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Sample records for open wounds

  1. Management of bleeding and open wounds in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Barbara J; Smith, Danny

    2012-06-01

    Bleeding or open wounds of the integumentary system occur frequently in athletics. Integumentary wounds vary from minor scrapes, blisters, and small punctures to more serious lacerations and arterial wounds that could threaten the life of the athlete. The Sports physical therapist (PT) must realize that integumentary wounds and subsequent bleeding can occur in many sports, and assessment and care of such trauma is an essential skill. The purpose of this "On the Sidelines" clinical commentary is to review types of integumentary wounds that may occur in sport and their acute management. 5.

  2. Open Wound Drainage Versus Wound Excision on the Modern Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-01

    containing area around the contaminated wound. He lamented, in regard to invasive infection, "... dann noch direct treffende Angriffsmittel besitzen wir...surgery. Proc Mil Surg 1900; 9: 3-68. 38. LaGarde LA. Characteristic lesions caused by projectiles. In: Gunshot injuries. 2nd ed. New Yorks William

  3. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Open Heart Surgery

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    Cemalettin Aydın

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediastinitis is a devastating complication in open heart surgery. The most common treatments after debridement are rewiring with antibiotic irrigation. Vacuum assisted closure therapy is a recently introduced technique that promotes the healing of difficult wounds, including post-sternotomy mediastinitis.Patients and Methods: Forty one patients with deep sternal wound infection were divided into two groups based on the treatment method used. Twenty two patients with post-cardio to my deep sternal wound infection were treated primarily by vacuum assisted closure method (group A and 19 patients with deep sternal wound infection who received closed mediastinal irrigation were treated with antibiotics (group B between January 2006 and January 2010.Results: The two groups were compared. Three patients died during treatment in group B. The median healing time was significantly shorter in group A (mean, 13.5 ± 3.2 days compared to 18 days (mean, 21.2 ± 16.4 days in group B (p< 0.001. Deep sternal wound infection showed no recurrences after the vacuum treatment, while 7 (24% patients in group B suffered recurrences. Hospital stay was significantly shorter in group A (median, 30.5 days; mean, 32.2 ± 11.3 days vs. median, 45 days; mean, 49.2 ± 19.3 days (p= 0.001.Conclusion: A significantly shorter healing time was confirmed with vacuum assisted closure. Hospital stay remained significantly shorter in group A (35 vs. 46 days.

  4. Successful closure of an open-window thoracostomy wound by negative-pressure wound therapy: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Sumiko; Sado, Tetsu; Sakurada, Akira; Okada, Yoshinori; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy is a newly developed, noninvasive technique to manage a wide variety of wounds. This novel therapy was successfully used to heal the wound after open-window thoracostomy without surgical closure. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of a painful mass on the right side of her chest. Radiological findings revealed an abscess on the right chest wall that had ruptured into the right lung and caused empyema. Antibiotic therapy did not yield sufficient improvement. Open-window thoracostomy was performed to achieve a sterile pleural space, and negative-pressure wound therapy was then applied. The pleural space was reduced, and the patient was discharged home with self-administered wound care. The wound healed completely in 5 months without any need for surgical closure.

  5. Evaluation of topical formulations of aqueous extract of Centella asiatica on open wounds in rats.

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    Sunilkumar; Parameshwaraiah, S; Shivakumar, H G

    1998-06-01

    Formulations (ointment, cream and gel) of aqueous extract of C. asiatica, when applied topically, thrice daily for 24 days on the open wounds in rats increased cellular proliferation and collagen synthesis at the wound site, as evidenced by increase in collagen content and tensile strength. The treated wounds epithelialised faster and the rate of wound contraction was higher as compared to control wounds. The process of healing was better with gel formulation when compared to other two formulations.

  6. Management of Open Lower Extremity Wounds With Concomitant Fracture Using a Porcine Urinary Bladder Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Bruce A; Geiger, Scott E; Deigni, Oliver A; Watson, John Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Open wounds of the distal third of the leg and foot with exposed bone, fractures, and hardware are challenging wounds for which to achieve stable coverage. The orthopedic advances in lower extremity fracture management over the last 30 years have allowed a rethinking of the standard operative approach to close these complex wounds. The ability of extracellular matrix (ECM) products to facilitate constructive remodeling of a wound seemed a reasonable approach for treatment, especially in patients who are often poor surgical candidates for more advanced reconstructive procedures. The authors reviewed 9 patients with 11 open fractures of the leg, ankle, or foot treated with a newer ECM wound healing device to total closure. The clinical course and patient management are reviewed. The authors conclude that newer ECM products can provide a reasonable method of management for patients who have wounds with exposed hardware, distal leg wounds, and open foot fractures compared to prolonged negative pressure wound therapy or complex reconstructive operative procedures.

  7. Wound care challenges in children and adults with spina bifida: an open-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Katherine; Harris, Amy B; Amling, June K; Kennelly, Ann M; Phillips, Leslie A; Tosi, Laura L

    2013-01-01

    Skin breakdown is a frequent concern for individuals with spina bifida. We explored wound incidence in patients with spina bifida and how it varies across a person's life span and functional neurologic level. We examined the settings in which skin breakdown most commonly occurred, looking for evidence of chronic, non-healing wounds. We also sought to develop criteria to improve wound monitoring. We identified reported wound episodes in an open-cohort study over a 13-year period, examining the hospital and outpatient clinical records of spina bifida patients at Children's National Medical Center (CNMC). Current age, age at wound presentation, sex, weight, functional neurologic level, wound location, setting in which the wound was acquired, the development of a chronic wound, and presence of a shunt were recorded. Of the 376 patients in our clinical population, 123 (average age: 18.8 years, range: infancy-56 years) developed a total of 375 wounds; the majority of patients who developed one wound went on to develop one or more additional wounds, and 20 patients developed chronic wounds. Our data suggest that age bracket (adolescents), wheelchair use, and bare feet, as well as possibly obesity and reduced executive functioning, are key risk factors for wound development. These findings have led to a focused effort to increase wound education and prevention. In addition we report on our early experience using a wound care specialist to champion this initiative.

  8. The 'French Fry' VAC technique: hybridisation of traditional open wound NPWT with closed incision NPWT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Karan; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Singh, Devinder P

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site occurrences (SSO), specifically surgical site infections represent a significant burden in the US health care system. It has been hypothesised that postoperative dressing can help drive down SSO. We describe the successful use of a novel technique combining both closed incision and open negative pressure wound therapy in the management of a high-risk wound associated with lymphoedema of obesity.

  9. Wound-related complications and clinical outcomes following open globe injury repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, George Y X; Henderson, Robert H; Sandhu, Sukhpal S; Essex, Rohan W; Allen, Penelope J; Campbell, William G

    2015-08-01

    Careful surgical management of traumatic wounds is important in open globe injury repair. This study examines the clinical outcomes following repair of open globe injuries with particular focus on wound-related issues. Retrospective, cohort study of consecutive open globe injuries presenting to a tertiary referral eye hospital from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2011. A total of 267 eyes of 263 patients, mainly male (82.5%) with a mean age of 44.8 (range: 4-97) years. Average follow up was 6.9 months. All cases classified according to Ocular Trauma Classification Group. Visual outcomes, risk factors for and rates of postoperative complications and endophthalmitis. There were 83 globe ruptures, 182 penetrating and 2 perforating eye injuries, of which 43 cases had intraocular foreign body. Factors contributing to final visual acuity (VA) globe rupture (OR = 4.64, [1.99-10.8]), retinal detachment (OR = 3.40, [1.19-9.74]) and age ≥50 (OR = 2.45, [1.05-5.74]). Wound leak occurred in 44 eyes (16%). Of these, 18 (41%) proceeded to re-suturing. Factors contributing to wound leak were stellate-shaped wound (OR = 3.28, [1.39-7.73]) and delayed presentation (OR = 2.80, [1.02-7.71]). Ten eyes (3.7%) developed endophthalmitis. Factors associated with endophthalmitis were delayed presentation (OR = 8.91, [1.71-46.6]), microbial keratitis (OR = 12.5, [1.85-85.0]) and lens capsule breach (OR = 12.4, [1.85-83.1]). Wound leak is an important postoperative complication of open globe injury repair. Delayed presentation is an important risk factor for postoperative wound leak and endophthalmitis. Prompt and meticulous wound management of open globe injury may reduce these complications. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  10. A rare cause of wound infection after an open fracture: Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Aditya; Singh, Jagwant; Davis, Nwaka; Urwin, Gillian

    2013-02-15

    An elderly gentleman presented with an open fracture of the calcaneum and ankle, following a boating accident. Despite treatment with repeated surgical debridement, delayed closure, prolonged antibiotics and strict adherence to national guidelines on the management of open fractures, he developed a wound infection with a rare organism, Shewanella putrefaciens, that appears to be increasing in prevalence.

  11. Outcome of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy for Open Abdomen Treatment After Nontraumatic Lower Gastrointestinal Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders; Fabricius, Rasmus; Kleif, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the risk factors for failure to achieve fascial closure after use of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in an open abdomen (OA). We aimed at analyzing possible risk factors for failure of fascial closure and the risk of fistulas after nontrauma lower gastrointestinal...

  12. The effects of Tarantula cubensis venom on open wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul Satar, N Y; Cangul, I T; Topal, A; Kurt, H; Ipek, V; Onel, G I

    2017-02-02

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and histopathological effects of two different dosages of alcohol extract of Tarantula cubensis (Theranekron) on open wounds. A total of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Tarantula cubensis extract (TCE1, n=8) 1/10 diluted, TCE (TCE2, n=8), and (3) vehicle-control (0.2 ml of 96 % ethanol, n=8) groups. Experimental full-thickness 1 x 1cm wounds were created on dorsum skin. TCE or vehicle were given systemically by subcutaneous injections on postoperative days 1 and 4. Wound planimetry and procurement of biopsies was performed on days 4, 8, 12 and 16. The mean non-epithelialised wound area in the vehicle-control group was significantly larger than in the TCE1 group on days 4, 8, 12 and 16, and in the TCE2 group on days 8, 12 and 16 (pwound contraction was significantly higher in the TCE1 and TCE2 groups than in the vehicle control group on days 8, 12 and 16 (pwound healing was characterised by a significant decrease in the neutrophil counts and a significant increase in neovascularisation; neither were effected by TCE. Our results suggest that alcohol extract of Tarantula cubensis accelerates epithelialisation and, thus, has beneficial effects on open wound healing in rats.

  13. Histological Study of Open Wound Healing with a Light Cure Instrument

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    Vahid Changizi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the present study, the effects of light cure on wound healing of mice’s skin with complete thickness were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty male mice of NMRI race were placed randomly into two groups of examination and control. Under aseptic and unconscious conditions, a circular wound of 6 mm width with complete thickness of skin was made on the back of each mice. The surgery day was established as day zero. Blue light of wavelength 420-500 nm from a light cure instrument was shined onto all the mice from the first day. Over the 3rd, 7th, 10th, 15th and 21st days after curing, four kinds of wound and healthy skins were taken from each mice. The practical procedures of general histology were applied on the samples, then slices of 5 micron thickness were taken from them and finally, they were colored with Hematoxline Eosin. The cell population of wound bed including fibroblast cells, macrophages, neutrophils and endothelia of vessels were studied. Results: The examination group showed significantly increased fibrosis and decreased inflammation (p≤0.05. Conclusion: Halogen blue light (light cure causes significant early open wound healing of skin with complete thickness.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of a Continuous Wound Catheter in Open Abdominal Partial Hepatectomy.

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    Che, Lu; Lu, Xin; Pei, Li-Jian

    2017-09-27

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of continuous local anesthetic wound infiltration following open abdominal partial hepatectomy. Methods We performed a prospective, non-randomized, concurrent and controlled study. Patients undergoing open abdominal partial hepatectomy, according to their willingness, accepted one of the following managements for the postoperative pain: continuous wound catheter (CWC) infiltration, patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), patient-controlled intravenous analgesia of morphine (PCIAM), and patient-controlled intravenous analgesia of sufentanil (PCIAS). The primary outcome was postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores at rest and on movement. Secondary outcomes included consumption of rescue medication, side effects, and complications associated with postoperative pain management. Results From August 2013 to December 2013, 80 patients were allocated to receive CWC (n=10), PCEA (n=22), PCIAM (n=29), or PCIAS (n=19). After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, percentage of resected liver, operation time, and Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, there was no significant difference in the VAS scores at rest or on movement between Group CWC and the other groups, namely PCEA, PCIAM, and PCIAS, at 4, 12, 48, and 72 hours postoperatively (all P>0.05). The need for rescue medication was not significantly different between Group CWC and the other three groups at 48 and 72 hours postoperatively (all P>0.05). There was no significant difference in the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting or anal exsufflation time between group CWC and the other three groups (all P>0.05). No severe adverse effects associated with continuous wound infiltration were observed during the study period. Conclusions CWC has a comparable analgesic effect compared with traditional analgesia Methods at most time points postoperatively. CWC is a safe alternative for the postoperative analgesic management of open liver

  15. Matching Biological Mesh and Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Reconstructing an Open Abdomen Defect

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    Fabio Caviggioli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of open abdominal defects is a clinical problem which general and plastic surgeons have to address in cooperation. We report the case of a 66-year-old man who presented an abdominal dehiscence after multiple laparotomies for a sigmoid-rectal adenocarcinoma that infiltrated into the abdominal wall, subsequently complicated by peritonitis and enteric fistula. A cutaneous dehiscence and an incontinent abdominal wall resulted after the last surgery. The abdominal wall was reconstructed using a biological porcine cross-linked mesh Permacol (Covidien Inc., Norwalk, CT. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT, instead, was used on the mesh in order to reduce wound dimensions, promote granulation tissue formation, and obtain secondary closure of cutaneous dehiscence which was finally achieved with a split-thickness skin graft. Biological mesh behaved like a scaffold for the granulation tissue that was stimulated by the negative pressure. The biological mesh was rapidly integrated in the abdominal wall restoring abdominal wall continence, while the small dehiscence, still present in the central area, was subsequently covered with a split-thickness skin graft. The combination of these different procedures led us to solve this complicated case obtaining complete wound closure after less than 2 months.

  16. Does wound infi ltration of tramadol reduce postoperative pain in laparoscopic or open herniorrhaphy?

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    Remziye Sıvacı

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The laparoscopic approach may be associated with more postoperative pain initially. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of administered tramadol at wound closure on postoperative painand analgesic requirements under spinal anesthesia in laparoscopic inguinal herniorrhaphy (LH or tension free open inguinal herniorrhaphy (TFOH.Methods: Twenty patients were randomly divided into two groups (n= 10 in each as LH or TFOH. Patients received infiltration of 200 mg tramadol with 40 mL of 0.9% saline solution at wound closure procedure. Postoperative pain was assessed with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS at 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively. Additional requirements of tramadol for postoperative pain releif were registered.Results: VAS scores at postoperative 12 and 24 hours were signifi cantly higher according to 3rd hour VAS scores in both groups. The VAS scores at 12 hours after operation signifi cantly lower in LH group than inTFOH group (1.5 ± 0.97 vs 5.1 ± 0.99. Additional requirements of tramadol for postoperative pain releif were significantly lower in LH group.Conclusion: We conclude that wound infi ltration of 200 mg tramadol reduce postoperative pain in LH group.

  17. Simulation of carbon dioxide insufflation via a diffuser in an open surgical wound model.

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    Cater, John E; van der Linden, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Flow within a model surgical opening during insufflation with heated carbon dioxide was studied using computational fluid dynamics. A volume of fluid method was used to simulate the mixture of ambient air and carbon dioxide gas. The negative buoyancy of the carbon dioxide caused it to fill the wound and form a protective layer on the internal surfaces for a range of flow rates, temperatures, and angles of patient inclination. It was observed that the flow remained attached to the surface of the model due to the action of the Coanda effect. A flow rate of 10 L/min was sufficient to maintain a warm carbon dioxide barrier for a moderately sized surgical incision for all likely angles of inclination.

  18. Animal-inflicted open wounds in rural Turkey: lessons learned and a proposed treatment algorithm for uncertain scenarios.

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    Sezgin, Billur; Ljohiy, Mbaraka; Akgol Gur, Sultan Tuna

    2016-12-01

    Uncertainty in the management of animal-inflicted injuries, especially in rural settings, usually results in a general approach to leave all wounds to heal with secondary intention, which can lead to unsightly scarring and functional loss. This study focusus on different circumstances dealt with by plastic surgeons in a rural setting in Turkey and aims to configure what the general approach should be through an analysis of a wide spectrum of patients. Between June 2013 and December 2014, 205 patients who presented to the emergency department for animal-inflicted injuries were retrospectively analysed. Patients who consulted for plastic surgery were included in the analysis to determine which wounds require further attention. Patients with past animal-inflicted injuries who presented to the outpatient plastic surgery clinic with concerns such as non-healing open wounds or cosmetic or functional impairment were also evaluated. Statistical analysis demostrated a significantly lower rate of infection encountered in animal-inflicted open wounds (AIOWs) of patients who consulted for plastic surgery from the emergency department than those who presented to the outpatient clinic (P wounds is their potential for infection, but this does not mean that every wound will be infected. The most important factor is being able to distinguish wounds that have a higher potential for infection and to select the type of wound management accordingly. An algorithm has been proposed as a guidance for the management of AIOWs, which covers the approach towards both domestic and stray animal-inflicted injuries. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 开放创面的负压治疗与传统换药治疗疗效对比的Meta分析%A meta-analysis of negative pressure wound therapy versus traditional wound care for open wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷耀斌; 邓玖征; 马炜; 田光磊

    2014-01-01

    目的:应用Meta分析的方法总结评价负压创面治疗( negative pressure wound therapy,NPWT )与传统换药对开放创面治疗的疗效。方法检索1993年1月至2013年12月,Cochrane database、Pub med、Embase、中国知网、万方数据库和中国科技期刊数据库,且配合手工检索相关领域的杂志,英文检索关键词:“negative pressure dressing”,“negative pressure therapy”,“negative pressure wound therapy”,“subatmospheric pressure dressing”,“subatmospheric pressure therapy”,“suction dressing”,“topical negative pressure”,“VAC”,“vacuum assisted closure” and “vacuum therapy”,“vacuum sealing”,“foam suction dressing”,“topical negative pressure”and“suction therapy”。中文检索关键词:“VSD”,“VAC”,“负压封闭引流”。纳入应用NPWT与传统换药治疗开放创面的随机对照研究,并应用Rvaman5.1进行Meta分析。结果通过筛选初检文献12214篇,依照纳入及排除标准,最终纳入18个研究(845例)。7个研究以慢性创面愈合时间为观察指标,结果 P=0.008。P<0.05,提示 NPWT 组愈合时间短于传统换药组;5个研究以急性创面经治疗后可以关闭创面时间为观察指标,结果P=0.00001。P<0.05,提示急性创面经治疗后 NPWT 组可早于传统换药组关闭创面;6个研究以创面大小的改变率为观察指标,结果 P=0.04。P<0.05,提示NPWT组创面缩小快于传统换药组。结论 NPWT治疗较传统换药在治疗开放创面存在优势,可缩短急慢性创面闭合时间及加快缩小创面。%Objective To apply the technique of meta-analysis to summarize and evaluate the effects of negative pressure wound therapy ( NPWT ) and traditional wound care for open wounds. Methods The data of NPWT versus traditional wound care for open wounds from January 1993 to December 2013 were retrieved. The databases included

  20. The effects of topical application of sunflower-seed oil on open wound healing in lambs

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    Marques Silvio Romero

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To demonstrate the effects of the use of sunflower seed oil on the treatment of skin wounds. METHODS: Eighteen male Saint Inês lambs were divided in 3 groups according to the pos-operative (7, 14 and 21 days. After antisepsis and local anestesia, two 4cm² wounds on each side of the thoracic region, close to the scapule were surgically produced. The experimental wounds were treated with sunflower seed oil, with high concentration of linoleic acid (LA, and the control ones with sterilized Vaseline. Biopsies of the pos-operative wounds tissue were performed on the 7th, 14th, 21st days and histologically evaluated. RESULTS: Topic application of sunflower seed oil accelerated healing process at the 7th and 21st days, reducing wound area and increasing wound contraction. Granulation tissue increased faster on treated wounds. The epidermis of the treated wounds was completely recovered when compared to control wounds. CONCLUSION: The topic use of sunflower seed oil accelerated the healing process, and it can be used as an alternative therapy on second intention wound healing.

  1. Protective effects of progesterone against gastric mucosal lesion induced by open abdominal wound and seawater immersion in rats

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    Jiang PU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effects of progesterone on gastric mucosal inflammatory response, changes in mucosa structure, and cell apoptosis in rats with open abdominal wound and seawater immersion. Methods  Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 each. The rats in group A were subjected to open abdominal wound + subcutaneous injection of sterile water, and rats in group B to open abdominal wound + seawater immersion + subcutaneous injection of sterile water, and rats in group C to open abdominal wound + seawater immersion + progesterone treatment. The animal model of open abdominal wound and seawater immersion was reproduced, and the rats in groups B and C were given subcutaneous injection of sterile water or progesterone (16mg/kg at 1, 6 and 12h after immersion. All rats were executed at 16h after immersion. The ulcer index (UI of gastric mucosa was calculated in the three groups. The pathological changes in gastric mucosa were observed under light microscope. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL -6 in gastric mucosa were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay, the expression of caspase-3 in gastric mucosa was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the cell apoptosis of gastric mucosa was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling staining. Results  The UI, concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6, and injury score of gastric mucosa in group B were all significantly higher than those in group A (P<0.01 and group C (P<0.05. The expression of caspase-3 (23.8%±3.5% and apoptosis index (26.4%±2.8% of the gastric mucosa in group B were higher than those in group A (10.2%±1.6% and 8.5%±1.5% respectively, P<0.01 and group C (17.1%±2.3% and 19.8%±2.4% respectively, P<0.05. Conclusion  Progesterone administration could suppress gastric mucosa inflammation, protect gastric mucosal structure, and reduce mucosal cell apoptosis in the rats

  2. The Effect of Withania Somnifera Root Extract on Open Wound Healing in the Male Rats

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    N Ajand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healing cutaneous wounds is regarded as one of the most important issues in the medicine. Different chemical agents have been used in regard with promoting wound healing, most of which unfortunately present some side effects and defects. Since natural combinations have proposed less disadvantages, this study aimed to investigate the effect of Withania Somnifera root extract on cutaneous wound healing in the male rats. Methods: This study was performed on 36 rats weighing 180-220g that were divided into 6 groups (n=6. First, wounds (2x2 were made on the dorsal skin of the animals. The first group was left without treatment (control group, the second was treated with Eucerin(negative control, the third group received 1% of phenytoin cream and in the other groups, different concentrations of hydroalcoholic extract of Withania Somnifera (20%, 40%, 60% w/w combined with Eucerin base were administrated once per day. The area of wounds was measured by Autocad software every day, from the 2nd day to 14th day. The study data were analyzed via SPSS software (ver.16 at the significant level of P<0.05. Results:The reduction of incisional wound area in the all groups treated with root extract of Withania Somnifera  ointment was significantly higher on the 8th  day. Moreover, dose of 60% and 90% revealed better effects (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings of the present study demonstrated that Withania Somnifera root, due to its significant reduction in the healing time as well as wound area, can be used as an effective material in regard with the cutaneous wound healing.

  3. POTENTIAL OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF FICUS BENGHALENSIS ON OPEN WOUNDS AND INFLAMMATION

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    Rita M. Charde

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with evaluation of antioxidant, wound healing and anti-inflammatory activity of ethanolic extract of Curcuma longa Linn rhizomes. The ethanolic extract prepared by maceration technique was subjected to screen for antioxidant activity using DPPH radical scavenging method and wound healing activity using incision, excision, histopathological and dead space wound model and the study was supported with evaluation of granuloma tissue to estimate hydroxyproline content and histopathological evaluation. The anti-inflammatory study was carried out by using carageenan induced rat paw odema method. The tested extract of different dilutions in range 200µg/ml to 1000 µg/ml shows activity in range of 9.34% to 18.55%. Significant increase in wound closure rate, skin breaking strength, granuloma breaking strength was observed. The hydroxyproline content was also increased with decrease in scar area. The initial healing action might be due to increased collagen deposition and better alignment, with the obtained results it can be concluded that Curcuma longa extract has significant wound healing activity and initial healing may be due to presence of some terpenoids and antimicrobial agents. The extract shows prominent anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of standard (Ibuprofen gel. The extract shows good anti-inflammatory activity on carageenan induced rat paw odema method.

  4. [Open digit amputation in cattle: Surgery, wound healing and follow-up].

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    Devaux, D; Steiner, A; Pipoz, F; Nuss, K

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to document secondary wound healing and outcome in 20 cattle that had undergone digit amputation at the level of the distal metaphysis of the first phalanx between April 2009 and June 2015. The surgical technique for amputation was simple and fast, and granulation tissue covered the stump of the first phalanx 9 to 30 days postoperatively. Complications associated with wound healing were seen in 7 animals and in 3, a second surgery was required; all 20 cattle were discharged from the clinic. Epithelial closure was complete after a mean of 3 months (range, 2 to 7 months). The mean postoperative survival time was 15 months (range, 1 to 34 months), and 6 animals were still alive at the time of follow-up inquiry. Wound healing and long-term outcome did not differ between cattle that had undergone a more intensive aftercare regime than those with a less intensive postoperative treatment.

  5. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen.

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    Turnock, Adam R; Fleischer, Brian P; Carney, Martin J; Vanderlan, Wesley B

    2016-06-14

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones.

  6. Penetration Deep into Tissues of Reactive Oxygen Species Generated in Floating-Electrode Dielectric Barrier Discharge (FE-DBD): in Vitro Agarose Gel Model Mimicking an Open Wound

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    Dobrynin, Danil; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript we present an in vitro model based on agarose gel that can be used to simulate a dirty, oily, bloody, and morphologically complex surface of, for example, an open wound. We show this models effectiveness in simulating depth of penetration of reactive species generated in plasma deep into tissue of a rat and confirm the penetration depths with agarose gel model. We envision that in the future such a model could be used to study plasma discharges (and other modalities) and minimize the use of live animals: plasma can be optimized on the agarose gel wound model and then finally verified using an actual wound.

  7. Repair of open compound lower extremity wounds%下肢开放复杂伤口与创面的修复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱敬民; 陈传功; 种亚林; 郝天智; 鲁刚; 周智; 随志甫; 刘静杰; 屠晓军; 罗金超; 范宝玉

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the repair of the open compound wounds in lower extremities caused by multiple factors. Methotis Transplantation of cutaneous.musculo-cutaneous or greater omentum flaps were applied to 155 patients of open compound lower extremity wounds. Results The wound healing rate following first operation was 50% and that following two operations was 14.8%.While the wounds were healed in 7.7% of patients after three operations. Conclusion Transplantations of cutaneous,musculo-cutaneous or greater omentum flaps ale effective to repair and reconstruct the open compound lower extremity wounds.%目的 探讨多种原因造成的下肢开放复杂伤口与创面的修复.方法 应用皮瓣、肌皮瓣、大网膜移植等方法,对155例下肢复杂伤口与创面进行修复.结果 一次手术愈合率为50%;两次手术愈合率为14.8%;三次手术愈合率为7.7%.结论 皮瓣、肌皮瓣以及大网膜移植,可以有效修复多种原因造成的下肢复杂伤口与创面.

  8. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of −50, −75 and −125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing.

  9. 26例犬咬伤开放伤口的护理%Nursing care of 26 patients with open wounds due to dog bite injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴淑华; 胡艳丽; 李健慧

    2012-01-01

    总结了应用现代敷料治疗26例犬咬伤患者开放伤口的经验.对患者局部伤口进行评估,根据伤口特点选择合适的敷料,保持创面清洁,通畅引流,对于伴有软组织撕脱伤的患者局部伤口可适当加压,促进愈合.本组26例伤口共102处,治疗时间12~28d,均恢复良好.%This paper summarizes the experience of using modern bandage and dressing on open wounds caused by dog bites in 26 patients. After wound assessment, the right dressings were used. The other key points of nursing are keeping the wounds clean, maintaining drainage unobstructed, and appropriate pressure for wounds with soft tissue avulsion to promote wound healing. The 26 patients with multiple wounds had been treated for 12 to 28 days and recovered well.

  10. Modern management of complex open abdominal wounds of war: a 5-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertrees, Amy; Greer, Lauren; Pickett, Chris; Nelson, Jeffery; Wakefield, Matthew; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Shriver, Craig

    2008-12-01

    Optimal management of the open abdomen remains controversial. Retrospective review of patients injured during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom returning to Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) from January 2003 to October 2007 for treatment of open abdomen. Three hundred fifty-four patients were evacuated to WRAMC after laparotomy, including 86 patients (24%) with open abdomen. Three transferred patients were excluded. Eighty-three patients, mean age 26 years (range 18 to 54 years), sustaining injury from secondary blast (n = 47), gunshot (n = 29), and blunt trauma (n = 7) were studied. Surgical management included early definitive abdominal closure (EDAC, n = 56; 67%), primary fascial closure (n = 15; 18%), planned ventral hernia (PVH, n = 9; 11%) and vacuum-assisted closure with AlloDerm (n = 3; 4%). EDAC closure involves serial closure with Gore-Tex Dualmesh and final closure supplemented with polypropylene mesh (62%) or AlloDerm (31%). There was no substantial difference in injury mechanism, age, length of evacuation to WRAMC, or Injury Severity Score (average 30) according to closure type. Complications included removal of infected prosthetic mesh in 4 EDAC closure patients (5%). Overall morbidity was lowest (60%) in primary repair patients (p = 0.01). Rates of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, abdominal wall hematoma, and infection did not differ between groups. Fistula rate was increased with PVH (20%). Two patients with PVH died. PVH and EDAC mesh complications have been minimized in the last 2 years of the study. Primary closure of fascia is ideal but not always possible. Early definitive closure has avoided PVH. Mesh-related complications have decreased with time.

  11. Endoscopic component separation for ventral hernia causes fewer wound complications compared to open components separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Henriksen, Nadia A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Open component separation (OCS) for tension-free approximation of fascial borders is increasingly used for repair of large midline ventral hernias. Recent studies suggested lower complication rates following a modified version of this technique with an endoscopic approach (ECS). The aim...... of this meta-analysis was to compare the outcomes after ECS and OCS. METHODS: A literature search was performed in PubMed and Embase in order to identify studies comparing ECS and OCS as a supplementary procedure for surgical repair of ventral hernia. The included studies were independently assessed using...

  12. SPEED UP THE PROCESS OF HEALING THE OPEN WOUNDS BY LOW POWER HE-NE LASER RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N TAKZARE

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reducing pain and enhancement of wound healing have several advantages. Wound healing is a complicated but regular process that includes synchronized and organized phenomena such as paranchyma cells migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. Rate of wound healing is affected by various factors. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of low power He-Ne laser radiation (630 nm, on metabolic process, cellular proliferation and finally wound repairment. Methods: In our research, about 50 healthy and mature rats were studied by experimental method. After shaving, small cuts (10 mm were made at the neck. Then they were divided randomly into control and case groups. The rats of the case group were radiated by He-Ne laser in the wounds about 4 minutes each day. After a week, we did wound autopsy of both groups and all the specimens were studied microscopically. Results: The findings showed that there were significant increase in the fibroblasts and connective tissue fibers and also vascularisation in the case group compared with the control group. Discussion: Wound healing in the case group was accelerated and wound diameter was smaller significantly. So, low power He-Ne laser radiation accelerates wound healing process.

  13. Blood flow response in small intestinal loops at different depths during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2013-08-01

    High closure rates of the open abdomen have been reported following negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, the method has occasionally been associated with increased development of intestinal fistulae. We have previously shown that the application of NPWT to the open abdomen causes a decrease in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal loop and the omentum adjacent to the visceral protective layer of the dressing. In this study we investigate whether the negative pressure affects only small intestinal loops lying directly below the dressing or if it also affects small intestinal loops that are not in direct contact with the dressing. Six pigs underwent midline incision and application of NPWT to the open abdomen. The microvascular blood flow was measured in four intestinal loops at different depths from the visceral protective layer, at two different locations: beneath the dressing and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of NPWT of -50, -70, -100, -120, -150 and -170 mmHg, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Negative pressures between -50 and -170 mmHg caused a significant decrease in the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal loops in direct contact with the visceral protective layer. A slight, but significant, decrease in blood flow was also seen in the intestinal loops lying beneath these loops. The decrease in microvascular blood flow increased with the amount of negative pressure applied. No difference in blood flow was seen in the intestinal loops lying deeper in the abdominal cavity. A decrease in blood flow was seen in the upper two intestinal loops located apically and anteriorly, but not in the lower two, indicating that this is a local effect and that pressure decreases with distance from the source. A long-term decrease in blood flow in the intestinal wall may induce ischaemia and secondary necrosis in the intestinal wall, which could promote the development of intestinal fistulae. We believe that NPWT of

  14. Silver Dressings Augment the Ability of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Reduce Bacteria in a Contaminated Open Fracture Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    in 100% oxygen) and epidural injection (Duramorph 0.1 mg/kg), a complex, contaminated musculo - skeletal wound was created on the hindlimb of 13...antibiotics are typically administered in the treatment of complex musculo - skeletal wounds, they were not used in this study in an effort to minimize

  15. IRRIGATION AND TRACTION THERAPY FOR OPEN FRACTURE WITH LARGE-SIZED FULL-THICKNESS SKIN-DEFICIT AND SEVERELY INFECTED WOUND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国平; 杜靖远

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the results of skeletal traction and irrigation therapy (STIT) used for open fracture complicated with large-sized full-thickness skin-deficit and infection wounds (OFIW) were presented.Fourteen patlents of OFIW were treated by the plaster cast and wound duessing (PCWD),and 30 patients of OFIW were treated by STIT.The results indicated that after one week of treatment,the white blood cell count in the STIT group,compared to 17.6±1.0×109/L from before treatment,returned to 8.8±0.8×109/L, and in contrast,the cell count of the PCWD group was about 13.0±1.4×109/L。All of wound exudate culture in the STIT group was negative,and those of 7 cases (7/14) in PCWD group were positive (P<0.01).The symptoms and signs such as pain,fever and septic exudate on the wound in the STIT group were much milder than those in the PCWD group. There were 5 cases (35.7%) of toxicemia and septicemia,2 cases (14.3%) of osteomyelitis,2 cases (14.3%) of amputation,1 case (7.1%) of delayed uninon and 3 cases (21.4%) of malunion in the PCWD group,and no complications in the STIT group.

  16. Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW: design and rationale for a large, multicenter collaborative 2 × 3 factorial trial of irrigating pressures and solutions in patients with open fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Open fractures frequently result in serious complications for patients, including infections, wound healing problems, and failure of fracture healing, many of which necessitate subsequent operations. One of the most important steps in the initial management of open fractures is a thorough wound irrigation and debridement to remove any contaminants. There is, however, currently no consensus regarding the optimal approach to irrigating open fracture wounds during the initial operative procedure. The selection of both the type of irrigating fluid and the pressure of fluid delivery remain controversial. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of irrigation solutions (soap vs. normal saline and pressure (low vs. high; gravity flow vs. high; low vs. gravity flow on re-operation within one year among patients with open fractures. Methods/Design The FLOW study is a multi-center, randomized controlled trial using a 2 × 3 factorial design. Surgeons at clinical sites in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit 2 280 patients who will be centrally randomized into one of the 6 treatment arms (soap + low pressure; soap + gravity flow pressure; soap + high pressure; saline + low pressure; saline + gravity flow pressure; saline + high pressure. The primary outcome of the study is re-operation to promote wound or bone healing, or to treat an infection. This composite endpoint of re-operation includes a narrow spectrum of patient-important procedures: irrigation and debridement for infected wound, revision and closure for wound dehiscence, wound coverage procedures for infected or necrotic wound, bone grafts or implant exchange procedures for established nonunion in patients with postoperative fracture gaps less than 1 cm, intramedullary nail dynamizations in the operating room, and fasciotomies for compartment syndrome. Patients, outcome adjudicators, and data analysts will be blinded. We will compare

  17. Puncture Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page. Please enable Javascript in your browser. Puncture Wounds What Is a Puncture Wound? Puncture wounds are not the same as cuts. ... professional treatment right away. Foreign Bodies in Puncture Wounds A variety of foreign bodies can become embedded ...

  18. Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  19. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chronic wounds. Poor blood flow due to clogged arteries ( arteriosclerosis ) or conditions such as varicose veins. Obesity increases the risk of infection after surgery. Being overweight can also put tension on stitches, which can make them break open. ...

  20. An open label, randomized, comparative, parallel group, multicenter, prospective, interventional, clinical study to evaluate efficacy and safety of “AHPL/AYTOP/0113” in comparison with “Framycetin sulphate cream” in acute wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay U Nipanikar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the present study was to assess efficacy and safety of AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream, a polyherbal formulation in comparison with Framycetin sulphate cream in acute wounds. Methodology: It was an open label, randomized, comparative, parallel group and multi-center clinical study. Total 47 subjects were randomly assigned to Group-A (AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream and 42 subjects were randomly assigned to Group-B (Framycetin sulphate cream. All the subjects were advised to apply study drug, thrice daily for 21 days or up to complete wound healing (whichever was earlier. All the subjects were called for follow up on days 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 or up to the day of complete wound healing. Data describing quantitative measures are expressed as mean ± SD. Comparison of variables representing categorical data was performed using Chi-square test. Results: Group-A subjects took significantly less (P < 0.05 i.e., (mean 7.77 days than (mean 9.87 days of Group-B subjects for wound healing. At the end of the study, statistically significant better (P < 0.05 results were observed in Group-A than Group-B in mean wound surface area, wound healing parameters and pain associated with wound. Excellent overall efficacy and tolerability was observed in subjects of both the groups. No adverse event or adverse drug reaction was noted in any subject of both the groups. Conclusion: AHPL/AYTOP/0113 cream proved to be superior to Framycetin sulphate cream in healing of acute wounds.

  1. Uncontrolled, open-label, pilot study of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil solution in the decolonisation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus positive wounds and its influence on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Margaret; Newall, Nelly; Carville, Keryln; Smith, Joanna; Riley, Thomas V; Carson, Christine F

    2011-08-01

    Many complementary and alternative products are used to treat wounds. The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia, tea tree oil, has proven antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, may be useful in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) decolonisation regimens and is reputed to have 'wound-healing' properties, but more data are required to support these indications. The primary aim of this uncontrolled case series was to assess whether a tea tree oil solution used in a wound cleansing procedure could decolonise MRSA from acute and chronic wounds of mixed aetiology. The secondary aim was to determine if the tea tree oil solution influenced wound healing outcomes. Nineteen participants with wounds suspected of being colonised with MRSA were enrolled in a pilot study. Seven were subsequently shown not to have MRSA and were withdrawn from the study. As many as 11 of the remaining 12 participants were treated with a water-miscible tea tree oil (3·3%) solution applied as part of the wound cleansing regimen at each dressing change. Dressing changes were three times per week or daily as deemed necessary by the study nurse following assessment. One participant withdrew from the study before treatment. No participants were MRSA negative after treatment. After treatment had been implemented, 8 of the 11 treated wounds had begun to heal and reduced in size as measured by computer planimetry. Although this formulation and mode of delivery did not achieve the primary aim of the study, tea tree oil did not appear to inhibit healing and the majority of wounds reduced in size after treatment.

  2. [Guideline 'Wound Care': recommendations for 5 challenging areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Vermeulen, Hester; Go, Peter M N Y H; Ubbink, Dirk T

    2013-01-01

    The interdisciplinary evidence-based guideline 'Wound Care' covers the treatment and management of acute wounds in adults and children and by all wound care disciplines. This guideline answers 5 basic questions with 38 recommendations covering wound cleansing, pain relief, instructing the patient, various dressings and the organisational aspects of wound care. The guideline recommendations include not to cleanse wounds that are primarily closed, to cleanse acute open wounds with clean tap water, to use the WHO pain ladder as the basis for the choice of analgesics for continuous wound pain, to administer lidocaine or prilocaine for localized pain relief during manipulation, not to cover primarily closed wounds with dressings, to use simple dressings for open wounds and to give the patient clear instructions. The guideline also advises about wound registration, documentation and hand-over of wound care, and recommends making clear agreements about referrals and responsibilities.

  3. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial evaluating topical zinc oxide for acute open wounds following pilonidal disease excision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agren, Magnus S; Ostenfeld, Ulla; Kallehave, Finn;

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial was to compare topical zinc oxide with placebo mesh on secondary healing pilonidal wounds. Sixty-four (53 men) consecutive patients, aged 17-60 years, were centrally randomized to either treatment with 3% zinc oxide...... range 42-71 days) for the zinc and 62 days (55-82 days) for the placebo group (p = 0.32). Topical zinc oxide increased (p wound fluid zinc levels to 1,540 (1,035-2,265) microM and decreased (p wounds. Fewer zinc oxide (n = 3) than placebo...... abnormalities by histopathological examination of wound biopsies, or other harmful effects. Larger clinical trials will be required to show definitive effects of topical zinc oxide on wound healing and infection....

  4. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Birke-Sorensen, Hanne; Kruse, Marie;

    Aim: Postoperative wound complications make many surgical procedures unnecessarily complex, particularly in high-risk patients. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy is well recognized in the management of open wounds. In recent years, it has been introduced as well in the management of closed surgical...... incisions to reduce postoperative wound complications, though the evidence base to support this intervention is limited. The aim of this study was to assess if Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) reduces postoperative complications when applied on closed surgical incisions. Method: A systematic review...... formation (52%) compared to standard care. The reduction in wound dehiscence was not statistically significant. The numbers needed to treat were 3 (seroma), 17 (dehiscence), and 25 (infection). Methodical heterogeneity across studies led to downgrading quality of evidence to moderate for infection...

  5. Open abdomen with vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction in patients with complicated diffuse secondary peritonitis: A single-center 8-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Matti; Mentula, Panu; Sallinen, Ville; Rasilainen, Suvi; Bäcklund, Minna; Leppäniemi, Ari

    2017-06-01

    Open abdomen (OA) treatment in patients with peritonitis is increasing worldwide. Various temporary abdominal closure devices are being used. This study included patients with complicated diffuse secondary peritonitis, OA, and vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM). The aim of this study was to describe mortality and major morbidity in terms of delayed primary fascial closure and enteroatmospheric fistula rates. This was a single-academic-center retrospective study of consecutive patients with diffuse peritonitis, OA, and VAWCM between years 2008 and 2016. Descriptive and univariate analyses were performed. Forty-one patients were identified and analyzed. Median age was 59 years, preoperative septic shock was diagnosed in 54% (n = 22), and 59% (n = 24) had a postoperative peritonitis. Mortality was 29% (n = 12), and 76% (n = 31) of patients were admitted in the intensive care unit. The median duration of OA was 7 days with a median of two dressing changes. Delayed primary fascial closure rate among survivors was 92% (n = 33), and enteroatmospheric fistulas developed in 7% (n = 3). In a subgroup analysis, patients with OA in the primary laparotomy for peritonitis (n = 27) were compared with patients with OA in the subsequent laparotomies (n = 14). There were no significant differences between groups. The VAWCM technique in patients with complicated secondary diffuse peritonitis and OA yields excellent results in terms of delayed primary fascial closure rate and a low number of enteroatmospheric fistulas. It seems to be safe to close the abdomen at the index laparotomy, if possible, even if there is a risk of a need of OA later. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV.

  6. Treatment of non-healing sternum wound after open-heart surgery with allogenic platelet-rich plasma and fibrin glue-preliminary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbasi Tashnizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-healing wound in the sternal region after coronary arteries bypass graft surgery is a serious complication. For healing a chronic wound, several novel approaches have been proposed recently such as using bone marrow stem cells, platelets and fibrin glue (PFG; but a non-invasive method is highly desirable in the first approach for treatment. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of the combination of PFG in one treatment. Materials and Methods: We report on the treatment of six patients with life-threatening chronic sternum wounds, which caused septicemia with multi-drug resistant pathogens. The ulcers were extensively debrided initially and were measured and photographed at weekly intervals. The combination of PFG was applied topically on the wound after every 2 days. Results: The wounds were completely closed in five patients and significantly reduced in size in one. There was no evidence of local or systemic complications and any abnormal tissue formation, keloid or hypertrophic scarring. Conclusions: Our study suggests, in the first approach, PFG can be used safely in order to heal a non healing sternum wound following coronary artery bypass surgery.

  7. Nursing care of abdominal wall wounds in 28 patients with open abdomen after skin transplantation%28例腹腔开放创面植皮患者的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓婷; 刘云; 任建安; 赵允召; 吴莉莉; 韩刚; 王革非; 顾国胜; 赵日升

    2013-01-01

    总结了28例腹腔开放患者自体皮肤移植后的创面护理.分阶段评估植皮后第3天、第7天、第21天的创面恢复情况,采用不同的创面护理措施.对创面合并肠瘘的患者,保持引流的有效性,并采取主动引流,避免肠液侵蚀.同时,做好头部供皮区的护理,加强功能锻炼和心理支持.本组27例患者腹壁创面植皮后第21天,皮片覆盖面积超过90%,只有1例未达90%,经过积极的创面护理,最终创面得到修复.%This paper summarizes the nursing care of abdominal wall wounds for 28 patients with open abdomen after autologous skin transplantation. Targeted wound care was provided for the patients based on the wound assessment at 3 days, 7 days and 21 days after skin transplantation. For patients complicated by intestinal fistula, active drainage was important to avoid corrosion from intestinal fluid. Moreover,nursing care focused on proper nursing of head skin donor site,functional exercises and psychological support. As a result,the covered size of the abdominal wall wounds by blade of thick skin was over 90% in 27 cases at 21 days after skin transplantation. Only one case was under 90%,but healed ultimately after active wound care.

  8. [Wound healing and wound dressing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, F; Sklarek, J

    1988-01-01

    This review article intends to discuss the clinical management of wounds in respect to a pathophysiological background. Recent results of research in the field of wound healing are demonstrated. Wound healing can be seen as aseptic inflammatory response to a traumatic stimulus. The activation of the clotting cascade by the trauma induces a sequence of humoral and cellular reactions. Platelets, granulocytes and macrophages are activated stepwisely. In the first phase of wound healing the wounded tissue area will be prepared for phagocytosis by enzymatic degradation of ground substance and depolymerisation of protein macromolecules (wound edema). Following the phagocytic microdebridement mesenchymal cells proliferate and produce matrix substance. Microcirculation within the traumatized area will be restored by angiogenesis, macroscopically observed as new formed granulation tissue. This leads to the wound healing phase of scar tissue formation. In this complexity of reactions naturally many possibilities of impairment are given. The most common complication during wound healing is the infection. It can be seen as self reinforcing process. The therapy of the impairment of wound healing consists in the disruption of the specific vicious circle, in the case of an osseus infection that would be a macrodebridement (that is necrectomy) and biomechanical stabilization. The surgical management of wounds principally consists in ensuring an undisturbed sequence of the healing process. This can be done by the wound excision that supports the phagocytic microdebridement. A further possibility is to avoid overwhelming formation of edema by eliminating the traumatic stimulus, by immobilization of the injured region and by ensuring a physiological microenvironment with a primary suture if possible. There are up to the present no drugs available to enhance cell proliferation and to regulate wound healing but it seems that experimental research is successful in characterizing

  9. A new proposal to evaluate the healing of open skin wounds: volumetry Nova proposta para avaliar cicatrização de ferida cutânea aberta: volumetria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Nagib Salomão Paulo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present a new proposal to evaluate the healing of an open subcutaneous and skin wound, which we termed "volumetry". METHODS: A total of 32 circular wounds were performed in the subcutaneous tissues and skin of four feet of pigs (8 each. Each wound had about 1 cm in diameter and was 0.2 cm deep. Volume was calculated from the wound filled with saline and mass Xantopren. With the aid of a magnifying glass and local lighting, the liquid was dripped with a micropipette inside the wound until complete fullness. Volume repletion was calculated in microliters, corresponding to the volume of the wound. The mass of Xantopren was placed inside the wound to obtain a mold of the lesion. Mold volume was calculated using the formula of the volume of a cylinder closest resembling a geometric figure with mold. RESULTS: The calculation of wound volume was possible with both Xantopren and mold techniques. Volume as calculated by micropipette was 119.37 ± 30.87 microliters while the volume calculated by mold was 122.41 ± 33.90 mm3 (p=0.79. CONCLUSIONS: Volumetry in pig feet is simple and reproducible. Volumetry perfomed with saline did not differ from the volumetry with mass Xantopren. This method may be a useful tool to help evaluate the healing of open skin wounds in experimental and clinical research.OBJETIVO: Apresentar nova proposta para avaliar a cicatrização de uma ferida cutânea aberta, denominada "volumetria." MÉTODOS: Foram provocadas 32 feridas circulares cutâneas, com cerca de 1 cm de diâmetro e 0.2 cm de profundidade, em quatro patas de suíno. O volume da ferida foi calculado com solução salina e massa de xantopren. O líquido foi gotejado com uma micropipeta no interior da ferida até sua completa repleção, o que foi auxiliado com uma lupa de aumento e iluminação local. O volume de repleção foi calculado em microlitros e correspondeu ao volume da ferida. A massa de xantopren foi colocada no interior da ferida para se

  10. Management of Traumatic Wounds and a Novel Approach to Delivering Wound Care in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe, Kathryn Q; Desmarais, Thomas J; Keller, Martin S

    2014-04-01

    Significance: The costs and morbidity of pediatric traumatic wounds are not well known. The literature lacks a comprehensive review of the volume, management, and outcomes of children sustaining soft tissue injury. We briefly review the existing literature for traumatic wounds such as open fractures and burns. Such injuries require dedicated wound care and we propose a novel approach for more efficient and more effective delivery of dedicated pediatric wound care. Recent Advances: New pediatric literature is emerging regarding the long-term effects of wound care pain in traumatic injuries-especially burns. A variety of wound dressings and alternative management techniques exist and are geared toward reducing wound care pain. Our institution utilizes a unique model to provide adequate sedation and pain control through a dedicated pediatric wound care unit. We believe that this model reduces the cost of wound care by decreasing emergency department and operating room visits as well as hospital length of stay. Critical Issues: First, medical costs related to pediatric traumatic wound care are not insignificant. The need for adequate pain control and sedation in children with complex wounds is traditionally managed with operating room intervention. Afterward, added costs can be from a hospital stay for ongoing acute wound management. Second, morbidities of complex traumatic wounds are shown to be related to the acute wound care received. Future Directions: Further guidelines are needed to determine the most effective and efficient care of complex traumatic soft tissue injuries in the pediatric population.

