currently being followed. Current problems and areas of research associated with water chemistry are described. Recommendations for further research are included. 183 refs., 9 figs., 19 tabs

  2. Nondestructive examination requirements for PWR vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanner, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements for the nondestructive examination of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessel internals in accordance with the requirements of the EPRI Material Reliability Program (MRP) inspection standard for PWR internals (MRP-228) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Section XI In-service Inspection. The MRP vessel internals examinations have been performed at nuclear plants in the USA since 2009. The objective of the inspection standard is to provide the requirements for the nondestructive examination (NDE) methods implemented to support the inspection and evaluation of the internals. The inspection standard contains requirements specific to the inspection methodologies involved as well as requirements for qualification of the NDE procedures, equipment and personnel used to perform the vessel internals inspections. The qualification requirements for the NDE systems will be summarized. Six PWR plants in the USA have completed inspections of their internals using the Inspection and Evaluation Guideline (MRP-227) and the Inspection Standard (MRP-228). Examination results show few instances of service-induced degradation flaws, as expected. The few instances of degradation have mostly occurred in bolting

  3. PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Control Status: A Summary of Industry Initiatives, Experience and Trends Relative to the EPRI PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruzzetti, Keith; Choi, Samuel

    2012-09-01

    The latest revision of the EPRI Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines was issued in February 2009. The Guidelines continue to focus on minimizing stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of steam generator tubes, as well as minimizing degradation of other major components / subsystems of the secondary system. The Guidelines provide a technically-based framework for a plant-specific and effective PWR secondary water chemistry program. With the issuance of Revision 7 of the Guidelines in 2009, many plants have implemented changes that allow greater flexibility on startup. For example, the previous Guidelines (Revision 6) contained a possible low power hold at 5% power and a possible mid power hold at approximately 30% power based on chemistry constraints. Revision 7 has established a range over which a plant-specific value can be chosen for the possible low power hold (between 5% and 15%) and mid power hold (between 30% and 50%). This has provided plants the ability to establish significant plant evolutions prior to reaching the possible power hold; such as establishing seal steam to the condenser, placing feed pumps in service, or initiating forward flow of heater drains. The application of this flexibility in the industry will be explored. This paper also highlights the major initiatives and industry trends with respect to PWR secondary chemistry; and outlines the recent work to effectively address them. These will be presented in light of recent operating experience, as derived from EPRI's PWR Chemistry Monitoring and Assessment (CMA) program (which contains more than 400 cycles of operating chemistry data). (authors)

  4. Evaluation of fire probabilistic safety assessment for a PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.; Lin, T.J.; Kao, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    The internal fire analysis of the level 1 power operation probability safety assessment (PSA) for Maanshan (PWR) Nuclear Power Plant (MNPP) was updated. The fire analysis adopted a scenario-based PSA approach to systematically evaluate fire and smoke hazards and their associated risk impact to MNPP. The result shows that the core damage frequency (CDF) due to fire is about six times lower than the previous one analyzed by the Atomic Energy Council (AEC), Republic of China in 1987. The plant model was modified to reflect the impact of human events and recovery actions during fire. Many tabulated EXCEL spread-sheets were used for evaluation of the fire risk. The fire-induced CDF for MNPP is found to be 2.1 E-6 per year in this study. The relative results of the fire analysis will provide the bases for further risk-informed fire protection evaluation in the near future. (author)

  5. Shutdown Chemistry Process Development for PWR Primary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K.B. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This study report presents the shutdown chemistry of PWR primary system to reduce and remove the radioactive corrosion products which were deposited on the nuclear fuel rods surface and the outside of core like steam generator channel head, RCS pipings etc. The major research results are the follows ; the deposition radioactive mechanism of corrosion products, the radiochemical composition, the condition of coolant chemistry to promote the dissolution of radioactive cobalt and nickel ferrite, the control method of dissolved hydrogen concentration in the coolant by the mechanical and chemical methods. The another part of study is to investigate the removal characteristics of corrosion product ions and particles by the demineralization system to suggest the method which the system could be operate effectively in shut-down purification period. (author). 19 refs., 25 figs., 48 tabs.

  6. Abnormal transient analysis by using PWR plant simulator, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Akira; Murakami, Yoshimitsu; Yokobayashi, Masao.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes results of abnormal transient analysis by using a PWR plant simulator. The simulator is based on an existing 822MWe power plant with 3 loops, and designed to cover wide range of plant operation from cold shutdown to full power at EOL. In the simulator, malfunctions are provided for abnormal conditions of equipment failures, and in this report, 17 malfunctions for secondary system and 4 malfunctions for nuclear instrumentation systems were simulated. The abnormal conditions are turbine and generator trip, failure of condenser, feedwater system and valve and detector failures of pressure and water level. Fathermore, failure of nuclear instrumentations are involved such as source range channel, intermediate range channel and audio counter. Transient behaviors caused by added malfunctions were reasonable and detail information of dynamic characteristics for turbine-condenser system were obtained. (author)

  7. Assessment of environmentally assisted cracking in PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    1) Since environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) is a time dependent process, assessment should be based on time rather than cycle dependent parameters. Thus an a/sub e/ vs a/sub i/ (or strain rate) basis for assessment should be used in preference to da/dN vs ΔK. 2) The threshold strain rate or velocity for the onset of EAC is controlled by material and environmental factors (e.g. steel sulphur content and water chemistry), and possibly by mechanical loading factors such as R ratio and load interaction effects. Above the threshold, crack growth rates are usually unacceptably rapid. 3) Sample calculations show that predicted crack growth rates using a time based model can be below or above those calculated using ASME XI depending on the value of the EAC threshold velocity but that for normal PWR operating conditions rates are likely to be below those predicted by the ASME code

  8. Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation experience with BWR and PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reparaz, A.; Smith, M.H.; Stephens, L.G.

    1992-01-01

    The large data base of fuel performance parameters available to Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP), and the excellent track record of innovation and fuel reliability accumulated over the last twenty-three years, allows SNP to have a clear insight on the characteristics of future developments in the area of fuel design. Following is a description of some of SNP's recent design innovations to prevent failures and to extend burnup capabilities. A goal paramount to the design and manufacture of BWR and PWR fuel is that of zero defects from any case during its operation in the reactor. Progress has already been made in achieving this goal. This paper summarized the cumulative failure rate of SNP fuel rod through January 1992

  9. PWR pressurizer discharge piping system on-site testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglaret, G.; Lasne, M.

    1983-08-01

    Framatome PWR systems includes the installation of safety valves and relief valves wich permit the discharge of steam from the pressurizer to the pressurizer relief tank through discharge piping system. Water seal expulsion pluration then depends on valve stem lift dynamics which can vary according to water-stem interaction. In order to approaches the different phenomenons, it was decided to perform a test on a 900 MWe French plant, test wich objectives are: characterize the mechanical response of the discharge piping to validate a mechanical model; open one, two or several valves among the following: one safety valve and three pilot operated relief valves, at a time or sequentially and measure the discharge piping transient response, the support loads, the

  10. PWR cold-leg small break loca with faulty HPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumamaru, H.; Kukita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a 1/48 volumetrically-scaled model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). At the LSTF are performed cold-leg small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests with faulty high pressure injection (HPI) system for break areas from 0.5% to 10% and an intentional primary system depressurization test following a small-break LOCA test. A simple prediction model is proposed for prediction of times of major events. Test data and calculations show that intentional primary system depressurization with use of the pressurizer power-operated relief valves (PORVs) is effective for break areas of approximately 0.5% or less, is unnecessary for breaks of 5% or more, and is insufficient for intermediate break areas to maintain adequate core cooling. (author)

  11. Numerical regulation of a test facility of materials for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-02-01

    The installation aims at testing materials used in nuclear power plants; tests consists in simulations of a design basis accident (failure of a primary circuit of a PWR type reactor) for a qualification of these materials. A description of the test installation, of the thermodynamic control, and of the control system is presented. The organisation of the software is then given: description of the sequence chaining monitor, operation, list and function of the programs. The analog information processing is also presented (data transmission). A real-time microcomputer and clock are used for this work. The microprocessor is the 6800 of MOTOROLA. The microcomputer used has been built around the MC 6800; its structure is described. The data acquisition include an analog data acquisition system and a numerical data acquisition system. Laboratory and on-site tests are finally presented [fr

  12. Transient analysis of multifailure conditions by using PWR plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisaki, Hidetoshi; Yokobayashi, Masao.

    1984-11-01

    This report describes results of the analysis of abnormal transients caused by multifailures using a PWR plant simulator. The simulator is based on an existing 822MWe power plant with 3 loops, and designed to cover wide range of plant operation from cold shutdown to full power at the end of life. Various malfunctions to simulate abnormal conditions caused by equipment failures are provided. In this report, features of abnormal transients caused by concurrence of malfunctions are discussed. The abnormal conditions studied are leak of primary coolant, loss of charging and feedwater flows, and control systems failure. From the results, it was observed that transient responses caused by some of the malfunctions are almost same as the addition of behaviors caused by each single malfunction. Therefore, it can be said that kinds of malfunctions which are concurrent may be estimated from transient characteristics of each single malfunction. (author)

  13. Modeling local chemistry in PWR steam generator crevices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past two decades steam generator corrosion damage has been a major cost impact to PWR owners. Crevices and occluded regions create thermal-hydraulic conditions where aggressive impurities can become highly concentrated, promoting localized corrosion of the tubing and support structure materials. The type of corrosion varies depending on the local conditions, with stress corrosion cracking being the phenomenon of most current concern. A major goal of the EPRI research in this area has been to develop models of the concentration process and resulting crevice chemistry conditions. These models may then be used to predict crevice chemistry based on knowledge of bulk chemistry, thereby allowing the operator to control corrosion damage. Rigorous deterministic models have not yet been developed; however, empirical approaches have shown promise and are reflected in current versions of the industry-developed secondary water chemistry guidelines

  14. Development of failed element monitoring system for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yupu; Liu Haojie

    2005-01-01

    Aiming at the existent problems of failed element monitoring system in the PWR, the detector, the spiral tube, the neutron-moderator and the shielding of neutron bas improved on in this task. These improvements decrease the backgrounds effectively, raise the work stability of the detectors and resolve the failed element error action problem which can not be resolved for the long time, and the detecting sensitivity is raise ten times. The γ-ray detector is arranged spiral with outside, so the γ-rays with shorter half-life can be detected. The structure of gross gamma detection station has improved, so the solid angle is expanded, the transmissivity of γ-rays and β-rays are increased, and the ratio of signal to background is raised. The measurement instrument has been intellectualized. This system is above criticism for the users in operation. (authors)

  15. Improving 900 MW(e) PWR control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouat, M.; Marcille, R.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of the behaviour of operators during operating tests on PWR units and the lessons learned from the TMI-2 accident have demonstrated the need to improve the interface between operators and the facilities they control. To that end, and to complement its establishment of safety panels, Electricite de France (EDF) embarked upon a study on the ''Modification of Control Desks and Boards'' in control rooms. This study, involving twenty-eight 900 MW(e) units, almost all of which are currently in service, began with an ergonomic analysis of control rooms by an external consultant, the ADERSA GERBIOS Association. This analysis was based on interviews with simulator instructors and operators, a study of the operation of the unit, and a general review of previous studies. The analysis began in October 1980 and resulted, in April 1981, in a critical report and a proposal to create a full-scale mock-up of a 900 MW(e) control room. Improvements to this were subsequently proposed, enabling options to be made between, among other things, active overall control panels and function-by-function control panels. Finally, a number of general principles, which largely encompass the operators' suggestions, were defined. The alterations to be made will make it necessary to revamp the control panels completely. The work and tests involved should match the duration of refuelling shut-downs. Audio-visual training programmes are planned (portable model). (author)

  16. Peaking-factor of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Noboru; Kato, Yasuji; Yokoi, M.

    1975-01-01

    Output peaking factor often plays an important role in the safety and operation of nuclear reactors. The meaning of the peaking factor of PWRs is categorized into two features or the peaking factor in core (FQ-core) and the peaking factor on the basis of accident analysis (or FQ-limit). FQ-core is the actual peaking factor realized in nuclear core at the time of normal operation, and FQ-limit should be evaluated from loss of coolant accident and other abnormal conditions. If FQ-core is lower than FQ-limit, the reactor may be operated at full load, but if FQ-core is larger than FQ-limit, reactor output should be controlled lower than FQ-limit. FQ-core has two kinds of values, or the one on the basis of nuclear design, and the other actually measured in reactor operation. The first FQ-core should be named as FQ-core-design and the latter as FQ-core-measured. The numerical evaluation of FQ-core-design is as follows; FQ-core-design of three-dimensions is synthesized with FQ-core horizontal value (X-Y) and FQ-core vertical value, the former one is calculated with ASSY-CORE code, and the latter one with one dimensional diffusion code. For the evaluation of FQ-core-measured, on-site data observation from nuclear reactor instrumentation or off-site data observation is used. (Iwase, T.)

