WorldWideScience

Sample records for open magnetic flux

  1. The Evolution of Open Magnetic Flux Driven by Photospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field is of paramount importance in solar and heliospheric physics. Two profoundly different views of the coronal magnetic field have emerged. In quasi-steady models, the predominant source of open magnetic field is in coronal holes. In contrast, in the interchange model, the open magnetic flux is conserved, and the coronal magnetic field can only respond to the photospheric evolution via interchange reconnection. In this view the open magnetic flux diffuses through the closed, streamer belt fields, and substantial open flux is present in the streamer belt during solar minimum. However, Antiochos and co-workers, in the form of a conjecture, argued that truly isolated open flux cannot exist in a configuration with one heliospheric current sheet (HCS) - it will connect via narrow corridors to the polar coronal hole of the same polarity. This contradicts the requirements of the interchange model. We have performed an MHD simulation of the solar corona up to 20R solar to test both the interchange model and the Antiochos conjecture. We use a synoptic map for Carrington Rotation 1913 as the boundary condition for the model, with two small bipoles introduced into the region where a positive polarity extended coronal hole forms. We introduce flows at the photospheric boundary surface to see if open flux associated with the bipoles can be moved into the closed-field region. Interchange reconnection does occur in response to these motions. However, we find that the open magnetic flux cannot be simply injected into closed-field regions - the flux eventually closes down and disconnected flux is created. Flux either opens or closes, as required, to maintain topologically distinct open and closed field regions, with no indiscriminate mixing of the two. The early evolution conforms to the Antiochos conjecture in that a narrow corridor of open flux connects the portion of the coronal hole that is nearly detached by one of the bipoles. In the later evolution, a

  2. Reconstruction of Open Solar Magnetic Flux and Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the 20Th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. G.; Miletsky, E. V.

    2004-10-01

    We reconstruct mean magnitudes of the open solar magnetic field since 1915 using α magnetic synoptic charts of the Sun. The obtained series allows estimation of the interplanetary magnetic field. They also confirm the known conclusion about the secular increase of the solar open magnetic flux in the first half of the 20th century.

  3. Catastrophe of coronal magnetic flux ropes in fully open magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guoqiang(李国强); HU; Youqiu(胡友秋)

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophe of coronal magnetic flux ropes is closely related to solar explosive phenomena, such as prominence eruptions, coronal mass ejections, and two-ribbon solar flares. Using a 2-dimensional, 3-component ideal MHD model in Cartesian coordinates, numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the equilibrium property of a coronal magnetic flux rope which is embedded in a fully open background magnetic field. The flux rope emerges from the photosphere and enters the corona with its axial and annular magnetic fluxes controlled by a single "emergence parameter". For a flux rope that has entered the corona, we may change its axial and annular fluxes artificially and let the whole system reach a new equilibrium through numerical simulations. The results obtained show that when the emergence parameter, the axial flux, or the annular flux is smaller than a certain critical value, the flux rope is in equilibrium and adheres to the photosphere. On the other hand, if the critical value is exceeded, the flux rope loses equilibrium and erupts freely upward, namely, a catastrophe takes place. In contrast with the partly-opened background field, the catastrophic amplitude is infinite for the case of fully-opened background field.

  4. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional multiple open magnetic flux tubes in the stratified solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gent, Frederick A; Erd'elyi, Rebertus

    2014-01-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modelled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. (MNRAS, 435, 689, 2013). Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background conditi...

  5. Magnetohydrostatic Equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional Multiple Open Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Stratified Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, F. A.; Fedun, V.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  6. Magnetar Giant Flares in Multipolar Magnetic Fields --- I. Fully and Partially Open Eruptions of Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for magnetar's enormous energy release during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium point is reached, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole dominated background...

  7. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. I. Fully and partially open eruptions of flux ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-04-01

    We propose a catastrophic eruption model for the enormous energy release of magnetars during giant flares, in which a toroidal and helically twisted flux rope is embedded within a force-free magnetosphere. The flux rope stays in stable equilibrium states initially and evolves quasi-statically. Upon the loss of equilibrium, the flux rope cannot sustain the stable equilibrium states and erupts catastrophically. During the process, the magnetic energy stored in the magnetosphere is rapidly released as the result of destabilization of global magnetic topology. The magnetospheric energy that could be accumulated is of vital importance for the outbursts of magnetars. We carefully establish the fully open fields and partially open fields for various boundary conditions at the magnetar surface and study the relevant energy thresholds. By investigating the magnetic energy accumulated at the critical catastrophic point, we find that it is possible to drive fully open eruptions for dipole-dominated background fields. Nevertheless, it is hard to generate fully open magnetic eruptions for multipolar background fields. Given the observational importance of the multipolar magnetic fields in the vicinity of the magnetar surface, it would be worthwhile to explore the possibility of the alternative eruption approach in multipolar background fields. Fortunately, we find that flux ropes may give rise to partially open eruptions in the multipolar fields, which involve only partial opening of background fields. The energy release fractions are greater for cases with central-arcaded multipoles than those with central-caved multipoles that emerged in background fields. Eruptions would fail only when the centrally caved multipoles become extremely strong.

  8. Long-term Longitudinal Recurrences of the Open Magnetic Flux Density in the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dósa, M.; Erdős, G.

    2017-04-01

    Open magnetic flux in the heliosphere is determined from the radial component of the magnetic field vector measured onboard interplanetary space probes. Previous Ulysses research has shown remarkable independence of the flux density from heliographic latitude, explained by super-radial expansion of plasma. Here we are investigating whether any longitudinal variation exists in the 50 year long OMNI magnetic data set. The heliographic longitude of origin of the plasma package was determined by applying a correction according to the solar wind travel time. Significant recurrent enhancements of the magnetic flux density were observed throughout solar cycle 23, lasting for several years. Similar, long-lasting recurring features were observed in the solar wind velocity, temperature and the deviation angle of the solar wind velocity vector from the radial direction. Each of the recurrent features has a recurrence period slightly differing from the Carrington rotation rate, although they show a common trend in time. Examining the coronal temperature data of ACE leads to the possible explanation that these long-term structures are caused by slow–fast solar wind interaction regions. A comparison with MESSENGER data measured at 0.5 au shows that these longitudinal magnetic modulations do not exist closer to the Sun, but are the result of propagation.

  9. FeNi-based flat magnetoimpedance nanostructures with open magnetic flux: New topological approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurlyandskaya, G.V., E-mail: galina@we.lc.ehu.es [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Chlenova, A.A. [Ural Federal University, Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Mira 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Fernández, E. [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); Lodewijk, K.J. [Universidad del País Vasco, UPV/EHU, Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain); Department of Material Sciences, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Classic flat MI multilayers consist of top and bottom ferromagnetic parts of equal thickness separated by a conductive lead. In previous studies symmetric MI structures were considered because they provide the highest sensitivity with respect to uniform external magnetic fields. There are a number of applications where non-uniform magnetic fields of complex configurations must be detected. Non-symmetric MI structures can be advantageous in this particular case. We describe our experience in design, fabrication and characterization of symmetric and non-symmetric MI multilayers with open magnetic flux. Non-symmetry of the structures was obtained by the deposition of top and bottom ferromagnetic parts of MI element of different thickness. MI responses of the structures with even or odd configurations of the FeNi layers were also considered. - Highlights: • Classic flat MI multilayer consists of ferromagnetic parts of equal thickness separated by a conductive lead. • In previous studies symmetric MI structures were considered. • Non-symmetric MI structures can be advantageous for applications where non-uniform magnetic fields are detected. • MI responses of the structures with even or odd configuration can be very different.

  10. Where is the Open Flux?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jon A.; Downs, Cooper; Caplan, Ronald M.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Henney, Carl John; Arge, Charles; Owens, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The Sun’s magnetic field has been observed in the photosphere from ground- and space-based observatories for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full disk magnetograms (either built up over a solar rotation, or evolved using flux transport models) are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Maps from different observatories typically agree qualitatively but often disagree quantitatively. Estimation of the coronal/solar wind physics can range from potential field source surface (PFSS) models with empirical prescriptions to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models with realistic energy transport and sub-grid scale descriptions of heating and acceleration. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) The open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes observed in emission, and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. We have investigated the July 2010 time period, using PFSS and MHD models computed using several available magnetic maps, coronal hole boundaries detected from STEREO and SDO EUV observations, and estimates of the interplanetary magnetic flux from in situ ACE measurements. We show that for all the model/map combinations, models that agree for (1) underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match (2), the modeled open field regions are larger than observed coronal holes. Alternatively, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining detected coronal hole boundaries with observatory synoptic magnetic maps, and show that this method also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. We discuss possible resolutions.Research supported by NASA, AFOSR, and NSF.

  11. Disconnecting Solar Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    DeForest, C E; McComas, D J

    2011-01-01

    Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by CMEs and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctie shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly-disconnected flux takes the form of a "U"-shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m/s^2 to 320 km/s, expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8uT, 6 Rs above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6x10^11 Wb (1.6x10^19 Mx). We mod...

  12. Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Flux over Cycles 23 and 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Chris; Qiu, Jiong; Leamon, Robert

    2017-01-01

    As the observational signature of the footprints of solar magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, coronal holes provide a critical measure of the structure and evolution of these lines. Using a combination of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT), Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (STEREO/EUVI A/B) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations spanning 1996 - 2015 (nearly two solar cycles), coronal holes are automatically detected and characterized. Coronal hole area distributions show distinct behavior in latitude, defining the domain of polar and low-latitude coronal holes. The northern and southern polar regions show a clear asymmetry, with a lag between hemispheres in the appearance and disappearance of polar coronal holes.

  13. Oscillations in the open solar magnetic flux with a period of 1.68 years: imprint on galactic cosmic rays and implications for heliospheric shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rouillard

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of how the heliosphere modulates galactic cosmic ray (GCR fluxes and spectra is important, not only for studies of their origin, acceleration and propagation in our galaxy, but also for predicting their effects (on technology and on the Earth's environment and organisms and for interpreting abundances of cosmogenic isotopes in meteorites and terrestrial reservoirs. In contrast to the early interplanetary measurements, there is growing evidence for a dominant role in GCR shielding of the total open magnetic flux, which emerges from the solar atmosphere and enters the heliosphere. In this paper, we relate a strong 1.68-year oscillation in GCR fluxes to a corresponding oscillation in the open solar magnetic flux and infer cosmic-ray propagation paths confirming the predictions of theories in which drift is important in modulating the cosmic ray flux.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (Cosmic rays, Interplanetary magnetic fields

  14. Theoretical magnetic flux emergence

    OpenAIRE

    MacTaggart, David

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic flux emergence is the subject of how magnetic fields from the solar interior can rise and expand into the atmosphere to produce active regions. It is the link that joins dynamics in the convection zone with dynamics in the atmosphere. In this thesis, we study many aspects of magnetic flux emergence through mathematical modelling and computer simulations. Our primary aim is to understand the key physical processes that lie behind emergence. The first chapter intro...

  15. Open solar flux estimates from near-Earth measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field: comparison of the first two perihelion passes of the Ulysses spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Results from all phases of the orbits of the Ulysses spacecraft have shown that the magnitude of the radial component of the heliospheric field is approximately independent of heliographic latitude. This result allows the use of near-Earth observations to compute the total open flux of the Sun. For example, using satellite observations of the interplanetary magnetic field, the average open solar flux was shown to have risen by 29% between 1963 and 1987 and using the aa geomagnetic index it was found to have doubled during the 20th century. It is therefore important to assess fully the accuracy of the result and to check that it applies to all phases of the solar cycle. The first perihelion pass of the Ulysses spacecraft was close to sunspot minimum, and recent data from the second perihelion pass show that the result also holds at solar maximum. The high level of correlation between the open flux derived from the various methods strongly supports the Ulysses discovery that the radial field component is independent of latitude. We show here that the errors introduced into open solar flux estimates by assuming that the heliospheric field's radial component is independent of latitude are similar for the two passes and are of order 25% for daily values, falling to 5% for averaging timescales of 27 days or greater. We compare here the results of four methods for estimating the open solar flux with results from the first and second perehelion passes by Ulysses. We find that the errors are lowest (1–5% for averages over the entire perehelion passes lasting near 320 days, for near-Earth methods, based on either interplanetary magnetic field observations or the aa geomagnetic activity index. The corresponding errors for the Solanki et al. (2000 model are of the order of 9–15% and for the PFSS method, based on solar magnetograms, are of the order of 13–47%. The model of Solanki et al. is based on the continuity equation of open flux, and uses

  16. Regulation of the interplanetary magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.; Gosling, J.T.; Phillips, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this study we use a recently developed technique for measuring the 2-D magnetic flux in the ecliptic plane to examine (1) the long term variation of the magnetic flux in interplanetary space and (2) the apparent rate at which coronal mass ejections (CMEs) may be opening new flux from the Sun. Since there is a substantial variation ({approximately}50%) of the flux in the ecliptic plane over the solar cycle, we conclude that there must be some means whereby new flux can be opened from the Sun and previously open magnetic flux can be closed off. We briefly describe recently discovered coronal disconnections events which could serve to close off previously open magnetic flux. CMEs appear to retain at least partial magnetic connection to the Sun and hence open new flux, while disconnections appear to be likely signatures of the process that returns closed flux to the Sun; the combination of these processes could regulate the amount of open magnetic flux in interplanetary space. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Physics of magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ryutova, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    This book is the first account of the physics of magnetic flux tubes from their fundamental properties to collective phenomena in an ensembles of flux tubes. The physics of magnetic flux tubes is absolutely vital for understanding fundamental physical processes in the solar atmosphere shaped and governed by magnetic fields. High-resolution and high cadence observations from recent space and  ground-based instruments taken simultaneously at different heights and temperatures not only show the ubiquity of filamentary structure formation but also allow to study how various events are interconnected by system of magnetic flux tubes. The book covers both theory and observations. Theoretical models presented in analytical and phenomenological forms are tailored for practical applications. These are welded with state-of-the-art observations from early decisive ones to the most recent data that open a new phase-space for exploring the Sun and sun-like stars. Concept of magnetic flux tubes is central to various magn...

  18. Open flux in Saturn’s magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badman, Sarah V.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Nichols, Jonathan D.; Clarke, John T.; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    We characterise the interaction between the solar wind and Saturn’s magnetosphere by evaluating the amount of ‘open’ magnetic flux connected to the solar wind. This is deduced from a large set of Hubble Space Telescope images of the ultraviolet aurora, using the poleward boundary of the main aurora as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary in the ionosphere. The amount of open flux is found to be 10-50 GWb, with a mean of 35 GWb. The typical change in open flux between consecutive observations separated by 10-60 h is -5 or +7 GWb. These changes are a result of imbalance between open flux creation at the dayside magnetopause and its closure in the magnetotail. The 5 GWb typical decrease in open flux is consistent with in situ measurements of the flux transported following a reconnection event. Estimates of average, net reconnection rates are found to be typically a few tens of kV, with some extreme examples of unbalanced magnetopause or tail reconnection occurring at ∼300 kV. The range of values determined suggest that Saturn’s magnetosphere does not generally achieve a steady state between flux opening at the magnetopause and flux closure in the magnetotail. The percentage of magnetic flux which is open in Saturn’s magnetosphere is similar to that measured at the Earth (2-11%), but the typical percentage that is closed between observations is significantly lower (13% compared to 40-70%). Therefore, open flux is usually closed in smaller (few GWb) events in Saturn’s magnetosphere. The exception to this behaviour is large, rapid flux closure events which are associated with solar wind compressions. While the rates of flux opening and closure should be equal over long timescales, they are evidently different on shorter (up to tens of hours) timescales. The relative independence of the magnetopause and tail reconnection rates can be attributed to the long loading timescales required to transport open field lines into the tail.

  19. Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boris Filippov; Olesya Martsenyuk; Abhishek K. Srivastava; Wahab Uddin

    2015-03-01

    In the early 1990s, it was found that the strongest disturbances of the space–weather were associated with huge ejections of plasma from the solar corona, which took the form of magnetic clouds when moved from the Sun. It is the collisions of the magnetic clouds with the Earth's magnetosphere that lead to strong, sometimes catastrophic changes in space–weather. The onset of a coronal mass ejection (CME) is sudden and no reliable forerunners of CMEs have been found till date. The CME prediction methodologies are less developed compared to the methods developed for the prediction of solar flares. The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they lose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading, etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field, which is estimated as decay index (). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are, therefore, good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by a comparison of observed filament heights with calculated decay index distributions. The present paper reviews the formation of magnetic flux ropes, their stable and unstable phases, eruption conditions, and also discusses their physical implications in the solar corona.

  20. Permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback for adjustably suspending an element on a single axis. The magnetic actuator includes a pair of opposing electromagnets and provides bi-directional forces along the single axis to the suspended element. Permanent magnets in flux feedback loops from the opposing electromagnets establish a reference permanent magnet flux-bias to linearize the force characteristics of the electromagnets to extend the linear range of the actuator without the need for continuous bias currents in the electromagnets.

  1. Periodicities in photospheric magnetic flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Wenbin; WANG; Jingxiu

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic field plays an important role in solar structure and activity. In principle, the determination of magnetic flux would provide the best general-purpose index of solar activity. Currently, the periodicity studies corresponding to photospheric magnetic flux (PMF) are very few possibly due to the absence of a uniform flux sequence. In this paper, by using 383 NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic charts we reconstruct a flux sequence from February 1975 to August 2003 and perform a relatively systemic periodicity analysis with two methods of the Scargle periodogram and the Morlet wavelet transform. As a result, four periods are found at around 1050, 500, 300 and 160 days. We analyze these periods' temporal variabilities in detail and discuss their respective origins briefly.

  2. Novel Switched Flux Permanent Magnet Machine Topologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸自强

    2012-01-01

    This paper overviews various switched flux permanent magnet machines and their design and performance features,with particular emphasis on machine topologies with reduced magnet usage or without using magnet,as well as with variable flux capability.

  3. Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Priest, E R; Lee, L C

    1990-01-01

    The American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on the Physics of Magnetic Flux Ropes was held at the Hamilton Princess Hotel, Hamilton, Bermuda on March 27–31, 1989. Topics discussed ranged from solar flux ropes, such as photospheric flux tubes, coronal loops and prominences, to flux ropes in the solar wind, in planetary ionospheres, at the Earth's magnetopause, in the geomagnetic tail and deep in the Earth's magnetosphere. Papers presented at that conference form the nucleus of this book, but the book is more than just a proceedings of the conference. We have solicited articles from all interested in this topic. Thus, there is some material in the book not discussed at the conference. Even in the case of papers presented at the conference, there is generally a much more detailed and rigorous presentation than was possible in the time allowed by the oral and poster presentations.

  4. Cross-field motion of plasma blob-filaments and related particle flux in an open magnetic field line configuration on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.Q., E-mail: hqliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580 (Japan); Hanada, K. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580 (Japan); Nishino, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 7398511 (Japan); Ogata, R.; Ishiguro, M. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580 (Japan); Gao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 8168580 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Blob-filaments have been observed by combined measurement with a fast camera and a movable Langmuir probe in an open magnetic field line configuration of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating plasma in QUEST. Blob-filaments extended along field lines do correspond to over-dense plasma structures and propagated across the field lines to the outer wall. The radial velocity of the blob structure, V{sub b}, was obtained by three methods and was dominantly driven by the E × B force. The radial velocity, size of the blob showed good agreements with the results obtained by sheath-connected interchange theoretical model. V{sub b} corresponds to roughly 0.02–0.07 of the local sound speed (C{sub s}) in QUEST. The higher moments (skewness S and kurtosis K) representing the shape of PDF of density fluctuation are studied. Their least squares fitting with quadratic polynomial is K = (1.60 ± 0.27)S{sup 2} − (0.46 ± 0.20). The larger blob structures, occurring only 10% of the time, can carry more than 60% loss of the entire radial particle flux.

  5. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  6. Initiation of CMEs by Magnetic Flux Emergence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind Dubey; Bart van der Holst; Stefaan Poedts

    2006-06-01

    The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). The initial CME model includes a magnetic flux rope in spherical, axisymmetric geometry. The initial configuration consists of a magnetic flux rope embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere with a background dipole magnetic field. The flux rope is in equilibrium due to an image current below the photosphere. An emerging flux triggering mechanism is used to make this equilibrium system unstable. When the magnetic flux emerges within the filament below the flux rope, this results in a catastrophic behavior similar to previous models. As a result, the flux rope rises and a current sheet forms below it. It is shown that the magnetic reconnection in the current sheet below the flux rope in combination with the outward curvature forces results in a fast ejection of the flux rope as observed for solar CMEs.We have done a parametric study of the emerging flux rate.

  7. Magnetic flux emergence in fast rotating stars

    OpenAIRE

    Holzwarth, V.

    2007-01-01

    Fast rotating cool stars are characterised by high magnetic activity levels and frequently show dark spots up to polar latitudes. Their distinctive surface distributions of magnetic flux are investigated in the context of the solar-stellar connection by applying the solar flux eruption and surface flux transport models to stars with different rotation rates, mass, and evolutionary stage. The rise of magnetic flux tubes through the convection zone is primarily buoyancy-driven, though their evo...

  8. Magnetic Flux Compression in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux compression (MFC) as a method for producing ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields had been originated in the 1950s by Sakharov et al. at Arzamas in the USSR (now VNIIEF, Russia) and by Fowler et al. at Los Alamos in the US. The highest magnetic field produced by explosively driven MFC generator, 28 MG, was reported by Boyko et al. of VNIIEF. The idea of using MFC to increase the magnetic field in a magnetically confined plasma to 3-10 MG, relaxing the strict requirements on the plasma density and Lawson time, gave rise to the research area known as MTF in the US and MAGO in Russia. To make a difference in ICF, a magnetic field of ˜100 MG should be generated via MFC by a plasma liner as a part of the capsule compression scenario on a laser or pulsed power facility. This approach was first suggested in mid-1980s by Liberman and Velikovich in the USSR and Felber in the US. It has not been obvious from the start that it could work at all, given that so many mechanisms exist for anomalously fast penetration of magnetic field through plasma. And yet, many experiments stimulated by this proposal since 1986, mostly using pulsed-power drivers, demonstrated reasonably good flux compression up to ˜42 MG, although diagnostics of magnetic fields of such magnitude in HED plasmas is still problematic. The new interest of MFC in plasmas emerged with the advancement of new drivers, diagnostic methods and simulation tools. Experiments on MFC in a deuterium plasma filling a cylindrical plastic liner imploded by OMEGA laser beam led by Knauer, Betti et al. at LLE produced peak fields of 36 MG. The novel MagLIF approach to low-cost, high-efficiency ICF pursued by Herrmann, Slutz, Vesey et al. at Sandia involves pulsed-power-driven MFC to a peak field of ˜130 MG in a DT plasma. A review of the progress, current status and future prospects of MFC in plasmas is presented.

  9. Moduli Stabilization Using Open String Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alok

    2007-04-01

    In this talk we discuss how by turning on gauge fluxes which couple to the end-points of open strings one can obtain stabilization of closed string moduli. This is done by analyzing supersymmetry constraints and RR tadpole conditions. Stabilization of complex and Kahler moduli is studied in a T6/Z2 orientifold. REFID="9789812770523_0020FN001">.

  10. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  11. Forced three-dimensional magnetic reconnection due to linkage of magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, A.

    1995-01-01

    During periods of southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation the magnetic field geometry at the dayside magnetopause is susceptible to magnetic reconnection. It has been suggested that reconnection may occur in a localized manner at several patches on the magnetopause. A major problem with this picture is the interaction of magnetic flux ropes which are generated by different reconnection processes. An individual flux rope is bent elbowlike where it intersects the magnetopause and the magnetic field changes from magnetospheric to interplanetary magnetic field orientation. Multiple patches of reconnection can lead to the formation of interlinked magnetic flux tubes. Although the corresponding flux is connected to the IMF the northward and southward connected branches are hooked into each other and cannot develop independently. We have studied this problem in the framework of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The results indicate that a singular current sheet forms at the interface of two interlinked flux tubes if no resistivity is present in the simulation. This current sheet is strongly tilted compared to the original current sheet. In the presence of resistivity the interaction of the two flux tubes forces a fast reconnection process which generates helically twisted closed magnetospheric flux. This linkage induced reconnection generates a boundary layer with layers of open and closed magnetospheric flux and may account for the brightening of auroral arcs poleward of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux.

  12. Magnetically insulated opening switch research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, M. W.; Kraft, R.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the feasibility of an opening switch concept based on magnetic insulation in a coaxial thermionic diode. It is found that the impedance ratio between closed and open states of the diode is marginal for efficient energy transfer via this type of switch. The open, or insulated state of the diode is characterized by current leakage across the magnetic field which is associated with the presence of plasma waves.

  13. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  14. Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Solar Photosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2008-04-01

    The most prominent magnetic structures on the surface of the Sun are bipolar active regions. These magnetic complexes are comprised of a hierarchy of magnetic structures of different sizes, the largest of which are sunspots. Observations indicate that the appearance of active regions on the solar surface result from the emergence of bundles of magnetic flux from the underlying convection zone. We study the emergence process by means of 3D radiation MHD simulations. In the simulations, an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube is introduced into the near-surface layers of the convection zone. Subject to the buoyancy force, the flux tube rises towards the photosphere. Our simulations highlight the importance of magneto-convection on the evolution of the magnetic flux tube. The external convective flow field has an important influence on the emergence morphology of the emerging magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the magnetic flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), flux emergence may lead to a disturbance of the local granulation pattern. The observational signatures associated with emerging magnetic flux in our simulations are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with observational studies of emerging flux regions on the Sun.

  15. Magnetic flux concentration methods for magnetic energy harvesting module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakiwaka Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents magnetic flux concentration methods for magnetic energy harvesting module. The purpose of this study is to harvest 1 mW energy with a Brooks coil 2 cm in diameter from environmental magnetic field at 60 Hz. Because the harvesting power is proportional to the square of the magnetic flux density, we consider the use of a magnetic flux concentration coil and a magnetic core. The magnetic flux concentration coil consists of an air­core Brooks coil and a resonant capacitor. When a uniform magnetic field crossed the coil, the magnetic flux distribution around the coil was changed. It is found that the magnetic field in an area is concentrated larger than 20 times compared with the uniform magnetic field. Compared with the air­core coil, our designed magnetic core makes the harvested energy ten­fold. According to ICNIRP2010 guideline, the acceptable level of magnetic field is 0.2 mT in the frequency range between 25 Hz and 400 Hz. Without the two magnetic flux concentration methods, the corresponding energy is limited to 1 µW. In contrast, our experimental results successfully demonstrate energy harvesting of 1 mW from a magnetic field of 0.03 mT at 60 Hz.

  16. Downward catastrophe of solar magnetic flux ropes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Quanhao; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui

    2016-01-01

    2.5D time-dependent ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models in Cartesian coordinates were used in previous studies to seek MHD equilibria involving a magnetic flux rope embedded in a bipolar, partially open background field. As demonstrated by these studies, the equilibrium solutions of the system are separated into two branches: the flux rope sticks to the photosphere for solutions at the lower branch but is suspended in the corona for those at the upper branch. Moreover, a solution originally at the lower branch jumps to the upper, as the related control parameter increases and reaches a critical value, and the associated jump is here referred to as upward catastrophe. The present paper advances these studies in three aspects. First, the magnetic field is changed to be force-free. The system still experiences an upward catastrophe with an increase in each control parameter. Secondly, under the force-free approximation, there also exists a downward catastrophe, characterized by a jump of a solution from the u...

  17. Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørk, R; Bahl, C R H

    2014-01-01

    A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e. the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders with flux concentrators is determined and the maximum torque is found. Finally, the effect of non-ideal flux concentrators and the practical use of flux concentrators, as well as demagnetization issues, is discussed.

  18. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  19. Magnetic flux biasing of magnetostrictive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2017-05-01

    The performance of magnetostrictive materials, especially those with high initial magnetic permeability and associated low magnetic reluctance, is sensitive to not just the amount of magnetic bias but also how the bias is applied. Terfenol-D and Galfenol have been characterized under constant magnetic field and constant magnetomotive force, which require active control. The application of a magnetic flux bias utilizing permanent magnets allows for robust magnetostrictive systems that require no active control. However, this biasing configuration has not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents flux density versus stress major loops of Terfenol-D and Galfenol at various magnetic flux biases. A new piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is defined as the locally-averaged slope of flux density versus stress. Considering the materials alone, the maximum {d}33φ is 18.42 T GPa-1 and 19.53 T GPa-1 for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. Compared with the peak piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33* measured under controlled magnetic fields, the piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is 26% and 74% smaller for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. This study shows that adding parallel magnetic flux paths to low-reluctance magnetostrictive components can partially compensate for the performance loss. With a low carbon steel flux path in parallel to the Galfenol specimen, the maximum {d}33φ increased to 28.33 T GPa-1 corresponding to a 45% improvement compared with the case without a flux path. Due to its low magnetic permeability, Terfenol-D does not benefit from the addition of a parallel flux path.

  20. Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Smith, Anders; Bahl, Christian R.H.

    2013-01-01

    A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown...... that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e., the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders...

  1. Magnetic Flux Controllers for Induction Heating Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valentin Nemkov; Robert Goldstein; Robert Ruffini

    2004-01-01

    Application of magnetic flux controllers/concentrators to induction heating coils can drastically improve the process efficiency and heat pattern control. Presentation includes: benefits provided by flux controllers, materials available for controllers, application techniques, computer assisted design of induction coils with concentrators, examples of applications. Depending on induction system design, magnetic flux controllers can concentrate heating in a specified area,change heat source distribution and shield a particular part zone or external area preventing unintended eddy current heating.Besides of the coil efficiency improvement and optimal power distribution, magnetic flux controllers reduce the coil current demand from a supplying circuitry thus strongly reducing losses in busswork, cables, transformers and inverter components.Improvement that can be achieved due to magnetic flux controllers is case dependable. 2D and 3D computer simulation allows the designer to predict accurately effect of controllers on the coil parameters and temperature distribution and optimize the whole electromagnetic system. Special attention in presentation is paid to new magnetodielectric materials optimized for induction heating conditions. These materials have high magnetic permeability and saturation flux density,excellent machinability, good chemical and temperature resistance. Concentrators from these materials can work in a wide range of frequencies and specific powers. Examples of magnetic flux controller application include surface hardening of shafts and gears, induction surface hardfacing and brazing.

  2. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Greg; Armitage, Philip J.; Simon, Jacob B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  3. Strongly magnetized accretion discs require poloidal flux

    CERN Document Server

    Salvesen, Greg; Simon, Jacob B; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by indirect observational evidence for strongly magnetized accretion discs around black holes, and the novel theoretical properties of such solutions, we investigate how a strong magnetization state can develop and persist. To this end, we perform local simulations of accretion discs with an initially purely toroidal magnetic field of equipartition strength. We demonstrate that discs with zero net vertical magnetic flux and realistic boundary conditions cannot sustain a strong toroidal field. However, a magnetic pressure-dominated disc can form from an initial configuration with a sufficient amount of net vertical flux and realistic boundary conditions. Our results suggest that poloidal flux is a necessary prerequisite for the sustainability of strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  4. Magnetic flux generator for balanced membrane loudspeaker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehder, Jörg; Rombach, Pirmin; Hansen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a magnetic flux generator with an application in a hearing aid loudspeaker produced in microsystem technology (MST). The technology plans for two different designs for the magnetic flux generator utilizing a softmagnetic substrate or electroplated NiCoFe as c......CoFe as core material are presented and the production and characterization of four different mono- and double-layer planar coil types are reported....

  5. Magnetic Flux Emergence on Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenaar, M.; Cheung, M.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic flux emerges on the Sun on many different scales, from weak intranetwork to network concentrations and (ephemeral) active regions. Methods previously developed to recognize regions of magnetic emergence on MDI Full Disk magnetograms fail when applied to Hinode/SOT Stokes maps: the resolution is so much higher that simple bipoles on MDI are observed as collections of fragments. We present a new method for the automatic detection and characterization of flux emergence on a range of scales.

  6. A potential lag between the open solar magnetic source flux and solar EUV and X-ray emissions as measured by the Earth's ionosphere during total solar eclipses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Davis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the ionospheric E-region during total solar eclipses have been used to provide information about the evolution of the solar magnetic field and EUV and X-ray emissions from the solar corona and chromosphere. By measuring levels of ionisation during an eclipse and comparing these measurements with an estimate of the unperturbed ionisation levels (such as those made during a control day, where available it is possible to estimate the percentage of ionising radiation being emitted by the solar corona and chromosphere. Previously unpublished data from the two eclipses presented here are particularly valuable as they provide information that supplements the data published to date. The eclipse of 23 October 1976 over Australia provides information in a data gap that would otherwise have spanned the years 1966 to 1991. The eclipse of 4 December 2002 over Southern Africa is important as it extends the published sequence of measurements. Comparing measurements from eclipses between 1932 and 2002 with the solar magnetic source flux reveals that changes in the solar EUV and X-ray flux lag the open source flux measurements by approximately 1.5 years. We suggest that this unexpected result comes about from changes to the relative size of the limb corona between eclipses, with the lag representing the time taken to populate the coronal field with plasma hot enough to emit the EUV and X-rays ionising our atmosphere.

  7. Wave heating in magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1990-01-01

    The bright chromosphere in the quiet sun is confined to magnetic elements (flux tubes), which are located in the interior of the supergranulation cells and within the network that surrounds the cells. The paper discusses the heating of the gas in the magnetic elements of the cell interior. These intranetwork flux tubes are closely associated with bright points, which are heated by large-amplitude compressive waves with periods near the acoustic cutoff that travel outward from the photosphere and dissipate their energy in the chromosphere. The energy flux of these long-period waves appears to be sufficient for the heating of the low and middle chromosphere in the bright points.

  8. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  9. Magnetic flux density in the heliosphere through several solar cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdős, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-20

    We studied the magnetic flux density carried by solar wind to various locations in the heliosphere, covering a heliospheric distance range of 0.3-5.4 AU and a heliolatitudinal range from 80° south to 80° north. Distributions of the radial component of the magnetic field, B{sub R} , were determined over long intervals from the Helios, ACE, STEREO, and Ulysses missions, as well as from using the 1 AU OMNI data set. We show that at larger distances from the Sun, the fluctuations of the magnetic field around the average Parker field line distort the distribution of B{sub R} to such an extent that the determination of the unsigned, open solar magnetic flux density from the average (|B{sub R} |) is no longer justified. We analyze in detail two methods for reducing the effect of fluctuations. The two methods are tested using magnetic field and plasma velocity measurements in the OMNI database and in the Ulysses observations, normalized to 1 AU. It is shown that without such corrections for the fluctuations, the magnetic flux density measured by Ulysses around the aphelion phase of the orbit is significantly overestimated. However, the matching between the in-ecliptic magnetic flux density at 1 AU (OMNI data) and the off-ecliptic, more distant, normalized flux density by Ulysses is remarkably good if corrections are made for the fluctuations using either method. The main finding of the analysis is that the magnetic flux density in the heliosphere is fairly uniform, with no significant variations having been observed either in heliocentric distance or heliographic latitude.

  10. Measurements and Phenomenological Modeling of Magnetic FluxBuildup in Spheromak Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Talamas, C A; Hooper, E B; Jayakumar, R; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Moller, J M

    2007-12-14

    Internal magnetic field measurements and high-speed imaging at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)] are used to study spheromak formation and field buildup. The measurements are analyzed in the context of a phenomenological model of magnetic helicity based on the topological constraint of minimum helicity in the open flux before reconnecting and linking closed flux. Two stages are analyzed: (1) the initial spheromak formation, i. e. when all flux surfaces are initially open and reconnect to form open and closed flux surfaces, and (2) the stepwise increase of closed flux when operating the gun on a new mode that can apply a train of high-current pulses to the plasma. In the first stage, large kinks in the open flux surfaces are observed in the high-speed images taken shortly after plasma breakdown, and coincide with large magnetic asymmetries recorded in a fixed insertable magnetic probe that spans the flux conserver radius. Closed flux (in the toroidal average sense) appears shortly after this. This stage is also investigated using resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In the second stage, a time lag in response between open and closed flux surfaces after each current pulse is interpreted as the time for the open flux to build helicity, before transferring it through reconnection to the closed flux. Large asymmetries are seen during these events, which then relax to a slowly decaying spheromak before the next pulse.

  11. Solar Intranetwork Magnetic Elements: bipolar flux appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jingxiu; Zhou, Guiping; Jin, Chunlan; Li, Hui

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims to quantify characteristic features of bipolar flux appearance of solar intranetwork (IN) magnetic elements. To attack such a problem, we use the Narrow-band Filter Imager (NFI) magnetograms from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board \\emph{Hinode}; these data are from quiet and an enhanced network areas. Cluster emergence of mixed polarities and IN ephemeral regions (ERs) are the most conspicuous forms of bipolar flux appearance within the network. Each of the clus...

  12. Turbulent dynamo with advective magnetic helicity flux

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Many astrophysical bodies harbor magnetic fields that are thought to be sustained by dynamo processes. However, it has been argued that the production of large-scale magnetic fields by a mean-field dynamo is strongly suppressed at large magnetic Reynolds numbers owing to the conservation of magnetic helicity. This phenomenon is known as catastrophic quenching. Advection of magnetic field toward the outer boundaries and away from the dynamo is expected to alleviate such quenching. Examples are stellar and galactic winds. Such advection might be able to overcome the constraint imposed by the conservation of magnetic helicity, transporting a fraction of it outside the domain in which the dynamo operates. We study how the dynamo process is affected by advection. In particular, we study the relative roles played by advective and diffusive fluxes of magnetic helicity. We do this by performing direct numerical simulations of a turbulent dynamo of alpha^2 type driven by forced turbulence in a Cartesian domain in the ...

  13. MAGNETIC FLUX SUPPLEMENT TO CORONAL BRIGHT POINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou, Chaozhou; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Fu, Hui; Jiao, Fangran; Hou, Zhenyong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S., E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn [Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-10

    Coronal bright points (BPs) are associated with magnetic bipolar features (MBFs) and magnetic cancellation. Here we investigate how BP-associated MBFs form and how the consequent magnetic cancellation occurs. We analyze longitudinal magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to investigate the photospheric magnetic flux evolution of 70 BPs. From images taken in the 193 Å passband of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) we dermine that the BPs’ lifetimes vary from 2.7 to 58.8 hr. The formation of the BP MBFs is found to involve three processes, namely, emergence, convergence, and local coalescence of the magnetic fluxes. The formation of an MBF can involve more than one of these processes. Out of the 70 cases, flux emergence is the main process of an MBF buildup of 52 BPs, mainly convergence is seen in 28, and 14 cases are associated with local coalescence. For MBFs formed by bipolar emergence, the time difference between the flux emergence and the BP appearance in the AIA 193 Å passband varies from 0.1 to 3.2 hr with an average of 1.3 hr. While magnetic cancellation is found in all 70 BPs, it can occur in three different ways: (I) between an MBF and small weak magnetic features (in 33 BPs); (II) within an MBF with the two polarities moving toward each other from a large distance (34 BPs); (III) within an MBF whose two main polarities emerge in the same place simultaneously (3 BPs). While an MBF builds up the skeleton of a BP, we find that the magnetic activities responsible for the BP heating may involve small weak fields.

  14. Magnetic flux reconstruction methods for shaped tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, Chi-Wa

    1993-12-01

    The use of a variational method permits the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation to be solved by reducing the problem of solving the 2D non-linear partial differential equation to the problem of minimizing a function of several variables. This high speed algorithm approximately solves the GS equation given a parameterization of the plasma boundary and the current profile (p` and FF` functions). The author treats the current profile parameters as unknowns. The goal is to reconstruct the internal magnetic flux surfaces of a tokamak plasma and the toroidal current density profile from the external magnetic measurements. This is a classic problem of inverse equilibrium determination. The current profile parameters can be evaluated by several different matching procedures. Matching of magnetic flux and field at the probe locations using the Biot-Savart law and magnetic Green`s function provides a robust method of magnetic reconstruction. The matching of poloidal magnetic field on the plasma surface provides a unique method of identifying the plasma current profile. However, the power of this method is greatly compromised by the experimental errors of the magnetic signals. The Casing Principle provides a very fast way to evaluate the plasma contribution to the magnetic signals. It has the potential of being a fast matching method. The performance of this method is hindered by the accuracy of the poloidal magnetic field computed from the equilibrium solver. A flux reconstruction package has been implemented which integrates a vacuum field solver using a filament model for the plasma, a multi-layer perception neural network as an interface, and the volume integration of plasma current density using Green`s functions as a matching method for the current profile parameters. The flux reconstruction package is applied to compare with the ASEQ and EFIT data. The results are promising.

  15. MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE INTERCHANGE AT THE HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florinski, V., E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu [Department of Space Science and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The magnetic field measured by Voyager 1 prior to its heliocliff encounter on 2012.65 showed an unexpectedly complex transition from the primarily azimuthal inner-heliosheath field to the draped interstellar field tilted by some 20° to the nominal azimuthal direction. Most prominent were two regions of enhanced magnetic field strength depleted in energetic charged particles of heliospheric origin. These regions were interpreted as magnetic flux tubes connected to the outer heliosheath that provided a path for the particles to escape. Despite large increases in strength, the field’s direction did not change appreciably at the boundaries of these flux tubes. Rather, the field’s direction changed gradually over several months prior to the heliocliff crossing. It is shown theoretically that the heliopause, as a pressure equilibrium layer, can become unstable to interchange of magnetic fields between the inner and the outer heliosheaths. The curvature of magnetic field lines and the anti-sunward gradient in plasma kinetic pressure provide conditions favorable for an interchange. Magnetic shear between the heliosheath and the interstellar fields reduces the growth rates, but does not fully stabilize the heliopause against perturbations propagating in the latitudinal direction. The instability could create a transition layer permeated by magnetic flux tubes, oriented parallel to each other and alternately connected to the heliosheath or the interstellar regions.

  16. Coronal Magnetic Flux Rope Equilibria and Magnetic Helicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using a 2.5-dimensional (2.5-D) ideal MHD model, this paper ana lyzes the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in a bipolar ambient magnetic field. It is found that the geometrical features of the magnetic flux rope,including the height of the rope axis, the half-width of the rope, and the length of the vertical current sheet below the rope, are determined by a single magnetic parameter, the magnetic helicity, which is the sum of the self-helicity of the rope and the mutual helicity between the rope field and the ambient magnetic field. All the geometrical parameters increase monotonically with increasing magnetic helicity.The implication of this result in solar active phenomena is briefly discussed.

  17. Photospheric Magnetic Flux Transport - Supergranules Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Rightmire-Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's photosphere show that active region magnetic flux is carried far from its origin by a combination of flows. These flows have previously been identified and modeled as separate axisymmetric processes: differential rotation, meridional flow, and supergranule diffusion. Experiments with a surface convective flow model reveal that the true nature of this transport is advection by the non-axisymmetric cellular flows themselves - supergranules. Magnetic elements are transported to the boundaries of the cells and then follow the evolving boundaries. The convective flows in supergranules have peak velocities near 500 m/s. These flows completely overpower the superimposed 20 m/s meridional flow and 100 m/s differential rotation. The magnetic elements remain pinned at the supergranule boundaries. Experiments with and without the superimposed axisymmetric photospheric flows show that the axisymmetric transport of magnetic flux is controlled by the advection of the cellular pattern by underlying flows representative of deeper layers. The magnetic elements follow the differential rotation and meridional flow associated with the convection cells themselves -- supergranules rule!

  18. Helioseismic Detection of Emerging Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Kosovichev, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    Investigating the properties of magnetic flux emergence is one of the most important problems of solar physics. In this study we present a newly developed deep-focus time-distance measurement scheme which is able to detect strong emerging flux events in the deep solar interior, before the flux becomes visible on the surface. We discuss in detail the differences between our method and previous methods, and demonstrate step-by-step how the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio is increased. The method is based on detection of perturbations in acoustic phase travel times determined from cross-covariances of solar oscillations observed on the surface. We detect strong acoustic travel-time reductions of an order of 12 - 16 seconds at a depth of 42 - 75 Mm. These acoustic anomalies are detected 1 - 2 days before high peaks in the photospheric magnetic flux rate implying that the average emerging speed is 0.3 - 0.6 km/s. The results of this work contribute to our understanding of solar magnetism and benefit space weather fore...

  19. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Lars K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation and the analytical part is fairly advanced, a lack of appropriate modelling software solutions for all modelling aspects in flux studies is limiting the application of metabolic flux analysis. Results We have developed OpenFLUX as a user friendly, yet flexible software application for small and large scale 13C metabolic flux analysis. The application is based on the new Elementary Metabolite Unit (EMU framework, significantly enhancing computation speed for flux calculation. From simple notation of metabolic reaction networks defined in a spreadsheet, the OpenFLUX parser automatically generates MATLAB-readable metabolite and isotopomer balances, thus strongly facilitating model creation. The model can be used to perform experimental design, parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis either using the built-in gradient-based search or Monte Carlo algorithms or in user-defined algorithms. Exemplified for a microbial flux study with 71 reactions, 8 free flux parameters and mass isotopomer distribution of 10 metabolites, OpenFLUX allowed to automatically compile the EMU-based model from an Excel file containing metabolic reactions and carbon transfer mechanisms, showing it's user-friendliness. It reliably reproduced the published data and optimum flux distributions for the network under study were found quickly ( Conclusion We have developed a fast, accurate application to perform steady-state 13C metabolic flux analysis. OpenFLUX will strongly facilitate and

  20. Coronal Magnetic Flux Ropes in Quadrupolar Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingzhi; Hu, Youqiu; Wang, Jingxiu

    Using a 2.5-D, time-dependent ideal MHD model in spherical coordinates, we carry out a numerical study of the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in a quadrupolar background magnetic field. For such a flux rope system, a catastrophic occurs: the flux rope is detached from the photosphere and jumps to a finite altitude with a vertical current sheet below. There is a transversal current sheet formed above the rope, and the whole system stays in quasi-equilibrium. We argue that the additional Lorentz force provided by the transversal current sheet on the flux rope plays an important role in keeping the system in quasi-equilibrium in the corona.

  1. Magnetic Flux Cancellation in Ellerman Bombs

    CERN Document Server

    Reid, A; Doyle, J G; Scullion, E; Henriques, V; Nelson, C; Ray, T

    2016-01-01

    Ellerman Bombs (EBs) are often found co-spatial with bipolar photospheric magnetic fields. We use H$\\alpha$ imaging spectroscopy along with Fe I 6302.5 \\AA\\ spectro-polarimetry from the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST), combined with data from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) to study EBs and the evolution of the local magnetic fields at EB locations. The EBs are found via an EB detection and tracking algorithm. We find, using NICOLE inversions of the spectro-polarimetric data, that on average (3.43 $\\pm$ 0.49) x 10$^{24}$ ergs of stored magnetic energy disappears from the bipolar region during the EBs burning. The inversions also show flux cancellation rates of 10$^{14}$ - 10$^{15}$ Mx s$^{-1}$, and temperature enhancements of 200 K at the detection footpoints. We investigate near-simultaneous flaring of EBs due to co-temporal flux emergence from a sunspot, which shows a decrease in transverse velocity when interacting with an existing, stationary area of opposite polarity magnetic flux and the EBs are f...

  2. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  3. Stochastic flux freezing and magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic flux conservation in turbulent plasmas at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is argued neither to hold in the conventional sense nor to be entirely broken, but instead to be valid in a statistical sense associated to the "spontaneous stochasticity" of Lagrangian particle trajectories. The latter phenomenon is due to the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion, which leads to a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics. Empirical evidence is presented for spontaneous stochasticity, including numerical results. A Lagrangian path-integral approach is then exploited to establish stochastic flux freezing for resistive hydromagnetic equations and to argue, based on the properties of Richardson diffusion, that flux conservation must remain stochastic at infinite magnetic Reynolds number. An important application of these results is the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in nonhelical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number (Pr(m)) equal to unity. Numerical results on the Lagrangian dynamo mechanisms by a stochastic particle method demonstrate a strong similarity between the Pr(m)=1 and 0 dynamos. Stochasticity of field-line motion is an essential ingredient of both. Finally, some consequences for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, dynamo, and reconnection are briefly considered.

  4. Magnetic Flux Transport at the Solar Surface

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, J; Cameron, R H; Solanki, S K; Gizon, L; Upton, L

    2014-01-01

    After emerging to the solar surface, the Sun's magnetic field displays a complex and intricate evolution. The evolution of the surface field is important for several reasons. One is that the surface field, and its dynamics, sets the boundary condition for the coronal and heliospheric magnetic fields. Another is that the surface evolution gives us insight into the dynamo process. In particular, it plays an essential role in the Babcock-Leighton model of the solar dynamo. Describing this evolution is the aim of the surface flux transport model. The model starts from the emergence of magnetic bipoles. Thereafter, the model is based on the induction equation and the fact that after emergence the magnetic field is observed to evolve as if it were purely radial. The induction equation then describes how the surface flows -- differential rotation, meridional circulation, granular, supergranular flows, and active region inflows -- determine the evolution of the field (now taken to be purely radial). In this paper, we...

  5. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  6. Axial flux permanent magnet brushless machines

    CERN Document Server

    Gieras, Jacek F; Kamper, Maarten J

    2008-01-01

    Axial Flux Permanent Magnet (AFPM) brushless machines are modern electrical machines with a lot of advantages over their conventional counterparts. They are being increasingly used in consumer electronics, public life, instrumentation and automation system, clinical engineering, industrial electromechanical drives, automobile manufacturing industry, electric and hybrid electric vehicles, marine vessels and toys. They are also used in more electric aircrafts and many other applications on larger scale. New applications have also emerged in distributed generation systems (wind turbine generators

  7. Magnetic flux stabilizing thin accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the minimal amount of large-scale poloidal magnetic field that has to thread the inner, radiation-over-gas pressure dominated region of a thin disk for its thermal stability. Such a net field amplifies the magnetization of the saturated turbulent state and makes it locally stable. For a $10 M_\\odot$ black hole the minimal magnetic flux is $10^{24}(\\dot M/\\dot M_{\\rm Edd})^{20/21}\\,\\rm G\\cdot cm^{2}$. This amount is compared with the amount of uniform magnetic flux that can be provided by the companion star -- estimated to be in the range $10^{22}-10^{24}\\,\\rm G\\cdot cm^2$. If accretion rate is large enough, the companion is not able to provide the required amount and such a system, if still sub-Eddington, must be thermally unstable. The peculiar variability of GRS 1915+105, an X-ray binary with the exceptionally high BH mass and near-Eddington luminosity, may result from the shortage of large scale poloidal field of uniform polarity.

  8. Flux emergence in a magnetized convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Pinto, R F

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux-ropes, and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran 3D MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code and analysed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux-ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model represents very crudely and inaccurately the local dynamics of the buoyant rise, but allows to study the influence of global effects such as self-consistently generated differential rotation, meridional circulation and Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increas...