  11. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wound from getting worse or becoming infected Preventing limb loss Preventing new wounds from occurring or old wounds ... Gauze Films Your provider may use one or multiple types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric ...

  12. Bacterial Wound Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  13. [Local treatment of chronic skin wounds in a Swiss out-patient wound centre 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Marc; Tanner, Daniel; Hunziker, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In Switzerland around 30,000 patients suffer from chronic skin wounds. Appropriate topical wound care along with treatment of the causes of the wounds enables to heal a lot of these patients and to avoid secondary disease such as infections. Thereby, the final goal of wound care is stable reepithelisation. Based on experience with chronic leg ulcers mainly in our out-patient wound centre, we give a survey of the wound dressings we actually use and discuss their wound-phase adapted application. Furthermore, we address the two tissue engineering products reimbursed in Switzerland, Apligraf and EpiDex, as well as the biological matrix product Oasis. The crucial question, which treatment options will be offered in future to the wound patients by our health regulatory and insurance systems, is open to debate.

  14. [Wound dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuninger, H

    1988-01-01

    The wide variety of dermatologic surgical procedures has resulted in a corresponding choice of wound dressings. Considering the chemical and physical properties as well as the function of the dressings, standardized dressing techniques can be performed with relatively few materials. This saves both time and money.

  15. 胫腓骨开放性骨折患者创口感染的病原学与预防研究%Etiology and prevention of wound infections in patients with open f ractures of tibia and fibula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬永琴; 于国军; 邹吉锋; 万峰格; 赵兰兰

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the characteristics of etiology of wound infections in patients with open tibia‐fibula fractures and its risk factors so as to provides reference for clinical prevention and treatment .METHODS A total of 553 patients with open tibia‐fibula fractures were selected in our hospital from Jun .2012 to Aug .2015 . Distribution of pathogens and risk factors of wound infections in patients with open tibia‐fibula open fractures were investigated .Data were analyzed with SPSS20 .0 .RESULTS A total of 56 patients suffered from open tibia‐fibula open fracture (10 .13% ) .Totally 73 strains of pathogenic bacteria were isolated ,including 41 strains of gram‐pos‐itive bacteria (56 .16% ) .According to multi‐factor logistic regression model ,severe fractures ,long treatment time interval ,length of hospital time ,long operation time ,and combined antimicrobial application were the inde‐pendent risk factors of wound infections in patients with open tibia‐fibula open fractures .CONCLUSION Preven‐tion and control measures to reduce incidence of infections should be taken by using antimicrobial agents rationally .%目的:调查胫腓骨发生开放性骨折患者创口感染的病原学特点并探究其危险因素,为临床预防与治疗提供参考依据。方法选择2012年6月-2015年8月医院收治553例胫腓骨开放性骨折患者为研究对象,分析病原菌分布及胫腓骨开放性骨折患者创口感染的危险因素,数据采用SASS 20.0软件进行统计分析。结果553例胫腓骨开放性骨折患者中56例发生感染,感染率为10.13%;共分离出73株病原菌,以革兰阳性菌为主,共41株占56.16%;多因素 logistics回归模型显示,骨伤程度严重、治疗间隔时间长、手术时间长、住院时间及联合抗菌药物应用是导致胫腓骨发生开放性骨折患者伤口感染的独立危险因素(P<0.05)。结论针对性加强患者伤口感染的

  16. Effect of Equal Daily Doses Achieved by Different Power Densities of Low-Level Laser Therapy at 635 nm on Open Skin Wound Healing in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Kilík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Despite the fact that the molecular mechanism of low-level laser therapy (LLLT is not yet known, the exploitation of phototherapy in clinical medicine and surgery is of great interest. The present study investigates the effects of LLLT on open skin wound healing in normal and diabetic rats. Materials and Methods. Four round full-thickness skin wounds on dorsum were performed in male adult nondiabetic (n=24 and diabetic (n=24 Sprague–Dawley rats. AlGaInP (635 nm, wavelength; 5 J/cm2, daily dose was used to deliver power densities of 1, 5, and 15 mW/cm2 three times daily until euthanasia. Results. PMNL infiltration was lower in the irradiated groups (15 mW/cm2. The synthesis and organisation of collagen fibres were consecutively enhanced in the 5 mW/cm2 and 15 mW/cm2 groups compared to the others in nondiabetic rats. In the diabetic group the only significant difference was recorded in the ratio PMNL/Ma at 15 mW/cm2. A significant difference in the number of newly formed capillaries in the irradiated group (5, 15 mW/cm2 was recorded on day six after injury compared to the control group. Conclusion. LLLT confers a protective effect against excessive inflammatory tissue response; it stimulates neovascularization and the early formation of collagen fibres.

  17. Staged Concept for Treatment of Severe Postsaphenectomy Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schroeter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The saphenous vein remains the most commonly used conduit in coronary artery bypass surgery. Vein harvest is a critical component with significant morbidity associated with leg wounds from open technique. Occurring complications are hematoma, postoperative pain, skin changes, neuropathy, and septic or nonseptic wound complications. Within the context of a recent case, we present our approach to postsaphenectomy wound management.

  18. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial evaluating topical zinc oxide for acute open wounds following pilonidal disease excision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Alice; Agren, MS; Ostenfeld, U;

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial was to compare topical zinc oxide with placebo mesh on secondary healing pilonidal wounds. Sixty-four (53 men) consecutive patients, aged 17-60 years, were centrally randomized to either treatment with 3% zinc oxide...... range 42-71 days) for the zinc and 62 days (55-82 days) for the placebo group (p = 0.32). Topical zinc oxide increased (p zinc levels to 1,540 (1,035-2,265) microM and decreased (p zinc oxide (n = 3) than placebo......-treated patients (n = 12) were prescribed postoperative antibiotics (p = 0.005). Serum-zinc levels increased (p Zinc oxide was not associated with increased pain by the visual analog scale, cellular...

  19. Experiencia en el cuidado de enfermería: herida de abdomen abierto en el adulto Experiência no cuidado de enfermagem: ferida de abdômen aberto em adultos Nursing care experience: open abdomen wound in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alfonso Castro Becerra

    2011-12-01

    -truturada feita ao profissional de enfermagem da Clínica de feridas que foi tomada como referência, servindo de guia na qual é recomendado aprofundar em pesquisas posteriores. Resultados: um protocolo de cuidados de enfermagem é estruturado e integrado por doze (12 diagramas de fluxo, agrupados e distribuídos em quatro lineamentos básicos. Conclusões: O protocolo é o resultado da descrição e análise, dos procedimentos realizados pelo pessoal de enfermagem, contando com uma ampla experiência no cuidado de pessoas com feridas de abdômen, à luz da literatura. No entanto, a continuação da estruturação deste protocolo é necessária, levando em conta tanto o processo de cicatrização quanto as dimensões psicossociais que intervém no cuidado dos adultos com feridas abertas no abdômen.Goal: the creation of a nursing protocol for adults with open abdomen wounds, in a State-owned social enterprise of the city of Bogota. Method: a descriptive and transversal study, whose sample was constituted by four (4 people with an open abdomen wound, and the contribution of the experience of the institution's professional nurse. The information gathered from an observation guide, from the photographic register of the evolution of four adults with an open abdomen wound and from a semi-structured interview made to a nursing professional form the Wound Clinics taken as reference, which serves as a guide and should be used further in future researches. Results: a nursing protocol is created, and is composed by twelve (12 flowcharts, grouped and divided in four basic guidelines. Conclusions: the protocol is the result of the description and analysis of the procedures performed by the nursing staff, who has a rich experience in the care of people with open abdomen wounds thanks to literature available to them. However, the construction of the protocol must be continued, taking into consideration not only the physiological aspect of the scarification process, but also the psychosocial

  20. Vacuum sealing drainage plus external fixation for open fractures of tibia and fibula complicated with wound infection%负压封闭引流加外固定架治疗胫腓骨开放性骨折感染创面

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑞增; 张文明

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨持续负压封闭引流(VSD)加外固定架治疗胫腓骨开放性骨折感染创面的临床疗效.方法 对32例严重的胫腓骨开放性骨折伴大面积伤口感染患者,清创后VSD敷料覆盖创面,应用VSD技术5~7 d,待肉芽生长、创面新鲜后行中厚皮片植皮治疗.结果 32例VSD治疗1周后去除VSD敷料,伤口感染控制,局部创面肉芽组织新鲜,愈合良好.结论 VSD可以改善局部微循环,促进肉芽组织生长及有效地避免交叉感染,促进大面积皮肤缺损感染伤口的愈合,为二次植皮提供条件.%Objective To explore the use of continuous vacuum sealing drainage ( VSD ) and external fixator in the treatment tibia and fibula open fractures wound infection clinical efficacy.Methods 32 patients with severe open fractures of tibia and fibula with a large area of wound infection were unndergone debridement, dressing covering the wound after the VSD application for 5 ~7d.After granulation, fresh wound underwent skin graft.Results After 1 week of VSD treatment, VSD were removed in 32 cases.Wound infection was controlled, local wound granulation tissue was fresh and healed well.Conclusions VSD can improve microcirculation, promote granulation tissue growth and effectively avoid cross-infection, and promote a large area of skin defect healing of infected wounds, which provides the conditions for the secondary skin graft.

  1. Wound debridement optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Sven Per Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Wound debridement, the removal of contaminated tissue and senescent cells, is the cornerstone in the care of patients with chronic wounds.......Wound debridement, the removal of contaminated tissue and senescent cells, is the cornerstone in the care of patients with chronic wounds....

  2. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In

  3. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In

  4. Wound healing ability of Xenopus laevis embryos. I. Rapid wound closure achieved by bisectional half embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Yasuko; Noda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Takashi; Ihara, Setsunosuke

    2005-10-01

    We examined wound closure in 'half embryos' produced by the transverse bisection of Xenopus laevis embryos at the primary eye vesicle stage. Both the anterior- and posterior-half embryos survived for more than 6 days, and grew into 'half tadpoles'. Histology and videomicroscopy revealed that the open wound in the half embryo was rapidly closed by an epithelial sheet movement in the wound marginal zone. The time-course of wound closure showed a downward convex curve: the wound area decreased to one-fifth of the original area within 30 min, and the wound continued to contract slowly thereafter. The rapidity of closure of the epidermis as well as the absence of inflammatory cells are typical features of an embryonic type of wound healing. There was a dorso-ventral polarity in the motility of the epidermis: the wound was predominantly closed by the ventral and lateral epidermis. The change in the contour of the wound edge with time suggested a complex mechanism involved in the wound closure that could not be explained only by the purse-string theory. The present experimental system would be a unique and useful model for analyses of cellular movements in the embryonic epithelia.

  5. Skin wound healing modulation by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2010-07-25

    Skin wound healing is a multi stage phenomenon that requires the activation, recruitment or activity of numerous cell types as keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblast and inflammatory cells. Among the latter, macrophages appear to be central to this process. They colonize the wound at its very early stage and in addition to their protective immune role seem to organize the activity of other cell types at the following stages of the healing. Their benefit to this process is however controversial, as macrophages are described to promote the speed of healing but may also favour the fibrosis resulting from it in scars. Moreover wound healing defects are associated with abnormalities in the inflammatory phase. In this review, we summarise our knowledge on what are the Wound Associated Macrophages, and how they interact with the other cell types to control the reepithelisation, angiogenesis and the extracellular matrix remodelling. We believe this knowledge may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on skin wounds.

  6. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  7. CICATRIZATION OF WOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Alexis; Hartmann, Alice

    1916-01-01

    1. A method for measuring the area of a wound not geometric in form is described. 2. The rate of cicatrization of a wound is greater at the beginning than at the end of the period of repair. It depends on the area rather than on the age of the wound. There is a constant relation between the size of a wound and the rate of cicatrization. The larger the wound the greater is the rate of cicatrization. Two wounds of different size have a tendency to become equal. 3. The rate is proportional to the area, but diminishes less rapidly than the area. 4. The process of contraction is the more important factor in the repair of a wound. Epidermization completes the work of contraction. After the wound is healed, the cicatrix as a rule expands. 5. The curve representing the diminution of the size of an aseptic wound while it cicatrizes is regular and geometric. PMID:19868052

  8. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  9. Enhanced wound contraction in fresh wounds dressed with honey in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhanced wound contraction in fresh wounds dressed with honey in wistar rats ... honey accelerates wound healing, an investigation on its role in wound contraction in ... However, there was no significant difference in fibroblast count per high ...

  10. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. EPIDERMAL DELETION OF HIF-2α STIMULATES WOUND CLOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Southwood, Mark; Nizet, Victor; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2013-01-01

    Wound closure requires a complex series of micro-environmentally influenced events. A key aspect of wound closure is the migration of keratinocytes across the open wound. It has been found previously that the response to hypoxia via the HIF-1α transcription factor is a key feature of wound closure. The need for hypoxic response is likely due to interrupted wound vasculature as well as infection, and in this work, we investigated the need for a highly related hypoxic response transcription factor, HIF-2α. This factor was deleted tissue-specifically in mice, and the resulting mice were found to have an accelerated rate of wound closure. This is correlated with a reduced bacterial load and inflammatory response in these mice. This indicates that manipulating or reducing the HIF-2α response in keratinocytes could be a useful means to accelerate wound healing and tissue repair. PMID:24037341

  12. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  13. Wound Healing and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing and Care Print A A A What's in ... mouth, or sunken eyes. There's good news about wound healing when you're a teen: Age is on ...

  14. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival

  15. Saliva and wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Wounds in the oral cavity heal faster and with less scarring than wounds in other parts of the body. One of the factors implicated in this phenomenon is the presence of saliva, which promotes the healing of oral wounds in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, which improves the survival

  16. A cross-sectional study of chronic wound-related pain and itching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Julia

    2013-07-01

    Persons with chronic wounds may experience wound-related itch (pruritus) and pain. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the occurrence of itch and pain in chronic wounds and the relationship of the intensity between these factors. Patients in an outpatient wound care center, 18 years and older with an open wound, were recruited consecutively over a 5-month period. The 199 participants (112 [56%] men) had a mean age of 67 years (range 21-98 years); one wound per person was addressed and included venous (31), arterial (23), neuropathic (31), pressure-related (33), traumatic (37), and "other" (41) wounds. Wound-related pain and itch data were obtained using a modified Paul-Pieper Itching Questionnaire and Characteristics of Itch Questionnaire. Responses were hand-recorded and coded without personal identifiers and analyzed using descriptive statistics, and associations among data were assessed using Pearson chi-square, Mantel-Haenszel chi-square, and Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Wound-related itch was significantly associated with participant age (P = 0.011) and employment status (P = 0.003). Wound-related pain was significantly associated only with education level (P = 0.048). Persons with venous wounds had both the largest proportion with wound-related itch (45.2%) and the largest proportion with wound-related pain (61.2%) out of all of the wound types. Persons with diabetic neuropathy had both the smallest proportion with wound-related itch (16.1%) and the smallest proportion with wound-related pain (35.4%) among all of the wound types. Associations between wound type and wound-related itch or pain were not significant. When venous wounds were compared to all other wound types combined, wound-related itch was significantly associated (P = 0.021) with wound type - ie, venous wound type and itch was statistically significant when venous wounds were compared to a combination of all other wound types. Wound-related pain and itch occurred together in 35

  17. Wound healing: a new approach to the topical wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Ferdi; Ermertcan, Aylin Türel

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex and well-coordinated interaction between inflammatory cells and mediators, establishing significant overlap between the phases of wound healing. Wound healing is divided into three major phases: inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Unlike the acute wound, the nonhealing wound is arrested in one of the phases of healing, typically the inflammatory phase. A systematic approach to the management of the chronic nonhealing wound emphasizes three important elements of wound bed preparation in chronic wounds: debridement, moisture, and countering bacterial colonization and infection. In this article, wound-healing process and new approaches to the topical wound care have been reviewed.

  18. Biofilm in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpaul, Kumal

    2015-03-01

    A biofilm can be described as a microbial colony encased in a polysaccharide matrix which can become attached to a wound surface. This can affect the healing potential of chronic wounds due to the production of destructive enzymes and toxins which can promote a chronic inflammatory state within the wound. Biofilms can be polymicrobial and can result in delayed wound healing and chronic wound infection resistant to antibiotics, leading to prolonged hospitalisation for some patients. There appears to be a correlation between biofilms and non-healing in chronic wounds. It is suggested that biofilms are a major player in the chronicity of wounds. They are a complex concept to diagnose and management needs to be multifactorial.

  19. The contribution of interleukin-2 to effective wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, Karen M; DelloStritto, Daniel J; Newell-Rogers, M Karen

    2017-02-01

    Ineffective skin wound healing is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Roughly 6.5 million Americans experience chronically open wounds and the cost of treating these wounds numbers in the billions of dollars annually. In contrast, robust wound healing can lead to the development of either hypertrophic scarring or keloidosis, both of which can cause discomfort and can be cosmetically undesirable. Appropriate wound healing requires the interplay of a variety of factors, including the skin, the local microenvironment, the immune system, and the external environment. When these interactions are perturbed, wounds can be a nidus for infection, which can cause them to remain open an extended period of time, or can scar excessively. Interleukin-2, a cytokine that directs T-cell expansion and phenotypic development, appears to play an important role in wound healing. The best-studied role for Interleukin-2 is in influencing T-cell development. However, other cell types, including fibroblasts, the skin cells responsible for closing wounds, express the Interleukin-2 receptor, and therefore may respond to Interleukin-2. Studies have shown that treatment with Interleukin-2 can improve the strength of healed skin, which implicates Interleukin-2 in the wound healing process. Furthermore, diseases that involve impaired wound healing, such as diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus, have been linked to deficiencies in Interleukin-2 or defects Interleukin-2-receptor signaling. The focus of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Interleukin-2 in wound healing, to highlight diseases in which Interleukin-2 and its receptor may contribute to impaired wound healing, and to assess Interleukin-2-modulating approaches as potential therapies to improve wound healing.

  20. Wound care in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caston, Stephanie S

    2012-04-01

    Care of equine wounds in the field can be a challenging endeavor. Many times, wound care is complicated by chronicity or by prior inappropriate care in addition to the great degree of tissue trauma that occurred when the horse was wounded. Recognizing involvement of synovial structures, loss of skin, and damage to bone are critical in the initial examination of wounds and will guide future care. Education of clients is also important in that preparing them for possible outcomes during healing may help improve compliance and proper treatment of wound. Owners and trainers often perform much of the daily care and monitoring of equine wounds and thus can greatly assist or impede the progress. Bandaging is important to management of equine wounds-especially on the limbs-and is sometimes overlooked because of its labor-intensive nature and the desire for a spray, ointment, or salve that will heal the wound. The practitioner that improves and utilizes his or her understanding of the wound-healing process in concert with his or her knowledge of local anatomy will be the one who is best equipped to care for wounds in ambulatory practice.

  1. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  2. Detection of grey seal Halichoerus grypus DNA in attack wounds on stranded harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijswijk, van J.; Begeman, L.; Witte, H.J.; IJsseldijk, L.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Grone, A.; Leopold, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    DNA was analysed from external wounds on 3 dead harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena that were stranded in the Netherlands. Puncture wounds as well as the edges of large open wounds were sampled with sterile cotton swabs. With specific primers that target the mtDNA control region of grey seal Halicho

  3. Detection of grey seal Halichoerus grypus DNA in attack wounds on stranded harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijswijk, van J.; Begeman, L.; Witte, H.J.; IJsseldijk, L.; Brasseur, S.M.J.M.; Grone, A.; Leopold, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    DNA was analysed from external wounds on 3 dead harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena that were stranded in the Netherlands. Puncture wounds as well as the edges of large open wounds were sampled with sterile cotton swabs. With specific primers that target the mtDNA control region of grey seal

  4. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  5. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Uzoagu A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2) is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes. PMID:28671607

  6. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzoagu A. Okonkwo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2 is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes.

  7. Compromised wounds in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Keith; Lawand, Christina; Perry, Sheril D

    2014-01-01

    Wounds are a serious healthcare issue with profound personal, clinical and economic implications. Using a working definition of compromised wounds, this study examines the prevalence of wounds by type and by healthcare setting using data from hospitals, home care, hospital-based continuing care and long-term care facilities within fiscal year 2011-2012 in Canada. It also evaluates several risk factors associated with wounds, such as diabetes, circulatory disease and age. Compromised wounds were reported in almost 4% of in-patient acute hospitalizations and in more than 7% of home care clients, almost 10% of long-term care clients and almost 30% of hospital-based continuing care clients. Patients with diabetes were much more likely to have a compromised wound than were patients without the disease. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  8. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  9. Critical Advances in Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    Analysis : – 1 visit / month inappropriate for most complex wound patients – Visit frequency inadequate to meet rehabilitation needs – Variable...wound pain Preventive skin care Burn wound care NPWT application and management Wound assessment and documentation Ostomy and fistula care Wound

  10. Wound Assessment: Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Cook, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    A structured approach to wound assessment is required to maintain a good standard of care. This involves a thorough patient assessment, which should be carried out by skilled and competent practitioners, adhering to local and national guidelines (Harding et al, 2008). Inappropriate or inaccurate assessment can lead to delayed wound healing, pain, increased risk of infection, inappropriate use of wound dressings and a reduction in the quality of life for patients.

  11. PATOPHYSIOLOGY OF WOUND HEALING

    OpenAIRE

    NOVINŠČAK, TOMISLAV; FILIPOVIĆ, MARINKO

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a basic, highly complex, logical and well orchestrated physiologic process of interaction of various speciic molecules and cells in normal tissue function and structure restoration. In essence, genetically deined and by reined physical and chemical forces driven process, in most living beings wound healing leads to imperfect but suficient tissue repair. Some rare exceptions in wound healing, like salamander or human fetus, that can achieve complete and perfect regeneration pr...

  12. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L A

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  13. Diabetes and wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Svendsen, Rikke; Irakunda, Gloire; Knudsen List, Karoline Cecilie; Sønderstup-Jensen, Marie; Hölmich Rosca, Mette Maria

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease where the glucose level in the blood is high, due to either insulin resistance, impaired insulin sensitivity or no insulin production. The high glucose level causes several complications, one of them being an impaired wound healing process, which might lead to chronic wounds, ulcers. Several factors play a role in the development of ulcers, and recent research indicates that microRNA might play a significant role in skin development and wound healing. The purpose of this...

  14. Innovation and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  15. Wound healing in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

  16. Telemedicine for wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Chittoria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference, are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

  17. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-12-11

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research.

  18. Saliva and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Henk S; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Veerman, Enno C I

    2014-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with less scar formation than skin wounds. One of the key factors involved is saliva, which promotes wound healing in several ways. Saliva creates a humid environment, thus improving the survival and functioning of inflammatory cells that are crucial for wound healing. In addition, saliva contains several proteins which play a role in the different stages of wound healing. Saliva contains substantial amounts of tissue factor, which dramatically accelerates blood clotting. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor in saliva promotes the proliferation of epithelial cells. Secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor inhibits the tissue-degrading activity of enzymes like elastase and trypsin. Absence of this protease inhibitor delays oral wound healing. Salivary histatins in vitro promote wound closure by enhancing cell spreading and cell migration, but do not stimulate cell proliferation. A synthetic cyclic variant of histatin exhibits a 1,000-fold higher activity than linear histatin, which makes this cyclic variant a promising agent for the development of a new wound healing medication. Conclusively, recognition of the many roles salivary proteins play in wound healing makes saliva a promising source for the development of new drugs involved in tissue regeneration.

  19. Assessment of Severe Extremity Wound Bioburden at the Time of Definitive Wound Closure or Coverage: Correlation With Subsequent Postclosure Deep Wound Infection (Bioburden Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Michael J; Murray, Clinton K; Carlini, Anthony R; Firoozabadi, Reza; Manson, Theodore; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Wenke, Joseph C; Zadnik, Mary; Castillo, Renan C

    2017-04-01

    Infection remains the most common and significant complication after high-energy fractures. The Bioburden Study is a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of wound bacterial bioburden and antibiotic care in severe open lower extremity fractures. The aims of this study are to (1) characterize the contemporary extremity wound "bioburden" at the time of definitive wound closure; (2) determine the concordance between polymerase chain reaction results and hospital microbiology; (3) determine, among those who develop deep infections, the concordance between the pathogens at wound closure and at deep infection; and (4) compare the probability of deep infection between those who did and did not receive an appropriate course of antibiotics based on bioburden at the time of wound closure. To address these aims, sites collected tissue samples from severe lower extremity injuries at the time of wound closure and at first surgery for treatment of a deep infection, nonunion, flap failure, amputation, or other complications (because these surgeries may be due to undetected infection). Otherwise, if no further surgical treatment occurred, participants were followed for 12 months. The study was conducted at 38 US trauma centers and has enrolled 655 participants aged 18-64 years. This is the first large multi-institutional study evaluating the wound bioburden of severe open tibia fractures and correlating this bioburden with the risk of wound complications after definitive soft tissue closure.

  20. Understanding methods of wound debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Leanne

    Autolytic debridement describes the body's natural method of wound-bed cleansing, helping it to prepare the wound bed for healing. In acute wounds, autolytic debridement occurs automatically and often does not require intervention, as during the inflammatory stage of a wound, neutrophils and macrophages digest and removes devitalised tissue, cell debris and contaminants, clearing the wound of any cellular barriers to healing. In chronic wounds, by contrast, healing is often delayed, frequently because of inadequate debridement. The autolytic process becomes overwhelmed by high levels of endotoxins released from damaged tissue (Broadus, 2013). Therefore wound debridement becomes an integral part of chronic-wound management and practitioners involved in wound care must be fully competent at wound-bed assessment and have an awareness of the options available for debridement. This article will review wound-bed assessment, highlighting variations in devitalised tissue, and explore options available for wound debridement, taking into consideration patients’ pain and quality of life.

  1. Wound healing potential of Pañcavalkala formulations in a postfistulectomy wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Rakesh Kumar; Dudhamal, Tukaram; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Mahanta, Vyasadeva

    2015-01-01

    Sushruta mentioned sixty measures for management of wounds. Panchavalkal is the combination of five herbs having properties like Shodhana (cleaning) and Ropana (healing) of wounds. Individual drugs and in combination have Kashaya rasa (astringent) dominant and useful in the management of Vrana (wounds) as well as Shotha (inflammations). A 35 years old male patient consulted in Shalya OPD with complaints like discharge per anum, induration and intermittent pain at perianal region since last five years. On inspection external opening was observed at anterior portion 1 O' clock position which was four centimeter away from anal verge. That case was diagnosed as Bhagandara (fistula-in-ano) and was treated with partial fistulectomy and application of Guggulu based Ksharasutra in the remaining tract. The big fistulectomy wound was treated with local application of Panchavalkal ointment daily and simultaneous change of Ksharasutra. The wound was assessed daily for pain, swelling, discharge, size, and shape. The wound healed completely within two and half month with normal scar having good tissue strength. This case demonstrated that post fistulectomy wound can be treated with Panchavalkal ointment.

  2. Case Study:81 cases of serious open wounds traumatic amputation of limbs operation indications%81例肢体严重开放伤创伤性截肢的手术适应证回顾性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐烽明; 侯世科; 樊毫军; 青格乐图; 丁辉; 刘子泉; 李子龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective To set a clear instruction on limb valuation method to determine whether an amputation is in need. Methods A comprehensive analysis was performed on the clinical data of 81 cases collected of severe traumatic patients with open fracture in between August 2005 and December 2013. The analysis included their respective clinical history, age, physical examination, treatment time and methods. Of the 81 cases, there were 52 cases of right limb injuries and 29 cases of left limb injuries, reflecting 23 cases of single injury, and 58 cases of multiple injuries. The standard Gustilo classification was adopted in categorizing the open wound in this study-2 cases of fracture in the group ofⅢa type, 18 cases inⅢtype B fractures, 61 cases of typeⅢc fracture, 10 cases with shock. They all carried with dorsalis pedis artery and the posterior tibial artery pulses to weakness or disappearance in different degree. Results In compliance with Gregory MESI score system which indicated an amputation if the score>20. In the group of 52 cases of which the patients’score>20, there were 46 cases of amputation (88.5%);In the group of 29 cases of which the patients’s score20是截肢的相关指征。本组患者评分>20者患肢52肢,截肢46例,截肢率为88.5%;评分<20者患肢29肢,截肢3肢,截肢率为10.3%,两者一比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。49例截肢MESS值7~13分,平均9.095分,留肢组MESS值2~7分,平均3.892分,截肢组与留肢组经统计学处理,有显著差异,P<0.01。61肢ⅢC型开放性骨折患肢有47肢截肢,截肢率为77.0%。结论截肢虽是一种破坏性手术,但是当肢体损伤必须截肢时,严格创伤截肢的标准,认真周密地设计和组织处理,掌握截肢的手术原则和指征,有助于患者身心康复。目前的各类分型方法及评分标准可做为参考,但却也无法做为截肢的绝对标准,截肢的判断需要多方面综合考虑分型和

  3. Understanding methods of wound debridement

    OpenAIRE

    Atkin, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Autolytic debridement describes the body's natural method of wound-bed cleansing, helping it to prepare the wound bed for healing. In acute wounds, autolytic debridement occurs automatically and often does not require intervention, as during the inflammatory stage of a wound, neutrophils and macrophages digest and removes devitalised tissue, cell debris and contaminants, clearing the wound of any cellular barriers to healing. In chronic wounds, by contrast, healing is often delayed, frequentl...

  4. Microdeformation in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Cornelia; White, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical forces greatly influence cellular organization and behavior. Cells respond to applied stress by changes in form and composition until a suitable state is reestablished. However, without any mechanical stimuli cells stop proliferating, discontinue migration, go into cell-cycle arrest, and eventually die. Hence, one can assume that pathologies closely depending on cell migration like cancer or atherosclerosis might be governed by biophysical parameters. Moreover, mechanical cues will have fundamental effects in wound healing. Especially negative pressure wound therapy has the potential to endorse wound healing by induction of both macrodeformation (wound contraction) and microdeformation (tissue reactions at microscopic level). So far, the capacity for researchers to study the link between mechanical stimulation and biological response has been limited by the lack of instrumentation capable of stimulating the tissue in an appropriate manner. However, first reports on application of micromechanical forces to wounds elucidate the roles of cell stretch, substrate stiffness, and tissue deformation during cell proliferation and differentiation. This review deals with their findings and tries to establish a link between the current knowledge and the questions that are essential to clinicians in the field: What is the significance of mirodeformations for wound healing? Does "dead space" impede propagation of mechanical cues? How can microdeformations induce cell proliferation? What role do fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, and mesenchymal stem cells play in chronic wounds with regard to micromechanical forces? © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  5. Understanding wound dressings: alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jacqui

    A variety of wound dressing groups is currently available on prescription. In a series of six articles, Jacqui Fletcher looks at the different groups of dressings, their composition, and indications for use. This first article looks at alginates. The second article in the series discusses foam dressings, and will appear in the Wound Care Supplement of 7 June.

  6. Treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds using human fibroblast-derived dermis: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Russell M; Smith, Nicholas C; Dux, Katherine; Stuck, Rodney M

    2014-04-01

    Human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute is a well-studied treatment for diabetic foot ulcers; however, no case series currently exist for its use in healing postoperative wounds of the lower extremity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 32 lower extremity postoperative wounds treated weekly with human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute. Postoperative wounds were defined as a wound resulting from an open partial foot amputation, surgical wound dehiscence, or nonhealing surgical wound of the lower extremity. Wound surface area was calculated at 4 and 12 weeks or until wound closure if prior to 12 weeks. Postoperative wounds treated with weekly applications showed mean improvement in surface area reduction of 63.6% at 4 weeks and 96.1% at 12 weeks. More than 56% of all wounds healed prior to the 12-week endpoint. Additionally, only one adverse event was noted in this group. This retrospective review supports the use of human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute in the treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds. This advanced wound care therapy aids in decreased total healing time and increased rate of healing for not only diabetic foot wounds but also postoperative wounds of the lower extremity, as demonstrated by this retrospective review.

  7. Skin wound healing and phytomedicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Rafiee, Esmail; Mehrabian, Abolfath; Feily, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Skin integrity is restored by a physiological process aimed at repairing the damaged tissues. The healing process proceeds in four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling. Phytomedicine presents remedies, which possess significant pharmacological effects. It is popular amongst the general population in regions all over the world. Phytotherapeutic agents have been largely used for cutaneous wound healing. These include Aloe vera, mimosa, grape vine, Echinacea, chamomile, ginseng, green tea, jojoba, tea tree oil, rosemary, lemon, soybean, comfrey, papaya, oat, garlic, ginkgo, olive oil and ocimum. Phytotherapy may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on cutaneous wounds. This article provides a review of the common beneficial medicinal plants in the management of skin wounds with an attempt to explain their mechanisms.

  8. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  9. A Rosa Mosqueta no tratamento de feridas abertas: uma revisão La Rosa Mosqueta en el tratamiento de heridas abiertas: una revisión Treatment of open wounds using Mosqueta Rose: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Silva dos Santos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Trata-se de uma revisão de literatura sobre os principais trabalhos científicos publicados nas últimas duas décadas acerca das propriedades medicinais da Rosa Mosqueta, especialmente no tratamento de feridas abertas. O objetivo é reunir informações que demonstrem, mediante evidências científicas e empíricas, a importância da medicina tradicional quanto ao uso da Rosa Mosqueta em diversas aplicações clínicas. Este estudo caracteriza-se como uma compilação de informações significativas sobre a composição, indicações e usos empíricos do extrato de Rosa Mosqueta, a fim de facilitar pesquisas posteriores, visto que a produção sobre o assunto é escassa. A pesquisa bibliográfica foi realizada através dos bancos de dados Bireme, SciELO, Capes e sites relacionados ao tema na internet.Este articulo es sobre una revisión de la literatura en los principales trabajos científicos publicados en las últimas dos décadas referentes a las características medicinales de Rosa Mosqueta, especialmente en el tratamiento de heridas abiertas. El objetivo es juntar la información que demuestran, con las evidencias científicas y empíricas, la importancia de la medicina tradicional cuánto al uso de Rosa Mosqueta en aplicaciones clínicas diversas. Este estudio se caracteriza como una compilación de la información significativa sobre la composición, las indicaciones y las aplicaciones empíricas del extracto de Rosa Mosqueta, para facilitar la investigación posterior, puesto que la producción en el tema es escasa. La investigación bibliográfica fue llevada a través de las bases de datos Bireme, SciELO, Capes y sitios relacionados con el tema en el Internet.This article is about a literature revision concerning to the main published scientific works in the last two decades about the medicinal properties of the Mosqueta Rose, especially in the treatment of open wounds. The objective is to congregate information demonstrating, by

  10. ROLE OF VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE (VAC - IN WOUND HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lokanadha Rao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Large, complicated wounds pose a significant surgical problem. Negative pressure wound therapy is one of several methods enabling to obtain better treatment results in case of open infected wounds.1,2 The use of negative pressure therapy enables to obtain a reduction in the number of bacteria which significantly reduces the number of complications.3,4,5 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the Role of VAC in wound healing in Orthopaedics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The cases presented in this study are those who were admitted in King George Hospital in the time period from January 2014 to August 2015. This is a prospective interventional study. In this study, 15 patients were assigned to the study group (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy- NPWT based on their willingness for undergoing treatment. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS 12 males and 3 females are involved in the study. There is decrease in the mean wound area from 64 cm2 to 38 cm2 . There is decrease in the duration of hospital stay. Finally, wound is closed by SSG or secondary suturing. DISCUSSION NPWT is known to reduce bacterial counts, although they remain colonised with organisms. Wounds covered with NPW dressing are completely isolated from the environment, thereby reduces cross infection. In our series, we had 73.3% (11 cases excellent results and 26.7% (4 cases good results and no poor results. As interpretation with results, VAC therapy is effective mode of adjuvant therapy for the management of infected wounds. CONCLUSION VAC has been proven to be a reliable method of treating a variety of infected wounds. It greatly increases the rate of granulation tissue formation and lowers bacterial counts to accelerate wound healing. It can be used as a temporary dressing to prepare wounds optimally prior to closure or as a definitive treatment for nonsurgical and surgical wounds. VAC is now being used in a multitude of clinical settings, including the treatment of surgical wounds, infected wounds

  11. Best practice in wound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Maureen

    2016-03-01

    Accurate and considered wound assessment is essential to fulfil professional nursing requirements and ensure appropriate patient and wound management. This article describes the main aspects of holistic assessment of the patient and the wound, including identifying patient risk factors and comorbidities, and factors affecting wound healing to ensure optimal outcomes.

  12. In vitro studies evaluating the effects of biofilms on wound-healing cells: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, Kelly R; James, Garth A

    2017-04-01

    Chronic wounds are characterized as wounds that have failed to proceed through the well-orchestrated healing process and have remained open for months to years. Open wounds are at risk for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Bacteria that colonize the open wound bed form surface-attached, multicellular communities called biofilms, and chronic wound biofilms can contain a diverse microbiota. Investigators are just beginning to elucidate the role of biofilms in chronic wound pathogenesis, and have simplified the complex wound environment using in vitro models to obtain a fundamental understanding of the impact of biofilms on wound-healing cell types. The intent of this review is to describe current in vitro methodologies and their results. Investigations started with one host cell-type and single species biofilms and demonstrated that biofilms, or their secretions, had deleterious effects on wound-healing cells. More complex systems involved the use of multiple host cell/tissue types and single species biofilms. Using human skin-equivalent tissues, investigators demonstrated that a number of different species can grow on the tissue and elicit an inflammatory response from the tissue. A full understanding of how biofilms impact wound-healing cells and host tissues will have a profound effect on how chronic wounds are treated. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. EWMA Document: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelqvist, Jan; Willy, Christian; Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari; Fraccalvieri, Marco; Malmsjö, Malin; Piaggesi, Alberto; Probst, Astrid; Vowden, Peter

    2017-03-01

    1. Introduction Since its introduction in clinical practice in the early 1990's negative pressure wounds therapy (NPWT) has become widely used in the management of complex wounds in both inpatient and outpatient care.(1) NPWT has been described as a effective treatment for wounds of many different aetiologies(2,3) and suggested as a gold standard for treatment of wounds such as open abdominal wounds,(4-6) dehisced sternal wounds following cardiac surgery(7,8) and as a valuable agent in complex non-healing wounds.(9,10) Increasingly, NPWT is being applied in the primary and home-care setting, where it is described as having the potential to improve the efficacy of wound management and help reduce the reliance on hospital-based care.(11) While the potential of NPWT is promising and the clinical use of the treatment is widespread, highlevel evidence of its effectiveness and economic benefits remain sparse.(12-14) The ongoing controversy regarding high-level evidence in wound care in general is well known. There is a consensus that clinical practice should be evidence-based, which can be difficult to achieve due to confusion about the value of the various approaches to wound management; however, we have to rely on the best available evidence. The need to review wound strategies and treatments in order to reduce the burden of care in an efficient way is urgent. If patients at risk of delayed wound healing are identified earlier and aggressive interventions are taken before the wound deteriorates and complications occur, both patient morbidity and health-care costs can be significantly reduced. There is further a fundamental confusion over the best way to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in this complex patient population. This is illustrated by reviews of the value of various treatment strategies for non-healing wounds, which have highlighted methodological inconsistencies in primary research. This situation is confounded by differences in the advice given by

  14. Biofilms in wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, R A; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, M

    2014-01-01

    Following confirmation of the presence of biofilms in chronic wounds, the term biofilm became a buzzword within the wound healing community. For more than a century pathogens have been successfully isolated and identified from wound specimens using techniques that were devised in the nineteenth...... extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cells within such aggregations (or biofilms) display varying physiological and metabolic properties that are distinct from those of planktonic cells, and which contribute to their persistence. There are many factors that influence healing in wounds and the discovery...... century by Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch. Although this approach still provides valuable information with which to help diagnose acute infections and to select appropriate antibiotic therapies, it is evident that those organisms isolated from clinical specimens with the conditions normally used...

  15. Cuts and puncture wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for bacteria. Prevention Keep knives, scissors, sharp objects, firearms, and fragile items out of the reach of ... team. Wounds and Injuries Read more Latest Health News Read more Health Topics A-Z Read more ...

  16. Diabetic Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue, called “debridement” Applying medication or dressings to the ulcer Managing blood glucose and other health problems Not ... keep blood glucose levels under tight control; keep the ulcer clean and bandaged; cleanse the wound daily, using ...

  17. Surgical wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... again after you take off the old dressing. Caring for the Wound You may use a gauze ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  18. Prevent Bite Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Prevention > Prevent Bite Wounds ... animals or other humans. Consider the following statistics: there are about 4.5 million dog bites reported annually in the United States, along ...

  19. Debridement for surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryburgh, Nancy; Smith, Fiona; Donaldson, Jayne; Mitchell, Melloney

    2008-07-16

    Surgical wounds that become infected are often debrided because clinicians believe that removal of this necrotic or infected tissue will expedite wound healing. There are numerous methods available but no consensus on which one is most effective for surgical wounds. The aim of this review is to determine the effect of different methods of debridement on the rate of debridement and healing of surgical wounds. We developed a search strategy to search the following electronic databases: Wounds Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 3/3/08) , Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2008, issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to February Week 3 2008 ), EMBASE (1980 to 2008 Week 09) and CINHAL (1982 to February Week 4 2008). We checked the citations within obtained studies to identify additional papers and also relevant conference proceedings. We contacted manufactures of wound debridement agents to ascertain the existence of published, unpublished and ongoing trials. Our search was not limited by language or publication status. We included relevant randomised controlled trials (RCT) with outcomes including at least one of the following: time to complete debridement, or time to complete healing. Two authors independently reviewed the abstracts and titles obtained from the search, two extracted data independently using a standardised extraction sheet, and two independently assessed methodological quality. One author was involved in all stages of the data collection and extraction process, thus ensuring continuity. Five RCTs were eligible for inclusion; all compared treatments for infected surgical wounds and reported time required to achieve a clean wound bed (complete debridement). One trial compared an enzymatic agent (Streptokinase/streptodornase) with saline-soaked dressings and reported the time to complete debridement. Four of the trials compared the effectiveness of dextranomer beads or paste with other products (different comparator

  20. Analysis of a Mathematical Model of Ischemic Cutaneous wounds

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner; Xue, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a major public health problem affecting 6.5 million people in the United States. Ischemia represents a serious complicating factor in wound healing. In this paper we analyze a recently developed mathematical model of ischemic dermal wounds. The model consists of a coupled system of partial differential equations in the partially healed region, with the wound boundary as a free boundary. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is assumed to be viscoelastic, and the free boundary moves with the velocity of the ECM at the boundary of the open wound. The model equations involve the concentrations of oxygen, cytokines, and the densities of several types of cells. The ischemic level is represented by a parameter which appears in the boundary conditions, 0 <= gamma < 1; gamma near 1 corresponds to extreme ischemia and gamma = 0 corresponds to normal non-ischemic conditions. We establish global existence and uniqueness of the free boundary problem and study the dependence of the free boundary on...

  1. Fibronectin and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinnell, F

    1984-01-01

    I have tried to briefly review the evidence (summarized in Table II) indicating that fibronectin is important in cutaneous wound healing. Fibronectin appears to be an important factor throughout this process. It promotes the spreading of platelets at the site of injury, the adhesion and migration of neutrophils, monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells into the wound region, and the migration of epidermal cells through the granulation tissue. At the level of matrix synthesis, fibronectin appears to be involved both in the organization of the granulation tissue and basement membrane. In terms of tissue remodeling, fibronectin functions as a nonimmune opsonin for phagocytosis of debris by fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and under some circumstances, macrophages. Fibronectin also enhances the phagocytosis of immune-opsonized particles by monocytes, but whether this includes phagocytosis of bacteria remains to be determined. In general, phagocytosis of bacteria has not appeared to involve fibronectin. On the contrary, the presence of fibronectin in the wound bed may promote bacterial attachment and infection. Because of the ease of experimental manipulations, wound healing experiments have been carried out on skin more frequently than other tissues. As a result, the possible role of fibronectin has not been investigated thoroughly in the repair of internal organs and tissues. Nevertheless, it seems reasonable to speculate that fibronectin plays a central role in all wound healing situations. Finally, the wound healing problems of patients with severe factor XIII deficiencies may occur because of their inability to incorporate fibronectin into blood clots.

  2. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albina, J.E.; Mills, C.D.; Barbul, A.; Thirkill, C.E.; Henry, W.L. Jr.; Mastrofrancesco, B.; Caldwell, M.D.

    1988-04-01

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of (guanido-/sup 14/C)arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis.

  3. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris;

    2007-01-01

    document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr......Chronic wound pain is not well understood and the literature is limited. Six of 10 patients venous leg ulcer experience pain with their ulcer, and similar trends are observed for other chronic wounds. Chronic wound pain can lead to depression and the feeling of constant tiredness. Pain related...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...

  4. Wound pH depends on actual wound size

    CERN Document Server

    Sirkka, T; Apell, S P

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process that involves many types of cells, reaction pathways as well as chemical, physical and electrical cues. Since biochemical reactions and physiological events are pH-dependent we study here pH as an important major characteristic of the wound healing process in the presence of endogenous and exogenous electric fields. Our model gives the spatial pH distribution in a wound. In particular we isolate a number of dimensionless quantities which sets the length, energy and time scales governing the wound healing process and which can be experimentally tested. Most interesting finding is that wound pH depends on actual wound size.

  5. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracorporal Shock Waves Activate Migration, Proliferation and Inflammatory Pathways in Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes, and Improve Wound Healing in an Open-Label, Single-Arm Study in Patients with Therapy-Refractory Chronic Leg Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Aschermann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic leg ulcers (CLUs are globally a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing prevalence. Their treatment is highly challenging, and many conservative, surgical or advanced therapies have been suggested, but with little overall efficacy. Since the 1980s extracorporal shock wave therapy (ESWT has gained interest as treatment for specific indications. Here, we report that patients with CLU showed wound healing after ESWT and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods: We performed cell proliferation and migration assays, FACS- and Western blot analyses, RT-PCR, and Affymetrix gene expression analyses on human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and a tube formation assay on human microvascular endothelial cells to assess the impact of shock waves in vitro. In vivo, chronic therapy-refractory leg ulcers were treated with ESWT, and wound healing was assessed. Results: Upon ESWT, we observed morphological changes and increased cell migration of keratinocytes. Cell-cycle regulatory genes were upregulated, and proliferation induced in fibroblasts. This was accompanied by secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from keratinocytes, which are known to drive wound healing, and a pro-angiogenic activity of endothelial cells. These observations were transferred “from bench to bedside”, and 60 consecutive patients with 75 CLUs with different pathophysiologies (e.g. venous, mixed arterial-venous, arterial were treated with ESWT. In this setting, 41% of ESWT-treated CLUs showed complete healing, 16% significant improvement, 35% improvement, and 8% of the ulcers did not respond to ESWT. The induction of healing was independent of patient age, duration or size of the ulcer, and the underlying pathophysiology. Conclusions: The efficacy of ESWT needs to be confirmed in controlled trials to implement ESWT as an adjunct to standard therapy or as a stand-alone treatment. Our results suggest that EWST may advance the

  7. [Stab wounds in emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bège, T; Berdah, S V; Brunet, C

    2013-12-01

    Stab wounds represent the most common cause of penetrating wounds, occurring mainly in case of aggression or suicide attempt. Clinical severity depends on the superficial or penetrating aspect of the wound, its location and damaged organs. Medical management must be known because the vital risk is involved in penetrating wounds. Hemodynamically unstable patients should be operated without delay after performing a chest X-ray and ultrasound Focus assisted sonography for trauma (FAST) to guide the surgery. In the stable patients, the general clinical examination, exploration of the wound and medical imaging detect injuries requiring surgical management. Stab penetrating wounds require close and rapid collaboration between medical teams, tailored to the institution's resources.

  8. Wound healing and treating wounds: Differential diagnosis and evaluation of chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds are an excellent example of how the field of dermatology represents a cross-section of many medical disciplines. For instance, wounds may be caused by trauma, vascular insufficiency, and underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatologic and inflammatory disease. This continuing medical education article provides an overview of wound healing and the pathophysiology of chronic wounds and reviews the broad differential diagnosis of chronic wounds. It also describes the initial steps necessary in evaluating a chronic wound and determining its underlying etiology. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen actions in mouse wound healing: Minimal in vivo effects of local antiandrogen delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Simanainen, Ulla; Cheer, Kenny; Suarez, Francia G; Gao, Yan Ru; Li, Zhe; Handelsman, David; Maitz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this work were to define the role of androgens in female wound healing and to develop and characterize a novel wound dressing with antiandrogens. Androgens retard wound healing in males, but their role in female wound healing has not been established. To understand androgen receptor (AR)-mediated androgen actions in male and female wound healing, we utilized the global AR knockout (ARKO) mouse model, with a mutated AR deleting the second zinc finger to disrupt DNA binding and transcriptional activation. AR inactivation enhanced wound healing rate in males by increasing re-epithelialization and collagen deposition even when wound contraction was eliminated. Cell proliferation and migration in ARKO male fibroblasts was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. However, ARKO females showed a similar healing rate compared to WT females. To exploit local antiandrogen effects in wound healing, while minimizing off-target systemic effects, we developed a novel electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold wound dressing material for sustained local antiandrogen delivery. Using the antiandrogen hydroxyl flutamide (HF) at 1, 5, and 10 mg/mL in PCL scaffolds, controlled HF delivery over 21 days significantly enhanced in vitro cell proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts and human keratinocytes. HF-PCL scaffolds also promoted in vivo wound healing in mice compared with open wounds but not to PCL scaffolds. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds.