  17. Twenty-five years of transient counting experience in French PWR units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelet, B. [Electricite de France (EDF DPN), 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Savoldelli, D.; Fritz, R. [Electricite de France (EDF DPN), 93 - Noisy le Grand (France)

    2001-07-01

    For nearly twenty five years, EDF has been checking that the actual operating transients are neither more severe nor more numerous than the design basis transients. This activity of transient cycle counting and bookkeeping has enabled EDF to own a database of more than 800 reactor.years for the PWR units. The current method of transient cycle counting is presented. In the paper, we will point out the main results of transient cycle counting and lessons learned. In general, the frequencies of transients are lower than the design frequencies. In few cases, they are higher, such as the transient frequencies of the RCS lines connected to auxiliary systems often due to operating procedures or particular periodic testing. Few periodic tests were not taken into account in the design basis transient file ; they have been detected thanks to the transient cycle counting. In the last 1980's, we achieved the first updating of the design basis transient file for the PWR 900 MWe series. In the early 1990's, we updated the design basis transient file of the PWR 1300 MWe series. In fact, since design and start-up, the operating conditions have been modified (fuel cycle with stretch-out, modification of the hot leg and cold leg temperatures for the PWR 1300 MWe,...). This was the cause of many unclassified transients. In the new design basis transient file, we have created new transients and increased the frequencies of some of them. This has enabled to consider the updated design basis transient file more representative of actual operating transients. For some years, we have increasingly associated the operators with the transient cycle counting concern. We noticed progress (decreased frequencies of most transients). (authors)

  18. Twenty-five years of transient counting experience in French PWR units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelet, B.; Savoldelli, D.; Fritz, R.

    2001-01-01

    For nearly twenty five years, EDF has been checking that the actual operating transients are neither more severe nor more numerous than the design basis transients. This activity of transient cycle counting and bookkeeping has enabled EDF to own a database of more than 800 reactor.years for the PWR units. The current method of transient cycle counting is presented. In the paper, we will point out the main results of transient cycle counting and lessons learned. In general, the frequencies of transients are lower than the design frequencies. In few cases, they are higher, such as the transient frequencies of the RCS lines connected to auxiliary systems often due to operating procedures or particular periodic testing. Few periodic tests were not taken into account in the design basis transient file ; they have been detected thanks to the transient cycle counting. In the last 1980's, we achieved the first updating of the design basis transient file for the PWR 900 MWe series. In the early 1990's, we updated the design basis transient file of the PWR 1300 MWe series. In fact, since design and start-up, the operating conditions have been modified (fuel cycle with stretch-out, modification of the hot leg and cold leg temperatures for the PWR 1300 MWe,...). This was the cause of many unclassified transients. In the new design basis transient file, we have created new transients and increased the frequencies of some of them. This has enabled to consider the updated design basis transient file more representative of actual operating transients. For some years, we have increasingly associated the operators with the transient cycle counting concern. We noticed progress (decreased frequencies of most transients). (authors)

  19. Probe for detection of denting in PWR steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerardin, J.P.; Germain, J.L.; Nio, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    In certain types of PWR steam generator, oxide deposits can lead to embedding, and subsequently to deformation of a tube (the phenomenon of ''denting''). Such embedding changes the vibratory behavior of the tubes and can result in fatigue cracking. This type of cracking can also be worsened in the event of improper assembly of the anti-vibration spacer bars supporting the U-bends. To prevent such incidents and provide for effective preventive condition-directed maintenance of its PWR steam generators, EDF has undertaken the study and development of a probe to detect this type of phenomenon. The studies began in 1990 and led to the building of an initial prototype probe. The principle behind the probe consists in inducing vibration in the U-bend and determining the main resonance modes of the tube. Measurements of frequency and amplitude and calculation of damping enable characterization of the mechanical behavior of the U-bend. The most important parameter is damping, for which the value must be sufficiently high to ensure that the tube is not subjected to major vibratory amplitudes during operation. Numerous tests have been performed with the first prototype version of the probe, on a mock-up in the test area and on one of the demounted steam generators on the Dampierre site. These different tests have enabled validation of the operating principle, fine-tuning the process, pinpointing certain mechanical problems in the probe design, and obtaining the first indications as to the real vibratory behavior of U-bends on a steam generator. On the basis of these preliminary tests, the specifications were drawn up for an industrial version of the probe. Following a call for bids and the choice of a manufacturer, work began on fabrication of a new probe model in 1993. This version was delivered at the end of 1993 and testing began in 1994. (authors). 5 figs., 2 tabs

  20. First application of hollow fiber filter for PWR condensate polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, S.; Otoha, K.; Takiguchi, H.

    2002-01-01

    In Tsuruga Unit-2 (PWR 1160 MWe commenced commercial operation in 1987), current procedure for secondary system clean-up before start-up had prolonged outage time and had consumed a huge amount of de-ionized (DI) water. In addition, iron oxide in condensate had accelerated the degradation of condensate demineralizer (CD) resin. The corrosion product of iron could also influence the secondary side corrosion of steam generator (SG) tubing if it intruded into SG through CD. To solve these problems, Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) decided to introduce hollow fiber filter (HFF) type condensate filter into Tsuruga-2, as the first application to PWR in the world. Because of retro-fitted HFF in Tsuruga Unit-2, limitations for installation space and flow resistance in condensate system and cost reduction required new design for compact and low differential pressure system and for long life filter module. JAPC and ORGANO assessed methodologies to achieve these goals. An advanced HFF system, including a newly developed compact HFF module design, was installed at Tsuruga Unit-2 in 1997 based on the assessment. During the 5 years since the installation, the HFF system has provided excellent crud removal that enables to shorten the outage period and to reduce DI water consumption drastically. Stable differential pressure (dP) trend of the HFF system indicates an expected module life of more than 7 years, with backwash cleaning required only 2 or 3 times per year. In addition to providing the expected operating cost reduction and improved SG tube integrity, numerous additional benefits have resulted from the retrofit. (authors)

  1. Radiation risk analysis of tritium in PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun; Wang Shimin

    1999-03-01

    Tritium is a common radionuclide in PWR nuclear power plant. In the normal operation conditions, its radiation risk to plant workers is the internal radiation exposure when tritium existing in air as HTO (hydrogen tritium oxide) is breathed in. As the HTO has the same physical and chemical characteristics as water, the main way that HTO entering the air is by evaporation. There are few opening systems in Nuclear Power Plant, the radiation risk of tritium mainly exists near the area of spent fuel pit and reactor pit. The highest possible radiation risk it may cause--the maximum concentration in air is the level when equilibrium is established between water and air phases for tritium. The author analyzed the relationship among the concentration of HTO in water, in air and the water temperature when equilibrium is established, the equilibrated HTO concentration in air increases with HTO concentration in water and water temperature. The analysis revealed that at 30 degree C, the equilibrated HTO concentration in air might reach 1 DAC (derived air concentration) when the HTO concentration in water is 28 GBq/m 3 . Owing to the operation of plant ventilation systems and the existence of moisture in the input air of the ventilation, the practical tritium concentration in air is much lower than its equilibrated levels, the radiation risk of tritium in PWR plant is quite limited. In 1997, Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant's practical monitoring result of the HTO concentration in the air of the nuclear island and the urine of workers supported this conclusion. Based on this analysis, some suggestions to the reduction of tritium radiation risk were made

  2. Activity transport models for PWR primary circuits; PWR-ydinvoimalaitoksen primaeaeripiirin aktiivisuuskulkeutumismallit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, V; Rosenberg, R [VTT Chemical Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1995-03-01

    The corrosion products activated in the primary circuit form a major source of occupational radiation dose in the PWR reactors. Transport of corrosion activity is a complex process including chemistry, reactor physics, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. All the mechanisms involved are not known and there is no comprehensive theory for the process, so experimental test loops and plant data are very important in research efforts. Several activity transport modelling attempts have been made to improve the water chemistry control and to minimise corrosion in PWR`s. In this research report some of these models are reviewed with special emphasis on models designed for Soviet VVER type reactors. (51 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.).

  3. Program of monitoring PWR fuel in Spain; Programa de Vigilancia de Combustible pwr en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez Murillo, J. C.; Quecedo, M.; Munoz-Roja, C.

    2015-07-01

    In the year 2000 the PWR utilities: Centrales Nucleares Almaraz-Trillo (CNAT) and Asociacion Nuclear Asco-Vandellos (ANAV), and ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas developed and executed a coordinated strategy named PIC (standing for Coordinated Research Program), for achieving the highest level of fuel reliability. The paper will present the scope and results of this program along the years and will summarize the way the changes are managed to ensure fuel integrity. The excellent performance of the ENUSA manufactured fuel in the PWR Spanish NPPs is the best indicator that the expectations on this program are being met. (Author)

  4. PWR secondary water chemistry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearl, W.L.; Sawochka, S.G.; Copley, S.E.; Siegwarth, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    Secondary water chemistry studies have been performed at ten operating PWRs for the past several years. The program includes seven PWRs with recirculating U-tube steam generators, and three once-through steam generator (OTSG) PWRs. Program results indicate that during periods of minimal condenser inleakage, condensate polishers do not remove significant quantities of sodium, chloride and sulfate. At higher inlet impurity levels, demineralizer removal efficiencies improve markedly. Corrosion product removal efficiencies generally are 60 to 95% depending on system design and operating practices. Significant quantities of sodium and chloride 'hide out' in steam generators with a portion returning during transients, particularly during plant shutdowns. In OTSG PWRs, a significant portion of the total sodium and chloride transported via the steam is removed with the moisture separator drains (MSD) and returned to the OTSG when MSDs are pumped forward. Partial return of MSDs to the condenser would result in reduced feedwater and steam impurity levels. (author)

  5. Analysis of PWR assembly bow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Robert J.; Franceschini, Fausto

    2008-01-01

    Excessive out of core assembly bow has been observed during refueling outages of certain PWRs. Assembly bow can take on a rather complex S-shape, and in other cases C-shape bow is prevalent. Concerns have been raised regarding the impact of the observed assembly bow on the in-core power distribution and the safety analyses supporting the plant operations. In response to these concerns, Westinghouse has developed a comprehensive analysis process for determining the effects of assembly bow on core power distributions and plant operating margins. This methodology has been applied to a particular reactor as part of an overall safety reanalysis completed in support of plant modifications. This paper provides a brief description of the methods used and a summary of the pertinent results. (authors)

  6. Analysis of PWR assembly bow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Robert J.; Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Excessive out of core assembly bow has been observed during refueling outages of certain PWRs. Assembly bow can take on a rather complex S-shape, and in other cases C-shape bow is prevalent. Concerns have been raised regarding the impact of the observed assembly bow on the in-core power distribution and the safety analyses supporting the plant operations. In response to these concerns, Westinghouse has developed a comprehensive analysis process for determining the effects of assembly bow on core power distributions and plant operating margins. This methodology has been applied to a particular reactor as part of an overall safety reanalysis completed in support of plant modifications. This paper provides a brief description of the methods used and a summary of the pertinent results. (authors)

  7. Study for identification of control rod drops in PWR reactors at any burnup step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Thiago J.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.; Goncalves, Alessandro C.