  9. Magnetic flux stabilizing thin accretion discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sądowski, Aleksander

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the minimal amount of large-scale poloidal magnetic field that has to thread the inner, radiation-over-gas pressure dominated region of a thin disc for its thermal stability. Such a net field amplifies the magnetization of the saturated turbulent state and makes it locally stable. For a 10 M⊙ black hole the minimal magnetic flux is 10^{24}(dot{M}/dot{M}_Edd)^{20/21} G cm2. This amount is compared with the amount of uniform magnetic flux that can be provided by the companion star - estimated to be in the range 1022-1024 G cm2. If accretion rate is large enough, the companion is not able to provide the required amount and such a system, if still sub-Eddington, must be thermally unstable. The peculiar variability of GRS 1915+105, an X-ray binary with the exceptionally high BH mass and near-Eddington luminosity, may result from the shortage of large-scale poloidal field of uniform polarity.

  10. SEED BANKS FOR MAGNETIC FLUX COMPRESSION GENERATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulkerson, E S

    2008-05-14

    In recent years the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been conducting experiments that require pulsed high currents to be delivered into inductive loads. The loads fall into two categories (1) pulsed high field magnets and (2) the input stage of Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG). Three capacitor banks of increasing energy storage and controls sophistication have been designed and constructed to drive these loads. One bank was developed for the magnet driving application (20kV {approx} 30kJ maximum stored energy.) Two banks where constructed as MFCG seed banks (12kV {approx} 43kJ and 26kV {approx} 450kJ). This paper will describe the design of each bank including switching, controls, circuit protection and safety.

  11. Exploring ISEE-3 magnetic cloud polarities with electron heat fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S.W. [Air Force Research Laboratory, 29 Randolph Rd, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Crooker, N.U. [Center for Space Physics, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Gosling, J.T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D 466, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-06-01

    We have used solar wind electron heat fluxes to determine the magnetic polarities of the interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) during the ISEE-3 observations in 1978{endash}1982. That period included 14 magnetic clouds (MCs) identified by Zhang and Burlaga. The MCs have been modeled as single magnetic flux ropes, and it is generally assumed that they are magnetically closed structures with each end of the flux rope connected to the Sun. The flux rope model is valid only if the magnetic polarity of each MC does not change during the passage of ISEE-3 through the MC. We test this model with the heat flux data, using the dominant heat flux in bidirectional electron heat fluxes to determine the MC polarities. The polarity changes within at least 2, and possibly 6, of the 14 MCs, meaning that those MCs can not fit the model of a single flux rope. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Exploring ISEE-3 magnetic cloud polarities with electron heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, S. W.; Crooker, N. U.; Gosling, J. T.

    1999-06-01

    We have used solar wind electron heat fluxes to determine the magnetic polarities of the interplanetary magnetic fields (IMF) during the ISEE-3 observations in 1978-1982. That period included 14 magnetic clouds (MCs) identified by Zhang and Burlaga. The MCs have been modeled as single magnetic flux ropes, and it is generally assumed that they are magnetically closed structures with each end of the flux rope connected to the Sun. The flux rope model is valid only if the magnetic polarity of each MC does not change during the passage of ISEE-3 through the MC. We test this model with the heat flux data, using the dominant heat flux in bidirectional electron heat fluxes to determine the MC polarities. The polarity changes within at least 2, and possibly 6, of the 14 MCs, meaning that those MCs can not fit the model of a single flux rope.

  13. Linear magnetic motor/generator. [to generate electric energy using magnetic flux for spacecraft power supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A linear magnetic motor/generator is disclosed which uses magnetic flux to provide mechanical motion or electrical energy. The linear magnetic motor/generator includes an axially movable actuator mechanism. A permament magnet mechanism defines a first magnetic flux path which passes through a first end portion of the actuator mechanism. Another permament magnet mechanism defines a second magnetic flux path which passes through a second end portion of the actuator mechanism. A drive coil defines a third magnetic flux path passing through a third central portion of the actuator mechanism. A drive coil selectively adds magnetic flux to and subtracts magnetic flux from magnetic flux flowing in the first and second magnetic flux path.

  14. Stop of magnetic flux movement in levitating superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyak, B.M., E-mail: b-smolyak@yandex.ru; Zakharov, M.S., E-mail: maksim.s.zakharov@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A direct experimental study of magnetic flux creep in the levitating superconductor. • When a levitating object is in a fixed position, magnetic flux movement is observed. • Levitation stops flux creep process. - Abstract: A phenomenon of magnetic relaxation stopping in a levitating superconductor was studied. It was experimentally shown that magnetic flux creep (diffusion of flux lines to regions with lower vortex density) is absent in magnetic suspension of the superconductor. Magnetic relaxation arises, when a rigid constraint that fixes a position of the superconductor relative to a magnet is imposed on a levitating object. It is assumed that oscillations of magnetic structure, which is due to free oscillations of the levitating superconductor, stop magnetic relaxation.

  15. Tongues, bottles, and disconnected loops: The opening and closing of the interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Atmospheric Sciences Group

    1994-06-01

    For years the field of Space Physics has had a problem, a really big problem for it occurs on the largest spatial scales in Space physics -- across the entire region under the Sun`s influence, the heliosphere. The problem is that the Sun appears to keep opening new magnetic flux into interplanetary space with no obvious way for this flux to close back off again. This state of affairs, without some previously unknown method for closing the open interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), leads to an ever growing amount of magnetic flux in interplanetary space: the magnetic flux catastrophe. Recently, considerable progress has been made in understanding why this catastrophic state is not the observed state of the heliosphere. This brief article paints the newly emerging picture of the opening and closing of the IMF and how these processes may account for the observed variation in the amount of magnetic flux in interplanetary space over the solar cycle.

  16. Magnetic flux array for spontaneous magnetic reconnection experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesich, A; Bonde, J; Egedal, J; Fox, W; Goodwin, R; Katz, N; Le, A

    2008-06-01

    Experimental investigation of reconnection in magnetized plasmas relies on accurate characterization of the evolving magnetic fields. In experimental configurations where the plasma dynamics are reproducible, magnetic data can be collected in multiple discharges and combined to provide spatially resolved profiles of the plasma dynamics. However, in experiments on spontaneous magnetic reconnection recently undertaken at the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT, the reconnection process is not reproducible and all information on the plasma must be collected in a single discharge. This paper describes a newly developed magnetic flux array which directly measures the toroidal component of the magnetic vector potential, A(phi). From the measured A(phi), the magnetic field geometry, current density, and reconnection rate are readily obtained, facilitating studies of the three-dimensional dynamics of spontaneous magnetic reconnection. The novel design of the probe array allows for accurate characterization of profiles of A(phi) at multiple toroidal angles using a relatively small number of signal channels and with minimal disturbance of the plasma.

  17. Magnetic flux noise in copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic flux noise and flux creep in thin films and single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}, Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, and TlCa{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The noise power spectrum generally scales as 1/f (f is frequency) from 1 Hz to 1 kHz, increases with temperature, and decreases in higher-quality films. It is proportional to the magnetic field B in which the sample is cooled, at least in the range 0.1 mT < B < 3 mT. A model of thermally activated vortex motion is developed which explains the dependence of the noise on frequency, temperature, current, and applied magnetic field. The pinning potential is idealized as an ensemble of double wells, each with a different activation energy separating the two states. From the noise measurements, this model yields the distribution of pinning energies in the samples, the vortex hopping distance, the number density of mobile vortices, and the restoring force on a vortex at a typical pinning site. The distribution of pinning energies in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} shows a broad peak below 0.1 eV. The small ambient magnetic field, and the detection of noise even in the absence of a driving force, insure that the measured pinning energies are characteristic of isolated vortices near thermal equilibrium. The observed vortex density in fields much less than 0.1 mT is too large to be explained by the ambient field, suggesting a mechanism intrinsic to the sample which produces trapped vortices.

  18. Automatic magnetic flux measurement of micro plastic-magnetic rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingdong; Lin, Mingxing; Song, Aiwei

    2015-07-01

    Micro plastic-magnetic rotors of various sizes and shapes are widely used in industry, their magnetic flux measurement is one of the most important links in the production process, and therefore some technologies should be adopted to improve the measurement precision and efficiency. In this paper, the automatic measurement principle of micro plastic-magnetic rotors is proposed and the integration time constant and the integrator drift’s suppression and compensation in the measurement circuit are analyzed. Two other factors influencing the measurement precision are also analyzed, including the relative angles between the rotor magnetic poles and the measurement coil, and the starting point of the rotors in the coil where the measurement begins. An instrument is designed to measure the magnetic flux of the rotors. Measurement results show that the measurement error is within  ±1%, which meets the basic requirements in industry application, and the measurement efficiency is increased by 10 times, which can cut down labor cost and management cost when compared with manual measurement.

  19. Flux ropes in the magnetic solar convection zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution results are presented on how twisted magnetic flux ropes interact with a magnetized model envelope similar to the solar convection zone. Both the flux ropes and the atmosphere are modelled as idealized 2.5-dimensional concepts using high resolution numerical MHD simulations (on...... of the magnetic flux ropes interact with the magnetic field in the atmosphere in a manner that depends, among other things, on the polarity and strength of the atmospheric field. The results include limits on the necessary and possible twist and polarity of solar magnetic flux ropes....

  20. Magnetic flux concentrations from turbulent stratified convection

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Kleeorin, N; Käpylä, M J; Rogachevskii, I

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Context: The mechanisms that cause the formation of sunspots are still unclear. Aims: We study the self-organisation of initially uniform sub-equipartition magnetic fields by highly stratified turbulent convection. Methods: We perform simulations of magnetoconvection in Cartesian domains that are $8.5$-$24$ Mm deep and $34$-$96$ Mm wide. We impose either a vertical or a horizontal uniform magnetic field in a convection-driven turbulent flow. Results: We find that super-equipartition magnetic flux concentrations are formed near the surface with domain depths of $12.5$ and $24$ Mm. The size of the concentrations increases as the box size increases and the largest structures ($20$ Mm horizontally) are obtained in the 24 Mm deep models. The field strength in the concentrations is in the range of $3$-$5$ kG. The concentrations grow approximately linearly in time. The effective magnetic pressure measured in the simulations is positive near the surface and negative in the bulk of the convection zone. Its ...

  1. Surface Magnetic Flux Maintenance In Quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Iida, Y

    2013-01-01

    We investigate surface processes of magnetic patches, namely merging, splitting, emergence, and cancellation, by using an auto-detection technique. We find that merging and splitting are locally predominant in the surface level, while the frequencies of the other two are less by one or two orders of magnitude. The frequency dependences on flux con- tent of surface processes are further investigated. Based on these observations, we discuss a possible whole picture of the maintenance. Our conclusion is that the photospheric magnetic field structure, especially its power-law nature, is maintained by the processes locally in the surface not by the interactions between different altitudes. We suggest a scenario of the flux maintenance as follows: The splitting and merging play a crucial role for the generation of the power-law distribution, not the emergence nor cancellation do. This power-law distribution results in another power-law one of the cancellation with an idea of the random convective transport. The can...

  2. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, D

    2006-11-01

    (1) In most MRI scanners, the patient examination table fits inside a long cylindrical tube. Large patients cannot be accommodated, and some persons experience claustrophobic reactions. Open MRI systems, in which the patient is placed between two plates, overcome these disadvantages. (2) Open MRI scanners are widely used in health care. High-field closed MRI systems are preferred for many examinations. (3) Early versions of open MRI scanners had low magnetic field strength, gave poorer image quality than most closed systems, and required longer examination times. Newer open scanners include machines with higher magnetic field strengths and improved image quality. (4) Closed high magnetic field scanners with short magnets and wide bore tubes offer improved comfort to patients, and may be an alternative to open scanners. (5) There is interest in using open systems for intra-operative and image-guided interventions.

  3. Relationships of a growing magnetic flux region to flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schadee, A.; Martin, S.F.; Bentley, R.D.; Antalova, A.; Kucera, A.; Dezs, L.; Gesztelyi, L.; Harvey, K.L.; Jones, H.; Livi, S.H.B.; Wang, J.

    1984-01-01

    Some sites for solar flares are known to develop where new magnetic flux emerges and becomes abutted against opposite polarity pre-existing magnetic flux (review by Galzauskas/1/). We have identified and analyzed the evolution of such flare sites at the boundaries of a major new and growing magnetic

  4. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  5. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density with Flux Loops and Hall Probes in the CMS Magnet Flux Return Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Curé, B; Ball, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Klyukhin, V I; Loveless, R; Mulders, M

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The flux return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume that was measured with the field-mapping machine. The voltages induced in the flux loops by the magnetic flux changing during the CMS magnet standard ramps down are measured with six 16-bit DAQ modules. The off-line inte...

  6. Magnetic flux concentration and zonal flows in magnetorotational instability turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xue-Ning [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Accretion disks are likely threaded by external vertical magnetic flux, which enhances the level of turbulence via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Using shearing-box simulations, we find that such external magnetic flux also strongly enhances the amplitude of banded radial density variations known as zonal flows. Moreover, we report that vertical magnetic flux is strongly concentrated toward low-density regions of the zonal flow. Mean vertical magnetic field can be more than doubled in low-density regions, and reduced to nearly zero in high-density regions in some cases. In ideal MHD, the scale on which magnetic flux concentrates can reach a few disk scale heights. In the non-ideal MHD regime with strong ambipolar diffusion, magnetic flux is concentrated into thin axisymmetric shells at some enhanced level, whose size is typically less than half a scale height. We show that magnetic flux concentration is closely related to the fact that the turbulent diffusivity of the MRI turbulence is anisotropic. In addition to a conventional Ohmic-like turbulent resistivity, we find that there is a correlation between the vertical velocity and horizontal magnetic field fluctuations that produces a mean electric field that acts to anti-diffuse the vertical magnetic flux. The anisotropic turbulent diffusivity has analogies to the Hall effect, and may have important implications for magnetic flux transport in accretion disks. The physical origin of magnetic flux concentration may be related to the development of channel flows followed by magnetic reconnection, which acts to decrease the mass-to-flux ratio in localized regions. The association of enhanced zonal flows with magnetic flux concentration may lead to global pressure bumps in protoplanetary disks that helps trap dust particles and facilitates planet formation.

  7. Magnetic flux noise in copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Mark Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic flux noise and flux creep in thin films and single crystals of YBa2Cu3O7-x, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x, Tl2Ca2Ba2Cu3Ox, and TlCa2Ba2Cu3Ox are measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The noise power spectrum generally scales as 1/f (f is frequency) from 1 Hz to 1 kHz, increases with temperature, and decreases in higher-quality films. It is proportional to the magnetic field B in which the sample is cooled, at least in the range 0.1 mT < B < 3 mT. A model of thermally activated vortex motion is developed which explains the dependence of the noise on frequency, temperature, current, and applied magnetic field. The pinning potential is idealized as an ensemble of double wells, each with a different activation energy separating the two states. From the noise measurements, this model yields the distribution of pinning energies in the samples, the vortex hopping distance, the number density of mobile vortices, and the restoring force on a vortex at a typical pinning site. The distribution of pinning energies in YBa2Cu3O7-x shows a broad peak below 0.1 eV. The small ambient magnetic field, and the detection of noise even in the absence of a driving force, insure that the measured pinning energies are characteristic of isolated vortices near thermal equilibrium. The observed vortex density in fields much less than 0.1 mT is too large to be explained by the ambient field, suggesting a mechanism intrinsic to the sample which produces trapped vortices.

  8. Flux Loop Measurements of the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Magnet Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A.; Curé, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Mulders, M.; Hervé, A.; Loveless, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10,000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The first attempt is made to measure the magnetic flux density in the steel blocks of the CMS magnet yoke using the standard magnet discharge with the current ramp down speed of 1.5 A/...

  9. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  10. Hall Effect–Mediated Magnetic Flux Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M.

    2017-02-01

    The global evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) has recently been shown to be largely controlled by the amount of poloidal magnetic flux threading the disk. The amount of magnetic flux must also coevolve with the disk, as a result of magnetic flux transport, a process that is poorly understood. In weakly ionized gas as in PPDs, magnetic flux is largely frozen in the electron fluid, except when resistivity is large. When the disk is largely laminar, we show that the relative drift between the electrons and ions (the Hall drift), and the ions and neutral fluids (ambipolar drift) can play a dominant role on the transport of magnetic flux. Using two-dimensional simulations that incorporate the Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion (AD) with prescribed diffusivities, we show that when large-scale poloidal field is aligned with disk rotation, the Hall effect rapidly drags magnetic flux inward at the midplane region, while it slowly pushes flux outward above/below the midplane. This leads to a highly radially elongated field configuration as a global manifestation of the Hall-shear instability. This field configuration further promotes rapid outward flux transport by AD at the midplane, leading to instability saturation. In quasi-steady state, magnetic flux is transported outward at approximately the same rate at all heights, and the rate is comparable to the Hall-free case. For anti-aligned field polarity, the Hall effect consistently transports magnetic flux outward, leading to a largely vertical field configuration in the midplane region. The field lines in the upper layer first bend radially inward and then outward to launch a disk wind. Overall, the net rate of outward flux transport is about twice as fast as that of the aligned case. In addition, the rate of flux transport increases with increasing disk magnetization. The absolute rate of transport is sensitive to disk microphysics, which remains to be explored in future studies.

  11. Photospheric and Subphotospheric Dynamics of Emerging Magnetic Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Kosovichev, A G

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic fields emerging from the Sun's interior carry information about physical processes of magnetic field generation and transport in the convection zone. Soon after appearance on the solar surface the magnetic flux gets concentrated in sunspot regions and causes numerous active phenomena on the Sun. This paper discusses some properties of the emerging magnetic flux observed on the solar surface and in the interior. A statistical analysis of variations of the tilt angle of bipolar magnetic regions during the emergence shows that the systematic tilt with respect to the equator (the Joy's law) is most likely established below the surface. However, no evidence of the dependence of the tilt angle on the amount of emerging magnetic flux, predicted by the rising magnetic flux rope theories, is found. Analysis of surface plasma flows in a large emerging active region reveals strong localized upflows and downflows at the initial phase of emergence but finds no evidence for large-scale flows indicating future appe...

  12. Magnetic Flux Transport by turbulent reconnection in astrophysical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, Elisabete M de Gouveia Dal; Santos-Lima, Reinaldo; Guerrero, Gustavo; Kowal, Grzegorz; Lazarian, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The role of MHD turbulence in astrophysical environments is still highly debated. An important question that permeates this debate is the transport of magnetic flux. This is particularly important, for instance, in the context of star formation. When clouds collapse gravitationally to form stars, there must be some magnetic flux transport. otherwise the new born stars would have magnetic fields several orders of magnitude larger than the observed ones. Also, the magnetic flux that is dragged in the late stages of the formation of a star can remove all the rotational support from the accretion disk that grows around the protostar. The efficiency of the mechanism which is often invoked to allow the transport of magnetic fields in the different stages of star formation, namely, the ambipolar diffusion, has been lately put in check. We here discuss an alternative mechanism for magnetic flux transport which is based on turbulent fast magnetic reconnection. We review recent results obtained from 3D MHD numerical si...

  13. Flux ropes in the magnetic solar convection zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution results are presented on how twisted magnetic flux ropes interact with a magnetized model envelope similar to the solar convection zone. Both the flux ropes and the atmosphere are modelled as idealized 2.5-dimensional concepts using high resolution numerical MHD simulations (on...

  14. Magnetic flux distribution in the amorphous modular transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczuk, B.; Koteras, D.

    2011-06-01

    3D magnetic fluxes in one-phase and three-phase transformers with amorphous modular cores have been studied. Scalar potentials were implemented for the 3D Finite Element field calculation. Due to the inability to simulate each thin amorphous layer, we introduced supplementary permeabilities along the main directions of magnetization. The calculated fluxes in the cores were tested on the prototypes.

  15. Design Considerations of Permanent Magnet Transverse Flux Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2011-01-01

    Permanent magnet transverse flux machine (PMTFM) is well known for its high torque density and is interested in various direct-drive applications. Due to its complicated 3-D flux components, design and design optimization of a PMTFM is more difficult and time consuming than for radial flux...

  16. More on Electric and Magnetic Fluxes in SU(2)

    CERN Document Server

    Von Smekal, L; Jahn, O; Smekal, Lorenz von; Forcrand, with Philippe de; Jahn, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The free energies of static charges and center monopoles are given by their fluxes. While electric fluxes show the universal behaviour of the deconfinement transition, the monopole free energies vanish in the thermodynamic limit at all temperatures and are thus irrelevant for the transition. Magnetic fluxes may, however, be used to measure the topological susceptibility without cooling.

  17. Influence of Slot Defect Length on Magnetic Flux Leakage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songling HUANG; Luming LI; Haiqing YANG; Keren SHI

    2004-01-01

    A key issue, which influences the applications of magnetic flux leakage testing, is defect quantification. There have been many research on the relationship between width, depth and magnetic flux leakage of slot defect. However, the length factor is often ignored. The relationship between characteristics of defect leakage field and defect length was investigated. The magnetic flux leakages of a series of plate specimens with the same width, same depth and different length slot defects were tested under the same magnetizing conditions. Testing results show that defect length is an important parameter needed to consider in quantifying defects.

  18. Magnetically Insulated Opening Switch Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    this research is to investigate the validity of the magneti- cally insulated opening switch concept proposed by Eninger (Ref. 5, Appendix 1). The...1973). 3. Y. Carmel, and J. Nation, Phys, Rev. Lett. 31, 286 (1973). 4. T.J. Orzechowski, and G. Bekefi, Phys. Fluids 19, 43 (1976). U 5. 3. Eninger

  19. Magnetic Simulation and Analysis of Radial Flux Permanent Magnet Generator using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pudji Irasari

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses magnetic simulation and analysis of radial flux permanent magnet generator (PMG using finite element method (FEM by utilizing open source software FEMM 4.2. The specification of generator is 25 V, 28 A, 3 phase, 300 rpm. The analyzed magnetic flux was in the air gap, stator teeth and slots to find out the distribusian pattern and its fluctuation. The simulations were conducted in no-load and nominal load (28 A conditions. Furthermore the maximum flux density of simulation (Bg(sim was used to calculate phase voltage Eph to find out the magnitude of generated electromotive force (EMF. The calculation results were presented as voltage vs. rotation graph in no-load condition and voltage vs. current graph in nominal load condition. Both graphs were validated with Eph of experiment result (Eph(exp and Eph that the value of Bg obtained from analytical calculation (Eph(calc. The final results showed that in no-load condition, Eph graph with Bg(sim (Eph(sim was close to Eph(exp and Eph(calc. The error rate with respect to the experiment was 6,9%. In nominal load condition, Eph(sim graph almost coincides with Eph(calc. graph, with the voltage drop of both was 0,441 V. Both graphs however were far different from Eph(exp graph, which has 9 V of voltage drop. The overall results demonstrated that magnetic distribution pattern presented by FEM was very helpful to avoid magnetic flux accumulation in a particular segment. Besides Bg(sim facilitated to predict the value of Eph.

  20. Flux Transport and the Sun's Global Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun s global magnetic field is produced and evolved through the emergence of magnetic flux in active regions and its transport across the solar surface by the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric convective flows of granulation, supergranulation, and giant cell convection. Maps of the global magnetic field serve as the inner boundary condition for space weather. The photospheric magnetic field and its evolution determine the coronal and solar wind structures through which CMEs must propagate and in which solar energetic particles are accelerated and propagate. Producing magnetic maps which best represent the actual field configuration at any instant requires knowing the magnetic field over the observed hemisphere as well as knowing the flows that transport flux. From our Earth-based vantage point we only observe the front-side hemisphere and each pole is observable for only six months of the year at best. Models for the surface magnetic flux transport can be used to provide updates to the magnetic field configuration in those unseen regions. In this presentation I will describe successes and failures of surface flux transport and present new observations on the structure, the solar cycle variability, and the evolution of the flows involved in magnetic flux transport. I find that supergranules play the dominant role due to their strong flow velocities and long lifetimes. Flux is transported by differential rotation and meridional flow only to the extent that the supergranules participate in those two flows.

  1. The initiation of coronal mass ejections by magnetic flux emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, G.; van der Holst, B.; Poedts, S.

    2006-12-01

    Aims.The initiation of solar Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is studied in the framework of computational Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics (MHD). Methods: .The initial configuration includes a magnetic flux rope that is embedded in a gravitationally stratified solar atmosphere with a background dipole magnetic field in spherical, axi-symmetric geometry. The flux rope is in equilibrium due to an image current below the photosphere. An emerging magnetic flux triggering mechanism is used to make this equilibrium configuration unstable. Results: . When the magnetic flux emerges within the filament below the flux rope this results in a catastrophic behavior similar to earlier, more simple models. As a result, the flux rope rises and a current sheet forms below it. It is shown that the magnetic reconnection in the current sheet below the flux rope in combination with the outward curvature forces results in a fast ejection of the flux rope as observed for solar CMEs. We have done a parameter study of the effect of the flux emergence rate on the velocity and the acceleration of the resulting CMEs.

  2. Studying the Formation and Evolution of Eruptive Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Solar magnetic eruptions are dramatic sources of solar activity, and dangerous sources of space weather hazards. Many of these eruptions take the form of magnetic flux ropes, i.e., magnetic fieldlines wrapping around a core magnetic flux tube. Investigating the processes which form these flux ropes both prior to and during eruption, and investigating their evolution after eruption, can give us a critical window into understanding the sources of and processes involved in these eruptions. This presentation will discuss modeling and observational investigations into these various phases of flux rope formation, eruption, and evolution, and will discuss how these different explorations can be used to develop a more complete picture of erupting flux rope dynamics.

  3. Flux-limitation of the Nernst effect in magnetized ICF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgers, Christopher; Barrois, Rion; Wengraf, Joshua; Bissell, John; Brodrick, Jonathan; Kingham, Robert; Read, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Magnetized ICF is a promising scheme which combines the advantages of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion. In the relevant high-energy density plasmas magnetic field evolution is often controlled by the Nernst effect where the magnetic field advects with the electron heat flow. It is well known that non-local thermal transport necessitates a flux-limiter on the heat flow. This suggests that a flux-limiter should also be applied to the Nernst effect. We have shown that this is the case using Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations and that the flux-limter is not the same as that required for the heat flow itself, for example when a NIF-relevant flux-limiter of 0.15 is required to limit the heat flow a Nernst flux limiter of 0.08 is required. We acknowledge support from EPSRC Grant No. EPM011372/1.

  4. Do the legs of magnetic clouds contain twisted flux-rope magnetic fields?

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterised primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The tim...

  5. Direct evidence for a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope flanked by two active magnetic reconnection X lines at Earth's magnetopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øieroset, M; Phan, T D; Eastwood, J P; Fujimoto, M; Daughton, W; Shay, M A; Angelopoulos, V; Mozer, F S; McFadden, J P; Larson, D E; Glassmeier, K-H

    2011-10-14

    We report the direct detection by three THEMIS spacecraft of a magnetic flux rope flanked by two active X lines producing colliding plasma jets near the center of the flux rope. The observed density depletion and open magnetic field topology inside the flux rope reveal important three-dimensional effects. There was also evidence for nonthermal electron energization within the flux rope core where the fluxes of 1-4 keV superthermal electrons were higher than those in the converging reconnection jets. The observed ion and electron energizations differ from current theoretical predictions.

  6. Magnetic flux tubes as sources of wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Rosner, R.; Ulmschneider, P.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of solar, and very likely stellar, surface magnetic fields is highly inhomogeneous: at the photospheric level, the fields are locally strong, and show concentration into a flux tube structure. In this case, the wave energy generated in stellar convection zones may be largely carried away by flux tube waves, which can then become important sources for the heating of the outer atmospheric layers. Such flux tube wave generation may help to explain the UV and X-ray fluxes observed by the IUE and Einstein observatories. The generation of longitudinal tube waves in magnetic flux tubes embedded in an otherwise magnetic field-free, turbulent, and stratified medium was considered. It is shown that compressible tube waves are generated by dipole emission and that the generation efficiency is a strong function of the magnetic field strength. Energy flux calculations are presented for different magnetic flux tubes, and show how the results depend on the magnetic field strength and the characteristics of the convective turbulence.

  7. Unsteady wandering magnetic field lines, turbulence and laboratory flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Liu, D.; Pulliam, D.; Lazarian, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe earth bound laboratory experiment investigations of patchy, unsteady, bursty, patchy magnetic field structures that are unifying features of magnetic reconnection and turbulence in helio, space and astro physics. Macroscopic field lines occupy cross sectional areas, fill up three dimensional (3D) volumes as flux tubes. They contain mass with Newtonian dynamics that follow magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) equations of motion. Flux rope geometry can be ubiquitous in laminar reconnection sheet geometries that are themselves unstable to formation of secondary "islands" that in 3D are really flux ropes. Flux ropes are ubiquitous structures on the sun and the rest of the heliosphere. Understanding the dynamics of flux ropes and their mutual interactions offers the key to many important astrophysical phenomena, including magnetic reconnection and turbulence. We describe laboratory investigations on RSX, where 3D interaction of flux ropes can be studied in great detail. We use experimental probes inside the the flux ropes to measure the magnetic and electric fields, current density, density, temperatures, pressure, and electrostatic and vector plasma potentials. Macroscopic magnetic field lines, unsteady wandering characteristics, and dynamic objects with structure down to the dissipation scale length can be traced from data sets in a 3D volume. Computational approaches are finally able to tackle simple 3D systems and we sketch some intriguing simulation results that are consistent with 3D extensions of typical 2D cartoons for magnetic reconnection and turbulence.

  8. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L., E-mail: jinliang@nankai.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov–Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms. -- Highlights: •The light transport is investigated through ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic field. •Aharonov–Bohm ring interferometer of arbitrary configuration is investigated. •The half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to destructive interference and transmission zeros for two-arm at equal length. •Complete transmission is available via tuning synthetic magnetic flux.

  9. Photospheric and Subphotospheric Dynamics of Emerging Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovichev, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic fields emerging from the Sun’s interior carry information about physical processes of magnetic field generation and transport in the convection zone. Soon after appearance on the solar surface the magnetic flux gets concentrated in sunspot regions and causes numerous active phenomena on the Sun. This paper discusses some properties of the emerging magnetic flux observed on the solar surface and in the interior. A statistical analysis of variations of the tilt angle of bipolar magnetic regions during the emergence shows that the systematic tilt with respect to the equator (the Joy’s law) is most likely established below the surface. However, no evidence of the dependence of the tilt angle on the amount of emerging magnetic flux, predicted by the rising magnetic flux rope theories, is found. Analysis of surface plasma flows in a large emerging active region reveals strong localized upflows and downflows at the initial phase of emergence but finds no evidence for large-scale flows indicating future appearance a large-scale magnetic structure. Local helioseismology provides important tools for mapping perturbations of the wave speed and mass flows below the surface. Initial results from SOHO/MDI and GONG reveal strong diverging flows during the flux emergence, and also localized converging flows around stable sunspots. The wave speed images obtained during the process of formation of a large active region, NOAA 10488, indicate that the magnetic flux gets concentrated in strong field structures just below the surface. Further studies of magnetic flux emergence require systematic helioseismic observations from the ground and space, and realistic MHD simulations of the subsurface dynamics.

  10. Time-Dependent Turbulent Heating of Open Flux Tubes in the Chromosphere, Corona, and Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate several key questions of plasma heating in open-field regions of the corona that connect to the solar wind. We present results for a model of Alfven-wave-driven turbulence for three typical open magnetic field structures: a polar coronal hole, an open flux tube neighboring an equatorial streamer, and an open flux tube near a strong-field active region. We compare time-steady, one-dimensional turbulent heating models (Cranmer et al., 2007) against fully time-dependent three-dimensional reduced-magnetohydrodynamics modeling of BRAID (van Ballegooijen et al., 2011). We find that the time-steady results agree well with time-averaged results from BRAID. The time-dependence allows us to investigate the variability of the magnetic fluctuations and of the heating in the corona. The high-frequency tail of the power spectrum of fluctuations forms a power law whose exponent varies with height, and we discuss the possible physical explanation for this behavior. The variability in the heating rate is bursty...

  11. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms.

  12. On Bosonic Magnetic Flux Operator and Bosonic Faraday Operator Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; WANG Tong-Tong; WANG Ji-Suo

    2007-01-01

    In the literature about mesoscopic Josephson devices the magnetic flux is considered as an operator, the fundamental commutative relation between the magnetic flux operator and the Cooper-pair charge operator is usually preengaged. In this paper we show that such a relation can be deduced from the basic Bose operators' commutative relation through the entangled state representation. The Faraday formula in bosonic form is then equivalent to the second Josephson equation. The current operator equation for LC mesoscopic circuit is also derived.

  13. Quantum Transport in a Biphenyl Molecule: Effects of Magnetic Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transport properties of a biphenyl molecule are studied based on the Green's function formalism. The molecule is sandwiched between two metallic electrodes, where each benzene ring is threaded by a magnetic flux $\\phi$. The results are focused on the effects of the molecule to electrode coupling strength and the magnetic flux $\\phi$. Our numerical study shows that, for a fixed molecular coupling, the current amplitude across the bridge can be {\\em regulated} significantly just by tun...

  14. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  15. Explosive events in connection with small scale flux emergence in open field regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, Klaus; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando, , Prof

    In recent years observations have shown that the emergence of new magnetic flux from the convection zone into the open field regions in the corona may generate spectacular jet phenomena. A smaller number of jets seem to end their near steady state phase in one or more spectacular eruptions where material is accelerated away from the solar surface reaching fairly high velocities. To investigate the jet phenomena, we have conducted a number of numerical MHD experiments that investigate the general interaction between an emerging bipolar flux region and the open coronal magnetic field. Under the correct conditions, this generates a well defined jet phase and the model explains many of the general characteristics of the typical Eiffel tower jets. Towards the end phase of the jet, the remains of the emerged flux system may experience some violent eruptions. This talk will discuss the general characteristics of these eruptions, aiming at providing an explanation to why they occur, and how they develop in general. These jets and eruptions may be what is taking place in some of the so-called breakout models described in a number of recent observational papers.

  16. Magnetic hysteresis and magnetic flux patterns measured by acoustically stimulated electromagnetic response in a steel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hisato; Watanabe, Kakeru; Ikushima, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic hysteresis loops are measured by ultrasonic techniques and used in visualizing the magnetic-flux distribution in a steel plate. The piezomagnetic coefficient determines the amplitude of acoustically stimulated electromagnetic (ASEM) fields, yielding the hysteresis behavior of the intensity of the ASEM response. By utilizing the high correspondence of the ASEM response to the magnetic-flux density, we image the specific spatial patterns of the flux density formed by an artificial defect in a steel plate specimen. Magnetic-flux probing by ultrasonic waves is thus shown to be a viable method of nondestructive material inspection.

  17. Correlations Between Magnetic Flux and Levitation Force of HTS Bulk Above a Permanent Magnet Guideway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Zheng, Jun; Zheng, Botian; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2017-06-01

    In order to clarify the correlations between magnetic flux and levitation force of the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk, we measured the magnetic flux density on bottom and top surfaces of a bulk superconductor while vertically moving above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG). The levitation force of the bulk superconductor was measured simultaneously. In this study, the HTS bulk was moved down and up for three times between field-cooling position and working position above the PMG, followed by a relaxation measurement of 300 s at the minimum height position. During the whole processes, the magnetic flux density and levitation force of the bulk superconductor were recorded and collected by a multipoint magnetic field measurement platform and a self-developed maglev measurement system, respectively. The magnetic flux density on the bottom surface reflected the induced field in the superconductor bulk, while on the top, it reveals the penetrated magnetic flux. The results show that the magnetic flux density and levitation force of the bulk superconductor are in direct correlation from the viewpoint of inner supercurrent. In general, this work is instructive for understanding the connection of the magnetic flux density, the inner current density and the levitation behavior of HTS bulk employed in a maglev system. Meanwhile, this magnetic flux density measurement method has enriched present experimental evaluation methods of maglev system.

  18. SQUIDs De-fluxing Using a Decaying AC Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Semenov, Vasili Kirilovich [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Plattsburgh, NY (United States); Anderson, Bill [Senior Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Flux trapping is the Achilles’ heel of all superconductor electronics. The most direct way to avoid flux trapping is a prevention of superconductor circuits from exposure to magnetic fields. Unfortunately this is not feasible if the circuits must be exposed to a strong DC magnetic field even for a short period of time. For example, such unavoidable exposures take place in superparamagnetic relaxation measurements (SPMR) and ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging (ULF MRI) using unshielded thin-film SQUID-based gradiometers. Unshielded SQUIDs stop working after being exposed to DC magnetic fields of only a few Gauss in strength. In this paper we present experimental results with de-fluxing of planar thin-film LTS SQUID-based gradiometers using a strong decaying AC magnetic field. We used four commercial G136 gradiometers for SPMR measurements with up to a 10 mT magnetizing field. Strong 12.9 kHz decaying magnetic field pulses reliably return SQUIDs to normal operation 50 ms after zeroing the DC magnetizing field. This new AC de-fluxing method was also successfully tested with seven other different types of LTS SQUID sensors and has been shown to dissipate extremely low energy.

  19. Magnetic flux generation and transport in cool stars

    CERN Document Server

    Işık, Emre; Schüssler, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    The Sun and other cool stars harbouring outer convection zones manifest magnetic activity in their atmospheres. The connection between this activity and the properties of a deep-seated dynamo generating the magnetic flux is not well understood. By employing physical models, we study the spatial and temporal characteristics of the observable surface field for various stellar parameters. We combine models for magnetic flux generation, buoyancy instability, and transport, which encompass the entire convection zone. The model components are: (1) a thin-layer alpha-Omega dynamo at the base of the convection zone; (2) buoyancy instabilities and the rise of flux tubes through the convection zone in 3D, which provides a physically consistent determination of emergence latitudes and tilt angles; and (3) horizontal flux transport at the surface. For solar-type stars and rotation periods longer than about 10 days, the latitudinal dynamo waves generated by the deep-seated alpha-Omega dynamo are faithfully reflected by th...

  20. Magnetic Flux Dynamics in Horizontally Cooled Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Martinello, M; Grassellino, A; Crawford, A C; Melnychuk, O; Romanenko, A; Sergatkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooling details have been performed for superconducting niobium cavities with the cavity beam axis placed parallel respect to the helium cooling flow, and findings showed that for sufficient cooling thermogradients all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper we investigate the flux trapping and its impact on radio frequency surface resistance when the resonators are positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is representative of how superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are cooled in an accelerator. We also extend the studies to different directions of applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. Results show that in the cavity horizontal configuration there is a different impact of the various field components on the final surface resistance, and that several parameters have to be considered to understand flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concent...

  1. Two-dimensional model of intrinsic magnetic flux losses in helical flux compression generators

    CERN Document Server

    Haurylavets, V V

    2012-01-01

    Helical Flux Compression Generators (HFCG) are used for generation of mega-amper current and high magnetic fields. We propose the two dimensional HFCG filament model based on the new description of the stator and armature contact point. The model developed enables one to quantitatively describe the intrinsic magnetic flux losses and predict the results of experiments with various types of HFCGs. We present the effective resistance calculations based on the non-linear magnetic diffusion effect describing HFCG performance under the strong conductor heating by currents.

  2. Scaling laws of free magnetic energy stored in a solar emerging flux region

    CERN Document Server

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    This Letter reports scaling laws of free magnetic energy stored in a solar emerging flux region which is a key to understanding the energetics of solar active phenomena such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections. By performing 3-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that reproduce several emerging flux regions of different magnetic configurations, we derive power law relationships among emerged magnetic flux, free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in these emerging flux regions. Since magnetic flux is an observable quantity, the scaling law between magnetic flux and free magnetic energy may give a way to estimate invisible free magnetic energy responsible for solar active phenomena.

  3. OpenFLUID: an open-source software environment for modelling fluxes in landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Rabotin, Michaël; Crevoisier, David; Libres, Aline; Dagès, Cécile; Moussa, Roger; Lagacherie, Philippe; Raclot, Damien; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Integrative landscape functioning has become a common concept in environmental management. Landscapes are complex systems where many processes interact in time and space. In agro-ecosystems, these processes are mainly physical processes, including hydrological-processes, biological processes and human activities. Modelling such systems requires an interdisciplinary approach, coupling models coming from different disciplines, developed by different teams. In order to support collaborative works, involving many models coupled in time and space for integrative simulations, an open software modelling platform is a relevant answer. OpenFLUID is an open source software platform for modelling landscape functioning, mainly focused on spatial fluxes. It provides an advanced object-oriented architecture allowing to i) couple models developed de novo or from existing source code, and which are dynamically plugged to the platform, ii) represent landscapes as hierarchical graphs, taking into account multi-scale, spatial heterogeneities and landscape objects connectivity, iii) run and explore simulations in many ways : using the OpenFLUID software interfaces for users (command line interface, graphical user interface), or using external applications such as GNU R through the provided ROpenFLUID package. OpenFLUID is developed in C++ and relies on open source libraries only (Boost, libXML2, GLib/GTK, OGR/GDAL, …). For modelers and developers, OpenFLUID provides a dedicated environment for model development, which is based on an open source toolchain, including the Eclipse editor, the GCC compiler and the CMake build system. OpenFLUID is distributed under the GPLv3 open source license, with a special exception allowing to plug existing models licensed under any license. It is clearly in the spirit of sharing knowledge and favouring collaboration in a community of modelers. OpenFLUID has been involved in many research applications, such as modelling of hydrological network

  4. The solar internetwork. I. Contribution to the network magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gošić, M.; Rubio, L. R. Bellot; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apdo. 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Orozco Suárez, D. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Katsukawa, Y., E-mail: mgosic@iaa.es [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    The magnetic network (NE) observed on the solar surface harbors a sizable fraction of the total quiet Sun flux. However, its origin and maintenance are not well known. Here we investigate the contribution of internetwork (IN) magnetic fields to the NE flux. IN fields permeate the interior of supergranular cells and show large emergence rates. We use long-duration sequences of magnetograms acquired by Hinode and an automatic feature tracking algorithm to follow the evolution of NE and IN flux elements. We find that 14% of the quiet Sun (QS) flux is in the form of IN fields with little temporal variations. IN elements interact with NE patches and modify the flux budget of the NE either by adding flux (through merging processes) or by removing it (through cancellation events). Mergings appear to be dominant, so the net flux contribution of the IN is positive. The observed rate of flux transfer to the NE is 1.5 × 10{sup 24} Mx day{sup –1} over the entire solar surface. Thus, the IN supplies as much flux as is present in the NE in only 9-13 hr. Taking into account that not all the transferred flux is incorporated into the NE, we find that the IN would be able to replace the entire NE flux in approximately 18-24 hr. This renders the IN the most important contributor to the NE, challenging the view that ephemeral regions are the main source of flux in the QS. About 40% of the total IN flux eventually ends up in the NE.

  5. Torsional Alfven waves in stratified and expanding magnetic flux tubes

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The effects of both density stratification and magnetic field expansion on torsional Alfven waves in magnetic flux tubes are studied. The frequencies, the period ratio P1/P2 of the fundamental and its first-overtone, and eigenfunctions of torsional Alfven modes are obtained. Our numerical results show that the density stratification and magnetic field expansion have opposite effects on the oscillating properties of torsional Alfven waves.

  6. Design of Magnetic Flux Feedback Controller in Hybrid Suspension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid suspension system with permanent magnet and electromagnet consumes little power consumption and can realize larger suspension gap. But realizing stable suspension of hybrid magnet is a tricky problem in the suspension control sphere. Considering from this point, we take magnetic flux signal as a state variable and put this signal back to suspension control system. So we can get the hybrid suspension mathematical model based on magnetic flux signal feedback. By application of MIMO feedback linearization theory, we can further realize linearization of the hybrid suspension system. And then proportion, integral, differentiation, magnetic flux density B (PIDB controller is designed. Some hybrid suspension experiments have been done on CMS04 magnetic suspension bogie of National University of Defense Technology (NUDT in China. The experiments denote that the new hybrid suspension control algorithm based on magnetic flux signal feedback designed in this paper has more advantages than traditional position-current double cascade control algorithm. Obviously, the robustness and stability of hybrid suspension system have been enhanced.

  7. Landscape and flux theory of non-equilibrium open economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Jin

    2017-09-01

    The economy is open and never in true equilibrium due to the exchanges with outside. However, most of the quantitative studies have been focused on the equilibrium economy. Despite of the recent efforts, it is still challenging to formulate a quantitative theory for uncovering the principles of non-equilibrium open economy. In this study, we developed a landscape and flux theory for non-equilibrium economy. We quantified the states of economy and identify the multi-stable states as the basins of attractions on the underlying landscape. We found the global driving force of the non-equilibrium economy is determined by both the underlying landscape gradient and the curl probability flux measuring the degree of non-equilibriumness through the detailed balance breaking. The non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the global stability, the optimal path and speed of the non-equilibrium economy can be formulated and quantified. In the conventional economy, the supply and demand usually has only one equilibrium. By considering nonlinear supply-demand dynamics, we found that both bi-stable states and limit cycle oscillations can emerge. By shifting the slope of demand curve, we can see how the bi-stability transforms to the limit cycle dynamics and vice versa. By parallel shifting the demand curve, we can also see how the monopoly, the competition, and the bistable monopoly and competition states emerge and transform to one other. We can also see how the mono-stable monopoly, the limit cycle and the mono-stable competition states emerge and transform to one another.

  8. Turbulent Erosion of Magnetic Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovay, K

    1997-01-01

    Results from a numerical and analytical investigation of the solution of a nonlinear axially symmetric diffusion equation for the magnetic field are presented for the case when the nonlinear dependence of the diffusivity $\

  9. Magnetic Flux Emergence Observed with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lites, B.; Martinez Pillet, V.

    1996-05-01

    We have carried out quantitative observations of the vector magnetic field during the emergence of three small bipolar active regions in June, 1992, July 1993, and September 1994 using the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter (ASP). The region of horizontal magnetic field at the actual site of emergence is always characterized by low magnetic field strength (i.e. considerably less than 1000 Gauss). We find a strong relationship between field strength and inclination in these regions. This suggests that 1) flux emerging from below the photosphere does not coalesce into strong flux tubes until it reaches the photosphere, becomes nearly vertical as a result of magnetic buoyancy, and is then acted upon by convective collapse, and 2) the field strength of flux rising through the convection zone may be in rough equipartition with the fluid motions. We find the flux emergence zone to be characterized by highly variable (both spatially and temporally) fill factors for the magnetic field, suggesting that the flux below the surface is filamentary, that it rises rapidly through the photosphere to form a magnetic canopy above the emergence region. Sequences of Hα on- and off-band images obtained with the ASP reveal the accompanying development of the arch-filament system, and suggest that the material within the Hα structures is supplied by a siphon flow as evidenced by apparent chromospheric red shifts on the sides of the loops closest to a large pore, and blue shifts where the fields anchor in plage regions. Proper motions of the magnetic flux images throughout a day's observation indicate the presence of a persistent vortex flow on a small scale (a few arcseconds). The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  10. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab "pump" the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in ...

  11. Open-circuit Fault Analysis and Fault-tolerant Control of Non-Rare-Earth Flux Mnemonic Doubly Salient Permanent Magnet Motors%磁通记忆式双凸极非稀土永磁电机单相断路下容错控制策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱孝勇; 朱峰; 张超; 杜怿; 全力

    2016-01-01

    A non-rare-earth flux mnemonic doubly salient permanent magnet motor (FM-DSPM) was presented, which used the magnetizing windings to adjust flux and operating point of permanent magnets (PMs) on-line. Thus, high reliability and fault-tolerant ability can be achieved. In order to solve the normal open-circuit fault, the magnetic reconstruction of windings was proposed. That is, the field magnetic motive force and armature reaction magnetic motive force of the motor were changed to complete the fault-tolerant operation under the situation of single-phase circuit faults. For the two methods, the magnetic reconstruction of single winding and the remedial brushless DC (BLDC) operation were analyzed and compared by MATLAB. Both of them can achieve similar torque output and fault-tolerant abilities. Finally, the experiment results prove that the proposed control strategy is correct and reliable.%提出了一种磁通记忆式双凸极非稀土永磁电机(doubly salient permanent magnet motor with non-rare-earth flux memory,FM-DSPM),采用了可在线调节永磁体磁化强度和工作点的磁化绕组,为电机的可靠运行以及容错能力增添了新的自由度。针对该类电机最常见的单相断路故障,提出了电枢磁场重构容错控制策略,即通过改变电机的励磁磁动势与电枢磁动势,来实现单相故障下的容错运行。通过仿真研究对比分析了该控制策略中的两种方案:单一电枢磁场重构容错控制、增磁无刷直流(brushless DC,BLDC)容错控制。两种方案均可在单相故障时,实现磁场重构,进而获得近似相等的转矩和容错运行能力。最后通过实验研究,验证了所提容错控制方法的正确性和可靠性。

  12. The Pressure Limitations on Flux Pile-Up Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y. E.

    1999-05-01

    Flux pile-up magnetic reconnection was thought to be able to provide fast energy dissipation a strongly magnetized plasma, for example, in solar flares. We examine the problem of the plasma pressure limitations on the rapidity of flux pile-up reconnection. It is shown that for a two-dimensional stagnation point flow with nonzero vorticity the magnetic merging rate cannot exceed the Sweet-Parker scaling in a low-beta plasma, which is too slow to explain flares. Moreover, the solution has some undesireable properties such as a diffusion layer at the external boundary and the massively increasing inflow speed. The pressure limitation appears to be somewhat less restrictive for three-dimensional flux pile-up. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9813933.

  13. Magnetic Flux Expulsion Studies in Niobium SRF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, Sam [Fermilab; Checchin, Mattia [Fermilab; Crawford, Anthony [Fermilab; Grassellino, Anna [Fermilab; Martinello, Martina [Fermilab; Melnychuk, Oleksandr [Fermilab; Romanenko, Alexander [Fermilab; Sergatskov, Dmitri [Fermilab; Trenikhina, Yulia [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    With the recent discovery of nitrogen doping treatment for SRF cavities, ultra-high quality factors at medium accelerating fields are regularly achieved in vertical RF tests. To preserve these quality factors into the cryomodule, it is important to consider background magnetic fields, which can become trapped in the surface of the cavity during cooldown and cause Q₀ degradation. Building on the recent discovery that spatial thermal gradients during cooldown can significantly improve expulsion of magnetic flux, a detailed study was performed of flux expulsion on two cavities with different furnace treatments that are cooled in magnetic fields amplitudes representative of what is expected in a realistic cryomodule. In this contribution, we summarize these cavity results, in order to improve understanding of the impact of flux expulsion on cavity performance.