  11. The wound/burn guidelines - 1: Wounds in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Maekawa, Takeo; Le Pavoux, Andres; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Ito, Takaaki; Isei, Taiki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association determined to prepare the Wound/Burn Guidelines focusing on treatments, catering to needs for the clinical practice of dermatology. Among these guidelines, "Wounds in General" was intended to explain knowledge necessary "to heal wounds" without specifying particular disorders. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  12. Molecular pathology of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshikazu; Ishida, Yuko

    2010-12-15

    Skin-wound healing is an orchestrated biological phenomena consisting of three sequential phases, inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. Many biological substances are involved in the process of wound repair, and this short and simplified overview of wound healing can be adopted to determine wound vitality or wound age in forensic medicine. With the development of genetically engineered animals, essential molecules for skin-wound healing have been identified. Especially, cytokines, and growth factors are useful candidates and markers for the determination of wound vitality or age. Moreover, bone marrow-derived progenitor cells would give significant information to wound age determination. In this review article, some interesting observations are presented, possibly contributing to the future practice of forensic pathologists. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Systemic antibiotics for treating malignant wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubbu, Darshini A; Smith, Valerie; Hayden, Fiona; Cronin, Patricia

    2017-08-24

    Malignant wounds are a devastating complication of cancer. They usually develop in the last six months of life, in the breast, chest wall or head and neck regions. They are very difficult to treat successfully, and the commonly associated symptoms of pain, exudate, malodour, and the risk of haemorrhage are extremely distressing for those with advanced cancer. Treatment and care of malignant wounds is primarily palliative, and focuses on alleviating pain, controlling infection and odour from the wound, managing exudate and protecting the surrounding skin from further deterioration. In malignant wounds, with tissue degradation and death, there is proliferation of both anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. The aim of antibiotic therapy is to successfully eliminate these bacteria, reduce associated symptoms, such as odour, and promote wound healing. To assess the effects of systemic antibiotics for treating malignant wounds. We searched the following electronic databases on 8 March 2017: the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched the clinical trial registries of the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (apps.who.int/trialsearch) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 20 March 2017; and OpenSIGLE (to identify grey literature) and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global (to retrieve dissertation theses related to our topic of interest) on 13 March 2017. Randomised controlled trials that assessed the effects of any systemic antibiotics on malignant wounds were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently screened and selected trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted study data. A third reviewer checked extracted data for accuracy prior to analysis. We identified only one study for inclusion in this review. This study was a prospective, double-blind cross

  14. 降低手术室开放性创伤手术感染鱼骨图与流程图应用的研究%Effect of fishbone diagram and flowchart on reduction of incidence of infections in patients undergoing open wounds surgery in operating room

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟宝英; 杨玲燕; 黄倩倩; 沈立峰

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨鱼骨图和流程图在手术室开放性创伤手术感染中的应用效果,以降低手术时开放性创伤手术的医院感染率。方法2010年1月始医院对开放性创伤手术的感染因素用鱼骨图进行分析并据此设计出流程图并实施;选取2010年1月-2013年6月于医院收治的124例开放性创伤手术患者为观察组,另选取鱼骨图和流程图实施前的138例开放性创伤手术患者为对照组,对两组患者的手术时间、手术出血量、术后感染率、伤口愈合时间、住院时间、患者满意率进行统计及比较。结果对照组手术时间为(5.7±1.8)h、手术出血量为(780±230)ml、住院时间为(24.7±4.5)d、伤口愈合时间为(17.3±5.6)d、术后感染率为30.43%,观察组分别为(2.5±1.3)h、(460±120)ml、(13.5±3.1)d、(8.6±2.6)d、4.84%,两组比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在开放性创伤手术感染中应用感染因素鱼骨图和感染管理流程图,可以有效提高开放性创伤手术的护理质量,降低感染的发生率。%OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of the fishbone diagram and flowchart on reduction of incidence of in‐fections in the patients undergoing open wounds surgery in the operating room so as to reduce the incidence of nos‐ocomial infections due to the open wound surgery .METHODS The fishbone diagram was employed to analyze the factors for the infections by start of Jan ,2010 ,based on which the flowchart was designed and implemented .A to‐tal of 124 patients who underwent the open wound surgery from Jan 2010 to Jun 2013 were chosen as the observa‐tion group ,while 138 patients who underwent the open wounds surgery before the fishbone diagram and flowchart were implemented were assigned as the control group .The operation duration ,intraoperative hemorrhage volume , incidence of postoperative infections ,wound

  15. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications.

  16. Wound Drainage Culture (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Wound Drainage Culture KidsHealth > For Parents > Wound Drainage Culture Print A A A What's in this article? ... Have Questions What It Is A wound drainage culture is a test to detect germs such as ...

  17. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana

    Women with a pre-gestational body mass index (BMI) above 30 kg/m2 giving birth by caesarean section are at high risk of surgical wound infection compared with women with a BMI below 30 kg/m2. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (iNPWT) is one strategy to reduce the rate of surgical wound...

  18. Cell therapy for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin grafts and local flaps, the cell therapy technique is simple, less time-consuming, and reduces the surgical burden for patients in the repair of acute wounds. Cell therapy has also been developed for chronic wound healing. By transplanting cells with an excellent wound healing capacity profile to chronic wounds, in which wound healing cannot be achieved successfully, attempts are made to convert the wound bed into the environment where maximum wound healing can be achieved. Fibroblasts, keratinocytes, adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, bone marrow stem cells, and platelets have been used for wound healing in clinical practice. Some formulations are commercially available. To establish the cell therapy as a standard treatment, however, further research is needed.

  19. Etiological analysis of wound infections in patients with open fracture of tibia and fibula and analysis of drug resistance%胫腓骨开放性骨折患者创口感染的病原学与耐药性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔金雷; 宋文超; 李玉华

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the etiology of wound infections in elderly patients with open fracture of tibia and fibula and analyze the drug resistance so as to provide guidance for clinical treatment .METHODS A total of 157 elderly patients with open fracture of tibia and fibula who were treated in the department of orthopedics from Jan 2011 to Oct 2013 were retrospectively analyzed .The clinical data of the patients and results of bacterial culture were investigated to analyze the etiology of the wound infections and the drug resistance ,and the statistical analy‐sis of the data was performed with the use of SPSS 22 .0 software .RESULTS The wound infections occurred in 23 cases ,with the infection rate of 14 .65% .The longer the time of treatment of open fracture of tibia and fibula de‐layed ,the higher the infection rate was .The infection rate was the highest (48 .84% ) in the patients with the type GustiloⅢ fracture .Totally 174 strains of pathogens have been isolated ,of which 52 .87% (92 strains ) were the gram‐positive bacteria ,and the strains had good antibacterial activity against vancomycin ,imipenem ,and pip‐eracillin‐tazobactam .CONCLUSION The incidence of wound infections in the elderly patients with open fracture of tibia and fibula is associated with the time and types of fracture .The gram‐positive bacteria are dominant among the pathogens causing the infections .It is an effective way to strengthen the aseptic operation ,closely monitor the drug‐resistant bacteria ,and reasonably use antibiotics so as to reduce the infection rate and improve the clinical ef‐f icacy .%目的:探讨高龄胫腓骨开放性骨折患者创口感染的病原学及耐药分析,为临床治疗提供帮助。方法对2011年1月-2013年10月骨科收治的157例高龄胫腓骨开放性骨折患者进行回顾性分析,通过患者的临床资料、细菌培养等分析其感染的病原学及耐药性,数据采用SPSS 22.0软件进行统计分

  20. Wound Healing and Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wounds can be so different, your doctor will give you instructions on how to take care of yourself after you go home from the hospital. In most cases, doctors will ask patients to do the following ... A doctor or nurse will give you instructions on how to change your dressing ...

  1. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  2. Healing Invisible Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  3. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Radha K Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies.

  4. Healing Invisible Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual…

  5. An overview of factors maximizing successful split-thickness skin grafting in diabetic wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Donegan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Open wounds, from ulcerations or slow healing, are one of the comorbidities in diabetic patients that can lead to amputation. Therefore, an optimal way to close and heal wounds quickly in diabetic patients is required. Split-thickness skin grafts (STSG offer a quick method of wound closure for diabetic patients. This article review will look at causes of failure in STSG, and ways to optimize success.

  6. Post-Laminectomy Wound Infections: Colonized Seromas Mimicking Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Post-operative laminectomy wounds are frequently accompanied by seromas. Post-operative wound drainage may be colonized or infected. The differentiation of wound colonization from infection is difficult for non-infectious disease physicians. Methods: External chart reviewers classified 31/1531 laminectomies (over three years as post-operative wound infections. We re-evaluated these cases using infectious disease criteria, i.e., while pathogens may be cultured from both colonized and infected wounds, only wound infections have a purulent discharge with abundant white blood cells (WBCs on Gram stain. Colonized wounds have positive wound cultures but no/few WBCs on Gram stain. Results: We found only 11/31 actual wound infections, the remainder were not bona fide wound infections, but were colonized seromas. Conclusion: Post-laminectomy colonized seromas that are culture positive for one or more organisms often mimic wound infections. In the era of public reporting of nosocomial infections, it is important that external reviewers differentiate colonization from infection to provide regulatory agencies with accurate data.

  7. Post-Laminectomy Wound Infections: Colonized Seromas Mimicking Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Abruzzo, Eileen D; Schoch, Paul E

    2014-02-14

    Post-operative laminectomy wounds are frequently accompanied by seromas. Post-operative wound drainage may be colonized or infected. The differentiation of wound colonization from infection is difficult for non-infectious disease physicians. External chart reviewers classified 31/1531 laminectomies (over three years) as post-operative wound infections. We re-evaluated these cases using infectious disease criteria, i.e., while pathogens may be cultured from both colonized and infected wounds, only wound infections have a purulent discharge with abundant white blood cells (WBCs) on Gram stain. Colonized wounds have positive wound cultures but no/few WBCs on Gram stain. We found only 11/31 actual wound infections, the remainder were not bona fide wound infections, but were colonized seromas. Post-laminectomy colonized seromas that are culture positive for one or more organisms often mimic wound infections. In the era of public reporting of nosocomial infections, it is important that external reviewers differentiate colonization from infection to provide regulatory agencies with accurate data.

  8. Assessment of Regenerative Therapy (MEBT/MEBO) in Healing of Vari-ous Open Wounds:A Multicenter Controlled Randomized Trial%多中心随机对照试验:再生复原技术治疗各种开放性创面的疗效评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmoud F. Sakr; 王乡宁; 付子俊; Hossam Hamed; Hesham El-Torky

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of regenerative therapy ( MEBO/MEBT) ( SanTou MEBO Pharmaceutical CO., LTD., China) in healing of various acute and chronic open wounds. Subjects and Methods Con-secutive patients ( n=276) with various open wounds ( n=376) treated at 3 different hospitals, between January 2007-January 2012, were randomized to receive either MEBT/MEBO ( Group 1, n=141 with 190 wounds) or saline wet-to-moist dressing ( Group 2 controls, n=135 with 180 wounds) . Data collected prospectively included demographics, predisposing disease, co-morbidities, and wound characteristics. Surface area ( SA) and healing index ( HI) were calculated and com-pared at two-week intervals for 12 weeks, and secondary amputations were recorded at 24 weeks post-treatment. Results Open wounds included chronic pressure ulcers ( CPUs) ( n=202) , diabetic foot ulcers ( DFUs) ( n=119) , and miscella-neous group ( n=55) . 171 patients ( 63%) were male and 105 ( 37%) were female. Their ages ranged between 5-102 years, with a mean of 63 ± 14.5 years. Patients in both groups had similar demographic, clinical, biochemical and wound characteristics. There was a significant increase in HI and reduction in SA starting at weeks two after initiation of treatment in patients treated with MEBT/MEBO. At 12 weeks, 66.3% of wounds ( 126/190) treated with MEBT/MEBO had com-plete healing ( HI=1) as opposed to only 22.6% ( 42/186) of those treated with saline ( χ2 =71.4, P=0.000) . None of the patients receiving MEBT/MEBO had a HI of 0.5 ) of 100%. At 24 weeks after initiation of treatment, patients with DFUs treated with MEBT/MEBO undergo significantly fewer secondary amputations than controls.%  目的 评估再生疗法( MEBT/MEBO)治疗各种急慢性开放性创面的安全性和有效性。方法 将2007年1月至2012年1月期间因各种开放性创伤就诊于3家不同医院的276例患者(376处创面)随机分组,接受 MEBT/MEBO治疗(1

  9. [Physiology and pathophysiology of wound healing of wound defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschler, W

    2012-09-01

    Understanding wound healing involves more than simply stating that there are the three phases of inflammation, proliferation and maturation. Wound healing is a complex series of actions, reactions and interactions among cells and mediators in a sequential and simultaneously ongoing temporal process within a spatial frame. At first this article will attempt to provide a concise summary of the events, cellular components and main influential mediators of wound healing over time. Secondly, the pathophysiology of chronic non-healing wounds is described where an imbalance of stimulating and inhibiting factors causes failure of healing. The most relevant extrinsic and intrinsic determinants are described and related to the cellular and molecular level of disturbed wound healing. A basic understanding of wound healing is a prerequisite for any prophylactic or therapeutic maneuver to maintain or re-establish wound equilibrium to give a satisfactory healing trajectory.

  10. Gunshot Wound Contamination with Squirrel Tissue: Wound Care Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter W. Maerz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While report of animal bites contaminating wounds is reported commonly, direct wound contamination with squirrel flesh has never been reported in the literature. The patient suffered an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound that drove squirrel flesh and buck shot deep within his right buttock. This case outlines his hospital course and wound treatment. The patient was treated with ten days of broad spectrum antibiotics, extensive debridement of the wound in the operating room, and further treatment of the wound with a vacuum dressing system. While squirrel tissue and buckshot had to be removed from the wound on day six of the hospital stay, the patient remained afebrile without signs or symptoms of systemic illness.

  11. Complex wounds Feridas complexas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Castro Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex wound is the term used more recently to group those well-known difficult wounds, either chronic or acute, that challenge medical and nursing teams. They defy cure using conventional and simple "dressings" therapy and currently have a major socioeconomic impact. The purpose of this review is to bring these wounds to the attention of the health-care community, suggesting that they should be treated by multidisciplinary teams in specialized hospital centers. In most cases, surgical treatment is unavoidable, because the extent of skin and subcutaneous tissue loss requires reconstruction with grafts and flaps. New technologies, such as the negative pressure device, should be introduced. A brief review is provided of the major groups of complex wounds-diabetic wounds, pressure sores, chronic venous ulcers, post-infection soft-tissue gangrenes, and ulcers resulting from vasculitis.Ferida complexa é uma nova definição para identificar aquelas feridas crônicas e algumas agudas já bem conhecidas e que desafiam equipes médicas e de enfermagem. São difíceis de serem resolvidas usando tratamentos convencionais e simples curativos. Têm atualmente grande impacto sócio-econômico. Esta revisão procura atrair atenção da comunidade de profissionais de saúde para estas feridas, sugerindo que devam ser tratadas por equipe multidisciplinar em centro hospitalar especializado. Na maioria dos casos o tratamento cirúrgico deve ser indicado, uma vez que a perda de pele e tecido subcutâneo é extensa, necessitando de reconstrução com enxertos e retalhos. Nova tecnologia, como uso da terapia por pressão negativa foi introduzido. Breves comentários sobre os principais grupos de feridas complexas: pé diabético, úlceras por pressão, úlceras venosas, síndrome de Fournier e vasculites.

  12. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of infected abdominal wounds containing mesh: an analysis of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharestani, Mona Mylene; Gabriel, Allen

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical outcomes of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) using reticulated open-cell foam (ROCF) in the adjunctive management of abdominal wounds with exposed and known infected synthetic mesh. A non randomised, retrospective review of medical records for 21 consecutive patients with infected abdominal wounds treated with NPWT was conducted. All abdominal wounds contained exposed synthetic mesh [composite, polypropylene (PP), or knitted polyglactin 910 (PG) mesh]. Demographic and bacteriological data, wound history, pre-NPWT and comparative post-NPWT, operative procedures and complications, hospital length of stay (LOS) and wound healing outcomes were all analysed. Primary endpoints measured were (1) hospital LOS prior to initiation of NPWT, (2) total time on NPWT, (3) hospital LOS from NPWT initiation to discharge and (4) wound closure status at discharge. A total of 21 patients with abdominal wounds with exposed, infected mesh were treated with NPWT. Aetiology of the wounds was ventral hernia repair (n = 11) and acute abdominal wall defect (n = 10). Prior to NPWT initiation, the mean hospital LOS for the composite, PP and PG meshes were 76 days (range: 21-171 days), 51 days (range: 32-62 days) and 19 days (range: 12-39 days), respectively. The mean hospital LOS following initiation of NPWT for wounds with exposed composite, PP and PG mesh were 28, 31 and 32 days, respectively. Eighteen of the 21 wounds (86%) reached full closure after a mean time of 26 days of NPWT and a mean hospital LOS of 30 days postinitiation of NPWT. Three wounds, all with composite mesh left in situ, did not reach full closure, although all exhibited decreased wound dimensions, granulating beds and decreased surface area exposure of mesh. During NPWT/ROCF, one hypoalbuminemic patient with exposed PP mesh developed an enterocutaneous fistula over a prior enterotomy site. This patient subsequently underwent total mesh extraction, takedown of

  13. The Evolving Field of Wound Measurement Techniques: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Rachel; Jansen, Shirley

    2016-06-01

    Wound healing is a complex and multifactorial process that requires the involvement of a multidisciplinary approach. Methods of wound measurement have been developed and continually refined with the purpose of ensuring precision in wound measurement and documentation as the primary indicator of healing. This review aims to ascertain the efficacies of current wound area measurement techniques, and to highlight any perceived gaps in the literature so as to develop suggestions for future studies and practice. Med- line, PubMed, CliniKey, and CINAHL were searched using the terms "wound/ulcer measurement techniques," "wound assessment," "digi- tal planimetry," and "structured light." Articles between 2000 and 2014 were selected, and secondary searches were carried out by exam- ining the references of relevant articles. Only papers written in English were included. A universal, standardized method of wound as- sessment has not been established or proposed. At present, techniques range from the simple to the more complex - most of which have char- acteristics that allow for applicability in both rural and urban settings. Techniques covered are: ruler measurements, acetate tracings/contact planimetry, digital planimetry, and structured light devices. Conclu- sion. In reviewing the literature, the precision and reliability of digital planimetry over the more conventional methods of ruler measurements and acetate tracings are consistently demonstrated. The advent and utility of the laser or structured light approach, however, is promising, has only been analyzed by a few, and opens up the scope for further evaluation of this technique.

  14. Mechanics of cutaneous wound rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Digendranath; Gupta, Anurag

    2016-11-07

    A cutaneous wound may rupture during healing as a result of stretching in the skin and incompatibility at the wound-skin interface, among other factors. By treating both wound and skin as hyperelastic membranes, and using a biomechanical framework of interfacial growth, we study rupturing as a problem of cavitation in nonlinear elastic materials. We obtain analytical solutions for deformation and residual stress field in the skin-wound configuration while emphasizing the coupling between wound rupture and wrinkling in the skin. The solutions are analyzed in detail for variations in stretching environment, healing condition, and membrane stiffness.

  15. Common questions about wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worster, Brooke; Zawora, Michelle Q; Hsieh, Christine

    2015-01-15

    Lacerations, abrasions, burns, and puncture wounds are common in the outpatient setting. Because wounds can quickly become infected, the most important aspect of treating a minor wound is irrigation and cleaning. There is no evidence that antiseptic irrigation is superior to sterile saline or tap water. Occlusion of the wound is key to preventing contamination. Suturing, if required, can be completed up to 24 hours after the trauma occurs, depending on the wound site. Tissue adhesives are equally effective for low-tension wounds with linear edges that can be evenly approximated. Although patients are often instructed to keep their wounds covered and dry after suturing, they can get wet within the first 24 to 48 hours without increasing the risk of infection. There is no evidence that prophylactic antibiotics improve outcomes for most simple wounds. Tetanus toxoid should be administered as soon as possible to patients who have not received a booster in the past 10 years. Superficial mild wound infections can be treated with topical agents, whereas deeper mild and moderate infections should be treated with oral antibiotics. Most severe infections, and moderate infections in high-risk patients, require initial parenteral antibiotics. Severe burns and wounds that cover large areas of the body or involve the face, joints, bone, tendons, or nerves should generally be referred to wound care specialists.

  16. Healing of chronic cutaneous wounds by topical treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaobing; Shen, Zuyao; Guo, Zhenrong; Zhang, Mingliang; Sheng, Zhiyong

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of topical application of recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor (rbFGF) on the healing of chronic cutaneous wounds. Twenty-eight patients with thirty-three chronic cutaneous wounds resulting from trauma, diabetes mellitus, pressure sore and radiation injuries were enrolled in this prospective, open-label crossover trial. Prior to treatment with rbFGF, all wounds failed to heal with conventional therapies within 4 weeks. All wounds were locally treated with rbFGF at a dose of 150 AU/cm(2). Healing time and the quality of wounds were used to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment. Healing of all chronic wounds was expedited. During the study, eighteen wounds completely healed within 2 weeks, four healed within 3 weeks, and another eight completely healed within 4 weeks. Only three wounds failed to heal within 4 weeks, but healed at 30, 40 and 42 days after treatment with rbFGF. Thus, compared with conventional therapies, the effective rate of rbFGF treatment within 4 weeks was 90.9%. Histological assessment showed more abundant capillary sprouts or tubes and that fibroblasts were differentiated in wounds treated with rbFGF. No adverse side effects related to basic fibroblast growth factor were observed. Our results indicate that rbFGF could be used to accelerate healing in chronic wounds. It is our belief that this may be a more effective method of chronic wound management.

  17. Investigation on the wound healing activity of oleo-resin from Copaifera langsdorffi in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, L A F; de Alencar Cunha, K M; Santos, F A; Gramosa, N V; Silveira, E R; Rao, V S N

    2002-12-01

    The wound healing activity of oleo-resin from Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Leguminaceae) bark was evaluated in rats on experimental wounds. The oleo-resin was tested by monitoring wound contraction in excised wounds and by measuring tensile strength in healing incision wounds. The topical application of oleo-resin at a concentration of 4% accelerated wound contraction in open wounds. The mean values of wound contraction in oleo-resin treated rats on day 9 was 84.05% +/- 2.37% as against 51.29% +/- 9.54% seen in controls and the difference was statistically significant (p contraction were observed on days 12, 15, 18 and 21. Also, the tensile strength in healing incised wounds was found to be significantly higher in the group of animals treated with 4% oleo-resin on day 5 but not on days 7 and 12 (controls: 35.95 +/- 7.44 g/cm; oleo-resin: 71.48 +/- 5.77 g/cm; p resin on wound healing and justify its traditional use for the treatment of wounds.

  18. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mira; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Kim, Byoung-Suhk; Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik; Park, Byung-Yong; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm(2) at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 不同术式阑尾切除术后切口感染的对比分析一项大型多中心回顾性研究%Wound infection after emergency appendectomy by open vs laparoscopic approach: a multicenter retrospective large cohort study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹建国; 李志洲; 王晓刚; 朱弋良; 钱正海; 吴品飞; 杨田; 王树生

    2014-01-01

    Objective Emergency laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) has been rapidly applied at county-level hospitals in China.This study is to analyze wound infection after appendectomy.Methods This retrospective study was conducted among patients with acute appendicitis undergoing either laparoscopic or open appendectomy (OA) at 6 county-level general hospitals in Eastern China from 2011 to 2013,using multivariate Logistic regression model to assess independent risk factors associated with wound infection.Results Among 9 340 patients,1 831 (19.6%) and 7 509 (80.4%) patients underwent LA and OA respectively.The overall postoperative wound infection rate was 5.1%.The proportion of LAs increased yearly from 9.2% to 15.0% to 32.9%,while the LA postoperative wound infection rate decreased from 5.6% to 4.4% to 3.5% (P < 0.05).Compared with OA,LA was associated with lower wound infection rate after appendectomy (2.1% vs.5.8%,P < 0.01).By multivariate logistic regression analysis,various procedure was found to be independently associated with postoperative wound infection [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) OR (95% CI),1.37 (1.12-1.63); P =0.02].Conclusions Laparoscopic appendectomy carries a decreasing postoperative wound infection rate by year basis.Laparoscopic procedure was independently associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection after appendectomy.%目的 探讨腹腔镜阑尾切除手术(laparoscopic appendectomy,LA)后常见并发症切口感染的发生情况.方法 回顾性分析2011-2013年华东地区6家县市级医院所有急性阑尾炎手术患者的临床资料,对LA和开腹阑尾切除术(open appendectomy,OA)后的结果进行对比,并对所有阑尾切除术后导致切口感染的危险因素进行多因素回归分析.结果 9 340例患者中行LA阑尾切除术1 831例(19.6%),开腹阑尾切除术7 509例(80.4%);3年间LA手术开展的比例分别为9.2%、15.0%及32.9%.所有阑尾切除患者

  20. Identifying wound prevalence using the Mobile Wound Care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Judi; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Mitchell, Eleanor; Steers, Nicole; Khalil, Hanan

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the prevalence of wounds within health care systems is a challenging and complex undertaking. This is often compounded by the clinicians' training, the availability of the required data to collect, incomplete documentation and lack of reporting of this type of data across the various health care settings. To date, there is little published data on wound prevalence across regions or states. This study aims to identify the number and types of wounds treated in the Gippsland area using the Mobile Wound Care (MWC™) program. The MWC program has enabled clinicians in Gippsland to collect data on wounds managed by district nurses from four health services. The main outcomes measured were patient characteristics, wound characteristics and treatment characteristics of wounds in Gippsland. These data create several clinical and research opportunities. The identification of predominant wound aetiologies in Gippsland provides a basis on which to determine a regional wound prospective and the impact of the regional epidemiology. Training that incorporates best practice guidelines can be tailored to the most prevalent wound types. Clinical pathways that encompass the Australian and New Zealand clinical practice guidelines for the management of venous leg ulcers can be introduced and the clinical and economical outcomes can be quantitatively measured. The MWC allows healing times (days) to be benchmarked both regionally and against established literature, for example, venous leg ulcers.

  1. Recent advances in topical wound care

    OpenAIRE

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound,...

  2. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  3. What is New in Wound Healing?

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Senthil; WONG, Peng Foo; LEAPER, David John

    2004-01-01

    Wound biology is complex. Wounds which were until recently seen only as defects in tissues are now increasingly interpreted in cellular and molecular terms. Growth factors, cytokines, proteases and adhesion molecules which participate in wound healing are discussed in this article. From a clinical perspective, conceptual shifts of importance, including moist wound healing, wound bed preparation and wound assessment, are presented. The frontiers of therapeutics employed in wound healing contin...

  4. The wound hormone jasmonate

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Abraham J. K.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2009-01-01

    Plant tissues are highly vulnerable to injury by herbivores, pathogens, mechanical stress, and other environmental insults. Optimal plant fitness in the face of these threats relies on complex signal transduction networks that link damage-associated signals to appropriate changes in metabolism, growth, and development. Many of these wound-induced adaptive responses are triggered by de novo synthesis of the plant hormone jasmonate (JA). Recent studies provide evidence that JA mediates systemic...

  5. Telemedicine in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanussot-Deprez, Caroline; Contreras-Ruiz, José

    2008-12-01

    Telemedical wound care is one of the applications of teledermatology. We present our experience using telemedicine in the successful assessment and treatment of three patients with hard-to-heal ulcers. Three patients were seen at the PEMEX General Hospital in Veracruz, Mexico. The first patient was a 53-year-old man with hypertension, morbid obesity, chronic venous insufficiency, recurrent erysipelas, leg ulcers and lymphoedema. There was one ulcer on his left lower leg (20 x 10 cm) and one on his right leg (9 x 7 cm). The second patient was a 73-year-old woman with class III obesity and ulcers in her right leg, secondary to surgical debridement of bullous erysipelas. The third patient was a 51-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis with one ulcer on each leg and chronic lymphostasis. Photographs with a digital camera were taken and sent weekly via email to a wound care specialist in Mexico City. The photographs allowed the expert to diagnose and evaluate the chronic wounds periodically. In the present cases, telemedicine allowed us to have a rapid evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. The images were of enough quality to be useful and small enough to be sent via regular email to the remote physician who immediately gave his feedback. The expert was confident to give therapeutic recommendations in this way, and we considered this method to be very cost-effective, saving the patient and the health care system, especially in transportation.

  6. Social facilitation of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detillion, Courtney E; Craft, Tara K S; Glasper, Erica R; Prendergast, Brian J; DeVries, A Courtney

    2004-09-01

    It is well documented that psychological stress impairs wound healing in humans and rodents. However, most research effort into influences on wound healing has focused on factors that compromise, rather than promote, healing. In the present study, we determined if positive social interaction, which influences hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in social rodents, promotes wound healing. Siberian hamsters received a cutaneous wound and then were exposed to immobilization stress. Stress increased cortisol concentrations and impaired wound healing in isolated, but not socially housed, hamsters. Removal of endogenous cortisol via adrenalectomy eliminated the effects of stress on wound healing in isolated hamsters. Treatment of isolated hamsters with oxytocin (OT), a hormone released during social contact and associated with social bonding, also blocked stress-induced increases in cortisol concentrations and facilitated wound healing. In contrast, treating socially housed hamsters with an OT antagonist delayed wound healing. Taken together, these data suggest that social interactions buffer against stress and promote wound healing through a mechanism that involves OT-induced suppression of the HPA axis. The data imply that social isolation impairs wound healing, whereas OT treatment may ameliorate some effects of social isolation on health.

  7. Meta-analysis of negative-pressure wound therapy for closed surgical incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, N; Birke-Sorensen, H; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative wound complications are common following surgical procedures. Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is well recognized for the management of open wounds and has been applied recently to closed surgical incisions. The evidence base to support this intervention is limited....... RESULTS: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, reporting on 1311 incisions in 1089 patients. NPWT was associated with a significant reduction in wound infection (relative risk (RR) 0·54, 95 per cent c.i. 0·33 to 0·89) and seroma formation (RR 0·48, 0·27 to 0·84) compared with standard care...

  8. The management of perineal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh k Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of perineal wounds can be very frustrating as these invariably get contaminated from the ano-genital tracts. Moreover, the apparent skin defect may be associated with a significant three dimensional dead space in the pelvic region. Such wounds are likely to become chronic and recalcitrant if appropriate wound management is not instituted in a timely manner. These wounds usually result after tumor excision, following trauma or as a result of infective pathologies like hideradenitis suppurativa or following thermal burns. Many options are available for management of perineal wounds and these have been discussed with illustrative case examples. A review of literature has been done for listing commonly instituted options for management of the wounds in perineum.

  9. Negative pressure wound therapy: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as traditional or conventional therapy in the

  10. Electrospun PCL membranes incorporated with biosynthesized silver nanoparticles as antibacterial wound dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Robin; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar; Thomas, Sabu

    2016-03-01

    An open wound is highly prone to bacterial colonization and infection. Bacterial barrier property is an important factor that determines the success of a wound coverage material. Apart from the bacterial barrier property, presence of antibacterial agents can successfully eliminate the invasion and colonization of pathogen in the wound. Silver nanoparticles are well-known antimicrobial agents against a wide range of microorganisms. Biosynthesized silver nanoparticles are more acceptable for medical applications due to superior biocompatibility than chemically synthesized ones. Presence of biomolecules on biosynthesized silver nanoparticles enhances its therapeutic efficiency. Polycaprolactone (PCL) is a well-known material for biomedical applications including wound dressings. Electrospinning is an excellent technique for the fabrication of thin membranes for wound coverage applications with barrier property against microbes. In this paper, we report the fabrication and characterization of electrospun PCL membranes incorporated with biosynthesized silver nanoparticles for wound dressing applications.

  11. [Negative pressure wound therapy dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téot, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There are many different forms of negative pressure wound therapy dressings and it is important to distinguish clearly between each type. They enable the treatment to be adapted to the shape and depth of the wound, its degree of exudation and the persistence of the fibrinous areas on the surface. The machine's traction capacity, measured in mm of mercury (Hg), must be controlled to establish the healing profile: the more powerful the machine and the more contact there is between the foam and the wound, the faster the formation of the granulation tissue. There are many different solutions which are implemented in accordance with the clinical assessment of the wound.

  12. Honey: A Biologic Wound Dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molan, Peter; Rhodes, Tanya

    2015-06-01

    Honey has been used as a wound dressing for thousands of years, but only in more recent times has a scientific explanation become available for its effectiveness. It is now realized that honey is a biologic wound dressing with multiple bioactivities that work in concert to expedite the healing process. The physical properties of honey also expedite the healing process: its acidity increases the release of oxygen from hemoglobin thereby making the wound environment less favorable for the activity of destructive proteases, and the high osmolarity of honey draws fluid out of the wound bed to create an outflow of lymph as occurs with negative pressure wound therapy. Honey has a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, but there is much variation in potency between different honeys. There are 2 types of antibacterial activity. In most honeys the activity is due to hydrogen peroxide, but much of this is inactivated by the enzyme catalase that is present in blood, serum, and wound tissues. In manuka honey, the activity is due to methylglyoxal which is not inactivated. The manuka honey used in wound-care products can withstand dilution with substantial amounts of wound exudate and still maintain enough activity to inhibit the growth of bacteria. There is good evidence for honey also having bioactivities that stimulate the immune response (thus promoting the growth of tissues for wound repair), suppress inflammation, and bring about rapid autolytic debridement. There is clinical evidence for these actions, and research is providing scientific explanations for them.

  13. Distribution assessment comparing continuous and periodic wound instillation in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy using an agar-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycerz, Anthony M; Slack, Paul; McNulty, Amy K

    2013-04-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a widely accepted and effective treatment for various wound types, including complex wounds. Negative pressure with instillation was initially used as a gravity-fed system whereby reticulated, open-cell foam in the wound bed was periodically exposed to cycles of soaking with instillation solution followed by NPWT. Recent publications have alluded to positive outcomes with continuous instillation, where fluid is delivered simultaneously with negative pressure. To evaluate the distribution of instillation solutions to wound beds in conjunction with negative pressure, agar-based models were developed and exposed to coloured instillation solutions to identify exposure intensity via agar staining. This model allowed comparison of continuous- versus periodic-instillation therapy with negative pressure. Continuous instillation at a rate of 30 cc/hour with negative pressure showed isolated exposure of instillation fluid to wound beds in agar wound models with and without undermining and tunnelling. In contrast, periodic instillation illustrated uniform exposure of the additive to the entire wound bed including undermined and tunnel areas, with increased staining with each instillation cycle. These findings suggest that periodic instillation facilitates more uniform exposure throughout the wound, including tunnels and undermining, to instillation solutions, thereby providing therapy consistent with the clinician-ordered treatment.

  14. Clinical safety and efficacy of a novel thermoreversible polyhexanide-preserved wound covering gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, O; Abels, C; Knie, U; May, T; Hirsch, T; Daigeler, A; Steinau, H-U; Langer, S

    2010-01-01

    An ideal topical formulation for wound therapy does not exist. The aim of this study was to develop a novel improved therapeutic option for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. A transparent wound gel which is in a liquid state below and in a gel state at or above room temperature was developed. Forty-four patients were included in this open randomized controlled single-center study. Flammazine served as control in the treatment of skin graft donor sites. Wounds were assessed for time of dressing change and overall satisfaction of patients and health care providers. The data were analyzed using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. The wound gel proved to be superior in comparison with Flammazine with respect to wound assessment (p = 0.002), staining (p = 0.007), leaking (p = 0.032) and smell (p = 0.034). Flammazine showed favorable results regarding the parameters dehydration of the dressings (p = 0.012) and wound adherence (p = 0.005). The evaluation of the overall dressing change process showed no significant differences. The thermoreversible wound gel containing polyhexanide allows for good handling and wound assessment. This study demonstrated a high satisfaction level of patient and health care providers, and the wound gel proved an effective alternative to commonly used treatments. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Rigid removable cover for dorsal wound protection and tube fixation in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stynes, G D; Kiroff, G K; Morrison, W A; Edwards, G A; Page, R S; Kirkland, M A

    2016-04-01

    To report the design and benefits of a rigid polyethylene cover 'shell' for the protection of dorsal torso wounds and tube fixation in pigs. Open C-shaped polyethylene shells were designed to protect wounds and dressings on the dorsum of pigs used in research into negative pressure dressing-assisted wound healing. The shells were designed to resist trauma and contamination, to be comfortable and expansible, and to facilitate tube fixation and management. Strap fixation was optimised during experimentation. Efficacy was assessed by direct observation of dressing and wound protection, tube integrity and by macroscopic and microscopic assessments of wound healing. The shells effectively protected the wounds against blunt and sharp trauma, were simple to remove and reapply, were well tolerated and allowed for growth of the pigs. Circumferential neck straps attached by lateral straps to the shells proved critical. There was no wound infection or inflammation underlying the shells. Porting tubing via mid-dorsal holes in the shells and affixing the tubing just cranial to these holes prevented tube damage and traction, permitted tube management from outside the cages and allowed the pigs to move freely without becoming entangled. These shells effectively protected dorsal skin wounds and dressings, prevented tube damage and facilitated tube management in pigs. Similar systems may be useful for other production animals for wound management and for tube management with negative pressure wound healing, drain tubes or the delivery of nutrition, fluids or medications. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Seismology of the Wounded Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Cally, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Active regions are open wounds in the Sun's surface. Seismic oscillations from the interior pass through them into the atmosphere, changing their nature in the process to fast and slow magneto-acoustic waves. The fast waves then partially reflect and partially mode convert to upgoing and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves. The reflected fast and downgoing Alfv\\'en waves then re-enter the interior through the active regions that spawned them, infecting the surface seismology with signatures of the atmosphere. Using numerical simulations of waves in uniform magnetic fields, we calculate the upward acoustic and Alfv\\'enic losses in the atmosphere as functions of field inclination and wave orientation as well as the Time-Distance `travel time' perturbations, and show that they are related. Travel time perturbations relative to quiet Sun can exceed 40 seconds in 1 kG magnetic field. It is concluded that active region seismology is indeed significantly infected by waves leaving and re-entering the interior through magnetic w...

  17. 635nm diode laser biostimulation on cutaneous wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Hakan; Gülsoy, Murat; Ülgen, Yekta

    2014-05-01

    Biostimulation is still a controversial subject in wound healing studies. The effect of laser depends of not only laser parameters applied but also the physiological state of the target tissue. The aim of this project is to investigate the biostimulation effects of 635nm laser irradiation on the healing processes of cutaneous wounds by means of morphological and histological examinations. 3-4 months old male Wistar Albino rats weighing 330 to 350 gr were used throughout this study. Low-level laser therapy was applied through local irradiation of red light on open skin excision wounds of 5mm in diameter prepared via punch biopsy. Each animal had three identical wounds on their right dorsal part, at which two of them were irradiated with continuous diode laser of 635nm in wavelength, 30mW of power output and two different energy densities of 1 J/cm2 and 3 J/cm2. The third wound was kept as control group and had no irradiation. In order to find out the biostimulation consequences during each step of wound healing, which are inflammation, proliferation and remodeling, wound tissues removed at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 following the laser irradiation are morphologically examined and than prepared for histological examination. Fragments of skin including the margin and neighboring healthy tissue were embedded in paraffin and 6 to 9 um thick sections cut are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological examinations show that 635nm laser irradiation accelerated the healing process of cutaneous wounds while considering the changes of tissue morphology, inflammatory reaction, proliferation of newly formed fibroblasts and formation and deposition of collagen fibers. The data obtained gives rise to examine the effects of two distinct power densities of low-level laser irradiation and compare both with the non-treatment groups at different stages of healing process.

  18. Platelet gel for healing cutaneous chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovetti, Giovanni; Martinelli, Giovanna; Issi, Marwan; Barone, Marilde; Guizzardi, Marco; Campanati, Barbara; Moroni, Marco; Carabelli, Angelo

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a specific host immune response for restoration of tissue integrity. Experimental studies demonstrated an alteration of growth factors activity due to their reduced synthesis, increased degradation and inactivation. In wound healing platelets play an essential role since they are rich of alpha-granules growth factors (platelet derived growth factor--PDGF; transforming growth factor-beta--TGF-beta; vascular endothelial growth factor--VEGF). Topical use of platelet gel (PG), hemocomponent obtained from mix of activated platelets and cryoprecipitate, gives the exogenous and in situ adding of growth factors (GF). The hemocomponents are of autologous or homologous origin. We performed a technique based on: multicomponent apheretic procedure to obtain plasma rich platelet and cryoprecipitate; manual processing in an open system, in sterile environment, for gel activation. Every step of the gel synthesis was checked by a quality control programme. The therapeutic protocol consists of the once-weekly application of PG. Progressive reduction of the wound size, granulation tissue forming, wound bed detersion, regression and absence of infective processes were considered for evaluating clinical response to hemotherapy. 24 patients were enrolled. They had single or multiple cutaneous ulcers with different ethiopathogenesis. Only 3 patients could perform autologous withdrawal; in the others homologous hemocomponent were used, always considering suitability and traceability criteria for transfusional use of blood. Complete response was observed in 9 patients, 2 were subjected to cutaneous graft, 4 stopped treatment, 9 had partial response and are still receiving the treatment. In each case granulation tissue forming increased following to the first PG applications, while complete re-epithelization was obtained later. Pain was reduced in every treated patient. Topical haemotherapy with PG may be considered as an adjuvant treatment of a multidisciplinary process

  19. Wound Failure in Laparotomy: New insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Wound failure is a common complication of abdominal surgery. Its clinical presentation can vary from superficial wound dehiscence to burst abdomen with intraabdominal organs protruding through the wound. In long term, incisional hernia can be considered a

  20. Extrato de Passiflora edulis na cicatrização de feridas cutâneas abertas em ratos: estudo morfológico e histológico Extract from Passiflora edulis on the healing of open wounds in rats: morphometric and histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaldo de Castro Garros

    2006-01-01

    edulis leaves has been used by the population as a healing agent for infections and skin inflammations in an empiric basis. PURPOSE: the aim of this work was to evaluate the healing process of open wounds in rats, in which Passiflora edulis hydro-alcoholic extract was applied. METHODS: Sixty male, adult Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Passiflora group and Control group. Rats of the first group were treated with Passiflora edulis extract, and those of the second group received distilled water. The daily application of the extract or distilled water was carried out on a 2 cm diameter standardized circular wound on the dorsal region of each animal. Wound assessment was performed macroscopically and microscopically on the 7th, 14th, and 21st postoperative days. Microscopic analysis included hematoxylin-eosine and Masson Trichromium stains, evaluating inflammatory response, fibroplasia and collagen deposition. The wound retraction was evaluated by digital planimetry. RESULTS: No significant difference in the rate of wound healing was detected comparing both groups. However, a significant increase in the number of fibroblastic cells was seen on the 7th PO day, and significantly greater collagen deposition was observed on the 14th day PO day in rats from the Passiflora group (p=0,012. CONCLUSIONS: The application of the Passiflora edulis extract does not accelerate the healing process of open wounds in rats, but is associated with increased number of fibroblastic cells on 7th P.O. day and greater collagen deposition on the 14th PO day.

  1. Murine models of human wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  2. Effect of discarded keratin-based biocomposite hydrogels on the wound healing process in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mira [Department of Organic Materials & Fiber Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hye Kyoung [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Incheon 402–751 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Suhk [Department of BIN fusion technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung Jin; Kim, In-Shik [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-safety Research institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung-Yong, E-mail: parkb@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine and Bio-safety Research institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak-Yong, E-mail: khy@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of BIN fusion technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels prepared by electron beam irradiation (EBI) were examined in wound healing. As the EBI dose increased to 60 kGy, the tensile strength of the hydrogels increased, while the percentage of elongation of the hydrogels decreased. After 7 days, the dehydrated wool-based hydrogels show the highest mechanical properties (the % elongation of 1341 and the tensile strength of 6030 g/cm{sup 2} at an EBI dose of 30 kGy). Excision wound models were used to evaluate the effects of human hair-based hydrogels and wool-based hydrogels on various phases of healing. On post-wounding days 7 and 14, wounds treated with either human hair-based or wool-based hydrogels were greatly reduced in size compared to wounds that received other treatments, although the hydrocolloid wound dressing-treated wound also showed a pronounced reduction in size compared to an open wound as measured by a histological assay. On the 14th postoperative day, the cellular appearances were similar in the hydrocolloid wound dressing and wool-based hydrogel-treated wounds, and collagen fibers were substituted with fibroblasts and mixed with fibroblasts in the dermis. Furthermore, the wound treated with a human hair-based hydrogel showed almost complete epithelial regeneration, with the maturation of immature connective tissue and hair follicles and formation of a sebaceous gland. - Highlights: • Biocompatible keratin-based hydrogels were examined for wound healing process. • Human hair-based hydrogel is superior to wool-based hydrogel in wound healing. • Discarded keratin-based hydrogels are expected more eco-friendly therapeutic agents.

  3. Wound pruritus: pathophysiology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul JC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Julia C PaulSchool of Nursing, Oakland University, Rochester, MI, USAPurpose: The objective of this article is to review literature on wound pruritus, with a focus on summarizing pathophysiology and management.Method: Literature related to the physiology of itch was reviewed. PubMed, MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, and Embase were searched for all research studies written in English which include “wound” (injury/burn and “pruritus” (itch in the title or abstract. Articles were accepted if they involved wounds or acute burns. Literature related to options for management of wound pruritus was reviewed.Results: While all types of wounds can be the source of associated pruritus, most studies have been done concerning pruritus associated with burns. There are treatment options for pruritus which can be considered for management of wound pruritus. Conclusion: Further research is indicated to gain insights into the problem of wound pruritus. As more is learned about the physiology of wound pruritus, more effective management strategies can be developed and employed.Keywords: wound, chronic itch, C-fibers, spinothalamic tract, positron emission tomography, pruritogens

  4. Trends in Surgical Wound Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of acute and chronic wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades. Unfortunately, improvement in clinical practice has not followed suit, although new trends and developments have improved the outcome of wound treatment in many ways. This review focuses...

  5. Wounded quarks at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Rybczynski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    We review the results of the wounded quark model, with a stress on eccentricity observables in small systems. A new element is a presentation of symmetric cumulants for the elliptic and triangular flow correlations, obtained in the wounded-quark approach.

  6. Multimodal imaging of ischemic wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Liu, Peng; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, no method is available for noninvasive, simultaneous, and quantitative imaging of these tissue parameters. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities into a single setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Advanced algorithms were developed for accurate reconstruction of wound oxygenation and appropriate co-registration between different imaging modalities. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated by an ongoing clinical trials approved by OSU IRB. In the clinical trial, a wound of 3mm in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was serially monitored by the multimodal imaging setup. Our experiments demonstrated the clinical usability of multimodal wound imaging.

  7. Burn Wound Healing and Treatment: Review and Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    outside the scope of this review, but several key points are noteworthy. Most burns among older people occur at home , especially in the kitchen and...plasma and Rowan et al. Critical Care (2015) 19:243 Page 11 of 12 wound exudate from children with severe burns . Bull Exp Biol Med. 2009;148:771–5. 163...REVIEW Open Access Burn wound healing and treatment: review and advancements Matthew P. Rowan1*, Leopoldo C. Cancio1, Eric A. Elster2, David M

  8. Vasculogenic Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds represent a growing healthcare burden that particularly afflicts aged, diabetic, vasculopathic, and obese patients. Studies have shown that nonhealing wounds are characterized by dysregulated cytokine networks that impair blood vessel formation. Two distinct forms of neovascularization have been described: vasculogenesis (driven by bone-marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenesis (local endothelial cell sprouting from existing vasculature. Researchers have traditionally focused on angiogenesis but defects in vasculogenesis are increasingly recognized to impact diseases including wound healing. A more comprehensive understanding of vasculogenic cytokine networks may facilitate the development of novel strategies to treat recalcitrant wounds. Further, the clinical success of endothelial progenitor cell-based therapies will depend not only on the delivery of the cells themselves but also on the appropriate cytokine milieu to promote tissue regeneration. This paper will highlight major cytokines involved in vasculogenesis within the context of cutaneous wound healing.

  9. Microbial Biofilms and Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Amin; Wright, J. Barry; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Nadworny, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Background is provided on biofilms, including their formation, tolerance mechanisms, structure, and morphology within the context of chronic wounds. The features of biofilms in chronic wounds are discussed in detail, as is the impact of biofilm on wound chronicity. Difficulties associated with the use of standard susceptibility tests (minimum inhibitory concentrations or MICs) to determine appropriate treatment regimens for, or develop new treatments for use in, chronic wounds are discussed, with alternate test methods specific to biofilms being recommended. Animal models appropriate for evaluating biofilm treatments are also described. Current and potential future therapies for treatment of biofilm-containing chronic wounds, including probiotic therapy, virulence attenuation, biofilm phenotype expression attenuation, immune response suppression, and aggressive debridement combined with antimicrobial dressings, are described. PMID:28272369

  10. Evidence-based surgical wound care on surgical wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Jaqueline

    2002-09-01

    Surgical wound infection is an important outcome indicator in the postoperative period. A 3-year prospective cohort epidemiological study of 2202 surgical patients from seven surgical wards across two hospitals was carried out using gold standard surveillance methodology. This involved following patients up as inpatients and postdischarge surveillance to 30 days by an independent observer. The results led to the development of a mathematical model for risk of clean, elective surgical wound infection. Risk of surgical wound infection was increased by smoking, higher body mass index, presence of malignancy, haematoma formation, increasing numbers of people in theatre, adherent dressing usage, and higher times to suture removal (P<0.05). The results show that this type of surveillance is an effective way of collecting accurate data on wound infection rates. It was noted that patient care practices affected the surgical wound infection rate and the surveillance was used to facilitate the adoption of evidence-based practice, through recommendations for clean surgery, to reduce the risk from extrinsic risk factors for wound infection. As a result of the implementation of this evidence-based practice there was a significant reduction (P<0.05) in the clean wound infection rate.

  11. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  12. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron C Y; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Singh, Mansher; Caterson, Edward J; Eriksson, Elof; Sørensen, Jens A

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen and carbon dioxide), pH, and anti-microbial treatment on the wound. These factors are well described in the literature and can be modified with treatment methods available in the clinic. Understanding the roles of these factors in wound pathophysiology is of central importance in wound treatment. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  13. Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine.

  14. Wound repair in Pocillopora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villalobos, Jenny Carolina; Work, Thierry M.; Calderon-Aguileraa, Luis Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Corals routinely lose tissue due to causes ranging from predation to disease. Tissue healing and regeneration are fundamental to the normal functioning of corals, yet we know little about this process. We described the microscopic morphology of wound repair in Pocillopora damicornis. Tissue was removed by airbrushing fragments from three healthy colonies, and these were monitored daily at the gross and microscopic level for 40 days. Grossly, corals healed by Day 30, but repigmentation was not evident at the end of the study (40 d). On histology, from Day 8 onwards, tissues at the lesion site were microscopically indistinguishable from adjacent normal tissues with evidence of zooxanthellae in gastrodermis. Inflammation was not evident. P. damicornis manifested a unique mode of regeneration involving projections of cell-covered mesoglea from the surface body wall that anastomosed to form gastrovascular canals.

  15. Recent advances in topical wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-05-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no 'magical dressings'. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention.