    2013-01-01

    The control rod drop event in PWR reactors induces an unsafe operating condition. Therefore, in a scenario of a control rod drop is important to quickly identify the rod to minimize undesirable effects. The objective of this work is to develop an on-line method for identification of control rod drop in PWR reactors. The method consists on the construction of a tool that is based on the ex-core detector responses. Therefore, it is proposed to recognize patterns in the neutron ex-core detectors responses and thus to identify on-line a control rod drop in the core during the reactor operation. The results of the study, as well as the behavior of the detector responses, demonstrated the feasibility of this method. (author)

  8. Study for identification of control rod drops in PWR reactors at any burnup step

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Thiago J.; Martinez, Aquilino S.; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.; Goncalves, Alessandro C., E-mail: tsouza@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: canedo@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: alessandro@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The control rod drop event in PWR reactors induces an unsafe operating condition. Therefore, in a scenario of a control rod drop is important to quickly identify the rod to minimize undesirable effects. The objective of this work is to develop an on-line method for identification of control rod drop in PWR reactors. The method consists on the construction of a tool that is based on the ex-core detector responses. Therefore, it is proposed to recognize patterns in the neutron ex-core detectors responses and thus to identify on-line a control rod drop in the core during the reactor operation. The results of the study, as well as the behavior of the detector responses, demonstrated the feasibility of this method. (author)

  9. Validation of the probabilistic approach for the analysis of PWR transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amesz, J.; Francocci, G.F.; Clarotti, C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews the pilot study at present being carried out on the validation of probabilistic methodology with real data coming from the operational records of the PWR power station at Obrigheim (KWO, Germany) operating since 1969. The aim of this analysis is to validate the a priori predictions of reactor transients performed by a probabilistic methodology, with the posteriori analysis of transients that actually occurred at a power station. Two levels of validation have been distinguished: (a) validation of the rate of occurrence of initiating events; (b) validation of the transient-parameter amplitude (i.e., overpressure) caused by the above mentioned initiating events. The paper describes the a priori calculations performed using a fault-tree analysis by means of a probabilistic code (SALP 3) and event-trees coupled with a PWR system deterministic computer code (LOOP 7). Finally the principle results of these analyses are presented and critically reviewed

  10. The AMEBA PWR, a new concept in the technology of nuclear reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, A

    2000-05-01

    AMEBA is an Italian acronym which stands for 'alta moderazione e basso arricchimento' (high moderation and low enrichment). The AMEBA reactor is nothing more than a PWR which possesses very unusual values of both volumetric ratio moderator/fuel and U-235 enrichment of UO{sub 2}. The possibility is shown of the technical realisation of a nuclear power plant equipped with an AMEBA PWR reactor. Among the most enticing properties of AMEBA are the following: self-shut-down in any abnormal condition, elimination of all need for control rods and boric acid dissolution in the water, absolute impossibility of reaching values of reactivity greater than a fraction of a dollar, intrinsic subcriticality, attaining to several dollars, in non-operative condition when the water is at ambient temperature, normal operation with a very small-sized pressurizer, self-start-up.

  11. The AMEBA PWR, a new concept in the technology of nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelli, A.

    2000-01-01

    AMEBA is an Italian acronym which stands for 'alta moderazione e basso arricchimento' (high moderation and low enrichment). The AMEBA reactor is nothing more than a PWR which possesses very unusual values of both volumetric ratio moderator/fuel and U-235 enrichment of UO 2 . The possibility is shown of the technical realisation of a nuclear power plant equipped with an AMEBA PWR reactor. Among the most enticing properties of AMEBA are the following: self-shut-down in any abnormal condition, elimination of all need for control rods and boric acid dissolution in the water, absolute impossibility of reaching values of reactivity greater than a fraction of a dollar, intrinsic subcriticality, attaining to several dollars, in non-operative condition when the water is at ambient temperature, normal operation with a very small-sized pressurizer, self-start-up

  12. Light water reactors development in Japan. (1) Introduction of LWR technology (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Ichita; Suzuki, Shigemitsu

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary progress of the LWR plants in the last half-century was reviewed in series. Introduction of LWR technology (PWR) in Japan was reviewed in this article. Kansai Electric Power imported the Mihama-1 - a 340 MWe PWR built by Westinghouse Corp. It began operating in 1970 to supply power to the World Exposition (EXPO70). There followed a period in which designs was purchased from US vendors and they were constructed with the co-operation of Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, who would then receive a license to build similar plants in Japan and develop the capacity to design and construct PWRs by itself. Progress of designs, fabrications, project management and construction of PWRs were reviewed from technology transfer to its autonomy age. (T. Tanaka)

  13. The function of single containment and double containment of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weijing.

    1985-01-01

    The function and structures of single containment and double containment of PWR nuclear power plant were described briefiy. The dissimilarites of diffent type of containments, which effects the impact of environment are discused. The impact of environment, effected by 'source term', containment gas leak rate and diffusion pattern of the released gas, under different operating condition is analysed. Especially, the impact of environment under LOCA accident is fully analysed

  14. Numerical simulation of the heating and start-up of PWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraco-Medeiros, M.A.; Leite, C.A.T.; Ramalho, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    The start-up of a PWR nuclear power plant must be done within safety criteria and requires a simulation. The design of some equipment, cost and time can be optimized. A computer simulator, which allows control of all the equipment and variables into the operation, has been developed and is presented in this paper. The KWU procedure and an alternative for Angra II were simulated. The results are showed up. 09 refs, 03 figs. (B.C.A.)

  15. Primary water chemistry improvement for radiation exposure reduction at Japanese PWR Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishizawa, Eiichi [Omiya Technical Institute, Saitama-ken (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    Radiation exposure during the refueling outages at Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plants has been gradually decreased through continuous efforts keeping the radiation dose rates at relatively low level. The improvement of primary water chemistry in respect to reduction of the radiation sources appears as one of the most important contributions to the achieved results and can be classified by the plant operation conditions as follows

  16. Water-hammer in the feed-water pipes for PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonnet, Bernard; Leroy, Claude; Oullion, Jean; Yazidjian, J.-C.

    1979-01-01

    PWR boiler water feed pipes have been known for several years to be affected by violent water-hammer during start-ups and operation of the plant. In view of the varying results of corrective design modifications in America and Europe, FRAMATOME undertook an experimental research programme which resulted in the adoption of cruciform tubes on the feed-water distributor as the most reliable solution. Subsequent tests at Fessenheim I confirmed the effectiveness of this device [fr

  17. Estimate of the speed of the refrigerant on a PWR: three way based on the analysis of noise; Estimacion de la volecidad del refrigerante en un PWR: tres vias basadas en el analisis de ruido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalvo, C.; Ruiz, M.; Garcia Berrocal, A.

    2014-07-01

    The speed of the refrigerant is a key parameter in the monitoring of the operation a PWR. He know this value and be able to track on-site It allows an understanding of the State of the kernel with valuable information about the refrigerant, and thus behavior on heat exchange which takes place in the reactor. (Author)

  18. PWR reload safety evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.; Chapin, D.L.; Love, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    The current practice for WWER safety analysis is to prepare the plant Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for initial plant operation. However, the existing safety analysis is typically not evaluated for reload cycles to confirm that all safety limits are met. In addition, there is no systematic reanalysis or reevaluation of the safety analyses after there have been changes made to the plant. The Westinghouse process is discussed which is in contrast to this and in which the SAR conclusions are re-validated through evaluation and/or analysis of each reload cycle. (Z.S.)

  19. PWR vessel inspection performance improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair Fairbrother, D.; Bodson, Francis

    1998-01-01

    A compact robot for ultrasonic inspection of reactor vessels has been developed that reduces setup logistics and schedule time for mandatory code inspections. Rather than installing a large structure to access the entire weld inspection area from its flange attachment, the compact robot examines welds in overlapping patches from a suction cup anchor to the shell wall. The compact robot size allows two robots to be operated in the vessel simultaneously. This significantly reduces the time required to complete the inspection. Experience to date indicates that time for vessel examinations can be reduced to fewer than four days. (author)

  20. The KINA neutronic module of the LEGO code for steady-state and transient PWR plant simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolopoulos, D.; Pollacchini, L.; Vimercati, G.; Spelta, S.

    1989-01-01

    The Automation Research Center (CRA) of ENEl has implemented some models for analyzing both incidental and operational transients in PWR power plants. For such models an axial neutron kinetics module characterized by high computational efficency with adequate results accuracy was called for. CISE has been entrusted with the task of implementing such a module named KINA and based on IQS (Improved Quasi Static) method, to be included in the library of LEGO modular code used by CRA to set up PWR power models. Moreover, The KINA module has been adapted to the neutron constants computing model developed by the EdF-SEPTEN, which has been using and improving the LEGO code for a long time in cooperation with ENEL-CRA. In this paper, after some remarks on the LEGO code, a general description of KINA neutronic module is given. The resylts of a preliminary validation activity of KINA for an EdF 1300 MWe PWR plant are also presented

  1. Zircaloy-4 corrosion in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyfitch, S.; Smalley, W.R.; Roberts, E.

    1985-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion has been studied extensively in the nuclear industry for a number of years. Following the early crud-related corrosion failures in the Saxton test reactor, Westinghouse undertook numerous programs to minimize crud deposition on fuel rods in power reactors through primary coolant chemistry control. Modern plants today are operating with improved coolant chemistry guidelines, and crud deposition levels are very low in proportion to earlier experience. Zircaloy-4 corrosion under a variety of coolant chemistry, heat flux and exposure conditions has been studied extensively. Experience to date, even in relatively high coolant temperature plants, has indicated that -for both fuel cladding and structural components- Zircaloy-4 waterside corrosion performance has been excellent. Recognizing future industry trends, however, which will result in Zircaloy-4 being subjected to ever increasing corrosion duties, Westinghouse will continue accumulating Zircaloy-4 corrosion experience in large power plants. 13 refs.

  2. Thermo-mechanical analysis of PWR bolts susceptible to IASCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteoli, C.; Hannink, M.H.C.; Blom, F.J.; Marck, S.C. van der; Charpin-Jacobs, F.

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) is considered a primary ageing issue for the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). In particular, this complex phenomenon which develops in an environment featuring thermal and mechanical stresses, interaction with corrosive compounds and irradiation, is affecting the bolts connecting the baffles and the formers in the Nuclear Power Plants' RPVs. The baffle-former assembly is the structure that borders the fuel assemblies region, contributing to keep them in position and separating in the radial direction, the core region from the downcomer region. An evaluation of the stresses and temperatures reached in the baffle-former bolts during normal operation was performed by means of a coupled thermo-mechanical study which uses reactor physics calculations to obtain the fluence in the reactor core and as a consequence the heat deposition in the RPV internals. The heat deposition data are coupled with a finite element model of the bolts and the RPV internals in order to perform a complete analysis taking in account thermal, mechanical and radiation loadings. The study is first carried out focusing on a section of the RPV internals, showing a single row of baffle-former bolts. Then the work is extended to the full core height. The model set up in this work, includes an in-depth study of the behavior of the core internals, in particular baffle-former bolts. The model has the capability of understanding the mechanical and thermal behavior of essential internal components in a PWR. (authors)

  3. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Tobin, S.J.; Favalli, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Hu, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) (Sweden); Trellue, H.; Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-11

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative–Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and {sup 134}Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  4. Effect of component aging on PWR control rod drive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, E.; Gunther, W.; Sullivan, K.