  14. Do the Legs of Magnetic Clouds Contain Twisted Flux-rope Magnetic Fields?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  15. DO THE LEGS OF MAGNETIC CLOUDS CONTAIN TWISTED FLUX-ROPE MAGNETIC FIELDS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, M. J. [Space and Atmospheric Electricity Group, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-20

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) characterized primarily by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction indicative of the presence of a magnetic flux rope. Energetic particle signatures suggest MC flux ropes remain magnetically connected to the Sun at both ends, leading to widely used model of global MC structure as an extended flux rope, with a loop-like axis stretching out from the Sun into the heliosphere and back to the Sun. The time of flight of energetic particles, however, suggests shorter magnetic field line lengths than such a continuous twisted flux rope would produce. In this study, two simple models are compared with observed flux rope axis orientations of 196 MCs to show that the flux rope structure is confined to the MC leading edge. The MC “legs,” which magnetically connect the flux rope to the Sun, are not recognizable as MCs and thus are unlikely to contain twisted flux rope fields. Spacecraft encounters with these non-flux rope legs may provide an explanation for the frequent observation of non-MC ICMEs.

  16. Effects of MHD slow shocks propagating along magnetic flux tubes in a dipole magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Erkaev

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations of the plasma pressure in a magnetic flux tube can produce MHD waves evolving into shocks. In the case of a low plasma beta, plasma pressure pulses in the magnetic flux tube generate MHD slow shocks propagating along the tube. For converging magnetic field lines, such as in a dipole magnetic field, the cross section of the magnetic flux tube decreases enormously with increasing magnetic field strength. In such a case, the propagation of MHD waves along magnetic flux tubes is rather different from that in the case of uniform magnetic fields. In this paper, the propagation of MHD slow shocks is studied numerically using the ideal MHD equations in an approximation suitable for a thin magnetic flux tube with a low plasma beta. The results obtained in the numerical study show that the jumps in the plasma parameters at the MHD slow shock increase greatly while the shock is propagating in the narrowing magnetic flux tube. The results are applied to the case of the interaction between Jupiter and its satellite Io, the latter being considered as a source of plasma pressure pulses.

  17. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Yates, T Y

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  18. Numerical simulations of sunspot rotation driven by magnetic flux emergence

    OpenAIRE

    Sturrock, Zoe

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic flux continually emerges from the Sun, rising through the solar interior, emerging at the photosphere in the form of sunspots and expanding into the atmosphere. Observations of sunspot rotations have been reported for over a century and are often accompanied by solar eruptions and flaring activity. In this thesis, we present 3D numerical simulations of the emergence of twisted flux tubes from the uppermost layers of the solar interior, examining the rotational movements of sunspots i...

  19. Magnetic Field Analysis of Interior Composite-Rotor Controllable-Flux Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yiguang; PAN Wei; SHEN Yonghuan; TANG Renyuan

    2006-01-01

    Conventional permanent magnet synchronous machine(PMSM)has the problem of large stator copper loss and narrow speed range. To solve this problem, an interior composite-rotor controllable-flux PMSM adaptive to multi-polar is proposed. This machine has the characteristics of low stator copper loss and wide-speed operation. The half-radial-set and half-tangential-set permanent magnets(PMs)are NdFeB that has high remanent flux density and high coercive force. The tangential-set PMs are AlNiCo that has high remanent flux density and low coercive force. By applying the pulse of d-axis stator current id, the magnetized intensity and direction of AlNiCo can be controlled. The flux created by NdFeB is repelled to stator and air-gap PM-flux is intensified, or is partially bypassed by AlNiCo in the rotor, so the air-gap PM-flux is weakened. The internal magnetic field distribution in two ultra magnetized situations is analyzed by finite element method. The dimension of PMs and magnetic structure are demonstrated. Especially when the q-axis magnetic resistance is larger and the q-axis inductance is smaller, the result of flux-weakening is better and the influence of armature reaction on air-gap PM-flux is weakened.

  20. Determining the axis orientation of cylindrical magnetic flux rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhaojin; Wan, Weixing; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Tielong; Lui, Anthony; Wang, Yuming; Dunlop, malcolm; Zhang, Yongcun; Zong, Qiugang

    2013-04-01

    We develop a new simple method for inferring the orientation of a magnetic flux rope, which is assumed to be a time-independent cylindrically symmetric structure via the direct single-point analysis of magnetic field structure. The model tests demonstrate that, for the cylindrical flux rope regardless of whether it is force-free or not, the method can consistently yield the axis orientation of the flux rope with higher accuracy and stability than the minimum variance analysis of the magnetic field and the Grad-Shafranov reconstruction technique. Moreover, the radial distance to the axis center and the current density can also be estimated consistently. Application to two actual flux transfer events observed by the four satellites of the Cluster mission demonstrates that the method is more appropriate to be used for the inner part of flux rope, which might be closer to the cylindrical structure, showing good agreement with the results obtained from the optimal Grad-Shafranov reconstruction and the least squares technique of Faraday's law, but fails to produce such agreement for the outer satellite that grazes the flux rope. Therefore, the method must be used with caution.

  1. Magnetic Flux in Toroidal Type I Compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenhagen, R; Körs, B; Lüst, Dieter; Blumenhagen, Ralph; Goerlich, Lars; Kors, Boris; Lust, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the compactification of type I strings on a torus with additional background gauge flux on the D9-branes. The solutions to the cancellation of the RR tadpoles display various phenomenologically attractive features: supersymmetry breaking, chiral fermions and the opportunity to reduce the rank of the gauge group as desired. We also point out the equivalence of the concept of various different background fields and noncommutative deformations of the geometry on the individual D9-branes by constructing the relevant boundary states to describe such objects.

  2. Coronal Flux Rope Equilibria in Closed Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Wang; You-Qiu Hu

    2003-01-01

    Using a 2.5-dimensional ideal MHD model in Cartesian coordinates, weinvestigate the equilibrium properties of coronal magnetic flux ropes in backgroundmagnetic fields that are completely closed. The background fields are produced by adipole, a quadrupole, and an octapole, respectively, located below the photosphereat the same depth. A magnetic flux rope is then launched from below the photo-sphere, and its magnetic properties, i.e., the annular magnetic flux φp and the axialmagnetic flux φz, are controlled by a single emergence parameter. The whole sys-tem eventually evolves into equilibrium, and the resultant flux rope is characterizedby three geometrical parameters: the height of the rope axis, the half-width of therope, and the length of the vertical current sheet below the rope. It is found thatthe geometrical parameters increase monotonically and continuously with increasingφ p and φz: no catastrophe occurs. Moreover, there exists a steep segment in theprofiles of the geometrical parameters versus either φp or φz, and the faster thebackground field decays with height, the larger both the gradient and the growthamplitude within the steep segment will be.

  3. Chromospheric and Coronal Wave Generation in a Magnetic Flux Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar; Hansteen, Viggo; Gudiksen, Boris; Wedemeyer, Sven; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-08-01

    Using radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar atmospheric layers from the upper convection zone to the lower corona, we investigate the self-consistent excitation of slow magneto-acoustic body waves (slow modes) in a magnetic flux concentration. We find that the convective downdrafts in the close surroundings of a two-dimensional flux slab “pump” the plasma inside it in the downward direction. This action produces a downflow inside the flux slab, which encompasses ever higher layers, causing an upwardly propagating rarefaction wave. The slow mode, excited by the adiabatic compression of the downflow near the optical surface, travels along the magnetic field in the upward direction at the tube speed. It develops into a shock wave at chromospheric heights, where it dissipates, lifts the transition region, and produces an offspring in the form of a compressive wave that propagates further into the corona. In the wake of downflows and propagating shock waves, the atmosphere inside the flux slab in the chromosphere and higher tends to oscillate with a period of ν ≈ 4 mHz. We conclude that this process of “magnetic pumping” is a most plausible mechanism for the direct generation of longitudinal chromospheric and coronal compressive waves within magnetic flux concentrations, and it may provide an important heat source in the chromosphere. It may also be responsible for certain types of dynamic fibrils.

  4. Open and Closed String Vertices for branes with magnetic field and T-duality

    CERN Document Server

    Pesando, I

    2009-01-01

    We discuss carefully the vertices which describe the dipole open strings and closed strings on a D-brane with magnetic flux on a torus. Translation invariance along closed cycles forces surprisingly closed string vertices written in open string formalism to acquire Chan-Paton like matrices. Moreover the one loop amplitudes have a single trace for the part of gauge group with the magnetic flux. These peculiarities are also required by consistency of the action of T-duality in the open string sector. In this way we can show to all orders in perturbation theory the equivalence of the T-dual open string theories, gravitational interactions included. We provide also a new and direct derivation of the bosonic boundary state in presence of constant magnetic and Kalb-Ramond background based on Sciuto-Della Selva-Saito vertex formalism.

  5. Open and closed string vertices for branes with magnetic field and T-duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesando, Igor

    2010-02-01

    We discuss carefully the vertices which describe the dipole open strings and closed strings on a D-brane with magnetic flux on a torus. Translation invariance along closed cycles forces surprisingly closed string vertices written in open string formalism to acquire Chan-Paton like matrices. Moreover the one loop amplitudes have a single trace for the part of gauge group with the magnetic flux. These peculiarities are also required by consistency of the action of T-duality in the open string sector. In this way we can show to all orders in perturbation theory the equivalence of the T-dual open string theories, gravitational interactions included. We provide also a new and direct derivation of the bosonic boundary state in presence of constant magnetic and Kalb-Ramond background based on Sciuto-Della Selva-Saito vertex formalism.

  6. Sausage Mode Propagation in a Thick Magnetic Flux Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Pardi, Anabele-Linda; Marcu, Alexandru; Orza, Beniamin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the propagation of slow magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage waves in a thick expanding magnetic flux tube in the context of the quiescent (VAL C) solar atmosphere. The propagation of these waves is found to be described by the Klein-Gordon equation. Using the governing MHD equations and the VAL C atmosphere model we study the variation of the cut-off frequency along and across the magnetic tube guiding the waves. Due to the radial variation of the cut-off frequency the flux tubes act as low frequency filters for waves.

  7. Advection of magnetic flux by accretion disks around neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tulian, S.; Reisenegger, A.

    The aim of our research is to address why millisecond pulsars have relatively weak surface magnetic fields, of about 10^8 G, with a narrow spread. We propose that the accretion of plasma from the companion star fully screens the original neutron star field, but the accretion disk carries additional magnetic flux from the companion star, or itself can generate field by means of dynamo processes. For a strongly magnetized star, the field prevents the disk from approaching the star. The accretion is along the field lines and deposits the matter on the polar cap. Then, the accreted plasma flows, dragging with itself the magnetic field lines, from the pole to the equator (Payne & Melatos 2004). In a following stage, when the star becomes non-magnetic, because the field has been buried, the disk touches the star. We suggest that some effective mechanism of magnetic flux transport such as that proposed by Spruit & Uzdensky 2005 (or Bisnovatyi-Kogan & Lovelace 2007), operates and necessarily leads to a "strongly magnetized disk''. It becomes laminar because the magneto-rotational instability saturates (it is considered to be responsible for turbulence in the disk), and the magnetic difussivity is negligible. Then, the loss of angular momentum allowing the accretion is only caused by the magneto-centrifugal disk-wind (Blandford & Payne 1982). Meanwhile, the wind-driven transport of the magnetic flux by the disk re-magnetizes the star. This process continues until the Lorentz force due to the star's magnetic field forbids any further accretion of matter and magnetic flux, in the Ideal Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics approach. Additional of material can fall onto the star (but at lower rate) if some instability process sets in, allowing the diffusion of mass through the magnetic field lines (e.g the Interchange Instability, Spruit & Taam 1990). All these processes might lead to an asymptotic magnetic field of 10^8 G,as is inferred from observations. We are developing a self

  8. Magnetic field generation from shear flow in flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Gao, K.; Klarenbeek, J.; Yoo, C.

    2012-10-01

    In the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) we have measured out of plane quadrupole magnetic field structure in situations where magnetic reconnection was minimal. This quadrupole out of plane magnetic signature has historically been presumed to be the smoking gun harbinger of reconnection. On the other hand, we showed that when flux ropes bounced instead of merging and reconnecting, this signature could evolve. This can follow from sheared fluid flows in the context of a generalized Ohms Law. We reconstruct a shear flow model from experimental data for flux ropes that have been experimentally well characterized in RSX as screw pinch equilibria, including plasma ion and electron flow, with self consistent profiles for magnetic field, pressure, and current density. The data can account for the quadrupole field structure.

  9. FLUXCAP: A flux-coupled ac/dc magnetizing device

    CERN Document Server

    Gopman, Daniel B; Kent, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    We report on an instrument for applying ac and dc magnetic fields by capturing the flux from a rotating permanent magnet and projecting it between two adjustable pole pieces. This can be an alternative to standard electromagnets for experiments with small samples or in probe stations in which an applied magnetic field is needed locally, with advantages that include a compact form-factor, very low power requirements and dissipation as well as fast field sweep rates. This flux capture instrument (FLUXCAP) can produce fields from -400 to +400 mT, with field resolution less than 1 mT. It generates static magnetic fields as well as ramped fields, with ramping rates as high as 10 T/s. We demonstrate the use of this apparatus for studying the magnetotransport properties of spin-valve nanopillars, a nanoscale device that exhibits giant magnetoresistance.

  10. OpenMebius: An Open Source Software for Isotopically Nonstationary 13C-Based Metabolic Flux Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Kajihata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a 13C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas 13C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST-13C-MFA has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase. Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-13C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-13C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-13C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-13C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-13C-MFA.

  11. OpenMebius: an open source software for isotopically nonstationary 13C-based metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihata, Shuichi; Furusawa, Chikara; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by (13)C-based metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a (13)C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas (13)C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis (INST-(13)C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-(13)C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-(13)C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-(13)C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-(13)C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-(13)C-MFA.

  12. Experimental Results from Railgun Firings Involving Magnetic Flux Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    report is unlimited KEYWORDS Railgun Accelerators Current Distribution Electromagnetic Launchers Magnetic Fields Plasma Armature COSATI GROUPS 2009 1906...series are presented. 2 3. EXPERIMENTAL DETAILS The power source for the RAPID railgun fi] used in the MRAP series consisted of a 2.0 mF capacitor bank...MEUKOURNE, VICTORIA TECHNICAL NOTE MRL-TN-509 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM RAILGUN FIRINGS INVOLVING MAGNETIC FLUX PROBES V. Kowalenko THE UNITED STATES

  13. Radiation-induced magnetization reversal causing a large flux loss in undulator permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizen, Teruhiko; Kinjo, Ryota; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Kagamihata, Akihiro; Kida, Yuichiro; Seike, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Takahiro; Hara, Toru; Itoga, Toshiro; Asano, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-11-29

    We report an unexpectedly large flux loss observed in permanent magnets in one of the undulators operated in SACLA, the x-ray free electron laser facility in Japan. Characterizations of individual magnets extracted from the relevant undulator have revealed that the flux loss was caused by a homogeneous magnetization reversal extending over a wide area, but not by demagnetization of individual magnets damaged by radiation. We show that the estimated flux-loss rate is much higher than what is reported in previous papers, and its distribution is much more localized to the upstream side. Results of numerical and experimental studies carried out to validate the magnetization reversal and quantify the flux loss are presented, together with possible countermeasures against rapid degradation of the undulator performance.

  14. Estimating effects from trapped magnetic fluxes in superconducting magnetic levitation measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masakazu Nakanishi

    2008-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic levitation measurement is one of the most promising approaches to define mass standard based on the fundamental physical constants. However, the present system has unknown factors causing error larger than 50 ppm. We examined the effects of magnetic fluxes trapped in the superconducting coil and the superconducting floating body. When fluxes were trapped in either coil or floating body, their effects were able to be cancelled by reversing polarities of current and magnetic field, as had been believed. However, fluxes trapped in both coil and body induced an attractive force between them and caused error. In order to reduce the fluxes, the coil and the floating body should be cooled in low magnetic field in magnetic and electromagnetic shields.

  15. Radiation-induced magnetization reversal causing a large flux loss in undulator permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizen, Teruhiko; Kinjo, Ryota; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Kagamihata, Akihiro; Kida, Yuichiro; Seike, Takamitsu; Watanabe, Takahiro; Hara, Toru; Itoga, Toshiro; Asano, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We report an unexpectedly large flux loss observed in permanent magnets in one of the undulators operated in SACLA, the x-ray free electron laser facility in Japan. Characterizations of individual magnets extracted from the relevant undulator have revealed that the flux loss was caused by a homogeneous magnetization reversal extending over a wide area, but not by demagnetization of individual magnets damaged by radiation. We show that the estimated flux-loss rate is much higher than what is reported in previous papers, and its distribution is much more localized to the upstream side. Results of numerical and experimental studies carried out to validate the magnetization reversal and quantify the flux loss are presented, together with possible countermeasures against rapid degradation of the undulator performance.

  16. Noncommutative Compactifications of Type I Strings on Tori with Magnetic Background Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Blumenhagen, R; Körs, B; Lüst, Dieter; Blumenhagen, Ralph; Goerlich, Lars; Kors, Boris; Lust, Dieter

    2000-01-01

    We construct six- and four-dimensional toroidal compactifications of the Type I string with magnetic flux on the D-branes. The open strings in this background probe a noncommutative internal geometry. Phenomenologically appealing features such as chiral fermions and supersymmetry breaking in the gauge sector are naturally realized by these vacua. We investigate the spectra of such noncommutative string compactifications and in a bottom-up approach discuss the possibility to obtain the standard or some GUT like model.

  17. Magnetic flux periodicities and finite momentum pairing in unconventional superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loder, Florian

    2009-12-22

    This work contains a thorough study of the magnetic flux periodicity of loops of conventional and unconventional, especially d-wave, superconductors. Although already in 1961, several independent works showed that the flux period of a conventional superconducting loop is the superconducting flux quantum hc/2e, this question has never been investigated deeply for unconventional superconductors. And indeed, we show here that d-wave superconducting loops show a basic flux period of the normal flux quantum hc/e, a property originating from the nodal quasi-particle states. This doubling of the flux periodicity is best visible in the persistent current circulating in the loop, and it affects other properties of the superconductor such as the periodicity of d-wave Josephson junctions. In the second part of this work, the theory of electron pairing with finite center-of-mass momentum, necessary for the description of superconducting loops, is extended to systems in zero magnetic field. We show that even in the field free case, an unconventional pairing symmetry can lead to a superconducting ground state with finite-momentum electron pairs. Such a state has an inhomogeneous charge density and therefore is a basis for the description of coexistence of superconductivity and stripe order. (orig.)

  18. Basal magnetic flux and the local solar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, J O

    2012-01-01

    The average unsigned magnetic flux density in magnetograms of the quiet Sun is generally dominated by instrumental noise. Due to the entirely different scaling behavior of the noise and the solar magnetic pattern it has been possible to determine the standard deviation of the Gaussian noise distribution and remove the noise contribution from the average unsigned flux density for the whole 15-yr SOHO/MDI data set and for a selection of SDO/HMI magnetograms. There is a very close correlation between the MDI disk-averaged unsigned vertical flux density and the sunspot number, and regression analysis gives a residual level of 2.7 G when the sunspot number is zero. The selected set of HMI magnetograms, which spans the most quiet phase of solar activity, has a lower limit of 3.0 G to the noise-corrected average flux density. These apparently cycle-independent levels may be identified as a basal flux density, which represents an upper limit to the possible flux contribution from a local dynamo, but not evidence for ...

  19. Scanning SQUID microscopy for magnetic flux systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, J I; Hata, Y

    2003-01-01

    Recently, vortices confined into micro-scale superconductors with shapes like a disk, triangle, square, etc., have attracted much attention because of the quantum phase transition of the self-organized vortex arrangement occurring within such geometrical constraints. Such a transition can be observed using a scanning SQUID microscope with high spatial resolution. We have successfully improved spatial resolution by incorporating a microfabrication technique that reduces both the size of the pick-up coil of the micro DC-SQUID and the standoff distance between the pick-up coil and the sample surface. Using this microscope, we have studied vortex arrangements in micro-scale superconductors made of Nb and YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta films with various sizes and geometrical shapes. A peculiar oscillating behavior of diamagnetic magnetization corresponding to the particular vortex state was observed.

  20. Plasma opening switch with extrinsic magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgachev, G; Maslennikov, D

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. We have demonstrated in series of experiments that plasma opening switch (POS) switching voltage (UPOS) is defined by energy density (w) deposited in the POS plasma. If we then consider a plasma erosion mainly responsible for the effect of POS switching (the erosion effect could be described by Hall or Child-Langmuir models) the energy density (w) could be measured as a function of a system "macro-parameter" such as the initial charging voltage of the capacity storage system (the Marx pulsed voltage generator) UMarx. The POS voltage in this case could be given by UPOS"aw=aUMarx4/7, where a is a constant. This report demonstrates that for the high-impedance POS which has limited charge density transferred through the POS plasma a"2.5 (MV3/7) with no external magnetic field applied. The use of the extrinsic magnetic field allows to increase a up to 3.6 (MV3/7) and to achieve higher voltages at the opening phase - UPOS=3.6UMarx4/7. To verify this approach set of experimental ...

  1. Flux line depinning in a magnet-superconductor levitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terentiev, A. N.; Hull, J. R.; De Long, L. E.

    The AC loss characteristics of a magnet-superconductor system were studied with the magnet fixed to the free end of an oscillating cantilever located near a stationary melt-textured YBCO pellet. Below a threshold AC field amplitude ≈2 Oe, the dissipation of the oscillator is amplitude-independent, characteristic of a linear, non-hysteretic regime. Above threshold, dissipation increases with amplitude, reflecting the depinning and hysteretic motion of flux lines. The threshold AC field is an order of magnitude higher than that measured for the same YBCO material via AC susceptometry in a uniform DC magnetic field. A partial lock-in of flux lines between YBCO ab planes is proposed as the mechanism for the substantial increase of the depinning threshold.

  2. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    We make a comparative analysis for two filaments that showed quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) are carried out to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17-20 and September 29. The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4*10^21 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed within 3 days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2*10^20 Mx, about one ...

  3. Tuning an rf-SQUID flux qubit system's potential with magnetic flux bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Tao; Xu Wei-Wei; Shi Jian-Xin; An De-Yue; Sun Guo-Zhu; Yu Yang; Wu Pei-Heng

    2012-01-01

    At an extremely low temperature of 20 mK,we measured the loop current in a tunable rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a dc-SQUID.By adjusting the magnetic flux applied to the rf-SQUID loop (φf) and the small dc-SQUID (φcjjf),respectively,the potential shape of the system can be fully controlled in situ.Variation in the transition step and overlap size in the switching current with a barrier flux bias are analyzed,from which we can obtain some relevant device parameters and build a model to explain the experimental phenomenon.

  4. MHD waves on solar magnetic flux tubes - Tutorial review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the highly simplified models that have been developed for solar magnetic flux tubes, which are intense photospheric-level fields confined by external gas pressure but able to vary rapidly with height, are presently discussed with emphasis on the torsional Alfven mode's propagation, reflection, and non-WKB properties. The 'sausage' and 'kink' modes described by the thin flux-tube approximation are noted. Attention is also given to the surface waves and resonance absorption of X-ray-emitting loops, as well as to the results of recent work on the resonant instabilities that occur in the presence of bulk flows.

  5. Turbulence-induced magnetic flux asymmetry at nanoscale junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Neil; Pershin, Yuriy; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-11-30

    It was recently predicted [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 18, 11059 (2006)] that turbulence of electron flow may develop at nonadiabatic nanoscale junctions under appropriate conditions. Here we show that such an effect leads to an asymmetric current-induced magnetic field on the two sides of an otherwise symmetric junction. We propose that measuring the fluxes ensuing from these fields across two surfaces placed at the two sides of the junction would provide direct and noninvasive evidence of the transition from laminar to turbulent electron flow. The flux asymmetry is predicted to first increase, reach a maximum, and then decrease with increasing current, i.e., with increasing amount of turbulence.

  6. The Solar Internetwork. II. Magnetic Flux Appearance and Disappearance Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Gošić, Milan; Iniesta, Jose Carlos Del Toro; Suárez, David Orozco; Katsukawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale internetwork magnetic fields are important ingredients of the quiet Sun. In this paper we analyze how they appear and disappear on the solar surface. Using high resolution \\textit{Hinode} magnetograms, we follow the evolution of individual magnetic elements in the interior of two supergranular cells at the disk center. From up to 38 hr of continuous measurements, we show that magnetic flux appears in internetwork regions at a rate of $120\\pm3$~Mx~cm$^{-2}$~day$^{-1}$ ($7.3 \\pm 0.2 \\times 10^{24}$~Mx~day$^{-1}$ over the entire solar surface). Flux disappears from the internetwork at a rate of $125 \\pm 6$~Mx~cm$^{-2}$~day$^{-1}$ ($7.6\\pm 0.4 \\times 10^{24}$~Mx~day$^{-1}$) through fading of magnetic elements, cancellation between opposite-polarity features, and interactions with network patches, which converts internetwork elements into network features. Most of the flux is lost through fading and interactions with the network, at nearly the same rate of about 50~Mx~cm$^{-2}$~day$^{-1}$. Our results ...

  7. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH INCLUDING SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Provornikova, E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tóth, G., E-mail: atmich@bu.edu, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu, E-mail: elena.a.provornikova@nasa.gov, E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: gtoth@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-04-10

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ∼100 km s{sup −1} larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  8. Slow mode shocks propagating in open and closed magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕建永; 魏奉思

    1999-01-01

    A 2-D MHD model is used to investigate the propagation of slow mode shocks in the open and closed magnetic fields of the meridional plane near the sun. The solutions demonstrate that a forward slow shock could retain its slow shock characteristics into interplanetary space in the magnetically open region; however, it can evolve into an intermediate shock through the helmet-type current sheet to the open magnetic field.

  9. Reconnection Experiments with Flux Ropes near 3D Magnetic Nulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrublevskis, A.; Egedal, J.; Le, A.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection has been predominantly investigated in two dimensions. However, depending on the topology and geometry of the magnetic field, a rich collection of magnetic reconnection scenarios is possible in 3D including reconnection at magnetic nulls. Nulls have been reported in the solar corona [1] and in Earth's magnetosphere [2], yet there are a limited number of laboratory observations. At the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) we have implemented a new magnetic geometry with a pair of 3D null points in the background toroidal field. We form a flux rope along the background field and observe it to rapidly restructure and rewire as the nulls develop. We can adjust the topology of the configuration from one where a field line connects the nulls to one where the nulls are no longer linked. A suit of diagnostics will be deployed and results presented for the dynamics of the flux rope. [1] Fletcher et al., Astrophys. J. 554, 451(2001) [2] Xiao et al., Nat. Phys. 2, 478 (2006)

  10. Evidence of Magnetic Helicity in Emerging Flux and Associated Flare

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, R; Aulanier, G; Malherbe, J M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to look at the magnetic helicity structure of an emerging active region and show that both emergence and flaring signatures are consistent with a same sign for magnetic helicity. We present a multi-wavelength analysis of an M1.6 flare occurring in the active region NOAA 10365 on 27 May, 2003, in which a large new bipole emerges in a decaying active region. The diverging flow pattern and the "tongue" shape of the magnetic field in the photosphere with elongated polarities are highly suggestive of the emergence of a twisted flux tube. The orientation of these tongues indicates the emergence of a flux tube with a right hand twist, i.e. positive magnetic helicity. The flare signatures in the chromosphere are ribbons observed in H-alpha by the MSDP spectrograph in the Meudon solar tower and in 1600 A by TRACE. These ribbons have a `J' shape and are shifted along the inversion line. The pattern of these ribbons suggests that the flare was triggered by magnetic reconnection at coronal height...

  11. On Signatures of Twisted Magnetic Flux Tube Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, Santiago Vargas; Green, Lucie; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Hood, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of NOAA active region 10953, by Okamoto {\\it et al.} ({\\it Astrophys. J. Lett.} {\\bf 673}, 215, 2008; {\\it Astrophys. J.} {\\bf 697}, 913, 2009), have interpreted photospheric observations of changing widths of the polarities and reversal of the horizontal magnetic field component as signatures of the emergence of a twisted flux tube within the active region and along its internal polarity inversion line (PIL). A filament is observed along the PIL and the active region is assumed to have an arcade structure. To investigate this scenario, MacTaggart and Hood ({\\it Astrophys. J. Lett.} {\\bf 716}, 219, 2010) constructed a dynamic flux emergence model of a twisted cylinder emerging into an overlying arcade. The photospheric signatures observed by Okamoto {\\it et al.} (2008, 2009) are present in the model although their underlying physical mechanisms differ. The model also produces two additional signatures that can be verified by the observations. The first is an increase in the unsigned magnetic fl...

  12. Open software tools for eddy covariance flux partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agro-ecosystem management and assessment will benefit greatly from the development of reliable techniques for partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). Among other activities, flux partitioning can aid in evaluating consumptive vs. non-consumptive agricultural...

  13. Magnetic-flux dynamics of high-Tc superconductors in weak magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il’ichev, E. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1994-01-01

    Aspects of magnetic-flux dynamics in different types of samples of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3Ox have been investigated in magnetic fields below 1 Oe and at 77 K. The experiments were carried out in an arrangement including a field coil, a flat sample perpendicular to the field...

  14. Magnetic Bipoles in Emerging Flux Regions on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C. S.; Livi, S. H. B.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT. We analyse magnetograms and H-alpha filtergrams of an Emerging Flux Region. Small bipoles have been observed on the magnetograms emerging between opposite polarities. Separation velocities of the opposite poles for 45 bipoles observed on June 9, 1985 have been measured and are in the range 0.5 contribuciones de los bipolos emergentes. Key words: SUN-CHROMOSPHERE - SUN-MAGNETIC FIELDS

  15. Turbulence-induced magnetic flux asymmetry at nanoscale junctions

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    It was recently predicted [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 11059 (2006)] that turbulence of the electron flow may develop at nonadiabatic nanoscale junctions under appropriate conditions. Here we show that such an effect leads to an asymmetric current-induced magnetic field on the two sides of an otherwise symmetric junction. We propose that by measuring the fluxes ensuing from these fields across two surfaces placed at the two sides of the junction would provide direct and noninvasive evidence...

  16. Stability and Bifurcation in Magnetic Flux Feedback Maglev Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Qing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear properties of magnetic flux feedback control system have been investigated mainly in this paper. We analyzed the influence of magnetic flux feedback control system on control property by time delay and interfering signal of acceleration. First of all, we have established maglev nonlinear model based on magnetic flux feedback and then discussed hopf bifurcation’s condition caused by the acceleration’s time delay. The critical value of delayed time is obtained. It is proved that the period solution exists in maglev control system and the stable condition has been got. We obtained the characteristic values by employing center manifold reduction theory and normal form method, which represent separately the direction of hopf bifurcation, the stability of the period solution, and the period of the period motion. Subsequently, we discussed the influence maglev system on stability of by acceleration’s interfering signal and obtained the stable domain of interfering signal. Some experiments have been done on CMS04 maglev vehicle of National University of Defense Technology (NUDT in Tangshan city. The results of experiments demonstrate that viewpoints of this paper are correct and scientific. When time lag reaches the critical value, maglev system will produce a supercritical hopf bifurcation which may cause unstable period motion.

  17. Influence of High Harmonics of Magnetic Fields on Trapped Magnetic Fluxes in HTS Bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, K.; Miyagi, D.; Tsukamoto, O.

    Various kinds of HTS bulk motors are proposed and have been developed. Generally, those motors are driven by semiconductor inverters and currents fed to the armature windings contain high harmonics. Therefore, the bulks are exposed to high harmonics magnetic fields and AC losses are produced in the bulks. The AC losses deteriorate the efficiency of the motors and cause temperature rise of the bulks which decrease the trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulks. Usually, electro-magnetic shielding devices are inserted between the bulks and armature windings. However, the shielding devices degrade compactness of the motors. Therefore, it is important to have knowledge of the influence of the high harmonics magnetic fields on the AC losses and trapped magnetic fluxes of the bulk for optimum design of the shielding devices. In this work, the authors experimentally study the influence of high harmonics magnetic fields.

  18. Characteristics of Magnetic Tribology on High Flux Pair of Magnetic Driving Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUQiang; XURui-qing; XUHong-qiu

    2004-01-01

    The rectangle-like pulsed magnetic field acted on the rubbing pair was presents through analyzing the exciting property in the reciprocationg travel the test of wear in NG-x tester shows that the wear between the electromagnetic core and down magnetic board distributes in the high veloctity slip region of reciprocating travel,an the adhesive wear in the low velocity slip region nearby up and down dead points is depressed owing to the presence of high flux magnetic field.the lubrication by magnetic fluid with high permeability effectively reduces the friction and wear of high flux rubbing pair and mproves the conductiong property of magnetic circuit constructed by the rubbing pair which is beneficial to increase the operation performance of magnetic driving mechanism.

  19. Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on the Cosmic Ray Penetration into an Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Rope

    OpenAIRE

    Kubo, Yuki; Shimazu, Hironori

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for cosmic ray penetration into an interplanetary magnetic flux rope, particularly the effect of the finite Larmor radius and magnetic field irregularities. First, we derive analytical solutions for cosmic ray behavior inside a magnetic flux rope, on the basis of the Newton-Lorentz equation of a particle, to investigate how cosmic rays penetrate magnetic flux ropes under an assumption of there being no scattering by small-scale magnetic field irregularities. Next, we pe...

  20. ADAPTIVE FLUX OBSERVER FOR PERMANENT MAGNET SYNCHRONOUS MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Bobtsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the observer design problem for a flux in permanent magnet synchronous motors. It is assumed that some electrical parameters such as resistance and inductance are known numbers. But the flux, the angle and the speed of the rotor are unmeasurable. The new robust approach to design an adaptive flux observer is proposed that guarantees globally boundedness of all signals and, moreover, exponential convergence to zero of observer error between the true flux value and an estimate obtained from the adaptive observer. The problem of an adaptive flux observer design has been solved with using the trigonometrical properties and linear filtering which ensures cancellation of unknown terms arisen after mathematical calculations. The key idea is the new parameterization of the dynamical model containing unknown parameters and depending on measurable current and voltage in the motor. By applying the Pythagorean trigonometric identity the linear equation has found that does not contain any functions depending on angle or angular velocity of the rotor. Using dynamical first-order filters the standard regression model is obtained that consists of unknown constant parameters and measurable functions of time. Then the gradient-like estimator is designed to reconstruct unknown parameters, and it guarantees boundedness of all signals in the system. The proposition is proved that if the regressor satisfies the persistent excitation condition, meaning the “frequency-rich” signal, then all errors in observer exponentially converges to zero. It is shown that observer error for the flux explicitly depends on estimator errors. Exponential convergence of parameter estimation errors to zero yields exponential convergence of the flux observer error to zero. The numerical example is considered.

  1. Evaluation of Surface Cracks Using Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution characteristics of surface cracks with various widths are discussed based on finite element (FEM) results. The crack depth was 0.20 mm, the width range was from 0.02 to 1.00 mm. The results showed that crack width and lift-off (the distance between surface and sensor) will influence signals. Discussed in this paper is the influence of various lift-off parameters on the peak to peak values of the normal component in magnetic flux leakage testing. The effects can be applied to evaluate surface breaking cracks of different widths and depths.An idea is presented to smooth narrow, sharp crack tips using alternating current (AC) field magnetization.

  2. Magnetic Flux Cancelation as the Trigger of Solar Quiet-region Coronal Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Chakrapani, Prithi

    2016-11-01

    We report observations of 10 random on-disk solar quiet-region coronal jets found in high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and having good coverage in magnetograms from the SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Recent studies show that coronal jets are driven by the eruption of a small-scale filament (called a minifilament). However, the trigger of these eruptions is still unknown. In the present study, we address the question: what leads to the jet-driving minifilament eruptions? The EUV observations show that there is a cool-transition-region-plasma minifilament present prior to each jet event and the minifilament eruption drives the jet. By examining pre-jet evolutionary changes in the line of sight photospheric magnetic field, we observe that each pre-jet minifilament resides over the neutral line between majority-polarity and minority-polarity patches of magnetic flux. In each of the 10 cases, the opposite-polarity patches approach and merge with each other (flux reduction between 21% and 57%). After several hours, continuous flux cancelation at the neutral line apparently destabilizes the field holding the cool-plasma minifilament to erupt and undergo internal reconnection, and external reconnection with the surrounding coronal field. The external reconnection opens the minifilament field allowing the minifilament material to escape outward, forming part of the jet spire. Thus, we found that each of the 10 jets resulted from eruption of a minifilament following flux cancelation at the neutral line under the minifilament. These observations establish that magnetic flux cancelation is usually the trigger of quiet-region coronal jet eruptions.

  3. Measurements of Magnetic Helicity within Two Interacting Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaas, Timothy; Gekelman, Walter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic helicity (HM) has become a useful tool in the exploration of astrophysical plasmas. Its conservation in the MHD limit (and even some fluid approaches) constrains the global behavior of large plasma structures. One such astrophysical structure is a magnetic flux rope: a rope-like, current-carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. Bundles of these ropes are commonly observed extending from the solar surface and can be found in the near-earth environment. In this well-diagnosed experiment (3D measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) , two magnetic flux ropes were generated in the Large Plasma Device at UCLA. These ropes were driven kink-unstable, commencing complex motion. As they interact, helicity conservation is broken in regions of reconnection, turbulence, and instabilities. The changes in helicity can be visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB +E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity (-2EB). Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These qualities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak. As the ropes move and the topology of the field lines change, a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) is formed. The volume averaged HM and the largest value of Q both oscillate but not in phase. In addition to magnetic helicity, similar quantities such as self-helicity, mutual-helicity, vorticity, and canonical helicity are derived and will be presented. This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  4. Exponentially Localized Wannier Functions in Periodic Zero Flux Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    De Nittis, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    n this work, we investigate conditions which ensure the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis for a given periodic hamiltonian. We extend previous results [Pan07, Kuc09] to include periodic zero flux magnetic fields. The new notion of magnetic symmetry plays a crucial r\\^ole; to a large class of symmetries for a non-magnetic system, one can associate "magnetic" symmetries of the related magnetic system. Observing that the existence of an exponentially localized Wannier basis is equivalent to the triviality of the so-called Bloch bundle, a rank m hermitian vector bundle over the Brillouin zone, we prove that magnetic time-reversal symmetry is sufficient to ensure the triviality of the Bloch bundle in spatial dimension d = 1, 2, 3. For d = 4, an exponentially localized Wannier basis exists provided that the trace per unit volume of a suitable function of the Fermi projection vanishes. For d > 4 and d \\leq 2m (stable rank regime) only the exponential localization of a subset of Wannier functions ...

  5. Flow boiling critical heat flux enhancement by using magnetic nanofluids and external magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.; Jeong, Y.H. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Tech., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    By using the nanofluid as a working fluid, we can expect the enhancement in the flow boiling critical heat flux mainly due to the deposition of nanoparticles on the heat transfer surface. In this study, we suggest the magnetic nanofluid, or magnetite-water nanofluid, as a working fluid which is regarded as a controllable nanofluid, that is, nanoparticles or magnetite nanoparticles in a nanofluid can be controlled by an external magnetic field. Therefore, we can expect the advantages of magnetic nanofluid such as, i) control of nanofluid concentration to maintain nanoparticle suspension and to localize nanofluid concentration, and ii) removal of nanoparticle from nanofluid when we want. In this study, we focused on the investigation of flow boiling critical heat flux characteristics for the magnetic nanofluid. Series of experiments were performed under the low pressure and low flow conditions, and based on the experimental results; we can conclude that the use of magnetic nanofluid improves the flow boiling critical heat flux characteristics. This is mainly due to the deposition of magnetite nanoparticles on the heat transfer surface, which results in the improvement of wettability and re-wetting characteristics of heat transfer surface. Preliminary results of the magnetic field effects on the flow boiling critical heat flux would be presented also. (author)

  6. OpenFLUX: efficient modelling software for 13C-based metabolic flux analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen Lars K; Wittmann Christoph; Quek Lake-Ee; Krömer Jens O

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The quantitative analysis of metabolic fluxes, i.e., in vivo activities of intracellular enzymes and pathways, provides key information on biological systems in systems biology and metabolic engineering. It is based on a comprehensive approach combining (i) tracer cultivation on 13C substrates, (ii) 13C labelling analysis by mass spectrometry and (iii) mathematical modelling for experimental design, data processing, flux calculation and statistics. Whereas the cultivation ...

  7. Magnetic forces and magnetized biomaterials provide dynamic flux information during bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Alessandro; Bianchi, Michele; Sartori, Maria; Parrilli, Annapaola; Panseri, Silvia; Ortolani, Alessandro; Sandri, Monica; Boi, Marco; Salter, Donald M; Maltarello, Maria Cristina; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Dediu, Valentin; Tampieri, Anna; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-03-01

    The fascinating prospect to direct tissue regeneration by magnetic activation has been recently explored. In this study we investigate the possibility to boost bone regeneration in an experimental defect in rabbit femoral condyle by combining static magnetic fields and magnetic biomaterials. NdFeB permanent magnets are implanted close to biomimetic collagen/hydroxyapatite resorbable scaffolds magnetized according to two different protocols . Permanent magnet only or non-magnetic scaffolds are used as controls. Bone tissue regeneration is evaluated at 12 weeks from surgery from a histological, histomorphometric and biomechanical point of view. The reorganization of the magnetized collagen fibers under the effect of the static magnetic field generated by the permanent magnet produces a highly-peculiar bone pattern, with highly-interconnected trabeculae orthogonally oriented with respect to the magnetic field lines. In contrast, only partial defect healing is achieved within the control groups. We ascribe the peculiar bone regeneration to the transfer of micro-environmental information, mediated by collagen fibrils magnetized by magnetic nanoparticles, under the effect of the static magnetic field. These results open new perspectives on the possibility to improve implant fixation and control the morphology and maturity of regenerated bone providing "in site" forces by synergically combining static magnetic fields and biomaterials.

  8. Analytical Calculation of the Magnetic Field distribution in a Flux-Modulated Permanent-Magnet Brushless Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a rapid approach to compute the magnetic field distribution in a flux-modulated permanent-magnet brushless motor. Partial differential equations are used to describe the magnet field behavior in terms of magnetic vector potentials. The whole computational domain is divided int...... magnetic field with those calculated by finite element method....

  9. Novel behavior of magnetic flux lines in type II superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler, Gregory Allan

    In this thesis we present several studies in the properties of magnetic flux lines in type II superconductors. We have carried out a model calculation of the flux noise produced by vortex avalanches in a Type-II superconductor, using a simple kinetic model proposed by Bassler and Paczuski. Over a broad range of frequencies, we find that the flux noise SFw has a power-law dependence on frequency, SFw ˜ w-s , with s ˜ 1.4 in reasonable agreement with experiment. In addition, for small lattices, the calculated SFw has a high-frequency knee, which is seen in some experiments, and which is due to the finite lattice size. We have analyzed the Lawrence-Doniach free energy in a tilted magnetic field within the lowest Landau level (LLL) approximation for the case of a highly anisotropic high temperature superconductor. The free energy maps onto that of a strictly c-axis field, but with a reduced interlayer coupling. We use this result to calculate the tilt modulus C44 of a vortex lattice and vortex liquid. The vortex contribution to C44 can be expressed in terms of the squared c-axis Josephson plasmon frequency w2pl . We find that the transverse component of the field has very little effect on the position of the melting curve. We present a simple numerical model for the IV characteristics of a highly anisotropic high temperature superconductor in different geometries. An array of grains coupled together by Josephson junctions is used, with a triangular structure in the planes normal to an applied magnetic field and a square structure otherwise. Overdamped junctions are used to describe the CuO2 planes, while underdamped junctions are used to describe the interplanar coupling. Each grain has a capacitive shunt to ground. We measure the depinning current strength, decoupling current strength, and the critical coupling value in the "flux-transformer geometry." We also examine voltage branches in the I--V hysteresis curve for c-axis transport. Finally, we have used a simple

  10. Decoupling Suspension Controller Based on Magnetic Flux Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The suspension module control system model has been established based on MIMO (multiple input and multiple output state feedback linearization. We have completed decoupling between double suspension points, and the new decoupling method has been applied to CMS04 magnetic suspension vehicle in national mid-low-speed maglev experiment field of Tangshan city in China. Double suspension system model is very accurate for investigating stability property of maglev control system. When magnetic flux signal is taken back to the suspension control system, the suspension module’s antijamming capacity for resisting suspension load variety has been proved. Also, the external force interference has been enhanced. As a result, the robustness and stability properties of double-electromagnet suspension control system have been enhanced.

  11. Energy flux determines magnetic field strength of planets and stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R; Holzwarth, Volkmar; Reiners, Ansgar

    2009-01-08

    The magnetic fields of Earth and Jupiter, along with those of rapidly rotating, low-mass stars, are generated by convection-driven dynamos that may operate similarly (the slowly rotating Sun generates its field through a different dynamo mechanism). The field strengths of planets and stars vary over three orders of magnitude, but the critical factor causing that variation has hitherto been unclear. Here we report an extension of a scaling law derived from geodynamo models to rapidly rotating stars that have strong density stratification. The unifying principle in the scaling law is that the energy flux available for generating the magnetic field sets the field strength. Our scaling law fits the observed field strengths of Earth, Jupiter, young contracting stars and rapidly rotating low-mass stars, despite vast differences in the physical conditions of the objects. We predict that the field strengths of rapidly rotating brown dwarfs and massive extrasolar planets are high enough to make them observable.

  12. Energy flux determines magnetic field strength of planets and stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R.; Holzwarth, Volkmar; Reiners, Ansgar

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic fields of Earth and Jupiter, along with those of rapidly rotating, low-mass stars, are generated by convection-driven dynamos that may operate similarly (the slowly rotating Sun generates its field through a different dynamo mechanism). The field strengths of planets and stars vary over three orders of magnitude, but the critical factor causing that variation has hitherto been unclear. Here we report an extension of a scaling law derived from geodynamo models to rapidly rotating stars that have strong density stratification. The unifying principle in the scaling law is that the energy flux available for generating the magnetic field sets the field strength. Our scaling law fits the observed field strengths of Earth, Jupiter, young contracting stars and rapidly rotating low-mass stars, despite vast differences in the physical conditions of the objects. We predict that the field strengths of rapidly rotating brown dwarfs and massive extrasolar planets are high enough to make them observable.

  13. Supergranular-scale magnetic flux emergence beneath an unstable filament

    CERN Document Server

    Palacios, J; Guerrero, A; Saiz, E; Cerrato, Y

    2015-01-01

    Here we report evidence of a large solar filament eruption on 2013, September 29. This smooth eruption, which passed without any previous flare, formed after a two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection towards Earth. The coronal mass ejection generated a moderate geomagnetic storm on 2013, October 2 with very serious localized effects. The whole event passed unnoticed to flare-warning systems. We have conducted multi-wavelength analyses of the Solar Dynamics Observatory through Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data. The AIA data on 304, 193, 211, and 94 \\AA sample the transition region and the corona, respectively, while HMI provides photospheric magnetograms, continuum, and linear polarization data, in addition to the fully inverted data provided by HMI. [...] We have observed a supergranular-sized emergence close to a large filament in the boundary of the active region NOAA11850. Filament dynamics and magnetogram results suggest that the magnetic flux emergenc...

  14. Tracking of magnetic flux concentrations over a five-day observation, and an insight into surface magnetic flux transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar dynamo problem is the question of how the cyclic variation in the solar magnetic field is maintained. One of the important processes is the transport of magnetic flux by surface convection. To reveal this process, the dependence of the squared displacement of magnetic flux concentrations on the elapsed time is investigated in this paper via a feature-recognition technique and a continual five-day magnetogram. This represents the longest time scale over which a satellite observation has ever been performed for this problem. The dependence is found to follow a power law and differ significantly from that of diffusion transport. Furthermore, there is a change in the behavior at a spatial scale of 103.8 km. A super-diffusion behavior with an index of 1.4 is found at smaller scales, while changing to a sub-diffusion behavior with an index of 0.6 on larger ones. We interpret this difference in the transport regime as coming from the network-flow pattern.

  15. Tracking of magnetic flux concentrations over a five-day observation and an insight into surface magnetic flux transport

    CERN Document Server

    Iida, Y

    2016-01-01

    The solar dynamo problem is the question of how the cyclic variation in the solar magnetic field is maintained. One of the important processes is the transport of magnetic flux by surface convection. To reveal this process, the dependence of the squared displacement of magnetic flux concentrations upon the elapsed time is investigated in this paper via a feature-recognition technique and a continual five-day magnetogram. This represents the longest time scale over which a satellite observation has ever been performed for this problem. The dependence is found to follow a power-law and differ significantly from that of diffusion transport. Furthermore there is a change in the behavior at a spatial scale of 10^{3.8} km. A super-diffusion behavior with an index of 1.4 is found on smaller scales, while changing to a sub-diffusion behavior with an index of 0.6 on larger ones. I interpret this difference in the transport regime as coming from the network-flow pattern.

  16. Knot energy in unstretching ergodic magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Recently Titov et al [ApJ \\textbf{693},(2009) and ApJ (2007)] have made use of a covariant model to investigate magnetic reconnection of astrophysical plasmas. Earlier R Ricca [Phys Rev A (1991)] has used another covariant formalism, to investigated vortex filaments and solitons. This formalism, called Ricci rotation coefficients (RRC), is applied here, to the Chui and Moffatt [PRSA (1995)] knotted magnetic flux tube (MFT) Riemann metric in the case of vanishing stretch. It is shown that, the vanishing of some components of the (RRC) leads to unstretching knotted tubes. Computing of magnetic knot energy in terms of the RCC, shows that, uniform, unstretching and constant cross-section tubes leads to a marginal dynamo action over magnetic surfaces. Recent investigation on the role of stretching in plasma dynamo action showed that in diffusive media [Phys Plasma \\textbf{14} (2008)], unstretching unknotted tubes would not support fast dynamo action. This result was generalized here to much more general knotted MF...

  17. Numerical Modeling of a Magnetic Flux Compression Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhin, Volodymyr; Bauer, Bruno S.; Awe, Thomas J.; Fuelling, Stephan; Goodrich, Tasha; Lindemuth, Irvin R.; Siemon, Richard E.; Garanin, Sergei F.

    2007-06-01

    A possible plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a stable diffuse z-pinch in a toroidal cavity, like that in MAGO experiments. To examine key phenomena of such MTF systems, a magnetic flux compression experiment with this geometry is under design. The experiment is modeled with 3 codes: a slug model, the 1D Lagrangian RAVEN code, and the 1D or 2D Eulerian Magneto-Hydro-Radiative-Dynamics-Research (MHRDR) MHD simulation. Even without injection of plasma, high- Z wall plasma is generated by eddy-current Ohmic heating from MG fields. A significant fraction of the available liner kinetic energy goes into Ohmic heating and compression of liner and central-core material. Despite these losses, efficiency of liner compression, expressed as compressed magnetic energy relative to liner kinetic energy, can be close to 50%. With initial fluctuations (1%) imposed on the liner and central conductor density, 2D modeling manifests liner intrusions, caused by the m = 0 Rayleigh-Taylor instability during liner deceleration, and central conductor distortions, caused by the m = 0 curvature-driven MHD instability. At many locations, these modes reduce the gap between the liner and the central core by about a factor of two, to of order 1 mm, at the time of peak magnetic field.