  16. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  17. Gunshot wounds: epidemiology, wound ballistics, and soft-tissue treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Paul J; Najibi, Soheil; Silverton, Craig; Vaidya, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    The extremities are the most common anatomic location for gunshot wounds. Because of the prevalence of gunshot injuries, it is important that orthopaedic surgeons are knowledgeable about caring for them. The most common injuries seen with gunshot wounds are those of the soft tissues. Nonsurgical management of patients who have gunshot wounds with minimal soft-tissue disruption has been successfully accomplished in emergency departments for several years; this includes extremity wounds without nerve, intra-articular, or vascular injury. Stable, nonarticular fractures of an extremity have also been successfully treated with either minimal surgical or nonsurgical methods in the emergency department. Indications for surgical treatment include unstable fractures, intra-articular injuries, a significant soft-tissue injury (especially with skin loss), vascular injury, and/or a large or expanding hematoma.

  18. Modulation of inflammation by Cicaderma ointment accelerates skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Christophe; Roumegous, Audrey; Carpentier, Gilles; Barbier-Chassefière, Véronique; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Caredda, Stéphane; Courty, José

    2012-10-01

    Skin wound healing is a natural and intricate process that takes place after injury, involving different sequential phases such as hemostasis, inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling that are associated with complex biochemical events. The interruption or failure of wound healing leads to chronic nonhealing wounds or fibrosis-associated diseases constituting a major health problem where, unfortunately, medicines are not very effective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of Cicaderma ointment (Boiron, Lyon, France) to accelerate ulcer closure without fibrosis and investigate wound healing dynamic processes. We used a necrotic ulcer model in mice induced by intradermal doxorubicin injection, and after 11 days, when the ulcer area was maximal, we applied Vaseline petroleum jelly or Cicaderma every 2 days. Topical application of Cicaderma allowed a rapid recovery of mature epidermal structure, a more compact and organized dermis and collagen bundles compared with the Vaseline group. Furthermore, the expression of numerous cytokines/molecules in the ulcer was increased 11 days after doxorubicin injection compared with healthy skin. Cicaderma rapidly reduced the level of proinflammatory cytokines, mainly tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and others of the TNF pathway, which can be correlated to a decrease of polymorphonuclear recruitment. It is noteworthy that the modulation of inflammation through TNF-α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-4, and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor was maintained 9 days after the first ointment application, facilitating the wound closure without affecting angiogenesis. These cytokines seem to be potential targets for therapeutic approaches in chronic wounds. Our results confirm the use of Cicaderma for accelerating skin wound healing and open new avenues for sequential treatments to improve healing.

  19. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...... methods that directly alter the features of the external wound microenvironment indirectly affect the internal wound microenvironment due to the exchange between the two compartments. In this review, we focus on the effects of temperature, pressure (positive and negative), hydration, gases (oxygen...

  20. Photobiomodulation in promoting wound healing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffler, Damien P

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse methods being applied to induce wound healing, many wounds remain recalcitrant to all treatments. Photobiomodulation involves inducing wound healing by illuminating wounds with light emitting diodes or lasers. While used on different animal models, in vitro, and clinically, wound healing is induced by many different wavelengths and powers with no optimal set of parameters yet being identified. While data suggest that simultaneous multiple wavelength illumination is more efficacious than single wavelengths, the optimal single and multiple wavelengths must be better defined to induce more reliable and extensive healing of different wound types. This review focuses on studies in which specific wavelengths induce wound healing and on their mechanisms of action.

  1. [Nursing management of wound care pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2007-06-01

    Wound care is an important step in promoting wound healing, but it may cause wound care pain. This article aims to explore factors influencing wound care pain and the effectiveness of various interventions to alleviate it. Five major factors that influence wound care pain include inappropriate dressing change techniques, inflammation response, emotion, cognition, and social-cultural factors. Nurses should apply appropriate dressings and dressing change techniques to relieve wound care pain. Music therapy and aromatherapy can alleviate wound pain after dressing change. But distraction techniques should be used in conjunction with consideration of the needs of the individual subject.

  2. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Maxillofacial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Mellott

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound therapy has greatly advanced the field of wound healing for nearly two decades, by providing a robust surgical adjunct technique for accelerating wound closure in acute and chronic wounds. However, the application of negative pressure wound therapy in maxillofacial applications has been relatively under utilized as a result of the physical articulations and contours of the head and neck that make it challenging to obtain an airtight seal for different negative pressure wound therapy systems. Adapting negative pressure wound therapies for maxillofacial applications could yield significant enhancement of wound closure in maxillofacial applications. The current review summarizes the basic science underlying negative pressure wound therapy, as well as specific maxillofacial procedures that could benefit from negative pressure wound therapy.

  3. Postoperative washing of sutured wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad Harrison

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A best evidence topic was written according to the structured protocol. The three part question addressed was: [In patients undergoing closure of surgical wounds with sutures] does [keeping the wound dry for the first 48 h after closure] [reduce the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs]? 4 relevant papers were culled from the literature and appraised. The authors, date, country, population, study type, main outcomes, key results and study weaknesses were tabulated. Current NICE guidelines recommend cleaning surgical wounds with sterile saline only for the first 48 h following skin closure. We found no evidence that washing wounds with tap water during this period increases the incidence of SSIs compared to keeping them dry. Further randomised controlled trials will enable the construction of conclusive systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

  4. Antimicrobial stewardship in wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A; Dryden, Matthew; Gottrup, Finn

    2016-01-01

    of experts in infectious diseases/clinical microbiology (from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy) and wound management (from the European Wound Management Association) who, after thoroughly reviewing the available literature and holding teleconferences, jointly produced this guidance document...... be as narrowly focused, and administered for the shortest duration, as possible. AMS teams should be interdisciplinary, especially including specialists in infection and pharmacy, with input from administrative personnel, the treating clinicians and their patients. CONCLUSIONS: Available evidence is limited...

  5. A Primer on Wound Bed Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Gokoo, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    Successful wound closure and healing are a major concern for today's clinician. Determining if the wound will progress or not relies on a comprehensive assessment, recognition of wound characteristics that will promote or impede the healing process and preparing the wound bed such that pathological features are removed allowing the healing cascade to occur. When complications are no longer a roadblock the wound will achieve a stable microenvironment and progress through the normal repairative...

  6. 四肢开放骨折患者伤口多药耐药菌感染的影响因素分析%Analysis on influence factors for multi-drug resistant bacterial infections in wounds in patients with open limb fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓英; 杨爽; 赵静

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨四肢开放骨折患者伤口并发多药耐药菌感染的影响因素,并提出相应的护理对策,以降低多药耐药菌感染率。方法选取四肢开放骨折术后切口感染患者5732例,按照是否为多药耐药菌感染将其分为两组,对患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析;采用SPSS13.0软件进行分析。结果多药耐药菌感染患者年龄≥60岁、未严格无菌操作、预防性应用抗菌药物、连续卧床时间较长以及与多药耐药菌感染者共住同病房者明显多于未发生多药耐药菌感染的患者,两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);经 logistic回归分析,年龄≥60岁(OR=2.196)、未严格无菌操作(OR=1.644)、预防应用抗菌药物(OR=2.583)、连续卧床≥7 d(OR=2.368)、与多药耐药菌感染患者同病房(OR=7.574)等因素是四肢开放骨折患者伤口并发多药耐药菌感染的独立危险因素。结论四肢开放骨折患者伤口并多药耐药菌感染与多因素有关,在护理过程中通过隔离带菌者、严格无菌原则切断感染源,并指导患者合理饮食和运动增强机体抵抗力保护易感人群,减少多药耐药菌感染的发生。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the factors affecting patients with open fracture complicated by multi-drug resistant bacterial infections (MDRBIs) in wounds ,and to put forward the corresponding nursing strategies to reduce the prevalence of MDRBIs .METHODS A total of 5732 patients with open limb fracture with postoperative wound infection were selected ,and divided into two groups according to whether it was multi-drug resistant bacterial infection . The clinical data were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed statistically with SPSS 13 .0 software .RESULTS Compared to patients without MDRBIs ,the occurrence of MDRBIs was significantly higher in patients who were ≥ 60 years ,received non-strict sterile operation

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen and wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Bhutani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is the use of 100% oxygen at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. Today several approved applications and indications exist for HBOT. HBOT has been successfully used as adjunctive therapy for wound healing. Non-healing wounds such as diabetic and vascular insufficiency ulcers have been one major area of study for hyperbaric physicians where use of HBOT as an adjunct has been approved for use by way of various studies and trials. HBOT is also indicated for infected wounds like clostridial myonecrosis, necrotising soft tissue infections, Fournier′s gangrene, as also for traumatic wounds, crush injury, compartment syndrome, compromised skin grafts and flaps and thermal burns. Another major area of application of HBOT is radiation-induced wounds, specifically osteoradionecrosis of mandible, radiation cystitis and radiation proctitis. With the increase in availability of chambers across the country, and with increasing number of studies proving the benefits of adjunctive use for various kinds of wounds and other indications, HBOT should be considered in these situations as an essential part of the overall management strategy for the treating surgeon.

  8. Wounds and weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H. [Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Roentgenabteilung, Lohmuehlenstrasse 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: Hermann.vogel@ak-stgeorg.lbk-hh.de; Dootz, B. [Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Roentgenabteilung, Lohmuehlenstrasse 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Purpose: X-ray findings are described, which are typical for injuries due to conventional weapons. It is intended to demonstrate that radiographs can show findings characteristic for weapons. Material and method: The radiograms have been collected in Vietnam, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Chad, Iran, Afghanistan, USA, Great Britain, France, Israel, Palestine, and Germany. Results: Radiograms of injuries due to hand grenades show their content (globes) and cover fragments. The globes are localized regionally in the victim's body. Survivors of cluster bombs show singular or few globes; having been hit by many globes would have been lethal. Shotguns produce characteristic distributions of the pallets and depth of penetration different from those of hand grenades and cluster bombs; cover fragments are lacking. Gunshot wounds (GSW) can be differentiated in those to low velocity bullets, high velocity projectiles, and projectiles, which disintegrate on impact. The radiogram furnishes the information about a dangerous shock and helps to recognize the weapon. Radiograms of victims of explosion show fragments and injuries due to the blast, information valid for therapy planning and prognosis. The radiogram shows details which can be used in therapy, forensic medicine and in war propaganda - examples could be findings typical for cluster bombs and for dumdum bullets; it shows the cruelty of the employment of weapons against humans and the conflict between the goal of medical care and those of military actions. Conclusion: Radiographs may show, which weapon has been employed; they can be read as war reports.

  9. Wounds and weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H; Dootz, B

    2007-08-01

    X-ray findings are described, which are typical for injuries due to conventional weapons. It is intended to demonstrate that radiographs can show findings characteristic for weapons. The radiograms have been collected in Vietnam, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Chad, Iran, Afghanistan, USA, Great Britain, France, Israel, Palestine, and Germany. Radiograms of injuries due to hand grenades show their content (globes) and cover fragments. The globes are localized regionally in the victim's body. Survivors of cluster bombs show singular or few globes; having been hit by many globes would have been lethal. Shotguns produce characteristic distributions of the pallets and depth of penetration different from those of hand grenades and cluster bombs; cover fragments are lacking. Gunshot wounds (GSW) can be differentiated in those to low velocity bullets, high velocity projectiles, and projectiles, which disintegrate on impact. The radiogram furnishes the information about a dangerous shock and helps to recognize the weapon. Radiograms of victims of explosion show fragments and injuries due to the blast, information valid for therapy planning and prognosis. The radiogram shows details which can be used in therapy, forensic medicine and in war propaganda - examples could be findings typical for cluster bombs and for dumdum bullets; it shows the cruelty of the employment of weapons against humans and the conflict between the goal of medical care and those of military actions. Radiographs may show, which weapon has been employed; they can be read as war reports.

  10. Evidence-Based Medicine: Wound Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christine M; Rothermel, Alexis T; Mackay, Donald R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the basic science of chronic wounds. 2. Discuss the general and local factors that should be considered in any patient with a chronic wound. 3. Discuss the rationale of converting a chronic wound into an acute wound. 4. Describe techniques used to prepare chronic wounds. 5. Discuss the appropriate use of different dressings presented in this article. 6. Discuss the pros and cons of the adjuncts to wound healing discussed in this article. This is the second Maintenance of Certification article on wound healing. In the first, Buchanan, Kung, and Cederna dealt with the mechanism and reconstructive techniques for closing wounds. In this article, the authors have concentrated on the chronic wound. The authors present a summary of the basic science of chronic wounds and the general and local clinical factors important in assessing any chronic wound. The evidence for interventions of these conditions is presented. The surgical and nonsurgical methods of wound preparation and the evidence supporting the use of the popular wound dressings are presented. The authors then present the evidence for some of the popular adjuncts for wound healing, including hyperbaric oxygen, electrotherapy, and ultrasound. A number of excellent articles on negative-pressure wound therapy have been written, and are not covered in this article.

  11. Topical oxygen wound therapies for chronic wounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, J; Kröger, K; Storck, M; Risse, A; Engels, P

    2015-02-01

    Chronic wounds are an increasing problem in our ageing population and can arise in many different ways. Over the past decades it has become evident that sufficient oxygen supply is an essential factor of appropriate wound healing. Sustained oxygen deficit has a detrimental impact on wound healing, especially for patients with chronic wounds. This has been proven for wounds associated with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and diabetic foot ulcers (particularly in combination with PAOD). However, this is still under debate for other primary diseases. In the past few years several different new therapeutic approaches for topical oxygen therapies have been developed to support wound healing. These tend to fall into one of four categories: (1) delivery of pure oxygen either under pressurised or (2) ambient condition, (3) chemical release of oxygen via an enzymatic reaction or (4) increase of oxygen by facilitated diffusion using oxygen binding and releasing molecules. In this review article, the available therapeutic topical oxygen-delivering approaches and their impact on wound healing are presented and critically discussed. A summary of clinical data, daily treatment recommendations and practicability is provided. J. Dissemond received an honorarium for lectures, advisory boards and/or clinical studies from the following companies: 3M, B. Braun, BSN, Coloplast, Convatec, Draco, Hartmann, KCI, Lohmann&Rauscher, Medoderm, Merz, Sastomed, Systagenix, UCB-Pharma, Urgo. K. Kröger received an honorarium for lectures, advisory boards and/or clinical studies from the following companies: Bayer, Sanofi, GSK, Hartmann, Sastomed, UCB-Pharma, Urgo. M. Storck received an honorarium for lectures for the following companies: KCI, Systagenix, and UCB-Pharma. A. Risse received an honorarium for lectures, advisory boards and/or clinical studies from the following companies: Bracco, Coloplast, Draco, Lilly Deutschland, NovoNordisk, Sastomed, Urgo. P. Engels received an

  12. Ballistics and gunshot wounds: effects on musculoskeletal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, C S; Helfet, D L; Hausman, M R; Strauss, E

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the increasing number of weapons in this country, as many as 500,000 missile wounds occur annually, resulting in 50,000 deaths, significant morbidity, and striking socioeconomic costs. Wounds are generally classified as low-velocity (less than 2,000 ft/sec) or high-velocity (more than 2,000 ft/sec). However, these terms can be misleading; more important than velocity is the efficiency of energy transfer, which is dependent on the physical characteristics of the projectile, as well as kinetic energy, stability, entrance profile and path traveled through the body, and the biologic characteristics of the tissues injured. Although bullets are not sterilized on discharge, most low-velocity gunshot wounds can be safely treated nonoperatively with local wound care and outpatient management. Typically, associated fractures are treated according to accepted protocols for each area of injury. Treatment of low-velocity, low-energy fractures is generally dictated by the osseous injuries, as these are similar in many regards to closed fractures. Soft tissues play a more critical role in high-velocity and shotgun fractures, which are essentially open injuries. Aside from perioperative prophylaxis, antibiotics are probably required only for grossly contaminated wounds; however, because contamination is not always apparent, most authors still recommend routine prophylaxis. High-energy injuries and grossly contaminated wounds mandate aggressive irrigation and debridement, including a thorough search for foreign material. Open fracture protocols including external fixation or intramedullary nailing and intravenous antibiotic therapy for 48 to 72 hours should be instituted. If there is vascular damage, exploration and repair are best performed after prompt fracture stabilization. Evaluation of the "four Cs"-color, consistency, contractility, and capacity to bleed-provides valuable information regarding the viability of muscle. Skin grafting is preferable when tension

  13. Wound healing in Mac-1 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Nagaraja, Sridevi; Zhou, Jian; Zhao, Yan; Fine, David; Mitrophanov, Alexander Y; Reifman, Jaques; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2017-05-01

    Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) is a macrophage receptor that plays several critical roles in macrophage recruitment and activation. Because macrophages are essential for proper wound healing, the impact of Mac-1 deficiency on wound healing is of significant interest. Prior studies have shown that Mac-1(-/-) mice exhibit deficits in healing, including delayed wound closure in scalp and ear wounds. This study examined whether Mac-1 deficiency influences wound healing in small excisional and incisional skin wounds. Three millimeter diameter full thickness excisional wounds and incisional wounds were prepared on the dorsal skin of Mac-1 deficient (Mac-1(-/-) ) and wild type (WT) mice, and wound healing outcomes were examined. Mac-1 deficient mice exhibited a normal rate of wound closure, generally normal levels of total collagen, and nearly normal synthesis and distribution of collagens I and III. In incisional wounds, wound breaking strength was similar for Mac-1(-/-) and WT mice. Wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice displayed normal total macrophage content, although macrophage phenotype markers were skewed as compared to WT. Interestingly, amounts of TGF-β1 and its downstream signaling molecules, SMAD2 and SMAD3, were significantly decreased in the wounds of Mac-1 deficient mice compared to WT. The results suggest that Mac-1 deficiency has little impact on the healing of small excisional and incisional wounds. Moreover, the findings demonstrate that the effect of single genetic deficiencies on wound healing may markedly differ among wound models. These conclusions have implications for the interpretation of the many prior studies that utilize a single model system to examine wound healing outcomes in genetically deficient mice. © 2017 by the Wound Healing Society.

  14. A novel model of chronic wounds: importance of redox imbalance and biofilm-forming bacteria for establishment of chronicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dhall

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ∼6.5 M people and costing ∼$25B/year in the US alone. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies.

  15. Bubaline Cholecyst Derived Extracellular Matrix for Reconstruction of Full Thickness Skin Wounds in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Shakya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An acellular cholecyst derived extracellular matrix (b-CEM of bubaline origin was prepared using anionic biological detergent. Healing potential of b-CEM was compared with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS and open wound (C in full thickness skin wounds in rats. Thirty-six clinically healthy adult Sprague Dawley rats of either sex were randomly divided into three equal groups. Under general anesthesia, a full thickness skin wound (20 × 20 mm2 was created on the dorsum of each rat. The defect in group I was kept as open wound and was taken as control. In group II, the defect was repaired with commercially available collagen sheet (b-CS. In group III, the defect was repaired with cholecyst derived extracellular matrix of bovine origin (b-CEM. Planimetry, wound contracture, and immunological and histological observations were carried out to evaluate healing process. Significantly (P<0.05 increased wound contraction was observed in b-CEM (III as compared to control (I and b-CS (II on day 21. Histologically, improved epithelization, neovascularization, fibroplasia, and best arranged collagen fibers were observed in b-CEM (III as early as on postimplantation day 21. These findings indicate that b-CEM have potential for biomedical applications for full thickness skin wound repair in rats.

  16. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain: new powerful tool for closed wound management: clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Jun; Han, DaeHee; Song, Hyunsuk; Jang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Ha; Park, Myong Chul

    2014-07-01

    Although various reconstructive flap surgeries have been successfully performed, there still are difficult wound complications, such as seroma formation, wound margin necrosis, delayed wound healing, and even flap failures. The negative-pressure wound therapy has been described in detail in the literature to assist open chronic/complex wound closure in reconstructive surgery. However, the negative-pressure wound therapy was difficult to be applied under the incisional closed wounds. A total of 23 patients underwent the various reconstructive flap surgeries with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain. Instead of using regular suction units, Barovac (50-90 mm Hg, Sewoon Medical, Seoul, Republic of Korea) drainage tubes were connected to the wall suction unit, providing continuous high-powered negative pressure. In addition, continuous subatmospheric suction pressure (100-300 mm Hg) was applied. Outcome of the measures was obtained from the incidence of seroma, volume of postoperative drainage, hospitalization period, and incidence of other typical wound complications. Dead space was evaluated postoperatively with ultrasonography. Using continuous high-pressure negative suction drain, successful management of seroma was obtained without any major complication such as wound infection, flap loss, and wound margin necrosis, except for only 1 case of seroma after discharge from the hospital. The indwelling time of the drain in the latissimus dorsi donor site was significantly reduced in comparison with the authors' previous data (P = 0.047). The volume of drainage and hospitalization period were also reduced; however, these were not statistically significant. The dead space with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain was more reduced than in the control group in the immediate postoperative period and confirmed with ultrasonography. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain might be the simple and powerful solution in the management of challenging

  17. 加强烧伤创面处理是防治并发症的重要措施%Enhancing treatment of burn wounds is an important measure for prevention and treatment of complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄跃生

    2014-01-01

    Burn wound repair is an eternal issue for burn treatment.Ischemia and hypoxia caused by stress and wound inflammatory reactions to burn injuries are key factors of sepsis and organ complications.Therefore,the treatment of burn wound is not only relevant to repair of burn wound itself; early extensive escharectomy and wound coverage are also important measures for prevention and treatment of complications,such as sepsis and organ dysfunction.Besides the good vital supportive treatment such as circulation maintenance,coverage of open wounds with reliable skin substitutes is also the key point to ensure success of early extensive escharectomy.

  18. Endoglin haploinsufficiency promotes fibroblast accumulation during wound healing through Akt activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Pericacho

    Full Text Available Accurate regulation of dermal fibroblast function plays a crucial role in wound healing. Many fibrotic diseases are characterized by a failure to conclude normal tissue repair and the persistence of fibroblasts inside lesions. In the present study we demonstrate that endoglin haploinsufficiency promotes fibroblast accumulation during wound healing. Moreover, scars from endoglin-heterozygous (Eng(+/- mice show persisting fibroblasts 12 days after wounding, which could lead to a fibrotic scar. Endoglin haploinsufficiency results in increased proliferation and migration of primary cultured murine dermal fibroblasts (MDFs. Moreover, Eng(+/- MDF have diminished responses to apoptotic signals compared with control cells. Altogether, these modifications could explain the augmented presence of fibroblasts in Eng(+/- mice wounds. We demonstrate that endoglin expression regulates Akt phosphorylation and that PI3K inhibition abolishes the differences in proliferation between endoglin haploinsufficient and control cells. Finally, persistent fibroblasts in Eng(+/- mice wound co-localize with a greater degree of Akt phosphorylation. Thus, endoglin haploinsufficiency seems to promote fibroblast accumulation during wound healing through the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These studies open new non-Smad signaling pathway for endoglin regulating fibroblast cell function during wound healing, as new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of fibrotic wounds.

  19. Endoglin haploinsufficiency promotes fibroblast accumulation during wound healing through Akt activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericacho, Miguel; Velasco, Soraya; Prieto, Marta; Llano, Elena; López-Novoa, José M; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Accurate regulation of dermal fibroblast function plays a crucial role in wound healing. Many fibrotic diseases are characterized by a failure to conclude normal tissue repair and the persistence of fibroblasts inside lesions. In the present study we demonstrate that endoglin haploinsufficiency promotes fibroblast accumulation during wound healing. Moreover, scars from endoglin-heterozygous (Eng(+/-)) mice show persisting fibroblasts 12 days after wounding, which could lead to a fibrotic scar. Endoglin haploinsufficiency results in increased proliferation and migration of primary cultured murine dermal fibroblasts (MDFs). Moreover, Eng(+/-) MDF have diminished responses to apoptotic signals compared with control cells. Altogether, these modifications could explain the augmented presence of fibroblasts in Eng(+/-) mice wounds. We demonstrate that endoglin expression regulates Akt phosphorylation and that PI3K inhibition abolishes the differences in proliferation between endoglin haploinsufficient and control cells. Finally, persistent fibroblasts in Eng(+/-) mice wound co-localize with a greater degree of Akt phosphorylation. Thus, endoglin haploinsufficiency seems to promote fibroblast accumulation during wound healing through the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These studies open new non-Smad signaling pathway for endoglin regulating fibroblast cell function during wound healing, as new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of fibrotic wounds.

  20. Application of topical drugs in burn wound%烧伤创面用药

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国安

    2008-01-01

    For bum patients, topical treatment is as important as systemic treatment. Reasonable and timely wound treatment will influence the homeostatic equilibrium, and the progression, the prognosis, and the outcome of the disease. The therapeutic principle should be varied for wounds with different depth of injury. But avoiding or at least alleviating infection, and accelerating healing period, were the common principles. In common, the medication for local wound treatment includes: topical antiseptic, surgical dressing products, artificial skins, and so on.Ideal topical antiseptic should have the following zcharacteristics: the antimierobial spectrum is broad, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA; be able to penetrate necrotic tissue; does not induce drug resistatance easily; no local irritating effect and not painful; no side effect to body; can be applied easily; low cost. The functions of surgical dressing in clude: protect the wounds, keep the microcirculation open, and accelerate wound healing. Artificial skin has been used as the autoskin carrier in skin transplantation operation for large burn area to protect the autoskin grafts, accelerate wound healing, and cover the wounds temporarily. Bums therapy has developed for 50 years in China, the study of local treatment for burn wounds has also experienced a tortuous path of trial and error. This review might contribute some ideas future research.

  1. Polysaccharide Fabrication Platforms and Biocompatibility Assessment as Candidate Wound Dressing Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Aduba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound dressings are critical for wound care because they provide a physical barrier between the injury site and outside environment, preventing further damage or infection. Wound dressings also manage and even encourage the wound healing process for proper recovery. Polysaccharide biopolymers are slowly becoming popular as modern wound dressings materials because they are naturally derived, highly abundant, inexpensive, absorbent, non-toxic and non-immunogenic. Polysaccharide biopolymers have also been processed into biomimetic platforms that offer a bioactive component in wound dressings that aid the healing process. This review primarily focuses on the fabrication and biocompatibility assessment of polysaccharide materials. Specifically, fabrication platforms such as electrospun fibers and hydrogels, their fabrication considerations and popular polysaccharides such as chitosan, alginate, and hyaluronic acid among emerging options such as arabinoxylan are discussed. A survey of biocompatibility and bioactive molecule release studies, leveraging polysaccharide’s naturally derived properties, is highlighted in the text, while challenges and future directions for wound dressing development using emerging fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting are outlined in the conclusion. This paper aims to encourage further investigation and open up new, disruptive avenues for polysaccharides in wound dressing material development.

  2. Betulin-Based Oleogel to Improve Wound Healing in Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa: A Prospective Controlled Proof-of-Concept Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Schwieger-Briel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Skin fragility and recurrent wounds are hallmarks of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa (EB. Treatment options to accelerate wound healing are urgently needed. Oleogel-S10 contains a betulin-rich triterpene extract from birch bark. In this study, we tested the wound healing properties of topical Oleogel-S10 in patients with dystrophic EB. Methods. We conducted an open, blindly evaluated, controlled, prospective phase II pilot trial in patients with dystrophic EB (EudraCT number 2010-019945-24. Healing of wounds treated with and without topical Oleogel-S10 was compared. Primary efficacy variable was faster reepithelialization as determined by 2 blinded experts. The main secondary outcome variable of the study was percentage of wound epithelialization. Results. Twelve wound pairs of 10 patients with dystrophic EB were evaluated. In 5 of 12 cases, both blinded reviewers considered epithelialization of the intervention wounds as superior. In 3 cases, only one reviewer considered Oleogel-S10 as superior and the other one as equal to control. Measurements of wound size showed a trend towards accelerated wound healing with the intervention but without reaching statistical significance. Conclusion. Our results indicate a potential for faster reepithelialization of wounds in patients with dystrophic EB when treated with Oleogel-S10 but larger studies are needed to confirm significance.

  3. WOUND HEALING IN DIABETIC ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Putra Pramana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of wound healing is a complex mechanism and involves a variety of cells. Injury is defined as a disruption of normal structure and function. Various types of growth factors and cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta involved in the mechanism of wound healing. There are four phases of wound healing mechanisms : hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. Diabetic ulcers is one major complication, occurring in 15% of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and as much as 84% of patients with diabetic ulcers require amputation action. In DM patients there is a failure in normal wound healing mechanisms. Various histopathological studies showed elongation phase of inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus, thus inhibiting the formation of granulation tissue. Increased blood sugar levels will lower the expressin of perlecan, increased advanced glycation endproducts, decreased the formation of nitric oxide (by ± 67%, changes in the structure and function of fibroblasts and increased activity of matrix metalolproteinases, it will cause distruption of the normal wound healing mechanisms. (MEDICINA 2012;43:49-53.

  4. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon.

  5. Influence of oxygen on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen has an important role in normal wound healing. This article reviews the evidence concerning the role of oxygen in wound healing and its influence on the different stages of wound healing. The evidence reviewed has demonstrated that improving oxygenation may be helpful in limiting wound infection, although there is a lack of good quality studies on the role of oxygen in the proliferative phase and in reepithelialisation. Overall, the relationship between oxygen and wound healing is complex. Knowledge of this aspect is important as many treatment modalities for refractory wounds are based on these principles.

  6. Wound healing and the role of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, P

    2013-08-01

    Fibroblasts are critical in supporting normal wound healing, involved in key processes such as breaking down the fibrin clot, creating new extra cellular matrix (ECM) and collagen structures to support the other cells associated with effective wound healing, as well as contracting the wound. This article explores and summarises the research evidence on the role of fibroblasts, their origins and activation, and how they navigate the wound bed, as well as how their activity leads to wound contraction. This article also explores the local conditions at the wound site, which activate, regulate and ultimately reduce the fibroblast activity as the skin's integrity returns on healing.

  7. Trauma and wound management: gunshot wounds in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsterman, Amelia S; Hanson, R Reid

    2014-08-01

    Bullet wounds in horses can cause a wide array of injuries, determined by the type of projectile, the energy of the bullet on entry, and the type of tissue the bullet encounters. Treatment includes identification of all structures involved, debridement of the permanent cavity, and establishing adequate drainage. Bullet wounds should be treated as contaminated, and broad-spectrum antibiotics, including those with an anaerobic spectrum, are indicated. Although musculoskeletal injuries resulting from gunshots are most common in horses, they carry a good prognosis for survival and return to function.

  8. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described.

  9. Recent advances in topical wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata Sarabahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no ′magical dressings′. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention.

  10. Basics in nutrition and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Thomas; Rahbarnia, Arastoo; Kellner, Martina; Sobotka, Lubos; Eberlein, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Wound healing is a process that can be divided into three different phases (inflammatory, proliferative, and maturation). Each is characterized by certain events that require specific components. However, wound healing is not always a linear process; it can progress forward and backward through the phases depending on various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. If the wound-healing process is affected negatively, this can result in chronic wounds. Chronic wounds demand many resources in the clinical daily routine. Therefore, local wound management and good documentation of the wound is essential for non-delayed wound healing and prevention of the development of chronic wounds. During the wound-healing process much energy is needed. The energy for the building of new cells is usually released from body energy stores and protein reserves. This can be very challenging for undernourished and malnourished patients. Malnutrition is very common in geriatric patients and patients in catabolic phases of stress such as after injury or surgery. For that reason a close survey of the nutritional status of patients is necessary to start supplementation quickly, if applicable. Wound healing is indeed a very complex process that deserves special notice. There are some approaches to develop guidelines but thus far no golden standard has evolved. Because wounds, especially chronic wounds, cause also an increasing economic burden, the development of guidelines should be advanced.

  11. Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Wound Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Valentina; Oranges, Teresa; Rotella, Luca; Romanelli, Marco

    2015-09-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, burdensome, debilitating disease of the hair follicle. It presents with recurrent painful inflamed and noninflamed lesions usually in specific body areas such as axillary, inguinal, perineal, and genital areas. It is associated with a large range of other diseases and conditions, such as obesity, arthropathy, inflammatory bowel diseases, and sqaumous cell carcinoma. Medical therapy may be systemic or topical, mainly based on antibiotics, retinoids, hormones and immunosuppressive drugs, including biological therapies. Surgical and laser therapies may be a valid therapeutic approach in order to treat locally recurring lesions. The aim of this article is to review the wound healing options after skin excision and laser treatments, with a focus on lesions left to heal by secondary intention, analyzing the efficacy of moist wound dressings, negative pressure wound therapy, bioactive dressings, such as platelet-rich plasma gel and hylarunoic acid scaffold, or autologous keratinocyte suspension in platelet concentrate and skin-grafting tecniques.

  12. Use of a portable, single-use negative pressure wound therapy device in home care patients with low to moderately exuding wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Theresa; Trueman, Paul; Rossington, Alan

    2014-03-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used in the management of acute and chronic wounds. The purpose of this 8-week study was to evaluate outcomes of using a new canisterless, portable, single-use NPWT system in patients with wounds treated in a Canadian community healthcare setting. The device is designed to provide negative pressure at 80±20 mm Hg, 24 hours a day of continuous usage, for a maximum wear time of 7 days. Data on wound outcomes, including exudate levels, wound appearance, and wound area, were collected weekly by a Registered Nurse as part of routine practice. When treatment was discontinued, patients and nurses were asked to rate their satisfaction with the device. Data from patients who had used a conventional NPWT device to manage their wounds were retrospectively abstracted from their medical records. In the prospective study, conducted between October 2011 and July 2012, 326 patients (median age=61 years; range 17-91 years) with wounds of mixed etiology (53 pressure ulcers, 21 venous leg ulcers, 16 diabetic foot ulcers, and 15 traumatic and 221 surgical wounds) were treated for a maximum of 8 weeks with the portable NPWT device. The majority of patients (228 out of 326; 68%) achieved complete wound closure within 8 weeks of treatment. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of median time to healing of all wounds was 9 weeks. The majority of patients (318 patients, 97%) reported they were pleased or satisfied with the dressing performance. Nurses indicated satisfaction with the dressing performance for all but two patients (99%). The majority (89%) of patients managed with conventional NPWT (n=539) had an open surgical wound with moderate or high levels of exudate. Healing rates in the portable and conventional NPWT group were similar (10% to 11% per week). Portable, single-use NPWT has the potential to deliver good wound outcomes in community care settings and simplify the use of negative pressure for nurses and patients. Additional research is

  13. Current management of wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-01-01

    in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing......While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information...

  14. Assessment of circular wound healing in rats after exposure to 808-nm laser pulses during specific healing phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakoglu, Hasim O; Sani, Musbahu M; Uba, Abdullahi I; Abdullahi, Umar A

    2016-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT), is an important application modality for the advancement of wound healing processes. In this study, histological and morphometric analyses have been made to understand and compare effects of high-power 808-nm pulses on circular skin wounds among groups irradiated immediately after wounding and groups irradiated at specific stages of the healing period. Experimental groups were as follows: Laser Therapy (LT) was received as three sessions of laser irradiation (6.38 J/cm2, 1.276 W/cm2, 808 nm) immediately after wounding (Inflammatory group, n = 12), 24 hours post-wounding (Proliferative group, n = 12), and 72 hours post-wounding (Remodeling group, n = 12); the Control group (n = 12) received no irradiation. Histological analyses were performed on the 3rd, 7th, and 14th days post-wounding. Mean wound diameters were 5 mm for all groups. On Day 7, wound diameters were measured as 2.99 ± 0.17, 2.95 ± 0.3, 2.52 ± 0.11, and 2.41 ± 0.34 mm for the Control, Inflammatory, Proliferative, and Remodeling groups, respectively. At 2 weeks post-wounding, dermal tissue in the Inflammatory and Proliferative groups closed superficially, while 1.30 ± 0.1 mm and 1.30 ± 0.06 mm openings remained in the Control and Remodeling groups, respectively. Mean wound healing rates (WHR) for all treatment groups were found to differ significantly from the control group (P wounding (late inflammatory, early proliferative stage) as demonstrated by increases in granulation tissue, fibroblasts and collagen deposition, which lead to faster rates of wound contraction and thus accelerated healing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Burn Wound Mucormycosis: A Case Study on Poor Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanistreet, Bryan; Bell, Derek

    Mucormycosis is a rare, rapidly progressive and often fatal fungal infection. The rarity of the condition lends itself to unfamiliarity, delayed treatment, and poor outcomes. Diagnosis of fungal infections early enough to enable appropriate treatment occurs in less than half of affected patients. A 56-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus II, hepatitis C, and intravenous drug abuse was involved in a rollover motor vehicle accident. He sustained circumferential partial and full-thickness burns to his lower extremities with 20% BSA burns. He ultimately required a below-knee amputation of his right lower extremity due to poor wound healing and nonviability of the soft tissue and foot. Debridement found muscle fibers that were necrotic and purulent. Pathology revealed Mucor species with extensive vascular invasion. This case and discussion highlights the importance of maintaining vigilance for mycotic infections and acting appropriately when there are concerning signs and symptoms of serious wound complications. Caretakers of severe trauma patients should have a high level of suspicion for complications and be cognizant of the American Burn Association's guidelines for systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Progressive necrosis outside the confines of the original burn wound should raise concern for impaired wound healing, an immunocompromised state or an underlying infection.

  16. Holistic wound assessment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, Amber

    2013-12-01

    Wound care is expensive and can cause immeasurable stress and inconvenience to patients and their significant others. It is therefore in the best interest of the patient, their significant others and the NHS as a whole that wounds are expertly assessed, managed and healed in the quickest timeframe possible. Nurses play a pivotal role in the process of accurate holistic wound assessment, evaluation and treatment. This article aims to help further develop and enhance both professional and clinical wound care assessment and evaluation skills. Pertinent wound care literature is critically reviewed and the crucial nature and important components of comprehensive wound assessment for facilitating the highest possible quality wound care to patients are presented alongside recommendations regarding how the enhanced knowledge and skills could be applied into everyday wound care practice.

  17. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Sciences, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, P.M.B. 1111, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. ... Methods:A total of 207 wound specimens collected from patients attending the University of Benin ..... of bacterial pathogens in burn wound.

  18. WOUND CARE DRESSING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Ismail Adigun

    ineffective and wasteful both in terms of time and physical resources. Key words: wound .... nice scent, absorbing characteristics, handling and adhesive properties, and ... dressing sloughy wounds is the use of larva therapy. (maggots) for the ...

  19. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2015-09-01

    Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died. During the first 3 weeks of therapy, healing was most likely to occur in surgical wounds (surgical vs. other wounds: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.23), while from 3 weeks to 3 months of therapy, cancer wounds, and pressure ulcers were least likely to heal (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 0.12, 0.03-0.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 0.44, 0.27-0.74). Cancer wounds and pressure ulcers were further associated with a three times increased probability of mortality compared with other wounds (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 3.19, 1.35-7.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 2.91, 1.56-5.42). In summary, the wound type was found to be a significant predictor of healing and mortality with cancer wounds and pressure ulcers being associated with poor prognosis. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. Hydro-responsive wound dressings simplify T.I.M.E. wound management framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, Karen; Rogers, Alan A; Rippon, Mark G

    2016-12-01

    The development of wound management protocols and guidelines such as the T.I.M.E. acronym are useful tools to aid wound care practitioners deliver effective wound care. The tissue, infection/inflammation, moisture balance and edge of wound (T.I.M.E.) framework provides a systematic approach for the assessment and management of the majority of acute and chronic wounds. The debridement of devitalised tissue from the wound bed, the reduction in wound bioburden and effective management of wound exudate - i.e., wound bed preparation - are barriers to wound healing progression that are targeted by T.I.M.E. There are a large number of wound dressings available to experienced wound care practitioners to aid in their goal of healing wounds. Despite the systematic approach of T.I.M.E., the large number of wound dressings available can introduce a level of confusion when dressing choices need to be made. Any simplification in dressing choice, for example by choosing a dressing system comprising of a limited number of dressings that are able to address all aspects of T.I.M.E., would be a valuable resource for delivering effective wound care. This article briefly reviews the principles of T.I.M.E. and describes the evidence for the use of a two-dressing, moisture balance-oriented, dressing-based wound management system.

  1. Phases of the wound healing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Annemarie

    This is the first in a six-part series on wound management. It describes the stages of the wound healing process and explains how they relate to nursing practice. Nurses need to know how to recognise and understand the different phases so they can identify whether wounds are healing normally and apply the appropriate treatments to remove the barriers to healing. Part 2 (page 14) focuses on wound assessment.

  2. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, Laura E.; Sharon Gerecht

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, whic...

  3. Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    healing phase (Weeks 1–6) and will focus on healing of both wound and donor sites. 5 Acute Healing Evaluations: 1. Wound ...control (i.e., 1:1.5 meshed STSG over Integra MBWM). We expect all ReCell-treated and control areas of the wounds to heal adequately. However, we predict... healing /non- healing of wound and donor site  Graft loss  Heterotrophic ossification  Infection  Scar contracture  Durability (i.e.

  4. Chemokine Regulation of Angiogenesis During Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in wound healing. A defect in the formation of a neovasculature induces ulcer formation. One of the challenges faced by the clinician when devising strategies to promote healing of chronic wounds is the initiation of angiogenesis and the formation of a stable vasculature to support tissue regeneration. Understanding the molecular factors regulating angiogenesis during wound healing will lead to better therapies for healing chronic wounds.

  5. CLINICAL STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE WOUND INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sudheer Darbha; Giddaluru Srihari

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study the most common organisms encountered and their sensitivity and resistance to antibiotics in postoperative wound infection and to study relation of emergency and elective surgery to postoperative wound infection and to study efficacy of different modes of preoperative preparation on postoperative wound infection and to study distribution of postoperative wound infection among different surgeries based on bacterial contamination such a...

  6. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  7. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, as used at our institution (CAMC, and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society may vary widely from country to country and payment system. [3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons. [1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise.

  8. Topical silver for preventing wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N. Storm-Versloot; C.G. Vos; D.T. Ubbink; H. Vermeulen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silver-containing treatments are popular and used in wound treatments to combat a broad spectrum of pathogens, but evidence of their effectiveness in preventing wound infection or promoting healing is lacking. OBJECTIVES: To establish the effects of silver-containing wound dressings and

  9. Wound Failure in Laparotomy: New insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Wound failure is a common complication of abdominal surgery. Its clinical presentation can vary from superficial wound dehiscence to burst abdomen with intraabdominal organs protruding through the wound. In long term, incisional hernia can be considered a representation

  10. Acceleration of cutaneous wound healing by brassinosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Debora; Rathinasabapathy, Thirumurugan; Schmidt, Barbara; Shakarjian, Michael P; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids are plant growth hormones involved in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Their effects in animals are largely unknown, although recent studies showed that the anabolic properties of brassinosteroids are possibly mediated through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling pathway. Here, we examined biological activity of homobrassinolide (HB) and its synthetic analogues in in vitro proliferation and migration assays in murine fibroblast and primary keratinocyte cell culture. HB stimulated fibroblast proliferation and migration and weakly induced keratinocyte proliferation in vitro. The effects of topical HB administration on progression of wound closure were further tested in the mouse model of cutaneous wound healing. C57BL/6J mice were given a full-thickness dermal wound, and the rate of wound closure was assessed daily for 10 days, with adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 as a positive control. Topical application of brassinosteroid significantly reduced wound size and accelerated wound healing in treated animals. mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were significantly lower, while tumor necrosis factor alpha was nearly suppressed in the wounds from treated mice. Our data suggest that topical application of brassinosteroids accelerates wound healing by positively modulating inflammatory and reepithelialization phases of the wound repair process, in part by enhancing Akt signaling in the skin at the edges of the wound and enhancing migration of fibroblasts in the wounded area. Targeting this signaling pathway with brassinosteroids may represent a promising approach to the therapy of delayed wound healing.

  11. The principles of holistic wound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Annemarie

    This article is the second in a series designed to enhance nurses' knowledge of wound management. It highlights the importance of assessing patients holistically, and provides an overview of the key factors that should be considered when assessing a wound. A well-designed template enables nurses to carry out a comprehensive assessment that ensures accurate documentation to monitor wound healing.

  12. BURN WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF Euphorbia hirta

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiprakash, B.; Chandramohan,; Reddy, D. Narishma

    2006-01-01

    The Ethanolic extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta was screened for burn wound healing activity in rats as 2% W/W cream. The study was carried out based on the assessment of percentage reduction in original wound. It showed significant burn wound healing activity.

  13. Modern wound care - practical aspects of non-interventional topical treatment of patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, Joachim; Augustin, Matthias; Eming, Sabine A; Goerge, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Karrer, Sigrid; Schumann, Hauke; Stücker, Markus

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic wounds is becoming increasingly complex. It was therefore the aim of the members of the working group for wound healing (AGW) of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) to report on the currently relevant aspects of non-interventional, topical wound treatment for daily practice. -Beside necessary procedures, such as wound cleansing and débridement, we describe commonly used wound dressings, their indications and practical use. Modern antiseptics, which are currently used in wound therapy, usually contain polyhexanide or octenidine. Physical methods, such as negative-pressure treatment, are also interesting options. It is always important to objectify and adequately treat pain symptoms which often affect these patients. Modern moist wound therapy may promote healing, reduce complications, and improve the quality of life in patients with chronic wounds. Together with the improvement of the underlying causes, modern wound therapy is an important aspect in the overall treatment regime for patients with chronic wounds.

  14. State-of-the-art wound healing: skin substitutes for chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, George

    2014-01-01

    The care of chronic wounds represents an important and evolving area of dermatology. With a rising prevalence of chronic wounds bearing notable effects on patient morbidity including amputations, appropriate and effective intervention to treat these debilitating wounds can make a significant clinical impact. In recent years, several advanced bioactive wound dressings have been developed to specifically treat chronic nonhealing wounds. These wound dressings encompass a wide range of products containing synthetic matrix scaffolds, animal-derived matrices, and human tissue. With several of these wound dressings, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated improvement in wound healing; furthermore, cost-effectiveness studies have suggested that these products may reduce the overall cost of treating a chronic wound. Familiarity with these products and their appropriate use may be helpful to dermatologists treating chronic wounds.

  15. In vivo wound-healing effects of novel benzalkonium chloride-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Kim, Kyung Soo; Kim, Dong-Wuk; Li, Dong Xun; Kim, Jong Oh; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the wound-healing effects of a novel benzalkonium chloride (BC)-loaded hydrocolloid wound dressing (HCD). A BC-loaded HCD was prepared with various constituents using a hot melting method, and its mechanical properties and antimicrobial activities were assessed. The in vivo wound healings of the BC-loaded HCD in various would models were evaluated in rats compared with a commercial wound dressing, Duoderm™. This BC-loaded HCD gave better skin adhesion, swelling, mechanical strength, and flexibility compared with the commercial wound dressing. It showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, as compared with the commercial wound dressing, it showed more improved wound healings and tissue restoration effect on the excision, infection, and abrasion wounds in rats. Thus, this novel BC-loaded HCD would be an excellent alternative to the commercial wound dressing for treatment of various wounds.

  16. Plasma Proteins and Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-01

    an iron donor for proline hydroxylase synthesis. Hapto- globin also may prevent retardation of wound healing caused by infection by reducing the...dans le syndrome degression et la croissance tissulaire. Expos. Annu. Biochim. Med., 1970, 30: 149. JEEEAY, H. The metabolism of scrum proteins—III

  17. Wound care dressings and choices for care of wounds in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Carrie L

    2013-05-01

    Statistics from various resources report that many patients in home healthcare settings have wounds. These vary from surgical, pressure, neuropathic, trauma, stasis, and venous wounds. These require the assessment, knowledge, and expertise of a clinician to assist them with wound care management. The purpose of this article is to identify and categorize types of wound care products appropriate for the various types of wounds that clinicians care for and manage in the home.

  18. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  19. Timer switch to convert suction apparatus for negative pressure wound therapy application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surath Amarnath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is an established modality in the treatment of chronic wounds, open fractures, and post-operative wound problems. This method has not been widely used due to the high cost of equipment and consumables. This study demonstrates an indigenously developed apparatus which gives comparable results at a fraction of the cost. Readily available materials are used for the air-tight dressing. Materials and Methods: Equipment consists of suction apparatus with adjustable pressure valve set to a pressure 125-150 mmHg. An electronic timer switch with a sequential working time of 5 min and a standby time of 3 min provides the required intermittent negative pressure. Readily available materials such as polyvinyl alcohol sponge, suction drains and steridrapes were used to provide an air tight wound cover. Results: A total of 90 cases underwent 262 NPWT applications from 2009 to 2014. This series, comprised of 30 open fractures, 21 post-operative and 39 chronic wounds. The wound healing rate in our study was comparable to other published studies using NPWT. Conclusion: The addition of electronic timer switch will convert a suction apparatus into NPWT machine, and the results are equally effective compared to more expensive counter parts. The use of indigenous dressing materials reduces the cost significantly.

  20. Timer switch to convert suction apparatus for negative pressure wound therapy application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Surath; Reddy, Mettu Rami; Rao, Chayam Hanumantha; Surath, Harsha Vardan

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an established modality in the treatment of chronic wounds, open fractures, and post-operative wound problems. This method has not been widely used due to the high cost of equipment and consumables. This study demonstrates an indigenously developed apparatus which gives comparable results at a fraction of the cost. Readily available materials are used for the air-tight dressing. Equipment consists of suction apparatus with adjustable pressure valve set to a pressure 125-150 mmHg. An electronic timer switch with a sequential working time of 5 min and a standby time of 3 min provides the required intermittent negative pressure. Readily available materials such as polyvinyl alcohol sponge, suction drains and steridrapes were used to provide an air tight wound cover. A total of 90 cases underwent 262 NPWT applications from 2009 to 2014. This series, comprised of 30 open fractures, 21 post-operative and 39 chronic wounds. The wound healing rate in our study was comparable to other published studies using NPWT. The addition of electronic timer switch will convert a suction apparatus into NPWT machine, and the results are equally effective compared to more expensive counter parts. The use of indigenous dressing materials reduces the cost significantly.

  1. Wounding in the plant tissue: the defense of a dangerous passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Valentin Savatin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants are continuously exposed to agents such as herbivores and environmental mechanical stresses that cause wounding and open the way to the invasion by microbial pathogens. Wounding provides nutrients to pathogens and facilitates their entry into the tissue and subsequent infection. Plants have evolved constitutive and induced defense mechanisms to properly respond to wounding and prevent infection. The constitutive defenses are represented by physical barriers, i.e. the presence of cuticle or lignin, or by metabolites that act as toxins or deterrents for herbivores. Plants are also able to sense the injured tissue as an altered self and induce responses similar to those activated by pathogen infection. Endogenous molecules released from wounded tissue may act as Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs that activate the plant innate immunity. Wound-induced responses are both rapid, such as the oxidative burst and the expression of defense-related genes, and late, such as the callose deposition, the accumulation of proteinase inhibitors and of hydrolytic enzymes (i.e. chitinases and gluganases. Typical examples of DAMPs involved in the response to wounding are the peptide systemin and the oligogalacturonides, which are oligosaccharides released from the pectic component of the cell wall. Responses to wounding take place both at the site of damage (local response and systemically (systemic response and are mediated by hormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene, salicylic acid and abscisic acid.