    1992-01-01

    An aging assessment of PWR control rod drive (CRD) systems has been completed as part of the US NRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The design, construction, maintenance, and operation of the Babcock ampersand Wilcox (B ampersand W), Combustion Engineering (CE), and Westinghouse (W) systems were evaluated to determine the potential for degradation as each system ages. Operating experience data were evaluated to identify the predominant failure modes, causes, and effects. This, coupled with an assessment of the materials of construction and operating environment, demonstrate that each design is subject to degradation, which if left unchecked, could affect its safety function as the plant ages. An industry survey, conducted with the assistance of EPRI and NUMARC, identified current CRD system maintenance and inspection practices. The results of this survey indicate that some plants have performed system modifications, replaced components, or augmented existing preventive maintenance practices in response to system aging. The survey results also supported the operating experience data, which concluded that the timely replacement of degraded components, prior to failure, was not always possible using existing condition monitoring techniques. The recommendations presented in this study also include a discussion of more advanced monitoring techniques, which provide trendable results capable of detecting aging

  5. Adaptive control of a PWR core power using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arab-Alibeik, H.; Setayeshi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Reactor power control is important because of safety concerns and the call for regular and appropriate operation of nuclear power plants. It seems that the load-follow operation of these plants will be unavoidable in the future. Discrepancies between the real plant and the model used in controller design for load-follow operation encourage one to use auto-tuning and (or) adaptive techniques. Neural network technology shows great promise for addressing many problems in non-model-based adaptive control methods. Also, there has been a great attention to inverse control especially in the neural and fuzzy control context. Fortunately, online adaptation eliminates some limitations of inverse control and its shortcomings for real world applications. We use a neural adaptive inverse controller to control the power of a PWR reactor. The stability of the system and convergence of the controller parameters are guaranteed during online adaptation phase provided the controller is near the plant's real inverse after offline training period. The performance of the controller is verified using nonlinear simulations in diverse operating conditions

  6. Study of anticipated transient without scram for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Jilong.

    1985-01-01

    Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) of PWR, the one of the 'Unresolved Safety Issue' with NRC, has been investigated for many years. The latest analysis done by the author considers the PWR's inherent stability and long-term performence under the condition of ATWS combined with SBLOCA and studies the sensitivity of several assumptions, which shows positive results

  7. Pushing back the boundaries of PWR fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofer, G.A.; Skogen, F.B.; Brown, C.A.; Fresk, Y.U.

    1985-01-01

    In today's fiercely competitive PWR reload market utilities are benefiting from a variety of design innovations which are helping to cut fuel cycle costs and to improve fuel performance. An advanced PWR fuel design from Exxon, for example, currently under evaluation at the Ginna plant in the United States, offers higher burn-up and greater power cycling. (author)

  8. An economic analysis code used for PWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dingqin

    1989-01-01

    An economic analysis code used for PWR fuel cycle is developed. This economic code includes 12 subroutines representing vavious processes for entire PWR fuel cycle, and indicates the influence of the fuel cost on the cost of the electricity generation and the influence of individual process on the sensitivity of the fuel cycle cost

  9. Sizewell: proposed site for Britain's first PWR power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    The pamphlet covers the following points, very briefly: nuclear power - a success story; the Government's nuclear programme; why Sizewell; the PWR (with diagram); the PWR at Sizewell (with aerial view) (location; size; cooling water; road access; fuel transport; construction; employment; environment; screening; the next steps (licensing procedures, etc.); safety; further information). (U.K.)

  10. Transient study of a PWR pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotoma, H.

    1973-01-01

    An appropriate method for the calculation and transient performance of the pressurizer of a pressurized water reactor is presented. The study shows a digital program of simulation of pressurizer dynamics based on the First Law of Thermodynamic and Laws of Heat and Mass Transfer. The importance of the digital program that was written for a pressurizer of PWR, lies in the fact that, this can be of practical use in the safety analysis of a reactor of Angra dos Reis type with a power of about 500 M We. (author)

  11. Technical specifications for PWR secondary water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.; van Rooyen, D.

    1977-08-01

    The bases for establishing Technical Specifications for PWR secondary water chemistry are reviewed. Whereas extremely stringent control of secondary water needs to be maintained to prevent denting in some units, sound bases for establishing limits that will prevent stress corrosion, wastage, and denting do not exist at the present time. This area is being examined very thoroughly by industry-sponsored research programs. Based on the evidence available to date, short term control limits are suggested; establishment of these or other limits as Technical Specifications is not recommended until the results of the research programs have been obtained and evaluated

  12. Technical basis for PWR emergency plans forming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homme, A.; Manesse, D.; Gauvain, J.; Crabol, B.

    1989-10-01

    Our speech first summarizes the french approach concerning the management of severe accidents which could occur on PWR stations. Then it defines the source-term which is being used as a general support for elaborating the emergency plans devoted to the protection of the population. It describes next the consequences of this source-term on the site and in the environment, which constitute the technical bases for defining actions of utilities and concerned authorities. It gives lastly information on the present status of the different emergency plans and the complementary work undertaken to improve them [fr

  13. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  14. Microcomputer simulation of PWR power plant pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, L.R.A. de; Calixto Neto, J.; Martinez, A.S.; Schirru, R.

    1990-01-01

    It is presented a method for the simulation of the pressurizer behavior of a PWR power plant. The method was implanted in a microcomputer, and it considers all the devices for the pressure control (spray and relief valves, heaters, controller, etc.). The physical phenomena and the PID (Proportional + Integral + Derivative) controller were mathematically represented by linear relations, uncoupled, discretized in the time. There are three different algorithms which take into account the non-linear effects introduced by the variation of the physical properties due to the temperature and pressure, and also the mutual effects between the physical phenomena and the PID controller. (author)

  15. Burst protected nuclear reactor plant with PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Michel, E.

    1978-01-01

    In the PWR, several integrated components from the steam raising unit and the main coolant pump are grouped around the reactor pressure vessel in a multiloop circuit and in a vertical arrangement. For safety reasons all primary circuit components and pipelines are situated in burst protection covers. To reduce the area of the plant straight tube steam raising units with forced circulation are used as steam raising units. The boiler pumps are connected to the vertical tubes and to the pressure vessel via double pipelines made as twin chamber pipes. (DG) [de

  16. Conceptual design study of small long-life PWR based on thorium cycle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subkhi, M. Nurul; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik

    2014-01-01

    A neutronic performance of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle based fuel has been investigated. Thorium cycle which has higher conversion ratio in thermal region compared to uranium cycle produce some significant of 233 U during burn up time. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.3, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in whole core cylindrical two-dimension R-Z geometry by SRAC-CITATION. this study would be introduced thorium nitride fuel system which ZIRLO is the cladding material. The optimization of 350 MWt small long life PWR result small excess reactivity and reduced power peaking during its operation

  17. Study of PWR reactor efficiency as a function of turbine steam extractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Janine Gandolpho da; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques; Martinez, Aquilino Senra

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to optimize the extractions of the low-pressure turbine of a PWR nuclear reactor, in order to obtain the best thermodynamic cycle efficiency. We have analyzed typical data of a 1300 MW PWR reactor, operating at 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% capacities, respectively. The first stage of this study consists of generating a mathematical model capable of describing the reactor behavior and efficiency at any power level. The second stage of this study consists of to combine the generated mathematical model in an optimization computer program that optimize the extractions flow of the low-pressure turbine until it finds the optimal system efficiency. This work does not alter the nuclear facility project in any way. (author)

  18. Primary circuit leak detection an application on PWR vessel head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loisy, F.; Germain, J.L.; Chauvel, L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1991, cracks were discovered and localized in the lower part of certain vessel head adapters in EDF PWR units. While awaiting the replacement of the vessel heads in question, EDF developed systems to enable continuous monitoring of vessel head penetration, by means of early detection of leaks. One of these systems in based on detection of water vapour in a confined space above the vessel head. The efficiency of the measurement chain is particularly dependent on dilution of the leakage in the confined space prior TO entry in the sampling circuit. The detection threshold for this method is on the order of 1.2 liters/hour for a dilution rate of 1500 rate of 1500 m 3 /h and a dew point of 22 deg C. This system has now been in operation on three 1300-MW PWR units for three years, and has proved to function satisfactorily. (authors)

  19. Techniques for Primary-to-Secondary Leak Monitoring in PWR Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Wook; Chi, Jun Hwa; Kang, Duck Won; Tae, Jeong Woo

    2006-01-01

    Historically, corrosion and mechanical damage have made steam generator tubes in PWR plants see various types of degradation from both the primary and secondary sides of the tubes. Since the tube degradation can lead to through-wall failure, the plant personnel should make efforts to prevent the failure. One of such preventive efforts is to monitor primary-to-secondary leakage (PSL) that usually precedes the tube rupture. Thus the objective of PSL monitoring is to make operators to determine when to shutdown the plant in order to minimize the likelihood of propagation of leaks to tube rupture under normal and faulted conditions This paper addresses briefly the status of techniques for PSL monitoring used in PWR plants

  20. Analysis of WWER-440 and PWR RPV welds surveillance data to compare irradiation damage evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debarberis, L. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: luigi.debarberis@cec.eu.int; Acosta, B. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)]. E-mail: beatriz.acosta-iborra@jrc.nl; Zeman, A. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Sevini, F. [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Ballesteros, A. [Tecnatom, Avd. Montes de Oca 1, San Sebasitan de los Reyes, E-28709 Madrid (Spain); Kryukov, A. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gillemot, F. [AEKI Atomic Research Institute, Konkoly Thege M. ut 29-33, 1121 Budapest (Hungary); Brumovsky, M. [NRI, Nuclear Research Institute, Husinec-Rez 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2006-04-15

    It is known that for Russian-type and Western water reactor pressure vessel steels there is a similar degradation in mechanical properties during equivalent neutron irradiation. Available surveillance results from WWER and PWR vessels are used in this article to compare irradiation damage evolution for the different reactor pressure vessel welds. The analysis is done through the semi-mechanistic model for radiation embrittlement developed by JRC-IE. Consistency analysis with BWR vessel materials and model alloys has also been performed within this study. Globally the two families of studied materials follow similar trends regarding the evolution of irradiation damage. Moreover in the high fluence range typical of operation of WWER the radiation stability of these vessels is greater than the foreseen one for PWR.

  1. The new lattice code Paragon and its qualification for PWR core applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouisloumen, M.; Huria, H.C.; Mayhue, L.T.; Smith, R.M.; Kichty, M.J.; Matsumoto, H.; Tahara, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Paragon is a new two-dimensional transport code based on collision probability with interface current method and written entirely in Fortran 90/95. The qualification of Paragon has been completed and the results are very good. This qualification included a number of critical experiments. Comparisons to the Monte Carlo code MCNP for a wide variety of PWR assembly lattice types were also performed. In addition, Paragon-based core simulator models have been compared against PWR plant startup and operational data for a large number of plants. Some results of these calculations and also comparisons against models developed with a licensed Westinghouse lattice code, Phoenix-P, are presented. The qualification described in this paper provided the basis for the qualification of Paragon both as a validated transport code and as the nuclear data source for core simulator codes

  2. Model-based fault detection and isolation of a PWR nuclear power plant using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Far, R.R.; Davilu, H.; Lucas, C.

    2008-01-01

    The proper and timely fault detection and isolation of industrial plant is of premier importance to guarantee the safe and reliable operation of industrial plants. The paper presents application of a neural networks-based scheme for fault detection and isolation, for the pressurizer of a PWR nuclear power plant. The scheme is constituted by 2 components: residual generation and fault isolation. The first component generates residuals via the discrepancy between measurements coming from the plant and a nominal model. The neutral network estimator is trained with healthy data collected from a full-scale simulator. For the second component detection thresholds are used to encode the residuals as bipolar vectors which represent fault patterns. These patterns are stored in an associative memory based on a recurrent neutral network. The proposed fault diagnosis tool is evaluated on-line via a full-scale simulator detected and isolate the main faults appearing in the pressurizer of a PWR. (orig.)