  18. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  19. Counterstreaming electrons in small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, H. Q.; Zhao, G. Q.; Wang, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Small interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (SIMFRs) are commonly observed by spacecraft at 1 AU, and their origin still remains disputed. We investigated the counterstreaming suprathermal electron (CSE) signatures of 106 SIMFRs measured by Wind during 1995-2005. We found that 79 (75%) of the 106 flux ropes contain CSEs, and the percentages of counterstreaming vary from 8% to 98%, with a mean value of 51%. CSEs are often observed in magnetic clouds (MCs), and this indicates these MCs are still attached to the Sun at both ends. CSEs are also related to heliospheric current sheets (HCSs) and the Earth's bow shock. We divided the SIMFRs into two categories: The first category is far from HCSs, and the second category is in the vicinity of HCSs. The first category has 57 SIMFRs, and only 7 of 57 ropes have no CSEs. This ratio is similar to that of MCs. The second category has 49 SIMFRs; however, 20 of the 49 events have no CSEs. This ratio is larger than that of MCs. These two categories have different origins. One category originates from the solar corona, and most ropes are still connected to the Sun at both ends. The other category is formed near HCSs in the interplanetary space.

  20. The free energies of partially open coronal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, B. C.; Smith, D. F.

    1993-01-01

    A simple model of the low corona is examined in terms of a static polytropic atmosphere in equilibrium with a global magnetic field. The question posed is whether magnetostatic states with partially open magnetic fields may contain magnetic energies in excess of those in fully open magnetic fields. Based on the analysis presented here, it is concluded that the cross-field electric currents in the pre-eruption corona are a viable source of the bulk of the energies in a mass ejection and its associated flare.

  1. The expected imprint of flux rope geometry on suprathermal electrons in magnetic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, Mathew James; Crooker, N. U.; Horbury, T. S.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections characterized by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction, which is interpreted as a signature of a magnetic flux rope. Suprathermal electron observations indicate that one or both ends of a magnetic cloud typically remain connected to the Sun as it moves out through the heliosphere. With distance from the axis of the flux rope, out toward its edge, the magnetic field winds more tightly about the axis and electrons...

  2. 2008 LHC Open Days LHC magnets on display

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years you’ve probably seen many of the 15 m long blue LHC dipole magnets being ferried around the site. Most of them are underground now, but on the LHC Open Days on 5 and 6 April the magnets will also play a central role on the surface. Installation of one of the LHC dipole magnets on the Saint-Genis roundabout on 7 March. The LHC dipole testing facility with several magnets at various stages of testing. The 27 km ring of the LHC consists of 1232 double-aperture superconducting dipole magnets, 360 short straight sections (SSS) and 114 special SSS for the insertion regions. On the Open Day, you will be able to "Follow the LHC magnets" through different stages around the site, culminating in their descent into the tunnel. Discover all the many components that have to be precisely integrated in the magnet casings, and talk to the engine...

  3. Comparison of flux measurement by open-path and close-path eddy covariance systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Xia; YU; Guirui; LIU; Yunfen; SUN; Xiaomin; REN; Chua

    2005-01-01

    For flux measurement, the eddy covariance technique supplies a possibility to directly measure the exchange between vegetation and atmosphere; and there are two kinds of eddy covariance systems, open-path and close-path systems. For the system error, it may result in difference of flux measurements by two systems. Therefore, it is necessary to compare the measured results from them. ChinaFLUX covers of eight sites applied the micrometeorological method, in which Changbai Mountains (CBS) and Qianyanzhou (QYZ) carried out open-path eddy covariance (OPEC) and close-path eddy covariance (CPEC) measurements synchronously.In this paper the data sets of CBS and QYZ were employed. The delay time of close-path analyzer to the open-path analyzer was calculated; the spectra and cospectra of time-series data of OPEC and CPEC were analyzed; the open-path flux measurement was used as a standard comparison, the close-path flux measurement results were evaluated. The results show that, at two sites the delay time of CO2 density for close-path analyzer was about 7.0-8.0 s, H2O density about 8.0-9.0 s; the spectrum from the open-path, close-path and 3D sonic anemometer was consistent with the expected -2/3 slope (log-log plot), and the cospectra showed the expected slope of -4/3 in the internal subrange; the CO2 flux measured by the close-path sensor was about 84% of that of open-path measurement at QYZ, about 80% at CBS, and the latent heat flux was balanced for two systems at QYZ, 86% at CBS. From the flux difference between open-path and close-path analyzers, it could be inferred that the attenuation of turbulent fluctuations in flow through tube of CPEC affected H2O flux more significantly than CO2 flux. The gap between two systems was bigger at CBS than at QYZ; the diurnal variation in CO2 flux of two measurement systems was very consistent.

  4. Open-Access, Low-Magnetic-Field MRI System for Lung Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Ross W.; Rosen, Matthew S.; Tsai, Leo L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Patz, Samuel; Ruset, Iullian C.; Hersman, F. William

    2009-01-01

    An open-access magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system is being developed for use in research on orientational/gravitational effects on lung physiology and function. The open-access geometry enables study of human subjects in diverse orientations. This system operates at a magnetic flux density, considerably smaller than the flux densities of typical other MRI systems, that can be generated by resistive electromagnet coils (instead of the more-expensive superconducting coils of the other systems). The human subject inhales air containing He-3 or Xe-129 atoms, the nuclear spins of which have been polarized by use of a laser beam to obtain a magnetic resonance that enables high-resolution gas space imaging at the low applied magnetic field. The system includes a bi-planar, constant-current, four-coil electromagnet assembly and associated electronic circuitry to apply a static magnetic field of 6.5 mT throughout the lung volume; planar coils and associated circuitry to apply a pulsed magnetic-field-gradient for each spatial dimension; a single, detachable radio-frequency coil and associated circuitry for inducing and detecting MRI signals; a table for supporting a horizontal subject; and electromagnetic shielding surrounding the electromagnet coils.

  5. Experimental realization of open magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C.; Chen, S.; Pang, T.; Qu, T.-M.

    2017-05-01

    The detection of extremely low magnetic fields has various applications in the area of fundamental research, medical diagnosis, and industry. Extracting the valuable signals from noises often requires magnetic shielding facilities. We demonstrated directly from Maxwell's equations that specifically designed superconductor coils can exactly shield the magnetic field to an extremely low value. We experimentally confirmed this effect in the frequency spectrum of 0.01-10 000 Hz and improved the electromagnetic environment in a hospital, a leading hospital in magnetocardiograph study in China.

  6. Electromagnetic Flux Analysis of Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motor Using Magnet Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R.Puttalakshmi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Permanent Magnet Brushless DC (PMBLDC motors is emerging as a suitable motor for a number of drive applications in industrial and consumer products. Cogging torque is one of the important drawbacks of PMBLDC motor which results in shaft vibrations and noise. The focus of this work is to minimize the electromagnetic flux and cogging torque in PMBLDC by introducing structural design modifications. The performance of the machine is analyzed by varying the magnet pole shape, magnet pole width and by using magnetic material with different remenance value. For analyzing the performance of the machine, machine is modeled using Finite Element Analysis (FEA based software package Magnet. Cogging torque and average torque are taken as performance measures to determineoptimum pole shape and pole width.

  7. Solar Magnetic Flux Tube Simulations with Time-Dependent Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Fawzy, Diaa E; Rammacher, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we expand the study of time-dependent ionization previously identified to be of pivotal importance for acoustic waves in solar magnetic flux tube simulations. We focus on longitudinal tube waves (LTW) known to be an important heating agent of solar magnetic regions. Our models also consider new results of wave energy generation as well as an updated determination of the mixing length of convection now identified as 1.8 scale heights in the upper solar convective layers. We present 1-D wave simulations for the solar chromosphere by studying tubes of different spreading as function of height aimed at representing tubes in environments of different magnetic filling factors. Multi-level radiative transfer has been applied to correctly represent the total chromospheric emission function. The effects of time-dependent ionization are significant in all models studied. They are most pronounced behind strong shocks and in low density regions, i.e., the middle and high chromosphere. Concerning our m...

  8. Magnetic Structure of the Magnetopause Boundary Layer for Open Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yonghui; Shen, Chao; Zeng, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Using Cluster and Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) spacecraft 4 point magnetic field measurements, we analyzed the magnetic structure of magnetopause boundary layer of the open magnetosphere. It is indicated that the magnetopause boundary layer is very thin under strong magnetic shear and the thickness is usually 0.1 Re. We found that the Rotational Discontinuity (RD) is very important structure at magnetopause when the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) is southward. Within the boundary layer, the magnetic field has a large rotation. Using curvature calculation method, we got that the minimum curvature radius of magnetic field of RD is 0.02 - 0.1Re, implying that the magnetosphere is open when the IMF is southward. Advanced research showed that the field-aligned currents are common in the magnetopause boundary layer.

  9. A Novel Open-winding Permanent Magnetic Starter-generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In order to overcome the difficulties of voltage regulation, narrow speed range and low power factor of the traditional permanent magnetic generator applied in the vehicles, a novel open-winding permanent magnetic starter-generator (see Fig.l) is used to widen the speed range and improve the efficiency in the generation mode.

  10. The magnetic flux leakage measurement by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Gwang Tae [Korea Industrial Testing Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Dae Rok; Han, Jung Hee; Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Physics, Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-15

    This paper is concerned with magnetic leakage flux measurement using by the hall sensor in the longitudinal magnetic field of the feromagnetic specimen. For detection sensitivity by the hall probe according to various depth of the subsurface defects, the specimen are prepared by six drilled holes of 0.5 mm φ from 1 mm depth to 4 mm depth in the carbon steel plate(10 x 35 x 265 mm). When the specimen applied by various frequency(2 - 9 Hz) of the AC through synthesizer and power amplifier in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage using lack-in amplifier and synthesizer are decreased linearly with defect depth at 2 Hz, but these signals are decreased suddenly with defect depth from the surface and obscured with increasing frequency. And, when the specimen applied range of 1 Amp. to 5 Amp. by DC power supply in the yoke, the signals of the magnetic flux leakage through DVM decreased linearly with defect depth up to 2.5 mm depth and change slightly defect depth above 2.5 mm depth from the surface, but its signals appeared predominately.

  11. The Study of Magnetic Flux Shunts Effects on the Leakage Reactance of Transformers via FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Abbaszadeh

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of arrangement, dimensions, and magnetic permeability of the magnetic flux shunts on the flux distribution and leakage reactance of the power transformers is studied in this paper by using a finite elements method and a simple modeling approach. By using magneto-static analysis and finite element method, first the flux distribution in the 2D model of a core-type three phase power transformer and then using the magnetic stored energy method the leakage reactance of the transformer windings is calculated. By studying the different models including magnetic flux shunts, the effect of the arrangement, geometric dimensions as well as the magnetic permeability of the magnetic flux shunt on the leakage reactance of the transformer are studied and some interesting results are obtained. It is shown that the variation of these parameters in the transformer model has significant effects on the leakage reactance of the transformer.

  12. Analysis of an eddy-current brake considering finite radius and induced magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kapjin; Park, Kyihwan

    2002-11-01

    Since the eddy-current problem usually depends on the geometry of the moving conductive sheet and the pole shape, there is no general method to find an analytical solution. The analysis of the eddy currents in a rotating disk with an electromagnet is performed in the case of time-invariant field with the consideration of the boundary conditions of the rotating disk and induced magnetic flux. First, the concept of Coulomb's law and the method of images are introduced with the consideration of the boundary conditions. Second, the induced magnetic flux density is calculated by using Ampere's law. Third, the net magnetic flux density is introduced by defining the magnetic Reynolds number Rm as the ratio of the induced magnetic flux density to the applied magnetic flux density. Finally, the braking torque is calculated by applying the Lorentz force law and the computed results are compared with experimental ones.

  13. On the Role of Repetitive Magnetic Reconnections in Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes in Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Joshi, Bhuwan; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    Parker's magnetostatic theorem, extended to astrophysical magnetofluids with large magnetic Reynolds number, supports ceaseless regeneration of current sheets and, hence, spontaneous magnetic reconnections recurring in time. Consequently, a scenario is possible where the repeated reconnections provide an autonomous mechanism governing emergence of coherent structures in astrophysical magnetofluids. In this work, such a scenario is explored by performing numerical computations commensurate with the magnetostatic theorem. In particular, the computations explore the evolution of a flux rope governed by repeated reconnections in a magnetic geometry resembling bipolar loops of solar corona. The revealed morphology of the evolution process—including onset and ascent of the rope, reconnection locations, and the associated topology of the magnetic field lines—agrees with observations, and thus substantiates physical realizability of the advocated mechanism.

  14. Eddy Covariance Measurements of Methane Flux Using an Open-Path Gas Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, G.; Anderson, T.; Zona, D.; Schedlbauer, J.; Anderson, D.; Eckles, R.; Hastings, S.; Ikawa, H.; McDermitt, D.; Oberbauer, S.; Oechel, W.; Riensche, B.; Starr, G.; Sturtevant, C.; Xu, L.

    2008-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential of about 23 times that of carbon dioxide over a 100-year cycle (Houghton et al., 2001). Measurements of methane fluxes from the terrestrial biosphere have mostly been made using flux chambers, which have many advantages, but are discrete in time and space and may disturb surface integrity and air pressure. Open-path analyzers offer a number of advantages for measuring methane fluxes, including undisturbed in- situ flux measurements, spatial integration using the Eddy Covariance approach, zero frequency response errors due to tube attenuation, confident water and thermal density terms from co-located fast measurements of water and sonic temperature, and remote deployment due to lower power demands in the absence of a pump. The prototype open-path methane analyzer is a VCSEL (vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser)-based instrument. It employs an open Herriott cell and measures levels of methane with RMS noise below 6 ppb at 10 Hz sampling in controlled laboratory environment. Field maintenance is minimized by a self-cleaning mechanism to keep the lower mirror free of contamination. Eddy Covariance measurements of methane flux using the prototype open-path methane analyzer are presented for the period between 2006 and 2008 in three ecosystems with contrasting weather and moisture conditions: (1) Fluxes over a short-hydroperiod sawgrass wetland in the Florida Everglades were measured in a warm and humid environment with temperatures often exceeding 25oC, variable winds, and frequent heavy dew at night; (2) Fluxes over coastal wetlands in an Arctic tundra were measured in an environment with frequent sub-zero temperatures, moderate winds, and ocean mist; (3) Fluxes over pacific mangroves in Mexico were measured in an environment with moderate air temperatures high winds, and sea spray. Presented eddy covariance flux data were collected from a co-located prototype open-path methane analyzer, LI-7500, and

  15. Slow twists of solar magnetic flux tubes and the polar magnetic field of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Lee, Martin A.

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind model of Weber and Davis (1967) is generalized to compute the heliospheric magnetic field resulting from solar rotation or a steady axisymmetric twist including a geometrical expansion which is more rapid than spherical. The calculated increase in the ratio of the toroidal to poloidal field components with heliocentric radial distance r clarifies an expression derived recently by Jokipii and Kota (1989). Magnetic-field components transverse to r do not in general grow to dominate the radial component at large r. The analysis also yields expressions for the Poynting flux associated with the steady twists.

  16. Simulations of Emerging Magnetic Flux. II. The Formation of Unstable Coronal Flux Ropes and the Initiation of Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a twisted convection zone flux tube into a pre-existing coronal dipole field. As in previous simulations, following the partial emergence of the sub-surface flux into the corona, a combination of vortical motions and internal magnetic reconnection forms a coronal flux rope. Then, in the simulations presented here, external reconnection between the emerging field and the pre-existing dipole coronal field allows further expansion of the coronal flux rope into the corona. After sufficient expansion, internal reconnection occurs beneath the coronal flux rope axis, and the flux rope erupts up to the top boundary of the simulation domain (approximately 36 Mm above the surface).We find that the presence of a pre-existing field, orientated in a direction to facilitate reconnection with the emerging field, is vital to the fast rise of the coronal flux rope. The simulations shown in this paper are able to self-consistently create many of the surface and coronal signatures used by coronal mass ejection (CME) models. These signatures include surface shearing and rotational motions, quadrupolar geometry above the surface, central sheared arcades reconnecting with oppositely orientated overlying dipole fields, the formation of coronal flux ropes underlying potential coronal field, and internal reconnection which resembles the classical flare reconnection scenario. This suggests that proposed mechanisms for the initiation of a CME, such as "magnetic breakout," are operating during the emergence of new active regions.

  17. Diffusive, convective and Nernst-effect losses of magnetic flux and heat from a wall-confined magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2013-10-01

    The recently proposed MAGLIF approach to inertial fusion ignition involves compression and heating of plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. To reach fusion conditions, the compressed plasma should retain a large fraction of the magnetic flux and thermal energy enclosed by the liner. Magnetic flux and heat losses from strongly magnetized plasma to a cold liner wall are significantly influenced by the Nernst and Ettingshausen thermomagnetic effects. We present exact analytical solutions of 1D MHD equations with Ohmic heating, heat conductivity and thermomagnetic terms included and discuss relative roles of diffusive, conductive and Nernst-effect-related losses of magnetic flux and heat from the magnetized plasma to the wall. These solutions are compared to our 1D simulation results. They can serve for verification of plasma transport modeling by MHD codes. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  18. Magnetic-flux-driven topological quantum phase transition and manipulation of perfect edge states in graphene tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S.; Zhang, G.; Li, C.; Song, Z.

    2016-08-01

    We study the tight-binding model for a graphene tube with perimeter N threaded by a magnetic field. We show exactly that this model has different nontrivial topological phases as the flux changes. The winding number, as an indicator of topological quantum phase transition (QPT) fixes at N/3 if N/3 equals to its integer part [N/3], otherwise it jumps between [N/3] and [N/3] + 1 periodically as the flux varies a flux quantum. For an open tube with zigzag boundary condition, exact edge states are obtained. There exist two perfect midgap edge states, in which the particle is completely located at the boundary, even for a tube with finite length. The threading flux can be employed to control the quantum states: transferring the perfect edge state from one end to the other, or generating maximal entanglement between them.

  19. What can we learn about ammonia fluxes from open-path eddy covariance measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, D.; Zondlo, M. A.; Benedict, K. B.; Schichtel, B. A.; Ham, J. M.; Shonkwiler, K. B.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is an important component of bio-atmospheric N cycle with implications of regional air quality, human and ecosystem health degradation, and global climate change. NH3 fluxes have high spatiotemporal variability controlled by several factors, such as atmospheric NH3 concentration, meteorological conditions, and compensation point of underlying surfaces. Quantifying NH3 fluxes is further complicated by severe measurement challenges including adsorption to instrument surfaces, low mole fractions, and gas-particle phase partitioning. To overcome these challenges, we have developed an open-path, eddy covariance NH3 instrument that minimizes these sampling issues. Eddy covariance measurements in 2015 and 2016 in the Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP), Colorado showed the capabilities of the system to measure fluxes in clean and moderate-polluted regions. Interesting patterns of NH3 fluxes and NH3 concentration variations were observed, such as deposition of NH3 associated plumes from urban and agricultural areas and reemission of a similar magnitude when clean free-tropospheric air passing the site. Observed downward fluxes during midnight and upward fluxes in early morning also indicated NH3 fluxes related to dew formation and evaporation events. More details about these patterns and their relationships with ambient temperature, relative humidity, and other fluxes will be presented. These measurements also provided an opportunity to evaluate our current understanding of transport and deposition of NH3. Micrometeorological method, backward trajectory model, and bidirectional NH3 flux model were used to analyze observed variability of NH3 concentrations and fluxes. Implications of these results and how eddy covariance measurements combined with other measurements may provide insights to better quantify NH3 fluxes will be discussed.

  20. Comparing a current-carrying circular wire with polygons of equal perimeter; Magnetic field versus magnetic flux

    OpenAIRE

    J P Silva; Silvestre, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We compare the magnetic field at the center of and the self-magnetic flux through a current-carrying circular loop, with those obtained for current-carrying polygons with the same perimeter. As the magnetic field diverges at the position of the wires, we compare the self-fluxes utilizing several regularization procedures. The calculation is best performed utilizing the vector potential, thus highlighting its usefulness in practical applications. Our analysis answers some of the intuition chal...

  1. Characteristic Analysis and Experimental Study of a Hybrid Permanent Magnet Variable Flux Memory Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Variable flux permanent magnet (PM) memory motors (VFMM), which combine the advantages of PM machines with high power density and electrically excited machines with controllable air-gap magnetic flux, have been widely concerned and researched in recent years.

  2. Interaction between granulation and small-scale magnetic flux observed by Hinode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Zhang; Shu-Hong Yang; Chun-Lan Jin

    2009-01-01

    With the polarimetric observations obtained by the Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode, we study the relationship between granular development and magnetic field evolution in the quiet Sun. Six typical cases are displayed to exhibit interaction be-tween granules and magnetic elements, and we have obtained the following results. (1) A granule develops centrosymmetrically when no magnetic flux emerges within the gran-ular cell. (2) A granule develops and splits noncentrosymmetrically while flux emerges at an outer part of the granular cell. (3) Magnetic flux emergence in a cluster of mixed polarities is detected at the position of a granule as soon as the granule breaks up. (4) A dipole emerges accompanied by the development of a granule, and the two elements of the dipole are rooted in the adjacent intergranular lanes and face each other across the gran-ule. Advected by the horizontal granular motion, the positive element of the dipole then cancels with the pre-existing negative flux. (5) Flux cancellation also takes place between a positive element, which is advected by granular flow, and its surrounding negative flux. (6) While magnetic flux cancellation takes place in a granular cell, the granule shrinks and then disappears. (7) Horizontal magnetic fields are enhanced at the places where dipoles emerge and where opposite polarities cancel each other, but only the horizontal fields between the dipolar elements point in an orderly way from the positive elements to the negative ones. Our results reveal that granules and small-scale magnetic fluxes influence each other. Granular flow advects magnetic flux, and magnetic flux evolution suppresses granular development. There exist extremely large Doppler blue-shifts at the site of one canceling magnetic element. This phenomenon may be caused by the upward flow pro-duced by magnetic reconnection below the photosphere.

  3. Magnetic flux inversion in Charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    CERN Document Server

    Cantanhede, C M; Ferreira, M M; da Hora, E

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate by first the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying localized and integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with flipping of the magnetic flux.

  4. Empirical Modeling of Radiative versus Magnetic Flux for the Sun-as-a-Star

    CERN Document Server

    Preminger, Dora; Chapman, Gary; Martens, Petrus C H; 10.1007/s11207-010-9560-1

    2010-01-01

    We study the relationship between full-disk solar radiative flux at different wavelengths and average solar photospheric magnetic-flux density, using daily measurements from the Kitt Peak magnetograph and other instruments extending over one or more solar cycles. We use two different statistical methods to determine the underlying nature of these flux-flux relationships. First, we use statistical correlation and regression analysis and show that the relationships are not monotonic for total solar irradiance and for continuum radiation from the photosphere, but are approximately linear for chromospheric and coronal radiation. Second, we use signal theory to examine the flux-flux relationships for a temporal component. We find that a well-defined temporal component exists and accounts for some of the variance in the data. This temporal component arises because active regions with high magnetic field strength evolve, breaking up into small-scale magnetic elements with low field strength, and radiative and magnet...

  5. Measurement method for determining the magnetic hysteresis effects of reluctance actuators by evaluation of the force and flux variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijsen, N H; Jansen, J W; Compter, J C; Lomonova, E A

    2013-07-01

    A measurement method is presented which identifies the magnetic hysteresis effects present in the force of linear reluctance actuators. The measurement method is applied to determine the magnetic hysteresis in the force of an E-core reluctance actuator, with and without pre-biasing permanent magnet. The force measurements are conducted with a piezoelectric load cell (Kistler type 9272). This high-bandwidth force measurement instrument is identified in the frequency domain using a voice-coil actuator that has negligible magnetic hysteresis and eddy currents. Specifically, the phase delay between the current and force of the voice-coil actuator is used for the calibration of the measurement instrument. This phase delay is also obtained by evaluation of the measured force and flux variation in the E-core actuator, both with and without permanent magnet on the middle tooth. The measured magnetic flux variation is used to distinguish the phase delay due to magnetic hysteresis from the measured phase delay between the current and the force of the E-core actuator. Finally, an open loop steady-state ac model is presented that predicts the magnetic hysteresis effects in the force of the E-core actuator.

  6. TRACC: an open source software for processing sap flux data from thermal dissipation probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric J. Ward; Jean-Christophe Domec; John King; Ge Sun; Steve McNulty; Asko Noormets

    2017-01-01

    Key message TRACC is an open-source software for standardizing the cleaning, conversion, and calibration of sap flux density data from thermal dissipation probes, which addresses issues of nighttime transpiration and water storage. Abstract Thermal dissipation probes (TDPs) have become a widely used method of monitoring plant water use in recent years. The use of TDPs...

  7. Effect of open-path gas analyzer wetness on eddy covariance flux measurements: A poposed solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Open-path gas analyzers are popular in eddy covariance flux measurements of trace gasses (i.e. CO2). The quality of the data, however, may be influenced by several factors. Exposure in an outdoor environment invariably causes the instrument to become colder or warmer than the air temperature.

  8. Effect of open-path gas analyzer wetness on eddy covariance flux measurements: A poposed solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Open-path gas analyzers are popular in eddy covariance flux measurements of trace gasses (i.e. CO2). The quality of the data, however, may be influenced by several factors. Exposure in an outdoor environment invariably causes the instrument to become colder or warmer than the air temperature. Instru

  9. OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR ACQUISITION OF FUGITIVE EMISSION FLUX DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. EPA has developed a gorund-based optical remote sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transfor...

  10. The expected imprint of flux rope geometry on suprathermal electrons in magnetic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Owens

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic clouds are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections characterized by a smooth rotation in the magnetic field direction, which is interpreted as a signature of a magnetic flux rope. Suprathermal electron observations indicate that one or both ends of a magnetic cloud typically remain connected to the Sun as it moves out through the heliosphere. With distance from the axis of the flux rope, out toward its edge, the magnetic field winds more tightly about the axis and electrons must traverse longer magnetic field lines to reach the same heliocentric distance. This increased time of flight allows greater pitch-angle scattering to occur, meaning suprathermal electron pitch-angle distributions should be systematically broader at the edges of the flux rope than at the axis. We model this effect with an analytical magnetic flux rope model and a numerical scheme for suprathermal electron pitch-angle scattering and find that the signature of a magnetic flux rope should be observable with the typical pitch-angle resolution of suprathermal electron data provided ACE's SWEPAM instrument. Evidence of this signature in the observations, however, is weak, possibly because reconnection of magnetic fields within the flux rope acts to intermix flux tubes.

  11. Distribution of Magnetic Flux Density in Soft-Contact EMCC Rectangular Mold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lin-tao; WANG En-gang; DENG An-yuan; HE Ji-cheng

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of the magnetic flux density in a soft-contact electromagnetic continuous casting (EMCC) rectangular mold was investigated. The experimental results show that with an increase in electric power, the magnetic flux density increases. The position where the maximum magnetic flux density appears will shift up when the coil moves to the top of the mold. At the same time, the maximum magnetic flux density will increase and the effective acting range of electromagnetic pressure will widen. As a result, in practice, the coil should be placed near the top part of the mold. The meniscus should be controlled near the top part of the coil, as this not only remarkably improves the billet surface quality but also saves energy. With the same electric power input, the higher the frequency, the lower the magnetic flux density.

  12. Design of axial-flux permanent-magnet low-speed machines and performance comparison between radial-flux and axial-flux machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parviainen, A.

    2005-07-01

    This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analytical design of surface-mounted axial-flux permanent-magnet machines. Emphasis has been placed on the design of axial-flux machines with a one-rotor-two-stators configuration. The design model developed in this study incorporates facilities to include both the electromagnetic design and thermal design of the machine as well as to take into consideration the complexity of the permanent-magnet shapes, which is a typical requirement for the design of high-performance permanent-magnet motors. A prototype machine with rated 5 kW output power at 300 min{sup -1} rotation speed has been designed and constructed for the purposes of ascertaining the results obtained from the analytical design model. A comparative study of low-speed axial-flux and low-speed radial-flux permanent-magnet machines is presented. The comparative study concentrates on 55 kW machines with rotation speeds 150 min{sup -1}, 300 min{sup -1} and 600 min{sup -1} and is based on calculated designs. A novel comparison method is introduced. The method takes into account the mechanical constraints of the machine and enables comparison of the designed machines, with respect to the volume, efficiency and cost aspects of each machine. It is shown that an axial-flux permanent-magnet machine with one-rotor-two-stators configuration has generally a weaker efficiency than a radial-flux permanent-magnet machine if for all designs the same electric loading, air-gap flux density and current density have been applied. On the other hand, axial-flux machines are usually smaller in volume, especially when compared to radial-flux machines for which the length ratio (axial length of stator stack vs. air-gap diameter) is below 0.5. The comparison results show also that radial-flux machines with a low number of pole pairs, p < 4, outperform the corresponding axial-flux machines. (orig.)

  13. Evaluation of magnetic flux leakage signals on fatigue crack growth of mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I.M Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In engineering applications, analysis of crack growth life is useful in situations where an unexpected crack has been found in a component of a machine, vehicle, or structure. The objective of this research is to investigate the correlation curve of magnetic flux leakage, Hp(y signals by evaluating their critical value point with respect to step size. Moreover, the relation of fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN toward the stress intensity range, ΔK and Hp(y in metal components is also discussed in this paper. The tension-tension fatigue test was conducted with the metal magnetic memory scanning device and crack opening displacement (COD gauges in 10 Hz (testing frequency by applying a load for 3.0-5.0 kN respectively. As a result, the correlation curve of Hp(y was built with the R-Squared values in the range of 0.99 and one mathematical model has been developed for estimation analysis. The sigmoidal shape curve was plotted on the graph of da/dN versus ΔK and also with Hp(y. Thus, for validation, the linear relation is represented between ΔK and Hp(y that present a good approach for magnetic parameter to be developed in the fatigue crack growth analysis. Therefore, the magnetic method has greater capability to analyze the fatigue crack propagation life in a real application.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONTROL METHODOLOGY OF THE GIANT MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATOR BASED ON MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Zhenyuan; Yang Xing; Shi Chun; Guo Dongming

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of the magnetostriction generating mechanism, the control model of giant magnetostriction material based on magnetic field and the control method with magnetic flux density are developed. Furthermore, this control method is used to develop a giant magnetostrictive micro-displacement actuator (GMA) and its driving system. Two control methods whose control variables are current intensity and magnetic flux density are compared with each other by experimental studies. Finally, effective methods on improving the linearity and control precision of micro-displacement actuator and reducing the hysteresis based on the controlling magnetic flux density are obtained.

  15. Magnetic flux pinning in superconductors with hyperbolic-tessellation arrays of pinning sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, V. R.; Nori, Franco

    2012-05-01

    We study magnetic flux interacting with arrays of pinning sites (APSs) placed on vertices of hyperbolic tessellations (HTs). We show that, due to the gradient in the density of pinning sites, HT APSs are capable of trapping vortices for a broad range of applied magnetic fluxes. Thus, the penetration of magnetic field in HT APSs is essentially different from the usual scenario predicted by the Bean model. We demonstrate that, due to the enhanced asymmetry of the surface barrier for vortex entry and exit, this HT APS could be used as a “capacitor” to store magnetic flux.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of magnetic flux density in a magnetic recording head and pseudo soft underlayer by electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Weixing; Hirata, Kei; Yanagisawa, Keiichi; Ishida, Yoichi; Kasai, Hiroto; Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic interaction between the pole tip of a single-pole head and a pseudo soft underlayer in perpendicular magnetic recording was observed by electron holography. The magnetic flux density inside the soft underlayer was quantitatively evaluated. The distribution of magnetic flux density was calculated using the finite element method, and the influences of the modulation of the reference wave and stray fields were investigated by comparison with experimental results. The flux density observed was found to be underestimated due to the modulation of the phase shift in reference wave. The magnetic flux measured experimentally was larger than that inside the specimen because of the relatively large stray fields above and below the specimen in the direction of the electron beam.

  17. Nonlinear magnetic field transport in opening switch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R. J.; Auer, P. L.; Sudan, R. N.; Oliver, B. V.; Seyler, C. E.; Greenly, J. B.

    1993-04-01

    The nonlinear transport of magnetic field in collisionless plasmas, as present in the plasma opening switch (POS), using the implicit multifluid simulation code anthem [J. Comput. Phys. 71, 429 (1987)] is studied. The focus is on early time behavior in the electron-magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) limit, with the ions fixed, and the electrons streaming as a fluid under the influence of ve×B Hall forces. Through simulation, magnetic penetration and magnetic exclusion waves are characterized, due to the Hall effect in the presence of transverse density gradients, and the interaction of these Hall waves with nonlinear diffusive disturbances from electron velocity advection, (veṡ∇)ve, is studied. It is shown how these mechanisms give rise to the anode magnetic insulation layer, central diffusion, and cathode potential hill structures seen in earlier opening switch plasmas studies.

  18. Local imaging of magnetic flux in superconducting thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapoval, Tetyana

    2010-01-26

    Local studies of magnetic flux line (vortex) distribution in superconducting thin films and their pinning by natural and artificial defects have been performed using low-temperature magnetic force microscopy (LT-MFM). Taken a 100 nm thin NbN film as an example, the depinning of vortices from natural defects under the influence of the force that the MFM tip exerts on the individual vortex was visualized and the local pinning force was estimated. The good agreement of these results with global transport measurements demonstrates that MFM is a powerful and reliable method to probe the local variation of the pinning landscape. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the presence of an ordered array of 1-{mu}m-sized ferromagnetic permalloy dots being in a magneticvortex state underneath the Nb film significantly influences the natural pinning landscape of the superconductor leading to commensurate pinning effects. This strong pinning exceeds the repulsive interaction between the superconducting vortices and allows vortex clusters to be located at each dot. Additionally, for industrially applicable YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} thin films the main question discussed was the possibility of a direct correlation between vortices and artificial defects as well as vortex imaging on rough as-prepared thin films. Since the surface roughness (droplets, precipitates) causes a severe problem to the scanning MFM tip, a nanoscale wedge polishing technique that allows to overcome this problem was developed. Mounting the sample under a defined small angle results in a smooth surface and a monotonic thickness reduction of the film along the length of the sample. It provides a continuous insight from the film surface down to the substrate with surface sensitive scanning techniques. (orig.)

  19. Differential rotation of stretched and twisted thick magnetic flux tube dynamos in Riemannian spaces

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The topological mapping between a torus of big radius and a sphere is applied to the Riemannian geometry of a stretched and twisted very thick magnetic flux tube, to obtain spherical dynamos solving the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) self-induction equation for the magnetic flux tubes undergoing differential (non-uniform) rotation along the tube magnetic axis. Constraints on the shear is also computed. It is shown that when the hypothesis of the convective cyclonic dynamo is used the rotation is ...

  20. Three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and divertor fluxes during application of resonant magnetic perturbations on ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Evans, T. E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Reiser, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Lunt, T.; Saibene, G.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Wiesen, S.

    2016-06-01

    Results from three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and plasma-wall interactions during application of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for control of edge-localized modes in the ITER standard 15 MA Q  =  10 H-mode are presented. The full 3D plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE is used for the modeling. Four characteristic perturbed magnetic topologies are considered and discussed with reference to the axisymmetric case without RMP fields. Two perturbation field amplitudes at full and half of the ITER ELM control coil current capability using the vacuum approximation are compared to a case including a strongly screening plasma response. In addition, a vacuum field case at high q 95  =  4.2 featuring increased magnetic shear has been modeled. Formation of a three-dimensional plasma boundary is seen for all four perturbed magnetic topologies. The resonant field amplitudes and the effective radial magnetic field at the separatrix define the shape and extension of the 3D plasma boundary. Opening of the magnetic field lines from inside the separatrix establishes scrape-off layer-like channels of direct parallel particle and heat flux towards the divertor yielding a reduction of the main plasma thermal and particle confinement. This impact on confinement is most accentuated at full RMP current and is strongly reduced when screened RMP fields are considered, as well as for the reduced coil current cases. The divertor fluxes are redirected into a three-dimensional pattern of helical magnetic footprints on the divertor target tiles. At maximum perturbation strength, these fingers stretch out as far as 60 cm across the divertor targets, yielding heat flux spreading and the reduction of peak heat fluxes by 30%. However, at the same time substantial and highly localized heat fluxes reach divertor areas well outside of the axisymmetric heat flux decay profile. Reduced RMP amplitudes due to screening or reduced RMP

  1. The Suppression and Promotion of Magnetic Flux Emergence in Fully Convective Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Maria A.; Browning, Matthew K.; Boardman, Suzannah; Clarke, Joshua; Pugsley, Samuel; Townsend, Edward

    2017-10-01

    Evidence of surface magnetism is now observed on an increasing number of cool stars. The detailed manner by which dynamo-generated magnetic fields giving rise to starspots traverse the convection zone still remains unclear. Some insight into this flux emergence mechanism has been gained by assuming bundles of magnetic field can be represented by idealized thin flux tubes (TFTs). Weber & Browning (2016) have recently investigated how individual flux tubes might evolve in a 0.3M⊙ M dwarf by effectively embedding TFTs in time-dependent flows representative of a fully convective star. We expand upon this work by initiating flux tubes at various depths in the upper ~50-75% of the star in order to sample the differing convective flow pattern and differential rotation across this region. Specifically, we comment on the role of differential rotation and time-varying flows in both the suppression and promotion of the magnetic flux emergence process.

  2. Magnetic flux emergence in granular convection: radiative MHD simulations and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study the emergence of magnetic flux from the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone into the photosphere. Methods: To model magnetic flux emergence, we carried out a set of numerical radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer, and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. Furthermore, the inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with actual observations of emerging flux. Results: We find that the interaction between the magnetic flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The emergence of magnetic flux tubes with a flux of 1019 Mx disturbs the granulation and leads to the transient appearance of a dark lane, which is coincident with upflowing material. These results are consistent with observed properties of emerging magnetic flux. Movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Spectropolarimetric evidence for a siphon flow along an emerging magnetic flux tube

    CERN Document Server

    Requerey, Iker S; Iniesta, J C Del Toro; Suárez, D Orozco; Rodríguez, J Blanco; Solanki, S K; Barthol, P; Gandorfer, A; Gizon, L; Hirzberger, J; Riethmüller, T L; van Noort, M; Schmidt, W; Pillet, V Martínez; Knölker, M

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics and topology of an emerging magnetic flux concentration using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. We obtain the full vector magnetic field and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity through inversions of the Fe I line at 525.02 nm with the SPINOR code. The derived vector magnetic field is used to trace magnetic field lines. Two magnetic flux concentrations with different polarity and LOS velocities are found to be connected by a group of arch-shaped magnetic field lines. The positive polarity footpoint is weaker (1100 G) and displays an upflow, while the negative polarity footpoint is stronger (2200 G) and shows a downflow. This configuration is naturally interpreted as a siphon flow along an arched magnetic flux tube.

  4. Instability of current sheets with a localized accumulation of magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    2015-06-01

    The longstanding problem of whether a current sheet with curved magnetic field lines associated with a small "normal" Bz component is stable is investigated using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations, employing closed boundary conditions analogous to those normally assumed in energy principle calculations. Energy principle arguments [Sitnov and Schindler, Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L08102 (2010)] have suggested that an accumulation of magnetic flux at the tailward end of a thin current sheet could produce a tearing instability. Two classes of such current sheet configurations are probed: one with a monotonically increasing Bz profile and the other with a localized Bz "hump." The former is found to be stable (in 2D) over any reasonable time scale, while the latter is prone to an ideal-like instability that shifts the hump peak in the direction of the curvature normal and erodes the field on the opposite side. The growth rate of this instability is smaller by an order of magnitude than previous suggestions of an instability in an open system. An example is given that suggests that such an unstable hump configuration is unlikely to be produced by external driving of a current sheet with no Bz accumulation even in the presence of open boundary conditions.

  5. Magnetic Flux Rope Identification and Characterization from Observationally Driven Solar Coronal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Chris; Yeates, Anthony

    2017-09-01

    Formed through magnetic field shearing and reconnection in the solar corona, magnetic flux ropes are structures of twisted magnetic field, threaded along an axis. Their evolution and potential eruption are of great importance for space weather. Here we describe a new methodology for the automated detection of flux ropes in simulated magnetic fields, utilizing field-line helicity. Our Flux Rope Detection and Organization (FRoDO) code, which measures the magnetic flux and helicity content of pre-erupting flux ropes over time, as well as detecting eruptions, is publicly available. As a first demonstration, the code is applied to the output from a time-dependent magnetofrictional model, spanning 1996 June 15–2014 February 10. Over this period, 1561 erupting and 2099 non-erupting magnetic flux ropes are detected, tracked, and characterized. For this particular model data, erupting flux ropes have a mean net helicity magnitude of 2.66× {10}43 Mx2, while non-erupting flux ropes have a significantly lower mean of 4.04× {10}42 Mx2, although there is overlap between the two distributions. Similarly, the mean unsigned magnetic flux for erupting flux ropes is 4.04× {10}21 Mx, significantly higher than the mean value of 7.05× {10}20 Mx for non-erupting ropes. These values for erupting flux ropes are within the broad range expected from observational and theoretical estimates, although the eruption rate in this particular model is lower than that of observed coronal mass ejections. In the future, the FRoDO code will prove to be a valuable tool for assessing the performance of different non-potential coronal simulations and comparing them with observations.

  6. Effects of Magnetic Flux Circulation on Radiation Belt and Ring Current Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Fok, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    The orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) determines the location of the dayside merging line and the magnetic flux circulation patterns. Magnetic flux circulation determines the amount of energy which enters the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We use the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) code to simulate both idealized and real solar wind cases. We use several satellites to validate the LFM simulation results for the real solar wind case studies. With these cases, we examine the magnetic flux circulation under differing IMF orientations. We also use the Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) and Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model to examine the inner magnetospheric response to the orientation of the IMF. We will present the different magnetic flux circulation patterns and the resulting effects on the radiation belt and ring current population.

  7. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Isabel; Maia, Paulo; Evangelista, Pedro; Vilaça, Paulo; Soares, Simão; Pinto, José P; Nielsen, Jens; Patil, Kiran R; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Rocha, Miguel

    2010-04-19

    Over the last few years a number of methods have been proposed for the phenotype simulation of microorganisms under different environmental and genetic conditions. These have been used as the basis to support the discovery of successful genetic modifications of the microbial metabolism to address industrial goals. However, the use of these methods has been restricted to bioinformaticians or other expert researchers. The main aim of this work is, therefore, to provide a user-friendly computational tool for Metabolic Engineering applications. OptFlux is an open-source and modular software aimed at being the reference computational application in the field. It is the first tool to incorporate strain optimization tasks, i.e., the identification of Metabolic Engineering targets, using Evolutionary Algorithms/Simulated Annealing metaheuristics or the previously proposed OptKnock algorithm. It also allows the use of stoichiometric metabolic models for (i) phenotype simulation of both wild-type and mutant organisms, using the methods of Flux Balance Analysis, Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment or Regulatory on/off Minimization of Metabolic flux changes, (ii) Metabolic Flux Analysis, computing the admissible flux space given a set of measured fluxes, and (iii) pathway analysis through the calculation of Elementary Flux Modes. OptFlux also contemplates several methods for model simplification and other pre-processing operations aimed at reducing the search space for optimization algorithms. The software supports importing/exporting to several flat file formats and it is compatible with the SBML standard. OptFlux has a visualization module that allows the analysis of the model structure that is compatible with the layout information of Cell Designer, allowing the superimposition of simulation results with the model graph. The OptFlux software is freely available, together with documentation and other resources, thus bridging the gap from research in strain optimization

  8. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto José P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last few years a number of methods have been proposed for the phenotype simulation of microorganisms under different environmental and genetic conditions. These have been used as the basis to support the discovery of successful genetic modifications of the microbial metabolism to address industrial goals. However, the use of these methods has been restricted to bioinformaticians or other expert researchers. The main aim of this work is, therefore, to provide a user-friendly computational tool for Metabolic Engineering applications. Results OptFlux is an open-source and modular software aimed at being the reference computational application in the field. It is the first tool to incorporate strain optimization tasks, i.e., the identification of Metabolic Engineering targets, using Evolutionary Algorithms/Simulated Annealing metaheuristics or the previously proposed OptKnock algorithm. It also allows the use of stoichiometric metabolic models for (i phenotype simulation of both wild-type and mutant organisms, using the methods of Flux Balance Analysis, Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment or Regulatory on/off Minimization of Metabolic flux changes, (ii Metabolic Flux Analysis, computing the admissible flux space given a set of measured fluxes, and (iii pathway analysis through the calculation of Elementary Flux Modes. OptFlux also contemplates several methods for model simplification and other pre-processing operations aimed at reducing the search space for optimization algorithms. The software supports importing/exporting to several flat file formats and it is compatible with the SBML standard. OptFlux has a visualization module that allows the analysis of the model structure that is compatible with the layout information of Cell Designer, allowing the superimposition of simulation results with the model graph. Conclusions The OptFlux software is freely available, together with documentation and other resources, thus

  9. Testing a Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Extrapolation Code with the Titov-Demoulin Magnetic Flux Rope Model

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    In the solar corona, magnetic flux rope is believed to be a fundamental structure accounts for magnetic free energy storage and solar eruptions. Up to the present, the extrapolation of magnetic field from boundary data is the primary way to obtain fully three-dimensional magnetic information of the corona. As a result, the ability of reliable recovering coronal magnetic flux rope is important for coronal field extrapolation. In this paper, our coronal field extrapolation code (CESE-MHD-NLFFF, Jiang & Feng 2012) is examined with an analytical magnetic flux rope model proposed by Titov & Demoulin (1999), which consists of a bipolar magnetic configuration holding an semi-circular line-tied flux rope in force-free equilibrium. By using only the vector field in the bottom boundary as input, we test our code with the model in a representative range of parameter space and find that the model field is reconstructed with high accuracy. Especially, the magnetic topological interfaces formed between the flux rop...

  10. Sausage Instabilities on top of Kinking Lengthening Current-Carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2015-11-01

    Observations indicate that the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in our cosmos and terrestrial experiments involve fast topological change beyond MHD reconnection. Recent experiments suggest that hierarchies of instabilities coupling disparate plasma scales could be responsible for this fast topological change by accessing two-fluid and kinetic scales. This study will explore the possibility of sausage instabilities developing on top of a kink instability in lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. Current driven flux tubes evolve over a wide range of aspect ratios k and current to magnetic flux ratios λ . An analytical stability criterion and numerical investigations, based on applying Newcomb's variational approach to idealized magnetic flux tubes with core and skin currents, indicate a dependence of the stability boundaries on current profiles and overlapping kink and sausage unstable regions in the k - λ trajectory of the flux tubes. A triple electrode planar plasma gun (Mochi.LabJet) is designed to generate flux tubes with discrete core and skin currents. Measurements from a fast-framing camera and a high resolution magnetic probe are being assembled into stability maps of the k - λ space of flux tubes. This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  11. Open channel flows of magnetic fluid induced by traveling magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Okubo, Masaaki; Yamane, Ryuichiro

    A theoretical analysis is made on laminar open channel flows of magnetic fluid induced by a non uniform traveling magnetic field which is applied with a stator of a single-sided linear induction motor. The induced flows are mainly in the direction opposite to the traveling direction of the magnetic field and in proportion to the phase velocity of the magnetic field. The velocity profiles are greatly affected by dimensionless wave number of the magnetic field. Near the bottom of the channel, the theoretical velocity distributions agree well with experimental ones which are measured with a laser optical fiber velocity sensor. However, the experimental velocity distributions become larger near the free surface.

  12. The Formation of Magnetic Depletions and Flux Annihilation Due to Reconnection in the Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Opher, M.; Richardson, J. D.

    2017-03-01

    The misalignment of the solar rotation axis and the magnetic axis of the Sun produces a periodic reversal of the Parker spiral magnetic field and the sectored solar wind. The compression of the sectors is expected to lead to reconnection in the heliosheath (HS). We present particle-in-cell simulations of the sectored HS that reflect the plasma environment along the Voyager 1 and 2 trajectories, specifically including unequal positive and negative azimuthal magnetic flux as seen in the Voyager data. Reconnection proceeds on individual current sheets until islands on adjacent current layers merge. At late time, bands of the dominant flux survive, separated by bands of deep magnetic field depletion. The ambient plasma pressure supports the strong magnetic pressure variation so that pressure is anticorrelated with magnetic field strength. There is little variation in the magnetic field direction across the boundaries of the magnetic depressions. At irregular intervals within the magnetic depressions are long-lived pairs of magnetic islands where the magnetic field direction reverses so that spacecraft data would reveal sharp magnetic field depressions with only occasional crossings with jumps in magnetic field direction. This is typical of the magnetic field data from the Voyager spacecraft. Voyager 2 data reveal that fluctuations in the density and magnetic field strength are anticorrelated in the sector zone, as expected from reconnection, but not in unipolar regions. The consequence of the annihilation of subdominant flux is a sharp reduction in the number of sectors and a loss in magnetic flux, as documented from the Voyager 1 magnetic field and flow data.

  13. Ambipolar transport via trapped-electron whistler instability along open magnetic field lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-09-28

    An open field line plasma is bounded by a chamber wall which intercepts the magnetic field. Steady state requires an upstream plasma source balancing the particle loss to the boundary. In cases where the electrons have a long mean free path, ambipolarity in parallel transport critically depends on collisionless detrapping of the electrons via wave-particle interaction. The trapped-electron whistler instability, whose nonlinear saturation produces a spectrum of whistler waves that is responsible for the electron detrapping flux, is shown to be an unusually robust kinetic instability, which is essential to the universality of the ambipolar constraint in plasma transport.

  14. Geothermal Heat Flux Underneath Ice Sheets Estimated From Magnetic Satellite Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox Maule, Cathrine; Purucker, M.E.; Olsen, Nils

    The geothermal heat flux is an important factor in the dynamics of ice sheets, and it is one of the important parameters in the thermal budgets of subglacial lakes. We have used satellite magnetic data to estimate the geothermal heat flux underneath the ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland....... By using satellite data, we are able to make heat flux maps covering the entire Antarctic continent and all of Greenland. We find that the heat flux varies from less than 50 to more than 150~mW/m2 underneath the ice sheets. To validate our results, we have compared our heat flux estimate with geologic...

  15. The continuum intensity as a function of magnetic field II. Local magnetic flux and convective flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kobel, P; Borrero, J M

    2014-01-01

    To deepen our understanding of the role of small-scale magnetic fields in active regions (ARs) and in the quiet Sun (QS) on the solar irradiance, it is fundamental to investigate the physical processes underlying their continuum brightness. Previous results showed that magnetic elements in the QS reach larger continuum intensities than in ARs at disk center, but left this difference unexplained. We use Hinode/SP disk center data to study the influence of the local amount of magnetic flux on the vigour of the convective flows and the continuum intensity contrasts. The apparent (i.e. averaged over a pixel) longitudinal field strength and line-of-sight (LOS) plasma velocity were retrieved by means of Milne-Eddington inversions (VFISV code). We analyzed a series of boxes taken over AR plages and the QS, to determine how the continuum intensity contrast of magnetic elements, the amplitude of the vertical flows and the box-averaged contrast were affected by the mean longitudinal field strength in the box (which sca...