  2. Efficacy of 1% acetic acid in the treatment of chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, V L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are those wounds that are persistent and do not respond to any sort of treatment. The concept of using topical antiseptics on open wounds is to prevent and treat infections. They also help to shorten the time taken to heal the wounds. The use of topical agents on wounds to prevent infection is a minimal ability to develop resistance to the microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with innate resistance to many antibiotics. In places that are economically backward, these problems get compounded by the inability of patients to afford newer expensive drugs. Topically applied dilute acetic acid, which is cheap and easily available, has been found to be effective in such chronic wounds. In the present study, an attempt has been made to use 1% acetic acid as the sole antimicrobial agent for the treatment of pseudomonal wound infections. A control limb was used in which the wounds were treated with normal saline. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid in low concentration of 1% in chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 6 months.

  3. Effect of visible and infrared polarized light on the healing process of full-thickness skin wounds: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanou, Panagiota; Lykoudis, Efstathios G; Athanasiou, Athanasios; Koniaris, Efthymios; Papaevangelou, Maria; Fatsea, Theodora; Bellou, Panagiota

    2009-04-01

    Polarized light has already been experimentally and clinically used in an effort to promote wound healing, but the findings have been equivocal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of visible and infrared polarized light of a specific range of wavelength (580-3400 nm) on the secondary healing of full-thickness skin wounds in rats. Forty male Wistar rats were used, divided in two groups of 20 animals each. A standardized open full-thickness skin wound was created on the back of each animal. In the first group the rats were exposed to polarized light (40 mW/cm(2) and 2.4 J/cm(2)) for 7 min on a daily basis (total daily dose = 16.8 J/cm(2)), while the second group acted as controls. Clinical and histological evaluation of wound healing were performed on days 5, 10, 15, and 20 post-wound. The size of the wounds was measured with the use of planimetry, whereas epithelialization, inflammatory response, neovascularization, and collagen formation were histologically assessed. According to our findings, the group exposed to light therapy showed statistically significantly faster epithelialization seen on days 10 and 15 post-wound compared to controls, as well as better quality of the healing process (although not statistically significantly) at all time points. In conclusion, this specific fraction of polarized light seems to have beneficial effects on wound healing, leading to faster epithelialization and qualitatively better wound healing.

  4. Overview of Wound Healing and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Dylan R; Murthy, Ananth S

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is a highly complex chain of events, and although it may never be possible to eliminate the risk of experiencing a wound, clinicians' armamentarium continues to expand with methods to manage it. The phases of wound healing are the inflammatory phase, the proliferative phase, and the maturation phase. The pathway of healing is determined by characteristics of the wound on initial presentation, and it is vital to select the appropriate method to treat the wound based on its ability to avoid hypoxia, infection, excessive edema, and foreign bodies.

  5. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 <{\\gamma}<1. Our three main findings are 1) the wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  6. Wound bed preparation from a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Halim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound bed preparation has been performed for over two decades, and the concept is well accepted. The ′TIME′ acronym, consisting of tissue debridement, i nfection or inflammation, moisture balance and edge effect, has assisted clinicians systematically in wound assessment and management. While the focus has usually been concentrated around the wound, the evolving concept of wound bed preparation promotes the treatment of the patient as a whole. This article discusses wound bed preparation and its clinical management components along with the principles of advanced wound care management at the present time. Management of tissue necrosis can be tailored according to the wound and local expertise. It ranges from simple to modern techniques like wet to dry dressing, enzymatic, biological and surgical debridement. Restoration of the bacterial balance is also an important element in managing chronic wounds that are critically colonized. Achieving a balance moist wound will hasten healing and correct biochemical imbalance by removing the excessive enzymes and growth factors. This can be achieved will multitude of dressing materials. The negative pressure wound therapy being one of the great breakthroughs. The progress and understanding on scientific basis of the wound bed preparation over the last two decades are discussed further in this article in the clinical perspectives.

  7. Wound Image Analysis Using Contour Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sundeep Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the algorithm described in this paper is to segment wound images from the normal and classify them according to the types of the wound. The segmentation of wounds extravagates color representation, which has been followed by an algorithm of grayscale segmentation based on the stack mathematical approach. Accurate classification of wounds and analyzing wound healing process is a critical task for patient care and health cost reduction at hospital. The tissue uniformity and flatness leads to a simplified approach but requires multispectral imaging for enhanced wound delineation. Contour Evolution method which uses multispectral imaging replaces more complex tools such as, SVM supervised classification, as no training step is required. In Contour Evolution, classification can be done by clustering color information, with differential quantization algorithm, the color centroids of small squares taken from segmented part of the wound image in (C1,C2 plane. Where C1, C2 are two chrominance components. Wound healing is identified by measuring the size of the wound through various means like contact and noncontact methods of wound. The wound tissues proportion is also estimated by a qualitative visual assessment based on the red-yellow-black code. Moreover, involving all the spectral response of the tissue and not only RGB components provides a higher discrimination for separating healed epithelial tissue from granulation tissue.

  8. Combined photoultrasonic treatment of infected wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Kalinin, Konstantin L.; Zmievskoy, Gregory N.; Velsher, Leonid Z.; Podkolzin, Alexander A.; Stakhanov, Mikhail L.; Gorchak, Yury Y.; Sarantsev, V. P.

    2001-05-01

    A new combined photoultrasonic (CPUS) technology for the treatment of infected wounds is suggested. The CPUS principal operation is based on the topical application of a photosensitizer followed by light irradiation in combination with low frequency ultrasonic (US) treatment of wounds. In CPUS, two methods - photodynamic (PDT) and ultrasonic therapies supplement each other beneficially and in conjunction provide a significant effect of deep suppurative inflammatory wounds treatment. The main advantages of the new technology are the combined application of an antibiotic solution and photodynamic therapy to destroy antibiotic- resistant microorganisms, an effective mixing of a photosensitizer in the wound, the US enhancement of photosensitizer impregnation into the membranes of bacteria, the US clearing of wound surface from necrotic products, an increased effective light dose exposure in the whole volume of the deep wound when the light does not penetrate totally inside the wound, an additional bactericidal effect under the US impact, and the combined effect of CPUS activation of the immune system.

  9. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Topical formulations and wound healing applications of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, H; Mori, T; Fujinaga, T

    2001-11-05

    Chitosan is being used as a wound-healing accelerator in veterinary medicine. To our knowledge, chitosan enhances the functions of inflammatory cells such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) (phagocytosis, production of osteopontin and leukotriene B4), macrophages (phagocytosis, production of interleukin (IL)-1, transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet derived growth factor), and fibroblasts (production of IL-8). As a result, chitosan promotes granulation and organization, therefore chitosan is beneficial for the large open wounds of animals. However, there are some reported complications of chitosan application. Firstly, chitosan causes lethal pneumonia in dogs which are given a high dose of chitosan. In spite of application of chitosan to various species, this finding is observed only in dogs. Secondly, intratumor injection of chitosan on mice bearing tumor increases the rate of metastasis and tumor growth. Therefore, it is important to consider these effects of chitosan, prior to drug delivery.

  11. [Suspected anaphylaxis by wound treatment with polyhexanide derivate wound products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrøder, Morten A; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Winther, Lone

    2014-12-15

    Only four cases of anaphylaxis triggered by polyhexanide have been reported in the literature. We report a case of anaphylaxis in a Danish patient treated with polyhexanide derivate (Prontosan) wound products. We emphasise the importance of intramuscular injection of adrenaline as part of the treatment protocol in the initial phase of anaphylaxis and stress the importance of being aware of polyhexanide as a potential trigger of anaphylaxis.

  12. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal

  13. Progress in corneal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal epithelium, and

  14. Rapid identification of slow healing wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kenneth; Covington, Scott; Sen, Chandan K; Januszyk, Michael; Kirsner, Robert S; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds have a prevalence of 2% in the United States, and cost an estimated $50 billion annually. Accurate stratification of wounds for risk of slow healing may help guide treatment and referral decisions. We have applied modern machine learning methods and feature engineering to develop a predictive model for delayed wound healing that uses information collected during routine care in outpatient wound care centers. Patient and wound data was collected at 68 outpatient wound care centers operated by Healogics Inc. in 26 states between 2009 and 2013. The dataset included basic demographic information on 59,953 patients, as well as both quantitative and categorical information on 180,696 wounds. Wounds were split into training and test sets by randomly assigning patients to training and test sets. Wounds were considered delayed with respect to healing time if they took more than 15 weeks to heal after presentation at a wound care center. Eleven percent of wounds in this dataset met this criterion. Prognostic models were developed on training data available in the first week of care to predict delayed healing wounds. A held out subset of the training set was used for model selection, and the final model was evaluated on the test set to evaluate discriminative power and calibration. The model achieved an area under the curve of 0.842 (95% confidence interval 0.834-0.847) for the delayed healing outcome and a Brier reliability score of 0.00018. Early, accurate prediction of delayed healing wounds can improve patient care by allowing clinicians to increase the aggressiveness of intervention in patients most at risk. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  15. Cefazolin concentration in surgically created wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy compared to surgically created wounds treated with nonadherent wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutin, Julia V; Lanz, Otto I; Magnin-Bissel, Geraldine C; Ehrich, Marion F; Miller, Emily I; Werre, Stephen R; Riegel, Thomas O

    2015-01-01

    To compare cefazolin concentrations in biopsied tissue samples collected from surgically created wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy to those collected from surgically created wounds treated with nonadherent dressings. Prospective, controlled, experimental study. Adult female spayed Beagles (n = 12). Full thickness cutaneous wounds were created on each antebrachium (n = 24). Immediately after surgery, cefazolin (22 mg/kg intravenously [IV]) was administered to each dog and continued every 8 hours during the study. The right wound was randomly assigned to group I or group II whereas the wound on the contralateral antebrachium was assigned to the other group. Group I wounds were treated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and group II wounds were treated with nonadherent dressings for 3 days. Dressings were changed and tissue biopsies obtained from wound beds at 24 hours intervals for both groups. Cefazolin wound tissue and plasma concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Blood samples for measuring plasma cefazolin concentrations were collected before biopsy sampling. At the time of surgery and at each subsequent bandage change, wound beds were swabbed and submitted for aerobic and anaerobic culture. After initiating cefazolin treatment, wound tissue antibiotic concentrations between treatment groups were not significantly different at any sampling time. Similarly, after initiating cefazolin treatment, plasma cefazolin concentrations were not significantly different at any sampling time for individual dogs. Using a canine experimental model, NPWT treatment of surgically created wounds does not statistically impact cefazolin tissue concentrations when compared with conventional nonadherent bandage therapy. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2015-01-01

    Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study...... to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound...... healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died...

  17. Management of minor acute cutaneous wounds: importance of wound healing in a moist environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korting, H C; Schöllmann, C; White, R J

    2011-02-01

    Moist wound care has been established as standard therapy for chronic wounds with impaired healing. Healing in acute wounds, in particular in minor superficial acute wounds - which indeed are much more numerous than chronic wounds - is often taken for granted because it is assumed that in those wounds normal phases of wound healing should run per se without any problems. But minor wounds such as small cuts, scraps or abrasions also need proper care to prevent complications, in particular infections. Local wound care with minor wounds consists of thorough cleansing with potable tap water or normal saline followed by the application of an appropriate dressing corresponding to the principles of moist wound treatment. In the treatment of smaller superficial wounds, it appears advisable to limit the choice of dressing to just a few products that fulfil the principles of moist wound management and are easy to use. Hydroactive colloid gels combining the attributes of hydrocolloids and hydrogels thus being appropriate for dry and exuding wounds appear especially suitable for this purpose - although there is still a lack of data from systematic studies on the effectiveness of these preparations. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Wound Penetration of Cefazolin, Ciprofloxacin, Piperacillin, Tazobactam, and Vancomycin During Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Matthew P.; Niece, Krista L.; Rizzo, Julie A.; Akers, Kevin S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses subatmospheric pressure as a noninvasive adjunct to treat wounds and has demonstrated clinical efficacy by accelerating healing of a variety of acute and chronic wounds. NPWT may also play a role in preventing or treating wound infections, possibly by increasing wound penetration of antibiotics. However, clinical data in patients undergoing antibiotic and NPWT treatment are limited. Approach: To evaluate the wound penetration of antibiotics in NPWT patients, we conducted a prospective, observational study of burn and trauma patients treated with NPWT and systemic antibiotics. We evaluated the plasma pharmacokinetic profile of systemic vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, cefazolin, and piperacillin/tazobactam, as well as total and unbound antibiotic concentrations in wound exudate from the same patients. Results: Data from 32 patients with 37 wounds undergoing NPWT demonstrated that vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam all penetrated wounds with exudate to plasma concentration ratios more than 0.8. Cefazolin did not penetrate wounds in patients undergoing NPWT as effectively, with an average exudate to plasma concentration ratio of 0.51. Innovation: Clinical data on the wound penetration of antibiotics in patients undergoing NPWT are limited, but these data suggest that antibiotics have different capacities for wound penetration during NPWT that should be considered when making clinical decisions. Conclusion: This initial report suggests that (1) vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam effectively penetrate wounds during NPWT and (2) cefazolin as well as other antibiotics may not penetrate wounds during NPWT.

  19. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in High Risk Patients Undergoing Panniculectomy: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Complications Wounds; Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Wound Healing Delayed; Incisional; Panniculectomy; Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Incisional Vac; Wound Vac; Obese; Renal Failure; Kidney Transplant; Complications; Wound Healing Complication

  20. Open access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenburg, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Open access week Van 19 tot en met 25 oktober 2015 vond wereldwijd de Open Access Week plaats. Tijdens deze week werden er over de hele wereld evenementen georganiseerd waar open access een rol speelt. Ook in Nederland zijn er diverse symposia, workshops en debatten georganiseerd zoals het debat in

  1. Predicting complex acute wound healing in patients from a wound expertise centre registry: a prognostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, Dirk T; Lindeboom, Robert; Eskes, Anne M; Brull, Huub; Legemate, Dink A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-10-01

    It is important for caregivers and patients to know which wounds are at risk of prolonged wound healing to enable timely communication and treatment. Available prognostic models predict wound healing in chronic ulcers, but not in acute wounds, that is, originating after trauma or surgery. We developed a model to detect which factors can predict (prolonged) healing of complex acute wounds in patients treated in a large wound expertise centre (WEC). Using Cox and linear regression analyses, we determined which patient- and wound-related characteristics best predict time to complete wound healing and derived a prediction formula to estimate how long this may take. We selected 563 patients with acute wounds, documented in the WEC registry between 2007 and 2012. Wounds had existed for a median of 19 days (range 6-46 days). The majority of these were located on the leg (52%). Five significant independent predictors of prolonged wound healing were identified: wound location on the trunk [hazard ratio (HR) 0·565, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·405-0·788; P = 0·001], wound infection (HR 0·728, 95% CI 0·534-0·991; P = 0·044), wound size (HR 0·993, 95% CI 0·988-0·997; P = 0·001), wound duration (HR 0·998, 95% CI 0·996-0·999; P = 0·005) and patient's age (HR 1·009, 95% CI 1·001-1·018; P = 0·020), but not diabetes. Awareness of the five factors predicting the healing of complex acute wounds, particularly wound infection and location on the trunk, may help caregivers to predict wound healing time and to detect, refer and focus on patients who need additional attention.

  2. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Bille, Camilla

    Background: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound complications, which may lead to delayed recovery, pain, reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound...... generator are used to allocate the participants into one of two groups (iNPWT vs. standard dressing), stratified by centre and type of CS. The study is conducted at five public hospitals located in three regions of Denmark. Interim analyses will be preformed along the trial using the group sequential method....... The analyses will be performed when sample size reaches 179, 357, 535, 713, and 891, respectively. Population: women with a pre-gestational BMI ≥ 30 undergoing planned or emergency caesarean section. The iNPWT or standard dressings is applied immediately following operation. In the intervention group...

  3. Current management of wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-01-01

    in the next decade. It is the hope that increasing parts of the new knowledge from basic wound healing research will be implemented in daily clinical practice. The development of new treatment products will also continue, and especially new technologies with combined types of dressing materials or dressing...... containing active substances will be accentuated. Further developments in the management structure and education will also continue and consensus of treatment guidelines, recommendations and organization models will hopefully be achieved....

  4. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in the Exotic Pets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A.; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regards to the animal’s temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency towards secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately impact wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that impact healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  5. Hydrogel wound dressing by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshii, Fumio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Water soluble polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were irradiated in solid and molten states as well as in aqueous solution in order to synthesize a hydrogel. PEO undergoes crosslinking at all phases by radiation initiation. Among these phases, the radiation in the aqueous solution requires the lowest dose for crosslinking due to the contribution of OH radical created in radiolysis of water. The hydrogel prepared by irradiation in aqueous solution was applied to a dressing for healing of wound. In order to evaluate the healing effect of the PEO hydrogel dressing, wounds formed on the back of marmots were covered by the hydrogel. The healing under the wet environment of the hydrogel dressing had three advantages, compared with that of gauze dressing, which gives a dry environment: (1) enhancement of healing rate, (2) facilitation for changing the dressing, i.e. the hydrogel can be peeled off without any damage to the regenerated skin surface, and (3) hydrogel dressing material does not remain stuck on the wound. (author)

  6. Trehalose lyophilized platelets for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Kaipainen, Arja; Ho, David; Orser, Cindy; Pebley, Walter; Rudolph, Alan; Orgill, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    Fresh platelet preparations are utilized to treat a wide variety of wounds, although storage limitations and mixed results have hampered their clinical use. We hypothesized that concentrated lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations, preserved with trehalose, maintain and possibly enhance fresh platelets' ability to improve wound healing. We studied the ability of a single dose of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets to enhance wound healing when topically applied on full-thickness wounds in the genetically diabetic mouse. We compared these results with the application of multiple doses of fresh platelet preparations and trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets as well as multiple doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and wounds left untreated. Trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets, in single and multiple applications, multiple applications of fresh platelets and multiple applications of VEGF increased granulation tissue deposition, vascularity, and proliferation when compared with untreated wounds, as assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Wounds treated with multiple doses of VEGF and a single dose of freeze-dried platelets reached 90% closure faster than wounds left untreated. A single administration of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations enhanced diabetic wound healing, therefore representing a promising strategy for the treatment of nonhealing wounds.

  7. Engineered biopolymeric scaffolds for chronic wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Dickinson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves towards precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered.

  8. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Laura E; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered.

  9. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meephansan J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jitlada Meephansan,1 Atiya Rungjang,1 Werayut Yingmema,2 Raksawan Deenonpoe,3 Saranyoo Ponnikorn3 1Division of Dermatology, Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 2Laboratory Animal Centers, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand; 3Chulabhorn International College of Medicine, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani, Thailand Abstract: Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin after injury. ROS are involved in all phases of wound healing. A balance between oxidative and antioxidative forces is necessary for a favorable healing outcome. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is considered a powerful antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing. Full-thickness dermal wounds were created in 36 healthy female mice, which were divided into a control group and a group receiving 78.9 µM topical astaxanthin treatment twice daily for 15 days. Astaxanthin-treated wounds showed noticeable contraction by day 3 of treatment and complete wound closure by day 9, whereas the wounds of control mice revealed only partial epithelialization and still carried scabs. Wound healing biological markers including Col1A1 and bFGF were significantly increased in the astaxanthin-treated group since day 1. Interestingly, the oxidative stress marker iNOS showed a significantly lower expression in the study. The results indicate that astaxanthin is an effective compound for accelerating wound healing. Keywords: astaxanthin, wound healing, reactive oxygen species, antioxidant 

  10. Bacterial Contribution in Chronicity of Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Kashif; Saleha, Shamim; Zhu, Xudong; Huo, Liang; Basit, Abdul; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2017-04-01

    A wound is damage of a tissue usually caused by laceration of a membrane, generally the skin. Wound healing is accomplished in three stages in healthy individuals, including inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling stages. Healing of wounds normally starts from the inflammatory phase and ends up in the remodeling phase, but chronic wounds remain in an inflammatory stage and do not show progression due to some specific reasons. Chronic wounds are classified in different categories, such as diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), venous leg ulcers (VLU) and pressure ulcer (PU), surgical site infection (SSI), abscess, or trauma ulcers. Globally, the incidence rate of DFU is 1-4 % and prevalence rate is 5.3-10.5 %. However, colonization of pathogenic bacteria at the wound site is associated with wound chronicity. Most chronic wounds contain more than one bacterial species and produce a synergetic effect that results in previously non-virulent bacterial species becoming virulent and causing damage to the host. While investigating bacterial diversity in chronic wounds, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Peptoniphilus, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Finegoldia, and Serratia were found most frequently in chronic wounds. Recently, it has been observed that bacteria in chronic wounds develop biofilms that contribute to a delay in healing. In a mature biofilm, bacteria grow slowly due to deficiency of nutrients that results in the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. The present review reflects the reasons why acute wounds become chronic. Interesting findings include the bacterial load, which forms biofilms and shows high-level resistance toward antibiotics, which is a threat to human health in general and particularly to some patients who have acute wounds.

  11. Clinical characteristics and treatment of burn wound sepsis in extensive burn patients: successful experience with eight cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴家科; 盛志勇; 杨红明

    2000-01-01

    Eight burn wound sepsis patients, in which 6 cases were diagnosed as MODS and two as septic shock, were treated consecutively in our hospital from September 1997 to October 1998. The plasma concentration of IL-6, IL-8, TNFα and LPS were assayed before and after surgical intervention, as well as when the patients' vital signs became stable. The results showed: ①The patients' conditions abruptly deteriorated when the burn wound sepsis emerged;②The major cause related to burn wound sepsis was extensive burn injuries, with large areas of deep burn remaining open; ③Although wound swabs taken on admission revealed the presence of colonization by many pathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was one of the most frequent bacteria isolated from the subeschar tissue; ④The plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, TNF and LPS before surgical intervention were significantly higher than that after surgical intervention (P<0.05) ;⑤The lowest level of the inflammatory mediators was observed when the patients' conditions became stable, as compared with before surgical intervention (P<0. 001).These findings suggest that the clinical characteristics of burn wound sepsis are abrupt deterioration of the general condition and prominent septic symptoms, often complicated by MODS. The main cause of burn wound sepsis is the presence of a large area of open deep burn wounds, which should be excised and covered early. LPS and pro-inflammatory mediators play an important role in the pathogenesis of burn wound sepsis. Although success in treating these patients is the result of appropriate application of multiple treatments, early, aggressive and thorough surgical excision of invasive burn infectious tissue and closure of wound play a crucial role in the successful treatment of patients complicated by burn wound sepsis. Other treatments are adjuvant but also important.

  12. 噬菌体治疗创面细菌感染研究进展%Advances in the treatment of wound bacterial infection with phage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔泽龙

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of wound bacterial infection is an extremely difficult problem in clinic, especially in patients with large wounds which are infected by multidrug resistant, pan-resistant or omni-resistant bacteria.In recent years, with a grim prospect of antibiotic resistance, phage therapy is re-valued by researchers after being ignored for nearly half a century.Phage therapy has made great achievements in prevention and control of bacterial infection of open wounds.This review is mainly focused on the latest research progress of phage therapy in wound bacterial infection.

  13. Reducing the pathogen burden and promoting healing with polyhexanide in non-healing wounds: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceviker, K; Canikoglu, M; Tatlıoglu, S; Bagdatli, Y

    2015-12-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a novel wound antiseptic solution that has a broad antimicrobial spectrum and wound healing promoting effect, with minimal side effects. The aim of present study was to demonstrate the efficacy of the PHMB on the bacterial burden of non-healing wounds, the reduction in wound size or closure of the wound in comparison to Ringer's lactate solution (RLS) after 21 days of wound dressing. A second objective was to investigate the differences in the C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and white blood cell (WBC) counts between the two groups. In this prospective and open-cohort clinical study, patients who underwent cardiac surgery between July 2006 and August 2008 were included and placed in one of two groups, PHMB or RLS, by the block randomisation method. A wound care team, consisting of two surgeons, a wound care nurse and a microbiologist, was created. Classic moist dressings and wet compresses during dressing changes were applied at least once a day or as needed. During the 21 days of hospitalisation the team collected data on the wound healing status daily, on infection parameters every third day, and wound tissue for culture weekly. There were 40 patients recruited of which 9 were excluded, leaving 31 in the intention-to-treat analysis. Of these 15 received PHMB and 16 received RLS. Overall 17 of 31 (66.7% PHMB group, 43.8% RLS group, p=0.181) patients were treated successfully by closure of surgically sutured wounds or healing by secondary intention, the wound tissue cultures of 19 of 31 patients (47.4% PHMB, 52.6% RLS, p=0.886) were negative, and wound size of all the patients were significantly reduced in clinical observations. Although the CRP levels were reduced significantly within group comparisons in both groups (p<0.001), it was significantly lower after 12 days (p<0.05) in the PHMB group compared with the RLS group. The results of this study emphasise that the successful treatment of chronic non-healing wounds require a

  14. Irradiation at 660 nm modulates different genes central to wound healing in wounded and diabetic wounded cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated process and involves a wide variety of cellular components, chemokines and growth factors. Laser irradiation has influenced gene expression and release of various growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins involved in wound healing. This study aimed to determine the expression profile of genes involved in wound healing in wounded and diabetic wounded fibroblast cells in response to irradiation at a wavelength of 660 nm. Human skin fibroblast cells (WS1) were irradiated with a diode laser (wavelength 660 nm; fluence 5 J/cm2; power output 100 mW; power density 11 mW/cm2; spot size 9.1 cm2; exposure duration 7 min 35 s). Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used as a template in real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Eighty four genes involved in wound healing (extracellular matrix and cell adhesion; inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; growth factors; and signal transduction) were evaluated in wounded and diabetic wounded cell models. Forty eight hours post-irradiation, 6 genes were significantly upregulated and 8 genes were down-regulated in irradiated wounded cells, whereas 1 gene was up-regulated and 33 genes down-regulated in irradiated diabetic wounded cells. Irradiation of stressed fibroblast cells to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 modulated the expression of different genes involved in wound healing in different cell models. Modulation of these genes leads to the effects of laser irradiation seen both in vivo and in vitro, and facilitates the wound healing process.

  15. Treatment of hyper-granulated limb wounds in horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Bader

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the different methods of treating hyper granulation tissue on experimentally induced wounds in equine limbs. Wounds were induced by removal of a skin patch and subcutaneous tissue for about 5-7 cm width and 6-8 cm in length from the dorsal and lateral aspect of the fore and hind limbs below the carpal and tarsal joints. The wounds were left open without treatment and the animals were trained 2-2.5 hours every day for about 3-5 weeks until hyper granulation tissue was developed. The schedule for the treatment of hyper granulation was divided into five groups each contained eight wounds of hyper granulation tissue; each main group was divided into two subgroups. The subgroups of first, second, third, fourth and fifth groups were treated by the following schedules: bandage alone; copper sulphate ointment 10%; silver nitrate ointment 2%; red mercury ointment 11%; and laser therapy (at a total dose of 9.72 Joule / cm2 respectively. While the second subgroups were treated by surgical resection of the hyper granulation tissue, followed by the same treatments applied on the first subgroup. The bandage for all experimental groups was changed every 48 hours until healing was occurred. The clinical and histological observation of the first group revealed that the healing take long period comparing with other groups. The mean of wound healing were 65 days in non surgical removal of hyper granulation tissue subgroup, while 57 days in surgical removed of hyper granulation tissue subgroup. The results of the second, third, fourth groups revealed that the caustic material especially red mercury has a role in healing processes through depressing the hyper granulation tissue. The mean of wound healing of the second group was 42.25 days in non surgical removal of hyper granulation tissue subgroup while 37.25 days in surgically removed hyper granulation tissue subgroup. In the third group the mean of wound healing was 45

  16. Modern and Convensional Wound Dressing to Interleukin 1 and Interleukin 6 in Diabetic wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werna Nontji

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Holistic wound care is one of the ways to prevent gangrene and amputation, modern wound dressing is more effective than convensional with increasing transforming growth factor and cytokine, especially interleukin. This study aims to identify the effectiveness of Modern and Convensional Wound Dressing to Interleukin 1 (IL-1 and Interleukin 6 (IL-6 in Diabetic wound. Method:A Quasi eksperimental pre-post with control group design was used. The intervention given was modern wound dressing and Control group by convensional wound dressing, This study was conducted in Makassar with 32 samples (16 in intervention group and 16 in control group. Result: The result of Pooled T- test showed that p = 0.00 (p < 0.05, it means that there was signifi cant correlation between modern wound dressing to IL-6 and IL-1 than Convensional wound dressing. Discussion: Process of wound healing was produced growth factor and cytokine (IL-1 and IL-6, it will stimulated by wound dressing, modern wound dressing (Calcium alginat can absorb wound drainage, non oklusive, non adhesif, and autolytic debridement. Keywords: Modern wound dressing, Interleukin 1 (IL-1, Interleukin 6 (IL-6

  17. Point-of-care wound visioning technology: Reproducibility and accuracy of a wound measurement app.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheila C; Anderson, John A E; Evans, Robyn; Woo, Kevin; Beland, Benjamin; Sasseville, Denis; Moreau, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Current wound assessment practices are lacking on several measures. For example, the most common method for measuring wound size is using a ruler, which has been demonstrated to be crude and inaccurate. An increase in periwound temperature is a classic sign of infection but skin temperature is not always measured during wound assessments. To address this, we have developed a smartphone application that enables non-contact wound surface area and temperature measurements. Here we evaluate the inter-rater reliability and accuracy of this novel point-of-care wound assessment tool. The wounds of 87 patients were measured using the Swift Wound app and a ruler. The skin surface temperature of 37 patients was also measured using an infrared FLIR™ camera integrated with the Swift Wound app and using the clinically accepted reference thermometer Exergen DermaTemp 1001. Accuracy measurements were determined by assessing differences in surface area measurements of 15 plastic wounds between a digital planimeter of known accuracy and the Swift Wound app. To evaluate the impact of training on the reproducibility of the Swift Wound app measurements, three novice raters with no wound care training, measured the length, width and area of 12 plastic model wounds using the app. High inter-rater reliabilities (ICC = 0.97-1.00) and high accuracies were obtained using the Swift Wound app across raters of different levels of training in wound care. The ruler method also yielded reliable wound measurements (ICC = 0.92-0.97), albeit lower than that of the Swift Wound app. Furthermore, there was no statistical difference between the temperature differences measured using the infrared camera and the clinically tested reference thermometer. The Swift Wound app provides highly reliable and accurate wound measurements. The FLIR™ infrared camera integrated into the Swift Wound app provides skin temperature readings equivalent to the clinically tested reference thermometer. Thus, the Swift

  18. A wearable wound moisture sensor as an indicator for wound dressing change: an observational study of wound moisture and status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Stephen D; Seoudi, Ihab; Al Hamad, Hanadi; Talal, Talal K; Anoop, Anzila A; Allahverdi, Niloofar; Zakaria, Zain; Menzies, Robert; Connolly, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Wound moisture is known to be a key parameter to ensure optimum healing conditions in wound care. This study tests the moisture content of wounds in normal practice in order to observe the moisture condition of the wound at the point of dressing change. This study is also the first large-scale observational study that investigates wound moisture status at dressing change. The WoundSense sensor is a commercially available moisture sensor which sits directly on the wound in order to find the moisture status of the wound without disturbing or removing the dressing. The results show that of the 588 dressing changes recorded, 44·9% were made when the moisture reading was in the optimum moisture zone. Of the 30 patients recruited for this study, 11 patients had an optimum moisture reading for at least 50% of the measurements before dressing change. These results suggest that a large number of unnecessary dressing changes are being made. This is a significant finding of the study as it suggests that the protocols currently followed can be modified to allow fewer dressing changes and less disturbance of the healing wound bed.

  19. HUMAN SKIN MICROORGANISMS ARE DISTRIBUTED IN BIOFILM AGGREGATES AT WOUND EDGES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, L.; Agren, M. S.; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2015-01-01

    -smoking healthy volunteers aged18 –49 yea rs were enrolled (NCT02116725). Suction blisters were raised on each but-tock by applying chambers with a 10 mm opening at 2380 mmHg and surface tem-perature of 408C. The blister roofs comprising the entire epidermis were excised. The60 wounds were scanned by OCT on day 0...

  20. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Phan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.; Carl, James

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or in proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds.

  1. Human ex vivo wound healing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a spatially and temporally regulated process that progresses through sequential, yet overlapping phases and aims to restore barrier breach. To study this complex process scientists use various in vivo and in vitro models. Here we provide step-by-step instructions on how to perform and employ an ex vivo wound healing model to assess epithelization during wound healing in human skin.

  2. [The wounded body, knowledge and art symbolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura Jorda, Gloria

    2011-02-01

    A brief tour through all art periods, analyzing and searching, to determine the meaning and symbolism of the wound in each period. To study the relationship and symbolism art / body / wound, is a vast and complex task. Can be approached from every angle imaginable. Different disciplines such as anthropology history and philosophy medicine, and now the art, we have provided different interpretations about the meaning representation and wounded human body through the centuries.

  3. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin accelerated the cutaneous wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Vinay; Gopal, Anu; Pathak, Nitya N; Kumar, Pawan; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-06-01

    Prolonged inflammation and increased oxidative stress impairs healing in diabetics and application of curcumin, a well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, could be an important strategy in improving impaired healing in diabetics. So, the present study was conducted to evaluate the cutaneous wound healing potential of topically applied curcumin in diabetic rats. Open excision skin wound was created in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats and wounded rats were divided into three groups; i) control, ii) gel-treated and iii) curcumin-treated. Pluronic F-127 gel (25%) and curcumin (0.3%) in pluronic gel were topically applied in the gel- and curcumin-treated groups, respectively, once daily for 19 days. Curcumin application increased the wound contraction and decreased the expressions of inflammatory cytokines/enzymes i.e. tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Curcumin also increased the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine i.e. IL-10 and antioxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Histopathologically, the curcumin-treated wounds showed better granulation tissue dominated by marked fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition, and wounds were covered by thick regenerated epithelial layer. These findings reveal that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential of curcumin caused faster and better wound healing in diabetic rats and curcumin could be an additional novel therapeutic agent in the management of impaired wound healing in diabetics.

  4. DIABETIC WOUND HEALING MANAGEMENT- A PEER REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhan Pathapati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder mainly impairs the body glucose utilization capacity due to this perforcely repressing the immuno-dysfunction (decreases chemotaxis, phagocytosis and intracellular killing actions and collagen synthesis which are essential in wound debridement management of diabetic patients. Delayed wound healing is considered as one of the most repulsive disabling and costly complication of diabetes. People with diabetes have extenuated circulation, poor resistance to infection and mitigate local nutrition, thus their wounds are meticulously susceptible to infection. Moreover diabetes agonizes the equilibrium exists between accumulation of extra-cellular matrix components and their re-modeling by matrix metallo-proteinases (meltrin, due to this extenuated proliferation action of fibroblasts and finally freezes the progress of wound healing frequency in hyper glycemics. However in diabetic persons the nervous system becomes numb and all feasible actions of neurons are skipped, that condition is called as diabetic neuropathy. In that situation patient body features elevated a glucose level which stiffens the arteries and lack of pain sensation in foot resulting in commencement of new wounds. Conclusion: Consider all problems associated with wound healing in diabetic persons, a proper wound healing management which includes controlling measures like optimized systemic and local factors as well as implement suitable wound dressing for necessary wound in diabeties patients.

  5. Wound Healing Effect of Curcumin: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Silvia; Manayi, Azadeh; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Gortzi, Olga; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-07-21

    Wound healing is a complex process that consists of several phases that range from coagulation, inflammation, accumulation of radical substances, to proliferation, formation of fibrous tissues and collagen, contraction of wound with formation of granulation tissue and scar. Since antiquity, vegetable substances have been used as phytotherapeutic agents for wound healing, and more recently natural substances of vegetable origin have been studied with the attempt to show their beneficial effect on wound treatment. Curcumin, the most active component of rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (common name: turmeric), has been studied for many years due to its bio-functional properties, especially antioxidant, radical scavenger, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, which play a crucial role in the wound healing process. Moreover, curcumin stimulated the production of the growth factors involved in the wound healing process, and so curcumin also accelerated the management of wound restoration. The aim of the present review is collecting and evaluating the literature data regarding curcumin properties potentially relevant for wound healing. Moreover, the investigations on the wound healing effects of curcumin are reported. In order to produce a more complete picture, the chemistry and sources of curcumin are also discussed.

  6. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ABDOMINAL WOUND DEHISCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahir Hussain

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Abdominal wound dehiscence is a preventable complication, but is still seen. When present, it poses problem in the management of the case, increases the morbidity and mortality of the patient. The present study is a prospective study done from January 2010-May 2016 with an objective to find out the incidence of wound dehiscence, the most common pathologies associated with dehiscence and to find out the statistical significance of the difference risk factors causing wound dehiscence and to evaluate the role of tension sutures in prevention of wound dehiscence. MATERIALS AND METHODS 291 major laparotomies were followed from January 2010-September 2016. There were 21 cases of dehiscence and from the remaining 270 cases, 58 patients were chosen as controls who underwent the same procedure, but without dehiscence. 15 factors were analysed and compared between the dehiscence and control groups. RESULTS The incidence was found to be 7.2%. Peritonitis was the most common pathology. The significant factors were age more than 50, wound infection. Tension suture application has shown to reduce the incidence of wound dehiscence. CONCLUSIONS  Intra-abdominal sepsis (peritonitis increases the incidence of wound dehiscence.  Age >50, Uraemic, Jaundiced, Obesity, Malnutrition increases the incidence of wound dehiscence.  Wound infection was a highly significant factor having 8 times more risk of dehiscence.

  7. Effect of astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meephansan, Jitlada; Rungjang, Atiya; Yingmema, Werayut; Deenonpoe, Raksawan; Ponnikorn, Saranyoo

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing consists of a complex series of convoluted processes which involve renewal of the skin after injury. ROS are involved in all phases of wound healing. A balance between oxidative and antioxidative forces is necessary for a favorable healing outcome. Astaxanthin, a member of the xanthophyll group, is considered a powerful antioxidant. In this study, we investigated the effect of topical astaxanthin on cutaneous wound healing. Full-thickness dermal wounds were created in 36 healthy female mice, which were divided into a control group and a group receiving 78.9 µM topical astaxanthin treatment twice daily for 15 days. Astaxanthin-treated wounds showed noticeable contraction by day 3 of treatment and complete wound closure by day 9, whereas the wounds of control mice revealed only partial epithelialization and still carried scabs. Wound healing biological markers including Col1A1 and bFGF were significantly increased in the astaxanthin-treated group since day 1. Interestingly, the oxidative stress marker iNOS showed a significantly lower expression in the study. The results indicate that astaxanthin is an effective compound for accelerating wound healing.

  8. The importance of wound documentation and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L

    Good wound documentation has become increasingly important over the last 10 years. Wound assessment provides a baseline situation against which a patient's plan of care can be evaluated. A number of documents have been implemented including the 'Code of Professional Conduct for Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors' (UKCC, 1992), the 'Post-registration Education Project' (UKCC, 1997), 'Standards of Records and Record Keeping' (UKCC, 1998), and 'Keeping the Record Straight' (NHS Executive (NHS E), 1993). These documents require nurses to maintain their professional knowledge and competence, and to recognize any deficiency in their knowledge. Having recognized any deficiency they should read the relevant literature and/or attend a study day on wound care. Nursing records are the first source of evidence investigated when a complaint is made. Wound assessment is very complex and a standardized approach to evaluation needs to be adopted. Such evaluation should encompass colour classification, wound measurement, and classification of tissue type present in the wound. There are numerous methods of measuring wounds; these range from the simple, such as manual estimation by means of a ruler or wound tracing, to the more technical procedures, e.g. computer, image analysis, and colour imaging using hue saturation and intensity. Photography, in conjunction with nursing notes, provides a very good form of wound documentation and can provide clear evidence if required for legal cases.

  9. Penetrating wounds of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrsdoerfer, R A; Johns, M E; Cantrell, R W

    1979-12-01

    Wounding capability of bullets is primarily releated to velocity. Bullet mass and shape, and specific gravity of body tissues being struck by the missile, are lesser factors. Seventy cases of penetrating wounds of the head and neck were treated during a six-year period. Vascular injuries were more common with neck wounds, while face and head injuries (extracranial) were similar to maxillofacial trauma. It is recognized that hemorrhage at the base of the skull is difficult to treat, and contemporary training in temporal bone and base of skull surgery is mandatory for the critical management of these wounds.

  10. Honey: an immunomodulator in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majtan, Juraj

    2014-01-01

    Honey is a popular natural product that is used in the treatment of burns and a broad spectrum of injuries, in particular chronic wounds. The antibacterial potential of honey has been considered the exclusive criterion for its wound healing properties. The antibacterial activity of honey has recently been fully characterized in medical-grade honeys. Recently, the multifunctional immunomodulatory properties of honey have attracted much attention. The aim of this review is to provide closer insight into the potential immunomodulatory effects of honey in wound healing. Honey and its components are able to either stimulate or inhibit the release of certain cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6) from human monocytes and macrophages, depending on wound condition. Similarly, honey seems to either reduce or activate the production of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils, also depending on the wound microenvironment. The honey-induced activation of both types of immune cells could promote debridement of a wound and speed up the repair process. Similarly, human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cell responses (e.g., cell migration and proliferation, collagen matrix production, chemotaxis) are positively affected in the presence of honey; thus, honey may accelerate reepithelization and wound closure. The immunomodulatory activity of honey is highly complex because of the involvement of multiple quantitatively variable compounds among honeys of different origins. The identification of these individual compounds and their contributions to wound healing is crucial for a better understanding of the mechanisms behind honey-mediated healing of chronic wounds.

  11. STRESS PROLONGS WOUND HEALING POST CESAREAN SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah. Yusuf

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decision for cesarean section may lead to the stress for women in delivery. Stress response requires longer recovery time in post cesarean section patients. Most of patients who experience stress before and after surgical is associated with wound healing delay. When this condition continues, the wound will have a higher risk of infection. The objective of this study was to analyze correlation between stress and wound healing phase in post cesarean section patients. Method: A cross sectional design was used in this study. The population were women with cesarean section, both elective or emergency, in Delivery Room I RSU Dr. Soetomo Surabaya. Samples were recruited by using purposive sampling, with 28 samples who met to the inclusion criterias. The observed variables were stress and wound healing phase in post cesarean section patient. Stress data were collected by interview and wound healing measurement done by observation on the 3rd day post cesarean section. Result: The result showed that women with stress experience wound healing delay. The characteristic of wound healing delay was prolonged on inflammation phase, nevertheless there was presence of granulation tissue. Spearman’s rho correlation showed that correlation value r=0.675 with p=0.000. Discussion: It can be concluded that there was strong significant correlation between stress and wound healing phase in post cesarean section patients. It is important to give this information to the patients with cesarean section in order to prevent stress and delay in wound healing phase.

  12. Vitality and time course of wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M

    2004-09-10

    The term "wound" describes the morphologic-functional disruption of the continuity of a tissue structure. A wound can be inflicted during life--when the cardiovascular and respiratory system is still intact--or after death, i.e. after cardiac and respiratory arrest. Traumatization during life triggers vital reactions that do not occur in postmortem wounds. Three types of vital reactions in wound healing can be distinguished: Reactions of the scavenger type, which are almost exclusively mediated by blood cells. Reactions by complex signal transduction pathways, which involves cascade-like release of chemokines, cytokines and adhesion molecules and may influence type 1 and type 3 reactions. Reactions of the scarring type, which involve the final repair of the damaged tissue and are carried out primarily by cells residing at the wound edges, i.e. partly concerning mesenchymal cells and partly tissue-specific cells dependent on the involved organ system. The three different types of reaction follow roughly parallel temporal courses that include cascade-like interactions among themselves. Whereas demonstration of a vital reaction suffices to differentiate an intravital wound from a postmortem wound, the vital reactions themselves follow strictly temporal courses. The regular time-dependent occurrence of each phenomenon allows--in limits--a reliable temporal classification of wound healing. A review will be given especially demonstrating the actual German scientific research in vitality and in skin wound timing as well as in timing of mechanical injury of the brain.

  13. [Signal transduction mechanism in burn wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiang-dong

    2008-10-01

    After 50 years of development in science of burns care in China, we have basically solved coverage of deep wounds of burn trauma, as well as role of multiple growth factors and stem cell in wound healing, making great contribution to improving the treatment of patients with large area of deep burns. Surgeons are paying close attention to problems of wound healing, especially in the fields of scarless healing and rehabilitation. To solve these problems, we need to do further investigation on multiple growth factors as well as proliferation/differentiation of stem cells in regulation of cell growth and differentiation in wound healing. Therefore, we are facing a even more serious challenge.

  14. Spatio-temporal Models of Lymphangiogenesis in Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Arianna; Painter, Kevin J; Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Several studies suggest that one possible cause of impaired wound healing is failed or insufficient lymphangiogenesis, that is the formation of new lymphatic capillaries. Although many mathematical models have been developed to describe the formation of blood capillaries (angiogenesis), very few have been proposed for the regeneration of the lymphatic network. Lymphangiogenesis is a markedly different process from angiogenesis, occurring at different times and in response to different chemical stimuli. Two main hypotheses have been proposed: (1) lymphatic capillaries sprout from existing interrupted ones at the edge of the wound in analogy to the blood angiogenesis case and (2) lymphatic endothelial cells first pool in the wound region following the lymph flow and then, once sufficiently populated, start to form a network. Here, we present two PDE models describing lymphangiogenesis according to these two different hypotheses. Further, we include the effect of advection due to interstitial flow and lymph flow coming from open capillaries. The variables represent different cell densities and growth factor concentrations, and where possible the parameters are estimated from biological data. The models are then solved numerically and the results are compared with the available biological literature.

  15. Wound complications following laparoscopic surgery in a Nigerian Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale O Adisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different complications may occur at laparoscopic port sites. The incidence of these varies with the size of the ports and the types of procedure performed through them. Objectives: The aim was to observe the rate and types of complications attending laparoscopic port wounds and to identify risk factors for their occurrence. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective descriptive study of all patients who had laparoscopic operations in one general surgery unit of a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria between January 2009 and December 2012. Results: A total of 236 (155 female and 81 male patients were included. The laparoscopic procedures include 63 cholecystectomies, 49 appendectomies, 62 diagnostic, biopsy and staging procedures, 22 adhesiolyses, six colonic surgeries, eight hernia repairs and 22 others. Port site complications occurred in 18 (2.8% ports on 16 (6.8% patients including port site infections in 12 (5.1% and hypertrophic scars in 4 (1.7% patients, while one patient each had port site bleeding and port site metastasis. Nine of 11 infections were superficial, while eight involved the umbilical port wound. Conclusion: Port site complications are few following laparoscopic surgeries in our setting. We advocate increased adoption of laparoscopic surgeries in Nigeria to reduce wound complications that commonly follow conventional open surgeries.

  16. Chitosan-based copper nanocomposite accelerates healing in excision wound model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Anu; Kant, Vinay; Gopalakrishnan, Anu; Tandan, Surendra K; Kumar, Dinesh

    2014-05-15

    Copper possesses efficacy in wound healing which is a complex phenomenon involving various cells, cytokines and growth factors. Copper nanoparticles modulate cells, cytokines and growth factors involved in wound healing in a better way than copper ions. Chitosan has been shown to be beneficial in healing because of its antibacterial, antifungal, biocompatible and biodegradable polymeric nature. In the present study, chitosan-based copper nanocomposite (CCNC) was prepared by mixing chitosan and copper nanoparticles. CCNC was applied topically to evaluate its wound healing potential and to study its effects on some important components of healing process in open excision wound model in adult Wistar rats. Significant increase in wound contraction was observed in the CCNC-treated rats. The up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor-beta1(TGF-β1) by CCNC-treatment revealed its role in facilitating angiogenesis, fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in CCNC-treated rats. Histological evaluation showed more fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition and intact re-epithelialization in CCNC-treated rats. Immunohistochemistry of CD31 revealed marked increase in angiogenesis. Thus, we concluded that chitosan-based copper nanocomposite efficiently enhanced cutaneous wound healing by modulation of various cells, cytokines and growth factors during different phases of healing process.

  17. Surgical sutures filled with adipose-derived stem cells promote wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Katharin Reckhenrich

    Full Text Available Delayed wound healing and scar formation are among the most frequent complications after surgical interventions. Although biodegradable surgical sutures present an excellent drug delivery opportunity, their primary function is tissue fixation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC act as trophic mediators and are successful in activating biomaterials. Here biodegradable sutures were filled with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC to provide a pro-regenerative environment at the injured site. Results showed that after filling, ASCs attach to the suture material, distribute equally throughout the filaments, and remain viable in the suture. Among a broad panel of cytokines, cell-filled sutures constantly release vascular endothelial growth factor to supernatants. Such conditioned media was evaluated in an in vitro wound healing assay and showed a significant decrease in the open wound area compared to controls. After suturing in an ex vivo wound model, cells remained in the suture and maintained their metabolic activity. Furthermore, cell-filled sutures can be cryopreserved without losing their viability. This study presents an innovative approach to equip surgical sutures with pro-regenerative features and allows the treatment and fixation of wounds in one step, therefore representing a promising tool to promote wound healing after injury.

  18. CLINICAL RESULTS FROM THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC SKIN WOUNDS WITH PLATELET RICH PLASMA (PRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pencho Kossev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To show platelet rich plasma (PRP application of chronic skin wounds and to evaluate the results from the treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 14 patients with problematic skin wounds had been treated at the clinic for a period of five years (from May 2009 to December 2014 with the following patient sex ratio: male patients - 5 and female patients - 9. Average age - 48,5 (30-76. Patients with Type 2 Diabetes - 4, with decubitus ulcers - 6, traumatic - 8, with infection - 5. Based on a scheme developed by us, all cases were treated by administering platelet-rich plasma, derived by PRGF Endoret system. Follow-up period was within 4 - 6 months (4,5 on average. RESULTS: The results have been evaluated based on the following functional scoring systems - Total wound score, Total anatomic score and Total score (20. The baseline values at the very beginning of the follow-up period were as follows: Total wound score - 12 p.; Total anatomic score - 10 p., Total score - 17 p. By the end of the treatment period the score was 0 p., which means excellent results, i.e. complete healing of the wounds. CONCLUSION: We believe that the application of PRP may become optimal therapy in the treatment of difficult to heal wounds around joints, bone, subject tendons, plantar surface of the foot, etc., as it opens new perspectives in the field of human tissue regeneration.