  3. Analyses of plant behaviors at the secondary side depressurization during LOCA of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabe, Yasuharu; Tamaki, Tomohiko; Kohriyama, Tamio; Ohtani, Masanori [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    When high pressure injection systems failed during a small break loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) for a PWR, main steam relief valves are opened to operate accumulator systems. However, it is pointed out that the core can be exposed since so-called counter current flow limitation (CCFL) occurs in steam generator (SG) tubes. The possibility of the core exposure by CCFL in a PWR plant was evaluated. First, RELAP5/MOD2 code was modified to be able to calculate CCFL. And then the code was applied to evaluate a 4-loop PWR plant. The LOCA with a rupture 3 inches were analyzed with the following two cases: (1) Only the main steam relief valve of the loop with the rupture is opened. (2) all of the relief valves are opened. It is seen that the CCFL phenomenon occurs in the case (1), however, the core cooling was maintained by the accumulator systems that actuated during the core exposure. On the other hand, the core exposure by CCFL is not observed in the case (2). It is shown that core cooling is promoted by operation of main steam relief valves. (author)

  4. Secure and effective valve stem sealing in PWR power generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.

    1991-01-01

    The PWR power generating plant combines severe operating conditions with the highest safety requirements, making it one of the most demanding environments for seals. An analysis of the conditions inherent in its operation reveals: an aggressive and radioactive fluid at high temperature and pressure; frequent thermal shocks; and hazards for maintenance personnel in the containment area unless the reactor is shut down. The achievement of today's quality and safety standards owes much to the experience, research and testing carried out by the Electricite de France during its graduation from its first nuclear unit to become the world's most important manager of PWR plants with over 45 now under its control. The number of valves involved in the French nuclear program is in excess of 1,300,000. Knowing what the affect of a leak can be, especially if it necessitates a shutdown of the power station, the need to insure the quality of valve sealing can be appreciated. At the beginning of their nuclear building program, the EdF was finding that valves, representing only 2 percent of the investment in a PWR plant, caused 20% of the unwanted outages and cost 60% of the total of plant maintenance. In this report, the author endeavors to show how this problem was solved by team work and concerted action by the EdF, the valve constructors and seal manufacturer, not forgetting the importance of informing and training the maintenance and repair teams within the power stations themselves

  5. CECP, Decommissioning Costs for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierschbach, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The Cost Estimating Computer Program CECP, designed for use on an IBM personal computer or equivalent, was developed for estimating the cost of decommissioning boiling water reactor (BWR) and light-water reactor (PWR) power stations to the point of license termination. 2 - Method of solution: Cost estimates include component, piping, and equipment removal costs; packaging costs; decontamination costs; transportation costs; burial volume and costs; and manpower staffing costs. Using equipment and consumables costs and inventory data supplied by the user, CECP calculates unit cost factors and then combines these factors with transportation and burial cost algorithms to produce a complete report of decommissioning costs. In addition to costs, CECP also calculates person-hours, crew-hours, and exposure person-hours associated with decommissioning. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is designed for a specific waste charge structure. The waste cost data structure cannot handle intermediate waste handlers or changes in the charge rate structures. The decommissioning of a reactor can be divided into 5 periods. 200 different items for special equipment costs are possible. The maximum amount for each special equipment item is 99,999,999$. You can support data for 10 buildings, 100 components each; ESTS1071/01: There are 65 components for 28 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (BWR). ESTS1071/02: There are 75 components for 25 systems available to specify the contaminated systems costs (PWR)

  6. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-01-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  7. BWR water chemistry guidelines and PWR primary water chemistry guidelines in Japan – Purpose and technical background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirotaka, E-mail: kawamuh@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Hirano, Hideo [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Katsumura, Yousuke [University of Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, Shunsuke [Tohoku University (Japan); Mizuno, Takayuki [Mie University (Japan); Kitajima, Hideaki; Tsuzuki, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Safety Institute (Japan); Terachi, Takumi [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc. (Japan); Nagase, Makoto; Usui, Naoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan); Takagi, Junichi; Urata, Hidehiro [Toshiba Corporation (Japan); Shoda, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Takao [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Ltd. (Japan)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Framework of BWR/PWR water chemistry Guidelines in Japan are presented. • Guideline necessity, definitions, philosophy and technical background are mentioned. • Some guideline settings for control parameters and recommendations are explaines. • Chemistry strategy is also mentioned. - Abstract: After 40 years of light water reactor (LWR) operations in Japan, the sustainable development of water chemistry technologies has aimed to ensure the highest coolant system component integrity and fuel reliability performance for maintaining LWRs in the world; additionally, it aimed to achieve an excellent dose rate reduction. Although reasonable control and diagnostic parameters are utilized by each boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) owner, it is recognized that specific values are not shared among everyone involved. To ensure the reliability of BWR and PWR operation and maintenance, relevant members of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish guidelines for water chemistry. The Japanese BWR and PWR water chemistry guidelines provide strategies to improve material and fuel reliability performance as well as to reduce dosing rates. The guidelines also provide reasonable “control values”, “diagnostic values” and “action levels” for multiple parameters, and they stipulate responses when these levels are exceeded. Specifically, “conditioning parameters” are adopted in the Japanese PWR primary water chemistry guidelines. Good practices for operational conditions are also discussed with reference to long-term experience. This paper presents the purpose, technical background and framework of the preliminary water chemistry guidelines for Japanese BWRs and PWRs. It is expected that the guidelines will be helpful as an introduction to achieve safety and reliability during operations.

  8. Scoping Study Investigating PWR Instrumentation during a Severe Accident Scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J. L. [Rempe and Associates, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lutz, R. J. [Lutz Nuclear Safety Consultant, LLC, Asheville, NC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The accidents at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) and Fukushima Daiichi Units 1, 2, and 3 nuclear power plants demonstrate the critical importance of accurate, relevant, and timely information on the status of reactor systems during a severe accident. These events also highlight the critical importance of understanding and focusing on the key elements of system status information in an environment where operators may be overwhelmed with superfluous and sometimes conflicting data. While progress in these areas has been made since TMI-2, the events at Fukushima suggests that there may still be a potential need to ensure that critical plant information is available to plant operators. Recognizing the significant technical and economic challenges associated with plant modifications, it is important to focus on instrumentation that can address these information critical needs. As part of a program initiated by the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), a scoping effort was initiated to assess critical information needs identified for severe accident management and mitigation in commercial Light Water Reactors (LWRs), to quantify the environment instruments monitoring this data would have to survive, and to identify gaps where predicted environments exceed instrumentation qualification envelop (QE) limits. Results from the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) scoping evaluations are documented in this report. The PWR evaluations were limited in this scoping evaluation to quantifying the environmental conditions for an unmitigated Short-Term Station BlackOut (STSBO) sequence in one unit at the Surry nuclear power station. Results were obtained using the MELCOR models developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-sponsored State of the Art Consequence Assessment (SOARCA) program project. Results from this scoping evaluation indicate that some instrumentation identified to provide critical information would be exposed to conditions that

  9. Definition of thermal-hydraulics parameters of a naval PWR via energy balance of a Westinghouse PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Luiz C.; Curi, Marcos F., E-mail: marcos.curi@cefet-rj.br [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we used the operational parameters of the Angra 1 nuclear power plant, designed by Westinghouse, to estimate the thermal-hydraulic parameters for naval nuclear propulsion, focusing on the analysis of the reactor and steam generator. A thermodynamics analysis was made to reach the operational parameters of primary circuit such as pressure, temperature, power generated among others. Previous studies available in literature of 2-loop Westinghouse Nuclear Power Plants, which is based on a PWR and similar to Angra-1, support this analysis in the sense of a correct procedure to deal with many complex processes to energy generation from a nuclear source. Temperature profiles in reactor and steam generator were studied with concepts of heat transfer, fluid mechanics and also some concepts of nuclear systems, showing the behavior into them. In this simulation, the Angra 1 primary circuit was reduced on a scale of 1: 3.5 to fit in a Scorpène-class submarine. The reactor generates 85.7 MW of total thermal power. The maximum power and temperatures reached were lower than the operational safe limits established by Westinghouse. The number of tubes of the steam generator was determined in 990 U-tubes with 6.3 m of average length. (author)

  10. PWR and WWER fuel performance. A comparison of major characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2006-01-01

    PWR and WWER fuel technologies have the same basic performance targets: most effective use of the energy stored in the fuel and highest possible reliability. Both fuel technologies use basically the same strategies to reach these targets: 1) Optimized reload strategies; 2) Maximal use of structural material with low neutron cross sections; 3) Decrease the fuel failure frequency towards a 'zero failure' performance by understanding and eliminating the root causes of those defects. The key driving force of the technology of both, PWR and WWER fuel is high burn-up. Presently a range of 45 - 50 MWD/kgU have been reached commercially for PWR and WWER fuel. The main technical limitations to reach high burn-up are typically different for PWR and WWER fuel: for PWR fuel it is the corrosion and hydrogen uptake of the Zr-based materials; for WWER fuel it is the mechanical and dimensional stability of the FA (and the whole core). Corrosion and hydrogen uptake of Zr-materials is a 'non-problem' for WWER fuel. Other performance criteria that are important for high burn-up are the creep and growth behaviour of the Zr materials and the fission gas release in the fuel rod. There exists a good and broad data base to model and design both fuel types. FA and fuel rod vibration appears to be a generic problem for both fuel types but with more evidence for PWR fuel performance reliability. Grid-to-rod fretting is still a major issue in the fuel failure statistics of PWR fuel. Fuel rod cladding defects by debris fretting is no longer a key problem for PWR fuel, while it still appears to be a significant root cause for WWER fuel failures. 'Zero defect' fuel performance is achievable with a high probability, as statistics for US PWR and WWER-1000 fuel has shown

  11. The simulation research for the dynamic performance of integrated PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jiandong; Xia Guoqing; Fu Mingyu

    2005-01-01

    The mathematical model of the reactor core of integrated PWR has been studied and simplified properly. With the lumped parameter method, authors have established the mathematical model of the reactor core, including the neutron dynamic equation, the feedback reactivities model and the thermo-hydraulic model of the reactor. Based on the above equations and models, the incremental transfer functions of the reactor core model have been built. By simulation experimentation, authors have compared the dynamic characteristics of the integrated PWR with the traditional dispersed PWR. The simulation results show that the mathematical models and equations are correct. (authors)

  12. Robots in P.W.R. nuclear powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1987-01-01

    The satisfactory operation of 37 900-MWe PWR powerplants in France, Belgium and South-Africa and the start-up of 1300 MWe powerplants allowed the development of a wide range of automatic units and robots for the periodic maintenance of nuclear plants, reducing the risk of ionizing radiation for the personnel. A large number of automated tools have been built. Among them: - inspection and maintenance systems for the tube bundle of steam generators, - robotized arms ROTETA and ROMEO for the heavy maintenance and delicate operations such as tube extraction or shot peening of tubes to improve their resistance to corrosion; - the versatile manipulator T.A.M. with electrically controlled articulations. The development of functionally versatile tools and robots and the integration of new technologies such as 3-D vision allowed the construction of the self-guided vehicle FRASTAR capable of moving within a nuclear building and in a cluttered environment. This vehicle includes means for avoiding isolated obstacles and can move on stairs [fr

  13. Lateral hydraulic forces calculation on PWR fuel assemblies with computational fluid dynamics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corpa Masa, R.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Moreno Garcia, B.

    2016-01-01

    To be able to simulate the behavior of nuclear fuel under operating conditions, it is required to include all the representative loads, including the lateral hydraulic forces which were not included traditionally because of the difficulty of calculating them in a reliable way. Thanks to the advance in CFD codes, now it is possible to assess them. This study calculates the local lateral hydraulic forces, caused by the contraction and expansion of the flow due to the bow of the surrounding fuel assemblies, on of fuel assembly under typical operating conditions from a three loop Westinghouse PWR reactor. (Author)

  14. VANTAGE 5 PWR fuel assembly demonstration program at Virgil C. Summer nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.C.; Orr, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    VANTAGE 5 is an improved PWR fuel product designed and manufactured by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The VANTAGE 5 fuel design features integral fuel burnable absorbers, intermediate flow mixer grids, axial blankets, high burnup capability, and a reconstitutable top nozzle. A demonstration program for this fuel design commenced in late 1984 in cycle 2 of the Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station. Objectives for VANTAGE 5 fuel are reduced fuel cycle costs, better core operating margins, and increased design and operating flexibility. Inspections of the VANTAGE 5 demonstration assemblies are planned at each refueling outage

  15. Metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling alloy 718 stress corrosion cracking resistance in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleume, J.