  16. Peculiarities of the magnetic flux emerging in the equatorial solar zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyakov, V. L.; Starkova, L. I.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic flux longitudinal distribution in the equatorial solar zone has been studied. The magnetic synoptic maps of the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) during Carrington rotations (CRs) 2052-2068 in 2007 and early 2008 have been analyzed. The longitudinal distributions of the area of the zones where the photospheric magnetic field locally enhanced have been constructed for each CR. The obtained distributions indicate that the zones are located discretely and that a clearly defined one narrow longitudinal interval with the maximum flux is present. The longitudinal position of this maximum shifted discretely by ≈130° at an interval of 5.5 ± 0.5 CRs. A longitudinal shift of the zones with an increased magnetic flux multiple of 60° was observed between the hemispheres. In addition, a time shift of ≈2.5 CRs existed between the instants when the position of maximum fluxes in different hemispheres shifted. The established peculiarities of the magnetic flux longitudinal distribution and time dynamics are interpreted as an action of supergiant convection cells. These actions result in that magnetic fields are removed from the generation region through the channels that are formed between such cells at a longitudinal interval of 120°. The average synodic rotation velocity of the considered equatorial channels, through which the magnetic flux emerges, is 13.43° day-1.

  17. Reduction of flux-creep in magnetized bulk HTS by use of permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, D.; Weinstein, R.; Davey, K.; Sawh, R.-P.; Carpenter, K.

    2017-01-01

    We report the effect of permanent magnet (PM) collars on the flux-creep rate of magnetized bulk HTS. The creep rates of single-grain, cylindrical samples are measured with attached collars activated to various fields, B PM, in the range 0 ≤ B PM ≤ B PM,max, where B PM,max is the fully saturated field of the PM. As B PM varies, the creep rate of the HTS is found to maintain its well-known form—a constant fractional loss λ, of original residual field, per decade of time. However, the magnitude of λ decreases as B PM increases. The decrease in λ is found to be linearly dependent on increasing B PM. The collar field for which flux-creep extrapolates to zero is found to be comparable to the maximum trappable field of the HTS bulk, B T,max. The properties of the dependence of λ on the HTS peak field, B T,max, the PM field, B PM, and the creep rate λ 0 with B PM = 0 permit the reduced creep rate in these experiments to be predicted by a universal equation.

  18. Wavefunction Properties of a Single and a System of Magnetic Flux Tube(s) Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Esmaeili, Shahriar; Dadashi, Neda; Safari, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the properties of wavefunctions of the MHD oscillations for a single and a system of straight flux tubes are investigated. Magnetic flux tubes with a straight magnetic field and longitudinally density stratification under coronal conditions were considered. With repect to the density inhomogeneity in the radial direction of the flux tube, a smoothed step function at the lateral surface is employed. A single three-dimensional wave equation for longitudinal component of the perturbed magnetic field is solved using the finite element method (FEM). Wavefunctions of the MHD oscillations are categorized into kink, sausage, and torsional modes. Concerning the amplitude location of the waves which are arisen from the flux tube, those waves identified as body, surface, and leaky waves and appeared in both a single and a system of flux tubes cases. Exact recognition of the wavefunctions can be used in coronal seismology and also helps to future the high resolution instruments that would be designed for s...

  19. Magnetic Activity in Thick Accretion Disks and Associated Observable Phenomena I. Flux Expulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; D'Silva, Sydney

    1993-01-01

    We study the dynamics of toroidal magnetic flux tubes, symmetric about the rotation axis, inside non-magnetic thick accretion disks around black holes. We present model equations which include effects of gravity, centrifugal force, pressure gradient force, Coriolis force, drag, magnetic tension and magnetic buoyancy. We solve them assuming the disk to be adiabatic. We show that under a wide range of parameters describing the size and the field strength, as well as angular momentum distributio...

  20. On the Characteristics of Footpoints of Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes during the Eruption

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, X; Ding, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the footpoints of four erupted magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) that appear as sigmoidal hot channels prior to the eruptions in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly high temperaure passbands. The simultaneous Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations disclose that one footpoint of the MFRs originates in the penumbra or penumbra edge with a stronger magnetic field, while the other in the moss region with a weaker magnetic field. The significant deviation of the axis of the MFRs from t...

  1. Heat flux anomalies in Antarctica revealed from satellite magnetic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maule, Cathrine Fox; Purucker, Michael E.; Olsen, Nils

    2005-01-01

    The geothermal heat flux is an important factor in the dynamics of ice sheets; it affects the occurrence of subglacial lakes, the onset of ice streams, and mass losses from the ice sheet base. Because direct heat flux measurements in ice-covered regions are difficult to obtain, we developed a met...

  2. BaBar technical design report: Chapter 9, Magnet coil and flux return

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connor, T.; The BaBar Collaboration

    1995-03-01

    The BaBar magnet is a thin, 1.5 T superconducting solenoid with a hexagonal flux return. This chapter discusses the physics requirements and performance goals for the magnet, describes key interfaces, and summarizes the projected magnet performance. It also presents the design of the superconducting solenoid, including magnetic design, cold mass design, quench protection and stability, cold mass cooling, cryostat design, and coil assembly and transportation. The cryogenic supply system and instrumentation are described briefly, and the flux return is described.

  3. Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in close binary stars II. Nonlinear evolution and surface distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2003-01-01

    Observations of magnetically active close binaries with orbital periods of a few days reveal the existence of starspots at preferred longitudes (with respect to the direction of the companion star). We numerically investigate the non-linear dynamics and evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the convection zoneof a fast-rotating component of a close binary system and explore whether the tidal effects are able to generate non-uniformities in the surface distribution of erupting flux tubes. Assuming a synchronised system with a rotation period of two days and consisting of two solar-type components, both the tidal force and the deviation of the stellar structure from spherical shape are considered in lowest-order perturbation theory. The magnetic field is initially stored in the form of toroidal magnetic flux rings within the stably stratified overshoot region beneath the convection zone. Once the field has grown sufficiently strong, instabilities initiate the formation of rising flux loops, which rise through the...

  4. A practical nonlinear controller for levitation system with magnetic flux feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金辉; 李杰

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a practical nonlinear controller for the MIMO levitation system. Firstly, the mathematical model of levitation modules is developed and the advantages of the control scheme with magnetic flux feedback are analyzed when compared with the current feedback. Then, a backstepping controller with magnetic flux feedback based on the mathematical model of levitation module is developed. To obtain magnetic flux signals for full-size maglev system, a physical method with induction coils installed to winding of the electromagnet is developed. Furthermore, to avoid its hardware addition, a novel conception of virtual magnetic flux feedback is proposed. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed controller, the nonlinear dynamic model of full-size maglev train with quintessential details is developed. Based on the nonlinear model, the numerical comparisons and related experimental validations are carried out. Finally, results illustrating closed-loop performance are provided.

  5. Turbulent ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes dynamos in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of first order torsion ${\\alpha}$-effect in twisted magnetic flux tubes representing a flux tube dynamo in Riemannian space is presented. Toroidal and poloidal component of the magnetic field decays as $r^{-1}$, while grow exponentially in time. The rate of speed of the helical dynamo depends upon the value of Frenet curvature of the tube. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from constant torsion tube approximation. It is also assumed that the curvature of the magnetic axis of the tube is constant. Though ${\\alpha}$-effect dynamo equations are rather more complex in Riemann flux tube coordinates, a simple solution assuming force-free magnetic fields is shown to be possible. Dynamo solutions are possible if the dynamo action is able to change the signs of torsion and curvature of the dynamo flux tube simultaneously.

  6. Twisted versus braided magnetic flux ropes in coronal geometry. II. Comparative behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, C.; Yeates, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Sigmoidal structures in the solar corona are commonly associated with magnetic flux ropes whose magnetic field lines are twisted about a mutual axis. Their dynamical evolution is well studied, with sufficient twisting leading to large-scale rotation (writhing) and vertical expansion, possibly leading to ejection. Here, we investigate the behaviour of flux ropes whose field lines have more complex entangled/braided configurations. Our hypothesis is that this internal structure will inhibit the large-scale morphological changes. Additionally, we investigate the influence of the background field within which the rope is embedded. Methods: A technique for generating tubular magnetic fields with arbitrary axial geometry and internal structure, introduced in part I of this study, provides the initial conditions for resistive-MHD simulations. The tubular fields are embedded in a linear force-free background, and we consider various internal structures for the tubular field, including both twisted and braided topologies. These embedded flux ropes are then evolved using a 3D MHD code. Results: Firstly, in a background where twisted flux ropes evolve through the expected non-linear writhing and vertical expansion, we find that flux ropes with sufficiently braided/entangled interiors show no such large-scale changes. Secondly, embedding a twisted flux rope in a background field with a sigmoidal inversion line leads to eventual reversal of the large-scale rotation. Thirdly, in some cases a braided flux rope splits due to reconnection into two twisted flux ropes of opposing chirality - a phenomenon previously observed in cylindrical configurations. Conclusions: Sufficiently complex entanglement of the magnetic field lines within a flux rope can suppress large-scale morphological changes of its axis, with magnetic energy reduced instead through reconnection and expansion. The structure of the background magnetic field can significantly affect the changing morphology of a

  7. Computer model simulation of null-flux magnetic suspension and guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic force computations in a null-flux suspension system using dynamic circuit theory. A computer simulation model that can be used to compute magnetic forces and predict the system performance is developed on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the model. The performance of the null-flux suspension system is simulated and discussed. 8 refs.

  8. Computer model simulation of null-flux magnetic suspension and guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic force computations in a null-flux suspension system using dynamic circuit theory. A computer simulation model that can be used to compute magnetic forces and predict the system performance is developed on the basis of dynamic circuit theory. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the model. The performance of the null-flux suspension system is simulated and discussed. 8 refs.

  9. MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT EFFECTS ON ION FLUX BEHAVIORS IN ECR PLASMA SOURCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The available electron cyclotron resonance plasma source has been simulated in two-dimensional configuration space (z, r) and three-dimensional velocity space (Vz, Vr Vθ). The simulation is focused on the magnetic field gradient effects on ion flux behaviors in electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. The simulation results show that, when the magnetic field gradients increase, electron temperature, plasma density, ionization rate, and ion flux in Zdirection would decrease, while ion energy and plasma potential would increase.

  10. Gap-related trapped magnetic flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.co [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Tsuzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.; Uetake, T.; Izumi, M. [Laboratory of Applied Physics, Department of Marine Electronics and Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: {yields} Rectangular YBCO bulks to realize a compact combination. {yields} The gap effect was added to consider in the trapped flux density mapping. {yields} The trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulks is gap related. {yields} It is possible to estimate the total magnetic flux of bulk combinations. - Abstract: Aiming at examining the trapped-flux dependence between single and combined bulk superconductors for field-pole applications, three rectangular Y{sub 1.65}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) bulks with a possibly compact combination were employed to investigate the trapped-flux characteristics of single and combined bulks with a field-cooling magnetization (FCM) method. A gap-related dependence was found between them. At lower gaps of 1 mm and 5 mm, the peak trapped fields and total magnetic flux of combined bulks are both smaller than the additive values of each single bulk, which can be ascribed to the demagnetization influences of the field around the bulk generated by the adjacent ones. While, at larger gaps like 10 mm, the situation becomes reversed. The combined bulks can attain bigger peak trapped fields as well as total magnetic flux, which indicates that the magnetic field by the bulk combination can reach higher gaps, thanks to the bigger magnetic energy compared with the single bulk. The presented results show that, on one hand, it is possible to estimate the total trapped magnetic flux of combined bulks by an approximate additive method of each single bulk while considering a demagnetization factor; on the other hand, it also means that the performance of combined bulks will be superior to the addition of each single bulk at larger gaps, thus preferable for large-scaled magnet applications.

  11. Construction and Design of a Modular Permanent Magnet Transverse Flux Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIOREL, I.-A.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple construction of a modular transverse flux generator with permanent magnets in the rotor is proposed in the paper. The specific technology is detailed and an analytical design algorithm is developed. A simplified model is proposed for calculating the machine heating and three dimensions magnetic flux calculation via finite element method (FEM is carried on in order to check the main generator characteristics.

  12. Magneto Hydrodynamic Simulations of a Magnetic Flux Compression Generator Using ALE3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-13

    ARL-TR-8055 ● JULY 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Magneto-Hydrodynamic Simulations of a Magnetic Flux Compression Generator...Simulations of a Magnetic Flux Compression Generator Using ALE3D by George B Vunni Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL... a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1

  13. Design and Finite Element Analysis of a Novel Transverse Flux Permanent Magnet Disk Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyedmohsen; Moghani, Javad Shokrollahi; Ershad, Nima Farrokhzad;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel structure of a transverse flux permanent magnet disk generator. The proposed disk shape structure simplifies prototyping by using simple laminated steel sheets in comparison with previous transverse flux structures that employ bent laminations and soft magnetic composi...... and then optimized. The necessity of optimization is to find the best inner radius which maximizes output power to weight ratio, power factor and efficiency. To this end, the optimization process needs three dimensional finite element analyses....

  14. Fast modeling of flux trapping cascaded explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Zhang, Jiande; Chen, Dongqun; Cao, Shengguang; Li, Da; Liu, Chebo

    2013-01-01

    To predict the performance of flux trapping cascaded flux compression generators, a calculation model based on an equivalent circuit is investigated. The system circuit is analyzed according to its operation characteristics in different steps. Flux conservation coefficients are added to the driving terms of circuit differential equations to account for intrinsic flux losses. To calculate the currents in the circuit by solving the circuit equations, a simple zero-dimensional model is used to calculate the time-varying inductance and dc resistance of the generator. Then a fast computer code is programmed based on this calculation model. As an example, a two-staged flux trapping generator is simulated by using this computer code. Good agreements are achieved by comparing the simulation results with the measurements. Furthermore, it is obvious that this fast calculation model can be easily applied to predict performances of other flux trapping cascaded flux compression generators with complex structures such as conical stator or conical armature sections and so on for design purpose.

  15. An introduction to the propellant-driven magnetic flux compression generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-12-01

    An introduction to the concept of a propellant-driven magnetic flux compression generator is presented, together with the theory of its operation. The principles of operation of the propellant flux compression generator combine generator principles, derived from lumped parameter circuit theory, and interior ballistic principles.

  16. Estimation of the magnetic flux emergence rate in the quiet Sun from Sunrise data

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Solanki, S K; Riethmueller, T

    2016-01-01

    The small-scale internetwork (IN) features are thought to be the major source of fresh magnetic flux in the quiet Sun. During its first science flight in 2009, the balloon-borne observatory Sunrise captured images of the magnetic fields in the quiet Sun at a high spatial resolution. Using these data we measure the rate at which the IN features bring magnetic flux to the solar surface. In a previous paper it was found that the lowest magnetic flux in small-scale features detected using the Sunrise observations is 9 x 10^14 Mx. This is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the smallest fluxes of features detected in observations from Hinode satellite. In this paper, we compute the flux emergence rate (FER) by accounting for such small fluxes, which was not possible before Sunrise. By tracking the features with fluxes in the range 10^15-10^18 Mx, we measure an FER of 1100 Mx cm^-2 day^-1. The smaller features with fluxes less than or equal to 10^16 Mx are found to be the dominant contributors to the solar ma...

  17. Modeling Coronal Response in Decaying Active Regions with Magnetic Flux Transport and Steady Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Upton, Lisa A.; Young, Peter R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new measurements of the dependence of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiance on the total magnetic flux in active regions as obtained from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Using observations of nine active regions tracked along different stages of evolution, we extend the known radiance—magnetic flux power-law relationship (I\\propto {{{Φ }}}α ) to the AIA 335 Å passband, and the Fe xviii 93.93 Å spectral line in the 94 Å passband. We find that the total unsigned magnetic flux divided by the polarity separation ({{Φ }}/D) is a better indicator of radiance for the Fe xviii line with a slope of α =3.22+/- 0.03. We then use these results to test our current understanding of magnetic flux evolution and coronal heating. We use magnetograms from the simulated decay of these active regions produced by the Advective Flux Transport model as boundary conditions for potential extrapolations of the magnetic field in the corona. We then model the hydrodynamics of each individual field line with the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model with steady heating scaled as the ratio of the average field strength and the length (\\bar{B}/L) and render the Fe xviii and 335 Å emission. We find that steady heating is able to partially reproduce the magnitudes and slopes of the EUV radiance—magnetic flux relationships and discuss how impulsive heating can help reconcile the discrepancies. This study demonstrates that combined models of magnetic flux transport, magnetic topology, and heating can yield realistic estimates for the decay of active region radiances with time.

  18. Comparing a current-carrying circular wire with polygons of equal perimeter: magnetic field versus magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J. P.; Silvestre, A. J.

    2005-09-01

    We compare the magnetic field at the centre and the self-magnetic flux through a current-carrying circular loop, with those obtained for current-carrying polygons with the same perimeter. As the magnetic field diverges at the position of the wires, we compare the self-fluxes utilizing several regularization procedures. The calculation is best performed utilizing the vector potential, thus highlighting its usefulness in practical applications. Our analysis answers some of the intuition challenges students face when they encounter a related simple textbook example. These results can be applied directly to the determination of mutual inductances in a variety of situations.

  19. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  20. Effects of relative orientation of magnetocaloric inserts with the magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risser, M.; Vasile, C. [National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Strasbourg, 24 Bd de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg, Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Genie de la Conception (LGeCo), 24 Bd de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg, Cedex (France); Engel, T. [National Institute of Applied Sciences (INSA) Strasbourg, 24 Bd de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg, Cedex (France); Laboratoire des Systemes Photoniques (LSP), 24 Bd de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg, Cedex (France)

    2009-08-15

    This paper presents the study of the magnetic change of the magnetic flux density into the magnetocaloric materials (MCMs). The MCMs are shaped in thin parallel plates separated by a fluid forming together an insert. It is shown that keeping all the parameters equal, the unique modification of the orientation of the insert induces a change of the magnetic flux density into the magnetocaloric materials. Like all paramagnetic and ferromagnetic materials, the MCMs have variable magnetic permeability according to the density of flux that crosses them. The influence of a thermal circuit on a permanent magnetic circuit assembly is also evaluated. In order to ensure the heat exchange between the magnetocaloric materials and the outside space, the use of a heat transfer fluid is needed. The heat transfer fluid goes along the mini plates and is also placed inside the magnetic field. Because a fluid is generally a diamagnetic element, this increases the total magnetic reluctance of the assembly. Two different configurations named serial and parallel have been studied and evaluated in order to find the configuration that causes minimal disturbances to the magnetic flux and thus increases the magnetocaloric effect (MCE). Both configurations were also compared in respect to the induction obtained inside the vacuum gap of the magnet assembly. (author)

  1. Flux pileup in collisionless magnetic reconnection: bursty interaction of large flux ropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimabadi, H; Dorelli, J; Roytershteyn, V; Daughton, W; Chacón, L

    2011-07-08

    Using fully kinetic simulations of the island coalescence problem for a range of system sizes greatly exceeding kinetic scales, the phenomenon of flux pileup in the collisionless regime is demonstrated. While small islands on the scale of λ ≤ 5 ion inertial length (d(i)) coalesce rapidly and do not support significant flux pileup, coalescence of larger islands is characterized by large flux pileup and a weaker time averaged reconnection rate that scales as √(d(i)/λ) while the peak rate remains nearly independent of island size. For the largest islands (λ = 100d(i)), reconnection is bursty and nearly shuts off after the first bounce, reconnecting ~20% of the available flux.

  2. Formation of Magnetic Flux Ropes during Confined Flaring Well Before the Onset of a Pair of Major Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Chintzoglou, Georgios; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    NOAA Active Region (AR) 11429 was the source of twin super-fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). The CMEs took place within a hour from each other, with the onset of the first taking place in the beginning of March 7, 2012. This AR fulfills all the requirements for a "super active region"; namely, Hale's law incompatibility and a $\\delta$-spot magnetic configuration. One of the biggest storms of Solar Cycle 24 to date ($D_{st}=-143$ nT) was associated with one of these events. Magnetic Flux Ropes (MFRs) are twisted magnetic structures in the corona, best seen in $\\sim$10 MK hot plasma emission and are often considered the core of erupting structures. However, their "dormant" existence in the solar atmosphere (i.e. prior to eruptions), is an open question. Aided by multi-wavelength observations (SDO/HMI/AIA and STEREO EUVI B) and a Non-Linear Force-Free (NLFFF) model for the coronal magnetic field, our work uncovers two separate, weakly-twisted magnetic flux systems which suggest the existence of pre-eruption MF...

  3. The effect of magnetic activity saturation in chromospheric flux-flux relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R M; Crespo-Chacón, I; Montes, D

    2011-01-01

    We present a homogeneous study of chromospheric and coronal flux-flux relationships using a sample of 298 late-type dwarf active stars with spectral types F to M. The chromospheric lines were observed simultaneously in each star to avoid spread due to long term variability. Unlike other works, we subtract the basal chromospheric contribution in all the spectral lines studied. For the first time, we quantify the departure of dMe stars from the general relations. We show that dK and dKe stars also deviate from the general trend. Studying the flux-colour diagrams we demonstrate that the stars deviating from the general relations are those with saturated X-ray emission and that those stars also present saturation in the H$\\alpha$ line. Using several age spectral indicators, we show that they are younger stars than those following the general relationships. The non-universality of flux-flux relationships found in this work should be taken into account when converting between fluxes in different chromospheric activ...

  4. A portable magnetic field of >3 T generated by the flux jump assisted, pulsed field magnetization of bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Difan; Ainslie, Mark D.; Shi, Yunhua; Dennis, Anthony R.; Huang, Kaiyuan; Hull, John R.; Cardwell, David A.; Durrell, John H.

    2017-02-01

    A trapped magnetic field of greater than 3 T has been achieved in a single grain GdBa2Cu3O7-δ (GdBaCuO) bulk superconductor of diameter 30 mm by employing pulsed field magnetization. The magnet system is portable and operates at temperatures between 50 K and 60 K. Flux jump behaviour was observed consistently during magnetization when the applied pulsed field, Ba, exceeded a critical value (e.g., 3.78 T at 60 K). A sharp dBa/dt is essential to this phenomenon. This flux jump behaviour enables the magnetic flux to penetrate fully to the centre of the bulk superconductor, resulting in full magnetization of the sample without requiring an applied field as large as that predicted by the Bean model. We show that this flux jump behaviour can occur over a wide range of fields and temperatures, and that it can be exploited in a practical quasi-permanent magnet system.

  5. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zalesak, S. T. [Berkeley Research Associates, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  6. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  7. Reversal of Flux Closure States in Cobalt Nanoparticle Rings With Coaxial Magnetic Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, T; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Scheinfein, MR

    2008-01-01

    Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (H-z). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths....

  8. Self-assembly and flux closure studies of magnetic nanoparticle rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Alexander; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Thermoremanent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can self-assemble into rings through dipolar interactions, when dispersed under appropriate conditions. Analysis of individual MNP rings and clusters by off-axis electron holography reveals bistable flux closure (FC) states at ambient temperatures......, and their reversible switching by magnetic field gradients. We introduce a line-bond formalism to describe the coupling between MNPs....

  9. Least-Squares Fitting Methods for Estimating the Winding Rate in Twisted Magnetic-Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Crouch, Ashley D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate least-squares fitting methods for estimating the winding rate of field lines about the axis of twisted magnetic-flux tubes. These methods estimate the winding rate by finding the values for a set of parameters that correspond to the minimum of the discrepancy between magnetic-field measurements and predictions from a twisted flux-tube model. For the flux-tube model used in the fitting, we assume that the magnetic field is static, axisymmetric, and does not vary in the vertical direction. Using error-free, synthetic vector magnetic-field data constructed with models for twisted magnetic-flux tubes, we test the efficacy of fitting methods at recovering the true winding rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate how assumptions built into the flux-tube models used for the fitting influence the accuracy of the winding-rate estimates. We identify the radial variation of the winding rate within the flux tube as one assumption that can have a significant impact on the winding-rate estimates. We show that the e...

  10. A Magnetic Flux Leakage and Magnetostrictive Guided Wave Hybrid Transducer for Detecting Bridge Cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Condition assessment of cables has gained considerable attention for the bridge safety. A magnetic flux leakage and magnetostrictive guided wave hybrid transducer is provided to inspect bridge cables. The similarities and differences between the two methods are investigated. The hybrid transducer for bridge cables consists of an aluminum framework, climbing modules, embedded magnetizers and a ribbon coil. The static axial magnetic field provided by the magnetizers meets the needs of the magnetic flux leakage testing and the magnetostrictive guided wave testing. The magnetizers also provide the attraction for the climbing modules. In the magnetic flux leakage testing for the free length of cable, the coil induces the axial leakage magnetic field. In the magnetostrictive guided wave testing for the anchorage zone, the coil provides a pulse high power variational magnetic field for generating guided waves; the coil induces the magnetic field variation for receiving guided waves. The experimental results show that the transducer with the corresponding inspection system could be applied to detect the broken wires in the free length and in the anchorage zone of bridge cables.

  11. Magnetic flux inversion in charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casana, R., E-mail: rodolfo.casana@gmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Ferreira, M.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Hora, E. da [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, 58051-900, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Miller, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Maranhao, 65085-580, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271 - Bl. II, 01140-070, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-05

    We demonstrate for the first time the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and localized magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with localized flipping of the magnetic flux.

  12. Magnetic flux inversion in charged BPS vortices in a Lorentz-violating Maxwell-Higgs framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; da Hora, E.; Miller, C.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate for the first time the existence of electrically charged BPS vortices in a Maxwell-Higgs model supplemented with a parity-odd Lorentz-violating (LV) structure belonging to the CPT-even gauge sector of the standard model extension and a fourth order potential (in the absence of the Chern-Simons term). The modified first order BPS equations provide charged vortex configurations endowed with some interesting features: localized and controllable spatial thickness, integer flux quantization, electric field inversion and localized magnetic flux reversion. This model could possibly be applied on condensed matter systems which support charged vortices carrying integer quantized magnetic flux, endowed with localized flipping of the magnetic flux.

  13. Photospheric Magnetic Flux Emergence: A comparative study between Hinode/SOT Observations and MHD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Tarbell, T. D.

    2007-12-01

    With high angular resolution, high temporal cadence and a stable point spread function, the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite is the ideal instrument for the study of magnetic flux emergence and its manifestations on the solar surface. In this presentation, we focus on the development of ephemeral regions and small active regions. In many instances, SOT has been able to capture the entire emergence process from beginning to end: i.e. from the initial stages of flux appearance in granule interiors, through the intermediate stages of G-band bright point formation, and finally to the coalescence of small vertical flux elements to form pores. To investigate the physics of the flux emergence process, we performed 3D numerical MHD simulations with the MURaM code. The models are able to reproduce, and help us explain, various observational signatures of magnetic flux emergence.

  14. Quantum transport through two series Aharonov-Bohm interferometers with zero total magnetic flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Ming; Wang Rui; Zhang Yong-Ping; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2007-01-01

    With the help of nonequilibrium Green's function technique, the electronic transport through series AharonovBohm (AB) interferometers is investigated. We obtain the AB interference pattern of the transition probability characterized by the algebraic sum φ and the difference θ of two magnetic fluxes, and particularly a general rule of AB oscillation period depending on the ratio of integer quantum numbers of the fluxes. A parity effect is observed, showing the asymmetric AB oscillations with respect to the even and odd quantum numbers of the total flux in antiparallel AB interferometers. It is also shown that the AB flux can shift the Fano resonance peaks of the transmission spectrum.

  15. Generating buoyant magnetic flux ropes in solar-like convective dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Our Sun exhibits strong convective dynamo action which results in magnetic flux bundles emerging through the stellar surface as magnetic spots. Global-scale dynamo action is believed to generate large-scale magnetic structures in the deep solar interior through the interplay of convection, rotation, and shear. Portions of these large-scale magnetic structures are then believed to rise through the convective layer, forming magnetic loops which then pierce the photosphere as sunspot pairs. Previous global simulations of 3D MHD convection in rotating spherical shells have demonstrated mechanisms whereby large-scale magnetic wreaths can be generated in the bulk of the convection zone. Our recent simulations have achieved sufficiently high levels of turbulence to permit portions of these wreaths to become magnetically buoyant and rise through the simulated convective layer through a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells. These buoyant magnetic loops are created in the bulk of the...

  16. Superconducting flux pump for high-temperature superconductor insert coils of NMR magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S.; Lee, H.; Iwasa, Y.

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes a prototype flux pump recently operated at the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory. The results of the prototype flux pump will be used in the development of a full-scale flux pump that will be coupled to a high-temperature superconductor (HTS) insert coil of a high-field NMR magnet. Such an HTS insert is unlikely to operate in persistent mode because of the conductor's low index (n). The flux pump can compensate for field decay in the HTS insert coil and make the insert operate effectively in persistent mode. The flux pump, comprised essentially of a transformer and two switches, all made of superconductor, transfers into the insert coil a fraction of a magnetic energy that is first introduced in the secondary circuit of the transformer by a current supplied to the primary circuit. A prototype flux pump has been designed, fabricated, and operated to demonstrate that a flux pump can indeed supply a small metered current into a load superconducting magnet. A current increment in the range of microamperes has been measured in the magnet after each pumping action. The superconducting prototype flux pump is made of Nb3Sn tape. The pump is placed in a gaseous environment above the liquid helium level to keep its heat dissipation from directly discharged in the liquid; the effluent helium vapor maintains the thermal stability of the flux pump. [This paper is also published in Advances in Cryogenic Engineering Volume 47A, AIP Conference Proceedings Volume 613, pp. 441-448.

  17. Eddy current loss calculation and thermal analysis of axial-flux permanent magnet couplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional magnetic field analytical model of axial-flux permanent magnet couplers is presented to calculate the eddy current loss, and the prediction of the copper plate temperature under various loads is analyzed. The magnetic field distribution is calculated, and then the eddy current loss is obtained, with the magnetic field analytical model established in cylindrical coordinate. The influence of various loads on eddy current loss is analyzed. Furthermore, a thermal model of axial-flux permanent magnet couplers is established by taking the eddy current loss as the heat source, using the electromagnetic-thermal coupled method. With the help of the thermal model, the influence of various loads on copper plate temperature rise is also analyzed. The calculated results are compared with the results of finite element method and measurement. The comparison results confirm the validity of the magnetic field analytical model and thermal model.

  18. Sausage instabilities on top of kinking lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2017-05-01

    We theoretically explore the possibility of sausage instabilities developing on top of a kink instability in lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. Observations indicate that the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in our cosmos and terrestrial experiments can involve topological changes faster than time scales predicted by resistive magnetohydrodynamics. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that hierarchies of instabilities, such as kink and Rayleigh-Taylor, could be responsible for initiating fast topological changes by locally accessing two-fluid and kinetic regimes. Sausage instabilities can also provide this coupling mechanism between disparate scales. Flux tube experiments can be classified by the flux tube's evolution in a configuration space described by a normalized inverse aspect-ratio k ¯ and current-to-magnetic flux ratio λ ¯ . A lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tube traverses this k ¯ - λ ¯ space and crosses stability boundaries. We derive a single general criterion for the onset of the sausage and kink instabilities in idealized magnetic flux tubes with core and skin currents. The criterion indicates a dependence of the stability boundaries on current profiles and shows overlapping kink and sausage unstable regions in the k ¯ - λ ¯ space with two free parameters. Numerical investigation of the stability criterion reduces the number of free parameters to a single one that describes the current profile and confirms the overlapping sausage and kink unstable regions in k ¯ - λ ¯ space. A lengthening, ideal current-carrying magnetic flux tube can therefore become sausage unstable after it becomes kink unstable.

  19. Emergence and cancellation of small-scale magnetic flux in a quiet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between the development of granules and emergence (cancellation) of magnetic flux at small spatial scales (~1 ) in a quiet region taken with the spectro-polarimeter (SP) of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. By examining 6 granular cell events, we have uncovered that a granular structure develops in a regular shape with a size as large as 2-3 , while the granule is pure, i.e. no magnetic flux emerges in the granule during its development. However, a granular structure develops in an irregular shape while emerging flux accompanies the granular development. Magnetic flux cancellation takes place between new emerging flux and pre-existing one. The transverse magnetic field significantly appears at the place where a tiny bipole emerges and where two opposite polarities cancel each other, but only the transverse field of emerging bipole points from the positive element to the negative element. In some cases, violent Doppler blueshifts at the early emerging stage of the magnetic elements appear. We suggest that the excess of the blue-shifts in the inter-granular lanes are produced by the magnetic reconnection below the photosphere

  20. Emergence and cancellation of small-scale magnetic flux in a quiet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; JIN ChunLan

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between the development of granules and emergence (cancellation) of magnetic flux at small spatial scales (~1″) in a quiet region taken with the spectro-polarimeter (SP) of the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite. By examining 6 granular cell events, we have uncovered that a granular structure develops in a regular shape with a size as large as 2-3″, while the granule is pure, i.e. no magnetic flux emerges in the granule during its development. How-ever, a granular structure develops in an irregular shape while emerging flux accompanies the granular development. Magnetic flux cancellation takes place between new emerging flux and pre-existing one. The transverse magnetic field significantly appears at the place where a tiny bipole emerges and where two opposite polarities cancel each other, but only the transverse field of emerging bipole points from the positive element to the negative element. In some cases, violent Doppler blueshifts at the early emerging stage of the magnetic elements appear. We suggest that the excess of the blue-shifts in the inter-granular lanes are produced by the magnetic reconnection below the photosphere

  1. Dynamics of local isolated magnetic flux tubes in a fast-rotating stellar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; Tajima, C.T. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics; Matsumoto, R. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)]|[ASRC, JAERI, Naka (Japan); Shibata, K. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in the fast rotating stellar atmosphere is studied. We focus on the effects and signatures of the instability of the flux tube emergence influenced by the Coriolis force. We present the result from a linear stability analysis and discuss its possible signatures in the course of the evolution of G-type and M-type stars. We present a three dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulation of local isolated magnetic flux tubes under a magnetic buoyancy instability in co-rotating Cartesian coordinates. We find that the combination of the buoyancy instability and the Coriolis effect gives rise to a mechanism, to twist the emerging magnetic flux tube into a helical structure. The tilt angle, east-west asymmetry and magnetic helicity of the Twisted flux tubes in the simulations are studied in detail. The linear and nonlinear analyses provide hints as to what kind of pattern of large spots in young M-type main-sequence stars might be observed. We find that young and old G-type stars may have different distributions of spots while M-type stars may always have low latitudes spots. The size of stellar spots may decrease when a star becomes older, due to the decreasing of magnetic field. A qualitative comparison with solar observations is also presented.

  2. Magnetic flux transport and the sun's dipole moment - New twists to the Babcock-Leighton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms that give rise to the sun's large-scale poloidal magnetic field are explored in the framework of the Babcock-Leighton (BL) model. It is shown that there are in general two quite distinct contributions to the generation of the 'alpha effect': the first is associated with the axial tilts of the bipolar magnetic regions as they erupt at the surface, while the second arises through the interaction between diffusion and flow as the magnetic flux is dispersed over the surface. The general relationship between flux transport and the BL dynamo is discussed.

  3. CONDITIONS FOR TRANSVERSE WAVES PROPAGATION ALONG THIN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES ON THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopin, Igor [Ussuriisk Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ussuriisk (Russian Federation); Nagorny, Ivan, E-mail: lopin78@mail.ru [Institute of Automation and Control Processes FEB RAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-10

    The propagation of kink waves in the thin gravity stratified flux tubes with a generalized magnetic field distribution model is considered in cylindrical geometry. The new kink wave equations for both wave variables are obtained. It is shown that the inclusion of the radial component of an unperturbed tube magnetic field sufficiently transforms the conditions for the propagation of transverse waves. It is demonstrated that, for the models of isothermal and polytropic atmosphere in the tube and its environment, the propagation of kink waves along thin magnetic flux tubes is cutoff-free.

  4. Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere. III - Nonlinear waves on open flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Jackson, S.; Galloway, D.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration is given the nonlinear propagation of Alfven waves on solar magnetic flux tubes, where the tubes are taken to be vertical, axisymmetric and initially untwisted and the Alfven waves are time-dependent axisymmetric twists. The propagation of the waves into the chromosphere and corona is investigated through the numerical solution of a set of nonlinear, time-dependent equations coupling the Alfven waves into motions that are parallel to the initial magnetic field. It is concluded that Alfven waves can steepen into fast shocks in the chromosphere, pass through the transition region to produce high-velocity pulses, and then enter the corona, which they heat. The transition region pulses have amplitudes of about 60 km/sec, and durations of a few tens of seconds. In addition, the Alfven waves exhibit a tendency to drive upward flows, with many of the properties of spicules.

  5. Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, Nathaniel [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2016-06-19

    The Grant DE-SC0000736, Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices, is a continuation of the Grant DE-FG02-06ER54851, Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines. In publications funded by DE-SC0000736, the grant DE-FG02-06ER54851 was actually credited. The key results obtained under Grant DE-SC0000736, Alpha Channeling in Open-System Magnetic Devices, appear in a series of publications. The earlier effort under DE-FG02- 06ER54851 was the subject of a previous Final Report. The theme of this later effort has been unusual confinement effects, or de-confinement effects, in open-field magnetic confinement devices. First, the possibilities in losing axisymmetry were explored. Then a number of issues in rotating plasma were addressed. Most importantly, a spinoff application to plasma separations was recognized, which also resulted in a provisional patent application. (That provisional patent application, however, was not pursued further.) Alpha channeling entails injecting waves into magnetically confined plasma to release energy from one particular ion while ejecting that ion. The ejection of the ion is actually a concomitant effect in releasing energy from the ion to the wave. In rotating plasma, there is the opportunity to store the energy in a radial electric field rather than in waves. In other words, the ejected alpha particle loses its energy to the radial potential, which in turn produces plasma rotation. This is a very useful effect, since producing radial electric fields by other means are technologically more difficult. In fact, one can heat ions, and then eject them, to produce the desired radial field. In each case, there is a separation effect of different ions, which generalizes the original alpha-channeling concept of separating alpha ash from hydrogen. In a further generalization of the separation concept, a double-well filter represents a new way to produce high-throughput separations of ions, potentially useful for nuclear waste remediation.

  6. Supersymmetric models on magnetized orbifolds with flux-induced Fayet-Iliopoulos terms

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Sumita, Keigo; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We study supersymmetric (SUSY) models derived from the ten-dimensional SUSY Yang- Mills theory compactified on magnetized orbifolds, with nonvanishing Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) terms induced by magnetic fluxes in extra dimensions. Allowing the presence of FI-terms relaxes a constraint on flux configurations in SUSY model building based on magnetized backgrounds. In this case, charged fields develop their vacuum expectation values (VEVs) to cancel the FI-terms in the D-flat directions of fluxed gauge symmetries, which break the gauge symmetries and lead to a SUSY vacuum. Based on this idea, we propose a new class of SUSY magnetized orbifold models with three generations of quarks and leptons. Especially, we construct a model where the right-handed sneutrinos develop their VEVs which restore the supersymmetry but yield lepton number violating terms below the compactification scale, and show their phenomenological consequences.

  7. Numerical simulations of three-dimensional magnetic swirls in a solar flux-tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Piotr; Murawski, Krzysztof; Solov'ev, Alexandr A.

    2014-07-01

    We aim to numerically study evolution of Alfvén waves that accompany short-lasting swirl events in a solar magnetic flux-tube that can be a simple model of a magnetic pore or a sunspot. With the use of the FLASH code we numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to simulate twists which are implemented at the top of the photosphere in magnetic field lines of the flux-tube. Our numerical results exhibit swirl events and Alfvén waves with associated clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of magnetic lines, with the largest values of vorticity at the bottom of the chromosphere, and a certain amount of energy flux.

  8. Helical ${\\alpha}$-dynamos as twisted magnetic flux tubes in Riemannian space

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Analytical solution of ${\\alpha}$-dynamo equation representing strongly torsioned helical dynamo is obtained in the thin twisted Riemannian flux tubes approximation. The $\\alpha$ factor possesses a fundamental contribution from torsion which is however weaken in the thin tubes approximation. It is shown that assuming that the poloidal component of the magnetic field is in principle time-independent, the toroidal magnetic field component grows very fast in time, actually it possesses a linear time dependence, while the poloidal component grows under the influence of torsion or twist of the flux tube. The toroidal component decays spatially with as $r^{-2}$ while vorticity may decay as $r^{-5}$ (poloidal component) where r represents the radial distance from the magnetic axis of flux tube. Toroidal component of vorticity decays as $r^{-1}$. In turbulent dynamos unbounded magnetic fields may decay at least as $r^{-3}$.

  9. Supersymmetric models on magnetized orbifolds with flux-induced Fayet-Iliopoulos terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Sumita, Keigo; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    We study supersymmetric (SUSY) models derived from the ten-dimensional SUSY Yang-Mills theory compactified on magnetized orbifolds, with nonvanishing Fayet-Iliopoulos (FI) terms induced by magnetic fluxes in extra dimensions. Allowing the presence of FI-terms relaxes a constraint on flux configurations in SUSY model building based on magnetized backgrounds. In this case, charged fields develop their vacuum expectation values to cancel the FI-terms in the D-flat directions of fluxed gauge symmetries, which break the gauge symmetries and lead to a SUSY vacuum. Based on this idea, we propose a new class of SUSY magnetized orbifold models with three generations of quarks and leptons. Especially, we construct a model where the right-handed sneutrinos develop their vacuum expectation values which restore the supersymmetry but yield lepton number violating terms below the compactification scale, and show their phenomenological consequences.

  10. Magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianliang; Coffey, H.

    1997-08-01

    This paper discusses magnetic damping forces in figure-eight-shaped null-flux coil suspension systems, focusing on the Holloman maglev rocket system. The paper also discusses simulating the damping plate, which is attached to the superconducting magnet by two short-circuited loop coils in the guideway. Closed-form formulas for the magnetic damping coefficient as functions of heave-and-sway displacements are derived by using a dynamic circuit model. These formulas are useful for dynamic stability studies.

  11. The formation of magnetic depletions and flux annihilation due to reconnection in the heliosheath

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, J F; Swisdak, M.; Opher, M.; Richardson, J.D.

    2017-01-01

    The misalignment of the solar rotation axis and the magnetic axis of the Sun produces a periodic reversal of the Parker spiral magnetic field and the sectored solar wind. The compression of the sectors is expected to lead to reconnection in the heliosheath (HS). We present particle-in-cell simulations of the sectored HS that reflect the plasma environment along the Voyager 1 and 2 trajectories, specifically including unequal positive and negative azimuthal magnetic flux as seen in the Voyager...

  12. Data Mining Solar X-Ray Flares Triggered by Emerging Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Kaitlyn; Saar, Steven H.; Schanche, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the association between emerging magnetic flux and solar X-ray flares to identify, and if possible quantify, distinguishing physical properties of flares triggered by flux emergence versus those triggered by other sources. Our study uses as its basis GOES-classified solar flares from March 2011 through June 2016 that have been identified by the Space Weather Prediction Center’s flare detection algorithm. The basic X-ray flare data is then enriched with data about related EUV-spectrum flares, emerging fluxes, active regions, eruptions, and sigmoids, which are all characterized by event-specific keywords, identified via SDO feature finding tools, and archived in the Heliophysics Events Knowledgebase (HEK). Using appropriate spatial and temporal parameters for each event type to determine association, we create a catalogue of solar events associated with each GOES-classified flare. After accounting for the primitive state of many of these event detection algorithms, we statistically analyze the compiled dataset to determine the effects of an emerging flux trigger on flare properties. A two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test confirms with 99.9% confidence that flares triggered by emerging flux have a different peak flux distribution than non-emerging-flux-associated flares. We observe no linear or logarithmic correlations between flares’ and their associated emerging fluxes’ individual properties and find flares triggered by emerging flux are ~ 10% more likely to cause an eruption inside an active region while outside of an active region, the flare’s association with emerging flux has no effect on its likeliness to cause an eruption. We also compare the morphologies of the flares triggered by emerging flux and flares not via a superposed epoch analysis of lightcurves. Our results will be of interest for predicting flare behavior as a function of magnetic activity (where we can use enhanced rates of emerging flux as a proxy for heightened stellar

  13. Structure, Stability, and Evolution of Magnetic Flux Ropes from the Perspective of Magnetic Twist

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Rui; Titov, Viacheslav S; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wiegelmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of NOAA Active Region 11817 during 2013 August 10--12, when it developed a complex field configuration and produced four confined, followed by two eruptive, flares. These C-and-above flares are all associated with a magnetic flux rope (MFR) located along the major polarity inversion line, where shearing and converging photospheric flows are present. Aided by the nonlinear force-free field modeling, we identify the MFR through mapping magnetic connectivities and computing the twist number $\\mathcal{T}_w$ for each individual field line. The MFR is moderately twisted ($|\\mathcal{T}_w| < 2$) and has a well-defined boundary of high squashing factor $Q$. We found that the field line with the extremum $|\\mathcal{T}_w|$ is a reliable proxy of the rope axis, and that the MFR's peak $|\\mathcal{T}_w|$ temporarily increases within half an hour before each flare while it decreases after the flare peak for both confined and eruptive flares. This pre-flare increase in $|\\mathcal{T}_w|$ has li...

  14. Non-Uniqueness of the Geometry of Interplanetary Magnetic Flux Ropes Obtained from Model-Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, K.; Cho, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    Since the early recognition of the important role of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IPFRs) to carry the southward magnetic fields to the Earth, many attempts have been made to determine the structure of the IPFRs by model-fitting analyses to the interplanetary magnetic field variations. This paper describes the results of fitting analyses for three selected solar wind structures in the latter half of 2014. In the fitting analysis a special attention was paid to identification of all the possible models or geometries that can reproduce the observed magnetic field variation. As a result, three or four geometries have been found for each of the three cases. The non-uniqueness of the fitted results include (1) the different geometries naturally stemming from the difference in the models used for fitting, and (2) an unexpected result that either of magnetic field chirality, left-handed and right-handed, can reproduce the observation in some cases. Thus we conclude that the model-fitting cannot always give us a unique geometry of the observed magnetic flux rope. In addition, we have found that the magnetic field chirality of a flux rope cannot be uniquely inferred from the sense of field vector rotation observed in the plane normal to the Earth-Sun line; the sense of rotation changes depending on the direction of the flux rope axis. These findings exert an important impact on the studies aimed at the geometrical relationships between the flux ropes and the magnetic field structures in the solar corona where the flux ropes were produced, such studies being an important step toward predicting geomagnetic storms based on observations of solar eruption phenomena.

  15. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, F A; Fuhr, G; Monnier, A; Benkadda, S

    2014-01-01

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code (EMEDGE3D) with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindr...

  16. Magnetic Flux Ropes from the Sun to 1 AU*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, J.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; St. Cyr, O. C.; Chen, J.

    2004-12-01

    Any practical model of the dynamics of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and its interplanetary counterpart (ICME) must conform to available observational constraints from sun and to the earth; the upcoming STEREO mission will add significantly to those constraints. We present model/data comparisons for specific CME/ICME events near the sun (using coronagraph image data) and in the heliosphere (using in situ measurements) to show that the flux rope model of Chen and Krall[1-2] provides an accurate physics-based characterization of flux-rope CMEs over this range. We further show that quantitative results, such as the field energy required for eruption, depend on specific aspects of the flux rope geometry, such as the ratio (length/width) of the elliptical shape traced out by the flux-rope axis. It is this geometry that will be determined, for the first time, by STEREO. [1] Chen, J. 1996, JGR, 101, 27499 [2] Krall, J. et al., 2000, ApJ, 539, 964 *Work supported by ONR, NASA and NSF

  17. An Improved Stator Flux Observation Method of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangjing Su; Hongmei Li; Ying Dai; Zheng Li

    2016-01-01

    The stator flux and electromagnetic torque observation is the basis of direct torque controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor ( PMSM) drive system. However, the traditional stator flux observer based on voltage model is affected by integral initial values and integral drift, that based on current model is affected by the parameters of PMSM, so a new stator flux observation method is proposed based on an improved second⁃order generalized integrator ( SOGI) . Compared to the stator flux observation method based on the conventional SOGI, the proposed method can not only overcome the influence of integral initial values and integral drift, but also completely eliminate the DC offset’ s influence. Therefore, the observation accuracy of stator flux is further improved. The simulation and experimental results both show that the proposed method has a higher stator flux and electromagnetic torque observation precision.

  18. Analytical magnetic torque calculations and experimental testing of radial flux permanent magnet-type eddy current brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jang-Young; Jang, Seok-Myeong

    2012-04-01

    This paper reports on analytical magnetic torque calculations and experimental tests of a radial flux permanent magnet (RFPM)-type eddy current brake (ECB). Analytical solutions for permanent magnet-generated magnetic fields that consider the eddy current reaction are obtained by using a magnetic vector potential and a two dimensional (2D) polar coordinate system. On the basis of these solutions, the analytical expressions for a magnetic torque are also derived. All analytical results are validated extensively by non-linear finite element calculations. In particular, magnetic torque measurements are obtained in tests to confirm the analyses. Finally, practical issues related to the analytical study of RFPM-type ECBs are fully discussed.

  19. Development of Correlations for Windage Power Losses Modeling in an Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine with Geometrical Features of the Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rasekh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a set of correlations for the windage power losses in a 4 kW axial flux permanent magnet synchronous machine (AFPMSM is presented. In order to have an efficient machine, it is necessary to optimize the total electromagnetic and mechanical losses. Therefore, fast equations are needed to estimate the windage power losses of the machine. The geometry consists of an open rotor–stator with sixteen magnets at the periphery of the rotor with an annular opening in the entire disk. Air can flow in a channel being formed between the magnets and in a small gap region between the magnets and the stator surface. To construct the correlations, computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations through the frozen rotor (FR method are performed at the practical ranges of the geometrical parameters, namely the gap size distance, the rotational speed of the rotor, the magnet thickness and the magnet angle. Thereafter, two categories of formulations are defined to make the windage losses dimensionless based on whether the losses are mainly due to the viscous forces or the pressure forces. At the end, the correlations can be achieved via curve fittings from the numerical data. The results reveal that the pressure forces are responsible for the windage losses for the side surfaces in the air-channel, whereas for the surfaces facing the stator surface in the gap, the viscous forces mainly contribute to the windage losses. Additionally, the results of the parametric study demonstrate that the overall windage losses in the machine escalate with an increase in either the rotational Reynolds number or the magnet thickness ratio. By contrast, the windage losses decrease once the magnet angle ratio enlarges. Moreover, it can be concluded that the proposed correlations are very useful tools in the design and optimizations of this type of electrical machine.