  19. Development of a wound healing index for patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Fife, Caroline E; Smout, Randall J; Barrett, Ryan S; Thomson, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials in wound care generalize poorly because they exclude patients with significant comorbid conditions. Research using real-world wound care patients is hindered by lack of validated methods to stratify patients according to severity of underlying illnesses. We developed a comprehensive stratification system for patients with wounds that predicts healing likelihood. Complete medical record data on 50,967 wounds from the United States Wound Registry were assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, etc.). Factors known to be associated with healing were evaluated using logistic regression models. Significant variables (p healing for each wound type. Some variables predicted significantly in nearly all models: wound size, wound age, number of wounds, evidence of bioburden, tissue type exposed (Wagner grade or stage), being nonambulatory, and requiring hospitalization during the course of care. Variables significant in some models included renal failure, renal transplant, malnutrition, autoimmune disease, and cardiovascular disease. All models validated well when applied to the holdout sample. The "Wound Healing Index" can validly predict likelihood of wound healing among real-world patients and can facilitate comparative effectiveness research to identify patients needing advanced therapeutics. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  20. Immunodepletion of high-abundant proteins from acute and chronic wound fluids to elucidate low-abundant regulators in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnacki Caroline

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of wound healing consists of several well distinguishable and finely tuned phases. For most of these phases specific proteins have been characterized, although the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not yet fully understood. It is an open question as to whether deficits in wound healing can be traced back to chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. Previous research efforts in this field focus largely on a restricted set of marker proteins due to the limitations detection by antibodies imposes. For mechanistic purposes the elucidation of differences in acute and chronic wounds can be addressed by a less restricted proteome study. Mass spectrometric (MS methods, e.g. multi dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT, are well suitable for this complex theme of interest. The human wound fluid proteome is extremely complex, as is human plasma. Therefore, high-abundant proteins often mask the mass spectrometric detection of lower-abundant ones, which makes a depletion step of such predominant proteins inevitable. Findings In this study a commercially available immunodepletion kit was evaluated for the detection of low-abundant proteins from wound fluids. The dynamic range of the entire workflow was significantly increased to 5-6 orders of magnitude, which makes low-abundant regulatory proteins involved in wound healing accessible for MS detection. Conclusion The depletion of abundant proteins is absolutely necessary in order to analyze highly complex protein mixtures such as wound fluids using mass spectrometry. For this the used immunodepletion kit is a first but important step in order to represent the entire dynamic range of highly complex protein mixtures in the future.

  1. Assessment of Wound Therapy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-07

    implant has been demonstrated (5,256). 4.5 Calcitonin This hormone ( salmon calcitonin is least degradable and thus most effective), given systemically...TAF) 46 4.5 Calcitonin 46 4.6 Miscellaneous Biological Growth Interaction 47 Materials 4.7 cAMP, cGMP 47 4.8 Adenyl Cylase Effectors 47 4.8.1 Cholera...Lupulescu, A. and J. Habowsky. 1978. Effects cf Calcitonin on Wound Healing: A Morphological Study in Rabbits. J. Surg. Res. 25(3): 260-8. 116. Hormann, H

  2. Marsupialization of fistulotomy and fistulectomy wounds improves healing and decreases bleeding: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatori, M; Ayabaca, S M; Cafaro, D; Iannello, A; Magrini, S

    2006-01-01

    Marsupialization of anal fistulotomy/fistulectomy wound leaves less raw unepithelialized tissue. The suture results in a more rapid healing and is likely to reduce the risk of bleeding but at the cost of an increased pain and infection. The aim of this prospective study was to compare the outcomes of marsupialization and open wound. Forty-six consecutive patients with anal fistulae were recruited in a randomized controlled trial. Fistula tracks were treated by fistulotomy and/or fistulectomy. The resulting wounds were marsupialized to the skin edges with locking continuous absorbable sutures (M group) or left open (O group). The clinical outcome was then evaluated. The intra-operative effect of the suture on wound size was recorded as well as the postoperative pain using a 0-10 visual analogue scale (VAS) and the occurrence of both wound bleeding and infection. Twenty-two patients were randomized to the M group and 24 to the O group. There were no differences in the age, sex and fistula type between the groups. Mean follow-up times were 10.5 and 13.8 months, respectively. No significant difference was observed in postoperative pain, the VAS being 3.5 +/- 1.5 in the M group and 3.4 +/- 1.6 in the O group at 12 h (mean +/- s.e.m.; n.s). The marsupialization nearly halved the size of the wound intra-operatively from an area of 1749 +/- 66 mm2 to 819 +/- 38 mm2 (P fistulotomy/fistulectomy significantly reduces the size of the wound and the risk of bleeding, without increasing postoperative pain and sepsis.

  3. Open hardware for open science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the open source software movement, the Open Hardware Repository was created to enable hardware developers to share the results of their R&D activities. The recently published CERN Open Hardware Licence offers the legal framework to support this knowledge and technology exchange.   Two years ago, a group of electronics designers led by Javier Serrano, a CERN engineer, working in experimental physics laboratories created the Open Hardware Repository (OHR). This project was initiated in order to facilitate the exchange of hardware designs across the community in line with the ideals of “open science”. The main objectives include avoiding duplication of effort by sharing results across different teams that might be working on the same need. “For hardware developers, the advantages of open hardware are numerous. For example, it is a great learning tool for technologies some developers would not otherwise master, and it avoids unnecessary work if someone ha...

  4. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  5. Open Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  6. General concept of wound healing, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus O.H. Prasetyono

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a transition of processes which is also recognized as one of the most complex processes in human physiology. Complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and mediators take place in the healing process of wound involving cellular and molecular events. The inflammatory phase is naturally intended to remove devitalized tissue and prevent invasive infection. The proliferative phase is characterized by the formation of granulation tissue within the wound bed, composed of new capillary network, fibroblast, and macrophages in a loose arrangement of supporting structure. This second phase lasts from day 8 to 21 after the injury is also the phase for epithelialisation. The natural period of proliferative phase is a reflection for us in treating wound to reach the goal which ultimately defines as closed wound. The final maturation phase is also characterized by the balancing between deposition of collagen and its degradation. There are at least three prerequisites which are ideal local conditions for the nature of wound to go on a normal process of healing i.e. 1 all tissue involved in the wound and surrounding should be vital, 2 no foreign bodies in the wound, and 3 free from excessive contamination/infection. The author formulated a step ladder of thinking in regards of healing intentions covering all acute and chronic wounds. Regarding the “hierarchy” of healing intention, the fi rst and ideal choice to heal wounds is by primary intention followed by tertiary intention and lastly the secondary intention. (Med J Indones 2009;18:206-14Key words: inflammatory mediator, epithelialisation, growth factor, wound healing

  7. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Jumaat Mohd. Yussof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs. MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds.

  8. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) for the Management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) for the Management of ... that in the management of laparostomy wounds, NPWT provides an easier way to manage ... the frequency of dressings changes required with traditional wound dressings.

  9. Mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fa-Si-Oen, Patrick Regnier

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical bowel preparation is a long standing practice in elective open colon surgery dating from the 1970's. It has always been believed to reduce the rate of postoperative complications in the form of anastomotic leakage and wound infection. In this thesis we broadly and thoroughly examine the various aspects and the value of mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery. - Mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery does not reduce the rate of anastomotic le...

  10. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  11. Advances in research on mechanisms of the effect of negative pressure wound treatment in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT refers to apply a highly porous material between the wound and a semipermeable membrane, and it is then connected to a suction apparatus, leading to a minimal deformation of wound, resulting in promoting cell proliferation and wound repair. These devices may significantly expedite wound healing, facilitate the formation of granulation tissue, and reduce the complexity of subsequent reconstructive operations. In recent years, along with wide clinical use, the therapeutic effect of NPWT has been recognized, but the mechanism of its clinical effect still needs further research. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.15

  12. Abdominal wound closure: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams ZF

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zachary F Williams, William W Hope Department of Surgery, South East Area Health Education Center, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC, USA Abstract: This review examines both early and late wound complications following laparotomy closure, with particular emphasis on technical aspects that reduce hernia formation. Abdominal fascial closure is an area of considerable variation within the field of general surgery. The formation of hernias following abdominal wall incisions continues to be a challenging problem. Ventral hernia repairs are among the most common surgeries performed by general surgeons, and despite many technical advances in the field, incisional hernia rates remain high. Much attention and research has been directed to the surgical management of hernias. Less focus has been placed on prevention of hernia formation despite its obvious importance. This review examines the effects of factors such as the type of incision, suture type and size, closure method, patient risk factors, and the use of prophylactic mesh. Keywords: incisional, abdominal, hernia, prevention, wound closure techniques 

  13. YAP and TAZ regulate skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Jung; Ran Byun, Mi; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-02-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway regulates organ size, tissue regeneration, and stem cell self-renewal. The two key downstream transcription coactivators in this pathway, Yes-associated protein (YAP) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), mediate the major gene regulation and biological functions of the Hippo pathway. The biological functions of YAP and TAZ in many tissues are known; however, their roles in skin wound healing remain unclear. To analyze whether YAP and/or TAZ are required for cutaneous wound healing, we performed small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of YAP/TAZ in full-thickness skin wounds. YAP is strongly expressed in the nucleus and cytoplasm in the epidermis and hair follicle. Interestingly, YAP is expressed in the nucleus in the dermis at 2 and 7 days after wounding. TAZ normally localizes to the cytoplasm in the dermis but is distributed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm at 1 day after wounding. The knockdown of YAP and TAZ markedly delayed the rate of wound closure and reduced the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) expression in the wound. YAP and TAZ also modulate the expression of TGF-β1 signaling pathway components such as Smad-2, p21, and Smad-7. These results suggest that YAP and TAZ localization to the nucleus is required for skin wound healing.

  14. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  15. Using behavior modification to promote wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, E; Walsh, A; Bradley, M

    2000-10-01

    Successfully caring for patients with wounds under PPS demands that current practice approaches must change. Instead of focusing on dressings and techniques alone, this article describes how first addressing patients' psychological readiness for change can move them quickly to self-care and enhance wound healing, which results in cost savings and better outcomes.

  16. Negative pressure wound therapy: clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoz H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heidi Sandoz Accelerate CIC, Mile End Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT, also known as topical negative pressure therapy, has been increasingly used in health care for the management of a wide variety of wounds over the last 2–3 decades. It is an advanced therapy that can be helpful to accelerate wound healing in both acute and chronic wounds by delivering negative pressure (suction to the wound bed. More recent advancements in the application of NPWT have provided clinicians with wider choices of utilization. There are now devices available that can deliver irrigation to the wound bed, be used for closed surgical incisions, or are disposable and highly portable. Systematic reviews considering NPWT have been published previously. These usually focus on one wound group or device and fail to offer practical clinical guidance due to the scrutiny offered to the evidence via a systematic review process. Here, an overview of the history of NPWT, the varieties of device available, their wide clinical application, and the evidence to support its use are explored in a pragmatic way. Keywords: negative pressure, wound, incision, healing, pain 

  17. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing.

  18. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  19. Assessment and nutritional aspects of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Antonio C L; Groth, Anne K; Branco, Alessandra B

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study is to review the physiopathology and the nutritional aspects of wound healing. Wound healing consists of a perfect and coordinated cascade of events that result in tissue reconstitution. The healing process is common to all wounds, independent of the agent that has caused it. It is divided didactically into three phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling or maturation. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and is also the main component of the wound matrix. It is organized in a thick and dynamic net, resulting from constant collagen deposition and reabsorption. Wound scar is the result of the interaction between collagen synthesis, degradation, and remodeling. There are several ways to evaluate wound healing: tensiometry, collagen morphometry, immunohistochemistry, and, more recently, the dosage of growth factors. Malnutrition adversely affects wound healing. On the contrary, the healing process can be stimulated by preoperative feeding and by certain nutrients such as glutamine, arginine, butyrate, and antioxidants. Wound healing is a complex process that started to be fully understood only in recent years. Recent research has been directed to act in the nutrition modulation of the healing process.

  20. Multispectral imaging of acute wound tissue oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Huong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the appropriate range of values for the transcutaneous blood oxygen saturation (StO2 of granulating tissues and the surrounding tissue that can ensure timely wound recovery. This work has used a multispectral imaging system to collect wound images at wavelengths ranging between 520nm and 600nm with a resolution of 10nm. As part of this research, a pilot study was conducted on three injured individuals with superficial wounds of different wound ages at different skin locations. The StO2 value predicted for the examined wounds using the Extended Modified Lambert–Beer model revealed a mean StO2 of 61±10.3% compared to 41.6±6.2% at the surrounding tissues, and 50.1±1.53% for control sites. These preliminary results contribute to the existing knowledge on the possible range and variation of wound bed StO2 that are to be used as indicators of the functioning of the vasomotion system and wound health. This study has concluded that a high StO2 of approximately 60% and a large fluctuation in this value should precede a good progression in wound healing.

  1. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro Iizuka; Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events;restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs), regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  2. Wound healing and wound location in critical limb ischemia following endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norihiro; Hirano, Keisuke; Nakano, Masatsugu; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Tsukahara, Reiko; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ishimori, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The differences in wound healing according to wound location remain unclear. Between April 2007 and October 2011, 138 patients (166 limbs) with critical limb ischemia with tissue loss were treated with endovascular treatment. On these limbs, 177 individual wounds were identified on the foot and were evaluated for wound healing rates and time to healing according to their locations. Wound locations were divided into 3 groups: group T (Toe wounds, n=112), group H (Heel wounds, n=25), and group E (Extensive wounds extending onto the fore- or mid-foot along with dorsum or plantar surfaces, n=40). The mean follow-up period was 23±19 months. At 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, wound healing rates were 51%, 64%, 75%, and 75%, respectively, in group T; 12%, 36%, 36%, and 52%, respectively, in group H; and 0%, 5%, 8%, and 13%, respectively, in group E. The median time to healing was 64 days (interquartile range 25-156 days) in group T, 168 days (interquartile range 123-316 days) in group H, and 267 days (interquartile range 177-316 days) in group E (P=0.038). Extensive wounds extending onto the fore- or mid-foot along with dorsum or plantar surfaces were the most difficult type of wound to heal.

  3. The natural history of pedal puncture wounds in diabetics: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    East Jeffrey M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons usually witness only the limb-threatening stages of infected, closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Given that this catastrophic outcome often represents failure of conservative management of pre-infected wounds, some suggest consideration of invasive intervention (coring or laying-open for pre-infected wounds in hope of preventing contamination from evolving into infection, there being no evidence based guidelines. However, an invasive pre-emptive approach is only justifiable if the probability of progression to catastrophic infection is very high. Literature search revealed no prior studies on the natural history of closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Methods A survey was conducted via an interviewer-administered questionnaire on 198 adult diabetics resident in the parish of St. James, Jamaica. The sample was selected using a purposive technique designed to mirror the social gradient and residential distribution of the target population and is twice the number needed to detect a prevalence of puncture wounds of 14% with a range of 7-21% in a random sample of the estimated adult diabetic population. Results The prevalence of a history of at least one closed pedal puncture wound since diagnosis of diabetes was 25.8% (CI; 19.6-31.9%. The only modifiable variable associated at the 5% level of significance with risk of pedal puncture wound, after adjustment by multivariable logistic regression, was site of interview/paying status, a variable substantially reflective of income more so than quality-of-care. Of 77 reported episodes of closed pedal puncture wound among 51 participants, 45.4% healed without medical intervention, 27.3% healed after non-surgical treatment by a doctor and 27.3% required surgical intervention ranging from debridement to below-knee amputation. Anesthetic foot (failure to feel the puncture and sole of the forefoot as site of puncture were the variables significantly associated with

  4. Open Source and Open Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Publication reference: Koper, R. (2008). Open Source and Open Standards. In J. M. Spector, M. Merrill, J. van Merriënboer & M. P. Driscol (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology (3rd ed., pp. 355-368). New York: Routledge.

  5. Wound healing in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreml, Stephan; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus; Prantl, Lukas; Landthaler, Michael; Babilas, Philipp

    2010-11-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major therapeutic and economic issues in medicine today. Cutaneous wound healing is an extremely well-regulated and complex process basically divided into 3 phases: inflammation, proliferation, and tissue remodeling. Unfortunately, we still do not understand this process precisely enough to give direction effectively to impaired healing processes. There have been many new developments in wound healing that provide fascinating insights and may improve our ability to manage clinical problems. Our goal is to acquaint the reader with selected major novel findings about cutaneous wound healing that have been published since the beginning of the new millennium. We discuss advances in areas such as genetics, proteases, cytokines, chemokines, and regulatory peptides, as well as therapeutic strategies, all set in the framework of the different phases of wound healing.

  6. An unusual stab wound to the buttock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf F Hefny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stab wounds to the buttock are uncommon injuries that are rarely seen in surgical civilian practice. Although, the wound appears trivial, it may cause major life-threatening visceral and vascular injuries. Failure to detect these injuries may lead to serious morbidity and mortality. Herein, we report a patient with a single gluteal stab wound, which was initially sutured and treated conservatively. Two days later, patient developed fever, lower abdominal pain and tenderness with leakage of fecal material from the wound. Exploratory laparotomy revealed an extraperitoneal rectal perforation for which a Hartmann′s procedure was performed. Computed tomography scanning is recommended as a diagnostic tool for stable patients having buttock stab wounds. Diverging colostomy is the standard surgical procedure for extraperitonal rectal injuries that cannot be properly visualized and repaired during a laparotomy. More evidence is needed to assess the fecal non-diversion approach in the treatment of these patients.

  7. [Management of wound infection after spinal operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yun; Chen, Zhong-Qiang; Zhou, Fang; Liu, Zhong-Jun

    2005-02-15

    To elucidate the treatment of wound infection after spinal operation. Thirty-six cases of wound infection after spinal operation were analyzed retrospectively. Sixteen cases had debridement and dressing changing, 20 cases had debridement and irrigation-suction system. Thirty-four cases had wound healed and 2 case dead of septicemia. Irrigation-suction had better result than that of only debridement. Among the 11 cases of internal fixation, 9 cases reserved the implants. (1) Wound infection after spinal operation is a serious postoperative complication and should be treated carefully; (2) Nutrition support, reasonable antibiotic and irrigation-suction are effective methods; (3) When wound infection occurs, removing the implants out is not indispensible.

  8. Animal models of chronic wound care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trostrup, Hannah; Thomsen, Kim; Calum, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    . An inhibiting effect of bacterial biofilms on wound healing is gaining significant clinical attention over the last few years. There is still a paucity of suitable animal models to recapitulate human chronic wounds. The etiology of the wound (venous insufficiency, ischemia, diabetes, pressure) has to be taken...... on nonhealing wounds. Relevant hypotheses based on clinical or in vitro observations can be tested in representative animal models, which provide crucial tools to uncover the pathophysiology of cutaneous skin repair in infectious environments. Disposing factors, species of the infectious agent(s), and time...... of establishment of the infection are well defined in suitable animal models. In addition, several endpoints can be involved for evaluation. Animals do not display chronic wounds in the way that humans do. However, in many cases, animal models can mirror the pathological conditions observed in humans, although...

  9. Surgical tip: Repair of acute Achilles rupture with Krackow suture through a 1.5 cm medial wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, T H

    2010-03-01

    Acute Achilles tendon ruptures is one of the commonest tendon injury of the foot and ankle. The management of this problem is still controversial. Treatment can be classified into non-surgical and surgical types. Surgical management can be subdivided into open repair, percutaneous with or without adjunct of arthroscopy. In compare with non-surgical management, surgical management will decrease the tendon re-rupture rate. However, the possible surgical complications including wound breakdown and sural nerve injury are still quite significant. Percutaneous repair technique has the advantage of less chance of wound breakdown, but the rate of tendon re-rupture is higher than that after open tendon repair, because the repair is usually weaker than that achieved in open repair. Lui have described an endoscopic assisted repair with the Krackow locking suture. However, the technique is complicated and six portal wounds are needed. A simpler way of applying the Krackow suture through the portal wound has been described for reattachment of Achilles tendon insertion after endoscopic calcaneoplasty. We describe a mini-open approach of Achilles tendon repair with the Krackow locking suture. By means of release of the medial edge of the investing fascia, the Achilles tendon can be mobilized easily and the Krackow locking suture can be applied through a 1.5cm medial wound. Hopefully, this can improve the strength of repair and maintaining the advantage of minimally invasive tendon repair.

  10. Amelioration of excision wounds by topical application of green synthesized, formulated silver and gold nanoparticles in albino Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naraginti, Saraschandra; Kumari, P Lakshmi; Das, Raunak Kumar; Sivakumar, A; Patil, Sagar Hindurao; Andhalkar, Vaibhav Vilas

    2016-05-01

    Wound healing, a complex biological process, has attained a lot of attention as dermatologists are primarily interested in stimulated wound closure without formation of scar or a faint scar. The recent upsurgence of nanotechnology has provided novel therapeutic materials in the form of silver and gold nanoparticles which accelerate the wound healing process. The effect of formulated nanoparticles using Coleus forskohlii root extract (green synthesized) has been tried out for ameliorating full thickness excision wounds in albino Wistar male rats. The evaluation of in vivo activity of nanoparticles in wound healing was carried out on open wounds made by excision on the dorsal sides of albino Wistar rats under anesthesia, and the healing of the wounds was assessed. Histological aspects of the healing process were studied by a HE (Hematoxylin and Eosin) staining method to assess various degrees of re-epithelialization and the linear alignment of the granulation tissue whereas Van Gieson's histochemical staining was performed to observe collagen fibers. The healing action shown by the formulated nanoparticles was remarkable during the early stages of wound healing, which resulted in the substantial reduction of the whole healing period. Topical application of formulated gold nanoparticles was found to be more effective in suppressing inflammation and stimulating re-epithelialization compared to silver nanoparticles during the healing process. The results throw light on the amelioration of excision wounds using nanoparticles which could be a novel therapeutic way of improving wound healing in clinical practice. The mechanism of advanced healing action of both types of nanoparticles could be due to their antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Open IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germonprez, Matt; Crowston, Kevin; Avital, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The collective intelligence and collective action of “open” communities have produced a variety of complex knowledge goods and radical social change. The Information Systems (IS) community has invested significant effort into researching open communities and the ecosystems in which they operate...... therefore seeks to stimulate a thoughtful and dynamic discussion around the proposition that becoming a more open community will enhance the IS discipline’s scholarly inquiry and global impact....

  12. Open IS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germonprez, Matt; Crowston, Kevin; Avital, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The collective intelligence and collective action of “open” communities have produced a variety of complex knowledge goods and radical social change. The Information Systems (IS) community has invested significant effort into researching open communities and the ecosystems in which they operate...... therefore seeks to stimulate a thoughtful and dynamic discussion around the proposition that becoming a more open community will enhance the IS discipline’s scholarly inquiry and global impact....

  13. An open question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, John

    2004-01-01

    The lungs are surrounded by the pleural membranes. The visceral pleura directly covers the lung and is separated from the parietal pleura by a layer of surfactant, which reduces friction during respiratory movement. A potential space exists between these two layers, and they may become separated by fluid or air. A lung can collapse to the size of a fist under pressure from either. Standard treatment in the field for an open chest wound is an occlusive dressing. The first thing that can be used to occlude the wound is a gloved hand. After placing the dressing, evaluate the breath sounds and determine if they have improved. The dressing should be taped down on three sides, leaving one side open to relieve the pressure during exhalation (one-way valve). "Burping" the dressing involves lifting one side to make sure any pressure buildup is relieved, as occasionally the dressing can become adhered to the skin, which may lead to a tension pneumothorax. If, after ensuring the occlusive dressing is properly in place, the respiratory rate increases, distress level worsens, oxygen saturations fall and breath sounds decrease, then needle decompression is required. A neurovascular bundle is located underneath each rib, and it is important to avoid damage to that bundle by performing a decompression over the top of a rib. If the patient is intubated before the development of a tension pneumothorax, carefully evaluate the breath sounds (especially if the left-side sounds are diminished) to determine if the ET tube needs to be withdrawn a centimeter. The rescuer performing ventilation will usually recognize a tension pneumothorax by the difficulty in bagging the patient. Remember, when you perform a needle thoracentesis, you are creating an open chest wound. Early signs and symptoms of a tension pneumothorax include diminished or absent breath sounds, severe dyspnea, narrowing pulse pressure, tachycardia and restlessness. Neck veins may be distended, but this can be a normal

  14. Wartime open globe eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plestina-Borjan, Ivna; Medvidovic-Grubisic, Maria; Zuljan, Igor; Lakos, Venera; Miljak, Snjezana; Markovic, Irena; Ivanisevic, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Open globe injuries are the most serious eye injuries in war as in peace time. The purpose of this study is to analyze wartime open globe eye injuries in 72 patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Clinical Hospital of Split from July 1991 to April 1993, during the intensive war in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, and to evaluate crucial factors responsible for the functional success of the treatment. Wartime open globe eye injuries were retrospectively analyzed in 72 patients (80 eyes) hospitalized at Clinical Hospital of Split, Department of Ophthalmology, between July 1991 and April 1993. The causes and ways of wounding, localization of wounds and presence, nature and localization of the foreign body, as well as admission time, microsurgical management and other factors contributing to poor visual outcome were studied. Standard international classification of ocular traumas (the Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology and the International Ocular Trauma Classification) was used for the classified and graded injuries. Open globe eye injuries amounted to 52.65% of all war injuries to the eyes. Bilateral injuries were found in eight patients (11.11%). The most frequent cause of the injures were fragments of explosive devices (more than two-thirds). Most of the patients were admitted to the hospital within 24 hours of the injury. Using current microsurgical techniques, the attempt was made to achieve not only anatomical but also functional recovery already in the primary treatment. In 30 eyes (37.50%) final visual acuity amounted to more than 0.1, and in 22 eyes (27.50%) it reached 0.5. There was a statistically significant correlation between admission within the first 12 hours and postoperative improved visual acuity (chi(2) = 4.53; p = 0.033). Statistically significantly better visual acuity was found in patients with lesions limited to the anterior segment of the eye. Primary enucleation or evisceration was performed only exceptionally: one enucleation

  15. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Tecomaria capensis leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saini NK; Singhal M; Srivastava B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential wound healing activity of Tecomaria capensis leaves extract (TCLE) using different models in rats.(a) Excision wound model,(b) Incision wound model and (c) Dead space wound model.TCLE (100,300,1 000 and 2 000 mg.kg-1) was given to rats to observe acute toxicity.No toxicity was found in animals till 14 days.TCLE 5% and 10% ointment were applied topically in excision wound model and incision wound model.TCLE 200 and 400 mg·kg-1 were given orally in dead space wound model.It improved healing in excision wound model,increased breaking strength of tissue in incision wound model,and increased granuloma breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in dead space wound model.These results showed that TCLE presents significant wound healing activity.

  16. Endoscopic versus open bursectomy of lateral malleolar bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Hyuck; Lee, Kyung Tai; Lee, Young Koo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jeong Ryoul; Chung, Woo Chull; Cha, Seung Do

    2012-06-01

    Compare the result of endoscopic versus open bursectomy in lateral malleolar bursitis. Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (22 ankles) undergoing either open or endoscopic excision of lateral malleolar bursitis. The median age was 64 (38-79) years old. The median postoperative follow-up was 15 (12-18) months. Those patients undergoing endoscopic excision showed a higher satisfaction rate (excellent 9, good 2) than open excision (excellent 4, good 3, fair 1). The wounds also healed earlier in the endoscopic group although the operation time was slightly longer. One patient in the endoscopic group had recurrence of symptoms but complications in the open group included one patient with skin necrosis, one patient with wound dehiscence, and two patients of with superficial peroneal nerve injury. Endoscopic resection of the lateral malleolar bursitis is a promising technique and shows favorable results compared to the open resection. Therapeutic studies-Investigating the result of treatment, Level II.

  17. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of clinically used antiseptics and wound irrigating agents in combination with wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Tobias; Limoochi-Deli, Simin; Lahmer, Armin; Jacobsen, Frank; Goertz, Ole; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Seipp, Hans-Martin; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2011-04-01

    A primary strategy for preventing and treating wound infection in chronic wounds is the use of topical antiseptics and wound irrigating agents. However, their interaction with commonly used wound dressings has not yet been investigated. In this study, the authors analyzed the antimicrobial activity of antiseptics and wound irrigating agents used with commercially available wound dressings. Five clinically used antiseptics and wound irrigating agents (Prontosan, Lavasept, Braunol, Octenisept, and Betaisodona) were tested in the presence or absence of 42 wound dressings against Staphylococcus aureus. The determination of antibacterial activity was performed by disk diffusion assay. Povidone-iodine-based products showed sufficient antimicrobial activity in 64 to 78 percent of the combinations assessed (p > 0.01). The octenidine derivate Octenisept showed sufficient antimicrobial activity in 54 percent of combinations. Polyhexamethylene biguanide derivatives demonstrated sufficient antimicrobial activity in 32 percent of the combinations. This study revealed that commonly used wound dressings dramatically reduce antibacterial activity of clinically used antiseptics and wound irrigating agents in vitro.

  19. Wound healing properties of Indian propolis studied on excision wound-induced rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyam Pillai, S; Palsamy, P; Subramanian, S; Kandaswamy, M

    2010-11-01

    In traditional medicine propolis is widely used for the treatment of various ailments including ulcer and wound healing. The phytochemical screening of Indian propolis indicates the presence of biologically active ingredients in appreciable amounts. In the absence of systematic evaluation of wound healing properties of Indian propolis in the literature, the present study was undertaken. The aim of this study was to evaluate the wound healing potential of Indian propolis on excision wounds induced in experimental rats. Excision wounds were created in male Wistar rats and were treated with Indian propolis ointment (nitrofurazone was used as a reference drug - widely used for wound healing) for a period of 14 days. Control rats were treated with petroleum jelly. The parameters analyzed include wound contraction, hydroxyproline, hexosamine, uronic acid, total protein, DNA, and RNA. Topical application of propolis ointment for 14 days significantly improved the wound contraction when compared to the control group of rats. The determination of hydroxyproline, hexosamine, uronic acid, DNA, RNA and protein levels in the wound matrix revealed the pro-healing effects of propolis. The results obtained were comparable with nitrofurazone. It appears that the ethanol extract of Indian propolis possesses significant pro-healing activity by accelerating the healing process at various phases of tissue repair. The presence of biologically active ingredients such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, terpenes, benzoic acids, amino acids and vitamins, etc. in Indian propolis may readily account for the observed prophylactic action of propolis in wound healing.

  20. Evaluation of wound healing property of Terminalia catappa on excision wound models in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Kumar, V; Singh, B K; Singh, R

    2014-05-01

    Wound is defined as the loss of breaking cellular and functional continuity of the living tissues. Management of wounds is frequently encountered with different problems. Drug resistance and toxicity hindered the development of synthetic antimicrobial agents with wound healing activity. Many plants with potent pharmacological activities may offer better treatment options viz. Terminalia chebula, Terminalia bellirica and Phyllanthus emblica formulations have shown healing activities on wounds.The present study was planned to investigate the wound healing activity of Terminalia catappa on excision wound model in rats. Ointment was prepared by using bark extract of Terminalia catappa in soft paraffin and preservative. Wistar albino rats (200-250 gm) of either sex were used in the present study. A circular wound of 2 cm in diameter was made on the depilated dorsal thoracic region of the rats under ether anesthesia in aseptic conditions. The ointment was applied for 18 days and percent wound closure observed along with the parameters viz. Epithelization, granuloma weight and scar formation. Animals were observed on 3rd, 6th, 9th, 12th, 15th and 18th post-wounding day.Wound healing activity was compared with that of control and Betadine ointment as standard drug. Animals treated with Terminalia catappa ointment exhibited 97% reduction in wound area as compared to the control animals (81%). Ointment treated wounds were found to induce epithelization faster compared to the control. In conclusion, Terminalia catappa ointment promotes significant wound healing in rats and further evaluation of this activity in humans is suggested.

  1. Effects of different sutures on fibrosis and wound healing in a rabbit model of corneal wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Hui J; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Jian G; Hu, Yun T; Ma, Zhi Z

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate wound healing and scar formation in rabbit corneal lamellar wounds repaired with simple interrupted sutures (SIS) or horizontal mattress sutures (HMS). Two parallel 'I'-shaped lamellar cornea wounds were created in one eye of 40 white New Zealand rabbits, while 5 uninjured rabbits were sacrificed to serve as normal controls. One side of the wounds, in the test rabbits, was closed with SIS, while the other side was treated with HMS. Ten days later, the stitches were removed under anesthesia. The animals were sacrificed on days 14 and 21, and months 3 and 6 after the suturing surgery, and corneal samples were subjected to histological and immunofluorescent studies: α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin were used to detect myofibroblasts and fibroblasts, respectively, and collagen type I and III was used to detect extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Relevant mRNA levels were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to elucidate the differences in wound healing and formation of fibrosis. Macroscopic and hematoxylin and eosin staining observations showed that the two sides of the wounds developed the most prominent fibrotic tissue on day 21. The immunofluorescence and qPCR results showed that HMS wounds produced increased α-SMA, vimentin and collagen type III compared to the SIS wounds on day 14 or 21. The collagen type I expression showed no distinctive difference in SIS and HMS wounds. In conclusion, corneal lamellar wounds treated with SIS developed less fibrotic-related proteins and related mRNA in the early stages of wound healing than wounds treated with HMS. Although differences were not distinct after 3 months, the results of the present study suggest a benefit in choosing SIS over HMS, as at least the initial fibrotic process seems more benign with SIS. Corneal wounds should be carefully sutured, ensuring the tissue is well aligned.

  2. Polysaccharides of Aloe vera induce MMP-3 and TIMP-2 gene expression during the skin wound repair of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel

    2014-04-01

    Polysaccharides are the main macromolecules of Aloe vera gel but no data about their effect on extracellular matrix (ECM) elements are available. Here, mannose rich Aloe vera polysaccharides (AVP) with molecular weight between 50 and 250 kDa were isolated and characterized. Open cutaneous wounds on the back of 45 rats (control and treated) were daily treated with 25mg (n=15) and 50 mg (n=15) AVP for 30 days. The levels of MMP-3 and TIMP-2 gene expression were analyzed using real time PCR. The levels of n-acetyl glucosamine (NAGA), n-acetyl galactosamine (NAGLA) and collagen contents were also measured using standard biochemical methods. Faster wound closure was observed at day 15 post wounding in AVP treated animals in comparison with untreated group. At day 10 post wounding, AVP inhibited MMP-3 gene expression, while afterwards MMP-3 gene expression was upregulated. AVP enhanced TIMP-2 gene expression, collagen, NAGLA and NAGA synthesis in relation to untreated wounds. Our results suggest that AVP has positive effects on the regulation of ECM factor synthesis, which open up new perspectives for the wound repair activity of Aloe vera polysaccharide at molecular level.

  3. Laser induced wounding of the plasma membrane and methods to study the repair process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana J; Maiuri, Paolo; Lafaurie-Janvore, Julie; Perez, Franck; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to agents that can trigger the perforation of their plasma membrane. This damage occurs naturally, and the frequency and intensity depends on how much cells are exposed to damaging threats. The following protocol is a simple and powerful method to damage the plasma membrane using laser ablation. It allows the induction of a single and localized wound at the plasma membrane of cultured cells, which can be followed with fast time-lapse imaging. The first part of the protocol describes simple cell culture techniques and the material ideal to make the experiments. A second part of the protocol gives advice about the procedures to make effective wounds in cells while ensuring a good survival rate. We also propose different ways to follow the opening and closure of the plasma membrane. Finally, we describe the procedure to efficiently analyze the data acquired after single cell photodamage to characterize the wounding process.

  4. Management of gunshot wounds to the mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Michael; Sawatari, Yoh

    2010-07-01

    The gunshot wound to the mandible is a unique traumatic injury. The resultant injury from the gunshot wound is diverse because of the variability of the projectile, motion, velocity, and tissue characteristics. When a high-velocity projectile strikes the mandible, often times the wound will consist of a severely comminuted mandible surrounded by nonvital soft tissues and the implantation of multiple foreign bodies. This represents a challenge for the treating surgeon. The anatomy and function of the mandible make it such that the care of the gunshot wound requires a combination of trauma and reconstructive surgeries. There are varying techniques advocated for the management of gunshot wound to the face. However, for the comminuted mandible fracture sustained from a gunshot wound, an approach involving the fabrication of an occlusal splint, intermaxillary fixation, aggressive debridement of hard and soft tissues, and immediate reconstruction with a titanium plate is a comprehensive approach that can restore the appropriate function and contour of the patient. At the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami, this approach to the comminuted mandible fracture secondary to the gunshot wound has led to the effective management of this specific subset of injury. The complication rate is comparable with the current literature and provides an advantage as a 1-stage management to restore appropriate function and cosmesis to the patient.

  5. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  6. Involvement of notch signaling in wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasulu Chigurupati

    Full Text Available The Notch signaling pathway is critically involved in cell fate decisions during development of many tissues and organs. In the present study we employed in vivo and cell culture models to elucidate the role of Notch signaling in wound healing. The healing of full-thickness dermal wounds was significantly delayed in Notch antisense transgenic mice and in normal mice treated with gamma-secretase inhibitors that block proteolytic cleavage and activation of Notch. In contrast, mice treated with a Notch ligand Jagged peptide showed significantly enhanced wound healing compared to controls. Activation or inhibition of Notch signaling altered the behaviors of cultured vascular endothelial cells, keratinocytes and fibroblasts in a scratch wound healing model in ways consistent with roles for Notch signaling in wound healing functions all three cell types. These results suggest that Notch signaling plays important roles in wound healing and tissue repair, and that targeting the Notch pathway might provide a novel strategy for treatment of wounds and for modulation of angiogenesis in other pathological conditions.

  7. Open access

    CERN Document Server

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder consent, and many authors, musicians, filmmakers, and other creators who depend on royalties are understandably unwilling to give their consent. But for 350 years, scholars have written peer-reviewed journal articles for impact, not for money, and are free to consent to open access without losing revenue. In this concise introduction, Peter Suber tells us what open access is and isn't, how it benefits authors and readers of research, how we pay for it, how it avoids copyright problems, how it has moved from the periphery to the mainstream, and what its future may hold. Distilling a decade of Suber's influential writing and thinking about open access, this is the indispe...

  8. Risk Factors for Wound Complications Following Abdominoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir K. Jabaiti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Abdominoplasty has become an increasingly popular procedure. Risk factors affecting wound complications of abdominoplasty are not adequately defined in literature. Identification of these risk factors is crucial for better patient’s selection and counseling. The objectives of this study were to determine wound complication rate following abdominoplasty and to examine the relationship of a set of possible risk factors with the incidence of complications. Approach: We studied 116 patients (107 women and 9 men who underwent abdominoplasty at Jordan University Hospital, between June 1997 and June 2007. Data were collected from patients’ medical records and analyzed to determine types and rates of surgical wound complications. Fourteen possible risk factors were investigated using logistic regression analysis to evaluate their relationship with the occurrence of wound complications. Risk factors examined were: age, sex, body mass index, parity number, smoking history, history of diabetes mellitus, previous gastroplasty for morbid obesity, previous abdominal surgical scars, type of abdominoplasty, plication of recti, hernia repair, operative time and operative blood loss. Results: A total of 29 patients (two males and 27 females (25% had wound complications. The most common complication was seroma. It was encountered in 15 cases (12.9%. Six patients (5.2% had wound infection. Partial skin necrosis was encountered in four cases (3.4 %. Two patients (1.7% developed wound dehiscence and two patients (1.7% had hematoma. The only factors significantly increased the complication rate were: increased body mass index (p = 0.002 and history of smoking (p = 0.004. Conclusions and Recommendations: This study confirms the adverse effect of overweight and cigarette smoking on the incidence of wound complication rate following abdominoplasty. We recommend that overweight patients and smokers undergoing abdominoplasty should be adequately

  9. [Complicated acute apendicitis. Open versus laparoscopic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Piedra, Francisco; Morales García, Dieter; Bernal Marco, José Manuel; Llorca Díaz, Javier; Marton Bedia, Paula; Naranjo Gómez, Angel

    2008-06-01

    Although laparoscopy has become the standard approach in other procedures, this technique is not generally accepted for acute appendicitis, especially if it is complicated due reports on the increase in intra-abdominal abscesses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity in a group of patients diagnosed with complicated apendicitis (gangrenous or perforated) who had undergone open or laparoscopic appendectomy. We prospectively studied 107 patients who had undergone appendectomy for complicated appendicitis over a two year period. Mean operation time, mean hospital stay and morbidity, such as wound infection and intra-abdominal abscess were evaluated. In the group with gangrenous appendicitis morbidity was significantly lower in laparoscopic appendectomy group (p = 0.014). Wound infection was significantly higher in the open appendectomy group (p = 0.041), and there were no significant differences in intra-abdominal abscesses (p = 0.471). In the perforated appendicitis group overall morbidity (p = 0.046) and wound infection (p = 0.004) was significantly higher in the open appendectomy group. There were no significant differences in intra-abdominal abscesses (p = 0.612). These results suggest that laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis is a safe procedure that may prove to have significant clinical advantages over conventional surgery.

  10. Palliative wound care: principles of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Barbara; Emmons, Kevin R

    2014-01-01

    Home care nursing occurs in a complex care environment. Nurses working in this setting care for a wide array of individuals who often are sicker and more complex than ever before. The high prevalence of wounds among these individuals requires that home care nurses have a certain level of knowledge to provide excellent care. Many times, individuals with wounds do not have the capacity to heal or are burdened with numerous symptoms affecting quality of life. In these cases, the home care nurse must understand concepts of palliative wound care to alleviate symptoms with the goal of improving quality of life.

  11. Open Brief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Leach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To commence the thirtieth annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ, held on Australia’s Gold Coast in July 2013, ten delegates were invited with very little warning to take five minutes and one image to offer a provocation on the open matters of architectural history in the present moment. The term “open” was taken as the conference theme—a device used by SAHANZ meetings not so much to define the scope of papers presented as to declare the conference flavour year by year. It was not, therefore, an open conference (anything goes so much as a conference on open issues (where, indeed, to go.  The ten interlocutors were invited after the conference to document their interventions and they are presented here as a record of the preoccupations of a specific moment and institutional geography with all the idiosyncrasies and commonalities it might reveal to a broader audience.

  12. Vacuum-assisted closure for complex cranial wounds involving the loss of dura mater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Alexander K; Neal, Matthew T; Argenta, Louis C; Wilson, John A; DeFranzo, Anthony J; Tatter, Stephen B

    2013-02-01

    The aim in this study was to describe the safety and efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in patients with complex cranial wounds with extensive scalp, bone, and dural defects who were not candidates for immediate free tissue transfer. Five patients (4 men and 1 woman) ages 24-73 years with complex cranial wounds were treated with VAC at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Etiologies included trauma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant meningioma. Cutaneous wound defects measured as large as 15 cm in diameter. Four of the 5 patients had open skull defects with concomitant dural defects, and 1 patient had dural dehiscence. After surgical debridement, all 5 patients were treated with the direct application of a VAC device to a reapproximated dura mater (1 patient), to a pericranial flap (1 patient), or to a regenerative tissue matrix overlying CNS tissue (3 patients). In all cases involving open cranial wounds, the VAC device promoted granulation tissue formation over the dural substitute, prevented CSF leakage, and kept the wounds free from local infection. The duration of VAC therapy ranged from 16 to 91 days. Although VAC therapy was intended as a temporary measure until these patients could be stabilized for larger tissue transfer procedures or they succumbed to their primary pathology, 1 patient had a successful skin graft following VAC therapy. Hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement developed in 2 patients during VAC therapy. The VAC dressings applied to a tissue matrix or other barrier over brain tissue in extensive cranial wounds are safe and well tolerated, providing a functional barrier and preventing infection.

  13. Combined effect of substance P and curcumin on cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Vinay; Kumar, Dinesh; Prasad, Raju; Gopal, Anu; Pathak, Nitya N; Kumar, Pawan; Tandan, Surender K

    2017-05-15

    Our earlier studies demonstrated that topically applied substance P (SP) or curcumin on excision skin wound accelerated the wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the wound healing potential of combination of SP and curcumin in diabetic rats. Open cutaneous excision wound was created on the back of each of the 60 diabetic rats. Wound-inflicted rats were equally divided into three groups namely, control, gel treated, and SP + curcumin treated. Normal saline, pluronic gel, and SP (0.5 × 10(-6)M) + curcumin (0.15%) were topically applied once daily for 19 d to these control, gel-treated, and SP + curcumin groups, respectively. SP + curcumin combination significantly accelerated wound closure and decreased messenger RNA expressions of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, whereas the combination markedly increased the expressions of interleukin-10, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, stromal cell-derived factors-1alpha, heme oxygenase-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in granulation-healing tissue, compared with control and gel-treated groups. In combination group, granulation tissue was better, as was evidenced by improved fibroblast proliferation, collagen deposition, microvessel density, growth-associated protein 43-positive nerve fibers, and thick regenerated epithelial layer. The combination of SP and curcumin accelerated wound healing in diabetic rats and both the drugs were compatible at the doses used in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA (PRP FOR THE TREATMENT OF PROBLEMATIC SKIN WOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetan Sokolov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To show platelet-rich plasma (PRP application of problematic skin wounds and to evaluate the results from the treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 31 patients with problematic skin wounds had been treated at the clinic for a period of five years (from May 2010 to September 2015 with the following patient sex ratio: male patients– 13 and female patients– 18. Average age– 46,5 (22-82. Patients with Type 2 Diabetes– 10, with decubitus ulcers– 2, traumatic– 29, with infection– 12, acute– 15, chronic– 16. Based on a scheme developed by us, all cases were treated by administering platelet-rich plasma, derived by PRGF Endoret system. Follow-up period was within 4 – 6 months (4,5 on average. We used platelet rich plasma derived by PRGF Endoret system, applied on the wound bed on a weekly basis. RESULTS: The results have been evaluated based on the following functional scoring systems - Total wound score, Total anatomic score and Total score (20. The baseline values at the very beginning of the follow-up period were as follows: Total wound score – 10 p.; Total anatomic score – 8 p., Total score – 15 p. By the end of the treatment period the score was 0 p., which means excellent results, i.e. complete healing of the wounds. CONCLUSION: We believe that the application of PRP may become optimal therapy in the treatment of difficult to heal wounds around joints, bone, subject tendons, plantar surface of the foot, etc., as it opens new perspectives in the field of human tissue regeneration.

  15. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    . Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR......-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL......-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However...

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treating acute surgical and traumatic wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Eskes; D.T. Ubbink; M. Lubbers; C. Lucas; H. Vermeulen

    2010-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used as a treatment for acute wounds (such as those arising from surgery and trauma) however the effects of HBOT on wound healing are unclear. To determine the effects of HBOT on the healing of acute surgical and traumatic wounds. We searched the Cochrane Wounds G

  17. The Electrical Response to Injury: Molecular Mechanisms and Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Brian; Zhao, Min

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Natural, endogenous electric fields (EFs) and currents arise spontaneously after wounding of many tissues, especially epithelia, and are necessary for normal healing. This wound electrical activity is a long-lasting and regulated response. Enhancing or inhibiting this electrical activity increases or decreases wound healing, respectively. Cells that are responsible for wound closure such as corneal epithelial cells or skin keratinocytes migrate directionally in EFs of physiological magnitude. However, the mechanisms of how the wound electrical response is initiated and regulated remain unclear. Recent Advances: Wound EFs and currents appear to arise by ion channel up-regulation and redistribution, which are perhaps triggered by an intracellular calcium wave or cell depolarization. We discuss the possibility of stimulation of wound healing via pharmacological enhancement of the wound electric signal by stimulation of ion pumping. Critical Issues: Chronic wounds are a major problem in the elderly and diabetic patient. Any strategy to stimulate wound healing in these patients is desirable. Applying electrical stimulation directly is problematic, but pharmacological enhancement of the wound signal may be a promising strategy. Future Directions: Understanding the molecular regulation of wound electric signals may reveal some fundamental mechanisms in wound healing. Manipulating fluxes of ions and electric currents at wounds might offer new approaches to achieve better wound healing and to heal chronic wounds. PMID:24761358

  18. Hyperspectral imaging-based wound analysis using mixture-tuned matched filtering classification method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, Mihaela Antonina; Coman, Toma; Parasca, Sorin Viorel; Bercaru, Nicolae; Savastru, Roxana; Manea, Dragos

    2015-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a technology that is beginning to occupy an important place in medical research with good prospects in future clinical applications. We evaluated the role of hyperspectral imaging in association with a mixture-tuned matched filtering method in the characterization of open wounds. The methodology and the processing steps of the hyperspectral image that have been performed in order to obtain the most useful information about the wound are described in detail. Correlations between the hyperspectral image and clinical examination are described, leading to a pattern that permits relative evaluation of the square area of the wound and its different components in comparison with the surrounding normal skin. Our results showed that the described method can identify different types of tissues that are present in the wounded area and can objectively measure their respective abundance, which proves its value in wound characterization. In conclusion, the method that was described in this preliminary case presentation shows promising results, but needs further evaluation in order to become a reliable and useful tool.

  19. Chitosan-Fibrin Nanocomposites as Drug Delivering and Wound Healing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedakumari, Weslen S; Prabu, Periyathambi; Sastry, Thotapalli P

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, chitosan-fibrin nanocomposites (CFNs) were prepared using a novel method and analysed for their physico-chemical properties. TEM and SEM studies revealed their size in the range of 24-28 nm with zeta potential value of + 16 mV. Anti-bacterial activity of CFN was investigated against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For drug delivery applications, 71% of methotrexate (MTX) was entrapped in CFNs that displayed sustained release for up to 96 h. Anti-cancer activity of MTX-CFN was evaluated on HeLa and MCF 7 cells, which showed dose-dependent toxicity on both the cell lines. Further, the role of CFN in wound healing was studied by creating open excision wounds on albino rats. Topical application of CFN, once in two days, for up to 10 days resulted in complete healing of wounds on day 14 whereas it took 22 days in control. Histological and biochemical analyses proved increased synthesis of collagen with active migration of fibroblasts and epithelial cells in CFN treated wounds. From our study, it is proposed that CFN may be used as a suitable candidate for drug delivery and wound healing applications.