    2007-11-01

    Improving the performance and reliability of the fuel assemblies of the pressurized water reactors requires having a perfect knowledge of the operating margins of both the components and the materials. The choice of alloy 718 as reference material for this study is justified by the industrial will to identify the first order parameters controlling the excellent resistance of this alloy to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). For this purpose, a specific slow strain rate (SSR) crack initiation test using tensile specimen with a V-shaped hump in the middle of the gauge length was developed and modeled. The selectivity of such SSR tests in simulated PWR primary water at 350 C was clearly established by characterizing the SCC resistance of nine alloy 718 thin strip heats. Regardless of their origin and in spite of a similar thermo-mechanical history, they did not exhibit the same susceptibility to SCC crack initiation. All the characterized alloy 718 heats develop oxide scale of similar nature for various exposure times to PWR primary medium in the temperature range [320 C - 360 C]. δ phase precipitation has no impact on alloy 718 SCC initiation behavior when exposed to PWR primary water, contrary to interstitial contents and the triggering of plastic instabilities (PLC phenomenon). (author)

  16. Aging management of PWR reactor internals in U.S. plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amberge, K.J.; Demma, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development, aging management strategies and inspection results of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) vessel internals inspection and evaluation guidelines. The goal of these guidelines is to provide PWR owners with robust aging management strategies to monitor degradation of internals components to support life extension as well as the current period of operation and power up-rate activities. The implementation of these guidelines began in 2010 within the U.S. PWR fleet and several examinations have been performed since. Examples of inspection results are presented for selected vessel internals components and are compared with simulation results. In summary, to date there have been no observations of austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which is consistent with expectations based on the current understanding of the mechanism. Observations of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) have been limited and only found in baffle former bolting. Additionally, no macroscopic effects or global observations of void swelling impacts on general conditions of reactor internal hardware have been observed. (authors)

  17. Product Evaluation Task Force Phase Two report for BWR/PWR dissolver wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that all Intermediate Level Wastes arising at Sellafield should be encapsulated prior to ultimate disposal. The Product Evaluation Task Force (PETF) was set up to investigate possible encapsulants and to produce an adequate data base to justify the preferred matrices. This report details the work carried out, under Phase 2 of the Product Evaluation Task Force programme, on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. Three possible types of encapsulants for BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes:- Inorganic cements, Polymer cements and Polymers are evaluated using the Kepner Tregoe decision analysis technique. This technique provides a methodology for scoring and ranking alternative options and evaluating any risks associated with an option. The analysis shows that for all four stages of waste management operations ie Storage, Transport, handling and emplacement, Disposal and Process, cement matrices are considerably superior to other potential matrices. A matrix, consisting of three parts Blast Furnace Slag (BFS) to one part Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), is recommended for Phase 3 studies on BWR/PWR Dissolver Wastes. (author)

  18. Generation of SCALE 6 Input Data File for Cross Section Library of PWR Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Cho, Dong Keun

    2010-11-01

    In order to obtain the cross section libraries of the Korean Pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel (SF), SCALE 6 code input files have been generated. The PWR fuel data were obtained from the nuclear design report (NDR) of the current operating PWRs. The input file were prepared for 16 fuel types such as 4 types of Westinghouse 14x14, 3 types of OPR-1000 16x16, 4 types of Westinghouse 16x16, and 6 types of Westinghouse 17x17. For each fuel type, 5 kinds of fuel enrichments have been considered such as 1.5, 2.0 ,3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 wt%. In the SCALE 6 calculation, a ENDF-V 44 group was used. The 25 burnup step until 72000 MWD/T was used. A 1/4 symmetry model was used for 16x16 and 17x17 fuel assembly, and 1/2 symmetry model was used for 14x14 fuel assembly The generated cross section libraries will be used for the source-term analysis of the PWR SF

  19. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Shmelev, Anatolii [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-08-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them {sup 241}Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides {sup 242}Cm and {sup 244}Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile {sup 239}Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of {sup 241}Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% {sup 238}Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  20. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them 241 Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides 242 Cm and 244 Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile 239 Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of 241 Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% 238 Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  1. RNL NDT studies related to PWR pressure vessel inlet nozzle inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogerson, A.; Poulter, L.N.J.; Clough, P.; Cooper, A.

    1984-01-01

    Non-destructive examinations of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) play an important role in assuring vessel integrity throughout its operational life. Automated ultrasonic techniques for the detection and sizing of flaws in thick-section seam welds and near-surface regions in a PWR RPV have been under development at RNL for some time. Techniques for the inspection of complex geometry welds and other regions of the vessel are now being assessed and further developed as part of the UK NDT development programme in support of the Sizewell PWR. One objective of this programme is to demonstrate that the range of ultrasonic techniques already shown to be effective for the inspection of seam welds and inlet nozzle corner regions, through exercises such as the Defect Detection Trials, can also be effective for inspection of these other vessel regions. The nozzle-to-vessel welds and nozzle crotch corners associated with the RPV water inlet and outlet nozzles are two such regions being examined in this programme. In this paper, a review is given of the work performed at RNL in the development of a laboratory-based inspection system for inlet nozzle inspection. The main features of the system in its current stage of development are explained. (author)

  2. PWR radiation fields at combustion engineering plants through mid-1985: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshay, S.S.; Beineke, T.A.; Bradshaw, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the results of the initial phase of the EPRI-PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program (SRMP) for PWR nuclear power plants with Nuclear Steam Supply Systems supplied by Combustion Engineering, Inc. The purposes of the SRMP are to provide reliable, consistent and systematic measurements of the rate of radiation-field buildup at operating PWR's; and to use that information to identify opportunities for radiation control and the consequent reduction of occupational radiation exposure. The report includes radiation surveys from seven participating power plants. These surveys were conducted at well-defined locations on the reactor coolant loop piping and steam generators, and/or inside the steam generator channel heads. In most cases only one survey is available from each power plant, so that conclusions about the rate of radiation-field buildup are not possible. Some observations are made about the distribution pattern of radiation levels within the steam generator channel heads and around the reactor coolant loops. The report discusses the relationship between out-of-core radiation fields (as measured by the SRMP) and: the pH of the reactor coolant, the concentration of lithium hydroxide in the reactor coolant, and the frequency of changes in reactor power level. In order to provide data for possible future correlations of these parameters with the SRMP radiation-field data, the report summarizes information available from participating plants on primary coolant pH, and on the frequency of changes in reactor power level. 12 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs

  3. PWR station blackout transient simulation in the INER integral system test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T.J.; Lee, C.H.; Hong, W.T.; Chang, Y.H.

    2004-01-01

    Station blackout transient (or TMLB' scenario) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) was simulated using the INER Integral System Test Facility (IIST) which is a 1/400 volumetrically-scaled reduce-height and reduce-pressure (RHRP) simulator of a Westinghouse three-loop PWR. Long-term thermal-hydraulic responses including the secondary boil-off and the subsequent primary saturation, pressurization and core uncovery were simulated based on the assumptions of no offsite and onsite power, feedwater and operator actions. The results indicate that two-phase discharge is the major depletion mode since it covers 81.3% of the total amount of the coolant inventory loss. The primary coolant inventory has experienced significant re-distribution during a station blackout transient. The decided parameter to avoid the core overheating is not the total amount of the coolant inventory remained in the primary core cooling system but only the part of coolant left in the pressure vessel. The sequence of significant events during transient for the IIST were also compared with those of the ROSA-IV large-scale test facility (LSTF), which is a 1/48 volumetrically-scaled full-height and full-pressure (FHFP) simulator of a PWR. The comparison indicates that the sequence and timing of these events during TMLB' transient studied in the RHRP IIST facility are generally consistent with those of the FHFP LSTF. (author)

  4. Issues and remedies for secondary system of PWR/VVER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordmann, Francis; Odar, Suat; Rochester, Dewey

    2012-09-01

    Secondary side degradation of steam generators (SG) and Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) in the secondary system have been for a long time important issues in PWR and VVER types of Nuclear Power Plants. With the evolution of the design, the most important issues are progressively moving from secondary side corrosion of Alloy 600 SG tubing, which is being replaced, to a larger variety of risks associated with potential inadequate chemistries. As far as FAC of carbon steel is concerned, the evolution of treatment selection for minimizing corrosion products transport toward the SG, as well as progressive replacement of components in the feedwater train, decreases the risk of dramatic failures which have occurred in the past. After having briefly explained the reason for the past problems encountered in the secondary system of PWR and VVER, this paper evaluates the risk associated with various impurities or contaminants that may be present in the secondary system and how to mitigate them in the most appropriate, efficient, economical and environmental friendly way. The covered species are sodium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, sulfate and sulfur compounds, fluorides, organic compounds, silica, oxygen, lead, ion exchange resins. This paper also proposes the best remedies for mitigating the new issues that may be encountered in operating plants or units under construction. These are mainly: - Selecting a steam water treatment able to minimize the quantity of corrosion products transported toward the SG; - Mitigating the risk of Flow Induced Vibration by a proper control of deposits in sensitive areas; - Minimizing the risk of concentration of impurities in local areas where they may induce corrosion; - Avoiding the presence of abnormal quantities of some species in SG, such as the detrimental presence of lead and ion exchange resin debris or the controversial presence of organic compounds; - Optimizing costs of maintenance activities (SG mechanical, chemical cleaning

  5. Development a computer codes to couple PWR-GALE output and PC-CREAM input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntjoro, S.; Budi Setiawan, M.; Nursinta Adi, W.; Deswandri; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    Radionuclide dispersion analysis is part of an important reactor safety analysis. From the analysis it can be obtained the amount of doses received by radiation workers and communities around nuclear reactor. The radionuclide dispersion analysis under normal operating conditions is carried out using the PC-CREAM code, and it requires input data such as source term and population distribution. Input data is derived from the output of another program that is PWR-GALE and written Population Distribution data in certain format. Compiling inputs for PC-CREAM programs manually requires high accuracy, as it involves large amounts of data in certain formats and often errors in compiling inputs manually. To minimize errors in input generation, than it is make coupling program for PWR-GALE and PC-CREAM programs and a program for writing population distribution according to the PC-CREAM input format. This work was conducted to create the coupling programming between PWR-GALE output and PC-CREAM input and programming to written population data in the required formats. Programming is done by using Python programming language which has advantages of multiplatform, object-oriented and interactive. The result of this work is software for coupling data of source term and written population distribution data. So that input to PC-CREAM program can be done easily and avoid formatting errors. Programming sourceterm coupling program PWR-GALE and PC-CREAM is completed, so that the creation of PC-CREAM inputs in souceterm and distribution data can be done easily and according to the desired format.

  6. A universal PWR spectral history correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutt, P.K.; Nunn, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of a form of universal correction for the difference between depletion conditions assumed in PWR assembly lattice calculations and those experienced in a reactor burn-up is investigated. The correction is based on lattice calculations in which only one such depletion history difference, depletion at two different water densities, is explicitly represented by lattice calculations. The assumption is made that other historical effects bear the same relationship to an appropriate time-average of the two-group neutron flux spectrum. The correction is shown to be accurate for the most important historical effects, depletion with burnable absorbers inserted, control rods inserted or at a different soluble boron level, in addition to density itself. The correction is less accurate for representing depletion at a different fuel or coolant temperature but even in these cases gives an improvement over no correction. In addition it is argued that these historic temperature effects are likely to be of minor importance. (author)

  7. Evaluation model for PWR irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, I.C.

    1983-01-01

    The individual economic value of the plutonium isotopes for the recycle of the PWR reactor is investigated, assuming the existence of an market for this element. Two distinct market situations for the stages of the fuel cycle are analysed: one for the 1972 costs and the other for costs of 1982. Comparisons are made for each of the two market situations concerning enrichment of the U-235 in the uranium fuel that gives the minimum cost in the fuel cycle. The method adopted to establish the individual value of the plutonium isotopes consists on the economical analyses of the plutonium fuel cycle for four different isotopes mixtures refering to the uranium fuel cycle. (Author) [pt

  8. Stochastic optimization of loading pattern for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smuc, T.; Pevec, D.

    1994-01-01

    The application of stochastic optimization methods in solving in-core fuel management problems is restrained by the need for a large number of proposed solutions loading patterns, if a high quality final solution is wanted. Proposed loading patterns have to be evaluated by core neutronics simulator, which can impose unrealistic computer time requirements. A new loading pattern optimization code Monte Carlo Loading Pattern Search has been developed by coupling the simulated annealing optimization algorithm with a fast one-and-a-half dimensional core depletion simulator. The structure of the optimization method provides more efficient performance and allows the user to empty precious experience in the search process, thus reducing the search space size. Hereinafter, we discuss the characteristics of the method and illustrate them on the results obtained by solving the PWR reload problem. (authors). 7 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  9. Evaluation of tight-pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.; Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.