  20. Magnetic Flux Cancellation as the Origin of Solar Quiet-region Pre-jet Minifilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the origin of 10 solar quiet-region pre-jet minifilaments, using EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and magnetograms from the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). We recently found that quiet-region coronal jets are driven by minifilament eruptions, where those eruptions result from flux cancellation at the magnetic neutral line under the minifilament. Here, we study the longer-term origin of the pre-jet minifilaments themselves. We find that they result from flux cancellation between minority-polarity and majority-polarity flux patches. In each of 10 pre-jet regions, we find that opposite-polarity patches of magnetic flux converge and cancel, with a flux reduction of 10%-40% from before to after the minifilament appears. For our 10 events, the minifilaments exist for periods ranging from 1.5 hr to 2 days before erupting to make a jet. Apparently, the flux cancellation builds a highly sheared field that runs above and traces the neutral line, and the cool transition region plasma minifilament forms in this field and is suspended in it. We infer that the convergence of the opposite-polarity patches results in reconnection in the low corona that builds a magnetic arcade enveloping the minifilament in its core, and that the continuing flux cancellation at the neutral line finally destabilizes the minifilament field so that it erupts and drives the production of a coronal jet. Thus, our observations strongly support that quiet-region magnetic flux cancellation results in both the formation of the pre-jet minifilament and its jet-driving eruption.

  1. Mechanisms of the outer radiation belt electron flux variation during magnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M.; Obara, T.; Koshiishi, H.; Koga, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Goka, T.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated variations of the energetic electron flux (> 0.4 MeV) and the magnetic field in the outer radiation belt obtained from the Standard DOse Monitor (SDOM) and the MAgnetoMeter (MAM) of the Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA) onboard Tsubasa (Mission Demonstration Test Satellite (MDS)-1). Since Tsubasa operates in geostationary transfer orbit (GTO) with an orbital period of 10 hours and an inclination of 28.5 degrees, it has provided a rare opportunity for directly observing near-equatorial radiation belt plasma particles and the magnetic field during magnetic storms. The decreases of the energetic electron flux during the main phase of the magnetic storms, and the subsequent recoveries and enhancements during the recovery phase in the outer radiation belt are linked respectively to typical variations of the magnetic field. At the moment that the outer radiation belt flux sharply drops during the main phase of the 17 April 2002 magnetic storm, the butterfly distribution is observed at L=5 and the magnetic equator where the magnitude of magnetic field is much smaller than the IGRF model. Calculating the drift motions of the energetic electrons in the Tyganenko 2001 magnetospheric magnetic field model, shows that the drift-shell splitting mechanism could generate the butterfly distribution due to loss of the near-equatorially mirroring electrons through dayside magnetopause boundary. We evaluate roles and contributions of the other possible mechanisms to explain the flux decreases. We discuss the three-dimensional field configuration in the magnetopause to compare with the low earth orbital observation of the outer radiation belt flux.

  2. Potential Magnetic Field around a Helical Flux-rope Current Structure in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Petrie, G J D

    2007-01-01

    We consider the potential magnetic field associated with a helical electric line current flow, idealizing the near-potential coronal field within which a highly localized twisted current structure is embedded. It is found that this field has a significant axial component off the helical magnetic axis where there is no current flow, such that the flux winds around the axis. The helical line current field, in including the effects of flux rope writhe, is therefore more topologically complex than straight line and ring current fields sometimes used in solar flux rope models. The axial flux in magnetic fields around confined current structures may be affected by the writhe of these current structures such that the field twists preferentially with the same handedness as the writhe. This property of fields around confined current structures with writhe may be relevant to classes of coronal magnetic flux rope, including structures observed to have sigmoidal forms in soft X-rays and prominence magnetic fields. For ex...

  3. Fourier transform magnetic resonance current density imaging (FT-MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ider, Yusuf Ziya; Birgul, Ozlem; Oran, Omer Faruk; Arikan, Orhan; Hamamura, Mark J; Muftuler, L Tugan

    2010-06-01

    Fourier transform (FT)-based algorithms for magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) from one component of magnetic flux density have been developed for 2D and 3D problems. For 2D problems, where current is confined to the xy-plane and z-component of the magnetic flux density is measured also on the xy-plane inside the object, an iterative FT-MRCDI algorithm is developed by which both the current distribution inside the object and the z-component of the magnetic flux density on the xy-plane outside the object are reconstructed. The method is applied to simulated as well as actual data from phantoms. The effect of measurement error on the spatial resolution of the current density reconstruction is also investigated. For 3D objects an iterative FT-based algorithm is developed whereby the projected current is reconstructed on any slice using as data the Laplacian of the z-component of magnetic flux density measured for that slice. In an injected current MRCDI scenario, the current is not divergence free on the boundary of the object. The method developed in this study also handles this situation.

  4. Tunable magnetic flux sensor using a metallic Rashba ring with half-metal electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.

    2011-04-01

    We propose a magnetic field sensor consisting of a square ring made of metal with a strong Rashba spin-orbital coupling (RSOC) and contacted to half-metal electrodes. Due to the Aharonov-Casher effect, the presence of the RSOC imparts a spin-dependent geometric phase to conduction electrons in the ring. The combination of the magnetic flux emanating from the magnetic sample placed below the ring, and the Aharonov-Casher effect due to RSOC results in spin interference, which modulates the spin transport in the ring nanostructure. By using the tight-binding nonequilibrium Green's function formalism to model the transport across the nanoring detector, we theoretically show that with proper optimization, the Rashba ring can function as a sensitive and tunable magnetic probe to detect magnetic flux.

  5. Effect of uncertainties in solar synoptic magnetic flux maps in modeling of solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Bertello, Luca; MacNeice, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the NSO/SOLIS team developed variance (error) maps that represent uncertainties in magnetic flux synoptic charts. These uncertainties are determined by the spatial variances of the magnetic flux distribution from full disk magnetograms that contribute to each bin in the synoptic chart. Here we present a study of the effects of variances on solar wind parameters (wind speed, density, magnetic field, and temperature) derived using the WSA-ENLIL model and ensemble modeling approach. We compare the results of the modeling with near-Earth solar wind magnetic field and plasma data as extracted from NASA/GSFC's OMNI data set. We show that analysis of uncertainties may be useful for understanding the sensitivity of the model predictions to short-term evolution of magnetic field and noise in the synoptic magnetograms.

  6. Reduction in Flux Loss of an Nd-Fe-B Bonded Ring Magnet for an SPM Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, Takeshi; Horita, Satoshi; Nakano, Masaki; Tsutsumi, Shinichi; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have previously proposed a simulation method of an initial flux loss in permanent magnets using finite element method, and confirmed that predicted flux loss of an Nd-Fe-B boned ring magnet showed good agreement with measured flux loss. In this paper, we applied our proposed method to an Nd-Fe-B boned ring magnet in an SPM motor. We modeled a rotor composed of an Nd-Fe-B bonded ring magnet and a soft magnetic core made from silicon steels, and carried out the simulations for magnetizing pr...

  7. Reconnection Rate in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection under Open Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jun; MA Zhi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is studied by using two-dimensional Darwin particle-in-cell simulations with different types of open boundary conditions.The simulation results indicate that reconnection rates are strongly dependent on the imposed boundary conditions of the magnetic field Bx in the inward side. Under the zerogradient Bx boundary condition,the reconnection rate quickly decreases after reaching its maximum and no steady-state is found.Under both electromagnetic and magnetosonic boundary conditions,the system can reach a quasi-steady state.However,the reconnection rate Er≈ 0.08 under the electromagnetic boundary condition is weaker than Er≈ 0.13 under the magnetosonic boundary condition.

  8. Accurate periodicity measurement of superconducting quantum interference device magnetic flux response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2010-09-01

    It is theoretically explained that a response of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is periodically dependent on total magnetic flux coupling to the SQUID ring (Φ) and its period is a flux quantum (Φ(o)=h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). For example, the voltage of an electromagnetically oscillated rf-SQUID or a current biased dc-SQUID is thought to be periodically dependent on Φ with a period of Φ(o). In this paper, we propose an accurate method to check the periodicity of a SQUID response by using a set of sensing coils covered with a superconducting sheath. As a demonstration, we measured periodicity of a commercially available thin-film type rf-SQUID response in magnetic flux ranging up to approximately 4300Φ(o). Its flux dependence was periodic below about 3400Φ(o).

  9. Performance comparison of three-phase flux reversal permanent magnet motors in BLDC and BLAC operation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štumberger, B.; Štumberger, G.; Hadžiselimović, M.; Hamler, A.; Goričan, V.; Jesenik, M.; Trlep, M.

    The paper presents a comparison of torque capability and flux-weakening performance of three-phase flux reversal permanent magnet motors with surface and inset permanent magnets. Finite element analysis is employed to determine the performance of each motor in BLDC and BLAC operation mode. It is shown that the torque capability and flux-weakening performance of surface or inset permanent magnet configuration is strongly dependent on the stator teeth number/rotor pole number combination.

  10. Performance comparison of three-phase flux reversal permanent magnet motors in BLDC and BLAC operation mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumberger, B. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Maribor, Smetanova ulica 17, Maribor SI-2000 (Slovenia)], E-mail: bojan.stumberger@uni-mb.si; Stumberger, G.; Hadziselimovic, M.; Hamler, A.; Gorican, V.; Jesenik, M.; Trlep, M. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Maribor, Smetanova ulica 17, Maribor SI-2000 (Slovenia)

    2008-10-15

    The paper presents a comparison of torque capability and flux-weakening performance of three-phase flux reversal permanent magnet motors with surface and inset permanent magnets. Finite element analysis is employed to determine the performance of each motor in BLDC and BLAC operation mode. It is shown that the torque capability and flux-weakening performance of surface or inset permanent magnet configuration is strongly dependent on the stator teeth number/rotor pole number combination.

  11. Quench-induced trapping of magnetic flux in annular

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaroe, M.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R.;

    2008-01-01

    over 4 orders of magnitude. After the quench the result of the spontaneous production of topological defects, trapped fluxons, is unambiguously observed as zero-field steps in the DC I-V characteristic of the junction. A power-law scaling behavior of trapping probability versus quench rate is found...... with a critical exponent of 0.5 (within experimental error). The main experimental challenges are to generate many identical quenches with accurate cooling rate, to automate data analysis and acquisition, and to suppress external magnetic fields and noise by passive magnetic shielding and compensation....

  12. Numerical simulations of magnetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a twisted solar flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, K.; Chmielewski, P.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khomenko, E.

    2016-07-01

    The paper aims to study the response of a solar small-scale and weak magnetic flux tube to photospheric twisting motions. We numerically solve three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations to describe the evolution of the perturbation within the initially static flux tube, excited by twists in the azimuthal component of the velocity. These twists produce rotation of the magnetic field lines. Perturbation of magnetic field lines propagates upwardly, driving vertical and azimuthal flow as well as plasma compressions and rarefactions in the form of eddies. We conclude that these eddies result from the sheared azimuthal flow which seeds Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) between the flux tube and the ambient medium. Numerically obtained properties of the KHI confirm the analytical predictions for the occurrence of the instability.

  13. Evolution of a typical ion-scale magnetic flux rope caused by thermal pressure enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, W.-L.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.

    2017-02-01

    With high time-resolution field and plasma measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft, interior fine structures of two ion-scale magnetic flux ropes ( 5 and 11 ion inertial length radius) separated by 14 s are resolved. These two ion-scale flux ropes (FR1 and FR2) show non-frozen-in ion behavior and consist of a strong axial magnetic field at the reversal of the negative-then-positive bipolar field component. The negative bipolar field component of the FR2 is found to be depressed, where magnetic pressure and total pressure decrease, but ion and electron thermal pressures increase, a feature akin to a crater-like flux rope. The pressure enhancement is due to the magnetosheath plasma feeding into the flux rope along the field lines. Magnetic field draping and energetic electrons are also observed in the trailing part of the FR2. The ratio of perpendicular and parallel currents indicates that the FR1 appears force-free but the FR2 seems not. Moreover, the FR2 is time-dependent as a result of a low correlation coefficient (CC = 0.75) for the derivation of the deHoffmann-Teller frame using the direct measured electric fields, while the FR1 is in quasi-steady conditions (CC = 0.94). It is concluded that the crater formation within the FR2 can be interpreted by the analytical flux rope simulation as the evolution of typical flux rope to crater-like one due to the thermal pressure enhancement, which could be induced by the depression of transverse magnetic fields of the flux rope.

  14. OpenMebius: An Open Source Software for Isotopically Nonstationary 13C-Based Metabolic Flux Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shuichi Kajihata; Chikara Furusawa; Fumio Matsuda; Hiroshi Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a 13C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas 13...

  15. Magnetic-field decay of three interlocked flux rings with zero linking number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Candelaresi, Simon; Brandenburg, Axel

    2010-03-01

    The resistive decay of chains of three interlocked magnetic flux rings is considered. Depending on the relative orientation of the magnetic field in the three rings, the late-time decay can be either fast or slow. Thus, the qualitative degree of tangledness is less important than the actual value of the linking number or, equivalently, the net magnetic helicity. Our results do not suggest that invariants of higher order than that of the magnetic helicity need to be considered to characterize the decay of the field.

  16. Magnetic field decay of three interlocked flux rings with zero linking number

    CERN Document Server

    del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2009-01-01

    The resistive decay of chains of three interlocked magnetic flux rings is considered. Depending on the relative orientation of the magnetic field in the three rings, the late-time decay can be either fast or slow. Thus, the qualitative degree of tangledness is less important than the actual value of the linking number or, equivalently, the net magnetic helicity. Our results do not suggest that invariants of higher order than that of the magnetic helicity need to be considered to characterize the decay of the field.

  17. Magnetic flux annihilation waves in inhomogeneous high-temperature superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnev, IA; Khodot, AE; Eremin, AV; Mikhailov, BP

    2004-01-01

    The process of magnetic field penetration into polycrystalline high-T-c superconductors of the YBa2Cu3O7 - x and Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 - x systems has been studied using traditional magnetooptical methods and scanning Hall probe microscopy. It is established that remagnetization of a sample is accompanied

  18. Measurements of flux pumping activation of trapped field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity, 202 Houston Science Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5002 (United States); Davey, Kent [Physics Department, 617 Science and Research Building I, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Large grains of high temperature superconducting (HTS) material can be utilized as trapped field magnets (TFMs). Persistent currents are set up in the HTS when it is cooled in a magnetic field, or exposed to a magnetic field after cooling. TFMs have been improved over the past two decades by the efforts of a large number of worldwide research groups. However, applications using TFMs have lagged, in part due to the problem of high fields needed for activation. We describe herein experiments designed to observe the behaviour of TFM activation using repeated applications of low fields (called 'pumping'). Significant partial activation is obtained using a non-uniform pumping field (e.g., a small permanent magnet) which is higher in the centre of the HTS than at the periphery. Cooling in zero field followed by pumping with such a field results in trapping the full applied field, in comparison to half of the applied field being trapped by cooling in zero field followed by application of a uniform field. We find that for partial activation by cooling in a field and subsequent activation by pumping, the resulting fields are additive. We also conclude that for activation by fluxoid pumping, creep assists the process.

  19. Moving magnetic tubes: fragmentation, vortex streets and the limit of the approximation of thin flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Schüssler, M.

    2006-05-01

    Aims.We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes in a stratified layer over a range of Reynolds numbers (25 ⪉ Re ⪉ 2600) by means of numerical simulations. Special emphasis is placed on studying the fragmentation of the rising tube, its trailing wake and the formation of a vortex street in the high-Reynolds number regime. Furthermore, we evaluate the relevance of the thin flux tube approximation with regard to describing the evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the simulations. Methods: .We used the FLASH code, which has an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm, thus allowing the simulations to be carried out at high Reynolds numbers. Results: .The evolution of the magnetic flux tube and its wake depends on the Reynolds number. At Re up to a few hundred, the wake consists of two counter-rotating vortex rolls. At higher Re, the vortex rolls break up and the shedding of flux into the wake occurs in a more intermittent fashion. The amount of flux retained by the central portion of the tube increases with the field line twist (in agreement with previous literature) and with Re. The time evolution of the twist is compatible with a homologous expansion of the tube. The motion of the central portion of the tube in the simulations is very well described by the thin flux tube model whenever the effects of flux loss or vortex forces can be neglected. If the flux tube has an initial net vorticity, it undergoes asymmetric vortex shedding. In this case, the lift force accelerates the tube in such a way that an oscillatory horizontal motion is super-imposed on the vertical rise of the tube, which leaves behind a vortex street. This last result is in accordance with previous simulations reported in the literature, which were carried out at lower Reynolds number.

  20. The stretching of magnetic flux tubes in the convective overshoot region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, George H.; Mcclymont, Alexander N.; Chou, Dean-Yi

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines the fate of a magnetic flux tube initially lying at the bottom of the solar convective overshoot region. Stretching of the flux tube, e.g., by differential rotation, reduces its density, causing it to rise quasi-statically (a process referred to as vertical flux drift) until it reaches the top of the overshoot region and enters the buoyantly unstable convection region, from which a portion of it may ultimately protrude to form an active region on the surface. It is suggested that vertical flux drift and flux destabilization are inevitable consequences of field amplification, and it is surmised that these phenomena should be considered in self-consistent models of solar and stellar dynamos operating in the overshoot region.

  1. Multiple Triangulation Analysis: another approach to determine the orientation of magnetic flux ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Z. Zhou

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Another approach (Multiple Triangulation Analysis, MTA is presented to determine the orientation of magnetic flux rope, based on 4-point measurements. A 2-D flux rope model is used to examine the accuracy of the MTA technique in a theoretical way. It is found that the precision of the estimated orientation is dependent on both the spacecraft separation and the constellation path relative to the flux rope structure. However, the MTA error range can be shown to be smaller than that of the traditional MVA technique. As an application to real Cluster data, several flux rope events on 26 January 2001 are analyzed using MTA, to obtain their orientations. The results are compared with the ones obtained by several other methods which also yield flux rope orientation. The estimated axis orientations are shown to be fairly close, suggesting the reliability of the MTA method.

  2. Influence of Josephson current second harmonic on stability of magnetic flux in long junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, P. K. H.; Boyadjiev, T. L.; Shukrinov, Y. U. M.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Seidel, P.

    2010-11-01

    We study the long Josephson junction (LJJ) model which takes into account the second harmonic of the Fourier expansion of Josephson current. The dependence of the static magnetic flux distributions on parameters of the model are investigated numerically. Stability of the static solutions is checked by the sign of the smallest eigenvalue of the associated Sturm-Liouville problem. New solutions which do not exist in the traditional model, have been found. Investigation of the influence of second harmonic on the stability of magnetic flux distributions for main solutions is performed.

  3. Surface and body waves in magnetic flux tubes. [in solar convection zone, photosphere, and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelatif, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    The dispersion relation of surface and body waves in a magnetic flux tube is studied in detail. The properties of the fast and slow bodywaves are described in terms of the filtering characteristics of the flux tube. In addition to the axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric distinction between the modes, an additional distinction is made between the fundamental mode and the rest of the modes. New results concerning the thin and large flux tube approximation are derived. The behavior of surface and body waves in the solar convection zone, photosphere, and corona is discussed.

  4. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  5. Tests of the frozen-flux and tangentially geostrophic assumptions using magnetic satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chulliat, A.; Olsen, Nils; Sabaka, T.

    the very large number of flows explaining the observed secular variation under the frozen-flux assumption alone. More recently, it has been shown that the combined frozen-flux and tangentially geostrophic assumptions translate into constraints on the secular variation whose mathematics are now well...... understood. Using these constraints, we test the combined frozen-flux and tangentially geostrophic assumptions against recent, high-precision magnetic data provided by the and CHAMP satellites. The methodology involves building constrained field models using least-squares methods. Two types of models...

  6. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  7. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  8. Magnetic flux density reconstruction using interleaved partial Fourier acquisitions in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee Myung; Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been introduced as a non-invasive modality to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density of an electrically conductive object by the injection of current. In order to measure a magnetic flux density signal in MREIT, the phase difference approach in an interleaved encoding scheme cancels the systematic artifacts accumulated in phase signals and also reduces the random noise effect. However, it is important to reduce scan duration maintaining spatial resolution and sufficient contrast, in order to allow for practical in vivo implementation of MREIT. The purpose of this paper is to develop a coupled partial Fourier strategy in the interleaved sampling in order to reduce the total imaging time for an MREIT acquisition, whilst maintaining an SNR of the measured magnetic flux density comparable to what is achieved with complete k-space data. The proposed method uses two key steps: one is to update the magnetic flux density by updating the complex densities using the partially interleaved k-space data and the other is to fill in the missing k-space data iteratively using the updated background field inhomogeneity and magnetic flux density data. Results from numerical simulations and animal experiments demonstrate that the proposed method reduces considerably the scanning time and provides resolution of the recovered B(z) comparable to what is obtained from complete k-space data.

  9. Torsional Alfven Waves in Solar Magnetic Flux Tubes of Axial Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Srivastava, A K; Kraskiewicz, J

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Propagation and energy transfer of torsional Alfv\\'en waves in solar magnetic flux tubes of axial symmetry is studied. Methods: An analytical model of a solar magnetic flux tube of axial symmetry is developed by specifying a magnetic flux and deriving general analytical formulae for the equilibrium mass density and a gas pressure. The main advantage of this model is that it can be easily adopted to any axisymmetric magnetic structure. The model is used to simulate numerically the propagation of nonlinear Alfv\\'en waves in such 2D flux tubes of axial symmetry embedded in the solar atmosphere. The waves are excited by a localized pulse in the azimuthal component of velocity and launched at the top of the solar photosphere, and they propagate through the solar chromosphere, transition region, and into the solar corona. Results: The results of our numerical simulations reveal a complex scenario of twisted magnetic field lines and flows associated with torsional Alfv\\'en waves as well as energy transfer to t...

  10. A miniaturized human-motion energy harvester using flux-guided magnet stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, M. A.; Park, J. Y.

    2016-11-01

    We present a miniaturized electromagnetic energy harvester (EMEH) using two flux-guided magnet stacks to harvest energy from human-generated vibration such as handshaking. Each flux-guided magnet stack increases (40%) the magnetic flux density by guiding the flux lines through a soft magnetic material. The EMEH has been designed to up-convert the applied human-motion vibration to a high-frequency oscillation by mechanical impact of a spring-less structure. The high-frequency oscillator consists of the analyzed 2-magnet stack and a customized helical compression spring. A standard AAA battery sized prototype (3.9 cm3) can generate maximum 203 μW average power from human hand-shaking vibration. It has a maximum average power density of 52 μWcm-3 which is significantly higher than the current state-of-the-art devices. A 6-stage multiplier and rectifier circuit interfaces the harvester with a wearable electronic load (wrist watch) to demonstrate its capability of powering small- scale electronic systems from human-generated vibration.

  11. The Total Solar Irradiance, UV Emission and Magnetic Flux during the Last Solar Cycle Minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Benevolenskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the total solar irradiance (TSI and the spectral solar irradiance as ultraviolet emission (UV in the wavelength range 115–180 nm, observed with the instruments TIM and SOLSTICE within the framework of SORCE (the solar radiation and climate experiment during the long solar minimum between the 23rd and 24th cycles. The wavelet analysis reveals an increase in the magnetic flux in the latitudinal zone of the sunspot activity, accompanied with an increase in the TSI and UV on the surface rotation timescales of solar activity complexes. In-phase coherent structures between the midlatitude magnetic flux and TSI/UV appear when the long-lived complexes of the solar activity are present. These complexes, which are related to long-lived sources of magnetic fields under the photosphere, are maintained by magnetic fluxes reappearing in the same longitudinal regions. During the deep solar minimum (the period of the absence of sunspots, a coherent structure has been found, in which the phase between the integrated midlatitude magnetic flux is ahead of the total solar irradiance on the timescales of the surface rotation.

  12. Reduction of Thermal Loss in HTS Windings by Using Magnetic Flux Deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Miki, M.; Felder, B.; Koshiba, Y.; Izumi, M.; Umemoto, K.; Aizawa, K.; Yanamoto, T.

    Efforts on the generation of intensified magnetic flux have been made for the optimized shape of HTS winding applications. This contributes to the high efficiency of the rotating machines using HTS windings. Heat generation from the HTS windings requires to be suppressed as much as possible, when those coils are under operation with either direct or alternative currents. Presently, the reduction of such thermal loss generated by the applied currents on the HTS coils is reported with a magnetic flux deflection system. The HTS coils are fixed together with flattened magnetic materials to realize a kind of redirection of the flux pathway. Eventually, the magnetic flux density perpendicular to the tape surface (equivalent to the a-b plane) of the HTS tape materials is reduced to the proximity of the HTS coil. To verify the new geometry of the surroundings of the HTS coils with magnetic materials, a comparative study of the DC coil voltage was done for different applied currents in prototype field-pole coils of a ship propulsion motor.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF LONGITUDINAL COMPONENT OF MAGNETIC FLUX IN FERROMAGNETIC WIRE OF SINGLE-CORE POWER CABLE ARMOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kostiukov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A problem of determination of effective longitudinal magnetic permeability of single core power cable armour is defined. A technique for experimental determination of longitudinal component of magnetic flux in armour spiral ferromagnetic wire is proposed.

  14. Small-scale ion flux and magnetic field fluctuations in solar wind, foreshock and magnetosheath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. N. Shevyrev; Du Jian; G. N. Zastenker; Wang Chi; P. E. Eigesa

    2007-01-01

    We have continued investigation of waves in the regions of undisturbed solar wind, foreshock and magnetosheath. The analysis of ion flux and magnetic field variations with the time interval l-240s was performed in the regions above. Very large variation in such a time interval can be considered the common feature of the foreshock and magnetosheath. The results of case and statistical studies showed that the level of relative variations of ion flux and magnetic field magnitude in foreshock is about 3 times larger than in undisturbed solar wind. Variations of these parameters in the magnetosheath topologically connected with the quasi-parallel bow shock are about two times larger than those behind the quasi-perpendicular. We also compared the results from Interball-1 data analysis with those from statistical analysis of cluster magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field variations obtained from the different satellite data coincide with each other very well not only in quality but also in quantity.

  15. Transport of magnetic flux and the vertical structure of accretion discs - I. Uniform diffusion coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilet, Jérôme; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2012-08-01

    Standard models of accretion discs study the transport of mass on a viscous time-scale but do not consider the transport of magnetic flux. The evolution of a large-scale poloidal magnetic field is, however, an important problem because of its role in the launching of jets and winds and in determining the intensity of turbulence. As a consequence, the transport of poloidal magnetic flux should be considered on an equal basis to the transport of mass. In this paper, we develop a formalism to study such a transport of mass and magnetic flux in a thin accretion disc. The governing equations are derived by performing an asymptotic expansion in the limit of a thin disc, in the regime where the magnetic field is dominated by its vertical component. Turbulent viscosity and resistivity are included, with an arbitrary vertical profile that can be adjusted to mimic the vertical structure of the turbulence. At a given radius and time, the rates of transport of mass and magnetic flux are determined by a one-dimensional problem in the vertical direction, in which the radial gradients of various quantities appear as source terms. We solve this problem to obtain the transport rates and the vertical structure of the disc. This paper is then restricted to the idealized case of uniform diffusion coefficients, while a companion paper will study more realistic vertical profiles of these coefficients. We show the advection of weak magnetic fields to be significantly faster than the advection of mass, contrary to what a crude vertical averaging might suggest. This results from the larger radial velocities away from the mid-plane, which barely affect the mass accretion owing to the low density in these regions but do affect the advection of magnetic flux. Possible consequences of this larger accretion velocity include a potentially interesting time dependence with the magnetic flux distribution evolving faster than the mass distribution. If the disc is not too thin, this fast advection

  16. Recent advances in understanding the origin of magnetic flux concentrations in strongly stratified turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of strong density stratification, hydromagnetic turbulence attains qualitatively new properties: the formation of magnetic flux concentrations. We review here the theoretical foundations of this mechanism in terms of what is now called the negative effective magnetic pressure instability. We also present direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence in strongly stratified layers and discuss the qualitative and quantitative similarities with corresponding mean-field simulations. Finally, the relevance to sunspot formation is discussed.

  17. Propagation of Long-Wavelength Nonlinear Slow Sausage Waves in Stratified Magnetic Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbulescu, M.; Erdélyi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The propagation of nonlinear, long-wavelength, slow sausage waves in an expanding magnetic flux tube, embedded in a non-magnetic stratified environment, is discussed. The governing equation for surface waves, which is akin to the Leibovich-Roberts equation, is derived using the method of multiple scales. The solitary wave solution of the equation is obtained numerically. The results obtained are illustrative of a solitary wave whose properties are highly dependent on the degree of stratification.

  18. The stabilize of current of load by redistribution of magnetic fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Р. I. Tinsky

    1966-12-01

    Full Text Available The supply transformer must have step up characteristic to stabilize the current of the electrical arc, when voltage and distance between coals of electrical arc are changed. The curves of the transformer voltage are parallel when the supply voltage is varied, therefore the load current is not constant. To stabilize the load current it is necessary to redistribute magnetic flux between the first pivot and magnetic pivot. The vector diagram of the reactive transformer for nominal regime is obtained

  19. Baseliner: An open-source, interactive tool for processing sap flux data from thermal dissipation probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, A. Christopher; Hawthorne, David A.; Oren, Ram

    Estimating transpiration from woody plants using thermal dissipation sap flux sensors requires careful data processing. Currently, researchers accomplish this using spreadsheets, or by personally writing scripts for statistical software programs (e.g., R, SAS). We developed the Baseliner software to help establish a standardized protocol for processing sap flux data. Baseliner enables users to QA/QC data and process data using a combination of automated steps, visualization, and manual editing. Data processing requires establishing a zero-flow reference value, or "baseline", which varies among sensors and with time. Since no set of algorithms currently exists to reliably QA/QC and estimate the zero-flow baseline, Baseliner provides a graphical user interface to allow visual inspection and manipulation of data. Data are first automatically processed using a set of user defined parameters. The user can then view the data for additional, manual QA/QC and baseline identification using mouse and keyboard commands. The open-source software allows for user customization of data processing algorithms as improved methods are developed.

  20. Sensing magnetic flux density of artificial neurons with a MEMS device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jesus A; Herrera-May, Agustin L; García-Ramírez, Pedro J; Martinez-Castillo, Jaime; Figueras, Eduard; Flores, Amira; Manjarrez, Elías

    2011-04-01

    We describe a simple procedure to characterize a magnetic field sensor based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, which exploits the Lorentz force principle. This sensor is designed to detect, in future applications, the spiking activity of neurons or muscle cells. This procedure is based on the well-known capability that a magnetic MEMS device can be used to sense a small magnetic flux density. In this work, an electronic neuron (FitzHugh-Nagumo) is used to generate controlled spike-like magnetic fields. We show that the magnetic flux density generated by the hardware of this neuron can be detected with a new MEMS magnetic field sensor. This microdevice has a compact resonant structure (700 × 600 × 5 μm) integrated by an array of silicon beams and p-type piezoresistive sensing elements, which need an easy fabrication process. The proposed microsensor has a resolution of 80 nT, a sensitivity of 1.2 V.T(-1), a resonant frequency of 13.87 kHz, low power consumption (2.05 mW), quality factor of 93 at atmospheric pressure, and requires a simple signal processing circuit. The importance of our study is twofold. First, because the artificial neuron can generate well-controlled magnetic flux density, we suggest it could be used to analyze the resolution and performance of different magnetic field sensors intended for neurobiological applications. Second, the introduced MEMS magnetic field sensor may be used as a prototype to develop new high-resolution biomedical microdevices to sense magnetic fields from cardiac tissue, nerves, spinal cord, or the brain.

  1. Stellar Coronal Response to Differential Rotation and Flux Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Gibb, G P S; Jardine, M M; Yeates, A R

    2016-01-01

    We perform a numerical parameter study to determine what effect varying differential rotation and flux emergence has on a star's non-potential coronal magnetic field. In particular we consider the effects on the star's surface magnetic flux, open magnetic flux, mean azimuthal field strength, coronal free magnetic energy, coronal heating and flux rope eruptions. To do this, we apply a magnetic flux transport model to describe the photospheric evolution, and couple this to the non-potential coronal evolution using a magnetofrictional technique. A flux emergence model is applied to add new magnetic flux onto the photosphere and into the corona. The parameters of this flux emergence model are derived from the solar flux emergence profile, however the rate of emergence can be increased to represent higher flux emergence rates than the Sun's. Overall we find that flux emergence has a greater effect on the non-potential coronal properties compared to differential rotation, with all the aforementioned properties incr...

  2. Analysis of recoverable current from one component of magnetic flux density in MREIT and MRCDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Oh In

    2007-06-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) provides a current density image by measuring the induced magnetic flux density within the subject with a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) has been focused on extracting some useful information of the current density and conductivity distribution in the subject Omega using measured B(z), one component of the magnetic flux density B. In this paper, we analyze the map Tau from current density vector field J to one component of magnetic flux density B(z) without any assumption on the conductivity. The map Tau provides an orthogonal decomposition J = J(P) + J(N) of the current J where J(N) belongs to the null space of the map Tau. We explicitly describe the projected current density J(P) from measured B(z). Based on the decomposition, we prove that B(z) data due to one injection current guarantee a unique determination of the isotropic conductivity under assumptions that the current is two-dimensional and the conductivity value on the surface is known. For a two-dimensional dominating current case, the projected current density J(P) provides a good approximation of the true current J without accumulating noise effects. Numerical simulations show that J(P) from measured B(z) is quite similar to the target J. Biological tissue phantom experiments compare J(P) with the reconstructed J via the reconstructed isotropic conductivity using the harmonic B(z) algorithm.

  3. Momentum transport and non-local transport in heat-flux-driven magnetic reconnection in HEDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Fox, Will; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2016-10-01

    Strong magnetic fields are readily generated in high-energy-density plasmas and can affect the heat confinement properties of the plasma. Magnetic reconnection can in turn be important as an inverse process, which destroys or reconfigures the magnetic field. Recent theory has demonstrated a novel physics regime for reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas where the magnetic field is advected into the reconnection layer by plasma heat flux via the Nernst effect. In this work we elucidate the physics of the electron dissipation layer in this heat-flux-driven regime. Through fully kinetic simulation and a new generalized Ohm's law, we show that momentum transport due to the heat-flux-viscosity effect provides the dissipation mechanism to allow magnetic field line reconnection. Scaling analysis and simulations show that the characteristic width of the current sheet in this regime is several electron mean-free-paths. These results additionally show a coupling between non-local transport and momentum transport, which in turn affects the dynamics of the magnetic field. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008655.

  4. A flux extraction device to measure the magnetic moment of large samples; application to bulk superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, R; Philippe, M; Wera, L; Fagnard, J F; Vanderheyden, B; Dennis, A; Shi, Y; Cardwell, D A; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-02-01

    We report the design and construction of a flux extraction device to measure the DC magnetic moment of large samples (i.e., several cm(3)) at cryogenic temperature. The signal is constructed by integrating the electromotive force generated by two coils wound in series-opposition that move around the sample. We show that an octupole expansion of the magnetic vector potential can be used conveniently to treat near-field effects for this geometrical configuration. The resulting expansion is tested for the case of a large, permanently magnetized, type-II superconducting sample. The dimensions of the sensing coils are determined in such a way that the measurement is influenced by the dipole magnetic moment of the sample and not by moments of higher order, within user-determined upper bounds. The device, which is able to measure magnetic moments in excess of 1 A m(2) (1000 emu), is validated by (i) a direct calibration experiment using a small coil driven by a known current and (ii) by comparison with the results of numerical calculations obtained previously using a flux measurement technique. The sensitivity of the device is demonstrated by the measurement of flux-creep relaxation of the magnetization in a large bulk superconductor sample at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K).

  5. Design improvement of permanent magnet flux switching motor with dual rotor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, H. A.; Sulaiman, E.; Kumar, R.; Rahim, N. S.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents design enhancement to reduce permanent magnet (PM) volume for 7S-6P-7S dual rotor permanent magnet flux-switching machines (DRPMFSM) for electric vehicle application. In recent years, Permanent magnet flux switching (PMFS) motor and a new member of brushless permanent magnet machine are prominently used for the electric vehicle. Though, more volume of Rare-Earth Permanent Magnet (REPM) is used to increase the cost and weight of these motors. Thus, to overcome the issue, new configuration of 7S-6P- 7S dual rotor permanent magnet flux-switching machine (DRPMFSM) has been proposed and investigated in this paper. Initially proposed 7S-6P-7S DRPMFSM has been optimized using “deterministic optimization” to reduce the volume of PM and to attain optimum performances. In addition, the performances of initial and optimized DRPMFSM have been compared such that back-emf, cogging torque, average torque, torque and power vs speed performances, losses and efficiency have been analysed by 2D-finite element analysis (FEA) using the JMAG- Designer software ver. 14.1. Consequently, the final design 7S-6P-7S DRPMFSM has achieved the efficiency of 83.91% at reduced PM volume than initial design to confirm the better efficient motor for HEVs applications.

  6. Precise Measurement of a Magnetic Field Generated by the Electromagnetic Flux Compression Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, D; Matsuda, Y H; Takeyama, S

    2013-01-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure an extremely high magnetic fields.

  7. On the Characteristics of Footpoints of Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes during the Eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, X

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the footpoints of four erupted magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) that appear as sigmoidal hot channels prior to the eruptions in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly high temperaure passbands. The simultaneous Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations disclose that one footpoint of the MFRs originates in the penumbra or penumbra edge with a stronger magnetic field, while the other in the moss region with a weaker magnetic field. The significant deviation of the axis of the MFRs from the main polarity inversion lines and associated filaments suggests that the MFRs have ascended to a high altitude, thus being distinguishable from the source sigmoidal ARs. The more interesting thing is that, with the eruption of the MFRs, the average inclination angle and direct current at the footpoints with stronger magnetic field tend to decrease, which is suggestive of a straightening and untwisting of the magnetic field in the MFR legs. Moreover, the associated flare ribbons also display an interesting evolution. Th...

  8. Precise measurement of a magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D; Sawabe, H; Matsuda, Y H; Takeyama, S

    2013-04-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure extremely high magnetic fields.

  9. Nonlinear fast sausage waves in homogeneous magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhalyaev, Badma B.; Ruderman, Michael S.

    2015-12-01

    > We consider fast sausage waves in straight homogeneous magnetic tubes. The plasma motion is described by the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations in the cold plasma approximation. We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger equation describing the nonlinear evolution of an envelope of a carrier wave. The coefficients of this equation are expressed in terms Bessel and modified Bessel functions. They are calculated numerically for various values of parameters. In particular, we show that the criterion for the onset of the modulational or Benjamin-Fair instability is satisfied. The implication of the obtained results for solar physics is discussed.

  10. Hot spot model of MagLIF implosions: Nernst term effect on magnetic flux losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Rubio, Fernando; Sanz Recio, Javier; Betti, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    An analytical model of a collisional plasma being compressed by a cylindrical liner is proposed and solved in a magnetized liner inertial fusion-like context. The implosion is assumed to be isobaric, and the magnetic diffusion is confined to a thin layer near the liner. Both unmagnetized and magnetized plasma cases are considered. The model reduces to a system of two partial differential equations for temperature and magnetic field. Special attention is given to the effect of the Nernst term on the evolution of the magnetic field. Scaling laws for temperature, magnetic field, hot spot mass increase and magnetic field losses are obtained. The temperature and magnetic field spatial profiles tend to a self-similar state. It is found that when the Nernst term is taken into account, the magnetic field is advected towards the liner, and the magnetic flux losses are independent of the magnetic Lewis number. Research supported by the Spanish Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad, Project No. ENE2014-54960R. Acknowledgements to the Laboratory of Laser Energetics (Rochester) for its hospitality.

  11. Magnetic Flux Fluctuations Due to Eddy Currents and Thermal Noise in Metallic Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakau, S.; Rijpma, A.P.; Dolfsma, J.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Peters, M.J.; Rogalla, H.

    2003-01-01

    We derive expressions for the magnetic flux in a circular loop due to eddy currents and thermal noise in coaxial metallic disks. The eddy currents are induced by an applied field that changes sinusoidally in time. We give expressions for the eddy current noise when the frequency of the applied field

  12. Magnetic Flux Fluctuations Due to Eddy Currents and Thermal Noise in Metallic Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakau, S.; Rijpma, A.P.; Dolfsma, J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Peters, M.J.; Rogalla, Horst

    2003-01-01

    We derive expressions for the magnetic flux in a circular loop due to eddy currents and thermal noise in coaxial metallic disks. The eddy currents are induced by an applied field that changes sinusoidally in time. We give expressions for the eddy current noise when the frequency of the applied field

  13. Accurate Modeling of a Transverse Flux Permanent Magnet Generator Using 3D Finite Element Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyedmohsen; Moghani, Javad Shokrollahi; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an accurate modeling method that is applied to a single-sided outer-rotor transverse flux permanent magnet generator. The inductances and the induced electromotive force for a typical generator are calculated using the magnetostatic three-dimensional finite element method. A n...... by combining three single-phase modules into a three-phase generator....

  14. Design, Prototyping, and Analysis of a Novel Modular Permanent Magnet Transverse Flux Disk Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyedmohsen; Moghani, Javad Shokrollahi; Ershad, Nima Farrokhzad

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design, prototyping, and analysis of a novel modular transverse flux permanent magnet disk generator. The disk-shaped structure simplifies the construction procedure by using laminated steel sheets. To reduce output harmonics, the excitation of the generator is done......, a prototype has been constructed and tested. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulation results....

  15. A Novel Hybrid-Flux Magnetic Gear and Its Performance Analysis Using the 3-D Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiduan Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel hybrid-flux magnetic gear, which integrates a transverse-flux magnetic gear and an axial-flux magnetic gear into a single unit. Compared to its conventional counterparts, the proposed magnetic gear transmits a relatively high torque density. When compared to the transverse-flux magnetic gear, this new structure employs an extra iron segment between the low-speed rotor and high-speed rotor to modulate the magnetic field and contribute to the transmission of additional torque. A three-dimensional (3-D finite element method (FEM is used for the analysis of the magnetic field. In the paper a variables-decoupling method based on the sensitivity analysis of the design parameters is also presented to accelerate the optimization process of the proposed machine.

  16. Dynamical Process of Liner Implosion in the Electromagnetic Flux Compression for Ultra-high Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H; Takeyama, Shojiro

    2013-01-01

    The spatial distribution of magnetic fields that are generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique is investigated, with emphasis on the dynamical processes of an imploding liner. By comparing with the results of computer simulations, we found that the non-uniform implosion of a liner is important in order to explain the magnetic field's distribution during the liner's implosion. In addition, our results suggest that the initial inwards compressing spool-like motion of the liner subsequently turns out to be outwards stretching barrel-like motion along the magnetic field axis.

  17. On the twists of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes observed at 1 AU

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuming; Zhuang, Bin; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chi, Yutian

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar physics, and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. So far it is unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs,...

  18. Iron loss in permanent-magnet brushless AC machines under maximum torque per ampere and flux weakening control \\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Z.Q.; Chen, Y. S.; Howe, D.

    2002-01-01

    The airgap flux density distribution, flux density loci in the stator core, and the associated iron loss in two topologies of brushless AC motor, having a surface-mounted magnet rotor and an interior-mounted magnet rotor, respectively, are investigated when operated under maximum torque per ampere control in the constant torque mode and maximum power control in the flux-weakening mode. It is shown that whilst the interior magnet topology is known to be eminently suitable for flux-weakening op...

  19. Open clusters as laboratories for stellar spin-down and magnetic activity decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Agueros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2017-01-01

    The oldest open clusters within 250 pc of the Sun, the Hyades and Praesepe, are important benchmarks for calibrating stellar properties such as rotation and magnetic activity. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at ~600 Myr. The repurposed Kepler mission, K2, has allowed us to measure rotation periods for dozens of Hyads and hundreds of Praesepe members, including the first periods measured for fully convective Hyads. These data have enabled new tests of models describing the evolution of stellar rotation; discrepancies with these models imply that we still do not fully understand how magnetic fields affect stellar spin-down. I will present rotation periods measured for 48 Hyads and 699 Praesepe members with K2, along with associated Halpha and X-ray fluxes. I will also show how we can compare the dependence of H-alpha and X-ray emission on rotation in order to test theories of magnetic field topology and stellar dynamos. These tests inform models of stellar wind-driven angular momentum loss and the age-rotation-activity relation.

  20. Disc formation in turbulent cloud cores: is magnetic flux loss necessary to stop the magnetic braking catastrophe or not?

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Lima, R; Lazarian, A

    2012-01-01

    Recent numerical analysis of Keplerian disk formation in turbulent, magnetized cloud cores by Santos-Lima, de Gouveia Dal Pino, & Lazarian (2012) demonstrated that reconnection diffusion is an efficient process to remove the magnetic flux excess during the build up of a rotationally supported disk. This process is induced by fast reconnection of the magnetic fields in a turbulent flow. In a similar numerical study, Seifried et al. (2012) concluded that reconnection diffusion or any other non-ideal MHD effects would not be necessary and turbulence shear alone would provide a natural way to build up a rotating disk without requiring magnetic flux loss. Their conclusion was based on the fact that the mean mass-to-flux ratio ({\\mu}) evaluated over a spherical region with a radius much larger than the disk is nearly constant in their models. In this letter we compare the two sets of simulations and show that this averaging over large scales can mask significant real increases of {\\mu} in the inner regions wher...

  1. Magnetic flux penetration in Nb superconducting films with lithographically defined microindentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, J.; Adami, O.-A.; Avila, J. I.; Motta, M.; Ortiz, W. A.; Nguyen, N. D.; Vanderbemden, P.; Vanderheyden, B.; Kramer, R. B. G.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    We present a thorough investigation by magneto-optical imaging of the magnetic flux penetration in Nb thin films with lithographically defined border indentations. We demonstrate that discontinuity lines (d lines), caused by the abrupt bending of current streamlines around the indentations, depart from the expected parabolic trend close to the defect and depend on the shape and size of the indentation as well as on the temperature. These findings are backed up and compared with theoretical results obtained by numerical simulations and analytical calculations highlighting the key role played by demagnetization effects and the creep exponent n . In addition, we show that the presence of nearby indentations and submicrometer random roughness of the sample border can severely modify the flux front topology and dynamics. Strikingly, in contrast to what has been repeatedly predicted in the literature, we do not observe that indentations act as nucleation spots for flux avalanches, but they instead help to release the flux pressure and avoid thermomagnetic instabilities.

  2. Dynamos and anti-dynamos as thin magnetic flux ropes in Riemannian spaces

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Two examples of magnetic anti-dynamos in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are given. The first is a 3D metric conformally related to Arnold cat fast dynamo metric: ${ds_{A}}^{2}=e^{-{\\lambda}z}dp^{2}+e^{{\\lambda}z}dq^{2}+dz^{2}$ is shown to present a behaviour of non-dynamos where the magnetic field exponentially decay in time. The curvature decay as z-coordinates increases without bounds. Some of the Riemann curvature components such as $R_{pzpz}$ also undergoes dissipation while component $R_{qzqz}$ increases without bounds. The remaining curvature component $R_{pqpq}$ is constant on the torus surface. The other anti-dynamo which may be useful in plasma astrophysics is the thin magnetic flux rope or twisted magnetic thin flux tube which also behaves as anti-dynamo since it also decays with time. This model is based on the Riemannian metric of the magnetic twisted flux tube where the axis possesses Frenet curvature and torsion. Since in this last example the Frenet torsion of the axis of the rope is almost zero, o...

  3. Vortex zero modes, large flux limit and Ambjørn-Nielsen-Olesen magnetic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Chatterjee, Chandrasekhar; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi

    2014-10-01

    In the large flux limit vortices become flux tubes with almost constant magnetic field in the interior region. This occurs in the case of non-Abelian vortices as well, and the study of such configurations allows us to reveal a close relationship between vortex zero modes and the gyromagnetic instabilities of vector bosons in a strong background magnetic field discovered by Nielsen, Olesen and Ambjørn. The BPS vortices are exactly at the onset of this instability, and the dimension of their moduli space is precisely reproduced in this way. We present a unifying picture in which, through the study of the linear spectrum of scalars, fermions and W bosons in the magnetic field background, the expected number of translational, orientational, fermionic as well as semilocal zero modes is correctly reproduced in all cases.

  4. Vortex Zero Modes, Large Flux Limit and Ambj{\\o}rn-Nielsen-Olesen Magnetic Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    In the large flux limit vortices become flux tubes with almost constant magnetic field in the interior region. This occurs in the case of non-Abelian vortices as well, and the study of such configurations allows us to reveal a close relationship between vortex zero modes and the gyromagnetic instabilities of vector bosons in a strong background magnetic field discovered by Nielsen, Olesen and Ambj{\\o}rn. The BPS vortices are exactly at the onset of this instability, and the dimension of their moduli space is precisely reproduced in this way. We present a unifying picture in which, through the study of the linear spectrum of scalars, fermions and W bosons in the magnetic field background, the expected number of translational, orientational, fermionic as well as semilocal zero modes is correctly reproduced in all cases.

  5. Design, Prototyping, and Analysis of a Novel Modular Permanent Magnet Transverse Flux Disk Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyedmohsen; Moghani, Javad Shokrollahi; Ershad, Nima Farrokhzad;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design, prototyping, and analysis of a novel modular transverse flux permanent magnet disk generator. The disk-shaped structure simplifies the construction procedure by using laminated steel sheets. To reduce output harmonics, the excitation of the generator is done...... by circular flat shaped Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. First, a typical low power generator is designed, and then partially optimized. The optimization objective is to find an inner radius which maximizes the power factor, the output power to mass ratio and the efficiency. The generator equivalent circuit...... parameters are computed by three dimensional finite element analyses. The simulation results show that the power factor of the proposed structure is considerably greater than the power factor previously reported for other transverse flux permanent magnet generator structures. To verify the simulation results...

  6. Geodesic dynamo chaotic flows and non-Anosov maps in twisted magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2008-01-01

    Recently Tang and Boozer [{\\textbf{Phys. Plasmas (2000)}}], have investigated the anisotropies in magnetic field dynamo evolution, from local Lyapunov exponents, giving rise to a metric tensor, in the Alfven twist in magnetic flux tubes (MFTs). Thiffeault and Boozer [\\textbf{Chaos}(2001)] have investigated the how the vanishing of Riemann curvature constrained the Lyapunov exponential stretching of chaotic flows. In this paper, Tang-Boozer-Thiffeault differential geometric framework is used to investigate effects of twisted magnetic flux tube filled with helical chaotic flows on the Riemann curvature tensor. When Frenet torsion is positive, the Riemann curvature is unstable, while the negative torsion induces an stability when time $t\\to{\\infty}$. This enhances the dynamo action inside the MFTs. The Riemann metric, depends on the radial random flows along the poloidal and toroidal directions. The Anosov flows has been applied by Arnold, Zeldovich, Ruzmaikin and Sokoloff [\\textbf{JETP (1982)}] to build a unifo...