  20. [Two cases of pasteurellosis accompanied by exudate with semen-like odor from the wound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arashima, Y; Kumasaka, K; Tutchiya, T; Yanai, M; Kawano, K

    1999-06-01

    We encountered two cases of Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica isolation from exudates with seminal fluid-like odor from dog scratch and cat bite. Case 1: A 78-year-old male who had been diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus five years ago was scratched by the claw of a pet dog (Pekinese) on the back of the right hand. Since inflammation ascended to the arm, the patient visited Nihon University Itabashi hospital for a medical examination. Case 2: A 51-year-old female without a specific past history other than hyperlipidemia was bitten by a pet cat at the medical and lateral sides of the left carpus. The patient immediately opened the wound and washed it with tap water, followed by disinfection using a non-iodine disinfectant at home. Two hours later, the patient felt an unpleasant sensation and smelled a seminal fluid-like odor at the wound. The next morning, the entire left arm swelled and pain worsened, then the patient sought medical attention. The patients were treated with antibiotics and the wound completely healed on the 16 days from on set in Case 1 and on the 10 days from onset in Case 2. From these two cases, Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica was isolated from the exudate, suggesting that when wounds caused by animals smell like seminal fluid, the wound is infected with Pasteurellae. This finding may be an important clue for differentiation in clinical diagnosis.

  1. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  2. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in the Exotic Pets

    OpenAIRE

    Mickelson, Megan A.; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A.

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regards to the animal’s temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency towards secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately impact wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, f...

  3. Wound healing potential of Pañcavalkala formulations in a postfistulectomy wound

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sushruta mentioned sixty measures for management of wounds. Panchavalkal is the combination of five herbs having properties like Shodhana (cleaning) and Ropana (healing) of wounds. Individual drugs and in combination have Kashaya rasa (astringent) dominant and useful in the management of Vrana (wounds) as well as Shotha (inflammations). A 35 years old male patient consulted in Shalya OPD with complaints like discharge per anum, induration and intermittent pain at perianal region since...

  4. Evaluation of lymphatic regeneration in rat incisional wound healing and its use in wound age estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevine M.F. El Deeb

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Lymphatic elements appear transiently in the wound edge, concurrent with the appearance of blood vessels but regress earlier. Identification of lymphatic vascular channels in the region of the wound may help to estimate the wound age in the early days after the injury. At later time points in the regeneration process, it may help to recognize the injured area, being the area where the dermis and subcutaneous tissue are devoid of lymphatics.

  5. The Open

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saitya Brata Das

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Open darkness and light, remembrance and oblivion, coming into existence and disappearing in death play their originary co-belonging, or co-figuration. Existence belongs to this opening and is exposed to its coming to presence: it is on the basis of this originary opening, this originary historical which is revealed to this mortal being called ‘man,’ on the basis of this revelation, man founds something like politics and history. There thus comes into existence out of this freedom, out of this “play space”2, this field called ‘polis’3 where there takes place war and festival, where historical revolutions tear apart history, brings ruptures and discontinuities in the very mode of his existence, where man seeks the foundation of his own foundation (which is his metaphysical task , where occurs the dialectics of negativity between man and man, where man puts at stake his own death, his own dissolution, and by the power of his own dissolution stands in relation to the total world that he seeks to dominate. This means that man’s attempts to metaphysically found his own political and historical existence must presuppose a far more originary non-foundation, the differentiating revealing of the open, the ungrounded spacing play, or playing space of natality and mortality.

  6. Open innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    by small, new, and not-for-profit organizations, as well as the linkage of individual actions and motivations to open innovation. Other opportunities include better measuring the costs, benefits, antecedents, mediators and moderators of the effects of OI on performance, and understanding why and how OI...

  7. Open palm technique in Dupuytren's disease treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Carpi Malta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of the open palm technique for the treatment of Dupuytren's disease. METHOD: The authors used the technique described by McCash. Twelve patients (13 hands were surgically treated, between october 2002 and september 2011. RESULTS: The wounds healed in a medium of 25 days (variation of 17 to 30 days. There were no complications, such as infection, haematoma formation, skin necrosis, residual edema. CONCLUSION: The open palm technique remains a safe alternative for the treatment of Dupuytren's disease, with satisfactory results and low risk of complications.

  8. Influence of hydrophilic polymers on functional properties and wound healing efficacy of hydrocolloid based wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jin Ki; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different hydrophilic polymers on the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of hydrocolloid wound dressings (HCDs) in order to provide an appropriate composition for a hydrocolloid wound dressing system. In this study, the HCDs were prepared with styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and polyisobutylene (PIB) as the base using a hot melting method. Additionally, numerous SIS/PIB-based HCDs were prepared with six hydrophilic polymers, and their wound dressing properties were assessed. Finally, the wound healing efficacy of the selected formulations was compared to a commercial wound dressing. The swelling ratio, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths of HCDs were increased in the order of sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer=HPMC>PVA=PVP, sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer>PVA>HPMC=PVP and sodium alginate≥PVA>PVP=HPMC=sodium CMC>poloxamer, respectively. Among the hydrophilic polymers tested, sodium alginate most enhanced the swelling capacity, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths. Thus, the hydrophilic polymers played great role in the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of SIS/PIB-based HCDs. The HCD formulation composed of PIB, SIS, liquid paraffin and sodium alginate at the weight ratio of 20/25/12/43 gave better wound dressing properties and more excellent wound healing efficacy than the commercial wound dressing. Therefore, the novel HCD formulation could be a promising hydrocolloid system for wound dressings.

  9. Peroxide-based oxygen generating topical wound dressing for enhancing healing of dermal wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Prafulla K; Ross, Christina L; Smith, Leona C; Jeong, Seon S; Kim, Jaehyun; Yoo, James J; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen generating biomaterials represent a new trend in regenerative medicine that aims to generate and supply oxygen at the site of requirement, to support tissue healing and regeneration. To enhance the healing of dermal wounds, we have developed a highly portable, in situ oxygen generating wound dressings that uses sodium percarbonate (SPO) and calcium peroxide (CPO) as chemical oxygen sources. The dressing continuously generated oxygen for more than 3 days, after which it was replaced. In the in vivo testing on porcine full-thickness porcine wound model, the SPO/CPO dressing showed enhanced wound healing during the 8 week study period. Quantitative measurements of wound healing related parameters, such as wound closure, reepithelialization, epidermal thickness and collagen content of dermis showed that supplying oxygen topically using the SPO/CPO dressing significantly accelerated the wound healing. An increase in neovascularization, as determined using Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31 staining, was also observed in the presence of SPO/CPO dressing. This novel design for a wound dressing that contains oxygen generating biomaterials (SPO/CPO) for supplying topical oxygen, may find utility in treating various types of acute to chronic wounds.

  10. Rapid hemostatic and mild polyurethane-urea foam wound dressing for promoting wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Niu, Yuqing; Chen, Kevin C; Chen, Shiguo

    2017-02-01

    A novel rapid hemostatic and mild polyurethane-urea foam (PUUF) wound dressing was prepared by the particle leaching method and vacuum freeze-drying method using 4, 4-Methylenebis(cyclohexyl isocyanate), 4,4-diaminodicyclohexylmethane and poly (ethylene glycol) as raw materials. And X-ray diffraction (XRD), tensile test, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG) were used to its crystallinity, stress and strain behavior, and thermal properties, respectively. Platelet adhesion, fibrinogen adhesion and blood clotting were performed to evaluate its hemostatic effect. And H&E staining and Masson Trichrome staining were used to its wound healing efficacy. The results revealed the pore size of PUUF is 50-130μm, and its porosity is 71.01%. Porous PUUF exhibited good water uptake that was benefit to adsorb abundant wound exudates to build a regional moist environment beneficial for wound healing. The PUUF wound dressing exhibit better blood coagulation effect than commercial polyurethane dressing (CaduMedi). Though both PUUF and CaduMedi facilitated wound healing generating full re-epithelialization within 13days, PUUF was milder and lead to more slight inflammatory response than CaduMedi. In addition, PUUF wound dressing exhibited lower cytotoxicity than CaduMedi against NIH3T3 cells. Overall, porous PUUF represents a novel mild wound dressing with excellent water uptake, hemostatic effect and low toxicity, and it can promote wound healing and enhance re-epithelialization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. An active wound dressing for controlled convective mass transfer with the wound bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabodi, Mario; Cross, Valerie L; Qu, Zheng; Havenstrite, Karen L; Schwartz, Suzanne; Stroock, Abraham D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional wound dressings-gauze, plastic films, foams, and gels-do not allow for spatial and temporal control of the soluble chemistry within the wound bed, and are thus limited to a passive role in wound healing. Here, we present an active wound dressing (AWD) designed to control convective mass transfer with the wound bed; this mass transfer provides a means to tailor and monitor the chemical state of a wound and, potentially, to aid the healing process. We form this AWD as a bilayer of porous poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and silicone; the pHEMA acts as the interface with the wound bed, and a layer of silicone provides a vapor barrier and a support for connecting to external reservoirs and pumps. We measure the convective permeability of the pHEMA sponge, and use this value to design a device with a spatially uniform flow profile. We quantify the global coefficient of mass transfer of the AWD on a dissolvable synthetic surface, and compare it to existing theories of mass transfer in porous media. We also operate the AWD on model wound beds made of calcium alginate gel to demonstrate extraction and delivery of low molecular weight solutes and a model protein. Using this system, we demonstrate both uniform mass transfer over the entire wound bed and patterned mass transfer in three spatially distinct regions. Finally, we discuss opportunities and challenges for the clinical application of this design of an AWD.

  12. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing.

  13. Teaching wound care to family medicine residents on a wound care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little SH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sahoko H Little,1,2 Sunil S Menawat,1,3 Michael Worzniak,1 Michael D Fetters2 1Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency, Wayne, Michigan, USA; 2University of Michigan, Department of Family Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; 3Ghent Family Medicine Residency, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia, USA Abstract: Primary care physicians often care for patients with chronic wounds, and they can best serve patients if they have knowledge and proficient skills in chronic wound care, including sharp debridement. The Oakwood Annapolis Family Medicine Residency in Michigan, USA developed a Wound Care Service, incorporating wound care training during the surgical rotation. Effectiveness of the wound care training was evaluated through pre- and posttesting of residents, to assess changes in knowledge and comfort in treating chronic wounds. The results demonstrate significant improvement in residents’ knowledge and comfort in wound care. This innovation demonstrates the feasibility of educating residents in chronic wound care through hands-on experience. Keywords: wound care education, primary care, residency education, surgery rotation, curriculum development

  14. Scarless wound healing: chasing the holy grail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Graham G; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wong, Victor W; Duscher, Dominik; Hu, Michael S; Zielins, Elizabeth R; Wearda, Taylor; Muhonen, Ethan; McArdle, Adrian; Tevlin, Ruth; Atashroo, David A; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Lorenz, H Peter; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Longaker, Michael T

    2015-03-01

    Over 100 million patients acquire scars in the industrialized world each year, primarily as a result of elective operations. Although undefined, the global incidence of scarring is even larger, extending to significant numbers of burn and other trauma-related wounds. Scars have the potential to exert a profound psychological and physical impact on the individual. Beyond aesthetic considerations and potential disfigurement, scarring can result in restriction of movement and reduced quality of life. The formation of a scar following skin injury is a consequence of wound healing occurring through reparative rather than regenerative mechanisms. In this article, the authors review the basic stages of wound healing; differences between adult and fetal wound healing; various mechanical, genetic, and pharmacologic strategies to reduce scarring; and the biology of skin stem/progenitor cells that may hold the key to scarless regeneration.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of penetrating anorectal wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin-sheng; HUI Xi-zeng; ZHANG Yang-de; LI Kun

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To research the diagnosis and effective treatment of penetrating anorectal wounds.Methods: Retrospective analysis was done in 16 cases of penetrating anorectal wounds from 1985 to 2004.Debridement and suture of anorectal and vesical wounds,effective diversion of fecal and urinary stream and sufficient presacral drainage were performed in all cases.Results: All the 16 cases were cured. Among them, 2cases with infection in presacral space were cured by sufficient drainage after operation, one case was cured by secondary repair after anal sphincter was repaired unsuccessfully and one case with rectovesical fistula was cured with conservative treatment. None of them suffered from complications such as anal stenosis, dysuria or importence etc.Conclusions: For penetrating anorectal wound, to master early recognition of concomitant injures, to select appropriate surgical intervention and to strengthen perioperative treatment are the keys to improve the curative effects.

  16. Fundamentals of pain management in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulling, Sarah

    Under-treated pain can result in a number of potentially serious sequelae (Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists, 2006), including delayed mobilization and recovery, cardiac complications, thromboses, pulmonary complications, delayed healing, psychosocial problems and chronic pain syndromes. This article considers pain management in the context of painful wounds. An international comparative survey on wound pain (European Wound Management Association, 2002) found that practitioners in the wound care community tend to focus on healing processes rather than the patient's total pain experience involving an accurate pain assessment and selection of an appropriate pain management strategy. Procedural pain with dressing removal and cleansing caused the greatest concerns. An overview of simple, evidence-based drug and non-drug techniques is offered as potential strategies to help minimize the experience of pain.

  17. Penetrating Stab Wound of the Right Ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onursal Buğra

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available 18 years old male patient was admitted to our emergency unit with a penetrating stab wound to the right ventricle. A stab wound to the right ventricle was found to be 3 cm in diameter. The bleeding was controlled by insertion of a Foley catheter and inflation of the balloon. The stab wound had transected distal acute marginal side ofthe right coronary artery. A successful repair was performed with the use of a foley catheter and application of the Medtronic Octopus Tissue Stabilization System. The wound was closed with pledgeted mattress sutures. The distal acute marginal side of the right coronary artery was ligated. In this presentation, the surgical intervention method was reported and followed by a discussion of emergency surgical procedures of the heart.

  18. Cyanoacrylate for Intraoral Wound Closure: A Possibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimala Sagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure is a part of any surgical procedure and the objective of laceration repair or incision closure is to approximate the edges of a wound so that natural healing process may occur. Over the years new biomaterials have been discovered as an alternate to conventional suture materials. Cyanoacrylate bioadhesives are one among them. They carry the advantages of rapid application, patient comfort, resistance to infection, hemostatic properties, and no suture removal anxiety. Hence this study was undertaken to study the effect of long chain cyanoacrylate as an adhesive for intraoral wound closure and also to explore its hemostatic and antibacterial effects. Isoamyl-2-cyanoacrylate (AMCRYLATE was used as the adhesive in the study. In conclusion isoamyl cyanoacrylate can be used for intraoral wound closure, as an alternative to sutures for gluing the mucoperiosteum to bone, for example, after impaction removal, periapical surgeries, and cleft repair. Its hemostatic and antibacterial activity has to be further evaluated.

  19. The effects of topical tripeptide copper complex and helium-neon laser on wound healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Nihal Y; Topal, Ayse; Cangul, I Taci; Yanik, Kemal

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and histopathological effects of tripeptide copper complex (TCC) and two different doses of laser application (helium-neon laser, 1 and 3 J cm(-2)) on wound healing with untreated control wounds. Experimental wounds were created on a total of 24 New Zealand white rabbits and topical TCC or laser was applied for 28 days. The wounds were observed daily, and planimetry was performed on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 to measure the unhealed wound area and percentage of total wound healing. Biopsies were taken weekly to evaluate the inflammatory response and the level of neovascularization. The median time for the first observable granulation tissue was shorter (P < 0.05) in the low and high dose laser groups than in the control group (3 and 2.66 vs. 4.5 days), but was not different between the TCC and control groups (4.16 vs. 4.5 days). Filling of the open wound to skin level with granulation tissue was faster (P < 0.05) in the TCC and high dose laser groups than in the control group (14 and 16 vs. 25 days), but was not different between the low dose laser and control groups (23 vs. 25 days). The average time for healing was shorter (P < 0.05) in the TCC and high dose laser groups (29.8 and 30.2 vs. 34.6 days), but was not different between the low dose laser and control groups (33.8 vs. 34.6 days). Histopathologically, wound healing was characterized by a decrease in the neutrophil counts and an increase in neovascularization. The TCC and high dose laser groups had greater neutrophil and vessel counts than in the control group, suggesting a more beneficial effect for wound healing.

  20. The palliative management of fungating malignant wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocott, P

    2000-01-01

    This study focused on the palliative management of fungating malignant wounds and individual experiences of living with such a wound. Dressings were evaluated for the ability to contain these wounds and reduce their impact on daily life. The project extended to collaboration with industry for the development and evaluation of dressings designed to meet patient needs. A longitudinal multiple case study design was adopted. The methodology evolved through three principal phases: quasi-experimental design; emergent collaborative design; and emergent theory-driven evaluation. The radical departure from the initial approach was in response to the methodological problems encountered in a study of individuals with uncontrolled disease. A non-probability sampling plan was adopted, mainly because of the lack of homogeneity in the patient population; 45 participants were included. The length of time patients remained in the study depended on how long they lived. This ranged from a few days to more than two years. A sampling plan was, however, adopted for the data collection. The study had a dual focus: methodology, and the generation of explanations for dressing performance and the management of fungating wounds. The methodological aspect included development of the Teler system as a method of measuring dressing performance against goals of optimal practice in fungating wound management. The second component was a system of reasoning developed as an analytical strategy for abstracting general issues from individual case study data in order to construct explanations. Theory was used to generalize beyond the individual cases. Two forms of explanation for fungating wound management were constructed. These included explanations of individual experiences of living with such a wound and knowledge of the elements of fungating wound management. The impact on the individual was explained in terms of the stigma attached to public disability and a revulsion in society for uncontrolled

  1. Negative pressure wound therapy for soft tissue injuries around the foot and ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jong-Keon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate the results of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with open wounds in the foot and ankle region. Materials and methods Using a NPWT device, 16 patients were prospectively treated for soft tissue injuries around the foot and ankle. Mean patient age was 32.8 years (range, 3–67 years. All patients had suffered an acute trauma, due to a traffic accident, a fall, or a crush injury, and all had wounds with underlying tendon or bone exposure. Necrotic tissues were debrided before applying NPWT. Dressings were changed every 3 or 4 days and treatment was continued for 18.4 days on average (range, 11–29 days. Results Exposed tendons and bone were successfully covered with healthy granulation tissue in all cases except one. The sizes of soft tissue defects reduced from 56.4 cm2 to 42.9 cm2 after NPWT (mean decrease of 24%. In 15 of the 16 cases, coverage with granulation tissue was achieved and followed by a skin graft. A free flap was needed to cover exposed bone and tendon in one case. No major complication occurred that was directly attributable to treatment. In terms of minor complications, two patients suffered scar contracture of grafted skin. Conclusion NPWT was found to facilitate the rapid formation of healthy granulation tissue on open wounds in the foot and ankle region, and thus, to shorten healing time and minimize secondary soft tissue defect coverage procedures.

  2. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    A. baumannii strains isolated from wounded military were sequenced and annotated. Received 8 June 2016 Accepted 6 July 2016 Published XXX Citation... XXX Citation Arivett BA, Ream DC, Fiester SE, Kidane D, Actis LA. 2016. Draft genome sequences of Escherichia coli isolates from wounded military...work. Received 17 June 2016 Accepted 17 June 2016 Published XXX Citation Arivett BA, Ream DC, Fiester SE, Kidane D, Actis LA. 2016. Draft genome

  3. Regeneration: the ultimate example of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawala, Prayag; Tanaka, Elly M; Currie, Joshua D

    2012-12-01

    The outcome of wound repair in mammals is often characterized by fibrotic scaring. Vertebrates such as zebrafish, frogs, and salamanders not only heal scarlessly, but also can regenerate lost appendages. Decades of study on the process of animal regeneration has produced key insights into the mechanisms of how complex tissue is restored. By examining our current knowledge of regeneration, we can draw parallels with mammalian wound healing to identify the molecular determinants that produce such differing outcomes.

  4. Modern Collagen Wound Dressings: Function and Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate...

  5. The assessment and treatment of wound pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Annemarie

    This article is the third in a series on wound management. Poor pain management leads to distress and can impede the healing process. This article describes the different types of pain and the psychological aspects of pain that should be taken into account when deciding on a wound-management strategy. It discusses assessment tools, along with pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for pain management.

  6. Modern Collagen Wound Dressings: Function and Purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, Cynthia Ann; Simman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Collagen, which is produced by fibroblasts, is the most abundant protein in the human body. A natural structural protein, collagen is involved in all 3 phases of the wound-healing cascade. It stimulates cellular migration and contributes to new tissue development. Because of their chemotactic properties on wound fibroblasts, collagen dressings encourage the deposition and organization of newly formed collagen, creating an environment that fosters healing. Collagen-based biomaterials stimulate...

  7. Nutritional Aspects of Gastrointestinal Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Kaushik; Sandra L Kavalukas; Barbul, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Although the wound healing cascade is similar in many tissues, in the gastrointestinal tract mucosal healing is critical for processes such as inflammatory bowel disease and ulcers and healing of the mucosa, submucosa, and serosal layers is needed for surgical anastomoses and for enterocutaneous fistula. Failure of wound healing can result in complications including infection, prolonged hospitalization, critical illness, organ failure, readmission, new or worsening enterocutaneo...

  8. [Ozone-ultrasonic therapy in the treatment of purulent wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, K V; Sopromadze, M A; Shekhter, A B; Rudenko, T G; Emel'ianov, A Iu

    2002-01-01

    Based on planimetric, bacteriologic and histologic study high efficiency of local ozonotherapy of wound in combination with low-frequency ultrasound was demonstrated experimentally on rat model of infected purulent skin wound. This method was used in 45 patients with purulent wounds of soft tissues (postoperative, posttraumatic, burn, sore spot) that led to fast cleaning of wound surface, decrease of bacterial contamination and granulations. It permitted to eliminate inflammation and to create optimum conditions for wound closure.

  9. Early treatment of wounds polluted by sea water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@During construction or training at sea, wounds are commonly seen and irresistibly polluted by sea water. An early and proper treatment of wounds polluted by sea water is very important for wound healing and function recovery of extremities. Some wounds even result in vegetation. In this study, we have reported the treatment results of 132 cases of wounds polluted by sea water admitted from 1985 to 1999.

  10. Open Source, Open Access, Open Review, Open Data. Initiativen zu mehr Offenheit in der digitalen Welt

    OpenAIRE

    Herb, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the principles of openess, open access and open availability of information based on the examples of open access to scientific information, open government data, open geographical data and open source software.

  11. Open Source, Open Access, Open Review, Open Data. Initiativen zu mehr Offenheit in der digitalen Welt

    OpenAIRE

    Herb, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the principles of openess, open access and open availability of information based on the examples of open access to scientific information, open government data, open geographical data and open source software.

  12. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C.; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B.; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure. PMID:25032064

  13. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rosińczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  14. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  15. Lead poisoning after gunshot wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Madureira

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the absence of symptoms in the majority of patients carrying lead bullet fragments in their bodies, there needs to be an awareness of the possible signs and symptoms of lead intoxication when bullets are lodged in large joints like knees, hips and shoulders. Such patients merit closer follow-up, and even surgical procedure for removing the fragments. OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient who developed clinical lead intoxication several years after a gunshot wound. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A single white 23-year-old male, regular job as a bricklayer, with a history of chronic alcohol abuse, showed up at the emergency department complaining of abdominal pain with colic, weakness, vomiting and diarrhea with black feces. All the symptoms had a duration of two to three weeks, and had been recurrent for the last two years, with calming during interval periods of two to three weeks. Abdominal radiograms showed a bullet lodged in the left hip, with a neat bursogram of the whole synovial capsule. A course of chelating treatment using calcium versenate (EDTACaNa2 intravenously was started. After the chelation therapy the patient had recurrence of his symptoms and a radical solution for the chronic mobilization of lead was considered. A hip arthroplasty procedure was performed, leading to complete substitution of the left hip.

  16. OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tullney, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Präsentationsfolien zum Vortrag „OpenAPC. Open-Access-Publikationskosten als Open Data“ in der Session „Ausgestaltung eines wissenschaftsadäquaten APC-Marktes: Grundsätze, Finanzierungsansätze und Management“ der Open-Access-Tage 2015 in Zürich (https://www.open-access.net/community/open-access-tage/open-access-tage-2015-zuerich/programm/#c1974)

  17. Exploring the concept of a team approach to wound care: MANAGING WOUNDS AS A TEAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Background The growing prevalence and incidence of nonhealing acute and chronic wounds is a worrying concern. A major challenge is the lack of united services aimed at addressing the complex needs of individuals with wounds. However, the WHO argues that interprofessional collaboration in education and practice is key to providing the best patient care, enhancing clinical and health-related outcomes and strengthening the health system. It is based on this background that the team approach to wound care project was conceptualised. The project was jointly initiated and realised by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC-USA), the Australian Wound Management Association (AWMA) and the European Wound Management Association (EWMA). Aim The aim of this project was to develop a universal model for the adoption of a team approach to wound care. Objective The overarching objective of this project was to provide recommendations for implementing a team approach to wound care within all clinical settings and through this to develop a model for advocating the team approach toward decision makers in national government levels. Method An integrative literature review was conducted. Using this knowledge, the authors arrived at a consensus on the most appropriate model to adopt and realise a team approach to wound care. Results Eighty four articles met the inclusion criteria. Following data extraction, it was evident that none of the articles provided a definition for the terms multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or transdisciplinary in the context of wound care. Given this lack of clarity within the wound care literature, the authors have here developed a Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care to fill this gap in our current understanding. Conclusion We advocate that the patient should be at the heart of all decision-making, as working with the Universal Model for the Team Approach to Wound Care begins with the needs of the patient. To facilitate this

  18. In vitro electrical-stimulated wound-healing chip for studying electric field-assisted wound-healing process

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yung-Shin; Peng, Shih-Wei; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The wound-healing assay is an easy and economical way to quantify cell migration under diverse stimuli. Traditional assays such as scratch assays and barrier assays are widely and commonly used, but neither of them can represent the complicated condition when a wound occurs. It has been suggested that wound-healing is related to electric fields, which were found to regulate wound re-epithelialization. As a wound occurs, the disruption of epithelial barrier short-circuits the trans-epithelial ...

  19. Results of open tibial fracture treatment using external fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Open lower leg fractures are the most common open fractures of the locomotor system and their treatment is associated with a number of complications. Objective. The aim of the paper was to present the results of the treatment of 68 patients with open lower leg fractures, as well as the complications that accompany the treatment of these fractures. Methods. In the analyzed group, there were 45 (66.18% men and 23 (33.82% women. The majority of patients - 33 (48.53% of them - were injured in motor vehicle accidents, whereas 24 (35.29% patients sustained injuries due to falls from heights. In two (2.94% patients the cause of open tibial fractures was gunshot injuries. In the analyzed group, there were 18 (26.47% type I open fractures, 21 (30.88% type II open fractures, 19 (27.94% type IIIA open fractures, seven (10.29% type IIIB open fractures, and three (4.41% type IIIC open fractures. Results. The tibial shaft fracture healed without serious complications in 50 (73.53% patients, whereas in 18 (26.47% patients we observed some complications. Nonunion was found in 10 (14.71% patients, osteitis in four (5.88, malunion in two (2.94% patients. Milder complications such as soft tissue pin tract infection developed in 13 (19.12% patients, infection of the open fracture wound soft tissue was observed in four (5.88% patients. Conclusion. Basic principles in the treatment of open lower leg fractures in this study are thorough primary open fracture wound treatment followed by the delayed wound closure, stable fracture fixation using unilateral external skeletal device, proper antibiotic treatment and tetanus prophylaxis. The results correlate with similar studies. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41017: Virtual Human Osteoarticular System and its Application in Preclinical and Clinical Practice

  20. Mechanical bowel preparation in elective open colon surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fa-Si-Oen, Patrick Regnier

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical bowel preparation is a long standing practice in elective open colon surgery dating from the 1970's. It has always been believed to reduce the rate of postoperative complications in the form of anastomotic leakage and wound infection. In this thesis we broadly and thoroughly examine the v

  1. Novel application of vacuum sealing drainage with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate for managing infective wounds of gas gangrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ning; Wu, Xing-Huo; Liu, Rong; Yang, Shu-Hua; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Dian-Ming; Wu, Qiang; Xia, Tian; Shao, Zeng-Wu; Ye, Zhe-Wei

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic gas gangrene is a fatal infection mainly caused by Clostridium perfringens. It is a challenge to manage gas gangrene in open wounds and control infection after debridement or amputation. The aim of the present study was to use vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate to manage infective wounds of gas gangrene and observe its clinical efficacy. A total of 48 patients with open traumatic gas gangrene infection were included in this study. Amputations were done for 27 patients, and limb salvage procedures were performed for the others. After amputation or aggressive debridement, the VSD system, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foam dressing and polyurethane (PU) film, with continuous irrigation of 1:5000 potassium permanganate solutions, was applied to the wounds. During the follow-up, all the patients healed without recurrence within 8-18 months. There were four complications. Cardiac arrest during amputation surgery occurred in one patient who suffered from severe septic shock. Emergent resuscitation was performed and the patient returned to stable condition. One patient suffered from mixed infection of Staphylococcal aureus, and a second-stage debridement was performed. One patient suffered from severe pain of the limb after the debridement. Exploratory operation was done and the possible reason was trauma of a local peripheral nerve. Three cases of crush syndrome had dialysis treatment for concomitant renal failure. In conclusion, VSD can convert open wound to closed wound, and evacuate necrotic tissues. Furthermore, potassium permanganate solutions help eliminate anaerobic microenvironment and achieve good therapeutic effect on gas gangrene and mixed infection. VSD with continuous irrigation of potassium permanganate is a novel, simple and feasible alternative for severe traumatic open wounds with gas gangrene infection.

  2. Full-thickness splinted skin wound healing models in db/db and heterozygous mice: implications for wound healing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Ae; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Covert, Jill; Dubielzig, Richard R; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah; Schurr, Michael; Abbott, Nicholas L; McAnulty, Jonathan; Murphy, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The excisional dorsal full-thickness skin wound model with or without splinting is widely utilized in wound healing studies using diabetic or normal mice. However, the effects of splinting on dermal wound healing have not been fully characterized, and there are limited data on the direct comparison of wound parameters in the splinted model between diabetic and normal mice. We compared full-thickness excisional dermal wound healing in db/db and heterozygous mice by investigating the effects of splinting, semi-occlusive dressing, and poly(ethylene glycol) treatment. Two 8-mm full-thickness wounds were made with or without splinting in db/db and heterozygous mice. Body weights, splint maintenance, wound contraction, wound closure, and histopathological parameters including reepithelialization, wound bed collagen deposition, and inflammation were compared between groups. Our results show that silicone splint application effectively reduced wound contraction in heterozygous and db/db mice. Splinted wounds, as opposed to nonsplinted wounds, exhibited no significant differences in wound closure between heterozygous and db/db mice. Finally, polyethylene glycol and the noncontact dressing had no significant effect on wound healing in heterozygous or db/db mice. We believe these findings will help investigators in selection of the appropriate wound model and data interpretation with fully defined parameters.

  3. The effects of autologous platelet gel on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jenifer L; Cupp, Craig L; Ross, E Victor; Shick, Paul C; Keefe, Michael A; Wester, Derin C; Hannon, Timothy; McConnell, Devin

    2003-08-01

    Laser resurfacing techniques have become a popular means of achieving rejuvenation of damaged skin. Interest is great in attempting to speed re-epithelialization and healing so that patients can return to their normal activities as quickly as possible. Previous studies have demonstrated that wounds heal more quickly when they are covered and kept moist than when they are left open to the air. Until now, no study has been conducted to investigate whether the healing process of a superficial skin burn might be accelerated by the use of an autologous platelet gel as a biologic dressing. Our study of five pigs showed that autologous platelet gel can influence wound healing by stimulating an intense inflammatory process that leads to highly significant increases in the production of extracellular matrices and granulation tissue. The platelet gel accelerated vascular ingrowth, increased fibroblastic proliferation, and accelerated collagen production. However, the gel did not appear to accelerate re-epithelialization. The aggressive production of granulation tissue and the acceleration of collagen production might mean that autologous platelet gel will have a future role in the treatment of burns because the highly vascularized bed it helps create should promote the success of skin grafting in patients with deep partial-thickness and full-thickness burns.

  4. Evaluation of Mouse Wound Models for Probiotics-Based Wound Infection Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    beneficial effect in limiting Streptococcus pyogenes infection. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Infection, antibiotics , probiotics, wounds, murine wound model...AND METHODS ......................................................................................... 2 3.1 Animals ...release. Distribution is unlimited. Cleared, 88PA, Case # 2016-4002, 16 Aug 2016. 1.0 SUMMARY Despite the wide use of antibiotics in trauma care

  5. The tip of the iceberg: Post caesarean wound dehiscence presenting as abdominal wound sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaundinya Kiran Bharatam

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Uterine scar dehiscence with infection requires high index of suspicion as rare cause for post partum localized/generalized peritonitis with sepsis. Severe abdominal wound infection after caesarean section may be associated with uterine wound dehiscence, which poses a grave risk to the mother in a future pregnancy.

  6. Survey of Wound-Healing Centers and Wound Care Units in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yufeng; Xia, Lei; Jia, Lijing; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the Chinese experience of establishing hospital-based wound care centers over 15 years. A total of 69 wound-healing centers (WHCs) and wound care units (WCUs) were involved. Questionnaires were diverged to the principal directors of these sites; data extracted for this study included origin, year of establishment, medical staff, degree of hospitals, wound etiology, wound-healing rate, hospital stay, and outcomes data. The period of data extraction was defined as before and after 1 year of the establishment of WHCs and WCUs. The earliest WHC was established in 1999, and from 2010 the speeds of establishing WHCs and WCUs rapidly increased. The majority of WHCs were divisions of burn departments, and all WHCs came from departments of outpatient dressing rooms. Full-time multidisciplinary employees of WHCs differed greatly to WCUs. Types of wound and outcomes vary with those of centers reported from Western countries and the United States. Improvement in wound healing caused by the establishment of WHCs and WCUs in China occurred without doubt. Some advices include the following: rearrange and reorganize the distribution of WHCs and WCUs; enact and generalize Chinese guidelines for chronic wounds; utilize medical resources reasonably; improve multidisciplinary medical staff team; draw up and change some medical and public policies and regulations.

  7. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Madaghiele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair, which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  8. Wound healing evaluation of sodium fucidate-loaded polyvinylalcohol/sodium carboxymethylcellulose-based wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Oh, Dong Hoon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Li, Dong Xun; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2010-07-01

    The cross-linked hydrogel films containing sodium fucidate were previously reported to be prepared polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (Na-CMC) using the freeze-thawing method and their physicochemical property was investigated. For the development of novel sodium fucidate-loaded wound dressing, here its in vivo wound healing test and histopathology were performed compared with the conventional ointment product. In wound healing test, the sodium fucidate-loaded composed of 2.5% PVA, 1.125% Na-CMC and 0.2% drug showed faster healing of the wound made in rat dorsum than the hydrogel without drug, indicating the potential healing effect of sodium fucidate. Furthermore, from the histological examination, the healing effect of sodium fucidate-loaded hydrogel was greater than that of the conventional ointment product and hydrogel without drug, since it might gave an adequate level of moisture and build up the exudates on the wound area. Thus, the sodium fucidate-loaded wound dressing composed of 5% PVA, 1.125% Na-CMC and 0.2% drug is a potential wound dressing with excellent wound healing.

  9. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  10. The effects of caffeine on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Pastar, Irena; Sawaya, Andrew; Yin, Natalie; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-10-01

    The purine alkaloid caffeine is a major component of many beverages such as coffee and tea. Caffeine and its metabolites theobromine and xanthine have been shown to have antioxidant properties. Caffeine can also act as adenosine-receptor antagonist. Although it has been shown that adenosine and antioxidants promote wound healing, the effect of caffeine on wound healing is currently unknown. To investigate the effects of caffeine on processes involved in epithelialisation, we used primary human keratinocytes, HaCaT cell line and ex vivo model of human skin. First, we tested the effects of caffeine on cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration, processes essential for normal wound epithelialisation and closure. We used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) proliferation assay to test the effects of seven different caffeine doses ranging from 0·1 to 5 mM. We found that caffeine restricted cell proliferation of keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, scratch wound assays performed on keratinocyte monolayers indicated dose-dependent delays in cell migration. Interestingly, adhesion and differentiation remained unaffected in monolayer cultures treated with various doses of caffeine. Using a human ex vivo wound healing model, we tested topical application of caffeine and found that it impedes epithelialisation, confirming in vitro data. We conclude that caffeine, which is known to have antioxidant properties, impedes keratinocyte proliferation and migration, suggesting that it may have an inhibitory effect on wound healing and epithelialisation. Therefore, our findings are more in support of a role for caffeine as adenosine-receptor antagonist that would negate the effect of adenosine in promoting wound healing.

  11. Emerging drugs for the treatment of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielins, Elizabeth R; Brett, Elizabeth A; Luan, Anna; Hu, Michael S; Walmsley, Graham G; Paik, Kevin; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Atashroo, David A; Wearda, Taylor; Lorenz, H Peter; Wan, Derrick C; Longaker, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    Wound healing can be characterized as underhealing, as in the setting of chronic wounds, or overhealing, occurring with hypertrophic scar formation after burn injury. Topical therapies targeting specific biochemical and molecular pathways represent a promising avenue for improving and, in some cases normalizing, the healing process. A brief overview of both normal and pathological wound healing has been provided, along with a review of the current clinical guidelines and treatment modalities for chronic wounds, burn wounds and scar formation. Next, the major avenues for wound healing drugs, along with drugs currently in development, are discussed. Finally, potential challenges to further drug development, and future research directions are discussed. The large body of research concerning wound healing pathophysiology has provided multiple targets for topical therapies. Growth factor therapies with the ability to be targeted for localized release in the wound microenvironment are most promising, particularly when they modulate processes in the proliferative phase of wound healing.

  12. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation. A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years. From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds. The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided. PMID:26554805

  13. Demonstrating a Conceptual Framework to Provide Efficient Wound Management Service for a Wound Care Center in a Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Nung; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2015-11-01

    Although the benefits of wound care services and multidisciplinary team care have been well elaborated on in the literature, there is a gap in the actual practice of wound care and the establishment of an efficient referral system. The conceptual framework for establishing efficient wound management services requires elucidation.A wound care center was established in a tertiary hospital in 2010, staffed by an integrated multidisciplinary team including plastic surgeons, a full-time coordinator, a physical therapist, occupational therapists, and other physician specialists. Referral patients were efficiently managed following a conceptual framework for wound care. This efficient wound management service consists of 3 steps: patient entry and onsite immediate wound debridement, wound re-evaluation, and individual wound bed preparation plan. Wound conditions were documented annually over 4 consecutive years.From January 2011 to December 2014, 1103 patients were recruited from outpatient clinics or inpatient consultations for the 3-step wound management service. Of these, 62% of patients achieved healing or improvement in wounds, 13% of patients experienced no change, and 25% of patients failed to follow-up. The outcome of wound treatment varied by wound type. Sixty-nine percent of diabetic foot ulcer patients were significantly healed or improved. In contrast, pressure ulcers were the most poorly healed wound type, with only 55% of patients achieving significantly healed or improved wounds.The 3-step wound management service in the wound care center efficiently provided onsite screening, timely debridement, and multidisciplinary team care. Patients could schedule appointments instead of waiting indefinitely for care. Further wound condition follow-up, education, and prevention were also continually provided.

  14. Biomaterials and Nanotherapeutics for Enhancing Skin Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhamoy Das

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an intricate process that requires complex coordination between many cells and an appropriate extracellular microenvironment. Chronic wounds often suffer from high protease activity, persistent infection, excess inflammation, and hypoxia. While there has been intense investigation to find new methods to improve cutaneous wound care; the management of chronic wounds, burns, and skin wound infection remain challenging clinical problems. Ideally, advanced wound dressings can provide enhanced healing and bridge the gaps in the healing processes that prevent chronic wounds from healing. These technologies have great potential for improving outcomes in patients with poorly healing wounds but face significant barriers in addressing the heterogeneity and clinical complexity of chronic or severe wounds. Active wound dressings aim to enhance the natural healing process and work to counter many aspects that plague poorly healing wounds including excessive inflammation, ischemia, scarring and wound infection. This review paper discusses recent advances in the development of biomaterials and nanoparticle therapeutics to enhance wound healing. In particular, this review focuses on the novel cutaneous wound treatments that have undergone significant preclinical development or currently used in clinical practice.

  15. Endophthalmitis following open-globe injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Y; Schimel, A M; Pathengay, A; Colyer, M H; Flynn, H W

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of traumatic endophthalmitis may be decreasing due to earlier wound closure and prompt initiation of antibiotics. Risk factors for endophthalmitis include retained intraocular foreign body, rural setting of injury, disruption of the crystalline lens, and a delay in primary wound closure. The microbiology in the post-traumatic setting includes a higher frequency of virulent organisms such as Bacillus species. Recognizing early clinical signs of endophthalmitis, including pain, hypopyon, vitritis, or retinal periphlebitis may prompt early treatment with intravitreal antibiotics. Prophylaxis of endophthalmitis in high-risk open-globe injuries may include systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics, topical antibiotics, and intravitreal antibiotics to cover both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. For clinically diagnosed post-traumatic endophthalmitis, intravitreal vancomycin, and ceftazidime are routinely used. Concurrent retinal detachment with endophthalmitis can be successfully managed with vitrectomy and use of intravitreal antibiotics along with a long acting gas or silicone oil tamponade. Endophthalmitis is a visually significant complication of open-globe injuries but early wound closure as well as comprehensive prophylactic antibiotic treatment at the time of injury repair may improve visual acuity outcomes. PMID:22134598

  16. A Conditioned Medium of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Overexpressing Wnt7a Promotes Wound Repair and Regeneration of Hair Follicles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can affect the microenvironment of a wound and thereby accelerate wound healing. Wnt proteins act as key mediators of skin development and participate in the formation of skin appendages such as hair. The mechanisms of action of MSCs and Wnt proteins on skin wounds are largely unknown. Here, we prepared a Wnt7a-containing conditioned medium (Wnt-CM from the supernatant of cultured human umbilical cord-MSCs (UC-MSCs overexpressing Wnt7a in order to examine the effects of this CM on cutaneous healing. Our results revealed that Wnt-CM can accelerate wound closure and induce regeneration of hair follicles. Meanwhile, Wnt-CM enhanced expression of extracellular matrix (ECM components and cell migration of fibroblasts but inhibited the migratory ability and expression of K6 and K16 in keratinocytes by enhancing expression of c-Myc. However, we found that the CM of fibroblasts treated with Wnt-CM (HFWnt-CM-CM can also promote wound repair and keratinocyte migration; but there was no increase in the number of hair follicles of regeneration. These data indicate that Wnt7a and UC-MSCs have synergistic effects: they can accelerate wound repair and induce hair regeneration via cellular communication in the wound microenvironment. Thus, this study opens up new avenues of research on the mechanisms underlying wound repair.

  17. A Conditioned Medium of Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Overexpressing Wnt7a Promotes Wound Repair and Regeneration of Hair Follicles in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Liang; Hao, Haojie; Liu, Jiejie; Ti, Dongdong; Tong, Chuan; Hou, Qian; Li, Meirong; Zheng, Jingxi; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can affect the microenvironment of a wound and thereby accelerate wound healing. Wnt proteins act as key mediators of skin development and participate in the formation of skin appendages such as hair. The mechanisms of action of MSCs and Wnt proteins on skin wounds are largely unknown. Here, we prepared a Wnt7a-containing conditioned medium (Wnt-CM) from the supernatant of cultured human umbilical cord-MSCs (UC-MSCs) overexpressing Wnt7a in order to examine the effects of this CM on cutaneous healing. Our results revealed that Wnt-CM can accelerate wound closure and induce regeneration of hair follicles. Meanwhile, Wnt-CM enhanced expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and cell migration of fibroblasts but inhibited the migratory ability and expression of K6 and K16 in keratinocytes by enhancing expression of c-Myc. However, we found that the CM of fibroblasts treated with Wnt-CM (HFWnt-CM-CM) can also promote wound repair and keratinocyte migration; but there was no increase in the number of hair follicles of regeneration. These data indicate that Wnt7a and UC-MSCs have synergistic effects: they can accelerate wound repair and induce hair regeneration via cellular communication in the wound microenvironment. Thus, this study opens up new avenues of research on the mechanisms underlying wound repair.

  18. Open Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanderhoff, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Museums around the world hold enormous troves of public domain artworks. In digitized form, they can be powerful tools for research and learning, as well as building blocks, in the hands of students, teachers, scholars, developers, and creative people. By opening up their digitized assets for reuse......, museums have a unique opportunity to broaden the scope of their public mission to serve and educate the public on 21st century media terms. What could be controversial about that? Art museums have a long legacy of restricting access to high quality images of artworks in order to protect them from improper...

  19. Open University

    CERN Document Server

    Pentz,M

    1975-01-01

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  20. Wound repair and anti-inflammatory potential of Lonicera japonica in excision wound-induced rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wei-Cheng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lonicera japonica Thunb. (Caprifoliaceae, a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal plant, is used to treat some infectious diseases and it may have uses as a healthy food and applications in cosmetics and as an ornamental groundcover. The ethanol extract of the flowering aerial parts of L. japonica (LJEE was investigated for its healing efficiency in a rat excision wound model. Methods Excision wounds were inflicted upon three groups of eight rats each. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction in skin wound sites in rats treated with simple ointment base, 10% (w/w LJEE ointment, or the reference standard drug, 0.2% (w/w nitrofurazone ointment. The effects of LJEE on the contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine during healing were estimated. The antimicrobial activity of LJEE against microorganisms was also assessed. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of LJEE was investigated to understand the mechanism of wound healing. Results LJEE exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis. The ointment formulation prepared with 10% (w/w LJEE exhibited potent wound healing capacity as evidenced by the wound contraction in the excision wound model. The contents of hydroxyproline and hexosamine also correlated with the observed healing pattern. These findings were supported by the histopathological characteristics of healed wound sections, as greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts, and angiogenesis were observed in the 10% (w/w LJEE ointment-treated group. The results also indicated that LJEE possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, as it enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines that suppress proinflammatory cytokine production. Conclusions The results suggest that the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of LJEE act synergistically to accelerate wound repair.

  1. Downregulation of PTEN at Corneal Wound Sites Accelerates Wound Healing through Increased Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lin; Graue-Hernandez, Enrique O.; Tran, Vu; Reid, Brian; Pu, Jin; Mannis, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The PI3K/Akt pathway is required for cell polarization and migration, whereas the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has inhibitory effects on the PI3K/Akt pathway. The authors therefore hypothesized that wounding would downregulate PTEN and that this downregulation would enhance wound healing. Methods. In human corneal epithelial (HCE) cell monolayer and rat cornea scratch wound models, the authors investigated PTEN and Akt expression using Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. The effects of PTEN and PI3K inhibitors dipotassium bisperoxo (picolinato) oxovanadate (bpv(pic)) and LY294002 on cell migration and wound closure were investigated using time-lapse imaging. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of PTEN inhibition on wound healing in whole rat eyes. Results. In HCE cell monolayer and rat cornea, PTEN was downregulated at the wound edges within 30 minutes of wounding. The downregulation of PTEN was causal in a simultaneous increase in Akt activation, which was responsible for a significant increase in individual cell migration rate from 8.8 μm/h to 17.3 μm/h. An increased migration rate was maintained for 20 hours. PTEN inhibition significantly enhanced the wound healing rate in the HCE cell monolayer from 10 minutes onward after treatment and reduced the healing time in eye organ culture from 30 to 20 hours. Conclusions. Injury to the corneal epithelium downregulates the expression of PTEN at wound edges, allowing increased PI3K/Akt signaling, thereby contributing to a significant enhancement of cell migration and wound healing. These results suggest that PTEN inhibition may be an effective treatment for corneal injury. PMID:21212174

  2. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  3. Effect of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Joon Chul; Choi, Rak-Jun; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include use of the safest and least invasive methods with a goal of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced technology in wound healing has triggered the use of cells and/or biological dermis to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing efficacy.Ten nude mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness 6-mm punch wounds were created on the dorsal surface of each mouse (total, 40 wounds). The wounds were randomly assigned to one of the following 4 treatments: topical application of Dulbecco phosphate-buffered saline (control), human fibroblasts (FB), artificial dermis (AD), and human fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis (AD with FB). On the 14th day after treatment, wound healing rate and wound contraction, which are the 2 main factors determining wound healing efficacy, were evaluated using a stereoimage optical topometer system, histomorphological analysis, and immunohistochemistry.The results of the stereoimage optical topometer system demonstrated that the FB group did not have significant influence on wound healing rate and wound contraction. The AD group showed reduced wound contraction, but wound healing was delayed. The AD with FB group showed decreased wound contraction without significantly delayed wound healing. Histomorphological analysis exhibited that more normal skin structure was regenerated in the AD with FB group. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the AD group and the AD with FB group produced less α-smooth muscle actin than the control group, but this was not shown in the FB group.Fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis may minimize wound contraction without significantly delaying wound healing in the treatment of skin and soft tissue defects.

  4. Low-cost uncalibrated video-based tool for tridimensional reconstruction oriented to assessment of chronic wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Leslie; Treuillet, Sylvie; Valencia, Braulio; Llanos, Alejandro; Castañeda, Benjamín.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major problem worldwide which mainly affects to the geriatric population or patients with limited mobility. In tropical countries, Cutaneous Leishmaniasis(CL)s is also a cause for chronic wounds,being endemic in Peru in the 75% of the country. Therefore, the monitoring of these wounds represents a big challenge due to the remote location of the patients. This papers aims to develop a low-cost user-friendly technique to obtain a 3D reconstruction for chronic wounds oriented to clinical monitoring and assessment. The video is taken using a commercial hand-held video camera without the need of a rig. The algorithm has been specially designed for skin wounds which have certain characteristics in texture where techniques used in regular SFM applications with undefined edges wouldn't work. In addition, the technique has been developed using open source libraries. The 3D cloud point estimated allows the computation of metrics as volume, depth, superficial area which recently have been used by CL specialists showing good results in clinical assessment. Initial results in cork phantoms and CL wounds show an average distance error of less than 1mm when compared against models obtained with a industrial 3D laser scanner.

  5. Quercetin impregnated chitosan-fibrin composite scaffolds as potential wound dressing materials - Fabrication, characterization and in vivo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedakumari, Weslen S; Ayaz, Nazeeha; Karthick, Arun S; Senthil, Rethinam; Sastry, Thotapalli P

    2017-01-15

    The present study efforts at fabricating chitosan-fibrin composite (CF) scaffolds impregnated with quercetin for wound dressing application and aims at investigating their physicochemical properties. CF scaffolds were prepared by mixing acidic solution of chitosan with an alkaline solution of fibrin, to which quercetin (Q) was added, homogenized and lyophilized obtain Q-CF scaffold. FTIR spectra were used to determine the interactions between the functional groups of quercetin and CF scaffolds. TGA analysis revealed the decomposition of saccharide rings and amino acids of chitosan and fibrin at the temperature range of 255-400°C. Q-CF scaffold exhibited maximum tensile strength of 1.45MPa, an ideal mechanical strength for a wound dressing material. Q-CF scaffolds exhibited good bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Biocompatibility of Q-CF scaffold was assessed using MTT assay, which elucidated its non-toxic property and excellent suitability for tissue engineering applications. In vivo wound healing experiments performed using albino rats revealed that topical application of Q-CF scaffold on open excision type of wounds can significantly accelerate the process of wound healing. These results suggest that Q-CF scaffold could serve as a promising wound dressing material.