    1979-08-01

    The impact of tight pinch cores on the consumption of natural uranium ore has been evaluated for two systems of coupled PWR's namely one particular type of thorium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/ThO 2 : 233 U/ThO 2 - and the conventional recycle-mode uranium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/UO 2 . The basic parameter varied was the fuel-to-moderator volume ratio (F/M) of the (uniform) lattice for the last core in each sequence. Although methods and data verification in the range of present interest, 0.5 (current lattices) 1.0, the EPRI-LEOPARD and LASER programs used for the thorium and uranium calculations, respectively, were successfully benchmarked against several of the more pertinent experiments

  10. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  11. Zebra: An advanced PWR lattice code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an advanced PWR lattice code ZEBRA developed at NECP laboratory in Xi'an Jiaotong Univ.. The multi-group cross-section library is generated from the ENDF/B-VII library by NJOY and the 361-group SHEM structure is employed. The resonance calculation module is developed based on sub-group method. The transport solver is Auto-MOC code, which is a self-developed code based on the Method of Characteristic and the customization of AutoCAD software. The whole code is well organized in a modular software structure. Some numerical results during the validation of the code demonstrate that this code has a good precision and a high efficiency. (authors)

  12. Simplified model of a PWR primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.L.; Faya, A.J.G.

    1988-07-01

    The computer program RENUR was developed to perform a very simplified simulation of a typical PWR primary circuit. The program has mathematical models for the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core and the pressurizer, the rest of the circuit being treated as a single volume. Heat conduction in the fuel rod is analyzed by a nodal model. Average and hot channels are treated so that bulk response of the core and DNBR can be evaluated. A homogenenous model is employed in the pressurizer. Results are presented for a steady-state situation as well as for a loss of load transient. Agreement with the results of more elaborate computer codes is good with substantial reduction in computer costs. (author) [pt

  13. Zebra: An advanced PWR lattice code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, L.; Wu, H.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi' an, ShannXi, 710049 (China)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of an advanced PWR lattice code ZEBRA developed at NECP laboratory in Xi'an Jiaotong Univ.. The multi-group cross-section library is generated from the ENDF/B-VII library by NJOY and the 361-group SHEM structure is employed. The resonance calculation module is developed based on sub-group method. The transport solver is Auto-MOC code, which is a self-developed code based on the Method of Characteristic and the customization of AutoCAD software. The whole code is well organized in a modular software structure. Some numerical results during the validation of the code demonstrate that this code has a good precision and a high efficiency. (authors)

  14. A pressure drop model for PWR grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Seok; In, Wang Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Jung, Youn Ho; Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A pressure drop model for the PWR grids with and without mixing device is proposed at single phase based on the fluid mechanistic approach. Total pressure loss is expressed in additive way for form and frictional losses. The general friction factor correlations and form drag coefficients available in the open literatures are used to the model. As the results, the model shows better predictions than the existing ones for the non-mixing grids, and reasonable agreements with the available experimental data for mixing grids. Therefore it is concluded that the proposed model for pressure drop can provide sufficiently good approximation for grid optimization and design calculation in advanced grid development. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  15. Development of advanced PWR steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Itaru; Nakamura, Tomomichi

    1999-01-01

    In response to the increased power of the advanced PWR, it is necessary to develop a steam generator (SG) which has a large capacity with high performance and high reliability as well as being economical to produce. In this paper, the development of the design of a new SG for the advanced PWRs is described and compared with the design of a conventional SG. Moreover, an outline of a seismic verification test for the U-bend tube bundle which includes advanced anti-vibration bars (AVB) which are very important is described. As a result, it was verified that the bundle has sufficient strength and a relatively high attenuation to seismic loads. These results will be reflected in the detailed design of advanced AVBs. (author)

  16. Radiation embrittlement of PWR vessel supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Robinson, G.C.; Pennell, W.E.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Several studies pertaining to radiation damage of PWR vessel supports were conducted between 1978 and 1987. During this period, apparently there was no reason to believe that low-temperature (<100 degree C) MTR embrittlement data were not appropriate for evaluating embrittlement of PWR vessel supports. However, late in 1986, data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel surveillance program indicated that the embrittlement rates of the several HFIR vessel materials (A212-B, A350-LF3, A105-II) were substantially greater than anticipated on the basis of MTR data. Further evaluation of the HFIR data suggested that a fluence-rate effect was responsible for the apparent discrepancy, and shortly thereafter it became apparent that this rate effect was applicable to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports. As a result, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) evaluate the impact of the apparent embrittlement rate effect on the integrity of light-water-reactor (LWR) vessel supports. The purpose of the study was to provide an indication of whether the integrity of reactor vessel supports is likely to be challenged by radiation-induced embrittlement. The scope of the evaluation included correlation of the HFIR data for application to the evaluation of LWR vessel supports; a survey and cursory evaluation of all US LWR vessel support designs, selection of two plants for specific-plant evaluation, and a specific-plant evaluation of both plants to determine critical flaw sizes for their vessel supports. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  17. PWR and BWR light water reactor systems in the USA and their fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, W.D.

    1977-01-01

    Light water reactor operating experience in the USA can be considered to date from the choice of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) for use in the naval reactor program and the subsequent construction and operation of the nuclear power plant at Shippingport, Pennsylvania in 1957. The development of the boiling water reactor (BWR) in 1954 and its selection for the plant at Dresden, Illinois in 1959 established this concept as the other major reactor type in the US nuclear power program. The subsequent growth profile is presented, leading to 31 PWR's and 23 BWR's currently in operation as well as to plants in the planning and construction phase. A significant operating record has been accumulated concerning the availability of each of these reactor types as determined by: (1) outage for refueling, (2) component reliability, (3) maintenance requirements, and (4) retrofitting required by government regulation. In addition, the use and performance of BWR's and PWR's in meeting system load requirements is discussed. The growing concern regarding possible terrorist activities and other potential threats has resulted in systems and procedures designed to assure effective safeguards at nuclear power installations. Safeguards measures currently in place are described. Environmental effects of operating plants are subject to both radiological and non-radiological monitoring to verify that results are within the limits established in the licensing process. The operating results achieved and the types of modifications that have been required of operating plants by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are reviewed. The PWR and BWR Fuel Cycle is examined in terms of: (1) fuel burnup experience and prospects for improvement, (2) the status and outlook for natural uranium resources, (3) enrichment capacity, (4) reprocessing and recycle, and the interrelationships among the latter three factors. High level waste management currently involving on-site storage of spent fuel is discussed

  18. Changes in 900 MW PWR alarm processing policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pont, M [Electricite de France, Generation and Transmission, Nuclear Power Plant Operations, Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    Following a brief description of the current 900 MW PWR alarm processing system, this document presents the feasibility study carried out within the scope of the Instrumentation and Control Refurbishment project (R2C). (author). 4 figs, tabs.

  19. Changes in 900 MW PWR alarm processing policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pont, M.

    1997-01-01

    Following a brief description of the current 900 MW PWR alarm processing system, this document presents the feasibility study carried out within the scope of the Instrumentation and Control Refurbishment project (R2C). (author). 4 figs, tabs

  20. Deboration in nuclear stations of the PWR type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Reactivity control in nuclear power stations of the PWR type is realised with boric acid. A method to concentrate boric acid without an evaporator has been studied. A flow-sheet with reverse osmosis is proposed. (author)

  1. Severe accident considerations for modern KWU-PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyink, J.

    1987-01-01

    In assumption of severe accident on modern KWU-PWR plants the author discusses on the: selection of core meltdown sequences, course of the accident, containment behaviour and source terms for fission products release to the environment

  2. Dose rate evaluation after accident in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cladel, C.; Duchemin, B.; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, B.; Nimal, J.C.; Evrard, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    A calculation scheme for the gamma radiation dose rate after accident in a PWR is presented. These studies use a fine description of the geometry and of the fission product inventory. Some results are given and some improvements are planned

  3. Characterization of Factors affecting IASCC of PWR Core Internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Won Sam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    A lot works have been performed on IASCC in BWR. Recent efforts have been devoted to investigate IASCC in PWR, but the mechanism in PWR is not fully understood yet as compared with that in BWR due to a lack of data from laboratories and fields. Therefore it is strongly needed to review and analyse recent researches of IASCC in both BWR and PWR for establishing a proactive management technology for IASCC of core internals in Korean PWRs. This work is aimed to review mainly recent technical reports on IASCC of stainless steels for core internals in PWR. For comparison, the works on IASCC in BWR were also reviewed and briefly introduced in this report.

  4. Ultrasonic inspection for testing the PWR fuel rod endplug welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillet, C.; Destribats, M.T.; Papezyk, F.

    1976-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic testing with local immersion and transversal waves was developed. It is possible to detect defects as the lacks of fusion and penetration and porosity in the PWR fuel rod endplug welds [fr

  5. Secondary water chemistry control practices and results of the Japanese PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Akihiro; Shoda, Yasuhiko; Ishihara, Nobuo; Murata, Kazutoyo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2012-09-01

    In Japan, since the start of the operation of the first PWR plant, Mihama Unit-1 in 1970, 24 PWR plants have been built by 2010, and all of them are in operation. Due to the plant-specific needs of management, and by flexibly incorporating the state-of-the-art insights into the design, the system configurations of the plants vary so many as 15 types. Meanwhile, the geographical feature of Japan makes all the Japanese PWR plants to have condensers cooled by sea water, and all the plants have a common system with a full-flow Condensate Polisher System (CPS). To prevent corrosion, continued improvements of the secondary water chemistry management has been performed like other countries, and one of the major features of the Japanese PWR plants is an enhanced provision for the condenser leakage. The water quality of SG (Steam Generator) has been significantly improved by the provision for the sea water leakage, in combination with other improvements in water chemistry management. Also in Japan, almost all of the treatments of the spent polisher resin and the wastewater are performed within the power plant sites. To facilitate the treatment of the waste water and the regeneration of the spent resins, either ammonia or ETA (Ethanol Amine) is selected as the pH adjustment agent for the secondary system water. Also at the ammonia treatment, high pH accomplishes the inhibition of the piping wall thinning and the lower iron transportation into SGs. In addition, the iron transported into the SG is removed by the chemical conditioning treatment called ASCA (Advanced Scale Conditioning Agent). This provides the effective recovery of the SG heat-transfer performance, and the improved SG support plate BEC (Broached Egg Crate) hole blockage rates. Basically in Japan, the secondary water chemistry management has been improved based on a single basic specification, for the variety of the plant configurations, with the plant-specific investigations and analyses. This paper summarizes

  6. Model for transient simulation in a PWR steam circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, L.A. de.

    1982-11-01

    A computer code (SURF) was developed and used to simulate pressure losses along the tubes of the main steam circuit of a PWR nuclear power plant, and the steam flow through relief and safety valves when pressure reactors its thresholds values. A thermodynamic model of turbines (high and low pressure), and its associated components are simulated too. The SURF computer code was coupled to the GEVAP computer code, complementing the simulation of a PWR nuclear power plant main steam circuit. (Author) [pt

  7. GO evaluation of a PWR spray system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, W.T.

    1975-08-01

    GO is a reliability analysis methodology developed over the years from 1960 to the present by Kaman Sciences Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado. In this report the GO methodology is presented and its application demonstrated by performing a reliability analysis of a conceptual PWR Containment Spray System. Certain numerical results obtained are compared with those of a prior fault tree analysis of the same system as documented in the 11 January 1973 draft report, A Fault Tree Evaluation of a PWR Spray System

  8. Performance of PWR study in the technology supplier countries: south korea and japan case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyana

    2007-01-01

    Electricity is needed as an infrastructure to support the national economic growth. For economic development sustainability, energy alternatives should be provided. Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) become the alternative of electricity generation for optimum energy mix in Indonesia and planned to operate in the 2016. Several studies have already done to prepare the NPP construction. This study focused on NPP performance especially PWR type in Asia, namely Japan and South Korea. Methodology used in this is literature tracing and a small calculation. The energy availability per unit per year is used as a parameter for evaluating the NPP performance. This conclusion are 1) the amount of NPP - PWR type in Japan is 22 units with total operational experiences 526 reactor-years and the average energy availability factor about 70.7% per unit per year. Meanwhile for the same type South Korea has 16 unit with total operational experience 222 reactor-years and average availability factor per unit per year is about 86.9%. 2) the 1000 class of PWR type both South Korea and Japan have 14 units. The operational experiences for thi class is 170 reactor-year for South Korean and 307 reactor-year for Japan. Meanwhile the average availability factor per unit per year is about 87.0% for South Korea and 69.6% for Japan. 3) the average availability factor is closed to capacity factor, so is important for real figure in assuming the techno-economic parameters, because it will influence the result o economic calculation. (author)