  7. Helicity Transformation under the Collision and Merging of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaas, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    A magnetic flux rope is a tube-like, current carrying plasma embedded in an external magnetic field. The magnetic field lines resemble threads in a rope, which vary in pitch according to radius. Flux ropes are ubiquitous in astrophysical plasmas, and bundles of these structures play an important role in the dynamics of the space environment. They are observed in the solar atmosphere and near-earth environment where they are seen to twist, merge, tear, and writhe. In this MHD context, their global dynamics are bound by rules of magnetic helicity conservation, unless, under a non-ideal process, helicity is transformed through magnetic reconnection, turbulence, or localized instabilities. These processes are tested under experimental conditions in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The device is a twenty-meter long, one-meter diameter, cylindrical vacuum vessel designed to generate a highly reproducible, magnetized plasma. Reliable shot-to-shot repetition of plasma parameters and over four hundred diagnostic ports enable the collection of volumetric datasets (measurements of ne, Te, Vp, B, J, E, uflow) as two kink-unstable flux ropes form, move, collide, and merge. Similar experiments on the LAPD have utilized these volumetric datasets, visualizing magnetic reconnection through a topological quasi-separatrix layer, or QSL. This QSL is shown to be spatially coincident with the reconnection rate, ∫ E . dl , and oscillates (although out of phase) with global helicity. Magnetic helicity is observed to have a negative sign and its counterpart, cross helicity, a positive one. These quantities oscillate 8% peak-to-peak, and the changes in helicity are visualized as 1) the transport of helicity (ϕB + E × A) and 2) the dissipation of the helicity - 2 E . B . This work is supported by LANL-UC research Grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  8. On the 3D Structure of the Magnetic Field in Regions of Emerging Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio

    2010-01-01

    We explore the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic field in an emerging flux region. An image of the equivalent width of the He I 10830 A red blended component shows the presence of filamentary structures that might be interpreted as magnetic loops. We point out that the magnetic field strength in the chromosphere resembles a smoothed version of that found in the photosphere and that it is not correlated at all with the above-mentioned equivalent width map. Lacking other diagnostics, this suggests that one cannot discard the possibility that the chromospheric field we infer from the observations is tracing the lower chromosphere of the active region instead of tracing the magnetic field along loops. If the He I line is formed within magnetic loops, we point out a potential problem that appears when interpreting observations using only one component along the line-of-sight.

  9. Oval gradient coils for an open magnetic resonance imaging system with a vertical magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Koki; Abe, Mitsushi; Kose, Katsumi; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Existing open magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems use biplanar gradient coils for the spatial encoding of signals. We propose using novel oval gradient coils for an open vertical-field MRI. We designed oval gradients for a 0.3 T open MRI system and showed that such a system could outperform a traditional biplanar gradient system while maintaining adequate gradient homogeneity and subject accessibility. Such oval gradient coils would exhibit high efficiency, low inductance and resistance, and high switching capability. Although the designed oval Y and Z coils showed more heat dissipation and less cooling capability than biplanar coils with the same gap, they showed an efficient heat-dissipation path to the surrounding air, which would alleviate the heat problem. The performance of the designed oval-coil system was demonstrated experimentally by imaging a human hand.

  10. Effects of the Magnetic Flux and of the Electron Momentum on the Transmission Amplitude in the Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaresh Kumar, M. V.; Sahoo, Debendranath

    A characterization of the two-terminal open-ring Aharonov-Bohm interferometer is made by analyzing the phase space plots in the complex transmission amplitude plane. Two types of plots are considered: type 1 plot uses the magnetic flux as the variable parameter and type 2 plot which uses the electron momentum as the variable parameter. In type 1 plot, the trajectory closes upon itself only when the ratio R of the arm lengths (of the interferometer) is a rational fraction, and the shape and the type of the generated flower-like pattern is sensitive to the electron momentum. For momenta corresponding to discrete eigenstates of the perfect ring (i.e., the ring without the leads), the trajectory passes through the origin a certain fixed number of times before closing upon itself, whereas for arbitrary momenta it never passes through the origin. Although the transmission coefficient is periodic in the flux with the elementary flux quantum as the basic period, the phenomenon of electron transmission is shown not to be so when analyzed via the present technique. The periodicity is seen to spread over several flux units whenever R is a rational fraction whereas there is absolutely no periodicity present when R is an irrational number. In type 2 plot, closed trajectories passing through the origin a number of times are seen for R being a rational fraction. The case R = 1 (i.e., a symmetric ring) with zero flux is rather pathological — it presents a closed loop surrounding the origin. For irrational R values, the trajectories never close.

  11. On the role of repetitive magnetic reconnections in evolution of magnetic flux-ropes in solar corona

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Sanjay; Joshi, Bhuwan; Smolarkiewicz, P K

    2016-01-01

    Parker's magnetostatic theorem extended to astrophysical magnetofluids with large magnetic Reynolds number supports ceaseless regeneration of current sheets and hence, spontaneous magnetic reconnections recurring in time. Consequently, a scenario is possible where the repeated reconnections provide an autonomous mechanism governing emergence of coherent structures in astrophysical magnetofluids. In this work, such a scenario is explored by performing numerical computations commensurate with the magnetostatic theorem. In particular, the computations explore the evolution of a flux-rope governed by repeated reconnections in a magnetic geometry resembling bipolar loops of solar corona. The revealed morphology of the evolution process, including onset and ascent of the rope, reconnection locations and the associated topology of the magnetic field lines, agrees with observations, and thus substantiates physical realisability of the advocated mechanism.

  12. Flux jumps in high-J c MgB2 bulks during pulsed field magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, H.; Mochizuki, H.; Naito, T.; Ainslie, M. D.; Giunchi, G.

    2016-03-01

    Pulsed field magnetization (PFM) of a high-J c MgB2 bulk disk has been investigated at 20 K, in which flux jumps frequently occur for high pulsed fields. Using a numerical simulation of the PFM procedure, we estimated the time dependence of the local magnetic field and temperature during PFM. We analyzed the electromagnetic and thermal instability of the high-J c MgB2 bulk to avoid flux jumps using the time dependence of the critical thickness, d c(t), which shows the upper safety thickness to stabilize the superconductor magnetically, and the minimum propagation zone length, l m(t), to obtain dynamical stability. The values of d c(t) and l m(t) change along the thermally-stabilized direction with increasing temperature below the critical temperature, T c. However, the flux jump can be qualitatively understood by the local temperature, T(t), which exceeds T c in the bulk. Finally, possible solutions to avoid flux jumps in high-J c MgB2 bulks are discussed.

  13. Polarized neutron imaging and three-dimensional calculation of magnetic flux trapping in bulk of superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treimer, Wolfgang; Ebrahimi, Omid; Karakas, Nursel; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2012-05-17

    Polarized neutron radiography was used to study the three-dimensional magnetic flux distribution inside of single-crystal and polycrystalline Pb cylinders with large (cm3) volume and virtually zero demagnetization. Experiments with single crystals being in the Meissner phase (Tmagnetic field. 99.9999 wt % pure polycrystalline samples were exposed to the same homogeneous magnetic field (6.4 mT) and only a portion of the applied field was expelled. The trapped field in the sample (Tflux was nearly constant. The expelled field outside of the samples followed 1/R dependence. These measurements provided a unique and detailed picture of macroscopic superconducting samples, confirming the existence of both uniform bulk Meissner expulsion in single crystals and bulk flux trapping with nearly-Bean-model profiles due to flux pinning in polycrystalline samples.

  14. Assessing Magnetic Torques and Energy Fluxes in Close-in Star-Planet Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugarek, A.

    2016-12-01

    Planets in close-in orbit interact with the magnetized wind of their hosting star. This magnetic interaction was proposed to be a source for enhanced emissions in the chromosphere of the star, and to participate in setting the migration timescale of the close-in planet. The efficiency of the magnetic interaction is known to depend on the magnetic properties of the host star and of the planet, and on the magnetic topology of the interaction. We use a global, three-dimensional numerical model of close-in star-planet systems, based on the magnetohydrodynamics approximation, to compute a grid of simulations for varying properties of the orbiting planet. We propose a simple parametrization of the magnetic torque that applies to the planet, and of the energy flux generated by the interaction. The dependency upon the planet properties and the wind properties is clearly identified in the derived scaling laws, which can be used in secular evolution codes to take into account the effect of magnetic interactions in planet migration. They can also be used to estimate a potential magnetic source of enhanced emissions in observed close-in star-planet systems, in order to constrain observationally possible exoplanetary magnetic fields.

  15. Thermally actuated magnetization flux pump in single-grain YBCO bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Yu; Li Quan; Coombs, T A, E-mail: yy300@cam.ac.u, E-mail: ql229@cam.ac.u, E-mail: tac1000@cam.ac.u [EPEC Superconductivity Group, Electrical Engineering Department, Cambridge University, 9 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Recent progress in material processing has proved that high temperature superconductors (HTS) have a great potential to trap large magnetic fields at cryogenic temperatures. For example, HTS are widely used in MRI scanners and in magnetic bearings. However, using traditional ways to magnetize, the YBCO will always need the applied field to be as high as the expected field on the superconductor or much higher than it, leading to a much higher cost than that of using permanent magnets. In this paper, we find a method of YBCO magnetization in liquid nitrogen that only requires the applied field to be at the level of a permanent magnet. Moreover, rather than applying a pulsed high current field on the YBCO, we use a thermally actuated material (gadolinium) as an intermedia and create a travelling magnetic field through it by changing the partial temperature so that the partial permeability is changed to build up the magnetization of the YBCO gradually after multiple pumps. The gadolinium bulk is located between the YBCO and the permanent magnet and is heated and cooled repeatedly from the outer surface to generate a travelling thermal wave inwards. In the subsequent experiment, an obvious accumulation of the flux density is detected on the surface of the YBCO bulk.

  16. Emergence of magnetic flux from the convection zone into the corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontis, V.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Galsgaard, K.; Hood, A.; O'Shea, E.

    2004-11-01

    Numerical experiments of the emergence of magnetic flux from the uppermost layers of the solar interior to the photosphere and its further eruption into the low atmosphere and corona are carried out. We use idealized models for the initial stratification and magnetic field distribution below the photosphere similar to those used for multidimensional flux emergence experiments in the literature. The energy equation is adiabatic except for the inclusion of ohmic and viscous dissipation terms, which, however, become important only at interfaces and reconnection sites. Three-dimensional experiments for the eruption of magnetic flux both into an unmagnetized corona and into a corona with a preexisting ambient horizontal field are presented. The shocks preceding the rising plasma present the classical structure of nonlinear Lamb waves. The expansion of the matter when rising into the atmosphere takes place preferentially in the horizontal directions: a flattened (or oval) low plasma-β ball ensues, in which the field lines describe loops in the corona with increasing inclination away from the vertical as one goes toward the sides of the structure. Magnetograms and velocity field distributions on horizontal planes are presented simultaneously for the solar interior and various levels in the atmosphere. Since the background pressure and density drop over many orders of magnitude with increasing height, the adiabatic expansion of the rising plasma yields very low temperatures. To avoid this, the entropy of the rising fluid elements should be increased to the high values of the original atmosphere via heating mechanisms not included in the present numerical experiments. The eruption of magnetic flux into a corona with a preexisting magnetic field pointing in the horizontal direction yields a clear case of essentially three-dimensional reconnection when the upcoming and ambient field systems come into contact. The coronal ambient field is chosen at time t=0 perpendicular to

  17. Magnetar giant flares in multipolar magnetic fields. II. Flux rope eruptions with current sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yu, Cong, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Object, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2014-11-20

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of a CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. In particular, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. This released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares, and the flux rope would, therefore, go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is inconsistent with the radio afterglow. Fortunately, in the latter case, i.e., the catastrophic escape, the flux rope could escape the magnetar and go to infinity in a dynamical way. This is more consistent with radio afterglow observations of giant flares. We find that the minor radius of the flux rope has important implications for its eruption. Flux ropes with larger minor radii are more prone to erupt. We stress that the CS provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection, which would further enhance the energy release during eruptions.

  18. The turbulent diffusion of toroidal magnetic flux as inferred from properties of the sunspot butterfly diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In order to match observed properties of the solar cycle, flux-transport dynamo models require the toroidal magnetic flux to be stored in a region of low magnetic diffusivity, typically located at or below the bottom of the convection zone. Aims: We infer the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field on the basis of empirical data. Methods: We considered the time evolution of mean latitude and width of the activity belts of solar cycles 12-23 and their dependence on cycle strength. We interpreted the decline phase of the cycles as a diffusion process. Results: The activity level of a given cycle begins to decline when the centers of its equatorward propagating activity belts come within their (full) width (at half maximum) from the equator. This happens earlier for stronger cycles because their activity belts are wider. From that moment on, the activity and the belt width decrease in the same manner for all cycles, independent of their maximum activity level. In terms of diffusive cancellation of opposite-polarity toroidal flux across the equator, we infer the turbulent diffusivity experienced by the toroidal field, wherever it is located, to be in the range 150-450 km2 s-1. Strong diffusive latitudinal spreading of the toroidal flux underneath the activity belts can be inhibited by an inflow toward the toroidal field bands in the convection zone with a magnitude of several meters per second. Conclusions: The inferred value of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field agrees, to order of magnitude, with estimates based on mixing-length models for the solar convection zone. This is at variance with the requirement of flux-transport dynamo models. The inflows required to keep the toroidal field bands together before they approach the equator are similar to the inflows toward the activity belts observed with local helioseismology.

  19. Confined partial filament eruption and its reformation within a stable magnetic flux rope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Kayshap, Pradeep; Uddin, Wahab [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Dwivedi, B. N. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Filippov, Boris [Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chandra, Ramesh [Department of Physics, D.S.B. Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263 002, Uttarakhand (India); Choudhary, Debi Prasad, E-mail: navin@aries.res.in, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present observations of a confined partial eruption of a filament on 2012 August 4, which restores its initial shape within ≈2 hr after eruption. From the Global Oscillation Network Group Hα observations, we find that the filament plasma turns into dynamic motion at around 11:20 UT from the middle part of the filament toward the northwest direction with an average speed of ≈105 km s{sup –1}. A little brightening underneath the filament possibly shows the signature of low-altitude reconnection below the filament eruptive part. In Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 Å images, we observe an activation of right-handed helically twisted magnetic flux rope that contains the filament material and confines it during its dynamical motion. The motion of cool filament plasma stops after traveling a distance of ≈215 Mm toward the northwest from the point of eruption. The plasma moves partly toward the right foot point of the flux rope, while most of the plasma returns after 12:20 UT toward the left foot point with an average speed of ≈60 km s{sup –1} to reform the filament within the same stable magnetic structure. On the basis of the filament internal fine structure and its position relative to the photospheric magnetic fields, we find filament chirality to be sinistral, while the activated enveloping flux rope shows a clear right-handed twist. Thus, this dynamic event is an apparent example of one-to-one correspondence between the filament chirality (sinistral) and the enveloping flux rope helicity (positive). From the coronal magnetic field decay index, n, calculation near the flux rope axis, it is evident that the whole filament axis lies within the domain of stability (i.e., n < 1), which provides the filament stability despite strong disturbances at its eastern foot point.

  20. Pulsating Magnetic Reconnection Driven by Three-Dimensional Flux-Rope Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; De Haas, T; Daughton, W; Van Compernolle, B; Intrator, T; Vincena, S

    2016-06-10

    The dynamics of magnetic reconnection is investigated in a laboratory experiment consisting of two magnetic flux ropes, with currents slightly above the threshold for the kink instability. The evolution features periodic bursts of magnetic reconnection. To diagnose this complex evolution, volumetric three-dimensional data were acquired for both the magnetic and electric fields, allowing key field-line mapping quantities to be directly evaluated for the first time with experimental data. The ropes interact by rotating about each other and periodically bouncing at the kink frequency. During each reconnection event, the formation of a quasiseparatrix layer (QSL) is observed in the magnetic field between the flux ropes. Furthermore, a clear correlation is demonstrated between the quasiseparatrix layer and enhanced values of the quasipotential computed by integrating the parallel electric field along magnetic field lines. These results provide clear evidence that field lines passing through the quasiseparatrix layer are undergoing reconnection and give a direct measure of the nonlinear reconnection rate. The measurements suggest that the parallel electric field within the QSL is supported predominantly by electron pressure; however, resistivity may play a role.

  1. The Snake - a Reconnecting Coil in a Twisted Magnetic Flux Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Bicknell, G V; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Li, Jianke

    2001-01-01

    We propose that the curious Galactic Center filament known as ``The Snake'' is a twisted giant magnetic flux tube, anchored in rotating molecular clouds. The MHD kink instability generates coils in the tube and subsequent magnetic reconnection injects relativistic electrons. Electrons diffuse away from a coil at an energy-dependent rate producing a flat spectral index at large distances from it. Our fit to the data of \\citet{gray95a} shows that the magnetic field $\\sim 0.4 \\> \\rm mG$ is large compared to the ambient $\\sim 7 \\mu \\> \\rm G$ field, indicating that the flux tube is force-free. If the {\\em relative} level of turbulence in the Snake and the general interstellar medium are similar, then electrons have been diffusing in the Snake for about $3 \\times 10^5 \\> \\rm yr$, comparable to the timescale at which magnetic energy is annihilated in the major kink. Estimates of the magnetic field in the G359.19-0.05 molecular complex are similar to our estimate of the magnetic field in the Snake suggesting a strong...

  2. On the Magnetic and Energy Characteristics of Recurrent Homologous Jets from An Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Yuming; Erdélyi, Robertus; Liu, Rui; McIntosh, Scott W.; Gou, Tingyu; Chen, Jun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Lijuan; Pan, Zonghao

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present the detailed analysis of recurrent homologous jets originating from an emerging negative magnetic flux at the edge of an active region. The observed jets show multithermal features. Their evolution shows high consistence with the characteristic parameters of the emerging flux, suggesting that with more free magnetic energy, the eruptions tend to be more violent, frequent, and blowout-like. The average temperature, average electron number density, and axial speed are found to be similar for different jets, indicating that they should have been formed by plasmas from similar origins. Statistical analysis of the jets and their footpoint region conditions reveals a strong positive relationship between the footpoint region total 131 Å intensity enhancement and jets’ length/width. Stronger linearly positive relationships also exist between the total intensity enhancement/thermal energy of the footpoint regions and jets’ mass/kinetic/thermal energy, with higher cross-correlation coefficients. All the above results together confirm the direct relationship between the magnetic reconnection and the jets and validate the important role of magnetic reconnection in transporting large amounts of free magnetic energy into jets. It is also suggested that there should be more free energy released during the magnetic reconnection of blowout than of standard jet events.

  3. Mulga, a major tropical dry open forest of Australia: recent insights to carbon and water fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamus, Derek; Huete, Alfredo; Cleverly, James; Nolan, Rachael H.; Ma, Xuanlong; Tarin, Tonantzin; Santini, Nadia S.

    2016-12-01

    Mulga, comprised of a complex of closely related Acacia spp., grades from a low open forest to tall shrublands in tropical and sub-tropical arid and semi-arid regions of Australia and experiences warm-to-hot annual temperatures and a pronounced dry season. This short synthesis of current knowledge briefly outlines the causes of the extreme variability in rainfall characteristic of much of central Australia, and then discusses the patterns and drivers of variability in carbon and water fluxes of a central Australian low open Mulga forest. Variation in phenology and the impact of differences in the amount and timing of precipitation on vegetation function are then discussed. We use field observations, with particular emphasis on eddy covariance data, coupled with modelling and remote sensing products to interpret inter-seasonal and inter-annual patterns in the behaviour of this ecosystem. We show that Mulga can vary between periods of near carbon neutrality to periods of being a significant sink or source for carbon, depending on both the amount and timing of rainfall. Further, we demonstrate that Mulga contributed significantly to the 2011 global land sink anomaly, a result ascribed to the exceptional rainfall of 2010/2011. Finally, we compare and contrast the hydraulic traits of three tree species growing close to the Mulga and show how each species uses different combinations of trait strategies (for example, sapwood density, xylem vessel implosion resistance, phenological guild, access to groundwater and Huber value) to co-exist in this semi-arid environment. Understanding the inter-annual variability in functional behaviour of this important arid-zone biome and mechanisms underlying species co-existence will increase our ability to predict trajectories of carbon and water balances for future changing climates.

  4. The performance of bonded magnets used in the treatment of anterior open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, J H; Shell, N; Hunt, N P

    1996-05-01

    This investigation examined the magnetic flux and repulsive force of neodymium-iron-boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets based on Nd2Fe14B with acrylic coatings in different orientations. The flux was measured with a Hall probe and the force measured by electronic scales with the magnets mounted on a laboratory jack. Results show that there were no magnetic losses after embedding the magnets in acrylic bite-blocks, although there were significant flux losses when the magnet blocks were directly heated. The alignment of the magnets over each other was of the utmost importance and significantly affected the repulsive force between the magnets. When the magnets were mounted in an articulator to simulate jaw movement, the force levels between the magnets was further reduced as a result of the effects of the rotation of the articulator. It is concluded that Nd-Fe-B type magnets embedded in acrylic can be used to give predictable repulsive forces in the mouth. The dramatic reduction in force levels when the magnets are not in optimal alignment, however, makes their effectiveness in aiding intrusion of teeth doubtful.

  5. Gauge coupling unification in SO(32) heterotic string theory with magnetic fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Hajime; Takano, Yasufumi; Tatsuishi, Takuya H

    2015-01-01

    We study $SO(32)$ heterotic string theory on torus with magnetic fluxes. Non-vanishing fluxes can lead to non-universal gauge kinetic functions for $SU(3) \\times SU(2) \\times U(1)_Y$ which is the important features of $SO(32)$ heterotic string theory in contrast to the $E_8\\times E_8$ theory. It is found that the experimental values of gauge couplings are realized with ${\\cal O}(1)$ values of moduli fields based on the realistic models with the $SU(3) \\times SU(2) \\times U(1)_Y$ gauge symmetry and three chiral generations of quarks and leptons without chiral exotics.

  6. Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects on the Gamma-Ray Burst Neutrino Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2010-01-01

    We reanalyze the prompt muon neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in terms of the particle physics involved. We first reproduce the often used reference Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux assuming photo-meson production by the Delta(1232) resonance, including synchrotron energy losses of the secondary pions explicitly. Then we switch on additional neutrino production modes, we include the neutrinos from muon decays, we include the magnetic field effects on all secondary species, and we apply flavor mixing including the current parameter uncertainties. We demonstrate that the combination of these effects modifies the shape of the original Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux significantly, and changes the normalization by up to one order of magnitude. As a consequence, the gamma-ray burst search strategy of neutrino telescopes may be based on the wrong flux shape, and the constraints derived for the GRB neutrino flux, such as the baryonic loading, may in fact be already much stronger than anticipated. Moreover, a neutrino flux ...

  7. Spectrum of the open QCD flux tube in d=2+1 and its effective string description

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Bastian B

    2013-01-01

    Simulations in lattice gauge theory suggest that the formation of a flux tube between quark and antiquark leads to quark confinement. It is conjectured that the infrared behaviour of the flux tube is governed by an effective string theory and simulations show good agreement between lattice data and its predictions. To next-to leading order ($R^{-3}$) in the inverse $q\\bar{q}$ separation $R$ the effective string theory is equivalent to Nambu-Goto string theory. For the open flux tube in three dimensions corrections appear at order $R^{-4}$. We compare these predictions to high-accuracy measurements of the groundstate energy of the flux tube in 3d SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory and extract the coefficient of the leading order boundary term in the effective action.

  8. Laser-driven magnetic-flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Chang, P Y; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Polomarov, O; Frenje, J; Li, C K; Manuel, M J-E; Petrasso, R D; Rygg, J R; Séguin, F H; Betti, R

    2009-11-20

    The demonstration of magnetic field compression to many tens of megagauss in cylindrical implosions of inertial confinement fusion targets is reported for the first time. The OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2] was used to implode cylindrical CH targets filled with deuterium gas and seeded with a strong external field (>50 kG) from a specially developed magnetic pulse generator. This seed field was trapped (frozen) in the shock-heated gas fill and compressed by the imploding shell at a high implosion velocity, minimizing the effect of resistive flux diffusion. The magnetic fields in the compressed core were probed via proton deflectrometry using the fusion products from an imploding D3He target. Line-averaged magnetic fields between 30 and 40 MG were observed.

  9. Reduction of the unbalanced magnetic force of a transverse flux machine by using symmetric multipair cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, G. H.; Park, N. K.; Lee, C. I.; Chang, J. H.; Jeong, S. W.; Kang, D. H.

    2008-04-01

    This paper investigates the characteristics of the magnetic force and the torque in the conventional rotatory two-phase transverse flux machine (TFM) by using the three-dimensional finite element method. This research shows that the unbalanced magnetic force is one of the dominant excitation forces in this machine, and it proposes a TFM with symmetric multipair cores in which each stator core of phases A and B is divided into two and the divided cores are disposed symmetrically to cancel the unbalanced magnetic force of each phase of a TFM. However, symmetric multipair cores of a TFM may reduce the winding space of coil which results in the reduction of torque and power. This research performs the optimization of teeth-slot configuration of the stator to overcome this shortcoming. It shows that the unbalance magnetic force of a TFM can be effectively eliminated without sacrificing torque or power by introducing symmetric multipair cores.

  10. Propagation and dispersion of sausage wave trains in magnetic flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Oliver, R; Terradas, J

    2015-01-01

    A localized perturbation of a magnetic flux tube produces a pair of wave trains that propagate in opposite directions along the tube. These wave packets disperse as they propagate, where the extent of dispersion depends on the physical properties of the magnetic structure, on the length of the initial excitation, and on its nature (e.g., transverse or axisymmetric). In Oliver et al. (2014) we considered a transverse initial perturbation, whereas the temporal evolution of an axisymmetric one is examined here. In both papers we use a method based on Fourier integrals to solve the initial value problem. Previous studies on wave propagation in magnetic wave guides have emphasized that the wave train dispersion is influenced by the particular dependence of the group velocity on the longitudinal wavenumber. Here we also find that long initial perturbations result in low amplitude wave packets and that large values of the magnetic tube to environment density ratio yield longer wave trains. To test the detectability ...

  11. Kinetic models of magnetic flux ropes observed in the Earth magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradov, A. A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasko, I. Y.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Zelenyi, L. M. [Space Research Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Artemyev, A. V. [Space Research Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Yushkov, E. V. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Space Research Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFR) are universal magnetoplasma structures (similar to cylindrical screw pinches) formed in reconnecting current sheets. In particular, MFR with scales from about the ion inertial length to MHD range are widely observed in the Earth magnetosphere. Typical MFR have force-free configuration with the axial magnetic field peaking on the MFR axis, whereas bifurcated MFR with an off-axis peak of the axial magnetic field are observed as well. In the present paper, we develop kinetic models of force-free and bifurcated MFR and determine consistent ion and electron distribution functions. The magnetic field configuration of the force-free MFR represents well-known Gold-Hoyle MFR (uniformly twisted MFR). We show that bifurcated MFR are characterized by the presence of cold and hot current-carrying electrons. The developed models are capable to describe MFR observed in the Earth magnetotail as well as MFR recently observed by Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission at the Earth magnetopause.

  12. Interaction between emerging magnetic flux and the ambient solar coronal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, M.; Derosa, M.

    2008-12-01

    We study the interaction between emerging magnetic flux and pre-existing coronal field by means of numerical simulations using the magneto-frictional method. By advancing the induction equation, the magneto-frictional method models the coronal magnetic field as a quasi-static sequence of non-linear force- free field configurations evolving in response to photospheric driving. A general feature of the simulations is the spontaneous formation of tangential discontinuities, interfaces where the field line torsional coefficient changes abruptly across separate domains of connectivity. Since the method evolves the vector potential, we can follow the evolution of the relative magnetic helicity and examine its relation to the magnetic free energy. Other tools, such as the squashing factor of Titov and Démoulin, are also used to study the topology of the field configurations.

  13. Towards a Data-Optimized Coronal Magnetic Field Model (DOC-FM): Simulating Flux Ropes with the Flux Rope Insertion Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmasse, K.; DeLuca, E. E.; Savcheva, A. S.; Gibson, S. E.; Fan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the 3D magnetic filed structure at the time of major solar eruptions is vital or understanding of the space weather effects of these eruptions. Multiple data-constrained techniques that reconstruct the 3D coronal field based on photospheric magnetograms have been used to achieve this goal. In particular, we have used the flux rope insertion method to obtain the coronal magnetic field of multiple regions containing flux ropes or sheared arcades based on line-of-sight magnetograms and X-ray and EUV observations of coronal loops. For the purpose of developing statistical measures of the goodness of fit of these models to the observations, here we present our modeling of flux ropes based on synthetic magnetograms obtained from Fan & Gibson emerging flux rope simulation. The goal is to reproduce the flux rope structure from a given time step of the MHD simulations based only on the photospheric magnetogram and synthetic forward modeled coronal emission obtained from the same step of the MHD simulation. For this purpose we create a large grid of models with the flux rope insertion method with different combinations of axial and poloidal flux, which give us different morphology of the flux rope. Then we compare the synthetic coronal emission with the shape of the current distribution and field lines from the models to come up with a best fit. This fit is then tested using the statistical methods developed by our team.

  14. Procedure to Perform Real-Time Reconstruction of the Magnetic Flux in FTU Using RTAI Virtual Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Yahya

    2012-06-01

    One of the important topics of plasma equilibrium issue in a tokamak is to determine and reconstruct the magnetic iso-flux surfaces using plasma boundary condition (in Shafranov, Sov Phys JETP Engl Transl 37:775, 1960). The equilibrium code ODIN is based on the technique using the multi-polar moments method (in Alladio and Crisanti, Nuclear Fusion 26:1143, 1986) which results from homogeneous solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation. This method is used to reconstruct the magnetic flux and equilibrium in the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade experiment. The real-time reconstruction of the magnetic field map is important to compute quantities necessary to control the plasma. In this paper we address the procedure to perform real-time reconstruction of the magnetic flux (based on ODIN) on RTAI virtual machine. As result of the real-time implementation, we will show the time evolution of the reconstructed magnetic iso-flux surfaces.

  15. Seeding magnetic fields for laser-driven flux compression in high-energy-density plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, O V; Knauer, J P; Chang, P Y; Jang, N W; Shoup, M J; Meyerhofer, D D; Betti, R

    2009-04-01

    A compact, self-contained magnetic-seed-field generator (5 to 16 T) is the enabling technology for a novel laser-driven flux-compression scheme in laser-driven targets. A magnetized target is directly irradiated by a kilojoule or megajoule laser to compress the preseeded magnetic field to thousands of teslas. A fast (300 ns), 80 kA current pulse delivered by a portable pulsed-power system is discharged into a low-mass coil that surrounds the laser target. A >15 T target field has been demonstrated using a capacitor bank, a laser-triggered switch, and a low-impedance (<1 Omega) strip line. The device has been integrated into a series of magnetic-flux-compression experiments on the 60 beam, 30 kJ OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The initial application is a novel magneto-inertial fusion approach [O. V. Gotchev et al., J. Fusion Energy 27, 25 (2008)] to inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where the amplified magnetic field can inhibit thermal conduction losses from the hot spot of a compressed target. This can lead to the ignition of massive shells imploded with low velocity-a way of reaching higher gains than is possible with conventional ICF.

  16. Laminated Magnetic Materials Losses Analysis under Non-Sinusoidal Flux Waveforms in Power Electronics Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Aguglia, D

    2014-01-01

    Losses analyses of laminated magnetic materials subject to non-sinusoidal magnetic flux are presented. Comparative analyses on typical Fe-Si oriented and non-oriented grains and nanocrystalline materials are carried out considering the influence of harmonic phase shift and associated B-H minor loops. Experimental measurements are performed to illustrate the B-H characteristics behaviours. A special experimental effort is given on nanocrystalline material, where Steinmetz coefficients are experimentally identified to analyse the performances of the improved Generalized Steinmetz Equation (iGSE) when phase displaced minor loops occur. It is proven that the iGSE is efficient in predicting nanocrystalline losses versus variable phase displaced harmonics.

  17. Study on Design of Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Instrument for gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang,Changlong; Jin,Yingwei; Xu,Zhangsui; Fu,Junmei

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the magnetic Dipole model of magnetic flux leakage (MFL) based on the principle of MFL testing, proposes the effects of surface defect width and depth on MFL field, and presents the peak-peak amplitude algorithm that the features of defect signal are extracted. The peak-peak amplitude and separation, signal gradient variation are used as the distinguish criterions of defects. The principle of instrumental hardware design is also introduced. The introduced gun MFL testing instrument is successfully employed in the nondestructive evaluation of gun.

  18. Analytical Investigation on the Power Factor of a Flux-Modulated Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinglin;

    2015-01-01

    Flux-modulated permanent-magnet synchronous machine (FM-PMSM) is characterized as a high-torque direct-drive electrical machine, but may suffer from the low power factor. This paper aims to investigate the issue of the low power factor in theory and explore the possibilities for improvement....... An analytical model for the FM-PMSM is developed to obtain the magnetic field distribution, and its accuracy is verified by the finite-element method. On the basis of the developed analytical model, a fast approach is developed to predict the power factor of the FM-PMSM. The analytical results indicate...

  19. Extracting, Tracking, and Visualizing Magnetic Flux Vortices in 3D Complex-Valued Superconductor Simulation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hanqi; Phillips, Carolyn L; Peterka, Tom; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Glatz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for the vortex extraction and tracking of superconducting magnetic flux vortices for both structured and unstructured mesh data. In the Ginzburg-Landau theory, magnetic flux vortices are well-defined features in a complex-valued order parameter field, and their dynamics determine electromagnetic properties in type-II superconductors. Our method represents each vortex line (a 1D curve embedded in 3D space) as a connected graph extracted from the discretized field in both space and time. For a time-varying discrete dataset, our vortex extraction and tracking method is as accurate as the data discretization. We then apply 3D visualization and 2D event diagrams to the extraction and tracking results to help scientists understand vortex dynamics and macroscale superconductor behavior in greater detail than previously possible.

  20. An exploding foil shockwave technique for magnetic flux compression and high voltage pulse generation

    CERN Document Server

    Goh, S E

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a novel electromagnetic shockwave technique for use in compressing magnetic flux and to serve as the basis for a new approach to producing fast-rising voltage pulses with amplitudes of several hundred kV. The shockwave is produced by an exploding foil driven electric gun that accelerates a Mylar flyer to impact with a sample of aluminium powder. Both Japanese and Russian researchers have previously published experimental results for shockwave magnetic flux compression using an explosive driver. The present research considers replacing the explosive energy of this driver by the electrostatic energy stored in a capacitor bank, thereby enabling experiments to be performed in a laboratory environment. Differences in performance that arise from the use of explosive and electrical driver are examined. A conventional electric gun system in planar geometry is developed to study the insulator-to-metallic transition in shock-compressed aluminium powder. This provides data on the conducting shock f...

  1. On the Magnetic and Energy Characteristics of Recurrent Homologous Jets from An Emerging Flux

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiajia; Erdélyi, Robertus; Liu, Rui; McIntosh, Scott W; Gou, Tingyu; Chen, Jun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Lijuan; Pan, Zonghao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the detailed analysis of recurrent homologous jets originating from an emerging negative magnetic flux at the edge of an Active Region. The observed jets show multi-thermal features. Their evolution shows high consistence with the characteristic parameters of the emerging flux, suggesting that with more free magnetic energy, the eruptions tend to be more violent, frequent and blowout-like. The average temperature, average electron number density and axial speed are found to be similar for different jets, indicating that they should have been formed by plasmas from similar origins. Statistical analysis of the jets and their footpoint region conditions reveals a strong positive relationship between the footpoint-region total 131 {\\AA} intensity enhancement and jets' length/width. Stronger linearly positive relationships also exist between the total intensity enhancement/thermal energy of the footpoint regions and jets' mass/kinetic/thermal energy, with higher cross-correlation coeffici...

  2. Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data

    CERN Document Server

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

  3. Axisymmetric absorption of p modes by an ensemble of thin, magnetic-flux tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R; Gascoyne, A [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hindman, B W, E-mail: R.Jain@sheffield.ac.uk [JILA, University of Colorado at Boulder (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The buffeting action of the solar acoustic waves (p modes) on magnetic fibrils excites magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) tube waves. We model these fibrils as axisymmetric, untwisted, vertically oriented, thin, magnetic-flux tubes. The MHD tube waves propagate along the length of the tube and carry energy away from the p-mode cavity creating a source of p-mode absorption. We calculate the absorption arising from the excitation of sausage MHD waves within a model plage composed of many flux tubes with differing plasma properties. We find that for a collection of tubes with normally distributed plasma parameters {beta}, the macroscopic absorption coefficient of the collection effectively depends on only the mean value of {beta}.

  4. Large-scale Flow and Transport of Magnetic Flux in the Solar Convection Zone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. Ambroz

    2000-09-01

    Horizontal large-scale velocity field describes horizontal displacement of the photospheric magnetic flux in zonal and meridian directions. The flow systems of solar plasma, constructed according to the velocity field, create the large-scale cellular-like patterns with up-flow in the center and the down-flow on the boundaries. Distribution of the large-scale horizontal eddies (with characteristic scale length from 350 to 490 Mm) was found in the broad equatorial zone, limited by 60° latitude circles on both hemispheres. The zonal averages of the zonal and meridian velocities, and the total horizontal velocity for each Carrington rotation during the activity cycles no. 21 and 22 varies during the 11-yr activity cycle. Plot of RMS values of total horizontal velocity is shifted about 1·6 years before the similarly shaped variation of the magnetic flux.

  5. Magnetic flux disorder and superconductor-insulator transition in nanohole thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, Enzo

    2016-08-01

    We study the superconductor-insulator transition in nanohole ultrathin films in a transverse magnetic field by numerical simulation of a Josephson-junction array model. Geometrical disorder due to the random location of nanoholes in the film corresponds to random flux in the array model. Monte Carlo simulation in the path-integral representation is used to determine the critical behavior and the universal resistivity at the transition as a function of disorder and average number of flux quanta per cell, fo. The resistivity increases with disorder for noninteger fo while it decreases for integer fo, and reaches a common constant value in a vortex-glass regime above a critical value of the flux disorder Dfc. The estimate of Dfc and the resistivity increase for noninteger fo are consistent with recent experiments on ultrathin superconducting films with positional disordered nanoholes.

  6. Basic properties of magnetic flux tubes and restrictions on theories of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the mean longitudinal field in a magnetic flux tube is reduced, rather than enhanced, by twisting the tube to form a rope. It is shown that there is no magnetohydrostatic equilibrium when one twisted rope is wound around another. Instead there is rapid line cutting (neutral point annihilation). It is shown that the twisting increases, and the field strength decreases, along a flux tube extending upward through a stratified atmosphere. These facts are at variance with Piddington's (1975) recent suggestion that solar activity is to be understood as the result of flux tubes which are enormously concentrated by twisting, which consist of several twisted ropes wound around each other, and which came untwisted where they emerge through the photosphere.

  7. Dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in close binary stars I. Equilibrium and stability properties

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, V R

    2003-01-01

    Surface reconstructions of active close binary stars based on photometric and spectroscopic observations reveal non-uniform starspot distributions, which indicate the existence of preferred spot longitudes (with respect to the companion star). We consider the equilibrium and linear stability of toroidal magnetic flux tubes in close binaries to examine whether tidal effects are capable to initiate the formation of rising flux loops at preferred longitudes near the bottom of the stellar convection zone. The tidal force and the deviation of the stellar structure from spherical symmetry are treated in lowest-order perturbation theory assuming synchronised close binaries with orbital periods of a few days. The frequency, growth time, and spatial structure of linear eigenmodes are determined by a stability analysis. We find that, despite their small magnitude, tidal effects can lead to a considerable longitudinal asymmetry in the formation probability of flux loops, since the breaking of the axial symmetry due to t...

  8. 3D Numerical Simulations of f-Mode Propagation Through Magnetic Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Daiffallah, K; Bendib, A; Cameron, R; Gizon, L

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations have been used to study the scattering of a surface-gravity wave packet by vertical magnetic flux tubes, with radii from 200 km to 3 Mm, embedded in stratified polytropic atmosphere. The scattered wave was found to consist primarily of m=0 (axisymmetric) and m=1 modes. It was found that the ratio of the amplitude of these two modes is strongly dependant on the radius of the flux tube: The kink mode is the dominant mode excited in tubes with a small radius while the sausage mode is dominant for large tubes. Simulations of this type provide a simple, efficient and robust way to start understanding the seismic signature of flux tubes, which have recently began to be observed.

  9. Observations of Magnetic Flux-rope Oscillation During the Precursor Phase of a Solar Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guiping; Zhang, Jie

    2016-07-01

    What is the pre-cursor of a solar eruption is a key question in solar physics for both understanding the physical mechanism and predicting solar eruptions. In this letter, we present the finding of flux rope oscillation as well as significant plasma heating before the onset of an X1.6 GOES X-ray flare and the eruption of a fast CME on 10 September 2014. This precursor oscillation, lasting for about 13 min and occurring in a sigmoidal structure as seen from SDO/AIA and Hinode XRT, was identified based on the IRIS spectrum observations at the coronal emission line of Fe XXI with wavelength of 1354.08 A and formation temperature of 9.1 MK. The IRIS slit was situated at a fixed position almost vertical to the main axis of the sigmoid, which had a length of about 243 arcsec or 1.8x10^{5} km. The vertical velocity oscillation was in the range from -5 to 11 km s^{-1} with a period T of ˜290 s. Our analysis, based on sigmoid temperature, density, length and magnetic field strength, indicates that the oscillation is best described by the fast magnetoacoustic standing kink mode. We conjecture that the pre-cursor oscillation was caused by the interaction of an unstable magnetic flux rope with the overlaying constraining magnetic field, as manifested by a localized plasma heating. The flux rope was subsequently erupted when the main flare reconnection was triggered in the possible current sheet underneath the magnetic flux rope.

  10. On the Area Expansion of Magnetic Flux-Tubes in Solar Active Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Dzifcakova, Elena; Cirtain, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    We calculated the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field extrapolated from the high-resolution \\textit{Hinode}/SOT magnetogram of a quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux-tubes hav...

  11. Accurate Modeling of a Transverse Flux Permanent Magnet Generator Using 3D Finite Element Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hosseini; MOGHANI, J. S.; Jensen, B B

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an accurate modeling method that is applied to a single-sided outer-rotor transverse flux permanent magnet generator. The inductances and the induced electromotive force for a typical generator are calculated using the magnetostatic three-dimensional finite element method. A new method is then proposed that reveals the behavior of the generator under any load. Finally, torque calculations are carried out using three dimensional finite element analyses. It is shown that...

  12. Advanced AC permanent magnet axial flux disc motor for electric passenger vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliman, G. B.

    1982-01-01

    An ac permanent magnet axial flux disc motor was developed to operate with a thyristor load commutated inverter as part of an electric vehicle drive system. The motor was required to deliver 29.8 kW (40 hp) peak and 10.4 kW (14 hp) average with a maximum speed of 11,000 rpm. It was also required to run at leading power factor to commutate the inverter. Three motors were built.

  13. Direct observations of magnetic flux rope formation during a solar coronal mass ejection

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongqiang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yao; Cheng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most spectacular eruptive phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is generally accepted that CMEs are results of eruptions of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs). However, a heated debate is on whether MFRs pre-exist before the eruptions or they are formed during the eruptions. Several coronal signatures, \\textit{e.g.}, filaments, coronal cavities, sigmoid structures and hot channels (or hot blobs), are proposed as MFRs and observed before the eruption, which suppor...

  14. Multiwavelength observations of a flux rope formation by series of magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Wang, Haimin

    2017-07-01

    Using high-resolution observations from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), we report direct evidence of merging and reconnection of cool Hα loops in the chromosphere during two homologous flares (B and C class) caused by a shear motion at the footpoints of two loops. The reconnection between these loops caused the formation of an unstable flux rope that showed counterclockwise rotation. The flux rope could not reach the height of torus instability and failed to form a coronal mass ejection. The HMI magnetograms revealed rotation of the negative and positive (N1/P2) polarity sunspots in the opposite directions, which increased the right- and left-handed twist in the magnetic structures rooted at N1/P2. Rapid photospheric flux cancellation (duration 20-30 min, rate ≈3.44 × 1020 Mx h-1) was observed during and even after the first B6.0 flare and continued until the end of the second C2.3 flare. The RHESSI X-ray sources were located at the site of the loop coalescence. To the best of our knowledge, such a clear interaction of chromospheric loops along with rapid flux cancellation has not been reported before. These high-resolution observations suggest the formation of a small flux rope by a series of magnetic reconnections within chromospheric loops that are associated with very rapid flux cancellation. Movies attached to Figs. 2, 7, 8, and 10 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Magnetic Twist and Writhe of Active Regions: On the Origin of Deformed Flux Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, M López; Mandrini, C H; Pevtsov, A A; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L

    2014-01-01

    We study the long term evolution of a set of 22 bipolar active regions (ARs) in which the main photospheric polarities are seen to rotate one around the other during several solar rotations. We first show that differential rotation is not at the origin of this large change in the tilt angle. A possible origin of this distortion is the nonlinear development of a kink-instability at the base of the convective zone; this would imply the formation of a non-planar flux tube which, while emerging across the photosphere, would show a rotation of its photospheric polarities as observed. A characteristic of the flux tubes deformed by this mechanism is that their magnetic twist and writhe should have the same sign. From the observed evolution of the tilt of the bipoles, we derive the sign of the writhe of the flux tube forming each AR; while we compute the sign of the twist from transverse field measurements. Comparing the handedness of the magnetic twist and writhe, we find that the presence of kink-unstable flux tube...

  16. Direct measurement of magnetic flux compression on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, R. D.; Bliss, D. E.; Martin, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Lamppa, D. C.; Dolan, D. H.; Lemke, R. W.; Rovang, D. C.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for directly measuring magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid aluminum liner (a cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-20-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz(t) =Bz (0)×[R(0)/R(t)]2, where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields directly. We report on our latest efforts to do so using a fiber-optic-based Faraday rotation diagnostic, where the magneto-active portion of the sensor is made from terbium-doped optical fiber. We have now used this diagnostic to measure a flux-compressed magnetic field to over 600 T prior to the imploding liner hitting the on-axis fiber housing. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Investigating the Effects of I-Shaped Cores in an Outer-Rotor Transverse Flux Permanent Magnet Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyedmohsen; Moghani, Javad Shokrollahi; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of I-shaped cores in an outer-rotor transverse flux permanent magnet generator. Performance characteristics of a typical outer-rotor transverse flux permanent magnet generator are obtained in two cases; with and without I-shaped cores. The results show...... the advantages and disadvantage of using I-shaped cores and emphasizes the necessity of performing a tradeoff study between using and not using I-shaped cores in practical transverse flux permanent magnet generators....

  18. Relationship between the Magnetic Flux of Solar Eruptions and the Ap Index of Geomagnetic Storms

    CERN Document Server

    Chertok, I M; Abunin, A A; Belov, A V; Grechnev, V V

    2014-01-01

    Solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are main drivers of the most powerful non-recurrent geomagnetic storms. In the extreme-ultraviolet range, CMEs are accompanied by bright post-eruption arcades and dark dimmings. The analysis of events of the Solar Cycle 23 (Chertok et al., 2013, Solar Phys. 282, 175) revealed that the summarized unsigned magnetic flux in the arcades and dimming regions at the photospheric level, Phi, is significantly related to the intensity (Dst index) of geomagnetic storms. This provides the basis for the earliest diagnosis of geoefficiency of solar eruptions. In the present article, using the same data set, we find that a noticeable correlation exists also between the eruptive magnetic flux, Phi, and another geomagnetic index, Ap. As the magnetic flux increases from tens to approx. 500 (in units of 10^{20} Mx), the geomagnetic storm intensity measured by the 3-hour Ap index, enhances in average from Ap approx. 50 to a formally maximum value of 400 (in units of 2 nT). The established rela...

  19. Magnetic rotor flux observer of induction motors with fast convergence and less transient oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-Woo; Hwang, Jung-Hoon

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an observer design for the estimation of magnetic rotor flux of induction motors. We characterize the class of MIMO induction motor systems that consists of the linear observable and the nonlinear part with a block triangular structure. The similarity transformation that plays an important role in proving the convergence of the proposed observer is generalized to the systems. Since the gain of the proposed observer minimizes a nonlinear part of the system to suppress for the stability of the error dynamics, it improves the transient performance of the high gain observer. Moreover, by using the generalized similarity transformation, it is shown that under some observability and boundedness conditions, the proposed observer guarantees the global exponential convergence to zero of the estimation error. Since the proposed scheme minimizes the nonlinearity of an induction motor system, it improves the transient performance of the observer and guarantees the global exponential convergence to zero of the estimation error. The estimation results of magnetic rotor fluxes through experiments are shown and it is presented that the proposed magnetic flux observer exhibits less transient oscillation and faster convergence time than the general observer.

  20. On Polar Magnetic Field Reversal and Surface Flux Transport During Solar Cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33--2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in October 2013; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60$^\\circ$ latitude) reversed in November 2012 and March 2014, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR ...

  1. Magnetic flux compression experiments on the Z pulsed-power accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, R. D.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C. A.; Bliss, D. E.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Awe, T. J.; Martin, M. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Greenly, J. B.; Intrator, T. P.; Weber, T. E.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the progress made to date for diagnosing magnetic flux compression on Z. Each experiment consisted of an initially solid Be or Al liner (cylindrical tube), which was imploded using Z's drive current (0-20 MA in 100 ns). The imploding liner compresses a 10-T axial seed field, Bz(0), supplied by an independently driven Helmholtz coil pair. Assuming perfect flux conservation, the axial field amplification should be well described by Bz (t) =Bz (0) × [ R (0) / R (t) ]2 , where R is the liner's inner surface radius. With perfect flux conservation, Bz and dBz/dt values exceeding 104 T and 1012 T/s, respectively, are expected. These large values, the diminishing liner volume, and the harsh environment on Z, make it particularly challenging to measure these fields. We report our latest efforts to do so using three primary techniques: (1) micro B-dot probes, (2) streaked visible Zeeman spectroscopy, and (3) fiber-based Faraday rotation. We will also briefly highlight some recent developments using neutron diagnostics (ratio of secondary DT to primary DD neutrons and secondary DT neutron energy spectra) to assess the degree of magnetization in fully integrated magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments on Z. This project was funded in part by Sandia's LDRD program and US DOE-NNSA Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. How are Emerging Flux, Flares and CMEs Related to Magnetic Polarity Imbalance in MDI Data?

    CERN Document Server

    Green, L M; Mandrini, C H; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand whether major flares or coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be related to changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field, we study 4 young active regions during seven days of their disc passage. This time period precludes any biases which may be introduced in studies that look at the field evolution during the short-term flare or CME period only. Data from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) with a time cadence of 96 minutes are used. Corrections are made to the data to account for area foreshortening and angle between line of sight and field direction, and also the underestimation of the flux densities. We make a systematic study of the evolution of the longitudinal magnetic field, and analyze flare and CME occurrence in the magnetic evolution. We find that the majority of CMEs and flares occur during or after new flux emergence. The flux in all four active regions is observed to have deviations from polarity balance both on the long-term (solar rotation) and on the short term (f...