  6. Effects of glutamine on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesici, Ugur; Kesici, Sevgi; Ulusoy, Hulya; Yucesan, Fulya; Turkmen, Aygen U; Besir, Ahmet; Tuna, Verda

    2015-06-01

    Studies reporting the need for replacing amino acids such as glutamine (Gln), hydroxymethyl butyrate (HMB) and arginine (Arg) to accelerate wound healing are available in the literature. The primary objective of this study was to present the effects of Gln on tissue hydroxyproline (OHP) levels in wound healing. This study was conducted on 30 female Sprague Dawley rats with a mean weight of 230 ± 20 g. Secondary wounds were formed by excising 2 × 1 cm skin subcutaneous tissue on the back of the rats. The rats were divided into three equal groups. Group C (Control): the group received 1 ml/day isotonic solution by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group A (Abound): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln, 0·052 g/kg/day/ml HMB and 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Arg by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group R (Resource): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. The OHP levels of the tissues obtained from the upper half region on the 8th day and the lower half region on the 21st day from the same rats in the groups were examined. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistics program SPSS version 17.0. No statistically significant differences were reported with regard to the OHP measurements on the 8th and 21st days (8th day: F = 0·068, P = 0·935 > 0·05; 21st day: F = 0·018, P = 0·983 > 0·05). The increase in mean OHP levels on the 8th and 21st days within each group was found to be statistically significant (F = 1146·34, P = 0·000 wound healing negatively and who do not have large tissue loss at critical level, Gln, Arg and HMB support would not be required to accelerate secondary wound healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The beneficial effects of Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) on wound healing of rabbit skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pişkin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Tümentemur, Gamze; Kaplan, Süleyman; Yazıcı, Ozgür Bülent; Hökelek, Murat

    2014-08-01

    Momordica charantia (MC; bitter gourd) is a traditional herbal commonly used for its antidiabetic, antioxidant, contraceptive and antibacterial properties. In the current study, the authors aim to observe the topical effect of MC cream on the wound-healing process in rabbits. Moreover, they compare the healing potential with conventional creams used therapeutically. Towards this aim, 28 New Zealand rabbits were divided into four groups and excision wounds (7 cm²) were made on their backs. Open wound dressing was carried out daily for 28 days among the experimental groups with the application of dekspanthenol (Bepanthen®; BP group, n = 7), nitrofurazon (Furacin®; FR group, n = 7) and olive oil extract of MC (MC group, n = 7). No application was made to the control group. At the end of day 28, areas of the skin with initial wound area were en bloc dissected and prepared for histopathological and stereological analysis. Inflammatory cells were abundant in the control group and cream application led to a decrease in the number of these cells, especially in the MC group. The highest number of fibroblasts was detected in the MC group. Furthermore, the MC group displayed the highest fractions of epidermis to papillary dermis, fibroblasts to reticular dermis and collagen fibres to reticular dermis. The MC group also presented a high density of blood vessels, moderate density of collagen fibres and mature fibroblasts. The BP group showed better epithelialisation compared with the FR group, but the latter provided more effective reorganisation of the dermis. Different cream supplements caused healthy and fast wound healing according to untreated controls and the results show that administration of the MC extract improves and accelerates the process of wound healing in rabbits in comparison with the BP and FR extracts.

  8. Targeting O-glycosyltransferase (OGT) to promote healing of diabetic skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runager, Kasper; Bektas, Meryem; Berkowitz, Paula; Rubenstein, David S

    2014-02-28

    Non-healing wounds are a significant source of morbidity. This is particularly true for diabetic patients, who tend to develop chronic skin wounds. O-GlcNAc modification of serine and threonine residues is a common regulatory post-translational modification analogous to protein phosphorylation; increased intracellular protein O-GlcNAc modification has been observed in diabetic and hyperglycemic states. Two intracellular enzymes, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-polypeptide β-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAc-selective N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (OGA), mediate addition and removal, respectively, of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from intracellular protein substrates. Alterations in O-GlcNAc modification of intracellular proteins is linked to diabetes, and the increased levels of protein O-GlcNAc modification observed in diabetic tissues may in part explain some of the observed underlying pathophysiology that contributes to delayed wound healing. We have previously shown that increasing protein O-GlcNAc modification by overexpression of OGT in murine keratinocytes results in elevated protein O-GlcNAc modification and a hyperadhesive phenotype. This study was undertaken to explore the hypothesis that increased O-GlcNAc modification of cellular proteins in diabetic skin could contribute to the delayed wound healing observed in patients with diabetic skin ulcers. In the present study, we show that human keratinocytes cultured under hyperglycemic conditions display increased levels of O-GlcNAc modification as well as a delay in the rate of wound closure in vitro. We further show that specific knockdown of OGT by RNA interference (RNAi) reverses this effect, thereby opening up the opportunity for OGT-targeted therapies to promote wound healing in diabetic patients.

  9. Sub-bandage sensing system for remote monitoring of chronic wounds in healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariz, Alex; Mehmood, Nasir; Voelcker, Nico

    2015-12-01

    Chronic wounds, such as venous leg ulcers, can be monitored non-invasively by using modern sensing devices and wireless technologies. The development of such wireless diagnostic tools may improve chronic wound management by providing evidence on efficacy of treatments being provided. In this paper we present a low-power portable telemetric system for wound condition sensing and monitoring. The system aims at measuring and transmitting real-time information of wound-site temperature, sub-bandage pressure and moisture level from within the wound dressing. The system comprises commercially available non-invasive temperature, moisture, and pressure sensors, which are interfaced with a telemetry device on a flexible 0.15 mm thick printed circuit material, making up a lightweight biocompatible sensing device. The real-time data obtained is transmitted wirelessly to a portable receiver which displays the measured values. The performance of the whole telemetric sensing system is validated on a mannequin leg using commercial compression bandages and dressings. A number of trials on a healthy human volunteer are performed where treatment conditions were emulated using various compression bandage configurations. A reliable and repeatable performance of the system is achieved under compression bandage and with minimal discomfort to the volunteer. The system is capable of reporting instantaneous changes in bandage pressure, moisture level and local temperature at wound site with average measurement resolutions of 0.5 mmHg, 3.0 %RH, and 0.2 °C respectively. Effective range of data transmission is 4-5 m in an open environment.

  10. Superabsorbent dressings for copiously exuding wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucher, Nathalie; Safar, Helene; Baret, Mylène; Philippe, Anne; Farid, Rachida

    Exudate control is important in the management of both acute and chronic wounds. A new category of absorbent dressings that contain superabsorbent particles promises high absorbency. The aim of this multicentre, prospective, non-comparative observational study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and absorbent capacity of a superabsorbent dressing. Fifteen inpatients and outpatients with highly exuding wounds were included. Most patients (n=8) (53%) had chronic wounds; 20% (n=3) had ulcerating tumours. The superabsorbent dressing was used as a primary or a secondary dressing. Assessment was on day 0 (start), day 3 and day 7 (end of study). The study looked at wound bed and periwound skin condition, exudate production, pain upon dressing removal, reason for dressing removal, and frequency of dressing changes. A clinical visual scoring tool was used, together with digital photographs, which were assessed by the same experienced clinician. All 15 patients completed the study, during which no adverse events were noted. At day 7, maceration had reduced from 46.7% (n=7) at day 0 to 6.7% (n=1). After only 3 days, dressing change frequency was reduced from once daily to twice weekly in 80% (n=12) of patients. The superabsorbent dressing seems to reduce complications associated with exudate production, stimulate wound healing and increase patient comfort; it may also save time and costs for caregivers.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinases in wound repair (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanti, L; Kähäri, V M

    2000-10-01

    Wound repair is initiated with the aggregation of platelets, formation of a fibrin clot, and release of growth factors from the activated coagulation pathways, injured cells, platelets, and extracellular matrix (ECM), followed by migration of inflammatory cells to the wound site. Thereafter, keratinocytes migrate over the wound, angiogenesis is initiated, and fibroblasts deposit and remodel the granulation tissue. Cell migration, angiogenesis, degradation of provisional matrix, and remodeling of newly formed granulation tissue, all require controlled degradation of the ECM. Disturbance in the balance between ECM production and degradation leads to formation of chronic ulcers with excessive ECM degradation, or to fibrosis, for example hypertrophic scars or keloids characterized by excessive accumulation of ECM components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases, which as a group can degrade essentially all ECM components. So far, 20 members of the human MMP family have been identified. Based on their structure and substrate specificity, they can be divided into subgroups of collagenases, stromelysins, stromelysin-like MMPs, gelatinases, membrane-type MMPs (MT-MMPs), and other MMPs. In this review, the role of MMPs in normal wound repair as well as in chronic ulcers is discussed. In addition, the role of signaling pathways, in particular, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in regulating MMP expression is discussed as possible therapeutical targets for wound healing disorders.

  12. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Ângela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats.

  13. Angiotensin II inhibitor facilitates epidermal wound regeneration in diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eKamber

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue regeneration and wound healing are severely impaired in diabetes and are associated with poor circulation and dysfunctional blood vessels. Angiotensin II inhibitors are anti-hypertensive drugs used in clinical practice to regulate blood pressure and could affect tissue remodeling. We hypothesize that blocking angiotensin II, using Losartan, could facilitate tissue regeneration in diabetic mice. To this end, we established an experimental model of wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Our data demonstrated that Losartan accelerates wound repair and normalizes wound stromal responses, having a beneficial role in diabetic wounds. Our findings highlight a potential therapeutic use of Losartan in improving wound repair in diabetic conditions.

  14. Wound healing Agents from Medicinal Plants:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShivaniRawat; Ramandeep Singh; Preeti Thakur; SatinderKaur; AlokSemwal

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of plants identified from various ethno botanical surveys and folklore medicinal survey with Wound healing activity. Wound is defined as the disruption of the cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Wound may be produced by physical, chemical, thermal, microbial or immunological insult to the tissues. The process of wound healing consists of integrated cellular and biochemical events leading to re-establishment of structural and functional integrity with regain of strength in injured tissues.This review discuss about Wound healing potential of plants, its botanicalname, Common name, family, part used and references, which are helpful for researcher to development new Wound healing formulations for human use.

  15. Pressurised irrigation versus swabbing method in cleansing wounds healed by secondary intention: a randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Suzanne So-Shan; Lee, Man-Ying; Cheung, Jeanny Sui-Sum; Choi, Kai-Chow; Chung, Tak-Ki; Wong, Tze-Wing; Lam, Kit-Yee; Lee, Diana Tze-fan

    2015-01-01

    Wound cleansing should create an optimal healing environment by removing excess debris, exudates, foreign and necrotic material which are commonly present in the wounds that heal by secondary intention. At present, there is no research evidence for whether pressurised irrigation has better wound healing outcomes compared with conventional swabbing practice in cleansing wound. This study investigated the differences between pressurised irrigation and swabbing method in cleansing wounds that healed by secondary intention in relation to wound healing outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Multicentre, prospective, randomised controlled trial. The study took place in four General Outpatient Clinics in Hong Kong. Two hundred and fifty six patients with wounds healing by secondary intention were randomly assigned by having a staff independent of the study opening a serially numbered, opaque and sealed envelope to either pressurised irrigation (n=122) or swabbing (n=134). Staff undertaking study-related assessments was blinded to treatment assignment. Patients' wounds were followed up for 6 weeks or earlier if wounds had healed to determine wound healing, infection, symptoms, satisfaction, and cost effectiveness. The primary outcome was time-to-wound healing. Patients were analysed according to their treatment allocation. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01885273. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that pressurised irrigation group was associated with a shorter median time-to-wound healing than swabbing group [9.0 days (95% CI: 7.4-13.8) vs. 12.0 (95% CI: 10.2-13.8); p=0.007]. Pressurised irrigation group has significantly more patients experiencing lower grade of pain during wound cleansing (93.4% vs. 84.2%; p=0.02), and significantly higher median satisfaction with either comfort or cleansing method (MD 1 [95% CI: 5-6]; p=0.002; MD 1 [95% CI: 5-6]; pirrigation group and in 7 (5.2%) patients in swabbing group (p=0.44). Cost-effectiveness analysis

  16. The prevalence, management and outcome for acute wounds identified in a wound care survey within one English health care district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowden, Kathryn R; Vowden, Peter

    2009-02-01

    This paper reports the characteristics and local management of 826 acute wounds identified during an audit across all health care providers serving the population of Bradford, UK. Of the wounds encountered 303 were traumatic wounds and 237 primary closures with smaller numbers of other acute wound types. Of the 303 traumatic wounds 174 occurred in women (57.4%). Men predominated in the under 45s (65M:26F), this being largely accounted for by hand and finger trauma (n = 62) particularly in patients of working age (M32:F12). Women predominated in the over 65s (50M:130F), this being largely accounted for by lower limb traumatic wounds (M24:F91), the majority of these being in patients 65 and over (M14:F82). In this sub-group of 96 patients 25 had wounds of 6 weeks or longer duration, only 3 had undergone Doppler assessment and only 2 received compression bandaging. Typically these wounds were of recent origin and small in size (under 1 week and less than 5 cm2 in surface area) however exceptions occurred where 10 people had wounds over 25 cm2 in area while 3 wounds had been present for over 5 years. 101 (12.2%) of the encountered wounds were considered to be infected although the practice of wound swabbing in the presence of presumed infection seemed inadequate with 37.6% of all infected acute wounds not being swabbed while 97 non-infected wounds were swabbed. Where wounds were swabbed 4.5% were found to be MRSA positive. Across all acute wound types (with the sole exception of primary closures) antimicrobial wound dressings were the most prevalent form of dressing and covered 56 (55.4%) of all infected wounds.

  17. Cranio-cerebral gunshot wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Majer1, G. Iacob2

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranio-cerebral gunshots wounds(CCGW are the most devastating injuriesto the central nervous system, especiallymade by high velocity bullets, the mostdevastating, severe and usually fatal type ofmissile injury to the head.Objective: To investigate and compare,using a retrospective study on five cases theclinical outcomes of CCGW. Predictors ofpoor outcome were: older age, delayedmode of transportation, low admissionCGS score with haemodynamic instability,CT visualization of diffuse brain damage,bihemispheric, multilobar injuries withlateral and midline sagittal planestrajectories made by penetrating highvelocity bullets fired from a very closerange, brain stem and ventricular injurywith intraventricular and/or subarachnoidhemorrhage, mass effect and midline shift,evidence of herniation and/or hematomas,high ICP and/or hypotension, abnormalcoagulation states on admission ordisseminated intravascular coagulation. Lessharmful effects were generated by retainedmissiles, bone fragments with CNSinfection, DAI lesions and neuronaldamages associated to cavitation, seizures.Material and methods: 5 patients (4 maleand 1 female, age ranged 22-65 years, withCCGW, during the period 2004-2009,caused by military conflict and accidentalfiring. After initial resuscitation all patientswere assessed on admission by the GlasgowComa Scale (GCS. After investigations: Xrayskull, brain CT, Angio-CT, cerebralMRI, SPECT; baseline investigations,neurological, haemodynamic andcoagulability status all patients underwentsurgical treatment following emergencyintervention. The survival, mortality andfunctional outcome were evaluated byGlasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score.Results: Referring on five cases weevaluate on a retrospective study the clinicaloutcome, imagistics, microscopic studies onneuronal and axonal damage generated bytemporary cavitation along the cerebralbullet’s track, therapeutics, as the review ofthe literature. Two patients with anadmission CGS 9 and 10

  18. Wound healing activity of the inflorescence of Typha elephantina (Cattail).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Vandana; Thakur, Tejas

    2014-03-01

    Methanolic extracts of Typha elephantina inflorescence (TE) and its bandage were screened for wound healing by incision and excision wound models in Wistar rats. In the incision wound model, incision wounds were topically treated with TE gel (2.0% [w/w], 3.0% [w/w], and 5.0% [w/w]), Typha elephantina inflorescence bandage, and the reference standard 5.0% w/w povidone iodine for a period of 10 days. When the wounds healed thoroughly, sutures were removed on the 8th postwounding day, and the tensile strength of the skin was measured on the 10th day. In the excision wound model, excision wounds were treated with TE gel (3.0% [w/w] and 5.0% [w/w]), inflorescence bandage, and 5.0% w/w povidone iodine till the wounds completely healed. Epithelization time, wound contraction, hydroxyproline and hexosamine content of the scab, and ascorbic acid and malondialdehyde content of the plasma were determined in this model. In the incision wound model, high tensile strength of the skin of the healed wound was observed in rats treated with the TE gels and the inflorescence bandage when compared with wounded control rats. The increase in tensile strength indicates a promotion of collagen fibers and a firm knitting of the disrupted wound surfaces by collagen. In the excision wound model, higher rate of wound contraction, decreased period of epithelization, elevated hydroxyproline, hexosamine, and ascorbic acid levels, and a significant decrease in malondialdehyde content was observed in treated groups when compared with the wounded control animals. It may be concluded that the inflorescence of Typha elephantina possesses a potent wound healing activity, which may be due to an underlying antioxidant mechanism.

  19. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing.

  20. Elements affecting wound healing time: An evidence based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Hanan; Cullen, Marianne; Chambers, Helen; Carroll, Matthew; Walker, Judi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the predominant client factors and comorbidities that affected the time taken for wounds to heal. A prospective study design used the Mobile Wound Care (MWC) database to capture and collate detailed medical histories, comorbidities, healing times and consumable costs for clients with wounds in Gippsland, Victoria. There were 3,726 wounds documented from 2,350 clients, so an average of 1.6 wounds per client. Half (49.6%) of all clients were females, indicating that there were no gender differences in terms of wound prevalence. The clients were primarily older people, with an average age of 64.3 years (ranging between 0.7 and 102.9 years). The majority of the wounds (56%) were acute and described as surgical, crush and trauma. The MWC database categorized the elements that influenced wound healing into 3 groups--factors affecting healing (FAH), comorbidities, and medications known to affect wound healing. While there were a multitude of significant associations, multiple linear regression identified the following key elements: age over 65 years, obesity, nonadherence to treatment plan, peripheral vascular disease, specific wounds associated with pressure/friction/shear, confirmed infection, and cerebrovascular accident (stroke). Wound healing is a complex process that requires a thorough understanding of influencing elements to improve healing times.© 2015 by the Wound Healing Society. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  1. Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmida Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic wounds are unlike typical wounds in that they are slower to heal, making treatment with conventional topical medications an uphill process. Among several different alternative therapies, honey is an effective choice because it provides comparatively rapid wound healing. Although honey has been used as an alternative medicine for wound healing since ancient times, the application of honey to diabetic wounds has only recently been revived. Because honey has some unique natural features as a wound healer, it works even more effectively on diabetic wounds than on normal wounds. In addition, honey is known as an “all in one” remedy for diabetic wound healing because it can combat many microorganisms that are involved in the wound process and because it possesses antioxidant activity and controls inflammation. In this review, the potential role of honey’s antibacterial activity on diabetic wound-related microorganisms and honey’s clinical effectiveness in treating diabetic wounds based on the most recent studies is described. Additionally, ways in which honey can be used as a safer, faster, and effective healing agent for diabetic wounds in comparison with other synthetic medications in terms of microbial resistance and treatment costs are also described to support its traditional claims.

  2. Effect of Propolis on Experimental Cutaneous Wound Healing in Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates clinically the effect of propolis paste on healing of cutaneous wound in dogs. Under general anesthesia and complete aseptic conditions, two full thickness skin wounds (3 cm diameter) were created in each side of the chest in five dogs, one dorsal and one ventral, with 10 cm between them. These wounds were randomly allocated into two groups, control group (10 wounds) and propolis group (10 wounds). Both groups were represented in each dog. The wounds were cleaned with normal saline solution and dressed with macrogol ointment in control group and propolis paste in propolis group, twice daily till complete wound healing. Measurement of the wound area (cm2) was monitored planimetrically at 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days after injury. The data were analyzed statistically. The results revealed a significant reduction in the wound surface area in the propolis group after 14 and 21 days compared to control group. The wound reepithelization, contraction, and total wound healing were faster in propolis group than in control group during five weeks of study. In conclusion, propolis paste has a positive impact on cutaneous wound healing and it may be suggested for treating various types of wounds in animals. PMID:26783495

  3. Evaluation of ghee based formulation for wound healing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Vure; Dorle, Avinash Kumar

    2006-08-11

    Formulation containing neomycin and ghee was evaluated for wound-healing potential on different experimental models of wounds in rats. The rats were divided into six groups of group 1 as control, group 2 as treated with neomycin only, group 3 as treated only with ghee, group 4 treated with F-1 formulation containing ghee 40% and neomycin 0.5%, group 5 treated with F-2 formulation containing ghee 50% and neomycin 0.5% and group 6 treated with F-3 formulation containing ghee and ointment base in all two wound models, each group consisting of six rats. Wound contraction ability in excision wound model was measured at different time intervals and study was continued until wound is completely healed. Tensile strength was measured in 10-day-old incision wound and quantitative estimation of hydroxy proline content in the healed tissue was determined in 10-day-old excision wound. Histological studies were done on 10-day-old sections of regenerated tissue of incision wound. F-2 formulation containing ghee 50% and neomycin 0.5% showed statistically significant response, in terms of wound contracting ability, wound closure time, period of epithelization, tensile strength of the wound, regeneration of tissues at wound site when compared with the control group and these results were comparable to those of a reference neomycin ointment.

  4. Wound biofilms: lessons learned from oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancl, Kimberly A; Kirsner, Robert S; Ajdic, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms play an important role in the development and pathogenesis of many chronic infections. Oral biofilms, more commonly known as dental plaque, are a primary cause of oral diseases including caries, gingivitis, and periodontitis. Oral biofilms are commonly studied as model biofilm systems as they are easily accessible; thus, biofilm research in oral diseases is advanced with details of biofilm formation and bacterial interactions being well elucidated. In contrast, wound research has relatively recently directed attention to the role biofilms have in chronic wounds. This review discusses the biofilms in periodontal disease and chronic wounds with comparisons focusing on biofilm detection, biofilm formation, the immune response to biofilms, bacterial interaction, and quorum sensing. Current treatment modalities used by both fields and future therapies are also discussed.

  5. Histopathology of marine vibrio wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, E N; Leonard, G L; Castillo, L E; Genre, C F; Pankey, G A

    1981-12-01

    Although marine vibrio wound infections and septicemia are being reported with increasing frequency, description of the histopathologic changes has been scanty. The histologic alterations in three patients with primary marine vibrio wound infections are presented. The lesions are characterized by intense acute cellulitis of the subcutis with much tissue destruction and extension into the adjacent dermis. The superficial dermis is devitalized and lacks an inflammatory cellular infiltrate. Subepidermal noninflammatory bullae are formed. Many organisms are seen both within the areas of intense acute inflammation and in devitalized areas. Organisms and inflammation are especially oriented around vessels, with associated acute vasculitis. It is concluded that the morphologic picture in marine vibrio wound infections is nonspecific yet characteristic.

  6. Sugar-coating wound repair: a review of FGF-10 and dermatan sulfate in wound healing and their potential application in burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Radek, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    Thousands of patients suffer from burn injuries each year, yet few therapies have been developed to accelerate the wound healing process. Most fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) have been extensively evaluated but only a few have been found to participate in the wound healing process. In particular, FGF-10 is robustly increased in the wound microenvironment after injury and has demonstrated some ability to promote wound healing in vitro and in vivo. Glycosaminoglycans are linear carbohydrates that participate in wound repair by influencing cytokine/growth factor localization and interaction with cognate receptors. Dermatan sulfate (DS) is the most abundant glycosaminoglycan in human wound fluid and has been postulated to be directly involved in the healing process. Recently, the combination of FGF-10 and DS demonstrated the potential to accelerate wound healing via increased keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Based on these preliminary studies, DS may serve as a cofactor for FGF-10, and together they are likely to expedite the healing process by stimulating keratinocyte activity. As a specific subtype of wounds, the overall healing process of burn injuries does not significantly differ from other types of wounds, where optimal repair results in matrix regeneration and complete reepithelialization. At present, standard burn treatment primarily involves topical application of antimicrobial agents, while no routine therapies target acceleration of reepithelialization, the key to wound closure. Thus, this novel therapeutic combination could be used in conjunction with some of the current therapies, but it would have the unique ability to initiate wound healing by stimulating keratinocyte epithelialization.

  7. Evaluation of dense collagen matrices as medicated wound dressing for the treatment of cutaneous chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helary, Christophe; Abed, Aicha; Mosser, Gervaise; Louedec, Liliane; Letourneur, Didier; Coradin, Thibaud; Giraud-Guille, Marie Madeleine; Meddahi-Pellé, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Cutaneous chronic wounds are characterized by an impaired wound healing which may lead to infection and amputation. When current treatments are not effective enough, the application of wound dressings is required. To date, no ideal biomaterial is available. In this study, highly dense collagen matrices have been evaluated as novel medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds. For this purpose, the structure, mechanical properties, swelling ability and in vivo stability of matrices concentrated from 5 to 40 mg mL(-1) were tested. The matrix stiffness increased with the collagen concentration and was associated with the fibril density and thickness. Increased collagen concentration also enhanced the material resistance against accelerated digestion by collagenase. After subcutaneous implantation in rats, dense collagen matrices exhibited high stability without any degradation after 15 days. The absence of macrophages and neutrophils evidenced their biocompatibility. Subsequently, dense matrices at 40 mg mL(-1) were evaluated as drug delivery system for ampicillin release. More concentrated matrices exhibited the best swelling abilities and could absorb 20 times their dry weight in water, allowing for an efficient antibiotic loading from their dried form. They released efficient doses of antibiotics that inhibited the bacterial growth of Staphylococcus Aureus over 3 days. In parallel, they show no cytotoxicity towards human fibroblasts. These results show that dense collagen matrices are promising materials to develop medicated wound dressings for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  8. Wound healing efficacy of a 660-nm diode laser in a rat incisional wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the optimum usage parameters of low reactive-level laser therapy (LLLT) in a rat incisional wound model. In Sprague-Dawley rats, surgical wounds of 15-mm length were made in the dorsal thoracic region. They were divided into groups to receive 660-nm diode laser irradiation 24 h after surgery at an energy density of 0 (control), 1, 5, or 10 J/cm(2). Tissue sections collected on postoperative day 3 were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and an antibody for ED1 to determine the number of macrophages around the wound. Samples collected on day 7 were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and observed via polarized light microscopy to measure the area occupied by collagen fibers around the wound; day 7 skin specimens were also subjected to mechanical testing to evaluate tensile strength. On postoperative day 3, the numbers of macrophages around the wound were significantly lower in the groups receiving 1 and 5 J/cm(2) irradiation, compared to the control and 10 J/cm(2) irradiation groups (p healing tissues from 1 and 5 J/cm(2) irradiation groups, compared to the control group (p wound healing in a rat incisional wound model. However, a higher radiation energy density yielded no significant enhancement.

  9. Influence of pH on wound-healing: a new perspective for wound-therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lars Alexander; Korber, Andreas; Grabbe, Stephan; Dissemond, Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is characterised by intercalating degradation and re-assembly of connective tissue and epidermal layer. The pH value within the wound-milieu influences indirectly and directly all biochemical reactions taking place in this process of healing. Interestingly it is so far a neglected parameter for the overall outcome. For more than three decades the common assumption amongst physicians was that a low pH value, such as it is found on normal skin, is favourable for wound healing. However, investigations have shown that in fact some healing processes such as the take-rate of skin-grafts require an alkaline milieu. The matter is thus much more complicated than it was assumed. This review article summarises the existing literature dealing with the topic of pH value within the wound-milieu, its influence on wound healing and critically discusses the currently existing data in this field. The conclusion to be drawn at present is that the wound pH indeed proves to be a potent influential factor for the healing process and that different pH ranges are required for certain distinct phases of wound healing. Further systematic data needs to be collected for a better understanding of the pH requirements under specific circumstances. This is important as it will help to develop new pH targeted therapeutic strategies.

  10. Chitosan preparations for wounds and burns: antimicrobial and wound-healing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Since its discovery approximately 200 years ago, chitosan, as a cationic natural polymer, has been widely used as a topical dressing in wound management owing to its hemostatic, stimulation of healing, antimicrobial, nontoxic, biocompatible and biodegradable properties. This article covers the antimicrobial and wound-healing effects of chitosan, as well as its derivatives and complexes, and its use as a vehicle to deliver biopharmaceuticals, antimicrobials and growth factors into tissue. Studies covering applications of chitosan in wounds and burns can be classified into in vitro, animal and clinical studies. Chitosan preparations are classified into native chitosan, chitosan formulations, complexes and derivatives with other substances. Chitosan can be used to prevent or treat wound and burn infections not only because of its intrinsic antimicrobial properties, but also by virtue of its ability to deliver extrinsic antimicrobial agents to wounds and burns. It can also be used as a slow-release drug-delivery vehicle for growth factors to improve wound healing. The large number of publications in this area suggests that chitosan will continue to be an important agent in the management of wounds and burns. PMID:21810057

  11. Formulation of Novel Layered Sodium Carboxymethylcellulose Film Wound Dressings with Ibuprofen for Alleviating Wound Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Vinklárková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective assessment and management of wound pain can facilitate both improvements in healing rates and overall quality of life. From a pharmacological perspective, topical application of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the form of film wound dressings may be a good choice. Thus, the aim of this work was to develop novel layered film wound dressings containing ibuprofen based on partially substituted fibrous sodium carboxymethylcellulose (nonwoven textile Hcel NaT. To this end, an innovative solvent casting method using a sequential coating technique has been applied. The concentration of ibuprofen which was incorporated as an acetone solution or as a suspension in a sodium carboxymethylcellulose dispersion was 0.5 mg/cm2 and 1.0 mg/cm2 of film. Results showed that developed films had adequate mechanical and swelling properties and an advantageous acidic surface pH for wound application. An in vitro drug release study implied that layered films retained the drug for a longer period of time and thus could minimize the frequency of changing the dressing. Films with suspended ibuprofen demonstrated higher drug content uniformity and superior in vitro drug release characteristics in comparison with ibuprofen incorporation as an acetone solution. Prepared films could be potential wound dressings for the effective treatment of wound pain in low exuding wounds.

  12. The Presence of Oxygen in Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Howard M; Grant, Anthony; Ditata, James

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen must be tightly governed in all phases of wound healing to produce viable granulation tissue. This idea of tight regulation has yet to be disputed; however, the role of oxygen at the cellular and molecular levels still is not fully understood as it pertains to its place in healing wounds. In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of oxygen on living tissue and its potential role as a therapy in wound healing, a substantial literature review of the role of oxygen in wound healing was performed and the following key points were extrapolated: 1) During energy metabolism, oxygen is needed for mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase as it produces high-energy phosphates that are needed for many cellular functions, 2) oxygen is also involved in the hydroxylation of proline and lysine into procollagen, which leads to collagen maturation, 3) in angiogenesis, hypoxia is required to start the process of wound healing, but it has been shown that if oxygen is administered it can accelerate and sustain vessel growth, 4) the antimicrobial action of oxygen occurs when nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-linked oxygenase acts as a catalyst for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a superoxide ion which kills bacteria, and 5) the level of evidence is moderate for the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for diabetic foot ulcers, crush injuries, and soft-tissue infections. The authors hypothesized that HBOT would be beneficial to arterial insufficiency wounds and other ailments, but at this time further study is needed before HBOT would be indicated.

  13. Kinin receptors in skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, Bruna da Silva; Morais, Rafael Leite Tavares de; Pesquero, João Bosco; Bader, Michael; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cabrini, Daniela Almeida

    2016-05-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that includes 3 different phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Kinins are vasoactive peptides released after tissue injury, and are directly involved in the development and maintenance of inflammatory processes, and their actions are mediated by the activation of receptors called B1 and B2. We aimed to evaluate the involvement of kinin receptors in the skin healing process. Knockout mice for kinin receptors (KOB1, KOB2 and KOB1B2) and wild type controls (WT) were subjected to a skin excision model, and tissue repair process was evaluated during different phases of wound healing. In knockout animals for kinin receptors differences were observed in the resolution period of injury exceeding 17 days for the total closure of wounds. The absence of kinin receptors promotes a significant reduction in infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells on day 2 of the inflammatory phase. Already at the late stage of this phase (3 days) there was a negative influence on the infiltration of polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells at the site of injury in comparison to WT. Collagen was significantly diminished in tissue of KOB1, KOB2 and KOB1B2 from day two to the end of the healing process. Moreover, wound tissue from KOB2 and KOB1B2, but not KOB1, presented impaired parameters of re-epitheliazation, reduced proliferation of cells (PCNA immunostaining), and a lower number of myofibroblasts (α-SMA immunostaining). These data reveal the involvement of kinin receptors in processes of skin repair. Both kinin receptors participate especially during the inflammatory phase, while B2 receptors seem to be more relevant in the quality of the wound scar. Thus, a better understanding of the contribution of kinins to skin wound healing may reveal novel options for therapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Superficial Burn Wound Healing with Intermittent Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Under Limited Access and Conventional Dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnegowda, Thittamaranahalli Muguregowda; Padmanabha Udupa, Echalasara Govindarama; Rao, Pragna; Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Thermal injury is associated with several biochemical and histopathological alteration in tissue. Analysis of these objective parameters in research and clinical field are common to determine healing rate of burn wound. Negative pressure wound therapy has been achieved wide success in treating chronic wounds. This study determines superficial burn wound healing with intermittent negative pressure wound therapy under limited access and conventional dressings METHODS A total 50 patients were randomised into two equal groups: limited access and conventional dressing groups. Selective biochemical parameters such as hydroxyproline, hexosamine, total protein, and antioxidants, malondialdhyde (MDA), wound surface pH, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and nitric oxide (NO) were measured in the granulation tissue. Histopathologically, necrotic tissue, amount of inflammatory infiltrate, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix deposition (ECM) were studied to determine wound healing under intermittent negative pressure. RESULTS Patients treated with limited access have shown significant increase in the mean hydroxyproline, hexosamine, total protein, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and decrease in MDA, MMP-2, wound surface pH, and NO. Histopathologic study showed that there was a significant difference after 10 days of treatment between limited access vs conventional dressing group, Median (Q1, Q3)=3 (2, 4.25) vs 2 (1.75, 4). CONCLUSION Limited access was shown to exert its beneficial effects on wound healing by increasing ground substance, antioxidants and reducing MMP-2 activity, MDA, NO and providing optimal pH, decreasing necrotic tissue, amount of inflammatory infiltrate, increasing ECM deposition and angiogenesis. PMID:27853690

  15. OpenER, a Dutch Initiative in Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuwer, Robert; Mulder, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the period 2006-2008, the Dutch Open Universiteit Nederland conducted an experiment in which Open Educational Resources (OER) were offered in an effort to bridge the gap between informal and formal learning and to establish a new style of entry portal to higher education with no barriers at all. OpenER received considerable attention both in…

  16. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing.

  17. Wound care with traditional, complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorai, Ananda A

    2012-05-01

    Wound care is constantly evolving with the advances in medicine. Search for the ideal dressing material still continues as wound care professionals are faced with several challenges. Due to the emergence of multi-resistant organisms and a decrease in newer antibiotics, wound care professionals have revisited the ancient healing methods by using traditional and alternative medicine in wound management. People's perception towards traditional medicine has also changed and is very encouraging. The concept of moist wound healing has been well accepted and traditional medicine has also incorporated this method to fasten the healing process. Several studies using herbal and traditional medicine from different continents have been documented in wound care management. Honey has been used extensively in wound care practice with excellent results. Recent scientific evidences and clinical trials conducted using traditional and alternative medicine in wound therapy holds good promise in the future.

  18. Effect of ginseng root polysaccharides on cutaneous wound repair in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 30 mg WGP group showed 85.0 % wound healing, while control group showed ... cells, resulting in increased fibroblast division, collagen synthesis, and production of blood cells during wound ... The skin plays a crucial role in maintaining.

  19. Polysaccharides and Cellulose in the Design of Wound Healing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic Wound Dressings that Sequester Harmful Proteases: Traditionally the use of carbohydrate-based wound dressings including cotton, xerogels, charcoal cloth, alginates, chitosan and hydrogels, have afforded properties such as absorbency, ease of application and removal, bacterial protection, flu...

  20. The Effect of Oral Medication on Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jeffrey M

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this learning activity is to provide information about the effects of oral medications on wound healing. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Identify oral medications that aid in wound healing.2. Recognize oral medications that interfere with wound healing. Given the accelerated medical discoveries of recent decades, there is a surprising lack of oral medications that directly improve wound healing. Of the oral medications available, most target ancillary aspects of wound care such as pain management, infection mitigation, and nutrition. This article describes oral pharmacologic agents intended to build new tissue and aid in wound healing, as well as an introduction to oral medications that interfere with wound healing. This review will not discuss the pharmacology of pain management or treatment of infection, nor will it address nutritional supplements.

  1. Eicosanoids: Emerging contributors in stem cell-mediated wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Elizabeth; Liu, Yanzhou; Chen, Li; Guo, Austin M

    2016-11-05

    Eicosanoids are bioactive lipid products primarily derived from the oxidation of arachidonic acid (AA). The individual contributions of eicosanoids and stem cells to wound healing have been of great interest. This review focuses on how stem cells work in concert with eicosanoids to create a beneficial environment in the wound bed and in the promotion of wound healing. Stem cells contribute to wound healing through modulating inflammation, differentiating into skin cells or endothelial cells, and exerting paracrine effects by releasing various potent growth factors. Eicosanoids have been shown to stimulate proliferation, migration, homing, and differentiation of stem cells, all of which contribute to the process of wound healing. Increasing evidence has shown that eicosanoids improve wound healing through increasing stem cell densities, stimulating differentiation, and enhancing the angiogenic properties of stem cells. Chronic wounds have become a major problem in health care. Therefore, research regarding the effects of stem cells and eicosanoids in the promotion wound healing is of great importance.

  2. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  3. A guide to wound managment in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Wayne A

    2005-11-01

    Wound management in palliative patients is often a very challenging area of care. There are many unique issues that can combine to produce complicated wound management scenarios, including the types of wounds and wound symptoms most commonly affecting palliative care patients, as well as the presence of concurrent disease and associated treatment. Problems exist with the availability of suitable dressings and balancing life expectancy with the goals of wound care. A significant, and possibly under-recognized, issue is the emotional and social distress experienced by these patients, which can be directly attributed to their wound. These problems must all be recognized and addressed in order to manage wounds effectively in this patient population. This article aims to explore these issues and offer advice on the management of wound-related symptoms, with the ultimate goal of improving patients' quality of life.

  4. Chitosan application to X-ray irradiated wound in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, H; Ohya, T; Ito, H; Kobayashi, Y; Yamada, K; Sato, M

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-impaired wounds are characterized by fibroblast and endothelial cell injury, resulting in delayed wound healing. Several previous studies have indicated that chitosan accelerates wound healing by up-regulating growth factor synthesis. In this study, the topical application of chitosan onto radiation-impaired wounds was investigated. An X-ray irradiated (25Gy) skin wound was treated with cotton fibre-type chitosan in dogs. Histopathologically, neovascularization was significantly accelerated in irradiated wounds in the chitosan application group (rad-chi group) when compared with irradiated wounds in the control group (rad-cont group). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in granulation tissue was positive in the rad-chi group, but was negative in the rad-cont group. The present results confirmed advanced granulation and capillary formation in wounds treated with chitosan, even after irradiation.

  5. Wound Healing Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaf Extract Ointment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05, improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties.

  6. Wound healing activity of Elaeis guineensis leaf extract ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Logeswaran, Selvarasoo; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga

    2012-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05), improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties.

  7. Haematological changes and wound healing effects of sildenafil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2016-12-07

    Dec 7, 2016 ... Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences, Volume 15 (Number 1). April ... and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University .... citrate could potentiate wound healing process in ..... late inflammatory response to wound ...

  8. The biomechanical modelling of non-ballistic skin wounding: blunt-force injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Kelly; Kieser, Jules; Ichim, Ionut; Swain, Michael; Waddell, Neil; Livingstone, Vicki; Taylor, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the biomechanical dynamics of blunt force trauma is indispensable for forensic reconstruction of a wounding event. In this study, we describe and interpret wound features on a synthetic skin model under defined laboratory conditions. To simulate skin and the sub-dermal tissues we used open-celled polyurethane sponge (foam), covered by a silicone layer. A drop tube device with three tube lengths (300, 400, and 500 mm), each secured to a weighted steel scaffold and into which a round, 5-kg Federal dumbbell of length 180 mm and diameter 8 cm was placed delivered blows of known impact. To calculate energy and velocity at impact the experimental set-up was replicated using rigid-body dynamics and motion simulation software. We soaked each foam square in 500 mL water, until fully saturated, immediately before placing it beneath the drop tube. We then recorded and classified both external and internal lacerations. The association between external wounding rates and the explanatory variables sponge type, sponge thickness, and height were investigated using Poisson regression. Tears (lacerations) of the silicone skin layer resembled linear lacerations seen in the clinical literature and resulted from only 48.6% of impacts. Poisson regression showed there was no significant difference between the rate of external wounding for different sponge types (P = 0.294) or different drop heights (P = 0.276). Most impacts produced "internal wounds" or subsurface cavitation (96%). There were four internal "wound" types; Y-shape (53%), linear (25%), stellate (16%), and double crescent (6%). The two-way interaction height by sponge type was statistically significant in the analysis of variance model (P = 0.035). The other two-way interactions; height by thickness and sponge type by thickness, were also bordering on statistical significance (P = 0.061 and P = 0.071, respectively). The observation that external wounds were present for less than half of impacts only, but that

  9. Clinical Outcome and Wound Healing following Carpal Tunnel Decompression: A Comparison of Two Common Suture Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. MacFarlane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Debate exists amongst surgeons regarding the ideal suture material for skin closure in carpal tunnel decompression (CTD. This study compares wound related complications, patient satisfaction, and functional outcome following open carpal tunnel decompression in patients undergoing wound closure with either of two common absorbable and nonabsorbable suture types. Materials and Methods. 53 patients underwent CTD with either 4/0 polypropylene (ProleneTM, n = 28 or 4/0 polyglactin (Vicryl RapideTM, n = 25 for skin closure. QuickDASH, VAS satisfaction scores, and Southampton wound scores were assessed preoperatively and at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively. Results. At 6 weeks the mean QuickDASH scores postoperatively were 18.54 and 17.70 for absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures, respectively, (P = 0.86. The mean VAS scores were 0.61 and 0.42 (P = 0.91, respectively. All patients achieved a Southampton wound score of 0 by 6 weeks except one, who achieved 1C in the nonabsorbable group, equivalent to mild erythema. There were no complications in either group. Conclusion. Both suture types are safe and effective materials for CTD, and we recommend surgeons to choose according to personal preference, handling properties, and resources available for suture removal.

  10. Laparoscopic Harvest of Omental Flaps for Reconstruction of Complex Mediastinal Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Jihad R.; Chock, Deborah A.; Gonzalez, John J.; Koneru, Suresh; Glass, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Omental harvest for complex poststernotomy mediastinal wounds has traditionally required a formal laparotomy in often high-risk patients, thus making it the procedure of last resort. Methods: The charts of all patients who underwent a laparoscopic omental harvest at the Texas Endosurgery Institute were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Seven patients, 4 males and 3 females with an average age of 65.1±6.3 years, with complex mediastinal wounds following coronary artery bypass grafting were studied. All patients underwent laparoscopic harvest of omental flaps based on the right gastroepiploic artery (3), the left gastroepiploic artery (1) or both (3), along with pectoralis major myocutaneous advancement flaps in 5 patients and partial-thickness skin graft and a vacuum-assisted closure device in 2 patients. The average operative time for the entire procedure was 196±54 minutes. Enteric feedings could be tolerated early postoperatively with a mean of 3.8 days. One death (14.2%) occurred. All surviving patients had excellent wound healing results at a mean follow-up of 19.1 months. Conclusion: Laparoscopic harvest of omental flaps for the reconstruction of complex mediastinal wounds is a valid and potentially less morbid alternative for the treatment of this infrequent but disastrous complication of open heart surgery. PMID:14626397

  11. STUDY ON SPANNING EXTERNAL FIXATORS FOR PERIARTICULAR OPEN FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth Maddila

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Open fractures which occur close to any fracture need immobilisation for the soft tissues to heal. Some open fractures are even fixed with provisional fixations to maintain the alignment of the fractures. The provisional fixation needs to be augmented with external support, which can be given by spanning external fixators across a joint. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our study consists of 38 open fractures of the lower limbs, which are of Gustilo-Anderson’s type IIIB, an MT4 of AO-ASIF soft tissue injury classification essentially requiring open wound management as well as fracture fixation. Wound lavage and debridements are carried out till the soft tissues show granulations. The position in which joint is immobilised is functional and with access to open wound for dressings and inspection without any displacement of the fracture as well as creeping granulation tissue. RESULTS All the cases in our study are maintained with functional position till soft tissue cover is achieved and provisional fixation is done with definitive fixation after soft tissue cover with skin grafting. CONCLUSION Spanning external fixators are useful in maintaining functional positions as well as augmenting the provisional fixation of the compound fractures.

  12. Comparing primary and secondary wound healing discomfort after mandibular third molar surgery: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refo'a, Youshiaho; Ouatik, Nabil; Golchin, Foroogh; Mahboobi, Nima

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of impacted mandibular third molars is one of the most common procedures in the oral cavity and often is followed by pain, swelling, and postextraction alveolitis and trismus. It has been suggested that postoperative discomfort is in relation to the type of surgical wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare pain, swelling, and maximum mouth opening in two groups of patients with primary and secondary wound healing after impacted mandibular third molar surgery. Thirty-two patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two equal groups, quantitatively and by gender. After the surgical procedures, 16 patients received primary wound closure, while the other 16 participants received secondary wound closure. A visual analog scale was used to collect pain data three days after the surgeries. A checklist was used to record data regarding swelling size and maximum mouth opening before, immediately following, three days after, and one week after surgery. Frequency tests and a t-test were used for statistical analysis and a P value of complications such as pain, maximal mouth opening, and swelling size after impacted mandibular third molar extractions.

  13. Effects of isoniazid and niacin on experimental wound-healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinreich, Jürgen; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Bilali, Erol

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for effective treatments of ischemic wounds. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that systemic administration of isoniazid or niacin can enhance wound healing in ischemic as well as nonischemic tissues.......There is a need for effective treatments of ischemic wounds. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that systemic administration of isoniazid or niacin can enhance wound healing in ischemic as well as nonischemic tissues....

  14. Wound assessment tools and nurses’ needs: an evaluation study

    OpenAIRE

    Greatrex-White, Sheila; Moxey, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain how well different wound assessment tools meet the needs of nurses in carrying out general wound assessment and whether current tools are fit for purpose. The methodology employed was evaluation research. In order to conduct the evaluation, a literature review was undertaken to identify the criteria of an optimal wound assessment tool which would meet nurses’ needs. Several freely available wound assessment tools were selected based on predetermin...

  15. Efficacy of Nano Germicidal Light Therapy on Wound Related Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    wound healing through leukocytes and stimulation of fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Specifically, the cytokines include platelet derived growth...infection and to serve as a central component releasing cytokine of wound healing process.29 During the proliferative phase, cells such as fibroblasts ... healing : Part II. Role in normal and chronic wound healing . Am J Surg. 1993;166(1):74-81. 29. Bowler PG. Wound pathophysiology, infection and

  16. Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Pikuła; Paulina Langa; Paulina Kosikowska; Piotr Trzonkowski

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound...

  17. Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0024 TITLE: Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carl Schulman, MD, PhD, MSPH...NUMBER Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Carl Schulman, MD, PhD, MSPH...chronic wounds with significant improvement in healing and scarring. Application of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy to severe burn wounds

  18. Treatment of open supracondylar fracture of humerus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞学中; 李俊; 梁刚

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the injury mechanism and treatment principle of open supracondylar fracture of humerus.Methods: The data of 32 patients with open supracondylar fracture of humerus hospitalized in our department in the recent 20 years were analyzed retrospectively. On an average, they were followed up for 30 months. The relationship between the fracture type, situation of wounds, operating time, operating method and time for postoperative functional exercise and final function of elbow joint were evaluated with Flynn scoring standard. Results: Excellent therapeutic effect was found in 14 cases, good in 12 and bad in 6, with the percentage of fine therapeutic effect of 81.25%. Conclusions: For the patients with open supracondylar fracture of humerus, debridement and internal fixation should be made as early as possible, for thorough debridement and correct internal fixation are the key points to improve the prognosis.

  19. External fixation in the treatment of open tibial shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zoran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Besides the conquasant fractures, open tibia shaft fractures belong to the group of the most severe fractures of tibia. Open tibia shaft fracture is one of the most common open fractures of long bones. They most frequently occur as a result of traffic accidents caused by the influence of a strong direct force. Methods. Within the period from January, 2000 to December 31, 2005. at the Clinic for Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Clinical Center Nis, 107 patients with open tibial fractures were treated. We analyzed 96 patients with open tibial fracture. In the series analyzed, the male sex was prevalent - there were 74 men (77.08%. The mean age was 47.3 years. The youngest patient was 17 years old, while the oldest patient was 79. According to the classification of the Gustilo et al. in the analysed group there were 30 (31.25% open tibial fractures of the I degree, 31 (32.29% of the II degree, 25 (26.05% of the III A degree, 8 (8.33% of the III B degree and 2 (2.08% of the III C degree. In 95 of the patients the treatment of open tibia shaft fractures consisted of the surgical treatment of wound and the external fixation of the fractured bone using "Mitkovic" type external fixator with a convergent method of pin applications. One primary amputations had been done in patients with grade IIIC open tibial fracture with large soft tissue defect. Results. Of the 96 open tibial fractures available for follow-up, 73 (76.04% healed without severe complications (osteitis, pseudoarthrosis, valgus malunion and amputation. Ther were nine (9.38% soft tissue pin track infections and six (6.25% superficial wound infections. The mean time of union was 21 (14-36 week. Among severe local complications associated with open tibial fractures, in eight patients (8.33% was registered osteitis, and in nine patients (9.38% fracture nonunion and the development of pseudoarthrosis. Three of the patients (3.13% had more than 10 degree valgus malunion. In one

  20. Openness initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, S.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.