  9. Thermal-hydraulic study of integrated steam generator in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Masahiro

    1989-01-01

    One of the safety aspects of innovative reactor concepts is the integration of steam generators (SGs) into the reactor vessel in the case of the pressurized water reactor (PWR). All of the reactor system components including the pressurizer are within the reactor vessel in the SG integrated PWR. The simple heat transfer code was developed for the parametric study of the integrated SG. The code was compared to the once-through 19-tube SG experiment and the good agreement between the experimental results and the code predictions was obtained. The assessed code was used for the parametric study of the integrated once-through 16 m-straight-tube SG installed in the annular downcomer. The proposed integrated SG as a first attempt has approximately the same tube size and pitch as the present PWR and the SG primary and secondary sides in the present PWR is inverted in the integrated PWR. Based on the study, the reactor vessel size of the SG integrated PWR was calculated. (author)

  10. PWR system simulation and parameter estimation with neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, Hatice; Colak, Uener

    2002-01-01

    A detailed nonlinear model for a typical PWR system has been considered for the development of simulation software. Each component in the system has been represented by appropriate differential equations. The SCILAB software was used for solving nonlinear equations to simulate steady-state and transient operational conditions. Overall system has been constructed by connecting individual components to each other. The validity of models for individual components and overall system has been verified. The system response against given transients have been analyzed. A neural network has been utilized to estimate system parameters during transients. Different transients have been imposed in training and prediction stages with neural networks. Reactor power and system reactivity during the transient event have been predicted by the neural network. Results show that neural networks estimations are in good agreement with the calculated response of the reactor system. The maximum errors are within ±0.254% for power and between -0.146 and 0.353% for reactivity prediction cases. Steam generator parameters, pressure and water level, are also successfully predicted by the neural network employed in this study. The noise imposed on the input parameters of the neural network deteriorates the power estimation capability whereas the reactivity estimation capability is not significantly affected

  11. Qualification tests for PWR control element drive mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Yong; Jin, Choon Eon; Choi Suhn [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    It is necessary to perform the qualification test for the magnetic jack type CEDM to show the design compatibility because the CEDM is composed of many mechanical and electrical components complicatedly. ABB-CE performed various qualification tests during the development of the System80 CEDM to which Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP) CEDM referred. The qualification test for the CEDM is classified into the performance test and the dynamic test. The performance test is to verify operability of the CEDM, and the dynamic test is to find dynamic characteristics and to verify the structural integrity if the CEDM for the seismic accidents. Described in this report are the test requirements, the test facilities and the test methods for the performance and the dynamic qualification tests of the PWR magnetic jack type CEDM. The impacts of the design changes in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) on the KSNP CEDM were analyzed to present the necessity for the tests. This report also proposes the facilities to perform the tests in KAERI including reasonable schedule for the tests. Attached to this report is the summary of qualification tests of System 80 CEDM performed by ABB-CE. 20 figs., 16 tabs., 21 refs. (Author) .new.

  12. Qualification tests for PWR control element drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Yong; Jin, Choon Eon; Choi Suhn

    1996-01-01

    It is necessary to perform the qualification test for the magnetic jack type CEDM to show the design compatibility because the CEDM is composed of many mechanical and electrical components complicatedly. ABB-CE performed various qualification tests during the development of the System80 CEDM to which Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP) CEDM referred. The qualification test for the CEDM is classified into the performance test and the dynamic test. The performance test is to verify operability of the CEDM, and the dynamic test is to find dynamic characteristics and to verify the structural integrity if the CEDM for the seismic accidents. Described in this report are the test requirements, the test facilities and the test methods for the performance and the dynamic qualification tests of the PWR magnetic jack type CEDM. The impacts of the design changes in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) on the KSNP CEDM were analyzed to present the necessity for the tests. This report also proposes the facilities to perform the tests in KAERI including reasonable schedule for the tests. Attached to this report is the summary of qualification tests of System 80 CEDM performed by ABB-CE. 20 figs., 16 tabs., 21 refs. (Author) .new

  13. PWR system simulation and parameter estimation with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Hatice; Colak, Uener E-mail: uc@nuke.hacettepe.edu.tr

    2002-11-01

    A detailed nonlinear model for a typical PWR system has been considered for the development of simulation software. Each component in the system has been represented by appropriate differential equations. The SCILAB software was used for solving nonlinear equations to simulate steady-state and transient operational conditions. Overall system has been constructed by connecting individual components to each other. The validity of models for individual components and overall system has been verified. The system response against given transients have been analyzed. A neural network has been utilized to estimate system parameters during transients. Different transients have been imposed in training and prediction stages with neural networks. Reactor power and system reactivity during the transient event have been predicted by the neural network. Results show that neural networks estimations are in good agreement with the calculated response of the reactor system. The maximum errors are within {+-}0.254% for power and between -0.146 and 0.353% for reactivity prediction cases. Steam generator parameters, pressure and water level, are also successfully predicted by the neural network employed in this study. The noise imposed on the input parameters of the neural network deteriorates the power estimation capability whereas the reactivity estimation capability is not significantly affected.

  14. Structural integrity evaluation of PWR nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Julio R.B.; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the most important structural component of a PWR nuclear power plant. It contains the reactor core and is the main component of the primary system pressure boundary, the system responsible for removing the heat generated by the nuclear reactions. It is considered not replaceable and, therefore, its lifetime is a key element to define the plant life as a whole. Three critical issues related to the reliability of the RPV structural integrity come out by reason of the radiation damage imposed to the vessel material during operation. These issues concern the definition of pressure versus temperature limits for reactor heatup and cooldown, pressurized thermal shock evaluation and assessment of reactor vessels with low upper shelf Charpy impact energy levels. This work aims to present the major aspects related to these topics. The requirements for preventing fracture of the RPV are reviewed as well as the available technology for assessing the safety margins. For each mentioned problem, the several steps for structural integrity evaluation are described and the analysis methods are discussed. (author)

  15. Fatigue analysis of a PWR steam generator tube sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billon, F.; Buchalet, C.; Poudroux, G.

    1985-01-01

    The fatigue analysis of a PWR steam generator (S.G) tube sheet is threefold. First, the flow, pressure and temperature variations during the design transients are defined for both the primary fluid and the normal and auxiliary feedwater. Second, the flow, velocities, pressure and temperature variations of the secondary fluid at the bottom of the downcomer and above the tube sheet are determined for the transients considered. Finally, the corresponding temperatures and stresses in the tube sheet are calculated and the usage factors determined at various locations in the tube sheet. The currently available standard design transients for the primary fluid and the feedwater are too conservative to be utilized as such in the fatigue analysis of the S.G. tube sheets. Thus, a detailed examination and reappraisal of each operating transient was performed. The revised design conditions are used as inputs to the calculation model TEMPTRON. TEMPTRON determines the mixing conditions between the feedwater and the recirculation fluid from the S.G. feedwater nozzles to the center of the tube sheet via the downcomer. The fluid parameters, flow rate and velocity, temperature and pressure variations, as a function of the time during the transients are obtained. Finally, the usage factors at various locations on the tube sheet are derived using the standard ASME section III method

  16. Improvements of nuclear fuel management in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    1978-07-01

    The severe variations to which the different elements contributing to the determination of the fuel cycle cost are subjected have led to a reopening of the problem of ''optimization'' of nuclear fuel management. The increase in costs of uranium ore, isotope separation work units (swu), reprocessing, the political implications of proliferation associated with the employment of reprocessing operations have been at the origin of a reassessment of present-day management. It therefore appeared to be appropriate to study variants with respect to a reference mode represented by the management of the PWR 900 MWe systems, without burnable poison in the cycle at equilibrium (Case 3 of Table 1). In order to obtain a complete view of impacts of such modifications, computations were carried out as far as the appraisal of the cycle cost and with reprocessing. There has likewise been added to this the estimate of the gain anticipated from certain improvements in the neutron balance contributed at the level of the lattice

  17. Study of aging effects in PWR power plants components - 15043

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Borges, D. da; Lava, D.D.; Guimaraes, A.C.F.; Moreira, M. de L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a simulation about the aging process of the containment spray injection system (CSIS) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) using the fault tree method (FT). The FT has the capacity to present the logic of events that leads to system unavailability, to capture frequency estimation of events, to model and calculate hazardous events frequency (before they happen) and help developing protective layers. The Monte Carlo method and Fussell-Vesely importance measure are used in this paper to determine the system unavailability probability and the most sensitive events to the aging process. The injection system fault tree consists of a main tree and 10 sub-trees. The main tree is composed of 35 basic events, 5 gates and 1 top event. The paper details the methodology. It can be seen that the increase of the failure rate of components due to the aging process, generates the increase in the general unavailability of the system that contains these components. The extension of the operating life of nuclear power plant must be accompanied by a special attention to the aging process of its components

  18. Applicability of oxygenated water chemistry for PWR secondary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermansson, H.P. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Takiguchi, H.; Otoha, K. [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Introduction of oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) in PWR secondary side is considered as a means to reduce the transportation of corrosion products into the steam generator and thus also minimizing crevice deposits and subsequent materials problems. One main concern, however, is the risk of inter-granular attack (IGA) in crevices. In order to study effects on crevice tube IGA by OWC, a series of experiments were performed in a steam generator (SG) simulating loop. This comprised a SG tube and a tube support plate (TSP) together forming the crevice. The over-all objective of the work accounted here was to demonstrate that it is possible to operate the steam generator secondary side with OWC without causing intolerable IGA or other types of attack on the tube in the crevice area. Tubes of sensitized Alloy 600 were exposed during a total of nine experiments in an autoclave using a TSP/tube arrangement with an asymmetric crevice design. Experiments were performed at high and low pH and potential under open and packed crevice conditions. The aggressiveness of the crevice environment was also further increased by addition of carbonate and chloride. Furthermore the tube was pressurized. Experimental parameters were monitored on the primary side as well as in the secondary bulk phase and in the crevice. (authors)

  19. Optimization of thermal efficiency of nuclear central power like as PWR; Otimizacao da eficiencia termica de uma usina nuclear do tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, Nelbia da Silva

    2005-10-15

    The main purpose of this work is the definition of operational conditions for the steam and power conservation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant in order to increase its system thermal efficiency without changing any component, based on the optimization of operational parameters of the plant. The thermal efficiency is calculated by a thermal balance program, based on conservation equations for homogeneous modeling. The circuit coefficients are estimated by an optimization tool, allowing a more realistic thermal balance for the plans under analysis, as well as others parameters necessary to some component models. With the operational parameter optimization, it is possible to get a level of thermal efficiency that increase capital gain, due to a better relationship between the electricity production and the amount of fuel used, without any need to change components plant. (author)

  20. French nuclear plants PWR vessel integrity assessment and life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Production Nucleaire, 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Quinot, P. [FRAMATOME, Dept. Bloc Reacteur et Boucles Primaires, 92 - Paris-La-Defence (France); Faidy, C.; Churier-Bossennec, H. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Ingenierie et Service, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-07-01

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel life management of 56 PWR 3 loop and 4 loop reactors units was engaged by the French Utility EDF (Electricite de France) a few years ago and is yet on going on. This paper will present the work carried out within the framework of justifying why the 34 three loop reactor vessels will remain acceptable for operation for a lifetime of at least 40-years. A summary of the measures will be given. An overall review of actions will be presented describing the French approach, using important existing databases, including studies related to irradiation surveillance monitoring program and end of life fluence assessment. The last results obtained are based on generic integrity analyses for all categories of situations (normal upset emergency and faulted conditions) until the end of lifetime, postulating circumferential an radial kinds of flaw located in the stainless steel cladding or shallow sub-cladding area. The results of structural integrity analyses beginning with elastic computations and completed with three-dimensional finite element elastic plastic computations for envelope cases, are compared with code criteria for operating plants. The objective is to evaluate the margins on different parameters as RTNDT (Reference Nil Ductility Transition Temperature), toughness or crack size, to justify the global fitness for service of all these Reactor Pressure Vessels. The paper introduces EDF's maintenance strategy, related to integrity assessment, for those nuclear power plants under operation, based on NDE in-service inspection of the first thirty millimeters in the thickness of the wall and major surveillance programs of the vessels. (author)