  3. The self-similar, non-linear evolution of rotating magnetic flux ropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Farrugia

    Full Text Available We study, in the ideal MHD approximation, the non-linear evolution of cylindrical magnetic flux tubes differentially rotating about their symmetry axis. Our force balance consists of inertial terms, which include the centrifugal force, the gradient of the axial magnetic pressure, the magnetic pinch force and the gradient of the gas pressure. We employ the "separable" class of self-similar magnetic fields, defined recently. Taking the gas to be a polytrope, we reduce the problem to a single, ordinary differential equation for the evolution function. In general, two regimes of evolution are possible; expansion and oscillation. We investigate the specific effect rotation has on these two modes of evolution. We focus on critical values of the flux rope parameters and show that rotation can suppress the oscillatory mode. We estimate the critical value of the angular velocity Ωcrit, above which the magnetic flux rope always expands, regardless of the value of the initial energy. Studying small-amplitude oscillations of the rope, we find that torsional oscillations are superimposed on the rotation and that they have a frequency equal to that of the radial oscillations. By setting the axial component of the magnetic field to zero, we study small-amplitude oscillations of a rigidly rotating pinch. We find that the frequency of oscillation ω is inversely proportional to the angular velocity of rotation Ω; the product ωΩbeing proportional to the inverse square of the Alfvén time. The period of large-amplitude oscillations of a rotating flux rope of low beta increases exponentially with the energy of the equivalent 1D oscillator. With respect to large-amplitude oscillations of a non-rotating flux rope, the only change brought about by rotation is to introduce a multiplicative factor greater than unity, which further increases the period. This multiplicative factor depends on the ratio of the azimuthal speed to the Alfvén speed

  4. Pinning features of the magnetic flux trapped by YBCO single crystals in weak constant magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monarkha, V. Yu.; Paschenko, V. A.; Timofeev, V. P.

    2013-02-01

    The dynamics of Abrikosov vortices and their bundles was experimentally investigated in weak constant magnetic fields, in the range of Earth's magnetic field. Characteristics of the isothermal magnetization relaxation in YBCO single-crystal samples with strong pinning centers were studied for different sample-field orientation. The obtained values of normalized relaxation rate S allowed us to estimate the effective pinning potential U in the bulk of the YBCO sample and its temperature dependence, as well as the critical current density Jc. A comparison between the data obtained and the results of similar measurements in significantly higher magnetic fields was performed. To compare different techniques for evaluation of Jc, the magnetization loop measurements M(H), which relate the loop width to the critical current, were carried out. These measurements provided important parameters of the samples under study (penetration field Hp and first critical field Hc1), which involve the geometrical configuration of the samples.

  5. Assessing magnetic torques and energy fluxes in close-in star-planet systems

    CERN Document Server

    Strugarek, A

    2016-01-01

    Planets in close-in orbit interact with the magnetized wind of their hosting star. This magnetic interaction was proposed to be a source for enhanced emissions in the chromosphere of the star, and to participate in setting the migration time-scale of the close-in planet. The efficiency of the magnetic interaction is know to depend on the magnetic properties of the host star, of the planet, and on the magnetic topology of the interaction. We use a global, three-dimensional numerical model of close-in star planet systems, based on the magnetohydrodynamics approximation, to compute a grid of simulations for varying properties of the orbiting planet. We propose a simple parametrization of the magnetic torque that applies to the planet, and of the energy flux generated by the interaction. The dependancy upon the planet properties and the wind properties are clearly identified in the derived scaling laws, which can be used in secular evolution codes to take into account the effect of magnetic interactions in planet...

  6. Quantifying the Topology and Evolution of a Magnetic Flux Rope Associated with Multi-flare Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Kai; Ding, M D

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic flux rope (MFR) plays an important role in solar activities. A quantitative assessment of the topology of an MFR and its evolution is crucial for a better understanding of the relationship between the MFR and the associated activities. In this paper, we investigate the magnetic field of active region 12017 from 2014 March 28 to 29, where 12 flares were triggered by the intermittent eruptions of a filament (either successful or confined). Using the vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory}, we calculate the magnetic energy and helicity injection in the active region, and extrapolate the 3D magnetic field with a nonlinear force-free field model. From the extrapolations, we find an MFR that is cospatial with the filament. We further determine the configuration of this MFR by a closed quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) around it. Then, we calculate the twist number and the magnetic helicity for the field lines composing the MFR. The re...

  7. Comparative measurements of water vapor fluxes over a tall forest using open- and closed-path eddy covariance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eddy covariance using infrared gas analyses has been a useful tool for gas exchange measurements between soil, vegetation and atmosphere. So far, comparisons between the open- and closed-path eddy covariance (CP system have been extensively made on CO2 flux estimations, while lacking in the comparison of water vapor flux estimations. In this study, the specific performance of water vapor flux measurements of an open-path eddy covariance (OP system was compared against a CP system over a tall temperate forest in Northeast China. The results show that the fluxes from the OP system (LEop were generally greater than the (LEcp though the two systems shared one sonic anemometer. The tube delay of closed-path analyser depended on relative humidity, and the fixed median time lag contributed to a significant underestimation of (LEcp between the forest and atmosphere, while slight systematic overestimation was also found for covariance maximization method with single broad time lag search window. After the optimized time lag compensation was made, the average difference between the 30 min (LEop and (LEcp was generally within 6%. Integrated over the annual cycle, the CP system yielded a 5.1% underestimation of forest evapotranspiration as compared to the OP system measurements (493 vs. 469 mm yr−1. This study indicates the importance to estimate the sampling tube delay accurately for water vapor flux calculations with closed-path analysers, and it also suggests that when discuss the energy balance closure problem in flux sites with closed-path eddy covariance systems, it has to be aware that some of the imbalance is possibly caused by the systematic underestimation of water vapor fluxes.

  8. The revised electromagnetic fields directive and worker exposure in environments with high magnetic flux densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Rianne

    2014-06-01

    Some of the strongest electromagnetic fields (EMF) are found in the workplace. A European Directive sets limits to workers' exposure to EMF. This review summarizes its origin and contents and compares magnetic field exposure levels in high-risk workplaces with the limits set in the revised Directive. Pubmed, Scopus, grey literature databases, and websites of organizations involved in occupational exposure measurements were searched. The focus was on EMF with frequencies up to 10 MHz, which can cause stimulation of the nervous system. Selected studies had to provide individual maximum exposure levels at the workplace, either in terms of the external magnetic field strength or flux density or as induced electric field strength or current density. Indicative action levels and the corresponding exposure limit values for magnetic fields in the revised European Directive will be higher than those in the previous version. Nevertheless, magnetic flux densities in excess of the action levels for peripheral nerve stimulation are reported for workers involved in welding, induction heating, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The corresponding health effects exposure limit values for the electric fields in the worker's body can be exceeded for welding and MRI, but calculations for induction heating and transcranial magnetic stimulation are lacking. Since the revised European Directive conditionally exempts MRI-related activities from the exposure limits, measures to reduce exposure may be necessary for welding, induction heating, and transcranial nerve stimulation. Since such measures can be complicated, there is a clear need for exposure databases for different workplace scenarios with significant EMF exposure and guidance on good practices.

  9. Significant flux trapping in single grain GdBCO bulk superconductor under off-axis field cooled magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Ida, Tetsuya; Miki, Motohiro; Teshima, Hidekazu; Morita, Mitsuru; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2017-03-01

    A single grain bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) exhibits intensified flux trapping performance upon field cooled magnetization. The world record of trapped flux is 17.6 T achieved by using stacked two-fold GdBCO bulks. However, the majority of magnetization studies focused on the magnetization along the crystallographic c-axis. In the present study, we clarify the flux trapping performance under field cooled magnetization using an off-axis magnetic field with respect to the c-axis. The results show that the trapped flux is almost polarized along the applied field as expected. This tendency remains up to a high off-axis angle θ around 60°. It is worth mentioning that, with θ of 30°, the maximum trapped flux component B // max parallel to the c-axis significantly remains more than 96% of 1.6 T which occurs under on-axis magnetization. Meanwhile, the angular dependence of the c-axis parallel component exhibits that observed flux density is higher than that expected from 1.6 cosθ. In addition, to visualize the flux line upon magnetization at θ of 90°, we successfully demonstrate the continuous flux line trace using steel wires; different trapped flux behaviour appears when applied field penetrates the bulk through the growth sectors centre and along the growth sector boundary, respectively. We interpret these results may come from the microstructure as a result of melt growth. It is highly emphasized that the off-axis magnetization with the finite inclination angle is quite useful for introducing into the design of HTS applications.

  10. Temperature evolution of magnetic flux rope in a failed solar eruption

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Hongqiang; Cheng, Xin; Chen, Yao; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we report for the first time the detailed temperature evolution process of the magnetic flux rope in a failed solar eruption. Occurred on January 05, 2013, the flux rope was impulsively accelerated to a speed of ~ 400 km/s in the first minute, then decelerated and came to a complete stop in two minutes. The failed eruption resulted in a large-size high-lying (~ 100 Mm above the surface) high-temperature "fire ball" sitting in the corona for more than two hours. The time evolution of the thermal structure of the flux rope was revealed through the differential emission measure analysis technique, which produced temperature maps using observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board Solar Dynamic Observatory. The average temperature of the flux rope steadily increased from ~ 5 MK to ~ 10 MK during the first nine minutes of the evolution, which was much longer than the rise time (about three minutes) of the associated soft X-ray flare. We suggest that the flux rope be heated by the ...

  11. Magnetic properties of high-T(sub c) superconductors: Rigid levitation, flux pinning, thermal depinning, and fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The levitation of high-T(sub c) superconductors is quite conspicuous: Above magnets of low symmetry a disk of these ceramics floats motionless, without vibration or rotation; it has a continuous range of stable positions and orientations as if it were stuck in sand. Some specimens may even be suspended above or below the same magnet. This fascinating stability, inherent to no other type of levitation, is caused by the pinning of magnetic flux lines by inhomogeneities inside these extreme type-2 superconductors. The talk deals with pinning of magnetic flux in these materials, with flux flow, flux creep, thermally activated depinning, and the thermal fluctuation of the vortex positions in the flux line lattice (often called flux lattice melting). Also discussed are the fluctuations of the (nearly periodic) magnetic field inside these superconductors which are caused by random pinning sites and by the finite temperature. These fluctuations broaden the van-Hove singularities observed in the density of the magnetic field by nuclear magnetic resonance and by muon spin rotation.

  12. The structure of an earthward propagating magnetic flux rope early in its evolution: comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Möstl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a magnetic signature associated with the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow observed by Cluster at −19 RE downtail on 22 August 2001. A distinct rotation of the magnetic field was seen by all four spacecraft. This event was previously examined by Slavin et al. (2003b using both linear force-free modeling as well as a curlometer technique. Extending this work, we apply here single- and multi-spacecraft Grad-Shafranov (GS reconstruction techniques to the Cluster observations and find good evidence that the structure encountered is indeed a magnetic flux rope and contains helical magnetic field lines. We find that the flux rope has a diameter of approximately 1 RE, an axial field of 26.4 nT, a velocity of ≈650 km/s, a total axial current of 0.16 MA and magnetic fluxes of order 105 Wb. The field line twist is estimated as half a turn per RE. The invariant axis is inclined at 40° to the ecliptic plane and 10° to the GSM equatorial plane. The flux rope has a force-free core and non-force-free boundaries. When we compare and contrast our results with those obtained from minimum variance, single-spacecraft force-free fitting and curlometer techniques, we find in general fair agreement, but also clear differences such as a higher inclination of the axis to the ecliptic. We further conclude that single-spacecraft methods have limitations which should be kept in mind when applied to THEMIS observations, and that non-force-free GS and curlometer techniques are to be preferred in their analysis. Some properties we derived for this earthward– moving structure are similar to those inferred by Lui et al. (2007, using a different approach, for a tailward-moving flux rope observed during the expansion phase of the same substorm.

  13. A dual-channel flux-switching permanent magnet motor for hybrid electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei; Wu, Zhongze; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Baoan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhou, Shigui

    2012-04-01

    The flux-switching permanent magnet (FSPM) motor is a relatively novel brushless machine having both magnets and concentrated windings in the stator, which exhibits inherently sinusoidal PM flux-linkage, back-EMF waveforms, and high torque capability. However, in the application of hybrid electric vehicles, it is essential to prevent magnets and armature windings moving in radial direction due to the possible vibration during operation, and to ensure fault-tolerant capability. Hence, in this paper based on an original FSPM motor, a dual-channel FSPM (DC-FSPM) motor with modified structure to fix both armature windings and magnets and improved reliability is proposed for a practical 10 kW integral starter/generator (ISG) in hybrid electric vehicles. The influences of different solutions and the end-effect on the static characteristics, are evaluated based on the 2D and 3D finite element analysis, respectively. Finally, both the predicted and experimental results, compared with a prototype DC-FSPM motor and an interior PM motor used in Honda Civic, confirm that the more sinusoidal back-EMF waveform and lower torque ripple can be achieved in the DC-FSPM motor, whereas the torque is smaller under the same coil current.

  14. Eruption of the magnetic flux rope in a quick decaying active region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shangbin; Xie, Wenbin; Liu, Jihong

    2015-03-01

    An isolated and quickly decaying active region (NOAA 9729) was observed as it passed across the solar disk. There was only one CME associated with the active region, which provides a good opportunity to investigate the whole process of the CME. A filament in this active region was observed to rise rapidly before stalling and disintegrating into flare loops. The rising filament seen in EIT images separates into two parts just before eruption. A new filament reforms several hours later after the CME; the axis of this new filament is rotated clockwise approximately 22° compared with that of the first filament,due to a changed orientation of the polarity inversion line. We also observed a bright transient slightly S-shaped X-ray sigmoid, which appears immediately after the filament eruption. The X-ray sigmoid quickly develops into a soft X-ray cusp and rises before dropping back down. Two magnetic cancelation regions were observed clearly just before filament eruption. The eruption process of the sigmoid structure in this quick decaying active region could be explained by using the 3D Tether-Cutting model. The magnetic flux rope erupted as the magnetic helicity approached its maximum and the normalized helicity was -0.036 when the magnetic flux rope erupted, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the simulation results of the kink and torus instability, but is close to the predicted value of Zhang et al. (2008) based on the theoretical non-linear force-free model.

  15. Circular-cylindrical flux-rope analytical model for Magnetic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, Teresa; Linton, Mark; Hidalgo, Miguel A.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Savani, Neel P.; Szabo, Adam; Farrugia, Charlie; Yu, Wenyuan

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds ( MCs). The model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. (2000) by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation.The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in-situ observations. Four Earth directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic fi eld and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of theplasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical.

  16. A Circular-cylindrical Flux-rope Analytical Model for Magnetic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Linton, M. G.; Hidalgo, M. A.; Vourlidas, A.; Savani, N. P.; Szabo, A.; Farrugia, C.; Yu, W.

    2016-05-01

    We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. When these structures are observed embedded in Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature, they are called Magnetic Clouds (MCs). Our model extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of MC geometrical information and orientation. The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3D MHD simulations. Here, we evaluate its performance in the reconstruction of MCs in in situ observations. Four Earth-directed ICME events, observed by the Wind spacecraft, are used to validate the technique. The events are selected from the ICME Wind list with the magnetic obstacle boundaries chosen consistently with the magnetic field and plasma in situ observations and with a new parameter (EPP, the Electron Pitch angle distribution Parameter) which quantifies the bidirectionally of the plasma electrons. The goodness of the fit is evaluated with a single correlation parameter to enable comparative analysis of the events. In general, at first glance, the model fits the selected events very well. However, a detailed analysis of events with signatures of significant compression indicates the need to explore geometries other than the circular-cylindrical. An extension of our current modeling framework to account for such non-circular CMEs will be presented in a forthcoming publication.

  17. Magnetic x-ray microscopy at low temperatures – Visualization of flux distributions in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Claudia, E-mail: stahl@is.mpg.de; Ruoß, Stephen; Weigand, Markus; Bechtel, Michael; Schütz, Gisela [Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstraße 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Albrecht, Joachim [Research Institute for Innovative Surfaces, FINO, Aalen University, Beethovenstraße 1, 73430 Aalen (Germany)

    2016-01-28

    X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) microscopy at liquid nitrogen temperature has been performed on bilayers of high-T{sub c} superconducting YBCO (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ}) and soft-magnetic Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}. This should allow us to map the magnetic flux density distribution in the current-carrying state of the superconductor with high spatial resolution. For that purpose the UHV scanning X-ray microscope MAXYMUS has been upgraded by a MMR Micro Miniature Joule-Thompson cryostat capable of temperatures between 75 K and 580 K. Resulting XMCD images of the magnetic flux density in the superconductor with a field of view ranging from millimeters to micrometers are presented. The microscope’s unique combination of total electron yield (TEY) measurements together with low temperatures offers novel possibilities concerning the current transport in superconductors on small length scales.

  18. On the twists of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes observed at 1 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yuming; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chi, Yutian

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) are one kind of fundamental structures in the solar physics, and involved in various eruption phenomena. Twist, characterizing how the magnetic field lines wind around a main axis, is an intrinsic property of MFRs, closely related to the magnetic free energy and stableness. So far it is unclear how much amount of twist is carried by MFRs in the solar atmosphere and in heliosphere and what role the twist played in the eruptions of MFRs. Contrasting to the solar MFRs, there are lots of in-situ measurements of magnetic clouds (MCs), the large-scale MFRs in interplanetary space, providing some important information of the twist of MFRs. Thus, starting from MCs, we investigate the twist of interplanetary MFRs with the aid of a velocity-modified uniform-twist force-free flux rope model. It is found that most of MCs can be roughly fitted by the model and nearly half of them can be fitted fairly well though the derived twist is probably over-estimated by a factor of 2.5. By applying the mod...

  19. Eruption of the magnetic flux rope in a fast decayed active region

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Shangbin; Liu, Jihong

    2013-01-01

    An isolated and fast decayed active region (NOAA 9729) was observed when passing through solar disk. There is only one CME related with it that give us a good opportunity to investigate the whole process of the CME. Filament in this active region rises up rapidly and then hesitates and disintegrates into flare loops. The rising filament from EIT images separates into two parts just before eruption. A new filament reforms several hours later after CME and the axis of this new one rotates clockwise about 22 degrees comparing with that of the former one. We also observed a bright transient J-shaped X-ray sigmoid immediately appears after filament eruption. It quickly develops into a soft X-ray cusp and rises up firstly then drops down. Two magnetic cancelation regions have been observed clearly just before filament eruption. Moreover, the magnetic flux rope erupted as the magnetic helicity approach the maximum and the normalized helicity is -0.036 when the magnetic flux rope erupted, which is close to the predic...

  20. A Novel Method to Magnetic Flux Linkage Optimization of Direct-Driven Surface-Mounted Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator Based on Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xie

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper pays attention to magnetic flux linkage optimization of a direct-driven surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous generator (D-SPMSG. A new compact representation of the D-SPMSG nonlinear dynamic differential equations to reduce system parameters is established. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of new D-SPMSG equations in the process of varying magnetic flux linkage are considered, which are illustrated by Lyapunov exponent spectrums, phase orbits, Poincaré maps, time waveforms and bifurcation diagrams, and the magnetic flux linkage stable region of D-SPMSG is acquired concurrently. Based on the above modeling and analyses, a novel method of magnetic flux linkage optimization is presented. In addition, a 2 MW D-SPMSG 2D/3D model is designed by ANSYS software according to the practical design requirements. Finally, five cases of D-SPMSG models with different magnetic flux linkages are simulated by using the finite element analysis (FEA method. The nephograms of magnetic flux density are agreement with theoretical analysis, which both confirm the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  1. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  2. Flux motion in Y-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors during pulse field magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, K [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakura-Josui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Nariki, S [Division of Material Science and Physics, Bulk Superconductor Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0023 (Japan); Sakai, N [Division of Material Science and Physics, Bulk Superconductor Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0023 (Japan); Murakami, M [Division of Material Science and Physics, Bulk Superconductor Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0023 (Japan); Hirabayasi, I [Division of Material Science and Physics, Bulk Superconductor Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0023 (Japan); Takizawa, T [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakura-Josui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2004-02-01

    We have studied the relationship between the magnetization and temperature change in Y-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor during pulse field magnetization (PFM). The flux motion was monitored using both Hall sensors and pick-up coils that are placed on a surface of a Y-Ba-Cu-O disc having dimensions of 15 mm in diameter and 0.95 mm in thickness. The peak value of the field was varied from 0.2 to 0.8 T. The effect of the static bias field was also studied in the range of 0-3 T. The temperature of the sample surface was measured using a resistance temperature sensor. The temperature increased with the magnitude of the applied pulsed magnetic field, and the amount of temperature rise decreased with increasing static bias field.

  3. Thermal Analysis on Radial Flux Permanent Magnet Generator (PMG using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman Syaeful A Syaeful A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The main source of heat in the permanent magnet generator (PMG is the total losses which f come from winding losses, core losses and rotational losses. Total heat arising from such these losses must be properly distributed and maintained so as not to exceed the maximum allowable temperature to prevent damage to insulation on the winding and demagnetization on the permanent magnet machines. In this research, we consider thermal analysis which is occurred on the radial flux PMG by using finite element method to determine the extent to which the heat generated can be properly distributed. The simulation results show that there are no points of heat concentration or hot spot. The simulation maximum temperatures of the permanent magnet and the winding are 39.1oC and 72.5oC respectively while the experimental maximum temperature of the winding is 62oC.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Torsional Alfvén Waves in Axisymmetric Solar Magnetic Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, D.; Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Konkol, P.; Mignone, A.

    2017-02-01

    We numerically investigate Alfvén waves propagating along an axisymmetric and non-isothermal solar flux tube embedded in the solar atmosphere. The tube magnetic field is current-free and diverges with height, and the waves are excited by a periodic driver along the tube magnetic field lines. The main results are that the two wave variables, the velocity and magnetic field perturbations in the azimuthal direction, behave differently as a result of gradients of the physical parameters along the tube. To explain these differences in the wave behavior, the time evolution of the wave variables and the resulting cutoff period for each wave variable are calculated and used to determine regions in the solar chromosphere where strong wave reflection may occur.

  5. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Fang, Hui; Li, Long; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xiaoming; Kang, Yihua; Sun, Yanhua; Tang, Chaoqing

    2017-01-01

    To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage) inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety. PMID:28117721

  6. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety.

  7. One-way light transport controlled by synthetic magnetic fluxes and {\\mathscr{P}}{\\mathscr{T}}-symmetric resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Controlled directional light propagation using optical nonlinearity has previously been proposed. Here, we propose a one-way optical device with linear elements controlled by synthetic magnetic fluxes. The device consists of two parity–time symmetric side-coupled resonators with balanced gain and loss. The gain and loss break the reflection symmetry and the magnetic fluxes break the transmission symmetry. Through tuning the magnetic fluxes, reflectionless full transmission in one direction and transmissionless full reflection in the opposite direction can be achieved. The device acts as a light-checking valve, preventing wave propagation in one direction. The proposed one-way transporter uses the nonreciprocity induced by non-Hermiticity and magnetic fluxes without applying nonlinearity. We anticipate that our findings will be useful for optical control and manipulation.

  8. Heat transfer in flow past a continuously moving semi-infinite flat plate in transverse magnetic field with heat flux

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, T.V.R.

    Thermal boundary layer on a continuously moving semi-infinite flat plate in the presence of transverse magnetic field with heat flux has been examined. Similarity solutions have been derived and the resulting equations are integrated numerically...

  9. Initiation and Eruption Process of Magnetic Flux Rope from Solar Active Region NOAA 11719 to Earth Directed-CME

    CERN Document Server

    Vemareddy, P

    2014-01-01

    An eruption event launched from solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from major sunspot and its south section is associated with inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in AIA passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution which has correspondence with rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR evaluated at north and south polarities showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits increasing trend. As the negative (positive) flux is having dominant positive (n...

  10. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, I.; Maia, P.; Evangelista, P.

    2010-01-01

    software aimed at being the reference computational application in the field. It is the first tool to incorporate strain optimization tasks, i.e., the identification of Metabolic Engineering targets, using Evolutionary Algorithms/Simulated Annealing metaheuristics or the previously proposed Opt......, computing the admissible flux space given a set of measured fluxes, and (iii) pathway analysis through the calculation of Elementary Flux Modes. OptFlux also contemplates several methods for model simplification and other pre-processing operations aimed at reducing the search space for optimization...... algorithms. The software supports importing/exporting to several flat file formats and it is compatible with the SBML standard. OptFlux has a visualization module that allows the analysis of the model structure that is compatible with the layout information of Cell Designer, allowing the superimposition...

  11. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  12. The effect of interplanetary magnetic field orientation on the solar wind flux impacting Mercury's surface

    CERN Document Server

    Varela, J; Moncuquet, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the plasma flows on the Mercury surface for different interplanetary magnetic field orientations on the day side of the planet. We use a single fluid MHD model in spherical coordinates to simulate the interaction of the solar wind with the Hermean magnetosphere for six solar wind realistic configurations with different magnetic field orientations: Mercury-Sun, Sun-Mercury, aligned with the magnetic axis of Mercury (Northward and Southward) and with the orbital plane perpendicular to the previous cases. In the Mercury-Sun (Sun-Mercury) simulation the Hermean magnetic field is weakened in the South-East (North-East) of the magnetosphere leading to an enhancement of the flows on the South (North) hemisphere. For a Northward (Southward) orientation there is an enhancement (weakening) of the Hermean magnetic field in the nose of the bow shock so the fluxes are reduced and drifted to the poles (enhanced and drifted to the equator). If the solar wind magnetic field is in the orbital...

  13. RECONCILING MODELS OF LUMINOUS BLAZARS WITH MAGNETIC FLUXES DETERMINED BY RADIO CORE-SHIFT MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Sikora, Marek, E-mail: knalew@stanford.edu [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-20

    Estimates of magnetic field strength in relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei, obtained by measuring the frequency-dependent radio core location, imply that the total magnetic fluxes in those jets are consistent with the predictions of the magnetically arrested disk (MAD) scenario of jet formation. On the other hand, the magnetic field strength determines the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation, which forms the low-energy bump of the observed blazar spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs of the most powerful blazars are strongly dominated by the high-energy bump, which is most likely due to the external radiation Compton mechanism. This high Compton dominance may be difficult to reconcile with the MAD scenario, unless (1) the geometry of external radiation sources (broad-line region, hot-dust torus) is quasi-spherical rather than flat, or (2) most gamma-ray radiation is produced in jet regions of low magnetization, e.g., in magnetic reconnection layers or in fast jet spines.

  14. The model of self-sustained propagation of a magnetic reconnection along the flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumin, Yurii

    This work represents a further development of our earlier ideas about heating the solar corona in the transition region from the "induction" to "drift" freezing of the magnetic field in plasma [1, 2]. The new detailed study of this process in the magnetic tube filled with a weakly-ionized plasma of the lower solar atmosphere shows that ignition of the magnetic reconnection develops most efficiently at the spot of approximate equality between the gyro-and collisional frequencies of charged particles. Next, due to the heat release and its propagation along the magnetic flux tube, the spot of most efficient reconnection moves upwards, thereby producing a self-sustained propagation of the reconnection along the field lines. The temperature increases sharply with height just due to decrease in plasma density, stratified by the gravitational field. This phenomenon may be efficiently applied to model the solar microflares, which are believed now to be an important ingredient of the solar atmosphere heating. References: 1. Yu.V. Dumin. Can Heating of the Solar Corona Be Related to a Transition from the In-duction to Drift Mechanism of the Magnetic Field Freezing in Plasma? Advances in Space Research, v.30, p.565 (2002). 2. Yu.V. Dumin. On the Physical Nature of the Magnetic-Field Freezing-in Effect in Collision-less Cosmic Plasmas. Solar System Research, v.32, p.323 (1998).

  15. Reconciling models of luminous blazars with magnetic fluxes determined by radio core shift measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of magnetic field strength in relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN), obtained by measuring the frequency-dependent radio core location, imply that the total magnetic fluxes in those jets are consistent with the predictions of the magnetically-arrested disk (MAD) scenario of jet formation. On the other hand, the magnetic field strength determines the luminosity of the synchrotron radiation, which forms the low-energy bump of the observed blazar spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs of the most powerful blazars are strongly dominated by the high-energy bump, which is most likely due to the external radiation Compton (ERC) mechanism. This high Compton dominance may be difficult to reconcile with the MAD scenario, unless 1) the geometry of external radiation sources (broad-line region, hot-dust torus) is quasi-spherical rather than flat, or 2) most gamma-ray radiation is produced in jet regions of low magnetization, e.g., in magnetic reconnection layers or in fast jet spines.

  16. Magnetic Reconnection resulting from Flux Emergence: Implications for Jet Formation in the lower solar atmosphere?

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, J Y; Doyle, J G; Lu, Q M; Vanninathan, K; Huang, Z

    2011-01-01

    We aim at investigating the formation of jet-like features in the lower solar atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere and transition region, as a result of magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection as occurring at chromospheric and transition regions densities and triggered by magnetic flux emergence is studied using a 2.5D MHD code. The initial atmosphere is static and isothermal, with a temperature of 20,000 K. The initial magnetic field is uniform and vertical. Two physical environments with different magnetic field strength (25 G and 50 G) are presented. In each case, two sub-cases are discussed, where the environments have different initial mass density. In the case where we have a weaker magnetic field (25 G) and higher plasma density ($N_e=2\\times 10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$), valid for the typical quiet Sun chromosphere, a plasma jet would be observed with a temperature of 2--3 $\\times 10^4$ K and a velocity as high as 40 km/s. The opposite case of a medium with a lower electron density ($N_e=2\\times 10^{10}$ cm$^{-3...

  17. An investigation into the torque density capabilities of flux-focusing magnetic gearboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Krishna Kiran

    Wind and many rotary based ocean energy conversion devices rely on a mechanical gearbox to increase their speed so as to match the requirements of the electromagnetic generator. However, mechanical gearboxes have a number of disadvantages such as the need for gear lubrication, no overload protection and the creation of acoustic noise. Frequently direct-drive generators are employed to overcome these issues, wherein the gearbox is removed and the shaft of the turbine is directly connected to the synchronous generator, either with an electrically excited or permanent magnet rotor. If the input speed to the generator is very low the torque must be very high in order to generate the necessary power. However, as the electrical loading of a synchronous generator is thermally limited, the size of the generator will become excessively large at high power levels. An alternative to these technologies is to consider replacing the mechanical gearbox with a magnetic gear. A magnetic gear can create speed change without any physical contact. It has inherent overload protection, and its non-contact operation offers the potential for high reliability. Despite significant progress, existing magnetic gear designs do not achieve torque densities that are competitive with mechanical gearboxes. This research has focused on designing a coaxial magnetic gear that can operate at a volumetric torque density that is comparable to a mechanical gearbox. A flux-focusing rotor topology also called spoke-type rotor magnet arrangement was adopted to improve the air-gap magnetic flux density which in turn improves the torque transferred between the rotors. Finite element analysis was utilized to conduct a parameter sweep analysis of the different geometric parameters of the magnetic gear. A sub-scale magnetic gear with a diameter of 110 mm and a scaled-up magnetic gear with a diameter of 228 mm was designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated. The torque and torque density of sub

  18. Temperature and Magnetic Field Dependence of Critical Current Density of YBCO with Varying Flux Pinning Additions (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2083 TEMPERATURE AND MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS...MAGNETIC FIELD DEPENDENCE OF CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBCO WITH VARYING FLUX PINNING ADDITIONS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b...20 ‒ 77 K. Films were prepared with pulsed laser deposition by (M/ YBCO )N multilayer or ( YBCO )1-x Mx single-target methods, for different M phases

  19. On Anisotropy in Expansion of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Solar Corona

    CERN Document Server

    Malanushenko, A

    2013-01-01

    Most 1d hydrodynamic models of plasma confined to magnetic flux tubes assume circular cross-section of these tubes. We use potential field models to show that flux tubes in circumstances relevant to the solar corona do not in general maintain the same cross-sectional shape through their length and therefore the assumption of a circular cross-section is rarely true. We support our hypothesis with mathematical reasoning and numeric experiments. We demonstrate that lifting this assumption in realistic non-circular loops make apparent expansion of magnetic flux tubes consistent with that of observed coronal loops. We propose that in a bundle of ribbon-like loops those that are viewed along the wide direction would stand out against those that are viewed across the wide direction, due to the difference in their column depths. That would impose a bias towards selecting loops that appear not to be expanding seen projected in the plane of sky. An implication of this selection bias is that the preferentially selected ...

  20. Magnetic Flux of Progenitor Stars Sets Gamma-ray Burst Luminosity and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to come from the core-collapse of Wolf-Rayet stars. Whereas their stellar masses $M_*$ have a rather narrow distribution, the population of GRBs is very diverse, with gamma-ray luminosities $L_\\gamma$ spanning several orders of magnitude. This suggests the existence of a "hidden" stellar variable whose burst-to-burst variation leads to a spread in $L_\\gamma$. Whatever this hidden variable is, its variation should not noticeably affect the shape of GRB lightcurves, which display a constant luminosity (in a time-average sense) followed by a sharp drop at the end of the burst seen with Swift/XRT. We argue that such a hidden variable is progenitor star's large-scale magnetic flux. Shortly after the core collapse, most of stellar magnetic flux accumulates near the black hole (BH) and remains there. The flux extracts BH rotational energy and powers jets of roughly a constant luminosity, $L_j$. However, once BH mass accretion rate $\\dot M$ falls below $\\sim L_j/c^2$,...

  1. Magnetar Giant Flares in Multipolar Magnetic Fields --- II. Flux Rope Eruptions With Current Sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We propose a physical mechanism to explain giant flares and radio afterglows in terms of a magnetospheric model containing both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet (CS). With the appearance of CS, we solve a mixed boundary value problem to get the magnetospheric field based on a domain decomposition method. We investigate properties of the equilibrium curve of the flux rope when the CS is present in background multipolar fields. In response to the variations at the magnetar surface, it quasi-statically evolves in stable equilibrium states. The loss of equilibrium occurs at a critical point and, beyond that point, it erupts catastrophically. New features show up when the CS is considered. Especially, we find two kinds of physical behaviors, i.e., catastrophic state transition and catastrophic escape. Magnetic energy would be released during state transitions. The released magnetic energy is sufficient to drive giant flares. The flux rope would go away from the magnetar quasi-statically, which is ...

  2. Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation of heat flux mitigation using magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüskow, Karl Felix; Kemnitz, S.; Bandelow, G.; Duras, J.; Kahnfeld, D.; Matthias, P.; Schneider, R.; Konigorski, D.

    2016-10-01

    The particle-in-cell (PIC) method was used to simulate heat flux mitigation experiments with partially ionised argon. The experiments demonstrate the possibility of reducing heat flux towards a target using magnetic fields. Modelling using the PIC method is able to reproduce the heat flux mitigation qualitatively. This is driven by modified electron transport. Electrons are magnetised and react directly to the external magnetic field. In addition, an increase of radial turbulent transport is also needed to explain the experimental observations in the model. Close to the target an increase of electron density is created. Due to quasi-neutrality, ions follow the electrons. Charge exchange collisions couple the dynamics of the neutrals to the ions and reduce the flow velocity of neutrals by radial momentum transport and subsequent losses. By this, the dominant heat-transport channel by neutrals gets reduced and a reduction of the heat deposition, similar to the experiment, is observed. Using the simulation a diagnostic module for optical emission is developed and its results are compared with spectroscopic measurements and photos from the experiment. The results of this study are in good agreement with the experiment. Experimental observations such as a shrank bright emission region close to the nozzle exit, an additional emission in front of the target and an overall change in colour to red are reproduced by the simulation.

  3. Electron and positron fluxes in primary cosmic rays measured with the alpha magnetic spectrometer on the international space station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-09-19

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  4. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chikanian, A; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Cui, Z; Dai, M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D’Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; Kunz, S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Malinin, A; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schuckardt, D; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Wang, L Q; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ∼30  GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  5. Electron and Positron Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chikanian, A.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Cui, Z.; Dai, M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; Kunz, S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Malinin, A.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schuckardt, D.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Precision measurements by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station of the primary cosmic-ray electron flux in the range 0.5 to 700 GeV and the positron flux in the range 0.5 to 500 GeV are presented. The electron flux and the positron flux each require a description beyond a single power-law spectrum. Both the electron flux and the positron flux change their behavior at ˜30 GeV but the fluxes are significantly different in their magnitude and energy dependence. Between 20 and 200 GeV the positron spectral index is significantly harder than the electron spectral index. The determination of the differing behavior of the spectral indices versus energy is a new observation and provides important information on the origins of cosmic-ray electrons and positrons.

  6. The Rate of Flux Pile-up Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Y. E.

    2000-05-01

    The rate of two-dimensional flux pile-up magnetic reconnection is known to be severely limited by gas pressure in a low-beta plasma of the solar corona. For a two-dimensional stagnation point flow with nonzero vorticity, for example, the rate cannot exceed the Sweet-Parker scaling. The limitation should be less restrictive, however, for three-dimensional flux pile-up. This paper examines the maximum rate of three-dimensional pile-up reconnection in the approximation of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD), which is valid in the solar coronal loops. Gas pressure effects are ignored in RMHD, but a similar limitation on the rate of magnetic merging exists. Both the magnetic energy dissipation rate and the reconnection electric field are shown to increase by several orders of magnitude in RMHD as compared with strictly two-dimensional pile-up. This is enough to explain small solar flares and slow coronal transients with energy release rates of order 1025 - 1026 erg s-1, as well as heating of quiet coronal loops. Notably, the reconnection electric field is several orders of magnitude greater than the Dreicer field, hence it can efficiently accelerate charged particles in flares. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9813933.

  7. The turbulent diffusion of toroidal magnetic flux as inferred from properties of the sunspot butterfly diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H

    2016-01-01

    In order to match observed properties of the solar cycle, flux-transport dynamo models require the toroidal magnetic flux to be stored in a region of low magnetic diffusivity, typically located at or below the bottom of the convection zone. We infer the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field on the basis of empirical data. We consider the time evolution of mean latitude and width of the activity belts of solar cycles 12--23 and their dependence on cycle strength. We interpret the decline phase of the cycles as a diffusion process. The activity level of a given cycle begins to decline when the centers of its equatorward propagating activity belts come within their width (at half maximum) from the equator. This happens earlier for stronger cycles because their activity belts are wider. From that moment on, the activity and the belt width decrease in the same manner for all cycles, independent of their maximum activity level. In terms of diffusive cancellation of opposite-polarity toroidal f...

  8. MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORTED BY FLUX EMERGENCE AND SHUFFLING MOTIONS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Kitai, R.; Takizawa, K., E-mail: zhangyin@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: zhangyin@bao.ac.cn [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    We present a new methodology which can determine magnetic helicity transport by the passage of helical magnetic field lines from the sub-photosphere and the shuffling motions of footpoints of preexisting coronal field lines separately. It is well known that only the velocity component, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field ({upsilon}{sub B}), has contributed to the helicity accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that {upsilon}{sub B} can be deduced from a horizontal motion and vector magnetograms under a simple relation of {upsilon}{sub t} = {mu}{sub t} + ({upsilon}{sub n}/B{sub n} ) B{sub t}, as suggested by Demoulin and Berger. Then after dividing {upsilon}{sub B} into two components, as one is tangential and the other is normal to the solar surface, we can determine both terms of helicity transport. Active region (AR) NOAA 10930 is analyzed as an example during its solar disk center passage by using data obtained by the Spectropolarimeter and the Narrowband Filter Imager of Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We find that in our calculation the helicity injection by flux emergence and shuffling motions have the same sign. During the period we studied, the main contribution of helicity accumulation comes from the flux emergence effect, while the dynamic transient evolution comes from the shuffling motions effect. Our observational results further indicate that for this AR the apparent rotational motion in the following sunspot is the real shuffling motions on the solar surface.

  9. Super-twisting sliding mode control of torque and flux in permanent magnet synchronous machine drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Christian; Boldea, Ion; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates a permanent magnet synchronous motor drive controlled by a second-order variable structure control technique, known as the super-twisting sliding modes (STSM) control. The STSM controller is designed as a direct torque and flux controller and it works in the stator flux...... reference frame, rather than the rotor frame, as a regular vector control scheme. Another second-order sliding mode controller (SMC) was developed and compared with the STSM controller. Also for comparison, a similar direct torque control scheme based on linear PI controllers was developed and tested....... The tests show that the STSM controller displays very robust behavior, like any SMC, and it works without notable chattering, like the linear PI-based controller. The paper presents theoretical aspects for the STSM control, several design and implementation details, and comparative experimental results...

  10. Cosmic strings with twisted magnetic flux lines and wound-strings in extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We consider a generalization of the Nielsen-Olesen ansatz, in the abelian-Higgs model, which describes strings with twisted magnetic flux lines in the vortex core. The solution does not possess cylindrical symmetry, which leads to the existence of components of conserved momentum, both around the core-axis and along the length of the string. In addition, we consider a model of F-strings with rotating, geodesic windings in the compact space of the Klebanov-Strassler geometry and determine matching conditions which ensure energy and momentum conservation when loops chop off from the long-string network. We find that the expressions for the constants of motion, which determine the macroscopic string dynamics, can be made to coincide with those for the twisted flux line string, suggesting that extra- dimensional effects for F-strings may be mimicked by field-theoretic structure in topological defects.

  11. On the Area Expansion of Magnetic Flux-Tubes in Solar Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Dudik, Jaroslav; Cirtain, Jonathan W

    2014-01-01

    We calculated the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field extrapolated from the high-resolution \\textit{Hinode}/SOT magnetogram of a quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux-tubes have squashed cross-sections and expand with height. The distribution of the expansion factors show overall increase with height, allowing an active region core characterized by low values of the expansion factor to be distinguished. The area expansion factors obtained from extrapolation of the SOT magnetogram are compared to those obtained from an approximation of the observed magnetogram by a series of 134 submerged charges. This approximation retains the general flux distribution in the observed magnetogram, but removes t...

  12. Signature of Collision of Magnetic Flux Tubes in the Quiet Solar Photosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andic, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Collision of the magnetic flux tubes in the Quiet Sun was proposed as one of the possible sources for the heating of the solar atmosphere (Furusawa and Sakai, 2000). The solar photosphere was observed using the New Solar Telescope ad Big Bear Solar Observatory. In TiO spectral line at 705.68 nm we approached resolution of 0.1". The horizontal plasma wave was observed spreading from the larger bright point. Shorty after this wave an increase in the oscillatory power appeared at the same location as the observed bright point. This behavior matches some of the results from the simulation of the collision of the two flux tubes with a weak current.

  13. Long-term Synoptic Observations of Ca II K and Magnetic Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertello, L.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Tlatov, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    Long-term synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K and measurements of the solar magnetic flux over several decades constitute a fundamental database for a variety of retrospective analyzes of the state of the solar magnetism. These data archives may also hold the key for untangling some of the mysteries behind the solar dynamo, which in turn could result in a better predictive capability of current dynamo models. Synoptic Ca II K observations began in 1907 at the Kodaikanal observatory (India) and in 1915 at the Mt Wilson (California, USA) solar observatory. By the early 1970s a number of synoptic programs for solar magnetic observations were established that provided full disk magnetograms. These programs include measurements carried out at the Mt Wilson 150-foot solar tower, Wilcox observatory (California, USA), and by the National Solar Observatory (NSO, USA). Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility. We will review some of these historical observations, their properties, and their importance for understanding the behavior of the solar magnetic field over multidecadal time scales. We will also show recent results about using Ca II K spectroheliograms and sunspot magnetic field measurements to reconstruct homogeneous series of pseudo-magnetograms prior the magnetograph era.

  14. MHD simulation of solar wind and multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Daiko

    2017-08-01

    Solar wind and CMEs are the main drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. The profile of IMF Bz is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts because various magnetospheric disturbances are caused by the southward IMF brought on the Earth. Recently, we have developed MHD simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields on the basis of observations of photospheric magnetic fields and coronal images. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the IMF at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003. The results of a simulation successfully reproduced the arrival at the Earth’s position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm, and provided an implication of the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth as a result of the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  15. PROPAGATION AND DISPERSION OF SAUSAGE WAVE TRAINS IN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, R.; Terradas, J. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Ruderman, M. S., E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-10

    A localized perturbation of a magnetic flux tube produces wave trains that disperse as they propagate along the tube, where the extent of dispersion depends on the physical properties of the magnetic structure, on the length of the initial excitation, and on its nature (e.g., transverse or axisymmetric). In Oliver et al. we considered a transverse initial perturbation, whereas the temporal evolution of an axisymmetric one is examined here. In both papers we use a method based on Fourier integrals to solve the initial value problem. We find that the propagating wave train undergoes stronger attenuation for longer axisymmetric (or shorter transverse) perturbations, while the internal to external density ratio has a smaller effect on the attenuation. Moreover, for parameter values typical of coronal loops axisymmetric (transverse) wave trains travel at a speed 0.75–1 (1.2) times the Alfvén speed of the magnetic tube. In both cases, the wave train passage at a fixed position of the magnetic tube gives rise to oscillations with periods of the order of seconds, with axisymmetric disturbances causing more oscillations than transverse ones. To test the detectability of propagating transverse or axisymmetric wave packets in magnetic tubes of the solar atmosphere (e.g., coronal loops, spicules, or prominence threads) a forward modeling of the perturbations must be carried out.

  16. Propagation and Dispersion of Sausage Wave Trains in Magnetic Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, R.; Ruderman, M. S.; Terradas, J.

    2015-06-01

    A localized perturbation of a magnetic flux tube produces wave trains that disperse as they propagate along the tube, where the extent of dispersion depends on the physical properties of the magnetic structure, on the length of the initial excitation, and on its nature (e.g., transverse or axisymmetric). In Oliver et al. we considered a transverse initial perturbation, whereas the temporal evolution of an axisymmetric one is examined here. In both papers we use a method based on Fourier integrals to solve the initial value problem. We find that the propagating wave train undergoes stronger attenuation for longer axisymmetric (or shorter transverse) perturbations, while the internal to external density ratio has a smaller effect on the attenuation. Moreover, for parameter values typical of coronal loops axisymmetric (transverse) wave trains travel at a speed 0.75-1 (1.2) times the Alfvén speed of the magnetic tube. In both cases, the wave train passage at a fixed position of the magnetic tube gives rise to oscillations with periods of the order of seconds, with axisymmetric disturbances causing more oscillations than transverse ones. To test the detectability of propagating transverse or axisymmetric wave packets in magnetic tubes of the solar atmosphere (e.g., coronal loops, spicules, or prominence threads) a forward modeling of the perturbations must be carried out.

  17. Magnetic Fields in Massive Stars. II. The Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes Through the Radiative Interior

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, K B

    2003-01-01

    We present results from an investigation of the dynamical behavior of buoyant magnetic flux rings in the radiative interior of a uniformly rotating early-type star. Our physical model describes a thin, axisymmetric, toroidal flux tube that is released from the outer boundary of the convective core, and is acted upon by buoyant, centrifugal, Coriolis, magnetic tension, and aerodynamic drag forces. We find that rings emitted in the equatorial plane can attain a stationary equilibrium state that is stable with respect to small displacements in radius, but is unstable when perturbed in the meridional direction. Rings emitted at other latitudes travel toward the surface along trajectories that largely parallel the rotation axis of the star. Over much of the ascent, the instantaneous rise speed is determined by the rate of heating by the absorption of radiation that diffuses into the tube from the external medium. Since the time scale for this heating varies like the square of the tube cross-sectional radius, for t...

  18. Intrinsic magnetism and spontaneous band gap opening in bilayer silicene and germanene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinquan; Wu, Zhigang

    2017-01-18

    It has been long sought to create magnetism out of simple non-magnetic materials, such as silicon and germanium. Here we show that intrinsic magnetism exists in bilayer silicene and germanene with no need to cut, etch, or dope. Unlike bilayer graphene, strong covalent interlayer bonding formed in bilayer silicene and germanene breaks the original π-bonding network of each layer, leaving the unbonded electrons unpaired and localized to carry magnetic moments. These magnetic moments then couple ferromagnetically within each layer while antiferromagnetically across two layers, giving rise to an infinite magnetic sheet with structural integrity and magnetic homogeneity. Furthermore, this unique magnetic ordering results in fundamental band gaps of 0.55 eV and 0.32 eV for bilayer silicene and germanene, respectively. The integration of intrinsic magnetism and spontaneous band gap opening makes bilayer silicene and germanene attractive for future nanoelectronics as well as spin-based computation and data storage.

  19. Laboratory study of low-β forces in arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, C. E.; Yamada, M.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Fox, W.

    2016-11-01

    The loss-of-equilibrium is a solar eruption mechanism whereby a sudden breakdown of the magnetohydrodynamic force balance in the Sun's corona ejects a massive burst of particles and energy into the heliosphere. Predicting a loss-of-equilibrium, which has more recently been formulated as the torus instability, relies on a detailed understanding of the various forces that hold the pre-eruption magnetic flux rope in equilibrium. Traditionally, idealized analytical force expressions are used to derive simplified eruption criteria that can be compared to solar observations and modeling. What is missing, however, is a validation that these idealized analytical force expressions can be applied to the line-tied, low-aspect-ratio conditions of the corona. In this paper, we address this shortcoming by using a laboratory experiment to study the forces that act on long-lived, arched, line-tied magnetic flux ropes. Three key force terms are evaluated over a wide range of experimental conditions: (1) the upward hoop force; (2) the downward strapping force; and (3) the downward toroidal field tension force. First, the laboratory force measurements show that, on average, the three aforementioned force terms cancel to produce a balanced line-tied equilibrium. This finding validates the laboratory force measurement techniques developed here, which were recently used to identify a dynamic toroidal field tension force that can prevent flux rope eruptions [Myers et al., Nature 528, 526 (2015)]. The verification of magnetic force balance also confirms the low-β assumption that the plasma thermal pressure is negligible in these experiments. Next, the measured force terms are directly compared to corresponding analytical expressions. While the measured and analytical forces are found to be well correlated, the low-aspect-ratio, line-tied conditions in the experiment are found to both reduce the measured hoop force and increase the measured tension force with respect to analytical

  20. Structural properties of the solar flare-producing coronal current system developed in an emerging magnetic flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2017-02-01

    The activity of a magnetic structure formed in the solar corona depends on a coronal current system developed in the structure, which determines how an electric current flows in the corona. To investigate structural properties of the coronal current system responsible for producing a solar flare, we perform magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an emerging magnetic flux tube which forms a coronal magnetic structure. Investigation using fractal dimensional analysis and electric current streamlines reveals that the flare-producing coronal current system relies on a specific coronal current structure of two-dimensional spatiality, which has a sub-region where a nearly anti-parallel magnetic field configuration is spontaneously generated. We discuss the role of this locally generated anti-parallel magnetic field configuration in causing the reconnection of a three-dimensional magnetic field, which is a possible mechanism for producing a flare. We also discuss how the twist of a magnetic flux tube affects structural properties of a coronal current system, showing how much volume current flux is carried into the corona by an emerging flux tube. This gives a way to evaluate the activity of a coronal magnetic structure.